WorldWideScience

Sample records for anti-cancer agent combining

  1. Resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Abdur; Imran, Muhammad; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Nadeem, Muhammad; Peters, Dennis G; Mubarak, Mohammad S

    2016-12-21

    Owing to their antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity, grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are the archetypal paradigms of fruits used not only for nutritional purposes, but also for exclusive therapeutics. Grapes are a prominent and promising source of phytochemicals, especially resveratrol, a phytoalexin antioxidant found in red grapes which has both chemopreventive and therapeutic effects against various ailments. Resveratrol's role in reducing different human cancers, including breast, cervical, uterine, blood, kidney, liver, eye, bladder, thyroid, esophageal, prostate, brain, lung, skin, gastric, colon, head and neck, bone, ovarian, and cervical, has been reviewed. This review covers the literature that deals with the anti-cancer mechanism of resveratrol with special reference to antioxidant potential. Furthermore, this article summarizes the literature pertaining to resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent.

  2. [Molecular mechanism regulating effect of anti-cancer agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saya, Hideyuki

    2009-01-01

    Faithful genome duplication is achieved by accurate coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Abnormalities occurring in this process are checked by biochemical signal transduction pathways, called checkpoints, which ensure the orderly progression of events in the cell cycle. Checkpoints prevent transition into subsequent phases until all processes in the previous phase are completed. Defects in cell cycle checkpoints result in gene mutations, chromosome damage, and aneuploidy, all of which contribute to tumorigenesis. However, it has recently been uncovered that the impairment of checkpoint function is the major reason why DNA damaging anti-cancer agents can selectively kill cancer cells. Given that G1 and G2 checkpoint functions are generally impaired in cancer cells, cells with DNA damage are unable to maintain G2 arrest and eventually die as they enter mitosis. This process is known as mitotic catastrophe.

  3. Quinones derived from plant secondary metabolites as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wu, Guo-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Shan; Huang, Ming-Qing; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2013-03-01

    Quinones are plant-derived secondary metabolites that present some anti-proliferation and anti-metastasis effects in various cancer types both in vitro and in vivo. This review focuses on the anti-cancer prospects of plant-derived quinones, namely, aloe-emodin, juglone, β-lapachol, plumbagin, shikonin, and thymoquinone. We intend to summarize their anti-cancer effects and investigate the mechanism of actions to promote the research and development of anti-cancer agents from quinones.

  4. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  5. Prodigiosins as anti cancer agents: living upto their name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R; Chander, R; Sainis, K B

    2009-01-01

    Prodigiosins are a family of bright red colored bacterial pigment and derive their name from the miraculous (prodigious) events associated with their occurrence. They indeed seem to be living upto their name as a host of activities such as anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-cancer and immunosuppressive have been associated with them. Out of these, immunosuppressive and anti-cancer activity has received more importance as it has a clinical promise. Prodigiosins, isolated mostly from Gram negative bacteria are characterized by a common pyrryldipyrrylmethene structure with varying side chains. The review discusses the mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activity of this class of compounds. In vitro, prodigiosins have been shown to primarily target the cancer cells independently of the p53 status while little or no effect has been observed on normal cells. In addition, prodigiosins are effective in cancer cells with multidrug resistance phenotype and defects in the apoptotic pathways. These make prodigiosins attractive candidates for further development. Though the molecular targets of prodigiosins have not been clearly defined, they have been found to target different signaling pathways possibly through induction of DNA double strand breaks and/ or neutralization of pH gradients leading to changes in cell cycle proteins and apoptosis. The review will discuss the recent findings related to the mechanism involved in the anti-cancer activity of this class of molecules.

  6. Anti-cancer effect of Scutellaria baicalensis in combination with cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Yoon; Joo, Jong Cheon; Lee, Yeon Kyu; Jang, Ik-Soon; Park, Soo Jung; Park, Yoon Jung

    2017-05-25

    Ovarian cancer is one of the major causes of death among females in worldwide. Cisplatin is a primary anti-cancer drug against ovarian cancer, but the recurrent tumors after treatment frequently show acquired chemoresistance. Extract of Scutellaria baicalensis (SbE) has been reported to have functional compounds including baicalin, which has anti-cancer effects. However, the anti-cancer effects of SbE in ovarian cancer and its underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated that the effects of SbE and/or cisplatin on cell death in the cisplatin sensitive ovarian cancer cell line A2780 (CSC) and the counterpart cell line that has cisplatin resistance (CRC). Molecular mechanisms of the effects, focusing on apoptosis and autophagy, were examined. Treatment of cisplatin or SbE reduced cell viability significantly in CSC and too much lesser extent in CRC. Cisplatin-induced cell death in CSC was mediated by p53-induced apoptosis acompanied by expresson of damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM). In CRC, decreased DRAM expression (p cisplatin resistance. Treatment of SbE also induced cell death in CSC by p53-dependent apoptosis, not in CRC. Autophagy was not induced by neither cisplatin nor SbE. Intriguingly, the combinational treatment of SbE and cisplatin significantly decreased cell viability in CRC. The cell death was mediated by autophagy with increased expression of Atg5 and Atg12 (p cisplatin was effective in CRC, leading to cell death via Beclin1-independent autophagy, suggesting that SbE treatment in combination with cisplatin has a potential as a chemotherapeutic agent in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer.

  7. Mitochondrial complex II, a novel target for anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klučková, Katarína; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1827, č. 5 (2013), s. 552-564 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1937; GA ČR GAP301/12/1851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrion * Complex II * Anti- cancer agent Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  8. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  9. Exploiting Cancer Metal Metabolism using Anti-Cancer Metal-Binding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlot, Angelica M; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Jansson, Patric J; Sahni, Sumit; Huang, Michael L; Lane, Darius L; Lok, Hiu; Richardson, Des R

    2017-07-05

    Metals are vital cellular elements necessary for multiple indispensable biological processes of living organisms, including energy transduction and cell proliferation. Interestingly, alterations in metal levels and also changes in the expression of proteins involved in metal metabolism have been demonstrated in a variety of cancers. Considering this and the important role of metals for cell growth, the development of drugs that sequester metals have become an attractive target for the development of novel anti-cancer agents. Interest in this field has surged with the design and development of new generations of chelators of the thiosemicarbazone class. These ligands have shown potent anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activity in vitro and in vivo. Due to their efficacy and safe toxicological assessment, some of these agents have recently entered multi-center clinical trials as therapeutics for advanced and resistant tumors. This review highlights the role, and changes in homeostasis, of metals in cancer and emphasizes the pre-clinical development and clinical assessment of metal ion-binding agents, namely, thiosemicarbazones, as anti-tumor agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Asfar S

    2013-01-01

    “ Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24358870

  11. Towards safety of oral anti-cancer agents, the need to educate our pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Saeed Mekdad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The global prevalence of cancer is rising. Use of oral anticancer medications has expanded exponentially. Knowledge about these medications as well as safe handling guidelines has not kept abreast with the rapidity these medications are applied in clinical practice. They pose serious hazards on all personal involved in handling these medications as well as on patients and their caregivers. We addressed the gaps in knowledge and safe handling of oral anticancer agents among pharmacists in institutional based cancer care. Materials and Methods: We used a 41 item questionnaire to explore three domains, pharmacists’ knowledge, safe handling practice and confidence and self-improving strategies towards these agents among pharmacists in multicentre specialized cancer care. Results: Participants included 120 pharmacists dedicated to handle and dispense oral anticancer agents. About 20% of Pharmacists have adequate knowledge about oral anticancer agents. Less than 50% apply safe handling principles adequately. Only a quarter are confident in educating cancer patients and their caregivers about Oral Anti-Cancer Agents. Conclusions: Pharmacists’ knowledge about Oral Anticancer agents needs to be improved. Safe handling and dispensing practice of these medications should be optimized. Pharmacists’ confidence towards educating patients and their caregiver needs to be addressed. Enhancing safety of oral anticancer agents should be a priority. Involving all key players, research and quality improving projects are needed to improve all aspects of the safety of oral anticancer agents.

  12. Radiation and Anti-Cancer Vaccines: A Winning Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Alexandra; Cushman, Taylor R; Anderson, Clark; Barsoumian, Hampartsoum B; Welsh, James W; Cortez, Maria Angelica

    2018-01-30

    The emerging combination of radiation therapy with vaccines is a promising new treatment plan in the fight against cancer. While many cancer vaccines such as MUC1, p53 CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, and SOX2 may be great candidates for antitumor vaccination, there still remain many investigations to be done into possible vaccine combinations. One fruitful partnership that has emerged are anti-tumor vaccines in combination with radiation. Radiation therapy was previously thought to be only a tool for directly or indirectly damaging DNA and therefore causing cancer cell death. Now, with much preclinical and clinical data, radiation has taken on the role of an in situ vaccine. With both cancer vaccines and radiation at our disposal, more and more studies are looking to combining vaccine types such as toll-like receptors, viral components, dendritic-cell-based, and subunit vaccines with radiation. While the outcomes of these combinatory efforts are promising, there is still much work to be covered. This review sheds light on the current state of affairs in cancer vaccines and how radiation will bring its story into the future.

  13. The potential for substance P antagonists as anti-cancer agents in brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer treatment and diagnosis, the prognosis for patients with CNS tumours remains extremely poor. This is, in part, due to the difficulty in completely removing tumours surgically, and also because of the presence of the blood brain barrier, which can prevent the entry of chemotherapeutic agents typically used in cancer treatment. Despite the presence of the blood brain barrier, tumour cells are capable of entering and colonising the brain to form secondary brain tumours. Additionally, tumour related disruption of the blood brain barrier is associated with the clinical presentation of many patients, with accompanying increases in intracranial pressure due, in part, to the development of vasogenic oedema. Vasogenic oedema results because the newly formed angiogenic vessels within brain tumours do not retain the highly selective properties of the blood brain barrier, and thus allow for the extravasation of plasma proteins and water into the brain parenchyma. Tachykinins, and in particular substance P, have been implicated in blood brain barrier disruption and the genesis of cerebral oedema in other CNS insults via a process known as neurogenic inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that substance P may play a similar role in CNS tumours. It has been well established that an upregulation of substance P and its receptors occurs in a number of different cancer types, including CNS neoplasms. In addition to disrupting blood brain barrier permeability, substance P and the NK1 receptors facilitate promotion of tumour growth and the development of cerebral oedema. Accordingly, recent patents describe the potential of NK1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer agents suggesting that substance P may provide a novel cancer treatment target. This review will examine the role of substance P in the development of CNS tumours.

  14. Landscape of Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Synergies in Melanoma Identifies a Novel BRAF-VEGFR/PDGFR Combination Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A Friedman

    Full Text Available A newer generation of anti-cancer drugs targeting underlying somatic genetic driver events have resulted in high single-agent or single-pathway response rates in selected patients, but few patients achieve complete responses and a sizeable fraction of patients relapse within a year. Thus, there is a pressing need for identification of combinations of targeted agents which induce more complete responses and prevent disease progression. We describe the results of a combination screen of an unprecedented scale in mammalian cells performed using a collection of targeted, clinically tractable agents across a large panel of melanoma cell lines. We find that even the most synergistic drug pairs are effective only in a discrete number of cell lines, underlying a strong context dependency for synergy, with strong, widespread synergies often corresponding to non-specific or off-target drug effects such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 transporter inhibition. We identified drugs sensitizing cell lines that are BRAFV600E mutant but intrinsically resistant to BRAF inhibitor PLX4720, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/kinase insert domain receptor (VEGFR/KDR and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR family inhibitor cediranib. The combination of cediranib and PLX4720 induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in animal models. This synergistic interaction is likely due to engagement of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, demonstrating the potential of drug- rather than gene-specific combination discovery approaches. Patients with elevated biopsy KDR expression showed decreased progression free survival in trials of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase pathway inhibitors. Thus, high-throughput unbiased screening of targeted drug combinations, with appropriate library selection and mechanistic follow-up, can yield clinically-actionable drug combinations.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of andrographolide analogues as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Ranjan; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Siddharth, Sumit; Mohapatra, Purusottam; Das, Dipon; Satapathy, Shakti Ranjan; Das, Supriya; Maiti, Nakul C; Maulik, Prakas R; Kundu, Chanakya Nath; Chowdhury, Chinmay

    2014-10-06

    A new family of andrographolide analogues were synthesized and screened in vitro against kidney (HEK-293) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. The anti-cancer effects of the active analogues (2b, 2c and 4c) were determined by multiple cell based assays such as MTT, immunostaining, FACS, western blotting and transcriptional inhibition of NF-κB activity. Importantly, these compounds were found to possess higher anti-cancer potency than andrographolide and low toxicity to normal (VERO and MCF-10A) cells. Increased level of Bax/Bcl-xL ratio, caspase 3, and sub G1 population, higher expression level of tumor suppressor protein p53 and lower expression level of NF-κB suggested potent apoptotic property of the active analogues. Data revealed that the andrographolide derivative-mediated cell death in cancer cells was p53 dependent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional effects of the anti-cancer agent camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Veloso

    Full Text Available The anti-cancer drug camptothecin inhibits replication and transcription by trapping DNA topoisomerase I (Top1 covalently to DNA in a "cleavable complex". To examine the effects of camptothecin on RNA synthesis genome-wide we used Bru-Seq and show that camptothecin treatment primarily affected transcription elongation. We also observed that camptothecin increased RNA reads past transcription termination sites as well as at enhancer elements. Following removal of camptothecin, transcription spread as a wave from the 5'-end of genes with no recovery of transcription apparent from RNA polymerases stalled in the body of genes. As a result, camptothecin preferentially inhibited the expression of large genes such as proto-oncogenes, and anti-apoptotic genes while smaller ribosomal protein genes, pro-apoptotic genes and p53 target genes showed relative higher expression. Cockayne syndrome group B fibroblasts (CS-B, which are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR, showed an RNA synthesis recovery profile similar to normal fibroblasts suggesting that TCR is not involved in the repair of or RNA synthesis recovery from transcription-blocking Top1 lesions. These findings of the effects of camptothecin on transcription have important implications for its anti-cancer activities and may aid in the design of improved combinatorial treatments involving Top1 poisons.

  18. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical trials as anti-cancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrillo Richard L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Histone deacetylases (HDACs can regulate expression of tumor suppressor genes and activities of transcriptional factors involved in both cancer initiation and progression through alteration of either DNA or the structural components of chromatin. Recently, the role of gene repression through modulation such as acetylation in cancer patients has been clinically validated with several inhibitors of HDACs. One of the HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat, has been approved by FDA for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL for patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies. Other inhibitors, for example, FK228, PXD101, PCI-24781, ITF2357, MGCD0103, MS-275, valproic acid and LBH589 have also demonstrated therapeutic potential as monotherapy or combination with other anti-tumor drugs in CTCL and other malignancies. At least 80 clinical trials are underway, testing more than eleven different HDAC inhibitory agents including both hematological and solid malignancies. This review focuses on recent development in clinical trials testing HDAC inhibitors as anti-tumor agents.

  19. Anti-cancer agents in Saudi Arabian herbals revealed by automated high-content imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina

    2017-06-13

    Natural products have been used for medical applications since ancient times. Commonly, natural products are structurally complex chemical compounds that efficiently interact with their biological targets, making them useful drug candidates in cancer therapy. Here, we used cell-based phenotypic profiling and image-based high-content screening to study the mode of action and potential cellular targets of plants historically used in Saudi Arabia\\'s traditional medicine. We compared the cytological profiles of fractions taken from Juniperus phoenicea (Arar), Anastatica hierochuntica (Kaff Maryam), and Citrullus colocynthis (Hanzal) with a set of reference compounds with established modes of action. Cluster analyses of the cytological profiles of the tested compounds suggested that these plants contain possible topoisomerase inhibitors that could be effective in cancer treatment. Using histone H2AX phosphorylation as a marker for DNA damage, we discovered that some of the compounds induced double-strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the active fraction isolated from Juniperus phoenicea revealed possible anti-cancer compounds. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of cell-based phenotypic screening of natural products to reveal their biological activities.

  20. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H.J. Kao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides being widely known as the major active ingredients, the different biological pathways by which they exert their anti-cancer effect remain poorly defined. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of action may lead to more widespread use of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.The aim of this paper is to summarise the various bioactive mechanisms that have been proposed for the anti-cancer properties of triterpenes and polysaccharides extracted from G. lucidum. A literature search of published papers on NCBI with keywords “Ganoderma” and “cancer” was performed. Among those, studies which specifically examined the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides were selected to be included in this paper.We have found five potential mechanisms which are associated with the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and three potential mechanisms for Ganoderma polysaccharides. In addition, G. lucidum has been used in combination with known anti-cancer agents to improve the anti-cancer efficacies. This suggests Ganoderma’s bioactive pathways may compliment that of anti-cancer agents. In this paper we present several potential anti-cancer mechanisms of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides which can be used for the development of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.

  1. A combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Yumiko; Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Mikami, Koji; Takeuchi, Takumi; Matsuda, Izuru; Arahira, Satoko

    2017-01-01

    The gold standard for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer Without metastasis is radical cystectomy. However, there increase patients very elderly and with serious complications. They are not good candidates for invasive surgical operation. Intraarterial infusion of 70 mg/m 2 of cisplatin and 30 mg/m 2 of pirarubicin into bilateral bladder arteries was conducted for 5 patients diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancers without distant metastasis. Right and left distribution of anti-cancer drugs was determined based on the location of bladder tumor(s). External beam radiation therapy was commenced immediately following intraarterial infusion. The patients were followed up with clinical and radiographic investigations and bladderbiopsy was performed as needed. Patients were all males who are smoking or with smoking history ranging from 73 to 85 years of age (median 82). The duration between transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TUR-Bt) and intraarterial infusion of anti-cancer drugs was 47.4 days (range 26-68), the median follow-up period after intraarterial infusion was 21.5 months (range 87-547) without death. Total radiation dose was 59.2 ±3.0 Gy. Complete remission was accomplished in all cases. One patient showed intravesical recurrence of non muscle-invasive tumors 45.8 months following intraarterial infusion and underwent TUR-Bt. Two cases underwent bladder biopsies showing no tumors. All patients but one case with bladder recurrence were free of tumor recurrence with radiographic investigation. For adverse events, acute renal failure was in one case and leukocytopenia was in all 5 cases, Grade 2 for one and Grade 3 for 4 cases. Follow-up periods are not long enough, but early results of a combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were good. (author)

  2. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A; Vovk, Mykhaylo V; Mel& #x27; nychenko, Nina V; Sukach, Volodymyr A

    2012-10-23

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  3. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Vovk, Mykhaylo V.; Mel' nychenko, Nina V.; Sukach, Volodymyr A.

    2012-08-14

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  4. Molecular predictors of therapeutic response to specific anti-cancer agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Heiser, Laura M.; Gibb, William J.; Kuo, Wen-lin; Wang, Nicholas J.

    2016-11-29

    Herein is described the use of a collection of 50 breast cancer cell lines to match responses to 77 conventional and experimental therapeutic agents with transcriptional, proteomic and genomic subtypes found in primary tumors. Almost all compounds produced strong differential responses across the cell lines produced responses that were associated with transcriptional and proteomic subtypes and produced responses that were associated with recurrent genome copy number abnormalities. These associations can now be incorporated into clinical trials that test subtype markers and clinical responses simultaneously.

  5. Bacterial biosynthesis and maturation of the didemnin anti-cancer agents

    KAUST Repository

    Xü, Ying

    2012-05-23

    The anti-neoplastic agent didemnin B from the Caribbean tunicate Trididemnum solidum was the first marine drug to be clinically tested in humans. Because of its limited supply and its complex cyclic depsipeptide structure, considerable challenges were encountered during didemnin B\\'s development that continue to limit aplidine (dehydrodidemnin B), which is currently being evaluated in numerous clinical trials. Herein we show that the didemnins are bacterial products produced by the marine α-proteobacteria Tistrella mobilis and Tistrella bauzanensis via a unique post-assembly line maturation process. Complete genome sequence analysis of the 6,513,401 bp T. mobilis strain KA081020-065 with its five circular replicons revealed the putative didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster (did) on the 1,126,962 bp megaplasmid pTM3. The did locus encodes a 13-module hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase enzyme complex organized in a collinear arrangement for the synthesis of the fatty acylglutamine ester derivatives didemnins X and Y rather than didemnin B as first anticipated. Imaging mass spectrometry of T. mobilis bacterial colonies captured the time-dependent extracellular conversion of the didemnin X and Y precursors to didemnin B, in support of an unusual post-synthetase activation mechanism. Significantly, the discovery of the didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster may provide a long-term solution to the supply problem that presently hinders this group of marine natural products and pave the way for the genetic engineering of new didemnin congeners. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Design, synthesis and molecular modeling studies of novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives as potential anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Vivek; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A series of novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives 4a-x have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for potential anti-cancer activity. The anti-cancer activity of synthesized compounds 4a-x were evaluated against selected human cancer cell line of breast (MCF-7) using sulforhodamine B (SRB) method. Among the synthesized compounds, 4x having 2-cyano phenyl group showed significant cytotoxic activity which is comparable to that of adriamycin as standard anti-cancer drug. The SAR study revealed that the substituted phenyl group on oxadiazole ring attached to thiazolidine-2,4-dione moiety showed significant growth inhibitory activity against MCF-7 cell line. The result of molecular modeling studies showed that compounds 4f, 4o and 4x having similar structural alignment as crystal ligand of protein.

  7. Liquid Chromatography - Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry : The gold standard for quantitative bioanalysis of anti-cancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vainchtein, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the pharmacologic mechanisms of action, efficacy and toxicity of any anti-cancer drug it is important to know how the compound is transformed in the body: either into active metabolites or inactive and toxic (degradation) products. This information may lead to the success or failure of

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs as anti-cancer and anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Sayed; Nam, Young-Joo; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, a series of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs were synthesized and then evaluated in terms of their cytotoxic activities against four human cancer cell lines, e.g. lung cancer (A549), ovarian cancer (SK-OV-3), skin cancer (SK-MEL-2), and colon cancer (HCT15), as well as anti-microbial activities against three microbes, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, and Aspergillus niger. The title compounds were synthesized by Knoevenagel condensation reaction of benzyl cyanide or p-nitrobenzyl cyanide with substituted benzaldehydes in good yields. Most of the compounds exhibited significant suppressive activities against the growth of all cancer cell lines. Compound 3c was most active in inhibiting the growth of A549, SK-OV-3, SK-MEL-2, and HCT15 cells lines with IC50 values of 0.57, 0.14, 0.65, and 0.34 mg/mL, respectively, followed by compounds 3f, 3i, and 3h. Compound 3c exhibited 2.4 times greater cytotoxic activity against HCT15 cells, whereas it showed similar potency against SK-OV-3 cells to that of the standard anti-cancer agent doxorubicin. Structure-activity relationship study revealed that electron-donating groups at the para-position of phenyl ring B were more favorable for improved cytotoxic activity, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups was unfavorable compare to unsubstituted acrylonitrile. An optimal electron density on phenyl ring A of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs was crucial for their cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines used in the present study. Qualitative structure-cytotoxic activity relationships were studied using physicochemical parameters; a good correlation between calculated polar surface area (PSA), a lipophobic parameter, and cytotoxic activity was found. Moreover, all compounds showed significant anti-bacterial activities against S. typhi, whereas compound 3k showed potent inhibition against both S. aureus and S. typhi bacterial strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  9. Anti-cancer agents based on 4-(hetero)Ary1-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl Amino derivatives and a method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A.; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-29

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. ##STR00001## In particular, the invention relates N-substituted derivatives of 4-(hetero)aryl-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl amines having the structural Formula (I) and (II), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. Meaning of R1 and R2 in the Formula (I) and (II) are defined in claim 1. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  10. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media.

  11. Anti-cancer effects of oncolytic viral therapy combined with photodynamic therapy in human pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Yazan S; Wright, Kathleen; Melcher, Alan; Jayne, David

    2015-02-26

    Oncolytic viral therapy and photodynamic therapy are potential therapies for inoperable or advanced pancreatic cancer. Our aim was to investigate the anti-cancer killing effects of reovirus therapy combined with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-mediated photodynamic therapy on a variety of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Pancreatic cancer cell lines (PsPC-1 and BXPC-3) and a non-cancer control cell line (HEK293) were infected with reovirus serotype 3 strain Dearing (T3D) at 0, 0·1, 1, and 10 plaque-forming units (PFU) per cell for 48 h. Cells were incubated with PpIX pro-drug 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 mM for 4 h. Then, cells were photo-irradiated for 15 min with visible red light-emitting diodes with a light-fluence of 0·54 J/cm(2) of 653 nm (PpIX optimal excitation wavelength). The killing effects of reovirus combined with PpIX-mediated photodynamic therapy were analysed in methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The effect of adding reovirus after photodynamic therapy was also assessed. The statistical significance of the difference between groups was assessed with the two-tailed Student's t test. pphotodynamic therapy resulted in a significantly increased cytotoxic effect compared with reovirus monotherapy and photodynamic therapy (p=0·042) with 100% cell death observed across pancreatic cell lines with 10 PFU per cell combined with 1 and 2 mM 5-ALA. There was no difference in cytotoxicity observed between added reovirus before or after photodynamic therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first in-vitro study to combine reovirus oncolytic viral therapy with PpIX-mediated photodynamic therapy to treat pancreatic cancer. These results show a significant additive effect in cell killing and they provide initial evidence for a novel combined therapeutic intervention. National Institute for Health Research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rational design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of third generation α-noscapine analogues as potent tubulin binding anti-cancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Manchukonda

    Full Text Available Systematic screening based on structural similarity of drugs such as colchicine and podophyllotoxin led to identification of noscapine, a microtubule-targeted agent that attenuates the dynamic instability of microtubules without affecting the total polymer mass of microtubules. We report a new generation of noscapine derivatives as potential tubulin binding anti-cancer agents. Molecular modeling experiments of these derivatives 5a, 6a-j yielded better docking score (-7.252 to -5.402 kCal/mol than the parent compound, noscapine (-5.505 kCal/mol and its existing derivatives (-5.563 to -6.412 kCal/mol. Free energy (ΔG bind calculations based on the linear interaction energy (LIE empirical equation utilizing Surface Generalized Born (SGB continuum solvent model predicted the tubulin-binding affinities for the derivatives 5a, 6a-j (ranging from -4.923 to -6.189 kCal/mol. Compound 6f showed highest binding affinity to tubulin (-6.189 kCal/mol. The experimental evaluation of these compounds corroborated with theoretical studies. N-(3-brormobenzyl noscapine (6f binds tubulin with highest binding affinity (KD, 38 ± 4.0 µM, which is ~ 4.0 times higher than that of the parent compound, noscapine (KD, 144 ± 1.0 µM and is also more potent than that of the first generation clinical candidate EM011, 9-bromonoscapine (KD, 54 ± 9.1 µM. All these compounds exhibited substantial cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 72.9 µM; compound 6f showed prominent anti-cancer efficacy with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 26.9 µM in cancer cells of different tissues of origin. These compounds perturbed DNA synthesis, delayed the cell cycle progression at G2/M phase, and induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Collectively, the study reported here identified potent, third generation noscapinoids as new anti-cancer agents.

  13. Enhancement of the photo-electric effect with pharmacological agents in synchrotron radiation based anti-cancer radiotherapy: a methodological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corde, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Anti-cancer therapy rests on three main principles: 1) anatomic confinement of irradiation; 2) temporal fractioning of treatment; 3) treatment of tissues that are more sensitive to radiation than surrounding healthy tissue. Under those principles hides the goal of radiotherapy: to deposit more of the X-ray energy in the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. This goal is hard to reach since one of the causes of the failures in radiotherapy is the continuing evolution of the tumor. Could synchrotron radiation be more effective as an X-ray source for radiotherapy? The variation of the radiation-matter interaction cross-sections as a function of X-ray energy and atomic number of the medium show that certain energies and certain elements are more suitable to obtain the largest number of interactions and the largest amount of deposited energy. Synchrotron radiation allows to select precisely those energies because of its high spectral intensity. Its spectral characteristics (energy of the photons between 10 and 100 keV) allow to trigger the photoelectric effect with a maximum of probability on heavy elements introduced close to cancerous cells. It has been shown that: 1) synchrotron radiation based tomodensitometry is a quantitative imaging technique, potentially powerful for radiotherapy since it insures in-vivo the measurement of intra-tumoral concentration of contrast agent (I or Gd); 2) in the presence of iodinated contrast agent the lethal effect of X-rays on cell survival is increased and the gain in radio sensitivity depends on X-ray energy; 3) at the cellular scale the lethality of irradiation can be optimised again by transporting heavy atoms (I, Pt) inside the DNA, which is the biological target of the irradiation. This reinforcement of the killing efficiency of low energy X-rays using a physical mechanism aimed at a pharmacological agent is an original concept in anti-cancer radiotherapy. (author) [fr

  14. Anti-cancer agents based on N-acyl-2, 3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b] quinoline derivatives and a method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. In particular, the invention relates to N-acyl derivatives of 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]quinolines having the structural Formula (I), ##STR00001## stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. The meaning of R1 is independently selected from H; C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl substituents; R2 is selected from C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl; substituted or non-substituted, fused or non-fused to substituted or non-substituted aromatic ring, aryl or heteroaryl groups. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  15. Drug repurposing of novel quinoline acetohydrazide derivatives as potent COX-2 inhibitors and anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Chelli Sai; Manikandan, A.; Sridhar, P.; Sivakumar, A.; Siva Kumar, B.; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara

    2018-02-01

    Novel QuinolineAcetohydrazide (QAh) derivatives (9a-n) were firstly evaluated in silico to determine their anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer efficacy via the mechanisms of COX1 and COX2 inhibition, and NF-ĸB, HDAC and Human Topoisomerase I pathways respectively. In the studied set, the trifluoro substituted QAh derivatives: (E)-N'-(4-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazid and (E)-N'-(3-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazide are determined to be potential leads, indicated from their best docked scores, relative ligand efficiency, and significant structural attributes evaluated by ab initio simulations. The only setback being their partition co-efficient that retrieved a red flag in the evaluation of their Lipinski parameters. The experimental in vitro studies confirmed the significant enhancement as COX-2 inhibitors and appreciable enhancement in MTT assay of breast and skin cancer cell lines. Significantly, trifluoro substituent in the quinoline scaffold can be reasoned to note the excellent binding affinity to all the evaluated drug targets.

  16. Benzene-poly-carboxylic acid complex, a novel anti-cancer agent induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Fares

    Full Text Available Some cases of breast cancer are composed of clones of hormonal-independent growing cells, which do not respond to therapy. In the present study, the effect of Benzene-Poly-Carboxylic Acid Complex (BP-C1 on growth of human breast-cancer cells was tested. BP-C1 is a novel anti-cancer complex of benzene-poly-carboxylic acids with a very low concentration of cis-diammineplatinum (II dichloride. Human breast cancer cells, MCF-7 and T47D, were used. Cell viability was detected by XTT assay and apoptosis was detected by Flow Cytometry and by annexin V/FITC/PI assay. Caspases were detected by western blot analysis and gene expression was measured by using the Applied Biosystems® TaqMan® Array Plates. The results showed that exposure of the cells to BP-C1 for 48 h, significantly (P<0.001 reduced cell viability, induced apoptosis and activated caspase 8 and caspace 9. Moreover, gene expression experiments indicated that BP-C1 increased the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (CASP8AP1, TNFRSF21, NFkB2, FADD, BCL10 and CASP8 and lowered the level of mRNA transcripts of inhibitory apoptotic genes (BCL2L11, BCL2L2 and XIAP. These findings may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of human cancer using BP-C1 analog.

  17. Advancing drug therapy for brain tumours: a current review of the pro-inflammatory peptide Substance P and its antagonists as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Kimberley; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of the Substance P (SP)/NK1 receptor system in the development and progression of cancer strongly supports its potential as a therapeutic target in malignancies. Novel strategies for approaching cancer treatment are urgently required particularly with regard to tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), which are notoriously difficult to effectively treat and associated with extremely poor prognosis for many patients. This is due, in part, to the presence of the highly specialised blood-brain barrier, which is known to restrict common treatments such as chemotherapy and hinder early tumour diagnosis. Additionally, tumours of the CNS are difficult to surgically resect completely, often contributing to the resurgence of the disease many years later. Interestingly, despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier, circulating tumour cells are able to gain entry to the brain and form secondary brain tumours; however, the underlying mechanisms of this process remain unclear. Tachykinins, in particular Substance P, have been implicated in early blood-brain barrier disruption via neurogenic inflammation in a number of other CNS pathologies. Recent evidence also suggests that Substance P may play a central role in the development of CNS tumours. It has been well established that a number of tumour cells express Substance P, NK1 receptors and mRNA for the tachykinin NK1 receptor. This increase in the Substance P/NK1 receptor system is known to induce proliferation and migration of tumour cells as well as stimulate angiogenesis, thus contributing to tumour progression. Accordingly, the NK1 receptor antagonist presents a novel target for anti-cancer therapy for which a number of patents have been filed. This review will examine the role of Substance P in the development of CNS tumours and its potential application as an anti-cancer agent.

  18. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of a curcumin analog as an anti-cancer agent inducing ER stress-mediated apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Yi; Sun, Yusheng; Ren, Luqing; Huang, Yi; Cai, Yuepiao; Weng, Qiaoyou; Shen, Xueqian; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have highlighted the importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cell death processes. Pharmacological interventions that effectively enhance tumor cell death through activating ER stress have attracted a great deal of attention for anti-cancer therapy. A bio-evaluation on 113 curcumin analogs against four cancer cell lines was performed through MTT assay. Furthermore, real time cell assay and flow cytometer were used to evaluate the apoptotic induction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(5-bromo-2-ethoxyphenyl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one (B82). Western blot, RT-qPCR, and siRNA were then utilized to confirm whether B82-induced apoptosis is mediated through activating ER stress pathway. Finally, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of B82 was evaluated. B82 exhibited strong anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cells. Treatment with B82 significantly induced apoptosis in H460 cells in vitro and inhibited H460 tumor growth in vivo. Further studies demonstrated that the B82-induced apoptosis is mediated by activating ER stress both in vitro and in vivo. A new monocarbonyl analog of curcumin, B82, exhibited anti-tumor effects on H460 cells via an ER stress-mediated mechanism. B82 could be further explored as a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of NSCLC

  20. Anti-cancer effects of newly developed chemotherapeutic agent, glycoconjugated palladium (II) complex, against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Kamiya, Takeshi; Joh, Takashi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Ohi, Hiromi; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Shibahara, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Mori, Yoshinori; Tanida, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various types of advanced cancer, including gastric cancer. However, almost all cancer cells acquire resistance against CDDP, and this phenomenon adversely affects prognosis. Thus, new chemotherapeutic agents that can overcome the CDDP-resistant cancer cells will improve the survival of advanced cancer patients. We synthesized new glycoconjugated platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes, [PtCl 2 (L)] and [PdCl 2 (L)]. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure to CDDP, and gene expression in the CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells was analyzed. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by [PtCl 2 (L)] and [PdCl 2 (L)] in CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells were evaluated. DNA double-strand breaks by drugs were assessed by evaluating phosphorylated histone H2AX. Xenograft tumor mouse models were established and antitumor effects were also examined in vivo. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells exhibit ABCB1 and CDKN2A gene up-regulation, as compared with CDDP-sensitive gastric cancer cells. In the analyses of CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells, [PdCl 2 (L)] overcame cross-resistance to CDDP in vitro and in vivo. [PdCl 2 (L)] induced DNA double-strand breaks. These results indicate that [PdCl 2 (L)] is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CDDP-resistant gastric cancer and may have clinical applications

  1. Study of anti-cancer effects of chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithra, K.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Prakasarao, Aruna; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of the variations in the spectroscopic patterns of the key bio molecules using Native fluorescence spectroscopy, without exogenous labels, has emerged as a new trend in the characterization of the Physiological State and the Discrimination of Pathological from normal conditions of cells and tissues as the relative concentration of these bio-molecules serve as markers in evaluating the presence of cancer in the body. The aim of this unique study is to use these features of Optical spectroscopy in monitoring the behavior of cells to treatment and thus to evaluate the response to Chemotherapeutic agents and Radiation in Breast Cancer Patients. The results of the study conducted using NFS of Human blood plasma of biopsy proved Breast Cancer patients undergoing treatment are promising, enhancing the scope of Native fluorescence Spectroscopy emerging as a promising technology in the evaluation of Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancer Patients.

  2. Development of a new anti-cancer agent for targeted radionuclide therapy: β- radiolabeled RAFT-RGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitprin, A.

    2013-01-01

    β-emitters radiolabeled RAFT-RGD as new agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. The αvβ3 integrin is known to play an important role in tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor proliferation, survival and metastasis. Because of its overexpression on neo-endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origins, αvβ3 integrin is an attractive molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of the rapidly growing and metastatic tumors. A tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK])4 (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets integrin αvβ3 in vitro and in vivo. RAFT-RGD has been used for tumor imaging and drug targeting. This study is the first to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the β-emitters radiolabeled tetrameric RGD peptide RAFT-RGD in a Nude mouse model of αvβ3 -expressing tumors. An injection of 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD in mice with αvβ3 -positive tumors caused a significant growth delay as compared with mice treated with 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RAD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In comparison, an injection of 30 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD had no efficacy for the treatment of αvβ3 -negative tumors. 90 Y-RAFT-RGD and 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent αvβ3 -expressing tumor targeting agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  3. QSAR Modeling on Benzo[c]phenanthridine Analogues as Topoisomerase I Inhibitors and Anti-cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Ngoc-Phuong Huynh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Benzo[c]phenanthridine (BCP derivatives were identified as topoisomerase I (TOP-I targeting agents with pronounced antitumor activity. In this study, hologram-QSAR, 2D-QSAR and 3D-QSAR models were developed for BCPs on topoisomerase I inbibitory activity and cytotoxicity against seven tumor cell lines including RPMI8402, CPT-K5, P388, CPT45, KB3-1, KBV-1and KBH5.0. The hologram, 2D, and 3D-QSAR models were obtained with the square of correlation coefficient R2 = 0.58 − 0.77, the square of the crossvalidation coefficient q2 = 0.41 − 0.60 as well as the external set’s square of predictive correlation coefficient r2 = 0.51 − 0.80. Moreover, the assessment method based on reliability test with confidence level of 95% was used to validate the predictive power of QSAR models and to prevent over-fitting phenomenon of classical QSAR models. Our QSAR model could be applied to design new analogues of BCPs with higher antitumor and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity.

  4. Combining anti-cancer drugs with artificial sweeteners: synthesis and anti-cancer activity of saccharinate (sac) and thiosaccharinate (tsac) complexes cis-[Pt(sac)2(NH3)2] and cis-[Pt(tsac)2(NH3)2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jibori, Subhi A; Al-Jibori, Ghassan H; Al-Hayaly, Lamaan J; Wagner, Christoph; Schmidt, Harry; Timur, Suna; Baris Barlas, F; Subasi, Elif; Ghosh, Shishir; Hogarth, Graeme

    2014-12-01

    The new platinum(II) complexes cis-[Pt(sac)2(NH3)2] (sac=saccharinate) and cis-[Pt(tsac)2(NH3)2] (tsac=thiosaccharinate) have been prepared, the X-ray crystal structure of cis-[Pt(sac)2(NH3)2] x H2O reveals that both saccharinate anions are N-bound in a cis-arrangement being inequivalent in both the solid-state and in solution at room temperature. Preliminary anti-cancer activity has been assessed against A549 human alveolar type-II like cell lines with the thiosaccharinate complex showing good activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new C-12(α/β)-(N-) sulfamoyl-phenylamino-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives as potent anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandanur, Sai Giridhar Sarma; Nanduri, Srinivas; Golakoti, Nageswara Rao

    2017-07-01

    Andrographolide, the major diterpenoidal constituent of Andrographis paniculata (Acanthaceae) and its derivatives have been reported to possess plethora of biological properties including potent anti-cancer activity. In this work, synthesis and in-vitro anti-cancer evaluation of new C-12-substituted aryl amino 14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives (III a-f) are reported. The substitutions include various sulfonamide moieties -SO 2 -NH-R 1 . The new derivatives (III a-e) exhibited improved cytotoxicity (GI 50 , TGI and LC 50 ) compared to andrographolide (I) and the corresponding 3,14,19-O-triacetyl andrographolide (II) when evaluated against 60 NCI cell line panel. Compounds III c and III e are found to be non-toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) cells compared to reference drug THZ-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Frondoside A from sea cucumber and nymphaeols from Okinawa propolis: Natural anti-cancer agents that selectively inhibit PAK1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Tawata, Shinkichi; Maruta, Hiroshi

    2017-05-30

    A sulfated saponin called "Frondoside A" (FRA) from sea cucumber and ingredients from Okinawa propolis (OP) have been previously shown to suppress the PAK1-dependent growth of A549 lung cancer as well as pancreatic cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism underlying their anti-cancer action still remains to be clarified. In this study, for the first time, we found that both FRA and OP directly inhibit PAK1 in vitro in a selective manner (far more effectively than two other oncogenic kinases, LIMK and AKT). Furthermore, at least two major anti-cancer ingredients of OP, nymphaeols A and C, also directly inhibit PAK1 in vitro in a selective manner. To the best of our knowledge, FRA is the first marine compound that selectively inhibits PAK1. Likewise, these nymphaeols are the first propolis ingredients that selectively inhibit PAK1.

  7. Combination of gefitinib and DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine exerts synergistic anti-cancer activity in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-feng Lou

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the treatment of human colon cancer, the chemotherapy efficacy against colon cancer is still unsatisfactory. In the present study, effects of concomitant inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and DNA methyltransferase were examined in human colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that decitabine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor synergized with gefitinib (an EGFR inhibitor to reduce cell viability and colony formation in SW1116 and LOVO cells. However, the combination of the two compounds displayed minimal toxicity to NCM460 cells, a normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line. The combination was also more effective at inhibiting the AKT/mTOR/S6 kinase pathway. In addition, the combination of decitabine with gefitinib markedly inhibited colon cancer cell migration. Furthermore, gefitinib synergistically enhanced decitabine-induced cytotoxicity was primarily due to apoptosis as shown by Annexin V labeling that was attenuated by z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor. Concomitantly, cell apoptosis resulting from the co-treatment of gefitinib and decitabine was accompanied by induction of BAX, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP, along with reduction of Bcl-2 compared to treatment with either drug alone. Interestingly, combined treatment with these two drugs increased the expression of XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1 which play an important role in cell apoptosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA depletion of XAF1 significantly attenuated colon cancer cells apoptosis induced by the combination of the two drugs. Our findings suggested that gefitinib in combination with decitabine exerted enhanced cell apoptosis in colon cancer cells were involved in mitochondrial-mediated pathway and induction of XAF1 expression. In conclusion, based on the observations from our study, we suggested that the combined administration of these two drugs might be considered as a novel therapeutic regimen for treating colon

  8. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  9. Anti-cancer effects of xanthones from pericarps of mangosteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akao, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Iinuma, Munekazu; Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2008-03-01

    Mangosteen, Garcinia mangostana Linn, is a tree found in South East Asia, and its pericarps have been used as traditional medicine. Phytochemical studies have shown that they contain a variety of secondary metabolites, such as oxygenated and prenylated xanthones. Recent studies revealed that these xanthones exhibited a variety of biological activities containing anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer effects. We previously investigated the anti-proliferative effects of four prenylated xanthones from the pericarps; alpha-mangostin, beta-mangostin, gamma-mangostin, and methoxy-beta-mangostin in various human cancer cells. These xanthones are different in the number of hydroxyl and methoxy groups. Except for methoxy-beta-mangostin, the other three xanthones strongly inhibited cell growth at low concentrations from 5 to 20 microM in human colon cancer DLD-1 cells. Our recent study focused on the mechanism of alpha-mangostin-induced growth inhibition in DLD-1 cells. It was shown that the anti-proliferative effects of the xanthones were associated with cell-cycle arrest by affecting the expression of cyclins, cdc2, and p27; G1 arrest by alpha-mangostin and beta-Mangostin, and S arrest by gamma-mangostin. alpha-Mangostin found to induce apoptosis through the activation of intrinsic pathway following the down-regulation of signaling cascades involving MAP kinases and the serine/threonine kinase Akt. Synergistic effects by the combined treatment of alpha-mangostin and anti-cancer drug 5-FU was to be noted. alpha-Mangostin was found to have a cancer preventive effect in rat carcinogenesis bioassay and the extract from pericarps, which contains mainly alpha-mangostin and gamma-mangostin, exhibited an enhancement of NK cell activity in a mouse model. These findings could provide a relevant basis for the development of xanthones as an agent for cancer prevention and the combination therapy with anti-cancer drugs.

  10. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/15s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asfar S Azmi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. Developing an Agent-Based Drug Model to Investigate the Synergistic Effects of Drug Combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongjie; Yin, Zuojing; Cao, Zhiwei; Zhang, Le

    2017-12-14

    The growth and survival of cancer cells are greatly related to their surrounding microenvironment. To understand the regulation under the impact of anti-cancer drugs and their synergistic effects, we have developed a multiscale agent-based model that can investigate the synergistic effects of drug combinations with three innovations. First, it explores the synergistic effects of drug combinations in a huge dose combinational space at the cell line level. Second, it can simulate the interaction between cells and their microenvironment. Third, it employs both local and global optimization algorithms to train the key parameters and validate the predictive power of the model by using experimental data. The research results indicate that our multicellular system can not only describe the interactions between the microenvironment and cells in detail, but also predict the synergistic effects of drug combinations.

  12. Array of translational systems pharmacodynamic models of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Mager, Donald E

    2016-12-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that is characterized by an uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. Drug development in oncology is particularly challenging and is associated with one of the highest attrition rates of compounds despite substantial investments in resources. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling seeks to couple experimental data with mathematical models to provide key insights into factors controlling cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutics and cancer progression. PK/PD modeling of anti-cancer compounds is equally challenging, partly based on the complexity of biological and pharmacological systems. However, reliable mechanistic and systems PK/PD models for anti-cancer agents have been developed and successfully applied to: (1) provide insights into fundamental mechanisms implicated in tumor growth, (2) assist in dose selection for first-in-human phase I studies (e.g., effective dose, escalating doses, and maximal tolerated doses), (3) design and optimize combination drug regimens, (4) design clinical trials, and (5) establish links between drug efficacy and safety and the concentrations of measured biomarkers. In this commentary, classes of relevant mechanism-based and systems PK/PD models of anti-cancer agents that have shown promise in translating preclinical data and enhancing stages of the drug development process are reviewed. Specific features of such models are discussed including their strengths and limitations along with a prospectus of using these models alone or in combination for cancer therapy.

  13. Recent advances on the anti-cancer properties of Nigella sativa, a widely used food additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin F. Majdalawieh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of naturally-occurring agents to regulate tumorigenesis is on the rise. Several herbal extracts, pure plant-derived active constituents, and food additives have been reported to possess potent anti-cancer properties and cancer-ameliorating effects. The wide-range anti-cancer effects of Nigella sativa, also known as black seed or black cumin, have been extensively studied using different in vitro and in vivo models. Here, we provide a comprehensive, analytical review of the reported anti-cancer properties of N. sativa seed extracts. This review focuses on analyzing experimental findings related to the ability of N. sativa to exert anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, cytotoxic, anti-mutagenic, anti-metastatic, and NK cytotoxic activity enhancing effects against various primary cancer cells and cancer cell lines. Moreover, we underline the molecular mechanisms of action and the signal transduction pathways implicated in the suppression of tumorigenesis by N. sativa. The major signaling pathway utilized by N. sativa to manifest its anti-cancer activity is the iNOS signaling pathway. This review underscores the recent developments that highlight an effective therapeutic potential of N. sativa to suppress tumor development, reduce tumor incidence, and ameliorate carcinogenesis. In sum, experimental findings reported in the last two decades strongly suggest that N. sativa fractions could serve, alone or in combination with known chemotherapeutic drugs, as effective agents to control tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis, and hence, treatment of a wide range of cancers.

  14. First report of anti-cancer agent, lapachol producing endophyte, Aspergillus niger of Tabebuia argentea and its in vitro cytotoxicity assays

    OpenAIRE

    Channabasava; Melappa Govindappa

    2014-01-01

    All parts of Tabebuia argentia were used for isolation and identified the lapachol producing endophytes were used for evaluation of in vitro cytotoxicity (antimitotic, antiproliferative, determination of cell viability, DNA fragmentation). Five endophytes (leaf endophytes, Alternaria alternata, Alternaria sp., Aspegerillus niger, Penicillium sp. and the bark endophyte, A. alternata) are able to produce potent anticancer agent lapachol. The 3rd and 4th fractions of endophytic extracts (A. nige...

  15. Efficacy of a non-hypercalcemic vitamin-D2 derived anti-cancer agent (MT19c and inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in an ovarian cancer xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous vitamin-D analogs exhibited poor response rates, high systemic toxicities and hypercalcemia in human trials to treat cancer. We identified the first non-hypercalcemic anti-cancer vitamin D analog MT19c by altering the A-ring of ergocalciferol. This study describes the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action of MT19c in both in vitro and in vivo models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Antitumor efficacy of MT19c was evaluated in ovarian cancer cell (SKOV-3 xenografts in nude mice and a syngenic rat ovarian cancer model. Serum calcium levels of MT19c or calcitriol treated animals were measured. In-silico molecular docking simulation and a cell based VDR reporter assay revealed MT19c-VDR interaction. Genomewide mRNA analysis of MT19c treated tumors identified drug targets which were verified by immunoblotting and microscopy. Quantification of cellular malonyl CoA was carried out by HPLC-MS. A binding study with PPAR-Y receptor was performed. MT19c reduced ovarian cancer growth in xenograft and syngeneic animal models without causing hypercalcemia or acute toxicity. MT19c is a weak vitamin-D receptor (VDR antagonist that disrupted the interaction between VDR and coactivator SRC2-3. Genome-wide mRNA analysis and western blot and microscopy of MT19c treated xenograft tumors showed inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN activity. MT19c reduced cellular levels of malonyl CoA in SKOV-3 cells and inhibited EGFR/phosphoinositol-3kinase (PI-3K activity independently of PPAR-gamma protein. SIGNIFICANCE: Antitumor effects of non-hypercalcemic agent MT19c provide a new approach to the design of vitamin-D based anticancer molecules and a rationale for developing MT19c as a therapeutic agent for malignant ovarian tumors by targeting oncogenic de novo lipogenesis.

  16. First report of anti-cancer agent, lapachol producing endophyte, Aspergillus niger of Tabebuia argentea and its in vitro cytotoxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channabasava

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available All parts of Tabebuia argentia were used for isolation and identified the lapachol producing endophytes were used for evaluation of in vitro cytotoxicity (antimitotic, antiproliferative, determination of cell viability, DNA fragmentation. Five endophytes (leaf endophytes, Alternaria alternata, Alternaria sp., Aspegerillus niger, Penicillium sp. and the bark endophyte, A. alternata are able to produce potent anticancer agent lapachol. The 3rd and 4th fractions of endophytic extracts (A. niger and Penicillium sp. exhibited the pure lapachol. The 3rd fraction of A. niger lapachol strongly inhibited the Allium cepa root actively growing cells at various stages of cell cycle in antimitotic assay and the index was 22.5 mg/mL, the yeast cells were died due to toxicity and possessed the cell necrosis and they exhibited the DNA fragmentation. Present promised endophytes can be used for production of lapachol using endophyte A. niger for large scale production of lapachol within short period of time.

  17. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  18. The combination of novel targeted molecular agents and radiation in the treatment of pediatric gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eDasgupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the most common solid pediatric malignancy. For high-grade, recurrent or refractory pediatric brain tumors, radiation therapy (XRT is an integral treatment modality. In the era of personalized cancer therapy, molecularly targeted agents have been designed to inhibit pathways critical to tumorigenesis. Our evolving knowledge of genetic aberrations in low-grade gliomas is being exploited with targeted inhibitors. These agents are also being combined with XRT to increase their efficacy. In this review, we discuss novel agents targeting three different pathways in low-grade gliomas, and their potential combination with XRT. B-Raf is a kinase in the Ras/Raf/MAPK kinase pathway, which is integral to cellular division, survival and metabolism. In low-grade pediatric gliomas, point mutations in BRAF (BRAF V600E or a BRAF fusion mutation (KIAA1549:BRAF causes overactivation of the MEK/MAPK pathway. Pre-clinical data shows cooperation between XRT and tagrgeted inhibitors of BRAF V600E, and MEK and mTOR inhibitors in the gliomas with the BRAF fusion. A second important signaling cascade in pediatric glioma pathogenesis is the PI3 kinase (PI3K/mTOR pathway. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors are poised to enter studies of pediatric tumors. Finally, many brain tumors express potent stimulators of angiogenesis. Several inhibitors of immunomodulators are currently being evaluated in in clinical trials for the treatment of recurrent or refractory pediatric central nervous system (CNS tumors. In summary, combinations of these targeted inhibitors with radiation are currently under investigation in both translational bench research and early clinical trials. We summarize the molecular rationale for, and the pre-clinical data supporting the combinations of these targeted agents with other anti-cancer agents and XRT in pediatric gliomas. Parallels are drawn to adult gliomas, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficacy of these agents is discussed

  19. Rational Combinations of Targeted Agents in AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithviraj Bose

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite modest improvements in survival over the last several decades, the treatment of AML continues to present a formidable challenge. Most patients are elderly, and these individuals, as well as those with secondary, therapy-related, or relapsed/refractory AML, are particularly difficult to treat, owing to both aggressive disease biology and the high toxicity of current chemotherapeutic regimens. It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that coordinated interruption of cooperative survival signaling pathways in malignant cells is necessary for optimal therapeutic results. The modest efficacy of monotherapy with both cytotoxic and targeted agents in AML testifies to this. As the complex biology of AML continues to be elucidated, many “synthetic lethal” strategies involving rational combinations of targeted agents have been developed. Unfortunately, relatively few of these have been tested clinically, although there is growing interest in this area. In this article, the preclinical and, where available, clinical data on some of the most promising rational combinations of targeted agents in AML are summarized. While new molecules should continue to be combined with conventional genotoxic drugs of proven efficacy, there is perhaps a need to rethink traditional philosophies of clinical trial development and regulatory approval with a focus on mechanism-based, synergistic strategies.

  20. Mitochondrially targeted anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biasutto, L.; Dong, L.A.; Zoratti, M.; Neužil, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2010), s. 670-681 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrial targeting * pro-oxidant effect * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.238, year: 2010

  1. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  2. Absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG): An updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ren-You; Li, Hua-Bin; Sui, Zhong-Quan; Corke, Harold

    2018-04-13

    Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world, especially in Asian countries. Consumption of green tea has been demonstrated to possess many health benefits, which mainly attributed to the main bioactive compound epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a flavone-3-ol polyphenol, in green tea. EGCG is mainly absorbed in the intestine, and gut microbiota play a critical role in its metabolism prior to absorption. EGCG exhibits versatile bioactivities, with its anti-cancer effect most attracting due to the cancer preventive effect of green tea consumption, and a great number of studies intensively investigated its anti-cancer effect. In this review, we therefore, first stated the absorption and metabolism process of EGCG, and then summarized its anti-cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, including its manifold anti-cancer actions and mechanisms, especially its anti-cancer stem cell effect, and next highlighted its various molecular targets involved in cancer inhibition. Finally, the anti-cancer effect of EGCG analogs and nanoparticles, as well as the potential cancer promoting effect of EGCG were also discussed. Understanding of the absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of EGCG can be of importance to better utilize it as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent.

  3. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-fluorouracil on colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Hiyoshi, Masaya; Kaneko, Manabu; Kitayama, Joji; Takahashi, Koki; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Tsuno, Nelson H; Sunami, Eiji; Tsurita, Giichiro; Kawai, Kazushige; Okaji, Yurai; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shuno, Yasutaka; Hongo, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), the worldwide used anti-malarial drug, has recently being focused as a potential anti-cancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer when used in combination with anti-cancer drugs. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cell death in various types of cancer. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice in colorectal cancer, but in most cases, resistance to 5-FU develops through various mechanisms. Here, we focused on the combination of CQ as a mechanism to potentiate the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, and their proliferative ability, apoptosis and autophagy induction effects, and the affection of the cell cycle were evaluated. The proliferative ability of HT-29 was analyzed by the MTS assay. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometry after double-staining of the cells with AnnexinV/PI. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow-cytometry after staining of cells with PI. Autophagy was quantified by flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis. Finally, to evaluate the fate of the cells treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, the colony formation assay was performed. 5-FU inhibited the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells, which was mostly dependent on the arrest of the cells to the G0/G1-phase but also partially on apoptosis induction, and the effect was potentiated by CQ pre-treatment. The potentiation of the inhibitory effect of 5-FU by CQ was dependent on the increase of p21 Cip1 and p27 Kip1 and the decrease of CDK2. Since CQ is reported to inhibit autophagy, the catabolic process necessary for cell survival under conditions of cell starvation or stress, which is induced by cancer cells as a protective mechanism against chemotherapeutic agents, we also analyzed the induction of autophagy in HT-29. HT-29 induced autophagy in response to 5-FU, and CQ inhibited this induction, a possible mechanism of the potentiation of the anti-cancer effect of 5-FU. Our

  4. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  5. Combining Rational and Biological Factors in Virtual Agent Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Gerritsen, C.; Treur, J.

    2011-01-01

    To enhance believability of virtual agents, this paper presents an agent-based modelling approach for decision making, which integrates rational reasoning based on means-end analysis with personal psychological and biological aspects. The agent model developed is a combination of a BDI-model and a

  6. Quantal health effects of three toxic agents combined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Quantal health effects such as cancer, correlated with the combined action of three toxic agents, are considered. Data on the combined effects of two agents are scarce and no such data exist for three toxicants, yet concerns have arisen about simultaneous exposure of radiation workers to three different agents. Using models developed from the analysis of health effects involving two toxicants, equations for the combined effects of three agents are derived from a more general formalism. An application of practical interest is the incidence of cancer of the esophagus and its correlation with concurrent exposures to alcohol, tobacco, and either low- or high-LET radiation. (author)

  7. Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Using Carbohydrate-Based Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbari, Javad; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Alibakhshi, Abbas; Tabarzad, Maryam; Hejazi, Maryam; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2018-02-12

    Polymeric drug delivery systems in the form of nanocarriers are the most interesting vehicles in anticancer therapy. Among different types of biocompatible polymers, carbohydrate-based polymers or polysaccharides are the most common natural polymers with complex structures consisting of long chains of monosaccharide or disaccharide units bound by glycosidic linkages. Their appealing properties such as availability, biocompatibility, biodegradability, low toxicity, high chemical reactivity, facile chemical modification and low cost led to their extensive applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical fields including development of nano-vehicles for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic agents. Generally, reducing systemic toxicity, increasing short half-lives and tumor localization of agents are the top priorities for a successful cancer therapy. Polysaccharide-based or - coated nanosystems with respect to their advantageous features as well as accumulation in tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect can provide promising carrier systems for the delivery of noblest impressive agents. Most challenging factor in cancer therapy was the toxicity of anti-cancer therapeutic agents for normal cells and therefore, targeted delivery of these drugs to the site of action can be considered as an interesting therapeutic strategy. In this regard, several polysaccharides exhibited selective affinity for specific cell types, and so they can act as a targeting agent in drug delivery systems. Accordingly, different aspects of polysaccharide applications in cancer treatment or diagnosis were reviewed in this paper. In this regard, after a brief introduction of polysaccharide structure and its importance, the pharmaceutical usage of carbohydrate-based polymers was considered according to the identity of accompanying active pharmaceutical agents. It was also presented that the carbohydrate based polymers have been extensively considered as promising materials in

  8. High throughput screening of South African plants for anti-cancer properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fouché, Gerda

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants have a long history of use in the treatment of cancer and over 60% of currently used anti-cancer agents are derived in one way or another from natural sources. South Africa has a rich plant biodiversity with only a limited number reported...

  9. Quantal health effects for a combination of several toxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Quantal health effects caused by the combined action of a number of toxic agents are modeled using the information available for each toxicant acting in isolation. Two basic models are used; one assumes no interaction, the other postulates a separable kind of interaction in which each agent contributes an enhancement factor independent of all other agents. These two models provide yardsticks by which to measure synergisms and antagonisms in the interaction between the effects of toxic agents. Equations are given in approximations for small and large values of the risk. (author)

  10. Proteomics of anti-cancer drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Hana; Martinková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Skalníková, Helena; Novák, Petr; Hajdůch, M.; Gadher, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Supplement 1 (2009), s. 84-84 E-ISSN 1742-4658. [34th FEBS Congress. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : proteomics * anti-cancer drugs * biomarkers Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  11. Rapid Screening of Novel Agents for Combination Therapy in Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Cubitt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For patients with sarcoma, metastatic disease remains very difficult to cure, and outcomes remain less than optimal. Treatment options have not largely changed, although some promising gains have been made with single agents in specific subtypes with the use of targeted agents. Here, we developed a system to investigate synergy of combinations of targeted and cytotoxic agents in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. Agents were investigated alone and in combination with varying dose ratios. Dose-response curves were analyzed for synergy using methods derived from Chou and Talalay (1984. A promising combination, dasatinib and triciribine, was explored in a murine model using the A673 cell line, and tumors were evaluated by MRI and histology for therapy effect. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors were synergistic with etoposide, dasatinib, and Akt inhibitors across cell lines. Sorafenib and topotecan demonstrated a mixed response. Our systematic drug screening method allowed us to screen a large number of combinations of sarcoma agents. This method can be easily modified to accommodate other cell line models, and confirmatory assays, such as animal experiments, can provide excellent preclinical data to inform clinical trials for these rare malignancies.

  12. Investigation of antibacterial and anti-cancer activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of antibacterial and anti-cancer activities of Streptomyces sp SRF1 culture filtrate. Kusavadee Sangdee, Benjaporn Buranrat, Prapairat Seephonkai, Nilawan Surapong, Aphidech Sangdee ...

  13. Biocompatibility of Portland cement combined with different radiopacifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Duarte, Marco A H; Lima, Marta C; Machado, Maria A A M; Abdo, Ruy C C; Oliveira, Thais M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of rat subcutaneous tissue to Portland cement combined with two different radiopacifying agents, iodoform (CHI3) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2). These materials were placed in polyethylene tubes and implanted into the dorsal connective tissue of Wistar rats for 7 and 15 days. The specimens were then stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and inflammatory reaction parameters were evaluated by light microscopy. The intensity of the inflammatory response to the sealants was analyzed by two blind calibrated observers throughout the experimental period. Histological analysis showed that all the materials caused a moderated inflammatory reaction at 7 days, which then diminished with time. At 15 days, the inflammatory reaction was almost absent, and fibroblasts and collagen fibers were observed indicating normal tissue healing. The degrees of the inflammatory reaction on different days throughout the experimental period were compared using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant differences amongst the groups, and Portland cement associated with radiopacifying agents gave satisfactory results. Therefore, Portland cement used in combination with radiopacifying agents can be considered a biocompatible material. Although our results are very encouraging, further studies are needed in order to establish safe clinical indications for Portland cement combined with radiopacifying agents.

  14. Mono- and combined antimicrobial agents efficiency in experimental wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Ігорівна Філімонова

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern problems of antibiotic therapy are shown by wide range of side effects, both on organism and microbiological levels: the spread of allergies, toxic for organ systems reactions, dysbiosis development, and resistant pathogens formation and dissemination. Therefore the necessity of search for new effective drugs with significant antimicrobial activity applied for the wounds treatment arises. Development of combined remedies on the background of different origin antimicrobial agents’ derivatives is one of the fight directions against infectious diseases in the skin pathology. Recently among the existing antimicrobial agents one should focus on antiseptic drugs, due to degenerative and dysfunctional effect on microbial cell.Aim of research. The comparison of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents chemotherapeutic efficiency in the treatment of localized purulent infection under experimental conditions.Metods. The study of chemotherapeutic efficiency was carried out on the model of localized purulent Staphylococcus infection on albino mice weighting 14 – 16 g. S.aureus ATCC 25923 strains were used as infectious agents. The contamination was performed subcutaneously to the right side of mice’s skin after depilation. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: the 1st group – infected mice without treatment (control; the 2nd group – infected mice treated with a ciprofloxacin; the 3rd group – infected mice treated with a Ciprofloxacin and Decamethoxin combination; the 4th group – infected mice treated with a combined drug on the base of mutual prodrugs (Hexamethylenetetramine and Phenyl salicylate.Results. The efficiency of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents under experimental Staphylococcus wound infection conditions was studied. It was found that localized purulent staph center was formed more slowly in comparison with control and mono preparation use (2nd group of animals. The average index of skin lesions in comparison

  15. Combining Targeted Agents With Modern Radiotherapy in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A.; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  16. Explorations of combinational therapy in cancer : targeting the tumor and its microenvironment by combining chemotherapy with chemopreventive approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, Johannes Willem van

    2011-01-01

    One of the most effective anticancer therapy still remains chemotherapy, however, both used as single agent as in combinational regimens, chemotherapy still encounters the problem of therapeutic resistance. Limitations of chemotherapy have led to the exploration of alternative anti-cancer approaches

  17. Autophagy inhibition synergistically enhances anti-cancer efficacy of RAMBA, VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells and tumor xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Abhijit M.; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Martin, Marlena S.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2012-01-01

    VN/12-1 is a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA) discovered in our laboratory. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of VN/12-1’s anticancer activity in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor xenografts. We investigated the effects of VN/12-1 on induction of autophagy andapoptosis in SKBR-3 cells. Further, we also examined the impact of pharmacological and genomic inhibition of autophagy on VN/12-1’s anti-cancer activity. Finally, the anti-tumor activity of VN/12-1 was evaluated as a single agent and in combination with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CHL) in an SKBR-3 mouse xenograft model. Short exposure of low dose (< 10 µM) of VN/12-1 induced endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), autophagy and inhibits G1-S phase transition and caused a protective response. However, higher dose of VN/12-1 initiates apoptosis in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy using either pharmacological inhibitors or RNA interference of Beclin-1 enhanced anti-cancer activity induced by VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells by triggering apoptosis. Importantly, VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) and the combination of VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) + chloroquine (50 mg/kg twice weekly) significantly suppressed established SKBR-3 tumor growth by 81.4% (p < 0.001 vs. control) and 96.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control), respectively. Our novel findings suggest that VN/12-1 may be useful as a single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors for treating human breast cancers. Our data provides a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of VN/12-1 as single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors. PMID:22334589

  18. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  19. Enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 targeting of head and neck cancer in combination with radiation therapy or ZD6126 vascular disrupting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alajez Nehad M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the 5th most common cancer worldwide. Locally advanced HNSCC are treated with either radiation or chemo-radiotherapy, but still associated with high mortality rate, underscoring the need to develop novel therapies. Oncolytic viruses have been garnering increasing interest as anti-cancer agents due to their preferential killing of transformed cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 against the human hypopharyngeal FaDu tumour model in vitro and in vivo. Results Our data demonstrated high toxicity of the virus against FaDu cells in vitro, which was associated with induction of apoptosis. In vivo, systemic injection of 1 × 109 pfu had minimal effect on tumour growth; however, when combined with two doses of ionizing radiation (IR; 5 Gy each or a single injection of the vascular disrupting agent (ZD6126, the virus exhibited profound suppression of tumour growth, which translated to a prolonged survival in the treated mice. Concordantly, VSVΔ51 combined with ZD6126 led to a significant increase in viral replication in these tumours. Conclusions Our data suggest that the combinations of VSVΔ51 with either IR or ZD6126 are potentially novel therapeutic opportunities for HNSCC.

  20. Ethnobotany and ethnopharmacy--their role for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Michael; Bremner, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Local and traditional knowledge has been the starting point for many successful drug development projects over the last decades. Here we discuss some examples of anti-cancer drugs which have had enormous impact as anti-cancer agents (camptothecan, taxol and derivatives) and a few examples of drugs currently under various stages of preclinical development. Ethnobotanists investigate the relationship between humans and plants in all its complexity, and such research is generally based on a detailed observation and study of the use a society makes of plants. The requirements of modern research on natural products as, for example, outlined in the Convention on Biological Diversity (Rio Convention) and the overall approach in ethnobotanical research are also discussed. Selected phytochemical-pharmacological studies based on traditional plant use are used to highlight the potential of ethnobotany driven anti-cancer research. The link between traditionally used plants and targets of the NF-kappaB pathway is discussed using on an EU-funded, multidisciplinary project as an example. Lastly the potential of chemopreventive agents derived from traditional food plants is briefly addressed.

  1. Nanotech revolution for the anti-cancer drug delivery through blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraglia, M; De Rosa, G; Salzano, G; Santini, D; Lamberti, M; Sperlongano, P; Lombardi, A; Abbruzzese, A; Addeo, R

    2012-03-01

    Nanotechnology-based drug delivery was born as a chance for pharmaceutical weapons to be delivered in the body sites where drug action is required. Specifically, the incorporation of anti-cancer agents in nanodevices of 100-300 nm allows their delivery in tissues that have a fenestrated vasculature and a reduced lymphatic drainage. These two features are typical of neoplastic tissues and, therefore, allow the accumulation of nanostructured devices in tumours. An important issue of anti-cancer pharmacological strategies is the overcoming of anatomical barriers such as the bloodbrain- barrier (BBB) that protects brain from toxicological injuries but, at the same time, makes impossible for most of the pharmacological agents with anti-cancer activity to reach tumour cells placed in the brain and derived from either primary tumours or metastases. In fact, only highly lipophilic molecules can passively diffuse through BBB to reach central nervous system (CNS). Another possibility is to use nanotechnological approaches as powerful tools to across BBB, by both prolonging the plasma half-life of the drugs and crossing fenestrations of BBB damaged by brain metastases. Moreover, modifications of nanocarrier surface with specific endogenous or exogenous ligands can promote the crossing of intact BBB as in the case of primary brain tumours. This aim can be achieved through the binding of the nanodevices to carriers or receptors expressed by the endothelial cells of BBB and that can favour the internalization of the nanostructured devices delivering anti-cancer drugs. This review summarizes the most meaningful advances in the field of nanotechnologies for brain delivery of drugs.

  2. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  3. Tumor-selective coronaviruses as potential anti-cancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Würdinger, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Despite much progress in the treatment of certain types of cancer, generally the successes of cancer therapy are still largely insufficient and new treatment options are therefore urgently needed. Oncolytic virotherapy may offer an unconventional approach to selectively eradicate cancer cells, while

  4. Sea Cucumbers Metabolites as Potent Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveena B. Janakiram

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sea cucumbers and their extracts have gained immense popularity and interest among researchers and nutritionists due to their nutritive value, potential health benefits, and use in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. Many areas of the world use sea cucumbers in traditional foods and folk medicine. Though the actual components and their specific functions still remain to be investigated, most sea cucumber extracts are being studied for their anti-inflammatory functions, immunostimulatory properties, and for cancer prevention and treatment. There is large scope for the discovery of additional bioactive, valuable compounds from this natural source. Sea cucumber extracts contain unique components, such as modified triterpene glycosides, sulfated polysaccharides, glycosphingolipids, and esterified phospholipids. Frondanol A5, an isopropyl alcohol/water extract of the enzymatically hydrolyzed epithelia of the edible North Atlantic sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, contains monosulfated triterpenoid glycoside Frondoside A, the disulfated glycoside Frondoside B, the trisulfated glycoside Frondoside C, 12-methyltetradecanoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and fucosylated chondroitin sulfate. We have extensively studied the efficacy of this extract in preventing colon cancer in rodent models. In this review, we discuss the anti-inflammatory, immunostimulatory, and anti-tumor properties of sea cucumber extracts.

  5. Ganoderma lucidum Polysaccharides as An Anti-cancer Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohretoglu, Didem; Huang, Shile

    2017-11-13

    The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been used for centuries in Asian countries to treat various diseases and to promote health and longevity. Clinical studies have shown beneficial effects of G. lucidum as an alternative adjuvant therapy in cancer patients without obvious toxicity. G. lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) is the main bioactive component in the water soluble extracts of this mushroom. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has demonstrated that GLP possesses potential anticancer activity through immunomodulatory, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects. Here, we briefly summarize these anticancer effects of GLP and the underlying mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Biological Activities of Fusarochromanone: a Potent Anti-cancer Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-03

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mahdavian E., Palyok P., Adelmund S., Williams-Hart T., Furmanski B...durations, trypsinized, collected and pelleted to- gether with any material floating in the medium. Cells were fixed in cold 70% ethanol, resuspended...component causing tibial dyschondroplasia in broiler chickens , and trichothecenes from fusarium roseum ’Graminearum’. Appl Environ Microbiol 1985, 50:102

  7. Anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives and analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-09-01

    Natural products have played a vital role in drug discovery and development process for cancer. Diospyrin, a plant based bisnaphthoquinonoid, has been used as a lead molecule in an effort to develop anti-cancer drugs. Several derivatives/analogues have been synthesized and screened for their pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities so far. Our review is focused on the pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives/analogues and the different mechanisms potentially involved in the bioactivity of these compounds. Particular focus has been placed on the different mechanisms (both chemical and molecular) thought to underlie the bioactivity of these compounds. A brief bioinformatics analysis at the end of the article provides novel insights into the new potential mechanisms and pathways by which these compounds might exert their effects and lead to a better realization of the full therapeutic potential of these compounds as anti-cancer drugs. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-cancer properties and mechanisms of action of thymoquinone, the major active ingredient of Nigella sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Fayyad, Muneera W; Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2017-12-12

    Over the past two decades, studies have documented the wide-range anti-cancer effects of Nigella sativa, known as black seed or black cumin. Thymoquinone (TQ), its major active ingredient, has also been extensively studied and reported to possess potent anti-cancer properties. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the findings related to the anti-cancer activity of TQ. The review focuses on analyzing experimental studies performed using different in vitro and in vivo models to identify the anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, cytotoxic, anti-metastatic, and NK-dependent cytotoxic effects exerted by TQ. In addition, we pinpoint the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects and the signal transduction pathways implicated by TQ. Our analysis show that p53, NF-κB, PPARγ, STAT3, MAPK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways are among the most significant pathways through which TQ mediates its anti-cancer activity. Experimental findings and recent advances in the field highlight TQ as an effective therapeutic agent for the suppression of tumor development, growth and metastasis for a wide range of tumors.

  9. Anti-cancer natural products isolated from chinese medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Guosheng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, a number of natural products isolated from Chinese herbs have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, suppress angiogenesis, retard metastasis and enhance chemotherapy, exhibiting anti-cancer potential both in vitro and in vivo. This article summarizes recent advances in in vitro and in vivo research on the anti-cancer effects and related mechanisms of some promising natural products. These natural products are also reviewed for their therapeutic potentials, including flavonoids (gambogic acid, curcumin, wogonin and silibinin, alkaloids (berberine, terpenes (artemisinin, β-elemene, oridonin, triptolide, and ursolic acid, quinones (shikonin and emodin and saponins (ginsenoside Rg3, which are isolated from Chinese medicinal herbs. In particular, the discovery of the new use of artemisinin derivatives as excellent anti-cancer drugs is also reviewed.

  10. Neurological complications of medical anti-cancer therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Hildebrand

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the features of central and peripheral neurological disorders caused by anti-cancer chemotherapy and supportive medications, such as antiepileptic drugs, glucocorticosteroids and opioids, frequently used in cancer patients. Diffuse encephalopathy with or without epileptic seizures, cerebellar disorders and aseptic meningitis may occur after systemic administration of conventional drug doses, but their incidence is much higher when either high-dose chemotherapy, or intrathecal or intracarotid administration is used. Spinal cord and/or spinal root lesions have been reported after intrathecal administration of methotrexate or cytosinearabinoside. Anti-cancer chemotherapy is the leading cause of peripheral neuropathy in cancer patients. The main culprits are vinca alkaloids, platinum derivatives and taxanes. Anti-cancer chemotherapy has no significant toxic effect on muscle tissue, but heavy administration of glucocorticosteroids is a common cause of disabling, predominantly pelvic, muscle atrophy.

  11. Is the Sudlow site I of human serum albumin more generous to adopt prospective anti-cancer bioorganic compound than that of bovine: A combined spectroscopic and docking simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ritika; Jadhao, Manojkumar; Kumar, Himank; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2017-12-01

    A comparative biophysical study on the individual conformational adaptation embraced by two homologous serum albumins (SA) (bovine and human) towards a potential anticancer bioorganic compound 2-(6-chlorobenzo[d] thiazol-2-yl)-1H-benzo[de] isoquinoline-1,3(2H)- dione (CBIQD) is apparent from the discrimination in binding behavior and the ensuing consequences accomplished by combined in vitro optical spectroscopy, in silico molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The Sudlow site I of HSA although anion receptive, harbors neutral CBIQD in Sudlow site I (subdomain IIA, close to Trp) of HSA, while in BSA its prefers to snugly fit into Sudlow site II (subdomain IIIA, close to Tyr). Based on discernable diminution of HSA mean fluorescence lifetime as a function of biluminophore concentration, facile occurrence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is substantiated as the probable quenching mechanism accompanied by structural deformations in the protein ensemble. CBIQD establishes itself within HSA close to Trp214, and consequently reduces the micropolarity of the cybotactic environment that is predominantly constituted by hydrophobic amino acid residues. The stronger association of CBIQD with HSA encourages an allosteric modulation leading to slight deformation in its secondary structure whereas for BSA the association is comparatively weaker. Sudlow site I of HSA is capable to embrace a favorable conformation like malleable gold to provide room for incoming CBIQD, whereas for BSA it behaves more like rigid cast-iron which does not admit any change thus forcing CBIQD to occupy an altogether different binding location i.e. the Sudlow site II. The anticancer CBIQD is found to be stable within the HSA scaffold as vindicated by root mean square deviation (RMSD) and root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) obtained by MD simulation. A competitively inhibited esterase-like activity of HSA upon CBIQD binding to Lys199 and Arg257 residues, plausibly

  12. Human-Agent Decision-making: Combining Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Kraus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive work has been conducted both in game theory and logic to model strategic interaction. An important question is whether we can use these theories to design agents for interacting with people? On the one hand, they provide a formal design specification for agent strategies. On the other hand, people do not necessarily adhere to playing in accordance with these strategies, and their behavior is affected by a multitude of social and psychological factors. In this paper we will consider the question of whether strategies implied by theories of strategic behavior can be used by automated agents that interact proficiently with people. We will focus on automated agents that we built that need to interact with people in two negotiation settings: bargaining and deliberation. For bargaining we will study game-theory based equilibrium agents and for argumentation we will discuss logic-based argumentation theory. We will also consider security games and persuasion games and will discuss the benefits of using equilibrium based agents.

  13. Onion: Anti Cancer Sulfur Compounds with High Cancer Chemo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onions are chock full of anti cancer sulfur compounds which are highly beneficial for cancer chemoprevention. Advanced studies have shown that onion may be inhibit liver, colon, prostate, lung cancer etc. with high antioxidant properties which also reduce not only oxidative stress, free radicals but also xenobiotics.

  14. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dong, L. F.; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 199-208 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitocans * Anti-cancer therapeutics * Classification Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.524, year: 2013

  15. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dong, L. F.; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 199-208 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitocans * Anti-cancer therapeutics * Classification Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.524, year: 2013

  16. Screening of Chinese brassica species for anti-cancer sulforaphane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural sulforaphane and erucin have been of increasing interest for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries due to their anti-cancer effect. The sulforaphane and/or erucin contents in seeds of 43 different Chinese Brassica oleracea L. varieties were analyzed by HPLC and GC-MS. Among them, 21 cultivars seed meal ...

  17. Syntheses, characterization, and anti-cancer activities of pyridine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Syntheses, characterization, and anti-cancer activities of pyridine-amide based compounds containing appended phenol or catechol groups. AFSAR ALIa, DEEPAK BANSALa, NAGENDRA K KAUSHIKb, NEHA KAUSHIKb,. EUN HA CHOIb and RAJEEV GUPTAa,∗. aDepartment of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 ...

  18. Screening of Chinese brassica species for anti-cancer sulforaphane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... Natural sulforaphane and erucin have been of increasing interest for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries due to their anti-cancer effect. The sulforaphane and/or erucin contents in seeds of 43 different Chinese Brassica oleracea L. varieties were analyzed by HPLC and GC-MS. Among them, 21.

  19. PG545 enhances anti-cancer activity of chemotherapy in ovarian models and increases surrogate biomarkers such as VEGF in preclinical and clinical plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhoff, Boris; Freyer, Luisa; Hammond, Edward; Giri, Shailendra; Mondal, Susmita; Roy, Debarshi; Teoman, Attila; Mullany, Sally A; Hoffmann, Robert; von Bismarck, Antonia; Chien, Jeremy; Block, Matthew S; Millward, Michael; Bampton, Darryn; Dredge, Keith; Shridhar, Viji

    2015-05-01

    Despite the utility of antiangiogenic drugs in ovarian cancer, efficacy remains limited due to resistance linked to alternate angiogenic pathways and metastasis. Therefore, we investigated PG545, an anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic agent which is currently in Phase I clinical trials, using preclinical models of ovarian cancer. PG545's anti-cancer activity was investigated in vitro and in vivo as a single agent, and in combination with paclitaxel, cisplatin or carboplatin using various ovarian cancer cell lines and tumour models. PG545, alone, or in combination with chemotherapeutics, inhibited proliferation of ovarian cancer cells, demonstrating synergy with paclitaxel in A2780 cells. PG545 inhibited growth factor-mediated cell migration and reduced HB-EGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK, AKT and EGFR in vitro and significantly reduced tumour burden which was enhanced when combined with paclitaxel in an A2780 model or carboplatin in a SKOV-3 model. Moreover, in the immunocompetent ID8 model, PG545 also significantly reduced ascites in vivo. In the A2780 maintenance model, PG545 initiated with, and following paclitaxel and cisplatin treatment, significantly improved overall survival. PG545 increased plasma VEGF levels (and other targets) in preclinical models and in a small cohort of advanced cancer patients which might represent a potential biomarker of response. Our results support clinical testing of PG545, particularly in combination with paclitaxel, as a novel therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Observation and Analysis of Anti-cancer Drug Use and Dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As all anti-cancer drugs are of narrow therapeutic window so dose individualization is required to be done. A study was conducted to check the use of anti-cancer drugs in the local anti-cancer facility of Bahawalpur i.e. Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (BINO). In this study, the dose individualization ...

  1. Circumvention of inherent or acquired cytotoxic drug resistance in vitro using combinations of modulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadagan, David; Merry, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Modulating agents are used to circumvent drug resistance in the clinical setting. However achievable serum concentrations are often lower than those which are optimal in vitro. Combination of modulating agents with non-overlapping toxicities may overcome this obstacle. We have investigated combinations of three modulating agents (quinine, verapamil, and cinnarizine) to circumvent inherent or acquired resistance to the cytotoxic drugs doxorubicin, vincristine and paclitaxel. Dose-response curves to cytotoxic drugs in the presence/absence of modulating agents were determined using colony formation and cell proliferation assays. Doxorubicin accumulation into cell monolayers was measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Greater (1.9-fold) sensitisation to particular cytotoxic drugs was observed for certain combinations of modulating agents compared to individual effects. The most effective combination was quinine-plus-verapamil with the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin. This increase in sensitivity was associated with increased doxorubicin accumulation. Such enhanced activity was, however, not observed for all combinations of modulating agents or for all studied cytotoxic drugs. The findings of the present study suggest certain combinations of modulating agents to have a clinical role in circumventing drug resistance. Particular combinations of modulating agents must be carefully chosen to suit particular cytotoxic drug treatments.

  2. Mitosis as an anti-cancer target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A; Medema, R H

    2011-06-23

    Most of the current drugs used to treat cancer can be classified as anti-proliferative drugs. These drugs perturb the proliferative cycle of tumor cells at diverse stages of the cell cycle. Examples of such drugs are DNA-damaging agents and inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases that arrest cell cycle progression at different stages of interphase. Another class of anti-proliferative drugs is the so-called anti-mitotic drugs, which selectively perturb progression through mitosis. Mitosis is the shortest and final stage in the cell cycle and has evolved to accurately divide the duplicated genome over the two daughter cells. This review deals with the different strategies that are currently considered to perturb mitotic progression in the treatment of cancer.

  3. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer.

  4. In vitro activity of certain antimicrobial agents in combination with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of methicillin-resistant Staphycoccus aureus to acquire resistance to most antibiotics is a worldwide concern that necessitated the study of the antimicrobial activity of the medicinal plant Augouardia lestestii alone and in combination with existing antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined ...

  5. Antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of recurrent or newly diagnosed glioblastoma: Analysis of single-agent and combined modality approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beal, Kathryn; Abrey, Lauren E; Gutin, Philip H

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma can prolong survival, but it is not curative. For patients with disease progression after frontline therapy, there is no standard of care, although further surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy may be used. Antiangiogenic therapies may be appropriate for treating glioblastomas because angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth. In a large, noncomparative phase II trial, bevacizumab was evaluated alone and with irinotecan in patients with recurrent glioblastoma; combination treatment was associated with an estimated 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 50.3%, a median overall survival of 8.9 months, and a response rate of 37.8%. Single-agent bevacizumab also exceeded the predetermined threshold of activity for salvage chemotherapy (6-month PFS rate, 15%), achieving a 6-month PFS rate of 42.6% (p < 0.0001). On the basis of these results and those from another phase II trial, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval of single-agent bevacizumab for the treatment of glioblastoma that has progressed following prior therapy. Potential antiangiogenic agents-such as cilengitide and XL184-also show evidence of single-agent activity in recurrent glioblastoma. Moreover, the use of antiangiogenic agents with radiation at disease progression may improve the therapeutic ratio of single-modality approaches. Overall, these agents appear to be well tolerated, with adverse event profiles similar to those reported in studies of other solid tumors. Further research is needed to determine the role of antiangiogenic therapy in frontline treatment and to identify the optimal schedule and partnering agents for use in combination therapy

  6. Co-culture with NK-92MI cells enhanced the anti-cancer effect of bee venom on NSCLC cells by inactivation of NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; Kim, Jung Hyun; Won, Dohee; Lee, Sang Min; Sung, Ha Chang; Chang, Hyun Sok; Lee, Kang Tae; Lee, Kang Sik; Park, Mi Hee; Song, Min Jong; Song, Ho Sueb; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-03-01

    In the present study we experimented on a multimodal therapeutic approach, such as combining chemotherapy agent (Bee venom) with cellular (NK-92MI) immunotherapy. Previously bee venom has been found to show anti-cancer effect in various cancer cell lines. In lung cancer cells bee venom showed an IC(50) value of 3 μg/ml in both cell lines. The co-culture of NK-92MI cell lines with lung cancer cells also show a decrease in viability upto 50 % at 48 h time point. Hence we used bee venom treated NK-92MI cells to co-culture with NSCLC cells and found that there is a further decrease in cell viability upto 70 and 75 % in A549 and NCI-H460 cell lines respectively. We further investigated the expression of various apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins and found that Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and -8 were increasing where as Bcl-2 and cIAP-2 was decreasing. The expression of various death receptor proteins like DR3, DR6 and Fas was also increasing. Concomitantly the expression of various death receptor ligands (TNFalpha, Apo3L and FasL) was also increasing of NK-92MI cells after co-culture. Further the DNA binding activity and luciferase activity of NF-κB was also inhibited after co-culture with bee venom treated NK-92MI cell lines. The knock down of death receptors with si-RNA has reversed the decrease in cell viability and NF-κB activity after co-culture with bee venom treated NK-92MI cells. Thus this new approach can enhance the anti-cancer effect of bee venom at a much lower concentration.

  7. New anti-cancer characteristics of jatrophane diterpenes from Euphorbia dendroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešić, Milica; Banković, Jasna; Aljančić, Ivana S; Todorović, Nina M; Jadranin, Milka; Vajs, Vlatka E; Tešević, Vele V; Vučković, Ivan; Momčilović, Miljana; Marković, Ivanka D; Tanić, Nikola; Ruždijić, Sabera

    2011-12-01

    Jatrophane diterpenes were shown to be inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). There are also evidences on their microtubule-interacting activity in cancer cells. We evaluated new anti-cancer characteristics of two jatrophane type compounds from Euphorbia dendroides. For that purpose, the model system of sensitive non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460) and its resistant counterpart (NCI-H460/R) was used. Although both jatrophanes showed inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth, they were non-toxic for peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We examined their effects in combination with paclitaxel (PTX), a well-known mitotic spindle interacting chemotherapeutic. Jatrophanes overcome PTX resistance in concentration-dependent manner in MDR cancer cell line (NCI-H460/R). We observed that this synergistic effect is not caused merely by P-gp inhibition. In combination with PTX, jatrophanes induce cell killing and change cell cycle distribution leading to G2/M arrest. Furthermore, they exert an anti-angiogenic effect by decreasing the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. The reduction of the level of mdr1 mRNA expression in sensitive cells, suggests that these compounds could not contribute to the development of resistance. In conclusion, present study provides a rational basis for the new cancer treatment approach with jatrophanes that are non-toxic to normal cells and have new favorable anti-cancer characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular targets and anti-cancer potential of escin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Dorothy H J; Arfuso, Frank; Sethi, Gautam; Wang, Lingzhi; Hui, Kam Man; Kumar, Alan Prem; Tran, Thai

    2018-02-21

    Escin is a mixture of triterpenoid saponins extracted from the horse chestnut tree, Aesculus hippocastanum. Its potent anti-inflammatory and anti-odematous properties makes it a choice of therapy against chronic venous insufficiency and odema. More recently, escin is being actively investigated for its potential activity against diverse cancers. It exhibits anti-cancer effects in many cancer cell models including lung adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and leukemia. Escin also attenuates tumor growth and metastases in various in vivo models. Importantly, escin augments the effects of existing chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby supporting the role of escin as an adjunct or alternative anti-cancer therapy. The beneficial effects of escin can be attributed to its inhibition of proliferation and induction of cell cycle arrest. By regulating transcription factors/growth factors mediated oncogenic pathways, escin also potentially mitigates chronic inflammatory processes that are linked to cancer survival and resistance. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of escin and its potential as an anti-cancer therapy through its anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Synergistic combination therapy of antitumor agents, membrane modification agents and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarai, Jiro; Itagaki, Takatomo; Akutsu, Thoru; Yamaguchi, Kouichi; Kato, Isao

    1983-01-01

    Larygeal cancer were treated with synergistic combination therapy of Futraful in suppository, vitamin A, cepharanthin and irradiation from April 1981 to June 1982. This combination therapy resulted in high percentage of the tumor regression in the case of the invading laryngeal cancer and negligible complication. (author)

  10. A comprehensive review on the anti-cancer properties and mechanisms of action of sesamin, a lignan in sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Massri, Mariam; Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2017-11-15

    Sesamin is the major active ingredient is Sesamum indicum seeds. Several studies revealed that sesamin possesses potent anti-cancer properties. The anti-cancer effects of sesamin have been mainly attributed to its anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-metastatic, anti- and pro-angiogenic, and pro-autophagocytic activities. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the reported anti-cancer effects of sesamin, both in vitro and in vivo. Experimental findings related to the potential of sesamin to attenuate oxidative stress, inflammation, proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis in various cancer cells and tumors are analyzed. Studies focusing on the ability of sesamin to induce apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells are also underscored. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of sesamin are highlighted, and the major signaling pathways targeted by sesamin are identified. Although the exact signaling events triggered by sesamin in cancer cells are not fully revealed, our analysis indicates that NF-κB, STAT3, JNK, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, PI3K/AKT, caspase-3, and p53 signaling pathways are critically involved in mediating the anti-cancer effects of sesamin. In sum, the experimental evidence suggesting that sesamin could exert potent anti-cancer activities in vitro and in vivo is compelling. Hence, sesamin can potentially be employed as an effective adjuvant therapeutic agent in ameliorating tumor development and progression, and therefore, it could be used in the prevention and/or treatment of various types of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-cancer effects of Piper nigrum via inducing multiple molecular signaling in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Sriwiriyajan, Somchai; Tedasen, Aman; Hiransai, Poonsit; Graidist, Potchanapond

    2016-07-21

    Piper nigrum is widely used as a folk medicine including usage for pain relief, fevers, as well as an anti-cancer agent. However the crude extract of piperine free P. nigrum (PFPE), which inhibits breast cancer, and its mechanisms are still being kept secret. This research aims to elucidate the anti-cancer effects of PFPE and its mechanisms. Anti-cancer effects of PFPE were investigated in N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU)-induced mammary tumorigenesis rats and breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and ZR-75-1. Furthermore, the cancer prevention effects of PFPE were investigated in rats. Western blotting was employed to study protein levels induced by PFPE. PFPE was found to up-regulate p53, and down-regulate estrogen receptor (ER), E-cadherin (E-cad), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), c-Myc, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in breast cancer rats. Moreover, PFPE decreased protein levels of E-cad, c-Myc, and VEGF in MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that PFPE can enhance breast cancer cell response to phytochemicals, then induce cell cycle arrest, and inhibit cancer cell proliferation resulting in tumor size decrease in the PFPE treated group. It further suggests that PFPE may suppress tumor cell invasion, migration, and angiogenesis. In addition, PFPE possessed cancer prevention effects through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to higher cancer cell cellular stress. PFPE may possess anti-cancer and cancer prevention effects; hence, it deserves further investigation as a novel candidate for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore as a selective target for anti-cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hoon eSuh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP is the ultimate step in dozens of lethal apoptotic signal transduction pathways which converge on mitochondria. One of the representative systems proposed to be responsible for the MOMP is the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP. Although the molecular composition of the MPTP is not clearly understood, the MPTP attracts much interest as a promising target for resolving two conundrums regarding cancer treatment: tumor selectivity and resistance to treatment. The regulation of the MPTP is closely related to metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells including mitochondrial alterations. Restoration of deregulated apoptotic machinery in cancer cells by tumor-specific modulation of the MPTP could therefore be a promising anti-cancer strategy. Currently, a number of MPTP-targeting agents are under pre-clinical and clinical studies. Here, we reviewed the structure and regulation of the MPTP as well as the current status of the development of promising MPTP-targeting drugs.

  13. The combination of sodium perborate and water as intracoronal teeth bleaching agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Tantri Budi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The color change on post-endodontic treated teeth can be overcome by intracoronal tooth bleaching using walking bleach. Some agents used in walking bleach are combination of sodium peroxide and hydrogen peroxide, and combination of sodium perborate and water. Purpose: The objective of this review is to provide information and consideration of using safe and effective bleaching agents in the field of dentistry. Reviews: On one side, the use of sodium perborate and water combination does not cause the reduction of dentin hardness, enamel decay, and root resorbtion. On the other side, the use of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide combination indicates that it takes longer time in yielding the proper color of teeth. Conclusion: The use of sodium perborate and water combination as bleaching agents is effective and safe.

  14. Survivin knockdown increased anti-cancer effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Motarab [Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States); Banik, Naren L. [Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Ray, Swapan K., E-mail: swapan.ray@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2012-08-01

    network formation ability of cells was significantly inhibited by survivin silencing and completely by combination of survivin silencing and EGCG treatment. Collectively, survivin silencing potentiated anti-cancer effects of EGCG in human malignant neuroblastoma cells having survivin overexpression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG controlled growth of human malignant neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin knockdown induced neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG induced morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination therapy inhibited invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis as well. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer So, combination therapy showed multiple anti-cancer mechanisms in neuroblastoma.

  15. Use of combination of leflunomide with biological agents in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalden, J.R.; Antoni, C.; Alvaro-Gracia, J.M.; Combe, B.; Emery, P.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Strand, C.V.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Smolen, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    An Expert Panel Meeting was held in May 2004 to assess experience with combination therapy with leflunomide and biological agents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to identify both optimal use of such combinations and precautions for use. Eleven published prospective or retrospective

  16. Black cumin seeds show promising anti-cancer effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is responsible for millions of death worldwide each year and it is the second most common cancer in both men and women. According to the American Cancer Society, lung cancer is responsible for about 1 in 4 cancer deaths and 14% of all new cases. More and more people require treatment, but due to the side effects and complications of modern drugs, there has been a growing interest in naturally occurring compounds with anti-cancer potential. Black cumin seed is one of the most promising and extensively studied plants which could provide support in considering this compound as an emerging drug.

  17. [A smear method for measuring anti-cancer drugs residues in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Takumi; Suzuki, Shigeru; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Saito, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer drugs are harmful to healthy persons. In recent years, occupational exposure to anti-cancer drugs has become a major concern to health care workers. To address this issue, a smear method was developed to measure widely using anti-cancer drugs depositing on the floors, safety cabinet surfaces, and tables in hospital. Ten kinds of widely used anti-cancer drugs, paclitaxel, vincristine, docetaxel, vinorelbine, irinotecan, methotrexate, oxaliplatin, cyclophosphamide, gemcitabine and fluorouracil were collected by smearing material surfaces with methanol impregnated cellulose filter paper and/or polypropylene nonwoven. The collected anti-cancer drugs are extracted in 5 ml of 0.01% (v/v) hydrazine/methanol solution by sonication. The extracted solution was filtered and concentrated to prepare 1ml of sample solution. Then, the anti-cancer drugs in the sample solution were simultaneously measured by LC/MS. The anti-cancer drugs excepting fluorouracil spread on P-tile surface were measured with recoveries of 37-101% and standard deviations (SD) of 1.8-19%. All 10 of the anti-cancer drugs on a stainless steel plate surface were measured with the recoveries of 35-111% and SD of 1.3-11%. Using this smear method, 9 or 10 kinds of widely used anti-cancer drug residues in hospital, possibly exposed to health care workers, were grasped.

  18. Metformin and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics: Hopes for a More Enhanced Armamentarium Against Human Neoplasias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Maria-Ioanna; Scorilas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Metformin, a natural product from Galega officinalis, is an oral drug, now in the forefront of the therapeutic management of type-2 diabetes mellitus. A series of clinical observations of the last decades, support that metformin may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer development in diabetic patients, and also to improvement of response-to-therapy and survival in individuals with certain types of malignancies. Moreover, several preclinical in vitro and in vivo data indicate that metformin indeed exerts anti-proliferative capacities upon tumor cells mediated through a variety of mechanisms. Interestingly, metformin has been shown to act in synergy with certain anti-cancer agents and also to overcome chemo- and/or radio-resistance of various types of tumors, providing a hopeful rationale for novel therapeutic strategies against cancer development and progression. However, this remains an issue of controversy, since significant contradictions exist among the available data. Limitations of preclinical studies and caveats of epidemiological works, together with significant variances among the several types of cancer and the fact that the mode of metformin's action is largely unknown, make longitudinal surveys urgently needed. Now, a plethora of large clinical trials are active worldwide, aiming at determining the effect of metformin in the prevention or prognosis of a variety of human cancers. If encouraging results arise, metformin will be an attractive candidate adjuvant in the management of human neoplasias, due to its safety, tolerability and low-cost, expected to mitigate adverse effects and no-response parameters of current anti-cancer therapeutics, thus improving the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Synergistic combinations of antifungals and antivirulence agents to fight against Candida albicans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Jinhui; Ren, Biao; Tong, Yaojun

    2015-01-01

    -drug resistance, demand innovative strategies for new effective antifungal drugs. Synergistic combinations of antifungals and anti-virulence agents highlight the pragmatic strategy to reduce the development of drug resistant and potentially repurpose known antifungals, which bypass the costly and time......-consuming pipeline of new drug development. Anti-virulence and synergistic combination provide new options for antifungal drug discovery by counteracting the difficulty or failure of traditional therapy for fungal infections....

  20. Novel Colchicine Derivatives and their Anti-cancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lorelei; Goping, Ing Swie; Rieger, Aja; Mane, Jonathan Y; Huzil, Torin; Banerjee, Asok; Luduena, Richard; Hassani, Bashar; Winter, Philip; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we provide an overview of the status of various colchicine derivatives in preclinical development with special focus on their anti-cancer activity. We discuss several groups of compounds that have been designed to differentially bind with specific affinities for tubulin β isotypes, especially in regard to βIII, which is commonly over-expressed in cancer. Computational prediction, protein-based and cell-based assays are summarized as well as some animal tests conducted on these compounds. It is concluded that an untapped potential exists for exploiting the colchicine scaffold as a pharmacophore with the possibility of increasing its affinity for tubulin isotypes overexpressed in cancer and decreasing it for normal cells thereby widening the therapeutic window. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Utilization and Expenditure of Anti-cancer Medicines in Kosovo: Findings and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakupi, Arianit; Godman, Brian; Martin, Antony; Haycox, Alan; Baholli, Indrit

    2018-02-02

    The Ministry of Health (MoH) leads and organizes health policy in Kosovo, which includes procurement and provision of medicines, including anti-cancer medicines, which compose a special group of medicines. However, there has been limited analysis of the utilization and expenditure on anti-cancer medicines in Kosovo; consequently, the objective of this study is to undertake research to provide future guidance on the use of anti-cancer medicines. National drug utilization data is available in Kosovo. Utilization and expenditure on anti-cancer medicines [Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) code L], initially from 2011 to 2013, especially for anti-cancer medicines on the essential medicines list was analysed from national data. In addition, current systems for procuring and managing anti-cancer medicines in Kosovo was documented. There was appreciable variability in the utilization of anti-cancer medicines over the years, with low or limited use of some anti-cancer medicines on the Essential Medicine List. This is a concern in view of their essential medicine status. From 2011 to 2013, €16.49 million was spent on anti-cancer medicines (ATC L). The process of selection of new medicines begins with suggestions from doctors at the University Clinical Centre in Kosovo. The analysis has shown appreciable variation with current utilization patterns for anti-cancer medicines in Kosovo. This needs to be addressed as part of improving the drug management process to optimize patient care within available resources. Future years and reforms need to be assessed to improve current utilization and expenditure patterns.

  2. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joyce T. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Deng, Jie [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  3. Combination Therapy of Oral Hypoglycemic Agents in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyong Moon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Korean Diabetes Association (KDA recently updated the Clinical Practice Guidelines on antihyperglycemic agent therapy for adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. In combination therapy of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs, general recommendations were not changed from those of the 2015 KDA guidelines. The Committee on Clinical Practice Guidelines of the KDA has extensively reviewed and discussed the results of meta-analyses and systematic reviews of effectiveness and safety of OHAs and many clinical trials on Korean patients with T2DM for the update of guidelines. All OHAs were effective when added to metformin or metformin and sulfonylurea, although the effects of each agent on body weight and hypoglycemia were different. Therefore, selection of a second agent as a metformin add-on therapy or third agent as a metformin and sulfonylurea add-on therapy should be based on the patient's clinical characteristics and the efficacy, side effects, mechanism of action, risk of hypoglycemia, effect on body weight, patient preference, and combined comorbidity. In this review, we address the results of meta-analyses and systematic reviews, comparing the effectiveness and safety among OHAs. It will help to choose the appropriate drug for an individual patient with T2DM.

  4. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Effects of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Conventional Antimicrobial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie de Rapper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the in vitro antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (lavender essential oil in combination with four commercial antimicrobial agents. Stock solutions of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nystatin, and fusidic acid were tested in combination with L. angustifolia essential oil. The antimicrobial activities of the combinations were investigated against the Gram-positive bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27858 and Candida albicans (ATCC 10231 was selected to represent the yeasts. The antimicrobial effect was performed using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC microdilution assay. Isobolograms were constructed for varying ratios. The most prominent interaction was noted when L. angustifolia essential oil was combined with chloramphenicol and tested against the pathogen P. aeruginosa (ΣFIC of 0.29. Lavendula angustifolia essential oil was shown in most cases to interact synergistically with conventional antimicrobials when combined in ratios where higher volumes of L. angustifolia essential oil were incorporated into the combination.

  5. A combination of biocontrol agents improves the management of dry root rot (Macrophomina phaseolina in greengram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thilagavathi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The biocontrol agents Trichoderma viride (strains Tv1 and Tv13, Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf1 and Py15 and Bacillus subtilis (Bs16 were tested individually and in combination for their effectiveness against root rot of greengram caused by Macrophomina phaseolina. As regards the compatibility of the biocontrol agents with each other, T. viride strains were not compatible with B. subtilis (Bs16, but P. fluorescens strains were compatible with B. subtilis and T. viride. Of the biocontrol agents tested in vitro against M. phaseolina, combinations of P. fluorescens+T. viride (Pf1+Tv1, Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1 inhibited mycelial growth of the pathogen and they also promoted the growth of the greengram seedlings. A combination of Pf1+Tv1 was most effective in reducing root rot incidence under glass-house and field conditions as compared with other single or combined treatments or the untreated control. The activity of the defense-related enzymes peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and phenyl alanine ammonia lyase was significantly greater in greengram plants treated with a talc based formulation containing Pf1+Tv1 followed by Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1, than in plants receiving other treatments or the untreated control. Moreover, a combination of Pf1+Tv1 followed by Pf1+Tv13 and Py15+Tv1 significantly increased yield under glass house and field conditions.

  6. Feasibility of using lower doses of chemopreventive agents in a combination regimen for cancer protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, C

    1988-04-01

    In experimental cancer chemoprevention studies, the doses of the agent used to produce an inhibitory response are generally very high, sometimes bordering on levels that will result in toxicity to the test animals. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of two or more agents may be just as effective as high doses of a single agent. An earlier report from our laboratory showed that vitamin E, although ineffective by itself, potentiates the anti-carcinogenic potency of selenite. Our objective was to complete a comprehensive set of dose titration experiments in the quantitative analysis of the synergism between selenium (Se) and vitamin E. Results indicated that the minimal amount of vitamin E required was around 500 ppm, which when combined with as little as 1 ppm Se, produced a significant protective effect in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumor model. This level of Se is 5 times below the marginal toxicity level of 5 ppm observed in our previous experience. With a 3-agent combination protocol involving Se (1 ppm), vitamin E (500 ppm) and vitamin A (66 ppm), it was found that vitamin A at this particular dose did not contribute any further chemoprevention than that provided by the Se/vitamin E duo. Both Se and vitamin E were present at a concentration 10 times, while vitamin A was present at 30 times their respective nutritional requirement. Our findings thus suggest that the minimum effective dose has to be systematically established for each micronutrient, and that it is feasible to use lower doses of a combination of agents if the threshold level of each agent can be determined under a prescribed set of conditions.

  7. Combined effect of environmental radiation and other agents: Is there a synergism trap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornhardt, S.; Jung, T.; Burkart, W.

    2002-01-01

    Most assessments of possible deleterious outcomes from environmental and occupational exposures concentrate on single agents and neglect the potential for combined effects, i.e. synergisms or antagonisms. Biomechanistic considerations based on multistep processes such as carcinogenesis indicate the potential for highly detrimental interactions, if two or more consecutive rate limiting steps are specifically effected by different agents. However, low specificity towards molecular structure or DNA-sequence - and therefore exchangeability - of many genotoxic agents indicate little functional specificity and therefore little vulnerability towards synergism at most occupational and environmental exposure situations. The low potential for significant combined effects for those common low exposure situations where non-genotoxic agents with highly non-linear dose effect relationships and apparent thresholds are involved, is also evident. Nevertheless, a quantitative assessment of the contribution of synergistic interactions to the total detriment from natural and man-made toxicants based on experimental data is far away. The existing database on combined effects is rudimentary, mainly descriptive and rarely covers exposure ranges large enough to make direct inferences to present day low dose exposure situations. In view of the multitude of possible interactions between the large number of potentially harmful agents in the human environment, descriptive approaches will have to be supplemented by the use of mechanistic models for critical health endpoints such as cancer. Finally an important question considering the shape of dose effect relationships for ionizing radiation arises from the unresolved question whether real or apparent thresholds may be used for any genotoxic agent separately or only one time for an exposed genome. (author)

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Intra Urban Growth Modeling using socio economic agents by combining cellular automata model with agent based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, V. K.; Jha, A. K.; Gupta, K.; Srivastav, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that there is a significant improvement in the urban land use dynamics through modeling at finer spatial resolutions. Geo-computational models such as cellular automata and agent based model have given evident proof regarding the quantification of the urban growth pattern with urban boundary. In recent studies, socio- economic factors such as demography, education rate, household density, parcel price of the current year, distance to road, school, hospital, commercial centers and police station are considered to the major factors influencing the Land Use Land Cover (LULC) pattern of the city. These factors have unidirectional approach to land use pattern which makes it difficult to analyze the spatial aspects of model results both quantitatively and qualitatively. In this study, cellular automata model is combined with generic model known as Agent Based Model to evaluate the impact of socio economic factors on land use pattern. For this purpose, Dehradun an Indian city is selected as a case study. Socio economic factors were collected from field survey, Census of India, Directorate of economic census, Uttarakhand, India. A 3X3 simulating window is used to consider the impact on LULC. Cellular automata model results are examined for the identification of hot spot areas within the urban area and agent based model will be using logistic based regression approach where it will identify the correlation between each factor on LULC and classify the available area into low density, medium density, high density residential or commercial area. In the modeling phase, transition rule, neighborhood effect, cell change factors are used to improve the representation of built-up classes. Significant improvement is observed in the built-up classes from 84 % to 89 %. However after incorporating agent based model with cellular automata model the accuracy improved from 89 % to 94 % in 3 classes of urban i.e. low density, medium density and commercial classes

  9. Ceramic core with polymer corona hybrid nanocarrier for the treatment of osteosarcoma with co-delivery of protein and anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Prasad, S.; Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Jayakrishnan, A.

    2018-01-01

    For the treatment of metastatic bone cancer, local delivery of therapeutic agents is preferred compared to systemic administration. Delivery of an anti-cancer drug and a protein that helps in bone regeneration simultaneously is a challenging approach. In this study, a nanoparticulate carrier which delivers a protein and an anti-cancer drug is reported. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein was loaded into hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles (NPs) and methotrexate (MTX) conjugated to poly(vinyl alcohol) was coated onto BSA-loaded HA NPs. Coating efficiency was in the range of 10–17 wt%. In vitro drug release showed that there was a steady increase in the release of both BSA and MTX with 76% of BSA and 88% of MTX being released in 13 days. Cytotoxicity studies of the NPs performed using human osteosarcoma (OMG-63) cell line showed the NPs were highly biocompatible and exhibited anti-proliferative activity in a concentration-dependent manner.

  10. Coping with antibiotic resistance: combining nanoparticles with antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kon, Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    The worldwide escalation of bacterial resistance to conventional medical antibiotics is a serious concern for modern medicine. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria among bacteria-based infections decreases effectiveness of current treatments and causes thousands of deaths. New improvements in present methods and novel strategies are urgently needed to cope with this problem. Owing to their antibacterial activities, metallic nanoparticles represent an effective solution for overcoming bacterial resistance. However, metallic nanoparticles are toxic, which causes restrictions in their use. Recent studies have shown that combining nanoparticles with antibiotics not only reduces the toxicity of both agents towards human cells by decreasing the requirement for high dosages but also enhances their bactericidal properties. Combining antibiotics with nanoparticles also restores their ability to destroy bacteria that have acquired resistance to them. Furthermore, nanoparticles tagged with antibiotics have been shown to increase the concentration of antibiotics at the site of bacterium-antibiotic interaction, and to facilitate binding of antibiotics to bacteria. Likewise, combining nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides and essential oils generates genuine synergy against bacterial resistance. In this article, we aim to summarize recent studies on interactions between nanoparticles and antibiotics, as well as other antibacterial agents to formulate new prospects for future studies. Based on the promising data that demonstrated the synergistic effects of antimicrobial agents with nanoparticles, we believe that this combination is a potential candidate for more research into treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  11. Anti-cancer potential of a mix of natural extracts of turmeric, ginger and garlic: A cell-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar Vemuri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer related morbidity and mortality is a major health care concern. Developing potent anti-cancer therapies which are non-toxic, sustainable and affordable is of alternative medicine. This study was designed to investigate the aqueous natural extracts mixture (NE mix prepared from common spices turmeric, ginger and garlic for its free radical scavenging potential and anti-cancer property against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, ZR-75 and MDA-MB 231. Qualitative analysis of their bioactive constituents from turmeric, ginger and garlic were done using liquid chromatography-ESI- mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS. To the best of our knowledge, NE mix with and without Tamoxifen has not been tested for its anti-cancer potential. We observed that the NE mix induced apoptosis in all the breast cancer cell lines, but it was more prominent in MCF-7 and ZR-75 cell lines in comparison to MDA-MB 231 cell line. The extent of apoptosis due to combined treatment with NE mix-Tamoxifen was higher than Tamoxifen alone, indicating a potential role of the NE mix in sensitizing the ER-positive breast cancer cells towards Tamoxifen. In support to MTT assay, cell cycle analysis, our RT-PCR results also prove that the NE mix 10 μg, Tam 20 μg and combination of NE mix 10 μg-Tam 20 μg altered the expression of apoptotic markers (p53 and Caspase 9 leading to apoptosis in all three cell lines. Our data strongly indicate that our NE mixture is a potential alternative therapeutic approach in certain types of cancer. Keywords: Breast cancer, Antagonists, Natural extracts, Tamoxifen, Turmeric, Ginger, Garlic, LC-ESI-MS/MS

  12. Modern dose-finding designs for cancer phase I trials drug combinations and molecularly targeted agents

    CERN Document Server

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Daimon, Takashi; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2018-01-01

    This book deals with advanced methods for adaptive phase I dose-finding clinical trials for combination of two agents and molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) in oncology. It provides not only methodological aspects of the dose-finding methods, but also software implementations and practical considerations in applying these complex methods to real cancer clinical trials. Thus, the book aims to furnish researchers in biostatistics and statistical science with a good summary of recent developments of adaptive dose-finding methods as well as providing practitioners in biostatistics and clinical investigators with advanced materials for designing, conducting, monitoring, and analyzing adaptive dose-finding trials. The topics in the book are mainly related to cancer clinical trials, but many of those topics are potentially applicable or can be extended to trials for other diseases. The focus is mainly on model-based dose-finding methods for two kinds of phase I trials. One is clinical trials with combinations of tw...

  13. Facile synthesis of 2-D Cu doped WO3 nanoplates with structural, optical and differential anti cancer characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Iqbal, Javed; Gul, Asma; Ahmed, Waqqar; Ismail, M.

    2017-04-01

    Simple chemical co-precipitation method has been employed to synthesize two dimensional copper (Cu) doped tungsten oxide (WO3) nanoplates. A numbers of characterization techniques have been used to investigate their structural, optical and biocompatible anti cancer properties. The XRD results have confirmed the monoclinic crystal structure of WO3 nanoplates, and also successful doping of Cu ions into the WO3 crystal lattice. The presence of functional groups and chemical bonding have been verified through FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM images demonstrate that both undoped and Cu doped WO3 samples have squares plate like morphology. The EDX spectra confirm the presence of Cu, W and O ions. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) analysis has revealed a substantial red-shift in the absorption edge and a decrease in the band gap energy of nanoplates with Cu doping. Photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to study the presence of defects like oxygen vacancies. Furthermore, the differential cytotoxic properties of Cu doped WO3 samples have been evaluated against human breast (MCF-7) and liver (Hep-2) cancer cells with ectocervical epithelial (HECE) healthy cells. The present findings confirm that the Cu doped WO3 nanoplates can be used as an efficient biocompatible anti cancer agent.

  14. Annotating Cancer Variants and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics in Reactome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milacic, Marija; Haw, Robin, E-mail: robin.haw@oicr.on.ca; Rothfels, Karen; Wu, Guanming [Informatics and Bio-computing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON, M5G0A3 (Canada); Croft, David; Hermjakob, Henning [European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); D’Eustachio, Peter [Department of Biochemistry, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Stein, Lincoln [Informatics and Bio-computing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON, M5G0A3 (Canada)

    2012-11-08

    Reactome describes biological pathways as chemical reactions that closely mirror the actual physical interactions that occur in the cell. Recent extensions of our data model accommodate the annotation of cancer and other disease processes. First, we have extended our class of protein modifications to accommodate annotation of changes in amino acid sequence and the formation of fusion proteins to describe the proteins involved in disease processes. Second, we have added a disease attribute to reaction, pathway, and physical entity classes that uses disease ontology terms. To support the graphical representation of “cancer” pathways, we have adapted our Pathway Browser to display disease variants and events in a way that allows comparison with the wild type pathway, and shows connections between perturbations in cancer and other biological pathways. The curation of pathways associated with cancer, coupled with our efforts to create other disease-specific pathways, will interoperate with our existing pathway and network analysis tools. Using the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as an example, we show how Reactome annotates and presents the altered biological behavior of EGFR variants due to their altered kinase and ligand-binding properties, and the mode of action and specificity of anti-cancer therapeutics.

  15. Annotating cancer variants and anti-cancer therapeutics in reactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milacic, Marija; Haw, Robin; Rothfels, Karen; Wu, Guanming; Croft, David; Hermjakob, Henning; D'Eustachio, Peter; Stein, Lincoln

    2012-11-08

    Reactome describes biological pathways as chemical reactions that closely mirror the actual physical interactions that occur in the cell. Recent extensions of our data model accommodate the annotation of cancer and other disease processes. First, we have extended our class of protein modifications to accommodate annotation of changes in amino acid sequence and the formation of fusion proteins to describe the proteins involved in disease processes. Second, we have added a disease attribute to reaction, pathway, and physical entity classes that uses disease ontology terms. To support the graphical representation of "cancer" pathways, we have adapted our Pathway Browser to display disease variants and events in a way that allows comparison with the wild type pathway, and shows connections between perturbations in cancer and other biological pathways. The curation of pathways associated with cancer, coupled with our efforts to create other disease-specific pathways, will interoperate with our existing pathway and network analysis tools. Using the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as an example, we show how Reactome annotates and presents the altered biological behavior of EGFR variants due to their altered kinase and ligand-binding properties, and the mode of action and specificity of anti-cancer therapeutics.

  16. Annotating Cancer Variants and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics in Reactome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milacic, Marija; Haw, Robin; Rothfels, Karen; Wu, Guanming; Croft, David; Hermjakob, Henning; D’Eustachio, Peter; Stein, Lincoln

    2012-01-01

    Reactome describes biological pathways as chemical reactions that closely mirror the actual physical interactions that occur in the cell. Recent extensions of our data model accommodate the annotation of cancer and other disease processes. First, we have extended our class of protein modifications to accommodate annotation of changes in amino acid sequence and the formation of fusion proteins to describe the proteins involved in disease processes. Second, we have added a disease attribute to reaction, pathway, and physical entity classes that uses disease ontology terms. To support the graphical representation of “cancer” pathways, we have adapted our Pathway Browser to display disease variants and events in a way that allows comparison with the wild type pathway, and shows connections between perturbations in cancer and other biological pathways. The curation of pathways associated with cancer, coupled with our efforts to create other disease-specific pathways, will interoperate with our existing pathway and network analysis tools. Using the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as an example, we show how Reactome annotates and presents the altered biological behavior of EGFR variants due to their altered kinase and ligand-binding properties, and the mode of action and specificity of anti-cancer therapeutics

  17. The anti-cancer property of proteins extracted from Gynura procumbens (Lour. Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaw-Sen Hew

    Full Text Available Gynura procumbens (Lour. Merr. belongs to the Asteraceae Family. The plant is a well-known traditional herb in South East Asia and it is widely used to treat inflammation, kidney discomfort, high cholesterol level, diabetic, cancer and high blood pressure. Our earlier study showed the presence of valuable plant defense proteins, such as peroxidase, thaumatin-like proteins and miraculin in the leaf of G. procumbens. However, the effects of these defense proteins on cancers have never been determined previously. In the present study, we investigated the bioactivity of gel filtration fractionated proteins of G. procumbens leaf extract. The active protein fraction, SN-F11/12, was found to inhibit the growth of a breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, at an EC50 value of 3.8 µg/mL. The mRNA expressions of proliferation markers, Ki67 and PCNA, were reduced significantly in the MDA-MB-23 cells treated with SN-F11/12. The expression of invasion marker, CCL2, was also found reduced in the treated MDA-MB-231 cells. All these findings highlight the anti-cancer property of SN-F11/12, therefore, the proteins in this fraction can be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment.

  18. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin–graphene oxide conjugates: Carriers for anti-cancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jingting; Meng, Na; Fan, Yunting; Su, Yutian; Zhang, Ming [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xiao, Yinghong, E-mail: yhxiao@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhou, Ninglin, E-mail: zhouninglin@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Nanjing Zhou Ninglin Advanced Materials Technology Company Limited, Nanjing 211505 (China)

    2016-04-01

    A novel drug carrier based on hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed to incorporate anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX). The formulated nanomedicines were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results showed that PTX can be incorporated into GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres successfully, with an average diameter of about 100 nm. The solubility and stability of PTX-loaded GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres in aqueous media were greatly enhanced compared with the untreated PTX. The results of hemolysis test demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanospheres were qualified with good blood compatibility for intravenous use. In vitro anti-tumor activity was measured and results demonstrated that the incorporation of PTX into the newly developed GO-COO-HP-β-CD carrier could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity to the nanosystem against tumor cells than single application of PTX. GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres may represent a promising formulation platform for a broad range of therapeutic agent, especially those with poor solubility. - Highlights: • Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed as a drug carrier. • The prepared PTX-loaded nanospheres can be dispersed in aqueous medium stably. • The GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres are safe for blood-contact applications. • This newly developed PTX-delivery system could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells.

  19. Synthesis and anti-cancer activities of new sulfonamides 4-substituted-triazolyl nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui, Soukaina; Dufies, Maeva; Driowya, Mohsine; Demange, Luc; Bougrin, Khalid; Robert, Guillaume; Auberger, Patrick; Pagès, Gilles; Benhida, Rachid

    2017-05-01

    Nucleoside analogues are among the most known drugs commonly used in antiviral and anticancer chemotherapies. Among them, those featuring a five-membered ring nucleobase are of utmost interest such as the anti-cancer agent AICAR or the anti-viral drug ribavirin. Despite its low activity in vitro in different cell lines, AICAR is under clinical development for several pathologies, thanks to its original mode of action. Indeed, AICAR induced autophagy cell death and is able, following this mechanism, to circumvent resistance to apoptotic drugs including kinase inhibitors currently on the market. To improve the activity of AICAR, we report herein an efficient synthesis of new series of sulfonamide-4-substituted-1,2,3-triazolyl nucleosides using a Cu-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. All these molecules have been fully characterized and evaluated against two aggressive tumor cell lines, RCC4 and MDA-MB-231. Among them, nucleoside analogue 5i belonging to the ribose series was found to be 19 to 66-fold more active than AICAR. Western blot analyses on RCC4 cells showed that 5i displayed an interesting mode of action by inducing both apoptosis and autophagy cell death, making therefore this class of molecules highly promising for further hit-to-lead optimization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Phytochemicals - A Novel and Prominent Source of Anti-cancer Drugs Against Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevappa, Ravikiran; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a malignant disease whose incidence and mortality rates are greatly influenced by environmental factors. Under-treatment of CRC such as a poor diagnostic evaluation, less aggressive surgery, less intensive chemotherapy results in metastasizing of the primary tumor cells and recurrence of cancer. Prolonged chemotherapy treatment against cancer is hazardous to the patients, which also limits its use in cancer therapy. Current research in developing a novel anti-cancer agent, direct towards finding a better antimetastatic and an anti-invasive drug with reduced side effects. In this direction, plant derived chemical compounds or phytochemical act as a prominent source of new compounds for drug development. Phytochemicals have a multi-action and a multi-target capacity, and has gained attention among the research communities from last two decades. Epidemiological study shows a direct relationship between a diet and CRC development. A diet rich in plant based products such as vegetables, fruits and cereals is known to prevent CRC development. This review is an effort to explore more about the potential phytochemicals in CRC prevention and also in CRC treatment. Here, we have discussed few phytochemicals actively used in CRC research and are in clinical trials against CRC. We have explored more on some of these phytochemicals which can act as a source for new drug or can act as a lead compound for further modifications during the drug development against cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Chi H.J. Kao; Amalini C. Jesuthasan; Karen S. Bishop; Marcus P. Glucina; Lynnette R. Ferguson

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides bei...

  2. Anti-cancer and anti-hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase activity of etodolac 1,2,4-triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çıkla-Süzgün, Pelin; Kaushik-Basu, Neerja; Basu, Amartya; Arora, Payal; Talele, Tanaji T; Durmaz, Irem; Çetin-Atalay, Rengül; Küçükgüzel, Ş Güniz

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid is an unsaturated fatty acid liberated from phospholipids of cell membranes. NSAIDs are known as targets of cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-1, COX-2 and COX-3) in arachidonic acid metabolism. This mechanism of COX-2 in carcinogenesis causes cancer. In addition, COX-2 plays a role in the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of our study was to improve effective agents against HCV. A novel series of new etodolac 1,2,4-triazoles derivatives (4a-h) have been synthesized and investigated for their activity against HCV NS5B polymerase. Compound 4a was found to be the most active with IC(50) value of 14.8 µM. In accordance with these results, compound 4a was screened for anti-cancer activity on liver cancer cell lines (Huh7, Mahlavu, HepG2, FOCUS). Compound 4a showed anti-cancer activity against Huh7 human hepatoma cell line with IC(50) value of 4.29 µM. Therefore, compound 4a could be considered as a new anti-cancer and anti-HCV lead compound.

  3. Treatment of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning with a Combination of Intravenous Glucagon, Digoxin and Antioxidant Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghabian, Zohreh; Mehrpour, Omid

    2016-08-01

    Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is used to protect stored grains from rodents. It produces phosphine gas (PH3), a mitochondrial poison thought to cause toxicity by blocking the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme and inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation, which results in cell death. AlP poisoning has a high mortality rate among humans due to the rapid onset of cardiogenic shock and metabolic acidosis, despite aggressive treatment. We report a 21-year-old male who was referred to the Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman, Iran, in 2015 after having intentionally ingested a 3 g AlP tablet. He was successfully treated with crystalloid fluids, vasopressors, sodium bicarbonate, digoxin, glucagon and antioxidant agents and was discharged from the hospital six days after admission in good clinical condition. For the treatment of AlP poisoning, the combination of glucagon and digoxin with antioxidant agents should be considered. However, evaluation of further cases is necessary to optimise treatment protocols.

  4. Treatment of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning with a Combination of Intravenous Glucagon, Digoxin and Antioxidant Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Oghabian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide (AlP is used to protect stored grains from rodents. It produces phosphine gas (PH3, a mitochondrial poison thought to cause toxicity by blocking the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme and inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation, which results in cell death. AlP poisoning has a high mortality rate among humans due to the rapid onset of cardiogenic shock and metabolic acidosis, despite aggressive treatment. We report a 21-yearold male who was referred to the Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman, Iran, in 2015 after having intentionally ingested a 3 g AlP tablet. He was successfully treated with crystalloid fluids, vasopressors, sodium bicarbonate, digoxin, glucagon and antioxidant agents and was discharged from the hospital six days after admission in good clinical condition. For the treatment of AlP poisoning, the combination of glucagon and digoxin with antioxidant agents should be considered. However, evaluation of further cases is necessary to optimise treatment protocols.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    The intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising therapeutic vector for the delivery of DNA, RNA or protein to cancer cells or to prime immune responses against tumour-specific antigens. A number of biological properties make L. monocytogenes a promising platform for development as a vector for either gene therapy or as an anti-cancer vaccine vector. L. monocytogenes is particularly efficient in mediating internalization into host cells. Once inside cells, the bacterium produces specific virulence factors which lyse the vaculolar membrane and allow escape into the cytoplasm. Once in the cytosol, L. monocytogenes is capable of actin-based motility and cell-to-cell spread without an extracellular phase. The cytoplasmic location of L. monocytogenes is significant as this potentiates entry of antigens into the MHC Class I antigen processing pathway leading to priming of specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The cytoplasmic location is also beneficial for the delivery of DNA (bactofection) by L. monocytogenes whilst cell-to-cell spread may facilitate access of the vector to cells throughout the tumour. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of L. monocytogenes for intracellular gene or protein delivery in vitro and in vivo, and this vector has also displayed safety and efficacy in clinical trial. Here, we review the features of the L. monocytogenes host-pathogen interaction that make this bacterium such an attractive candidate with which to induce appropriate therapeutic responses. We focus primarily upon work that has led to attenuation of the pathogen, demonstrated DNA, RNA or protein delivery to tumour cells as well as research that shows the efficacy of L. monocytogenes as a vector for tumour-specific vaccine delivery.

  6. The anti-cancer effects of Tualang honey in modulating breast carcinogenesis: an experimental animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sarfraz; Othman, Nor Hayati

    2017-04-11

    Honey has been shown to have anti-cancer effects, but the mechanism behind these effects is not fully understood. We investigated the role of Malaysian jungle Tualang honey (TH) in modulating the hematological parameters, estrogen, estrogen receptors (ER1) and pro and anti-apoptotic proteins expression in induced breast cancer in rats. Fifty nulliparous female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and grouped as follows: Group 0 (healthy normal rats control), Group 1 (negative control; untreated rats), Groups 2, 3 and 4 received daily doses of 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg body weight of TH, respectively. The rats in groups 1, 2, 3, 4 were induced with 80 mg/kg of 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU). TH treatment in groups 2, 3 and 4 was started one week prior to tumor induction and continued for 120 days. The TH-treated rats had tumors of different physical attributes compared to untreated negative control rats; the tumor progression (mean 75.3 days versus 51.5 days); the incidence (mean 76.6% versus 100%); the multiplicity (mean 2.5 versus 4 tumor masses per rat); the size of tumor mass (mean 0.41 cm versus 1.47 cm [p Honey alleviates breast carcinogenesis through modulation of hematologic, estrogenic and apoptotic activities in this experimental breast cancer animal model. Tualang Honey may be used as a natural 'cancer-alleviating' agent or as a supplement to chemotherapeutic agents.

  7. Insecticidal Effects of Insecticide, Fungicide, Complex Fertilizer and Wetting Agent Combinations Depending on Water Hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Vuković

    2009-01-01

    thiametoxam+mancozeb+wetting agent combinations, which showed significantly lower efficacy. After 48 h, substantially lowereffectiveness, in comparison with the sole insecticide and other combinations, was only observed in thiametoksam+mancozeb+Mortonjic plus combination. Significantly lower efficacy of that combination is probably due to an incompatibility of the macozeb preparation and the complex fertilizer containing boron (B, which was evidenced only in very hard water.

  8. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in Oncology: Evaluating Efficacy of Anti-Cancer Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris P. Reutelingsperger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT. Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1–2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a long time to prove therapy response. Both patient and pharmaceutical industry could therefore profit from an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. Diagnostic methods providing information on a functional level, rather than a structural, could present the solution. Recent technological advances in molecular imaging enable in vivo imaging of biological processes. Since most anti-cancer therapies combat tumors by inducing apoptosis, imaging of apoptosis could offer an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. This review focuses on principles of and clinical experience with molecular imaging of apoptosis using Annexin A5, a widely accepted marker for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo in animal models. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in combination with SPECT has been probed in clinical studies to assess efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy within 1–4 days after start of therapy. Annexin A5-based functional imaging of apoptosis shows promise to offer a personalized medicine approach, now primarily used in genome-based medicine, applicable to all cancer patients.

  9. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in Oncology: Evaluating Efficacy of Anti-Cancer Therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaper, Frédéric L.W.V.J.; Reutelingsperger, Chris P.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT). Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1–2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a long time to prove therapy response. Both patient and pharmaceutical industry could therefore profit from an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. Diagnostic methods providing information on a functional level, rather than a structural, could present the solution. Recent technological advances in molecular imaging enable in vivo imaging of biological processes. Since most anti-cancer therapies combat tumors by inducing apoptosis, imaging of apoptosis could offer an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. This review focuses on principles of and clinical experience with molecular imaging of apoptosis using Annexin A5, a widely accepted marker for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo in animal models. 99m Tc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in combination with SPECT has been probed in clinical studies to assess efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy within 1–4 days after start of therapy. Annexin A5-based functional imaging of apoptosis shows promise to offer a personalized medicine approach, now primarily used in genome-based medicine, applicable to all cancer patients

  10. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Anti-Cancer Mechanism by Periplocin Treatment in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zejun Lu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periplocin is used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, reinforcement of bones and tendons, palpitations or shortness of breath and lower extremity edema in traditional medicine. Our previous findings suggested that periplocin could inhibit the growth of lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. But the biological processes and molecular pathways by which periplocin induces these beneficial effects remain largely undefined. Methods: To explore the molecular mechanisms of periplocin involved in anti-cancer activity, in the present study the protein profile changes of human lung cancer cell lines A549 in response to periplocin treatment were investigated using the proteomics approaches (2-DE combined with MS/MS. Western blot was employed to verify the changed proteins. Interactions between changed proteins were analyzed by STRING. Results: 29 down-regulated protein species named GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN, Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A-1 (EIF5A and Profilin-1(PFN1, and 10 up-regulated protein species named Heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein (HSPA8,10 kDa heat shock protein (HSPE1, and Cofilin-1(CFL-1 were identified. Among them, GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN and Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA were the most significantly changed (over tenfold. The proteasome subunit beta type-6 (PSMB6, ATP synthase ecto-α-subunit (ATP5A1, Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 and EIF5A were verified by immunoblot assays to be dramatically down-regulated. By STRING bioinformatics analysis revealing interactions and signaling networks it became apparent that the proteins changed they are primarily involved in transcription and proteolysis. Conclusion: Periplocin inhibited growth of lung cancer by down-regulating proteins, such as ATP5A1, EIF5A, ALDH1 and PSMB6. These findings may improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of

  11. [Influence of monkshood root-peony root combination on inflamation-induced agents and free radicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, L; Peng, X; Zhang, S H; Wang, L; Liu, F

    2000-06-01

    To find out the effect of monkshood root and peony root on inflammation-induced agents and free radicals when used separately and in combination. Two drugs were made into decoctions separately and in combination, i.p., qd, for 7 d, red blood cell SOD and serum LPO were analysed and the anti-inflammatory actions were observed. In an experimental rat model with inflamed paw edema induced by carrageenin or formaldehyde and in a mouse model with ear swelling induced by xylene, the anti-inflammatory effect appeared stronger when the two drugs were used in combination, especially in comparison with the use of monkshood root alone. The exudation of blood capillaries and the contents of inflammation medium PGE2 were lowered; The activity of SOD extracted from rat or mouse red blood cells was enhanced, and the serum LPO, which was high in level when monkshood root was used alone, could be declined when the two drugs were used in combination. The drug combination is more effective in inhibiting inflammation and scavenging free radicals.

  12. Combination of chemotherapy and cancer stem cell targeting agents: Preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Atkinson, Katharine; Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-28

    The cancer stem cell model claims that the initiation, maintenance, and growth of a tumor are driven by a small population of cancer cells termed cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells possess a variety of phenotypes associated with therapeutic resistance and often cause recurrence of the diseases. Several strategies have been investigated to target cancer stem cells in a variety of cancers, such as blocking one or more self-renewal signaling pathways, reducing the expression of drug efflux and ATP-binding cassette efflux transporters, modulating epigenetic aberrations, and promoting cancer stem cell differentiation. A number of cell and animal studies strongly support the potential benefits of combining chemotherapeutic drugs with cancer stem cell targeting agents. Clinical trials are still underway to address the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of combination treatment. This mini-review provides an updated discussion of these preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological effects of radiation in combination with other physical, chemical or biological agents. Annex L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Annex considers the combined action of radiation with potentially important environmental conditions. Since there is a scarcity of systematic data on which an analysis of combined effects can be based, this Annex will be more hypothetical and will attempt to suggest definitions, to identify suitable methods of analysis, to select from a large amount of diffuse information the conditions and the data of importance for further consideration and to provide suggestions for future research. For humans in environmental circumstances the UNSCEAR Committee has been unable to document any clear case of synergistic interaction between radiation and other agents, which could lead to substantial modifications of the risk estimates for significant sections of the population.

  14. Anti cancer effects of curcumin: cycle of life and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Tanya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increasing knowledge on the cell cycle deregulations in cancers has promoted the introduction of phytochemicals, which can either modulate signaling pathways leading to cell cycle regulation or directly alter cell cycle regulatory molecules, in cancer therapy. Most human malignancies are driven by chromosomal translocations or other genetic alterations that directly affect the function of critical cell cycle proteins such as cyclins as well as tumor suppressors, e.g., p53. In this respect, cell cycle regulation and its modulation by curcumin are gaining widespread attention in recent years. Extensive research has addressed the chemotherapeutic potential of curcumin (diferuloylmethane, a relatively non-toxic plant derived polyphenol. The mechanisms implicated are diverse and appear to involve a combination of cell signaling pathways at multiple levels. In the present review we discuss how alterations in the cell cycle control contribute to the malignant transformation and provide an overview of how curcumin targets cell cycle regulatory molecules to assert anti-proliferative and/or apoptotic effects in cancer cells. The purpose of the current article is to present an appraisal of the current level of knowledge regarding the potential of curcumin as an agent for the chemoprevention of cancer via an understanding of its mechanism of action at the level of cell cycle regulation. Taken together, this review seeks to summarize the unique properties of curcumin that may be exploited for successful clinical cancer prevention.

  15. Combining Bayesian Networks and Agent Based Modeling to develop a decision-support model in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nong, Bao Anh; Ertsen, Maurits; Schoups, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Complexity and uncertainty in natural resources management have been focus themes in recent years. Within these debates, with the aim to define an approach feasible for water management practice, we are developing an integrated conceptual modeling framework for simulating decision-making processes of citizens, in our case in the Day river area, Vietnam. The model combines Bayesian Networks (BNs) and Agent-Based Modeling (ABM). BNs are able to combine both qualitative data from consultants / experts / stakeholders, and quantitative data from observations on different phenomena or outcomes from other models. Further strengths of BNs are that the relationship between variables in the system is presented in a graphical interface, and that components of uncertainty are explicitly related to their probabilistic dependencies. A disadvantage is that BNs cannot easily identify the feedback of agents in the system once changes appear. Hence, ABM was adopted to represent the reaction among stakeholders under changes. The modeling framework is developed as an attempt to gain better understanding about citizen's behavior and factors influencing their decisions in order to reduce uncertainty in the implementation of water management policy.

  16. Clinical trial success rates of anti-obesity agents: the importance of combination therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, H T; Parker, J L; Sharma, A M

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a clinical trial profile assessing the risk of drug failure among anti-obesity agents. Research was conducted by looking at anti-obesity therapies currently on the market or in clinical trials (phases I to III) conducted from 1998 to September 2014, with the exclusion of any drugs whose phase I trial was conducted prior to January 1998. This was completed primarily through a search on http://clinicaltrials.gov where a total of 51 drugs met the search criteria. The transition probabilities were then calculated based on various classifications and compared against industry standards. The transition probability of anti-obesity agents was 8.50% whereas the transition probability of industry standards was 10.40%. Combination therapies had four times the transition probability than monotherapies, 40% and 4.75%, respectively. Therefore, it was determined that 92% of drugs fail during clinical trial testing for this indication and combination therapy appears to improve clinical trial success rates to 10-fold. © 2015 World Obesity.

  17. Modulation of associated ovarian carcinoma antigens by 5 cytokines used as single agents or in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert-Marcille, B M; Thédrez, P; Saï-Maurel, C; François, C; Auget, J L; Benard, J; Jacques, Y; Imai, S; Chatal, J F

    1994-05-01

    Optimization of intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer depends on increasing the antigenic expression of tumor cells. For this purpose, we studied the effect of 5 cytokines (IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta), used as single agents or in combination, on 4 ovarian cancer cell lines which present different antigenic profiles with the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested (OC125, OVTL-3, MOv 18 and MOv 19). Analyses were performed by flow cytometry and the Scatchard technique in order to study antigenic modulation. The effect on proliferation was determined by cell counting. Expression of O3 antigen, recognized by the OVTL3 MAb, was increased up to 2.5 times after IFNs and TNF-alpha (used as single agent) on the 2 lines presenting low basal expression (SHIN-3 and IGROVI). The expression of CA125 antigen and the antigens recognized by MOv 18 and MOv 19 MAbs was not increased by any of the cytokines tested. The combination IFN-gamma+TNF-alpha was synergistic on cytotoxicity and enhanced O3 expression, providing 10 times as many sites per cell on the SHIN-3 line. For 3 other associations (IFN-alpha+IFN-gamma, IFN-beta+IFN-gamma and IFN-alpha+TNF-alpha), there was an additive effect on O3 expression and on cell cytotoxicity.

  18. Deformation and Plateau Region of Functionally Graded Aluminum Foam by Amount Combinations of Added Blowing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, to further improve the performance of aluminum foam, functionally graded (FG aluminum foams, whose pore structure varies with their position, have been developed. In this study, three types of FG aluminum foam of aluminum alloy die casting ADC12 with combinations of two different amounts of added blowing agent titanium(II hydride (TiH2 powder were fabricated by a friction stir welding (FSW route precursor foaming method. The combinations of 1.0–0 mass %, 0.4–0 mass %, and 0.2–0 mass % TiH2 were selected as the amounts of TiH2 relative to the mass of the volume stirred by FSW. The static compression tests of the fabricated FG aluminum foams were carried out. The deformation and fracture of FG aluminum foams fundamentally started in the high-porosity (with TiH2 addition layer and shifted to the low-porosity (without TiH2 addition layer. The first and second plateau regions in the relationship between compressive stress and strain independently appeared with the occurrence of deformations and fractures in the high- and low-porosity layers. It was shown that FG aluminum foams, whose plateau region varies in steps by the combination of amounts of added TiH2 (i.e., the combination of pore structures, can be fabricated.

  19. Deformation and Plateau Region of Functionally Graded Aluminum Foam by Amount Combinations of Added Blowing Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Kitahara, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2015-10-21

    Recently, to further improve the performance of aluminum foam, functionally graded (FG) aluminum foams, whose pore structure varies with their position, have been developed. In this study, three types of FG aluminum foam of aluminum alloy die casting ADC12 with combinations of two different amounts of added blowing agent titanium(II) hydride (TiH₂) powder were fabricated by a friction stir welding (FSW) route precursor foaming method. The combinations of 1.0-0 mass %, 0.4-0 mass %, and 0.2-0 mass % TiH₂ were selected as the amounts of TiH₂ relative to the mass of the volume stirred by FSW. The static compression tests of the fabricated FG aluminum foams were carried out. The deformation and fracture of FG aluminum foams fundamentally started in the high-porosity (with TiH₂ addition) layer and shifted to the low-porosity (without TiH₂ addition) layer. The first and second plateau regions in the relationship between compressive stress and strain independently appeared with the occurrence of deformations and fractures in the high- and low-porosity layers. It was shown that FG aluminum foams, whose plateau region varies in steps by the combination of amounts of added TiH₂ ( i.e. , the combination of pore structures), can be fabricated.

  20. Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2-Cu(x)S double-shelled hollow spheres for enhanced chemo-/photothermal anti-cancer therapy and dual-modal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Yang, Guixin; Wang, Xingmei; Lv, Ruichan; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; Gulzar, Arif; Yang, Piaoping

    2015-07-28

    Multifunctional composites have gained significant interest due to their unique properties which show potential in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the design of an efficient combination of multiple diagnostic and therapeutic modes is still a challenge. In this contribution, Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2 double-shelled hollow spheres (DSHSs) with up-conversion fluorescence have been successfully prepared through a facile integrated sacrifice template method, followed by a calcination process. It is found that the double-shelled structure with large specific surface area and uniform shape is composed of an inner shell of luminescent Y2O3:Yb,Er and an outer mesoporous silica shell. Ultra small Cu(x)S nanoparticles (about 2.5 nm) served as photothermal agents, and a chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin, DOX) was then attached onto the surface of mesoporous silica, forming a DOX-DSHS-Cu(x)S composite. The composite exhibits high anti-cancer efficacy due to the synergistic photothermal therapy (PTT) induced by the attached Cu(x)S nanoparticles and the enhanced chemotherapy promoted by the heat from the Cu(x)S-based PTT when irradiated by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) light. Moreover, the composite shows excellent in vitro and in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) and up-conversion fluorescence (UCL) imaging properties owing to the doped rare earth ions, thus making it possible to achieve the target of imaging-guided synergistic therapy.

  1. Synthesis, spectral and quantum chemical studies and use of (E)-3-[(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenylimino)methyl]benzene-1,2-diol and its Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes as an anion sensor, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, anti-microbial, anti-mutagenic and anti-cancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünver, Hüseyin; Boyacıoğlu, Bahadır; Zeyrek, Celal Tuğrul; Yıldız, Mustafa; Demir, Neslihan; Yıldırım, Nuray; Karaosmanoğlu, Oğuzhan; Sivas, Hülya; Elmalı, Ayhan

    2016-12-01

    We report the synthesis of a novel Schiff base (E)-3-[(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl) phenylimino)methyl] benzene-1,2-diol from the reaction of 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde with 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)aniline, and its Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes. The molecular structure of the Schiff base was experimentally determined using X-ray single-crystal data and was compared to the structure predicted by theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT), Hartree-Fock (HF) and Möller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2). In addition, nonlinear optical (NLO) effects of the compound was predicted using DFT. The antimicrobial activities of the compounds were investigated for their minimum inhibitory concentration. UV-Vis spectroscopy studies of the interactions between the compounds and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) showed that the compounds interacts with CT-DNA via intercalative binding. A DNA cleavage study showed that the Cu(II) complex cleaved DNA without any external agents. The compounds inhibited the base pair mutation in the absence of S9 with high inhibition rate. In addition, in vitro cytotoxicity of the Ni(II) complex towards HepG2 cell line was assayed by the MTT method. Also, the colorimetric response of the Schiff base in DMSO to the addition of equivalent amount of anions (F-, Br-, I-, CN-, SCN-, ClO4-, HSO4-, AcO-, H2PO4-, N3- and OH-) was investigated. In this regard, while the addition of F-, CN-, AcO- and OH- anions into the solution containing Schiff base resulted in a significant color change, the addition of Br-, I-, SCN-, ClO4-, HSO4-, H2PO4- and N3- anions resulted in no color change. The most discernable color change in the Schiff base was caused by CN-, which demonstrated that the ligand can be used to selectively detect CN-.

  2. Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils enhanced by complexation: Arsenic extraction by reducing agents and combination of reducing and chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Cheol [Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Kitae, E-mail: kbaek@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Abiotic reductive extraction of As from contaminated soils was studied. • Oxalate/ascorbate were effective in extracting As bound to amorphous iron oxides. • Reducing agents were not effective in extracting As bound to crystalline oxides. • Reductive As extraction was greatly enhanced by complexation. • Combination of dithionite and EDTA could extract about 90% of the total As. - Abstract: Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils was studied with various reducing agents and combinations of reducing and chelating agents in order to remediate arsenic-contaminated soils. Oxalate and ascorbic acid were effective to extract arsenic from soil in which arsenic was associated with amorphous iron oxides, but they were not effective to extract arsenic from soils in which arsenic was bound to crystalline oxides or those in which arsenic was mainly present as a scorodite phase. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that iron oxides present in soils were transformed to Fe(II,III) or Fe(II) oxide forms such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sup II}Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) by reduction with dithionite. Thus, arsenic extraction by dithionite was not effective due to the re-adsorption of arsenic to the newly formed iron oxide phase. Combination of chelating agents with reducing agents greatly improved arsenic extraction from soil samples. About 90% of the total arsenic could be extracted from all soil samples by using a combination of dithionite and EDTA. Chelating agents form strong complexation with iron, which can prevent precipitation of a new iron oxide phase and also enhance iron oxide dissolution via a non-reductive dissolution pathway.

  3. Combining antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic agents – optimizing cardiovascular risk factor management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamorano J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available José Zamorano1, Jonathan Edwards21Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain; 2UBC Scientific Solutions, 5 North Street, Horsham, West Sussex, UKAbstract: Clinical guidelines now recognize the importance of a multifactorial approach to managing cardiovascular (CV risk. This idea was taken a step further with the concept of the Polypill™. There are, however, considerable patent, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, registration, and cost implications that will need to be overcome before the Polypill™ or other single-pill combinations of CV medications become widely available. However, a medication targeting blood pressure (BP and lipids provides much of the proposed benefits of the Polypill™. A single-pill combination of the antihypertensive amlodipine besylate and the lipid-lowering medication atorvastatin calcium (SPAA is currently available in many parts of the world. This review describes the rationale for this combination therapy and the clinical trials that have demonstrated that these two agents can be combined without the loss of efficacy for either agent or an increase in the incidence of adverse events. The recently completed Cluster Randomized Usual Care vs Caduet Investigation Assessing Long-term-risk (CRUCIAL trial is discussed in detail. CRUCIAL was a 12-month, international, multicenter, prospective, open-label, parallel design, cluster-randomized trial, which demonstrated that a proactive intervention strategy based on SPAA in addition to usual care (UC had substantial benefits on estimated CV risk, BP, and lipids over continued UC alone. Adherence with antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapies outside of the controlled environment of clinical trials is very low (~30%–40% at 12 months. Observational studies have demonstrated that improving adherence to lipid-lowering and antihypertensive medications may reduce CV events. One means of improving adherence is the use of single-pill combinations. Real-world observational

  4. Anti-Cancer Effect of IN-2001 in T47D Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Ki Eun; Min, Kyung Nan; Kim, Dae-Kee; Sheen, Yhun Yhong

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes involved in the remodelling of chromatin, and have a key role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging as an exciting new class of potential anti-cancer agents. In recent years, a number of structurally diverse HDAC inhibitors have been identified and these HDAC inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation and/or apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed at investigating the anti-tumor activity of various HDAC inhibitors, IN-2001, using T47D human breast cancer cells. Moreover, the possible mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors exhibit anti-tumor activity was also explored. In estrogen receptor positive T47D cells, IN-2001, HDAC inhibitor showed anti-proliferative effects in dose-and time-dependent manner. In T47D human breast cancer cells showed anti-tumor activity of IN-2001 and the growth inhibitory effects of IN-2001 were related to the cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Flow cytometry studies revealed that IN-2001 showed accumulation of cells at G2/M phase. At the same time, IN-2001 treatment time-dependently increased sub-G1 population, representing apoptotic cells. IN-2001-mediated cell cycle arrest was associated with induction of cdk inhibitor expression. In T47D cells, IN-2001 as well as other HDAC inhibitors treatment significantly increased p21(WAF1) and p27(KIP1) expression. In addition, thymidylate synthase, an essential enzyme for DNA replication and repair, was down-regulated by IN-2001 and other HDAC inhibitors in the T47D human breast cancer cells. In summary, IN-2001 with a higher potency than other HDAC inhibitors induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and eventual apoptosis in human breast cancer possibly through modulation of cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, such as cdk inhibitors, cyclins, and thymidylate synthase.

  5. Interaction of anthraquinone anti-cancer drugs with DNA:Experimental and computational quantum chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Jamelah S.; Teesdale Spittle, Paul; El Gogary, Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthraquinones form the basis of several anticancer drugs. Anthraquinones anticancer drugs carry out their cytotoxic activities through their interaction with DNA, and inhibition of topoisomerase II activity. Anthraquinones (AQ4 and AQ4H) were synthesized and studied along with 1,4-DAAQ by computational and experimental tools. The purpose of this study is to shade more light on mechanism of interaction between anthraquinone DNA affinic agents and different types of DNA. This study will lead to gain of information useful for drug design and development. Molecular structures were optimized using DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G(d). Depending on intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions two conformers of AQ4 were detected and computed as 25.667 kcal/mol apart. Molecular reactivity of the anthraquinone compounds was explored using global and condensed descriptors (electrophilicity and Fukui functions). Molecular docking studies for the inhibition of CDK2 and DNA binding were carried out to explore the anti cancer potency of these drugs. NMR and UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra of anthraquinones/DNA were investigated at the physiological pH. The interaction of the three anthraquinones (AQ4, AQ4H and 1,4-DAAQ) were studied with three DNA (calf thymus DNA, (Poly[dA].Poly[dT]) and (Poly[dG].Poly[dC]). NMR study shows a qualitative pattern of drug/DNA interaction in terms of band shift and broadening. UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra were employed to measure the affinity constants of drug/DNA binding using Scatchard analysis.

  6. Synthetic Strigolactone Analogues Reveal Anti-Cancer Activities on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, Mohammed Nihal

    2018-02-09

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The complex etiology is attributed to many factors like heredity, cirrhosis, hepatitis infections or the dysregulation of the different molecular pathways. Nevertheless, the current treatment regimens have either severe side effects or tumors gradually acquire resistance upon prolonged use. Thus, developing a new selective treatment for HCC is the need of the hour. Many anticancer agents derived from plants have been evaluated for their cytotoxicity towards many human cancer cell lines. Strigolactones (SLs)-a newly discovered class of phytohormones, play a crucial role in the development of plant-root and shoot. Recently, many synthetic analogues of SLs have demonstrated pro-apoptotic effects on different cancer cell lines like prostate, breast, colon and lung. In this study, we tested synthetic SLs analogues on HCC cell line-HepG2 and evaluated their capability to induce cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis. Primary WST-1 assays, followed by annexin-V/7AAD staining, demonstrated the anti-proliferative effects. The SLs analogues TIT3 and TIT7 were found to significantly reduce HepG2 cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induce apoptosis. Interestingly, though TIT3 and TIT7 strongly affected cancer cell proliferation, both compounds showed moderate anti-proliferative effect on normal cells. Further, migration of cancer cells was suppressed upon treatment with TIT3 and TIT7 in a wound healing assay. In summary, these findings suggest that two SLs analogues TIT3 and TIT7 exert selective inhibitory effects on cancer cells most likely through targeting microtubules. SLs analogues could be used in future as potential anti-cancer candidates in chemotherapy.

  7. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Matatagui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs. The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13, and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR. Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  8. Love-wave sensors combined with microfluidics for fast detection of biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-07-15

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  9. Searching in mother nature for anti-cancer activity: anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect elicited by green barley on leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Robles-Escajeda

    Full Text Available Green barley extract (GB was investigated for possible anti-cancer activity by examining its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties on human leukemia/lymphoma cell lines. Our results indicate that GB exhibits selective anti-proliferative activity on a panel of leukemia/lymphoma cells in comparison to non-cancerous cells. Specifically, GB disrupted the cell-cycle progression within BJAB cells, as manifested by G2/M phase arrest and DNA fragmentation, and induced apoptosis, as evidenced by phosphatidylserine (PS translocation to the outer cytoplasmic membrane in two B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cell lines. The pro-apoptotic effect of GB was found to be independent of mitochondrial depolarization, thus implicating extrinsic cell death pathways to exert its cytotoxicity. Indeed, GB elicited an increase of TNF-α production, caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation, and PARP-1 cleavage within pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia Nalm-6 cells. Moreover, caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation and PARP-1 cleavage were strongly inhibited/blocked by the addition of the specific caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK and Ac-DEVD-CHO. Furthermore, intracellular signaling analyses determined that GB treatment enhanced constitutive activation of Lck and Src tyrosine kinases in Nalm-6 cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that GB induced preferential anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic signals within B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cells, as determined by the following biochemical hallmarks of apoptosis: PS externalization, enhanced release of TNF-α, caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation, PARP-1 cleavage and DNA fragmentation Our observations reveal that GB has potential as an anti-leukemia/lymphoma agent alone or in combination with standard cancer therapies and thus warrants further evaluation in vivo to support these findings.

  10. Quantitative comparison of the convulsive activity of combinations of twelve fluoroquinolones with five nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jahye; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2009-01-01

    Concomitant administration of certain fluoroquinolone antimicrobials and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents (NSAIDs) induces serious convulsion in humans. There are differences in convulsive activity among fluoroquinolones and in the potentiation of fluoroquinolone-induced convulsion among NSAIDs, but a comprehensive, quantitative comparison has not been carried out. This study evaluates the inhibitory effects of twelve fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pazufloxacin, prulifloxacin, sparfloxacin, and tosufloxacin) alone or in the presence of an NSAID (4-biphenylacetic acid, diclofenac sodium, loxoprofen, lornoxicam or zaltoprofen) on the GABA(A) receptor binding of [(3)H]muscimol in an in vitro study using mice synaptic plasma membrane. The rank order of inhibitory effects of the fluoroquinolones was prulifloxacin asymptotically equal to norfloxacin > ciprofloxacin > or = enoxacin > gatifloxacin > or = ofloxacin asymptotically equal to tosufloxacin asymptotically equal to lomefloxacin > levofloxacin > or = sparfloxacin > or = pazufloxacin asymptotically equal to fleroxacin. 4-Biphenylacetic acid most potently enhanced the inhibitory effects of the fluoroquinolones, while zaltoprofen, loxoprofen, lornoxicam and diclofenac had essentially no effect. The clinical risk of convulsion for each combination was estimated using a pharmacodynamic model based on receptor occupancy using the in vitro data set obtained and pharmacokinetic parameters in humans collected from the literature. The combinations of 4-biphenylacetic acid with prulifloxacin and enoxacin were concluded to be the most hazardous.

  11. Synergistic Anticancer Effect of Tocotrienol Combined with Chemotherapeutic Agents or Dietary Components: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Eitsuka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol (T3, unsaturated vitamin E, is gaining a lot of attention owing to its potent anticancer effect, since its efficacy is much greater than that of tocopherol (Toc. Various factors are known to be involved in such antitumor action, including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, antiangiogenesis, anti-metastasis, nuclear factor-κB suppression, and telomerase inhibition. Owing to a difference in the affinity of T3 and Toc for the α-tocopherol transfer protein, the bioavailability of orally ingested T3 is lower than that of Toc. Furthermore, cellular uptake of T3 is interrupted by coadministration of α-Toc in vitro and in vivo. Based on this, several studies are in progress to screen for molecules that can synergize with T3 in order to augment its potency. Combinations of T3 with chemotherapeutic drugs (e.g., statins, celecoxib, and gefitinib or dietary components (e.g., polyphenols, sesamin, and ferulic acid exhibit synergistic actions on cancer cell growth and signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the current status of synergistic effects of T3 and an array of agents on cancer cells, and discuss their molecular mechanisms of action. These combination strategies would encourage further investigation and application in cancer prevention and therapy.

  12. Effects of combinations of maternal agents on the fetal cerebrum in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Harumi; Iwasaki, Setsuo; Arima, Masataka; Nakazawa, Kazuharu

    1985-01-01

    Fetal cerebral development influenced by maternal ethanol or caffeine either singly or in combination with X-irradiation was investigated in rat. Female Wistar rats were given 20 % ethanol, 0.04 % caffeine and water during the premating period and pregnancy, and 0.03 % vitamin E only during pregnancy. Pregnant rats were X-irradiated with 100 R or sham-irradiated on gestational day 13. Ethanol-treatment alone much reduced the fetal body and cerebral weights, and X-irradiation alone resulted in great reductions in weight and DNA concentration in the fetal cerebrum. The reduction in body weight with ethanol exceeded that with X-irradiation, therefore, the addition of X-irradiation had no effect on that of ethanol. The reduction in cerebral weight on X-irradiation exceeded that with ethanol, thus the addition of ethanol had only a slight effect on that with X-irradiation. The decrease in body and cerebral weights and the increase in lipid peroxide (LP) formation on caffeine-treatment and the decrease in cerebral weight and the increase in LP on vitamin E-treatment were inhibited by X-irradiation as compared to the combined effects of the other drink treatments. The increase in placental weight and the decrease in cerebral weight on ethanol-treatment and the decrease in placental, body and cerebral weights on caffeine-treatment, which findings were covered by the addition of X-irradiation, became much clearer on single drink treatment. Independently of X-irradiation, ethanol-treatment resulted in increased fetal mortality and LP, and decreased body weight. These results suggest that the combined effects of maternal agents on live fetuses should be investigated as to whether they act independently of or dependently with each other and how the effects appear either singly or mixed. (author)

  13. Assessing the Risk of Birth Defects Associated with Exposure to Fixed-Dose Combined Antituberculous Agents during Pregnancy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Awodele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the risks of disease progression and transmission to the newborn, treatment of tuberculosis is often pursued during pregnancy and fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents have been found to be beneficial. Unfortunately, there is paucity of data on the safety of the fixed-dose combined antituberculous drugs during pregnancy. This study intends to assess the teratogenic effect of fixed-dose combined antituberculous drugs on the organogenesis stage of fetal development and also investigate the possible roles of vitamin C in modulating the teratogenic effects of these agents on the fetus using animal model. Pregnant rats were divided into 3 groups with 12 animals per group: group 1 received distilled water (10 mL/kg orally; group 2 received 51.4 mg/kg/day of fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents orally; group 3 received 51.4 mg/kg/day of fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents plus vitamin C (10 mg/kg/day orally. Six rats in each group were randomly selected and sacrificed on day 20 by cervical dislocation prior to day 21 of gestation, and the foetuses were harvested through abdominal incision for physical examination. Blood samples were collected from the 1st filial rats of the remaining six animals for biochemical and hematological examination. The liver, kidney, heart, and brain of all the sacrificed animals were used for histopathological examination. There were significant (≤0.05 low birth weights of the foetuses of the animals that were treated with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents. The haematological parameters also revealed a reduction in the platelets counts and neutrophiles at the first filial generation. Significant (≤0.05 elevations in the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP in the foetuses of the animals treated with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents were also observed. However, the combination of vitamin C with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents

  14. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  15. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Furocoumarin Derivatives as Possible Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mattarei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Targeting small molecules to appropriate subcellular compartments is a way to increase their selectivity and effectiveness while minimizing side effects. This can be accomplished either by stably incorporating specific “homing” properties into the structure of the active principle, or by attaching to it a targeting moiety via a labile linker, i.e., by producing a “targeting pro-drug.” Mitochondria are a recognized therapeutic target in oncology, and blocking the population of the potassium channel Kv1.3 residing in the inner mitochondrial membrane (mtKv1.3 has been shown to cause apoptosis of cancerous cells expressing it. These concepts have led us to devise novel, mitochondria-targeted, membrane-permeant drug candidates containing the furocoumarin (psoralenic ring system and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP lipophilic cation. The strategy has proven effective in various cancer models, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and glioblastoma, stimulating us to devise further novel molecules to extend and diversify the range of available drugs of this type. New compounds were synthesized and tested in vitro; one of them—a prodrug in which the coumarinic moiety and the TPP group are linked by a bridge comprising a labile carbonate bond system—proved quite effective in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Selective death induction is attributed to inhibition of mtKv1.3. This results in oxidative stress, which is fatal for the already-stressed malignant cells. This compound may thus be a candidate drug for the mtKv1.3-targeting therapeutic approach.

  16. A Novel Biomolecule-Mediated Reduction of Graphene Oxide: A Multifunctional Anti-Cancer Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jung Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO is a monolayer of carbon atoms that form a dense honeycomb structure, consisting of hydroxyl and epoxide functional groups on the two accessible sides and carboxylic groups at the edges. In contrast, graphene is a two-dimensional sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb lattice. Graphene has great potential for use in biomedical applications due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this study, we report a facile and environmentally friendly approach for the synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (rGO using uric acid (UA. The synthesized uric acid-reduced graphene oxide (UA-rGO was fully characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD, dynamic light scattering (DLS, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Raman spectroscopy. GO and UA-rGO induced a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and induced cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results from this study suggest that UA-rGO could cause apoptosis in mammalian cells. The toxicity of UA-rGO is significantly higher than GO. Based on our findings, UA-rGO shows cytotoxic effects against human ovarian cancer cells, and its synthesis is environmentally friendly. UA-rGO significantly inhibits cell viability by increasing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, activation of caspase-3, and DNA fragmentation. This is the first report to describe the comprehensive effects of UA-rGO in ovarian cancer cells. We believe that the functional aspects of newly synthesized UA-rGO will provide advances towards various biomedical applications in the near future.

  17. Characterisation of Mesothelioma-Initiating Cells and Their Susceptibility to Anti-Cancer Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pasdar, E.A.; Smits, M.; Stapelberg, M.; Bajziková, Martina; Stantic, M.; Goodwin, J.; Yan, B.; Štursa, J.; Kovářová, Jaromíra; Sachaphibulkij, K.; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Sobol, Margaryta; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Tomasetti, M.; Zobalová, Renata; Hozák, Pavel; Dong, L.F.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2015), e0119549 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : MALIGNANT PLEURAL MESOTHELIOMA * EMBRYONIC STEM-CELLS * ALPHA-TOCOPHERYL SUCCINATE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel quinazoline-sulfonamides as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudapally, Suresh; Battu, Shankar; Velatooru, Loka Reddy; Bethu, Murali Satyanarayana; Janapala, Venkateswara Rao; Sharma, Somesh; Sen, Subhabrata; Pottabathini, Narender; Iska, Vijaya Bhaskara Reddy; Katangoor, Vidya

    2017-05-01

    A robust economic approach to N-(quinazoline-4-yl)sulfonamides was developed and synthesized different aryl, hetero aryl, alkyl and cyclopropyl sulfonamides in excellent yields. All the compounds were evaluated for cytotoxic affinity to SKOV3, DU145, THP1, U937, and COLO205 cell lines. Interesting to find that the bulkiness of substituent at C-2 position of quinazoline forces the molecule to flip around in order to bind in the active site, when compared to the binding preference of previously known quinazoline compounds. Among the 21 compounds synthesized 2b, 2d, 2e, 2h, 2i, 3c, 3d, 3f, 3g and 3h found to be active on all the cell lines tested with IC 50 values <10µg/mL. Performed docking simulations to understand the binding preference of various C-2 substituted quinazoline sulfonamides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preclinical and Clinical Assessment of Cannabinoids as Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Ladin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States with 1.7 million new cases estimated to be diagnosed in 2016. This disease remains a formidable clinical challenge and represents a substantial financial burden to the US health care system. Therefore, research and development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer is of high priority. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have been utilized for their medicinal and therapeutic properties throughout history. Cannabinoid activity is regulated through the endocannabinoid system, which is comprised of cannabinoid receptors, transporters, and enzymes involved in cannabinoid synthesis and breakdown. More recently, cannabinoids have gained special attention for their role in cancer development and reduction. However, many studies investigated these roles using in vitro models which may not adequately mimic tumor growth and metastasis. As such, this article aims to review study results which evaluated effects of cannabinoids from plant, synthetic and endogenous origins on cancer development in preclinical models and to examine the current standing of cannabinoids currently being tested in human cancer patients.

  20. Liposomal delivery systems for anti-cancer analogues of vitamin E

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, S.; Knotigova, P.T.; Masek, J.; Prochazka, L.; Lukac, R.; Miller, A.D.; Neužil, Jiří; Turanek, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 207, Jun 10 (2015), s. 59-69 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Alpha-tocopheryl succinate * Analogues of vitamin E * Anti-cancer drugs Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.441, year: 2015

  1. Anti-Cancer Efficacy of Silybin Derivatives - A Structure-Activity Relationship

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agarwal, Ch.; Wadhwa, R.; Deep, G.; Biedermann, David; Gažák, Radek; Křen, Vladimír; Agarwal, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2013), e00074 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10027 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Silybin * silibinin * anti- cancer efficacy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  2. Phytochemical investigation and the anti-cancer properties of pengularia daemia and phylica paniculata

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khorombi, TE

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) implemented an in-house anti-cancer screen aimed at testing several plant extracts. This was done in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the USA and involved training...

  3. Anti-Cancer Properties of Diethylether Extract of Wood from Sukun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-cancer properties of the diethylether extract of Sukun (Artocarpus altilis) wood. Methods: The extract was tested in human T47D breast cancer cells and examined for its effect on cell viability, nuclear morphology and sub-G1 formation. Cell viability was determined by microculture tetrazolium ...

  4. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0824-z. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer activity of new Schiff base and its copper complex derived from sulfamethoxazole. I RAMA∗ and R SELVAMEENA. PG and Research Department of Chemistry, Seethalakshmi Ramaswami College,. Tiruchirappalli 620 002 ...

  5. Trade-off between synergy and efficacy in combinations of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M

    2018-02-01

    Eradicating HIV-1 infection is difficult because of the reservoir of latently infected cells that gets established soon after infection, remains hidden from antiretroviral drugs and host immune responses, and retains the capacity to reignite infection following the cessation of treatment. Drugs called latency-reversing agents (LRAs) are being developed to reactivate latently infected cells and render them susceptible to viral cytopathicity or immune killing. Whereas individual LRAs have failed to induce adequate reactivation, pairs of LRAs have been identified recently that act synergistically and hugely increase reactivation levels compared to individual LRAs. The maximum synergy achievable with LRA pairs is of clinical importance, as it would allow latency-reversal with minimal drug exposure. Here, we employed stochastic simulations of HIV-1 transcription and translation in latently infected cells to estimate this maximum synergy. We incorporated the predominant mechanisms of action of the two most promising classes of LRAs, namely, protein kinase C agonists and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and quantified the activity of individual LRAs in the two classes by mapping our simulations to corresponding in vitro experiments. Without any adjustable parameters, our simulations then quantitatively captured experimental observations of latency-reversal when the LRAs were used in pairs. Performing simulations representing a wide range of drug concentrations, we estimated the maximum synergy achievable with these LRA pairs. Importantly, we found with all the LRA pairs we considered that concentrations yielding the maximum synergy did not yield the maximum latency-reversal. Increasing concentrations to increase latency-reversal compromised synergy, unravelling a trade-off between synergy and efficacy in LRA combinations. The maximum synergy realizable with LRA pairs would thus be restricted by the desired level of latency-reversal, a constrained optimum we elucidated with

  6. Effects of combined traditional Chinese medicine with immunosuppressive agents for patients with myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Gu, Shanshan; Liu, Peng; Yang, Hongxia; Dong, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a kind of autoimmune disease induced by transferring dysfunction of neuromuscular junction. In the present study, we developed an integrated therapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine and immuno suppressive agents to seek for an effective treatment of MG. 220 MG patients were randomly divided into two groups with different therapies. Plasma levels of acetylcholine receptors antibodies (AchRAb) and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+Treg) were conducted through ELISA and flow cytometry. The amount of AchRAb (8.52±0.96 vs. 5.22±0.46) and CD4+CD25+Treg (1.94±1.21 vs. 3.21±0.96) in Group A receiving integrated therapy were significantly improved compared with Group B; the clinical performance of group treated with the integrated therapy was also much better. The integrated therapy in the present study could significantly improve the condition of MG with high recovery rate and low recurrence rate, which can be employed in future clinical treatment of MG. PMID:26770531

  7. Screening for Anti-Cancer Compounds in Marine Organisms in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobretsov, Sergey; Tamimi, Yahya; Al-Kindi, Mohamed A; Burney, Ikram

    2016-05-01

    Marine organisms are a rich source of bioactive molecules with potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and industry; however, few bioactive compounds have been isolated from organisms inhabiting the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. This study aimed to isolate and screen the anti-cancer activity of compounds and extracts from 40 natural products of marine organisms collected from the Gulf of Oman. This study was carried out between January 2012 and December 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. Fungi, bacteria, sponges, algae, soft corals, tunicates, bryozoans, mangrove tree samples and sea cucumbers were collected from seawater at Marina Bandar Al-Rowdha and Bandar Al-Khayran in Oman. Bacteria and fungi were isolated using a marine broth and organisms were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate. Compounds were identified from spectroscopic data. The anti-cancer activity of the compounds and extracts was tested in a Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF)-7 cell line breast adenocarcinoma model. Eight pure compounds and 32 extracts were investigated. Of these, 22.5% showed strong or medium anti-cancer activity, with malformin A, kuanoniamine D, hymenialdisine and gallic acid showing the greatest activity, as well as the soft coral Sarcophyton sp. extract. Treatment of MCF-7 cells at different concentrations of Sarcophyton sp. extracts indicated the induction of concentration-dependent cell death. Ultrastructural analysis highlighted the presence of nuclear fragmentation, membrane protrusion, blebbing and chromatic segregation at the nuclear membrane, which are typical characteristics of cell death by apoptosis induction. Some Omani marine organisms showed high anti-cancer potential. The efficacy, specificity and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer compounds from Omani marine organisms on various cancer models should be investigated in future in vitro and in vivo studies.

  8. Screening for Anti-Cancer Compounds in Marine Organisms in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Dobretsov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Marine organisms are a rich source of bioactive molecules with potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and industry; however, few bioactive compounds have been isolated from organisms inhabiting the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. This study aimed to isolate and screen the anti-cancer activity of compounds and extracts from 40 natural products of marine organisms collected from the Gulf of Oman. Methods: This study was carried out between January 2012 and December 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. Fungi, bacteria, sponges, algae, soft corals, tunicates, bryozoans, mangrove tree samples and sea cucumbers were collected from seawater at Marina Bandar Al-Rowdha and Bandar Al-Khayran in Oman. Bacteria and fungi were isolated using a marine broth and organisms were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate. Compounds were identified from spectroscopic data. The anti-cancer activity of the compounds and extracts was tested in a Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF-7 cell line breast adenocarcinoma model. Results: Eight pure compounds and 32 extracts were investigated. Of these, 22.5% showed strong or medium anti-cancer activity, with malformin A, kuanoniamine D, hymenialdisine and gallic acid showing the greatest activity, as well as the soft coral Sarcophyton sp. extract. Treatment of MCF-7 cells at different concentrations of Sarcophyton sp. extracts indicated the induction of concentration-dependent cell death. Ultrastructural analysis highlighted the presence of nuclear fragmentation, membrane protrusion, blebbing and chromatic segregation at the nuclear membrane, which are typical characteristics of cell death by apoptosis induction. Conclusion: Some Omani marine organisms showed high anti-cancer potential. The efficacy, specificity and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer compounds from Omani marine organisms on various cancer models should be investigated in future in vitro and in vivo studies.

  9. In vitro synergistic combinations of pentamidine, polymyxin B, tigecycline and tobramycin with antifungal agents against Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzebon Venturini, Tarcieli; Rossato, Luana; Chassot, Francieli; Tairine Keller, Jéssica; Baldissera Piasentin, Fernanda; Morais Santurio, Janio; Hartz Alves, Sydney

    2016-08-01

    The genus Fusarium is characterized by hyaline filamentous fungi that cause infections predominantly in immunocompromised patients. The remarkable primary resistance to antifungal agents of this genus requires a search for new therapeutic possibilities. This study assessed the in vitro susceptibility of 25 clinical isolates of Fusarium against antifungal agents (amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole and voriconazole) and antimicrobials (pentamidine, polymyxin B, tigecycline and tobramycin) according to the broth microdilution method (M38-A2). The interactions between antifungal and antimicrobial agents were evaluated by the microdilution checkerboard method. Pentamidine and polymyxin B showed MIC values ≥4 µg ml-1 against Fusarium spp. The highest rates of synergism were observed when amphotericin B or voriconazole was combined with tobramycin (80 % and 76 %, respectively), polymyxin B (76 % and 64 %) and pentamidine (72 % and 68 %). The most significant combinations deserve in vivo evaluations in order to verify their potential in the treatment of fusariosis.

  10. Drug Repurposing Approach Identifies a Synergistic Drug Combination of an Antifungal Agent and an Experimental Organometallic Drug for Melanoma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Tina; Demaria, Olivier; Zava, Olivier; Joncic, Ana; Gilliet, Michel; Dyson, Paul J

    2018-01-02

    By screening a drug library comprising FDA approved compounds, we discovered a potent interaction between the antifungal agent haloprogin and the experimental organometallic drug RAPTA-T, to synergistically induce cancer cell killing. The combination of these two small molecules, even at low doses, elicited an improved therapeutic response on tumor growth over either agent alone or the current treatment used in the clinic in the highly aggressive syngeneic B16F10 melanoma tumor model, where classical cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents show little efficacy. The combination with the repurposed chemodrug haloprogin provides the basis for a new powerful treatment option for cutaneous melanoma. Importantly, because synergistic induction of tumor cell death is achieved with low individual drug doses, and cellular targets for RAPTA-T are different from those of classical chemotherapeutic drugs, a therapeutic strategy based on this approach could avoid toxicities and potentially resistance mechanisms, and could even inhibit metastatic progression.

  11. Biologics combined with conventional systemic agents or phototherapy for the treatment of psoriasis: real-life data from PSONET registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busard, C. I.; Cohen, A. D.; Wolf, P.; Gkalpakiotis, S.; Cazzaniga, S.; Stern, R. S.; Hutten, B. A.; Feldhamer, I.; Quehenberger, F.; Lichem, R.; Kojanova, M.; Adenubiova, E.; Addis, A.; Naldi, L.; Spuls, P. I.

    2018-01-01

    Biologics have greatly improved psoriasis management. However, primary and secondary non-response to treatment requires innovative strategies to optimize outcomes. To describe the use of combined treatment of biologics with conventional systemic agents or phototherapy in daily clinical practice. We

  12. Multiple Mechanisms of Anti-Cancer Effects Exerted by Astaxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (ATX is a xanthophyll carotenoid which has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA as food colorant in animal and fish feed. It is widely found in algae and aquatic animals and has powerful anti-oxidative activity. Previous studies have revealed that ATX, with its anti-oxidative property, is beneficial as a therapeutic agent for various diseases without any side effects or toxicity. In addition, ATX also shows preclinical anti-tumor efficacy both in vivo and in vitro in various cancer models. Several researches have deciphered that ATX exerts its anti-proliferative, anti-apoptosis and anti-invasion influence via different molecules and pathways including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. Hence, ATX shows great promise as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. Here, we review the rapidly advancing field of ATX in cancer therapy as well as some molecular targets of ATX.

  13. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharafeddin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO and disto-occlusal (DO Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity (MO, Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 and in the disto-occlusal (DO cavity, Prompt-L-Pop + Z250 were applied. As for group B, in the MO and DO cavities, Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX, and varnish + amalgam (In box + Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX were used respectivelywhile in group C; the teeth were restored with amalgam and varnish mesio-occlusally and with amalgam only disto-occlusally. As for group D, varnish + amalgam (in box + Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 were applied mesio-occlusally and Varnish + Amalgam (in box + Prompt–L–Pop + Z250 disto-occlusally.Marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration into various sections of the restored teeth. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for data analysis.Results: Microleakage in gingival margin was more than that in occlusal margin (P<0.05 and microleakage of combined amalgam-composite restorations was significantly lower than that of conventional composite and amalgam restorations.Conclusion: Marginal microleakage decreased by using amalgam at the base of the box in Class II composite restorations.

  14. Voglibose in Combination of Three Hypoglycemic Agents in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Pankivn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study — clinical and metabolic rationale for the selection of the third hypoglycemic agent to enhance the effectiveness of treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM type 2, assessment of the impact of the therapy intensification due to the addition of voglibose on carbohydrate metabolism parameters, which have not reached target levels during the combination therapy with metformin and glimepiride. Materials and methods. We observed 45 patients with DM type 2, who have not reached the targets of carbohydrate metabolism under the influence of previous treatments (metformin and glimepiride. After the initial clinical examination, patients were divided into two groups. In the first group (n = 30, wе added to the treatment the drug voglibose (Voxid, production of Kusum Pharm Ltd, Ukraine 0.2 mg before breakfast, lunch and dinner for 12 weeks. Results. After 12 weeks of treatment, the level of glycated hemoglobin (НbА1с in the first group decreased by 1.5 [1.1; 1.9] % (p  0.05. 80 % of patients achieved target levels of glycemia. The first group of patients showed a significant increase in HOMA-β index by 24.9 %, as well as a reduction of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR by 31.5 %. After 12 weeks of therapy, there was a statistically significant decrease in body weight by 2.1 kg in the first group of patients and no response in patients of the second group. Safety has been proveв in terms of the functional state of the liver and kidneys in this therapy. Conclusions. Adding voglibose for intensification of therapy in patients with type 2 DM, who had previously received metformin and glimepiride, has led to a significant improvement in carbohydrate metabolism (decrease in HbA1c by 1.5 %. Better control of carbohydrate metabolism during the combination therapy with metformin, glimepiride, and voglibose is accompanied by an increase of functional activity of pancreatic β-cells, a decrease in insulin resistance in the

  15. In vitro activities of tulathromycin and ceftiofur combined with other antimicrobial agents using bovine Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Michael T; Brumbaugh, Gordon W; Watts, Jeffrey L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the activities of two antibacterial agents used in the treatment of bovine respiratory infections-tulathromycin, a macrolide, and ceftiofur, a third-generation cephalosporin-alone, in combination with each other, and in combination with each of seven additional antibiotics (tilmicosin, florfenicol, enrofloxacin, danofloxacin, ampicillin, tetracycline, and penicillin G) against bovine Pasteurella multocida (n = 60) and Mannheimia haemolytica (n = 10) isolates for determination of synergy, antagonism, or indifference. Of 458 organism-drug combinations, 160 combinations of tulathromycin and 209 combinations of ceftiofur with eight antimicrobial drugs were indifferent. One combination was antagonistic (ceftiofur + florfenicol against one isolate of P. multocida). Time-kill studies showed loss of cidality for ceftiofur when combined with florfenicol at 1x the minimal inhibitory concentration. Overall, the in vitro data demonstrated that tulathromycin and ceftiofur, in combination with each other or seven other antimicrobial agents, primarily produce an indifferent response with no occurrences of synergism and rare occurrences of antagonism.

  16. In Vitro Synergistic Effect of Psidium guineense (Swartz in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Gomes Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of aqueous extract of Psidium guineense Swartz (Araçá-do-campo and five antimicrobials (ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem against twelve strains of Staphylococcus aureus with a resistant phenotype previously determined by the disk diffusion method. Four S. aureus strains showed resistance to all antimicrobial agents tested and were selected for the study of the interaction between aqueous extract of P. guineense and antimicrobial agents, by the checkerboard method. The criteria used to evaluate the synergistic activity were defined by the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI. All S. aureus strains were susceptible to P. guineense as determined by the microdilution method. The combination of the P. guineense extract with the antimicrobial agents resulted in an eight-fold reduction in the MIC of these agents, which showed a FICI ranging from 0.125 to 0.5, suggesting a synergistic interaction against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains. The combination of the aqueous extract of P. guineense with cefoxitin showed the lowest FICI values. This study demonstrated that the aqueous extract of P. guineense combined with beta lactamics antimicrobials, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems, acts synergistically by inhibiting MRSA strains.

  17. Combination chemotherapy versus single-agent therapy as first- and second-line treatment in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensuu, H; Holli, K; Heikkinen, M

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report results of a randomized prospective study that compared single agents of low toxicity given both as the first-line and second-line chemotherapy with combination chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer with distant metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients in the single-agent arm...... three times per week (CEF) followed by M 8 mg/m2 plus vinblastine (V) 6 mg/m2 every 4 weeks. Exclusion criteria included age greater than 70 years, World Health Organization (WHO) performance status greater than 2, prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease, and presence of liver metastases in patients...

  18. Combining human and machine intelligence to derive agents' behavioral rules for groundwater irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yao; Quinn, Christopher J.; Cai, Ximing; Garfinkle, Noah W.

    2017-11-01

    For agent-based modeling, the major challenges in deriving agents' behavioral rules arise from agents' bounded rationality and data scarcity. This study proposes a "gray box" approach to address the challenge by incorporating expert domain knowledge (i.e., human intelligence) with machine learning techniques (i.e., machine intelligence). Specifically, we propose using directed information graph (DIG), boosted regression trees (BRT), and domain knowledge to infer causal factors and identify behavioral rules from data. A case study is conducted to investigate farmers' pumping behavior in the Midwest, U.S.A. Results show that four factors identified by the DIG algorithm- corn price, underlying groundwater level, monthly mean temperature and precipitation- have main causal influences on agents' decisions on monthly groundwater irrigation depth. The agent-based model is then developed based on the behavioral rules represented by three DIGs and modeled by BRTs, and coupled with a physically-based groundwater model to investigate the impacts of agents' pumping behavior on the underlying groundwater system in the context of coupled human and environmental systems.

  19. Mitosis-targeted anti-cancer therapies: where they stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K-S; Koh, C-G; Li, H-Y

    2012-10-18

    The strategy of clinically targeting cancerous cells at their most vulnerable state during mitosis has instigated numerous studies into the mitotic cell death (MCD) pathway. As the hallmark of cancer revolves around cell-cycle deregulation, it is not surprising that antimitotic therapies are effective against the abnormal proliferation of transformed cells. Moreover, these antimitotic drugs are also highly selective and sensitive. Despite the robust rate of discovery and the development of mitosis-selective inhibitors, the unpredictable complexities of the human body's response to these drugs still herald the biggest challenge towards clinical success. Undoubtedly, the need to bridge the gap between promising preclinical trials and effective translational bedside treatment prompts further investigations towards mapping out the mechanistic pathways of MCD, understanding how these drugs work as medicine in the body and more comprehensive target validations. In this review, current antimitotic agents are summarized with particular emphasis on the evaluation of their clinical efficacy as well as their limitations. In addition, we discuss the basis behind the lack of activity of these inhibitors in human trials and the potential and future directions of mitotic anticancer strategies.

  20. Glucose-aspirin: Synthesis and in vitro anti-cancer activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, James N; Tazawa, Makio J

    2012-05-01

    Glucose-aspirin (GA) was synthesized by conjugating aspirin (ASA) to glucose. The water solubility and biological activity of GA was studied in comparison to aspirin. The human serum protease activity on the ester showed a slower hydrolysis rate, compared to ASA. Glucose-aspirin was sevenfold more water soluble than aspirin and it was about 8- to 9-fold more active in inhibiting cell growth than aspirin in their anti-cancer cell culture activity on breast (SKBR3), pancreatic (PANC-1), and prostate (PC3) cell lines, whereas the activity was similar on a benign non-cancerous cell line (WI 38). In conclusion, GA is a highly water soluble derivative of aspirin. Although the serum hydrolysis for GA was slower, there was significant anti-cancer activity at the doses studied under the experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. When ubiquitin meets NF-κB: a trove for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Yuling

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades, the studies on ubiquitination in regulating transcription factor NF-κB activation have elucidated the expanding role of ubiquitination in modulating cellular events by non-proteolytic mechanisms, as well as by proteasomal degradation. The significance of ubiquitination has also been recognized in regulating gene transcription, epigenetic modifications, kinase activation, DNA repair and subcellular translocation. This progress has been translated into novel strategies for developing anti-cancer therapeutics, exemplified by the success of the first FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor drug Bortezomib. Here we discuss the current understanding of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and how it is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling pathways in response to a variety of stimuli. We also focus on the recent progress of anti-cancer drug development targeting various steps of ubiquitination process, and the potential of these drugs in cancer treatment as related to their impact on NF-κB activation.

  2. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-10-16

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  3. Evidence of vanillin binding to CAMKIV explains the anti-cancer mechanism in human hepatic carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Huma; Tarique, Mohd; Khan, Parvez; Luqman, Suaib; Ahamad, Shahzaib; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2018-01-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr kinase family, and is associated with different types of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Vanillin is a natural compound, a primary component of the extract of the vanilla bean which possesses varieties of pharmacological features including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-tumor. Here, we have investigated the binding mechanism and affinity of vanillin to the CAMKIV which is being considered as a potential drug target for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. We found that vanillin binds strongly to the active site cavity of CAMKIV and stabilized by a large number of non-covalent interactions. We explored the utility of vanillin as anti-cancer agent and found that it inhibits the proliferation of human hepatocyte carcinoma (HepG2) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, vanillin treatment resulted into the significant reduction in the mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ROS production that eventually leads to apoptosis in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cancer cells. These findings may offer a novel therapeutic approach by targeting the CAMKIV using natural product and its derivative with a minimal side effect.

  4. Toosendanin Exerts an Anti-Cancer Effect in Glioblastoma by Inducing Estrogen Receptor β- and p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Cao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor with median survival of approximately one year. This dismal poor prognosis is due to resistance to currently available chemotherapeutics; therefore, new cytotoxic agents are urgently needed. In the present study, we reported the cytotoxicity of toosendanin (TSN in the GBM U87 and C6 cell lines in vitro and in vivo. By using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry analysis, and Western blot, we found that TSN inhibited U87 and C6 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis at a concentration as low as 10 nM. Administration of TSN also reduced tumor burden in a xenograft model of athymic nude mice. Pharmacological and molecular studies suggested that estrogen receptor β (ERβ and p53 were prominent targets for TSN. GBM cell apoptosis induced by TSN was a stepwise biological event involving the upregulation of ERβ and contextual activation of functional p53. Collectively, our study indicates, for the first time, that TSN is a candidate of novel anti-cancer drugs for GBM. Furthermore, ERβ and p53 could act as predictive biomarkers for the sensitivity of cancer to TSN.

  5. MEK-ERK inhibition potentiates WAY-600-induced anti-cancer efficiency in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaifeng; Fan, Yaohua; Chen, Gongying; Wang, Zhengrong; Kong, Dexin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-05-27

    The search for novel anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) agents is important. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) hyper-activation plays a pivotal role in promoting HCC tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. The current preclinical study evaluated the potential anti-HCC activity by a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor, WAY-600. We showed that WAY-600 inhibited survival and proliferation of HCC cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7) and primary human HCC cells. Caspase-dependent apoptosis was activated by WAY-600 in above HCC cells. Reversely, caspase inhibitors largely attenuated WAY-600's lethality against HCC cells. At the signaling level, WAY-600 blocked mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) assemble and activation, yet activated MEK-ERK pathway in HCC cells. MEK-ERK inhibitors, PD-98059 and MEK-162, or MEK1/2 shRNA significantly potentiated WAY-600's cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that WAY-600 intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in nude mice inhibited p-AKT Ser-473 and displayed significant anti-cancer activity against HepG2 xenografts. Remarkably, co-administration of MEK-162 further potentiated WAY-600's anti-HCC activity in vivo. These preclinical results demonstrate the potent anti-HCC activity by WAY-600, either alone or with MEK-ERK inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A physical method to enhance transdermal delivery of a tissue optical clearing agent: combination of microneedling and sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jinhee; Park, Donghee; Son, Taeyoon; Seo, Jongbum; Nelson, J Stuart; Jung, Byungjo

    2010-07-01

    Various physical methods, such as microneedling, laser ablation, sonophoresis, and sandpaper, have been widely studied to enhance the transdermal delivery of tissue optical clearing (TOC) agents. A previous study demonstrated that the microneedling method could effectively enhance the permeability of a TOC agent through the skin barrier. In this study, we introduce a new physical combination method which utilizes both microneedling and sonophoresis to further enhance the transdermal delivery of a TOC agent, glycerol. Porcine skin samples were divided into a control group treated only with the microneedle roller and a test group treated with both the microneedle roller and sonophoresis. Glycerol was applied topically after microneedling. The optimal concentration and transdermal delivery efficacy of glycerol were quantitatively evaluated. A 70% glycerol solution was determined to be the optimal concentration for the combination method. The combination method resulted in approximately a 2.3-fold higher transdermal diffusion rate of glycerol when compared to the microneedling method alone. The combination method and optimal glycerol concentration effectively enhanced transdermal delivery of glycerol by accelerating the diffusion rate through the skin barrier.

  7. Centrosome – a promising anti-cancer target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera-Rivera Y

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yainyrette Rivera-Rivera, Harold I Saavedra Department of Pharmacology, Ponce Health Sciences University-School of Medicine, Ponce Research Institute, Ponce, Puerto Rico Abstract: The centrosome, an organelle discovered >100 years ago, is the main microtubule-organizing center in mammalian organisms. The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by the pericentriolar material (PMC and plays a major role in the regulation of cell cycle transitions (G1-S, G2-M, and metaphase-anaphase, ensuring the normality of cell division. Hundreds of proteins found in the centrosome exert a variety of roles, including microtubule dynamics, nucleation, and kinetochore–microtubule attachments that allow correct chromosome alignment and segregation. Errors in these processes lead to structural (shape, size, number, position, and composition, functional (abnormal microtubule nucleation and disorganized spindles, and numerical (centrosome amplification [CA] centrosome aberrations causing aneuploidy and genomic instability. Compelling data demonstrate that centrosomes are implicated in cancer, because there are important oncogenic and tumor suppressor proteins that are localized in this organelle and drive centrosome aberrations. Centrosome defects have been found in pre-neoplasias and tumors from breast, ovaries, prostate, head and neck, lung, liver, and bladder among many others. Several drugs/compounds against centrosomal proteins have shown promising results. Other drugs have higher toxicity with modest or no benefits, and there are more recently developed agents being tested in clinical trials. All of this emerging evidence suggests that targeting centrosome aberrations may be a future avenue for therapeutic intervention in cancer research. Keywords: centrosomes, cell cycle, mitosis, CA, CIN, cancer therapy

  8. In vitro and in vivo analysis of antimicrobial agents alone and in combination against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songzhe eHE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of tigecycline and other 13 common antimicrobial agents, alone or in combination, against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.MethodsAn in vitro susceptibility test of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii was used to detect minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs. A mouse lung infection model of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii,established by the ultrasonic atomization method, was used to define in vivo antimicrobial activities.Results Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii showed high sensitivity to tigecycline (98% inhibition, polymyxin B (78.2% inhibition, and minocycline (74.2% inhibition. However, the use of these antimicrobial agents in combination with other antimicrobial agents produced synergistic or additive effects. In vivo data showed that white blood cell (WBC counts in drug combination groups C (minocycline + amikacin and D (minocycline + rifampicin were significantly higher than in groups A (tigecycline and B (polymyxin B (P < 0.05, after administration of the drugs 24h post-infection. Lung tissue inflammation gradually increased in the model group during the first 24h after ultrasonic atomization infection; vasodilation, congestion with hemorrhage were observed 48h post infection. After three days of anti-infective therapy in groups A, B, C and D, lung tissue inflammation in each group gradually recovered with clear structures. The mortality rates in drug combination groups (groups C and D were much lower than in groups A and B.ConclusionThe combination of minocycline with either rifampicin or amikacin is more effective against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii than single-agent tigecycline or polymyxin B. In addition, the mouse lung infection by ultrasonic atomization is a suitable model for drug screening and analysis of infection mechanism.

  9. Preclinical evaluation of molecular-targeted anticancer agents for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Mechthild; Zips, Daniel; Thames, Howard D.; Kummermehr, Johann; Baumann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The combination of molecular-targeted agents with irradiation is a highly promising avenue for cancer research and patient care. Molecular-targeted agents are in themselves not curative in solid tumours, whereas radiotherapy is highly efficient in eradicating tumour stem cells. Recurrences after high-dose radiotherapy are caused by only one or few surviving tumour stem cells. Thus, even if a novel agent has the potential to kill only few tumour stem cells, or if it interferes in mechanisms of radioresistance of tumours, combination with radiotherapy may lead to an important improvement in local tumour control and survival. To evaluate the effects of novel agents combined with radiotherapy, it is therefore necessary to use experimental endpoints which reflect the killing of tumour stem cells, in particular tumour control assays. Such endpoints often do not correlate with volume-based parameters of tumour response such as tumour regression and growth delay. This calls for radiotherapy specific research strategies in the preclinical testing of novel anti-cancer drugs, which in many aspects are different from research approaches for medical oncology

  10. Beliefs Underlying Messages of Anti-Cancer-Screening Websites in Japan: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhara, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Okada, Masahumi; Kato, Mio; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2018-02-26

    Background: Cancer screening rates are lower in Japan than in Western countries. Meanwhile, anti-cancer-screening activists take to the internet to spread their messages that cancer screening has little or no efficacy, poses substantial health risks such as side effects from radiation exposure, and that people should forgo cancer screening. We applied a qualitative approach to explore the beliefs underlying the messages of anti-cancer-screening websites, by focusing on perceived value the beliefs provided to those who held them. Methods: We conducted online searches using Google Japan and Yahoo! Japan, targeting websites we classified as “pro,” “anti,” or “neutral” depending on their claims. We applied a dual analytic approach- inductive thematic analysis and deductive interpretative analysis- to the textual data of the anti websites. Results: Of the 88 websites analyzed, five themes that correspond to beliefs were identified: destruction of common knowledge, denial of standard cancer control, education about right cancer control, education about hidden truths, and sense of superiority that only I know the truth. Authors of anti websites ascribed two values (“safety of people” and “self-esteem”) to their beliefs. Conclusion: The beliefs of authors of anti-cancer-screening websites were supposed to be strong. It would be better to target in cancer screening promotion not outright screening refusers but screening hesitant people who are more amenable to changing their attitudes toward screening. The possible means to persuade them were discussed. Creative Commons Attribution License

  11. Cytotoxic, anti-cancer, and anti-microbial effects of different extracts obtained from Artemisia rupestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokerbek, Shamshabanu; Sakipova, Zuriyadda; Chalupová, Marta; Nejezchlebová, Marcela; Hošek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Artemisia rupestris is a part of traditional Kazakh folk medicine. Extracts obtained from this plant are used to treat various diseases, including cancer. This study evaluates the anti-microbial, cytotoxic, and anti-cancer effects of different extracts of the plant. Different extraction techniques were used and the resultant activities were compared. Extracts of A. rupestris were prepared from the flowers plus the leaves and from the stems. The antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus was quantified. Cell lines L1210 and THP-1 were used to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of these extracts in vitro. The anti-cancer effect was tested using L1210-induced tumorgenesis in mouse model. The aqueous extract of stems was the most active against C. albicans, whereas the methanolic extract of flowers plus leaves especially inhibited the growth of S. aureus. The aqueous extracts were found to be non-cytotoxic for both cell lines, whereas the lipophilic extracts showed cytotoxic effects. The extract obtained from flowers plus leaves was more cytotoxic than that from stems. The tested extracts showed no anti-cancer potential. The results obtained testify to the relatively safe consumption of aqueous extracts of A. rupestris, but lipophilic extracts showed toxic effects and their consumption should be considered more carefully.Key words: L1210 cell line THP-1 cell line microwave-assisted extraction ultrasonic-assisted extraction Candida albicans Staphylococcus aureus.

  12. Combination of Multi-Agent Systems and Wireless Sensor Networks for the Monitoring of Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriuso, Alberto L; Villarrubia González, Gabriel; De Paz, Juan F; Lozano, Álvaro; Bajo, Javier

    2018-01-02

    Precision breeding techniques have been widely used to optimize expenses and increase livestock yields. Notwithstanding, the joint use of heterogeneous sensors and artificial intelligence techniques for the simultaneous analysis or detection of different problems that cattle may present has not been addressed. This study arises from the necessity to obtain a technological tool that faces this state of the art limitation. As novelty, this work presents a multi-agent architecture based on virtual organizations which allows to deploy a new embedded agent model in computationally limited autonomous sensors, making use of the Platform for Automatic coNstruction of orGanizations of intElligent Agents (PANGEA). To validate the proposed platform, different studies have been performed, where parameters specific to each animal are studied, such as physical activity, temperature, estrus cycle state and the moment in which the animal goes into labor. In addition, a set of applications that allow farmers to remotely monitor the livestock have been developed.

  13. The circadian clock modulates anti-cancer properties of curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Ashapurna; Sharma, Vishal P.; Sarkar, Arindam B.; Sekar, M. Chandra; Samuel, Karunakar; Geusz, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Curcuminoids of the spice turmeric and their enhanced derivatives have much potential as cancer treatments. They act on a wide variety of biological pathways, including those regulating cell division and circadian rhythms. It is known that circadian clocks can modify cancer therapy effectiveness, according to studies aimed at optimizing treatments based on the circadian cycle. It is therefore important to determine whether treatments with curcumin or similar chemotherapeutic agents are regulated by circadian timing. Similarly, it is important to characterize any effects of curcumin on timing abilities of the circadian clocks within cancer cells. We examined the circadian clock’s impact on the timing of cell death and cell division in curcumin-treated C6 rat glioma cells through continuous video microscopy for several days. To evaluate its persistence and distribution in cancer cells, curcumin was localized within cell compartments by imaging its autofluorescence. Finally, HPLC and spectroscopy were used to determine the relative stabilities of the curcumin congeners demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin that are present in turmeric. Circadian rhythms in cell death were observed in response to low (5 μM) curcumin, reaching a peak several hours before the peak in rhythmic expression of mPER2 protein, a major circadian clock component. These results revealed a sensitive phase of the circadian cycle that could be effectively targeted in patient therapies based on curcumin or its analogs. Curcumin fluorescence was observed in cell compartments at least 24 h after treatment, and the two congeners displayed greater stability than curcumin in cell culture medium. We propose a mechanism whereby curcuminoids act in a sustained manner, over several days, despite their tendency to degrade rapidly in blood and other aqueous media. During cancer therapy, curcumin or its analogs should be delivered to tumor cells at the optimal phase for highest efficacy after identifying

  14. 12-Chloracetyl-PPD, a novel dammarane derivative, shows anti-cancer activity via delay the progression of cell cycle G2/M phase and reactive oxygen species-mediate cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu De; Sun, Yuan Yuan; Zhao, Chen; Qu, Fan Zhi; Zhao, Yu Qing

    2017-03-05

    (20R)-Dammarane-3β, 12β, 20, 25-tetrol (25-OH-PPD) is a ginsenoside isolated from Panax ginseng (C. A. Meyer). This compound exhibits anti-cancer activities on many human cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated anti-cancer mechanisms of 12β-O-( L -Chloracetyl)-dammar-20(22)-ene-3β,25-diol(12-Chloracetyl-PPD), a modified 25-OH-PPD. We found that compound 12-Chloracetyl-PPD resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of viability in prostate, breast, and gastric cancer cells, without affecting the viability of normal cell (human gastric epithelial cell line-GES-1, hair follicle dermal papilla cell line-HHDPC and rat myocardial cell line-H9C2). In MDA-MB-435 and C4-2B cancer cells, 12-Chloracetyl-PPD induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, down-regulated mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) expression, up-regulated p53 expression, triggered apoptosis, and stimulated reactive oxygen species production. Apoptosis can be attenuated by the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine. Our results suggested that compound 12-Chloracetyl-PPD showed obvious anti-cancer activity based on delaying cell cycle arrest and inducing cell apoptosis by reactive oxygen species production, which supported development of 12-Chloracetyl-PPD as a potential agent for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combination of nanotechnology with vascular targeting agents for effective cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanban-Esfahlan, Rana; Seidi, Khaled; Banimohamad-Shotorbani, Behnaz; Jahanban-Esfahlan, Ali; Yousefi, Bahman

    2018-04-01

    As a young science, nanotechnology promptly integrated into the current oncology practice. Accordingly, various nanostructure particles were developed to reduce drug toxicity and allow the targeted delivery of various diagnostic and therapeutic compounds to the cancer cells. New sophisticated nanosystems constantly emerge to improve the performance of current anticancer modalities. Targeting tumor vasculature is an attractive strategy to fight cancer. Though the idea was swiftly furthered from basic science to the clinic, targeting tumor vasculature had a limited potential in patients, where tumors relapse due to the development of multiple drug resistance and metastasis. The aim of this review is to discuss the advantages of nanosystem incorporation with various vascular targeting agents, including (i) endogen anti-angiogenic agents; (ii) inhibitors of angiogenesis-related growth factors; (iii) inhibitors of tyrosine kinase receptors; (iv) inhibitors of angiogenesis-related signaling pathways; (v) inhibitors of tumor endothelial cell-associated markers; and (vi) tumor vascular disrupting agents. We also review the efficacy of nanostructures as natural vascular targeting agents. The efficacy of each approach in cancer therapy is further discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Percutaneous exposure to the nerve agent VX: Efficacy of combined atropine, obidoxime and diazepam treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.J.A.; Schans, M.J. van der; Helden, H.P.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The nerve agent VX is most likely to enter the body via liquid contamination of the skin. After percutaneous exposure, the slow uptake into the blood, and its slow elimination result in toxic levels in plasma for a period of several hours. Consequently, this has implications for the development of

  17. An agent strategy for automated stock market trading combining price and order book information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Silaghi; V. Robu (Valentin)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper proposes a novel automated agent strategy for stock market trading, developed in the context of the Penn-Lehman automated trading (PLAT) simulation platform by Kearns, M., and Ortiz, L., (2003). We provide a comprehensive experimental validation of our strategy using historic

  18. Polymeric Nano-Encapsulation of Curcumin Enhances its Anti-Cancer Activity in Breast (MDA-MB231) and Lung (A549) Cancer Cells Through Reduction in Expression of HIF-1α and Nuclear p65 (Rel A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed N; Haggag, Yusuf A; Lane, Majella E; McCarron, Paul A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M

    2018-02-14

    The anti-cancer potential of curcumin, a natural NFκβ inhibitor, has been reported extensively in breast, lung and other cancers. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin is enhanced when formulated in a nanoparticulate carrier. However, the mechanism of action of curcumin at the molecular level in the hypoxic tumour micro-environment is not fully understood. Hence, the aim of our study was to investigate the mechanism of action of curcumin formulated as nanoparticles in in vitro models of breast and lung cancer under an hypoxic microenvironment. Biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) PLGA nanoparticles (NP), loaded with curcumin (cur-PLGA-NP), were fabricated using a solvent evaporation technique to overcome solubility issues and to facilitate intracellular curcumin delivery. Cytotoxicity of free curcumin and cur-PLGA-NP was evaluated in MDA-MB-231 and A549 cell lines using migration, invasion and colony formation assays. All treatments were performed under an hypoxic micro-environment and whole cell lysates from controls and test groups were used to determine the expression of HIF-1α and p65 levels using ELISA assays. A ten-fold increase in solubility, three-fold increase in anti-cancer activity and a significant reduction in the levels of cellular HIF-1α and nuclear p65 (Rel A) were observed for cur-PLGA-NP, when compared to free curcumin. Our findings indicate that curcumin can effectively lower the elevated levels of HIF-1α and nuclear p65 (Rel A) in breast and lung cancer cells under an hypoxic tumour micro-environment when delivered in nanoparticulate form. This applied means of colloidal delivery could explain the improved anti-cancer efficacy of curcumin and has further potential applications in enhancing the activity of anti-cancer agents of low solubility. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Study of phytochemical, anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, and anti-cancer properties of Allium wallichii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Jaya; Muhammad, BushraTaj; Thapa, Pratiksha; Shrestha, Bhupal Govinda

    2017-02-08

    There is growing interest in the use of plants for the treatment and prevention of cancer. Medicinal plants are currently being evaluated as source of promising anticancer agents. In this paper, we have investigated the anticancer potential of plant Allium wallichii, a plant native to Nepal and growing at elevations of 2300-4800 m. This is the first study of its kind for the plant mentioned. The dried plant was extracted in aqueous ethanol. Phytochemical screening, anti-microbial assay, anti-oxidant assay, cytotoxicity assay and the flow-cytometric analysis were done for analyzing different phytochemicals present, anti-microbial activity, anti-oxidant activity and anti-cancer properties of Allium wallichii. We observed the presence of steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, reducing sugars and glycosides in the plant extract and the plant showed moderate anti-microbial and anti-oxidant activity. The IC 50 values of Allium wallichii in different cancer cell lines are 69.69 μg/ml for Prostate cancer (PC3) cell line, 55.29 μg/ml for Breast Cancer (MCF-7) cell line and 46.51 μg/ml for cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line as compared to Doxorubicin (0.85 μg/ml). The cell viability assay using FACS showed that the IC 50 value of Allium wallichii for Burkitt's lymphoma (B-Lymphoma) cell line was 3.817 ± 1.99 mg/ml. Allium wallichii can be an important candidate to be used as an anticancer agent. Separation of pure compounds with bioassay guided extraction, spectrometric analysis and subsequent cytotoxicity assay of the pure bioactive compounds from Allium wallichii is highly recommended as the crude extract itself showed promising cytotoxicity.

  20. Effects of Complementary Combination Therapy of Korean Red Ginseng and Antiviral Agents in Chronic Hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Hwa; Yang, Keum-Jin; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2016-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B management is commonly targeted at reducing viral replication. However, the currently available antiviral therapies are associated with some problems, including resistance and numerous adverse effects. Ginseng has been reported to be effective for treating viral infections such as influenza and human immunodeficiency virus. However, there are currently few studies on the effects of ginseng in chronic hepatitis B. Thus, this study investigated the effects of ginseng together with antiviral agents in chronic hepatitis B. This was a prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial, and single-center study. Thirty-eight patients were enrolled. The control group (n = 19) was administered antiviral agents alone. The experimental group (n = 19) was administered antiviral agents along with Korean Red Ginseng powder capsules (each dose is 1 gram (two capsules), a one-day dose is 3 grams). The baseline characteristics did not differ between the two groups. Differences in several non-invasive fibrosis serologic markers (type IV collagen, hyaluronic acid, transforming growth factor-β) and in the hepatitis B virus DNA levels were compared between the groups. The non-invasive fibrosis serologic markers were further decreased in the experimental group, with significant differences after treatment observed for hyaluronic acid (p = 0.032) and transforming growth factor-β (p = 0.008), but not for type IV collagen (p = 0.174). This study suggests the possibility of Korean Red Ginseng as a complementary therapy for chronic hepatitis B.

  1. Combination of Multi-Agent Systems and Wireless Sensor Networks for the Monitoring of Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriuso, Alberto L.; De Paz, Juan F.; Lozano, Álvaro

    2018-01-01

    Precision breeding techniques have been widely used to optimize expenses and increase livestock yields. Notwithstanding, the joint use of heterogeneous sensors and artificial intelligence techniques for the simultaneous analysis or detection of different problems that cattle may present has not been addressed. This study arises from the necessity to obtain a technological tool that faces this state of the art limitation. As novelty, this work presents a multi-agent architecture based on virtual organizations which allows to deploy a new embedded agent model in computationally limited autonomous sensors, making use of the Platform for Automatic coNstruction of orGanizations of intElligent Agents (PANGEA). To validate the proposed platform, different studies have been performed, where parameters specific to each animal are studied, such as physical activity, temperature, estrus cycle state and the moment in which the animal goes into labor. In addition, a set of applications that allow farmers to remotely monitor the livestock have been developed. PMID:29301310

  2. Combining agent-based modeling and life cycle assessment for the evaluation of mobility policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florent, Querini; Enrico, Benetto

    2015-02-03

    This article presents agent-based modeling (ABM) as a novel approach for consequential life cycle assessment (C-LCA) of large scale policies, more specifically mobility-related policies. The approach is validated at the Luxembourgish level (as a first case study). The agent-based model simulates the car market (sales, use, and dismantling) of the population of users in the period 2013-2020, following the implementation of different mobility policies and available electric vehicles. The resulting changes in the car fleet composition as well as the hourly uses of the vehicles are then used to derive consistent LCA results, representing the consequences of the policies. Policies will have significant environmental consequences: when using ReCiPe2008, we observe a decrease of global warming, fossil depletion, acidification, ozone depletion, and photochemical ozone formation and an increase of metal depletion, ionizing radiations, marine eutrophication, and particulate matter formation. The study clearly shows that the extrapolation of LCA results for the circulating fleet at national scale following the introduction of the policies from the LCAs of single vehicles by simple up-scaling (using hypothetical deployment scenarios) would be flawed. The inventory has to be directly conducted at full scale and to this aim, ABM is indeed a promising approach, as it allows identifying and quantifying emerging effects while modeling the Life Cycle Inventory of vehicles at microscale through the concept of agents.

  3. A numerical study of combined use of two biocontrol agents with different biocontrol mechanisms in controlling foliar pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X-M; Jeffries, P; Pautasso, M; Jeger, M J

    2011-09-01

    Effective use of biocontrol agents is an important component of sustainable agriculture. A previous numerical study of a generic model showed that biocontrol efficacy was greatest for a single biocontrol agent (BCA) combining competition with mycoparasitism or antibiosis. This study uses the same mathematical model to investigate whether the biocontrol efficacy of combined use of two BCAs with different biocontrol mechanisms is greater than that of a single BCA with either or both of the two mechanisms, assuming that two BCAs occupy the same host tissue as the pathogen. Within the parameter values considered, a BCA with two biocontrol mechanisms always outperformed the combined use of two BCAs with a single but different biocontrol mechanism. Similarly, combined use of two BCAs with a single but different biocontrol mechanism is shown to be far less effective than that of a single BCA with both mechanisms. Disease suppression from combined use of two BCAs was very similar to that achieved by the more efficacious one. As expected, a higher BCA introduction rate led to increased disease suppression. Incorporation of interactions between two BCAs did not greatly affect the disease dynamics except when a mycoparasitic and, to a lesser extent, an antibiotic-producing BCA was involved. Increasing the competitiveness of a mycoparasitic BCA over a BCA whose biocontrol mechanism is either competition or antibiosis may lead to improved biocontrol initially and reduced fluctuations in disease dynamics. The present study suggests that, under the model assumptions, combined use of two BCAs with different biocontrol mechanisms in most cases only results in control efficacies similar to using the more efficacious one alone. These predictions are consistent with published experimental results, suggesting that combined use of BCAs should not be recommended without clear understanding of their main biocontrol mechanisms and relative competitiveness, and experimental evaluation.

  4. Safety of selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 microspheres combined with systemic anticancer agents: expert consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Andrew; Brown, Daniel B; Feilchenfeldt, Jonas; Marshall, John; Wasan, Harpreet; Fakih, Marwan; Gibbs, Peter; Knuth, Alexander; Sangro, Bruno; Soulen, Michael C; Pittari, Gianfranco; Sharma, Ricky A

    2017-12-01

    Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with microspheres labelled with the β-emitter yttrium-90 (Y-90) enables targeted delivery of radiation to hepatic tumors. SIRT is primarily used to treat inoperable primary or metastatic liver tumors. Eligible patients have usually been exposed to a variety of systemic anticancer therapies, including cytotoxic agents, targeted biologics, immunotherapy and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). All these treatments have potential interactions with SIRT; however, robust evidence on the safety of these potential combinations is lacking. This paper provides current clinical experiences and expert consensus guidelines for the use of SIRT in combination with the anticancer treatment agents likely to be encountered in clinical practice. It was agreed by the expert panel that precautions need to be taken with certain drugs, but that, in general, systemic therapies do not necessarily have to be stopped to perform SIRT. The authors recommend stopping vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors 4-6 weeks before SIRT, and restart after the patient has recovered from the procedure. It may also be prudent to stop potent radiosensitizers such as gemcitabine therapy 4 weeks before SIRT, and restart treatment at least 2‒4 weeks later. Data from phase III studies combining SIRT with fluorouracil (5FU) or folinic acid/5FU/oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) suggest that hematological toxicity is more common from the combination than it is from chemotherapy without SIRT. There is no evidence to suggest that chemotherapy increases SIRT-specific gastro-intestinal or liver toxicities.

  5. [Clinical development of therapy with two antihypertensive agents in fixed combination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, I

    1995-08-01

    Changing the blood pressure brings counter-regulatory effects into play which may impair the antihypertensive efficacy of treatment targeted at a single blood pressure regulatory factor. Thus, diuretics stimulate the renin angiotensin and catecholamine systems and, in some cases, vasopressin. Arteriolar vasodilators stimulate the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin system, while blockade of the renin-angiotensin system itself triggers a reactive release of renin which may then serve to restore normal circulating angiotensin II levels. Rational combinations can therefore be developed to neutralize the effects of counter-regulation and achieve blood pressure control at lower drug doses and hence with fewer side-effects. Such combinations can also be prescribed in steadily increasing doses of each drug, to achieve blood pressure control by a process of 3-stage titration. The stringent rules governing the clinical development of such combinations are reviewed: formulation, pharmacokinetics, pilot studies, factorial design, high-risk patients. One advantage of combination therapy is that it enhances compliance, as an entire treatment is contained in a single pack of drugs. A disadvantage is the potential multiplicity of combinations between the five or six major classes of antihypertensive drug.

  6. Immunological changes following a combined effect of chromic small dose γ-irradiation and toxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubik, V.M.; Zykova, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    Immunologic changes under conditions of durable effect of low dose γ-radiation on people in the case of combining radiation with the effect of low concentrations of toxic substances, are studied. Under the above effect, the appearance of deviations from the side of immunologic status is possible. Taking into account the important role of the immunity system in homeostasis preservation and the formation of a series of pathological states it is advisable to use figures, and characteristics inherent in the state of the cell immunity to autoallergic processes to estimate a combined effect of radiation and toxic substances on the organism of people [ru

  7. Combining Computational Fluid Dynamics and Agent-Based Modeling: A New Approach to Evacuation Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joshua M.; Pankajakshan, Ramesh; Hammond, Ross A.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel hybrid of two fields—Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Agent-Based Modeling (ABM)—as a powerful new technique for urban evacuation planning. CFD is a predominant technique for modeling airborne transport of contaminants, while ABM is a powerful approach for modeling social dynamics in populations of adaptive individuals. The hybrid CFD-ABM method is capable of simulating how large, spatially-distributed populations might respond to a physically realistic contaminant plume. We demonstrate the overall feasibility of CFD-ABM evacuation design, using the case of a hypothetical aerosol release in Los Angeles to explore potential effectiveness of various policy regimes. We conclude by arguing that this new approach can be powerfully applied to arbitrary population centers, offering an unprecedented preparedness and catastrophic event response tool. PMID:21687788

  8. Bimodal imaging probes for combined PET and OI: recent developments and future directions for hybrid agent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, Uwe; Wängler, Björn; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging--and especially positron emission tomography (PET)--has gained increasing importance for diagnosis of various diseases and thus experiences an increasing dissemination. Therefore, there is also a growing demand for highly affine PET tracers specifically accumulating and visualizing target structures in the human body. Beyond the development of agents suitable for PET alone, recent tendencies aim at the synthesis of bimodal imaging probes applicable in PET as well as optical imaging (OI), as this combination of modalities can provide clinical advantages. PET, due to the high tissue penetration of the γ-radiation emitted by PET nuclides, allows a quantitative imaging able to identify and visualize tumors and metastases in the whole body. OI on the contrary visualizes photons exhibiting only a limited tissue penetration but enables the identification of tumor margins and infected lymph nodes during surgery without bearing a radiation burden for the surgeon. Thus, there is an emerging interest in bimodal agents for PET and OI in order to exploit the potential of both imaging techniques for the imaging and treatment of tumor diseases. This short review summarizes the available hybrid probes developed for dual PET and OI and discusses future directions for hybrid agent development.

  9. Anti-cancer activity and mutagenic potential of novel copper(II) quinolinone Schiff base complexes in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Brian; Thangella, Venkat Reddy; Creaven, Bernadette S; Walsh, Maureen; Egan, Denise A

    2012-08-15

    This study determined the cytotoxic, cyto-selective and mutagenic potential of novel quinolinone Schiff base ligands and their corresponding copper(II) complexes in human-derived hepatic carcinoma cells (Hep-G2) and non-malignant human-derived hepatic cells (Chang). Results indicated that complexation of quinolinone Schiff bases with copper served to significantly enhance cytotoxicity. Here, the complex of (7E)-7-(3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzylideamino)-4-methylquinolin-2(1H)-one (TV117-FM) exhibited the lowest IC(50) value (17.9 μM) following 96 h continuous exposure, which was comparable to cisplatin (15.0 μM). However, results revealed that TV117-FM lacked cytoselectivity over non-malignant cells. Additionally, the complex was minimally effluxed from cells via Pglycoprotein (P-gp) and was shown to be non-mutagenic in the Standard Ames test. Furthermore, BrdU incorporation assays showed that it was capable of inhibiting DNA synthesis in a concentrationand time-dependent manner. However, inhibition was not as a consequence of DNA intercalation, as illustrated in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Interestingly, it was shown that the ligand was capable of inhibiting the action of topoisomerase II, but this was lost following complexation. This indicated that the mechanism of action of the novel copper(II) complex was different from that of the parent ligand and suggests that TV117-FM may have a therapeutic role to play in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Studies are currently underway to elucidate the exact in vitro mechanism of action of this novel, metal-based anti-cancer agent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. MEK-ERK inhibition potentiates WAY-600-induced anti-cancer efficiency in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kaifeng, E-mail: kaifeng_wangdr@sina.com [Cancer center, the Affiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China); Fan, Yaohua [Oncology Department, No. 1 Hospital of Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, Jiaxing (China); Chen, Gongying [Oncology Department, The Affiliated Hospital Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Zhengrong [Taizhou Hospital, Zhejiang Province, Taizhou (China); Kong, Dexin; Zhang, Peng [Oncology Department, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Medical School, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2016-05-27

    The search for novel anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) agents is important. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) hyper-activation plays a pivotal role in promoting HCC tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. The current preclinical study evaluated the potential anti-HCC activity by a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor, WAY-600. We showed that WAY-600 inhibited survival and proliferation of HCC cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7) and primary human HCC cells. Caspase-dependent apoptosis was activated by WAY-600 in above HCC cells. Reversely, caspase inhibitors largely attenuated WAY-600's lethality against HCC cells. At the signaling level, WAY-600 blocked mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) assemble and activation, yet activated MEK-ERK pathway in HCC cells. MEK-ERK inhibitors, PD-98059 and MEK-162, or MEK1/2 shRNA significantly potentiated WAY-600's cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that WAY-600 intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in nude mice inhibited p-AKT Ser-473 and displayed significant anti-cancer activity against HepG2 xenografts. Remarkably, co-administration of MEK-162 further potentiated WAY-600's anti-HCC activity in vivo. These preclinical results demonstrate the potent anti-HCC activity by WAY-600, either alone or with MEK-ERK inhibitors. -- Highlights: •WAY-600 inhibits HCC cell survival and proliferation in vitro. •WAY-600 activates caspase-dependent apoptosis in HCC cells. •WAY-600 blocks mTORC1/2 activation, but activates MEK-ERK in HCC cells. •MEK-ERK inhibitors or MEK1/2 shRNA enhances WAY-600's cytotoxicity against HCC cells. •MEK-162 co-administration potentiates WAY-600-induced the anti-HepG2 tumor efficacy.

  11. MEK-ERK inhibition potentiates WAY-600-induced anti-cancer efficiency in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kaifeng; Fan, Yaohua; Chen, Gongying; Wang, Zhengrong; Kong, Dexin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The search for novel anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) agents is important. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) hyper-activation plays a pivotal role in promoting HCC tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. The current preclinical study evaluated the potential anti-HCC activity by a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor, WAY-600. We showed that WAY-600 inhibited survival and proliferation of HCC cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7) and primary human HCC cells. Caspase-dependent apoptosis was activated by WAY-600 in above HCC cells. Reversely, caspase inhibitors largely attenuated WAY-600's lethality against HCC cells. At the signaling level, WAY-600 blocked mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) assemble and activation, yet activated MEK-ERK pathway in HCC cells. MEK-ERK inhibitors, PD-98059 and MEK-162, or MEK1/2 shRNA significantly potentiated WAY-600's cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that WAY-600 intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in nude mice inhibited p-AKT Ser-473 and displayed significant anti-cancer activity against HepG2 xenografts. Remarkably, co-administration of MEK-162 further potentiated WAY-600's anti-HCC activity in vivo. These preclinical results demonstrate the potent anti-HCC activity by WAY-600, either alone or with MEK-ERK inhibitors. -- Highlights: •WAY-600 inhibits HCC cell survival and proliferation in vitro. •WAY-600 activates caspase-dependent apoptosis in HCC cells. •WAY-600 blocks mTORC1/2 activation, but activates MEK-ERK in HCC cells. •MEK-ERK inhibitors or MEK1/2 shRNA enhances WAY-600's cytotoxicity against HCC cells. •MEK-162 co-administration potentiates WAY-600-induced the anti-HepG2 tumor efficacy.

  12. Combined effect of gamma radiation and some fungal control agents on the greasy cut- worm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd EL- Wahed, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    The greasy cut worm, Agrotis ipsilon (Lepidoptera- Noctuidae) is widely distributed all over the world, particularly in moderate and subtropical countries of the northern and southern hemispheres (Kononenko ,2003). The greasy cut worm causes damage to vegetables, cucurbitaceous and industrial crops. The greatest damage is caused to cotton, essential-oil cultures, maize, tobacco, sunflower, tomatoes, sugar beet and potato. The pest can strongly harm vegetables, and also damage seedlings of tree species (pine, maple, and nut). This pest has solitary habits. They commonly feed on seedlings at ground level, cutting off the stem and sometimes dragging the plants into their burrows. The continuous use of chemical pesticides against pests, resistance to the action of pesticides had dramatically evolved. Also, the extensive use of these chemicals has given rise to problems such as residual toxicity (pollution) and harmful effects on beneficial insects, which are natural enemies of target or nontarget pest species. Such problems have become a cause of search for safety pesticides including microbial agents as fungi, bacteria and viruses (Rashed, 1993). The use of radiation to induce dominate lethal mutations in the sterile insect technique (SIT) is now as the major component of many large and successful programs for pest suppression and eradication. Adult insects, and their different developmental stages, differ in their sensitivity to the induction of dominate lethal mutation. Care has to be taken to identify the appropriate dose of radiation that produces the required level of sterility without impairing the overall fitness of the released insects.(Sawires, 2005). This technique would be successful control device for suppressing and combating many lepidopteraus insect pests, including A. Ipsilon has been studied (EL- kady et al., 1983, EL-Naggar et al., 1984, Abd El -Hamid 2004 and Gabarty, 2008). Entomopathogenic fungi that infect insects have received considerable

  13. Sporothrix schenckii COMPLEX: SUSCEPTIBILITIES TO COMBINED ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ENZYMATIC PROFILES

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA, Daniele Carvalho; de LORETO, ?rico Silva; MARIO, D?bora Alves Nunes; LOPES, Paulo G. Markus; NEVES, Louise Vignolles; da ROCHA, Marta Pires; SANTURIO, Janio Morais; ALVES, Sydney Hartz

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Sporothrix schenckiiwas reclassified as a complex encompassing six cryptic species, which calls for the reassessment of clinical and epidemiological data of these new species. We evaluated the susceptibility of Sporothrix albicans (n = 1) , S. brasiliensis (n = 6) , S. globosa (n = 1), S. mexicana(n = 1) and S. schenckii(n = 36) to terbinafine (TRB) alone and in combination with itraconazole (ITZ), ketoconazole (KTZ), and voriconazole (VRZ) by a checkerboard microdilution method and d...

  14. Combining Multi-Agent Systems and Wireless Sensor Networks for Monitoring Crop Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Villarrubia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring mechanisms that ensure efficient crop growth are essential on many farms, especially in certain areas of the planet where water is scarce. Most farmers must assume the high cost of the required equipment in order to be able to streamline natural resources on their farms. Considering that many farmers cannot afford to install this equipment, it is necessary to look for more effective solutions that would be cheaper to implement. The objective of this study is to build virtual organizations of agents that can communicate between each other while monitoring crops. A low cost sensor architecture allows farmers to monitor and optimize the growth of their crops by streamlining the amount of resources the crops need at every moment. Since the hardware has limited processing and communication capabilities, our approach uses the PANGEA architecture to overcome this limitation. Specifically, we will design a system that is capable of collecting heterogeneous information from its environment, using sensors for temperature, solar radiation, humidity, pH, moisture and wind. A major outcome of our approach is that our solution is able to merge heterogeneous data from sensors and produce a response adapted to the context. In order to validate the proposed system, we present a case study in which farmers are provided with a tool that allows us to monitor the condition of crops on a TV screen using a low cost device.

  15. Segmented polyurethane intravaginal rings for the sustained combined delivery of antiretroviral agents dapivirine and tenofovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd J; Gupta, Kavita M; Fabian, Judit; Albright, Theodore H; Kiser, Patrick F

    2010-02-19

    Dual segment polyurethane intravaginal rings (IVRs) were fabricated to enable sustained release of antiretroviral agents dapivirine and tenofovir to prevent the male to female sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus. Due to the contrasting hydrophilicity of the two drugs, dapivirine and tenofovir were separately formulated into polymers with matching hydrophilicity via solvent casting and hot melt extrusion. The resultant drug loaded rods were then joined together to form dual segment IVRs. Compression testing of the IVRs revealed that they are mechanically comparable to the widely accepted NuvaRing IVR. Physical characterization of the individual IVR segments using wide angle X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry determined that dapivirine and tenofovir are amorphous and crystalline within their polymeric segments, respectively. In vitro release of tenofovir from the dual segment IVR was sustained over 30 days while dapivirine exhibited linear release over the time period. A 90 day accelerated stability study confirmed that dapivirine and tenofovir are stable in the IVR formulation. Altogether, these results suggest that multisegment polyurethane IVRs are an attractive formulation for the sustained vaginal delivery of drugs with contrasting hydrophilicity such as dapivirine and tenofovir. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metformin as a new anti-cancer drug in adrenocortical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Giada; Cantini, Giulia; Armignacco, Roberta; Fucci, Rossella; Santi, Raffaella; Canu, Letizia; Nesi, Gabriella; Mannelli, Massimo; Luconi, Michaela

    2016-08-02

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare heterogeneous malignancy with poor prognosis. Since radical surgery is the only available treatment, more specific and effective drugs are urgently required. The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been associated with a decreased cancer prevalence and mortality in several solid tumors, prompting its possible use for ACC treatment.This paper evaluates the in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects of metformin using the ACC cell model H295R.Metformin treatment significantly reduces cell viability and proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner and associates with a significant inhibition of ERK1/2 and mTOR phosphorylation/activation, as well as with stimulation of AMPK activity. Metformin also triggers the apoptotic pathway, shown by the decreased expression of Bcl-2 and HSP27, HSP60 and HSP70, and enhanced membrane exposure of annexin V, resulting in activation of caspase-3 apoptotic effector. Metformin interferes with the proliferative autocrine loop of IGF2/IGF-1R, which supports adrenal cancer growth. Finally, in the ACC xenograft mouse model, obtained by subcutaneous injection of H295R cells, metformin intraperitoneal administration inhibits tumor growth, confirmed by the significant reduction of Ki67%.Our data suggest that metformin inhibits H295R cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Further preclinical studies are necessary to validate the potential anti-cancer effect of metformin in patients affected by ACC.

  17. Molecular Biological Study of Anti-cancer Effects of Bee Venom Aqua-acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chan-Yol

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available To study anti-cancer effect and molecular biological mechanism of bee venom for aqua-acupuncture, the effects of bee venom on cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed using MTT assay, tryphan blue assay, [3H]thymidine release assay, flow cytometric analysis, and activity of caspase-3 protease activity assay. To explore whether anti-cancer effects of bee venom are associated with the transcriptional control of gene expression, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of apoptosis-related genes was performed. The obtained results are summarized as follows: 1. The MTT assay demonstrated that cell viability was decreased by bee venom in a dose-dependant manner. 2. Significant induction of apoptosis was identified using tryphan blue assay, [3H]thymidine release assay, and flow cytometric analysis of sub G1 fraction. 3. In analysis of caspase-3 protease activity, the activity had increased significantly, in a dose-dependant manner. 4. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the apoptosis-related genes showed that Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL were down-regulated whereas Bax was up-regulated by bee venom treatment.

  18. Optimizing Chemotherapeutic Anti-cancer Treatment and the Tumor Microenvironment: An Analysis of Mathematical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledzewicz, Urszula; Schaettler, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    We review results about the structure of administration of chemotherapeutic anti-cancer treatment that we have obtained from an analysis of minimally parameterized mathematical models using methods of optimal control. This is a branch of continuous-time optimization that studies the minimization of a performance criterion imposed on an underlying dynamical system subject to constraints. The scheduling of anti-cancer treatments has all the features of such a problem: treatments are administered in time and the interactions of the drugs with the tumor and its microenvironment determine the efficacy of therapy. At the same time, constraints on the toxicity of the treatments need to be taken into account. The models we consider are low-dimensional and do not include more refined details, but they capture the essence of the underlying biology and our results give robust and rather conclusive qualitative information about the administration of optimal treatment protocols that strongly correlate with approaches taken in medical practice. We describe the changes that arise in optimal administration schedules as the mathematical models are increasingly refined to progress from models that only consider the cancerous cells to models that include the major components of the tumor microenvironment, namely the tumor vasculature and tumor-immune system interactions.

  19. NPACT: Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Manu; Sagar, Parul; Singh, Harinder; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Agarwal, Subhash M

    2013-01-01

    Plant-derived molecules have been highly valued by biomedical researchers and pharmaceutical companies for developing drugs, as they are thought to be optimized during evolution. Therefore, we have collected and compiled a central resource Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database (NPACT, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/npact/) that gathers the information related to experimentally validated plant-derived natural compounds exhibiting anti-cancerous activity (in vitro and in vivo), to complement the other databases. It currently contains 1574 compound entries, and each record provides information on their structure, manually curated published data on in vitro and in vivo experiments along with reference for users referral, inhibitory values (IC(50)/ED(50)/EC(50)/GI(50)), properties (physical, elemental and topological), cancer types, cell lines, protein targets, commercial suppliers and drug likeness of compounds. NPACT can easily be browsed or queried using various options, and an online similarity tool has also been made available. Further, to facilitate retrieval of existing data, each record is hyperlinked to similar databases like SuperNatural, Herbal Ingredients' Targets, Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, PubChem and NCI-60 GI(50) data.

  20. Anti-Cancer Potential of Homemade Fresh Garlic Extract Is Related to Increased Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voin Petrovic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of garlic and garlic-based extracts has been linked to decreased incidence of cancer in epidemiological studies. Here we examine the molecular and cellular activities of a simple homemade ethanol-based garlic extract (GE. We show that GE inhibits growth of several different cancer cells in vitro, as well as cancer growth in vivo in a syngeneic orthotopic breast cancer model. Multiple myeloma cells were found to be especially sensitive to GE. The GE was fractionated using solid-phase extractions, and we identified allicin in one GE fraction; however, growth inhibitory activities were found in several additional fractions. These activities were lost during freeze or vacuum drying, suggesting that the main anti-cancer compounds in GE are volatile. The anti-cancer activity was stable for more than six months in −20 °C. We found that GE enhanced the activities of chemotherapeutics, as well as MAPK and PI3K inhibitors. Furthermore, GE affected hundreds of proteins involved in cellular signalling, including changes in vital cell signalling cascades regulating proliferation, apoptosis, and the cellular redox balance. Our data indicate that the reduced proliferation of the cancer cells treated by GE is at least partly mediated by increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress.

  1. Ultrasound contrast-enhanced study as an imaging biomarker for anti-cancer drug treatment: preliminary study with paclitaxel in a xenograft mouse tumor model (secondary publication)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Hwang, Sung Il; Jung, Hyun Sook; Kang, Mi Ra [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jong Hoe; Kong, Hoon Young [Dept. of Molecular Biology, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess tumor angiogenesis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) of human prostate cancer cells (PC3) that were implanted in mice before and after paclitaxel injection. Twelve mice were injected with human PC3. The mice were grouped into two groups; one was the paclitaxel-treated group (n=6) and the other was the control group (n=6). Before administering paclitaxel into the peritoneal cavity, baseline CEUS was performed after the administration of 500 μL (1×108 microbubbles) of contrast agent. The area under the curve (AUC) up to 50 seconds after injection was derived from the time-intensity curves. After injection of paclitaxel or saline, CEUS studies were performed at the 1-week follow-up. Changes in tumor volume and the AUC in both two groups were evaluated. After CEUS, the microvessel density (MVD) was compared between the groups. In the paclitaxel-treated group, the AUC from CEUS showed a significant decrease 1-week after paclitaxel administration (P=0.030), even though the tumor volume showed no significant changes (P=0.116). In the control group, there was no significant decrease of the AUC (P=0.173). Pathologically, there was a significant difference in MVD between both groups (P=0.002). The AUC from the time intensity curve derived from CEUS showed an early change in response to the anti-cancer drug treatment that preceded the change in tumor size. The findings of CEUS could serve as an imaging biomarker for assessing tumor responses to anti-cancer drug treatment.

  2. Development of a Novel Anti-HIF-1α Screening System Coupled with Biochemical and Biological Validation for Rapidly Selecting Potent Anti-Cancer Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Madu, Chikezie; Masters, Jordan; Lu, Andrew; Li, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the American women. Adaptation to the hypoxic environment seen in solid tumors is critical for tumor cell survival and growth. The activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), an important master transcriptional factor that is induced and stabilized by intratumoral hypoxia, stimulates a group of HIF-1α-regulated genes including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), leading tumor cells towards malignant progression. Therefore, a promising therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is to target HIF-1α. The goal of this project was to develop and validate a screening system coupled with secondary screen/validation process that has the capability to screen large numbers of potential anti-cancer small-molecule compounds based on their anti-HIF-1α activities. Breast cancer MDA-231 cells were used as the model to select potent anti-HIF-1α compounds by their abilities to inhibit transactivation of a VEGF promoter fused to a luciferase reporter gene under hypoxia. Positive compounds were then validated by a series of assays that confirm compounds' anti-HIF-1α activities including measurement of HIF-1α downstream VEGF gene expression and angiogenic ability of BCa cells. Results of our pilot screening demonstrate that this prototype screening coupled with validation system can effectively select highly potent anti-HIF-1α agents from the compound library, suggesting that this prototype screen system has the potential to be developed into a high-throughput screen (HTS) coupled with automated validation process for the screening and identification of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs based on anti-HIF-1α mechanism.

  3. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid increases anti-cancer effect of tumor necrosis factor-α through up-regulation of TNF receptor 1 in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bo Ra; Han, Bo Ram; Park, Woo Hyun

    2017-03-14

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor has anti-cancer effect. Here, we evaluated the effect of SAHA on HDAC activity and cell growth in many normal lung and cancer cells. We observed that the HDAC activities of lung cancer cells were higher than that of normal lung cells. SAHA inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells regardless of the inhibitory effect on HDAC. This agent induced a G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis, which was accompanied by mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP: ΔΨm) loss in lung cancer cells. However, SAHA did not induce cell death in normal lung cells. All tested caspase inhibitors prevented apoptotic cell death in SAHA-treated A549 and Calu-6 lung cancer cells. Treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) enhanced apoptosis in SAHA-treated lung cancer cells through caspase-8 and caspase-9 activations. Especially, SAHA increased the expression level of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1), especially acetylation of the region of TNFR1 promoter -223/-29 in lung cancer cells. The down-regulation of TNFR1 suppressed apoptosis in TNF-α and SAHA-treated lung cancer cells. In conclusion, SAHA inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells via a G2/M phase arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. SAHA also enhanced apoptotic effect of TNF-α in human lung cancer cells through up-regulation of TNFR1. TNF-α may be a key to improve anti-cancer effect of HDAC inhibitors.

  4. Underestimated potential of organometallic rhenium complexes as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonidova, Anna; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-10-17

    In the recent years, organometallic compounds have become recognized as promising anti-cancer drug candidates. While radioactive (186/188)Re compounds are already used in clinics for cancer treatment, cold Re organometallic compounds have mostly been explored as luminescent probes for cell imaging and photosensitizers in photocatalysis. However, a growing number of studies have recently revealed the potential of Re organometallic complexes as anti-cancer agents. Several compounds have displayed cytotoxicity equaling or exceeding that of the well-established anti-cancer drug cisplatin. In this review, we present the currently known Re organometallic complexes that have shown anti-proliferative activity on cancer cell lines. A particular emphasis is placed on their cellular uptake and localization as well as their potential mechanism of action.

  5. In vitro evaluation of various antifungal agents alone and in combination by using an automatic turbidimetric system combined with viable count determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Auwera, P; Ceuppens, A M; Heymans, C; Meunier, F

    1986-01-01

    A new method combining automatic turbidimetry and sequential viable count determinations was developed to evaluate the in vitro activity of various antifungal agents alone and in combination against three clinical isolates of Candida spp. (two Candida albicans and one C. tropicalis) at two inocula (10(-5) and 10(-6) CFU/ml). Specific parameters were derived from the time-kill curves: the maximal rate of killing, the lowest biomass, and the overnight biomass. Their intra-assay and between-assay reproducibilities were high, with respective standard deviations of 0.4 and 0.25 to 1.4 log CFU/ml. Amphotericin B alone showed a linear relationship between rate of killing or lowest biomass and the log of concentration from 0.03 to 4 mg/liter that was similar for the three strains tested. 5-Fluorocytosine (flucytosine) alone showed a dose-related reduction of overnight biomass for concentrations up to 8 mg/liter with no further increase at higher concentrations for one strain of C. albicans and a paradoxical decrease for one strain of C. tropicalis. Ketoconazole alone was found to be only fungistatic with no increased activity at concentrations up to 16 mg/liter. Amphotericin B plus flucytosine interacted synergistically in 46 to 60% of the combinations tested against C. tropicalis depending on the initial inoculum. Indifference was observed for the two strains of C. albicans. Amphotericin B or flucytosine plus ketoconazole was usually indifferent against the three tested strains. PMID:3729367

  6. Sporothrix schenckii COMPLEX:SUSCEPTIBILITIES TO COMBINED ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ENZYMATIC PROFILES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Daniele Carvalho; de Loreto, Érico Silva; Mario, Débora Alves Nunes; Lopes, Paulo G Markus; Neves, Louise Vignolles; da Rocha, Marta Pires; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii was reclassified as a complex encompassing six cryptic species, which calls for the reassessment of clinical and epidemiological data of these new species. We evaluated the susceptibility of Sporothrix albicans(n = 1) , S. brasiliensis(n = 6) , S. globosa(n = 1), S. mexicana(n = 1) and S. schenckii(n = 36) to terbinafine (TRB) alone and in combination with itraconazole (ITZ), ketoconazole (KTZ), and voriconazole (VRZ) by a checkerboard microdilution method and determined the enzymatic profile of these species with the API-ZYM kit. Most interactions were additive (27.5%, 32.5% and 5%) or indifferent (70%, 50% and 52.5%) for TRB+KTZ, TRB+ITZ and TRB+VRZ, respectively. Antagonisms were observed in 42.5% of isolates for the TRB+VRZ combination. Based on enzymatic profiling, the Sporothrix schenckii strains were categorized into 14 biotypes. Leucine arylamidase (LA) activity was observed only for S. albicans and S. mexicana. The species S. globosa and S. Mexicana were the only species without β-glucosidase (GS) activity. Our results may contribute to a better understanding of virulence and resistance among species of the genus Sporothrix in further studies.

  7. Evaluation of Danazol, Cyclosporine, and Prednisolone as Single Agent or in Combination for Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjaksha Ghosh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The responses of 32 patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH were assessed after the patients were put on various combinations of danazol, prednisolone, and cyclosporine. METHODS: Nineteen males and 13 females aged between 14 and 60 years with confirmed diagnosis of PNH were treated with danazol (4, danazol + cyclosporine (7, cyclosporine (1, and prednisolone + danazol (20. Response to these interventions was assessed regularly. Danazol was added to cyclosporine in patients with aplastic bone marrow after 3 months of cyclocporine use only unless the former therapy was successful. Four patients with aplastic marrow received only danazol because they had renal insufficiency at presentation. Patients were evaluated with regular complete blood count and routine liver and renal function tests. RESULTS: One patient responded to cyclosporine only. Thirteen of 32 patients (40% had complete response, 12/32 patients (37% had partial response leading to freedom from red cell transfusion, and 2/32 (7% had no response. Five patients (16% died due to thrombosis or hemorrhage within 3 months of therapy before their response to therapy could be assessed. The median period of review of the cases was 4 years and 6 months. CONCLUSION: Danazol is a useful addition to PNH therapy both in combination with cyclosporine for hypoplastic PNH and with prednisolone for other forms of PNH, and this therapy could be a good alternative where eculizumab and anti-lymphocyte globulin cannot be used for various reasons.

  8. Sporothrix schenckii COMPLEX: SUSCEPTIBILITIES TO COMBINED ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ENZYMATIC PROFILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Carvalho OLIVEIRA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Sporothrix schenckiiwas reclassified as a complex encompassing six cryptic species, which calls for the reassessment of clinical and epidemiological data of these new species. We evaluated the susceptibility of Sporothrix albicans (n = 1 , S. brasiliensis (n = 6 , S. globosa (n = 1, S. mexicana(n = 1 and S. schenckii(n = 36 to terbinafine (TRB alone and in combination with itraconazole (ITZ, ketoconazole (KTZ, and voriconazole (VRZ by a checkerboard microdilution method and determined the enzymatic profile of these species with the API-ZYM kit. Most interactions were additive (27.5%, 32.5% and 5% or indifferent (70%, 50% and 52.5% for TRB+KTZ, TRB+ITZ and TRB+VRZ, respectively. Antagonisms were observed in 42.5% of isolates for the TRB+VRZ combination. Based on enzymatic profiling, the Sporothrix schenckii strains were categorized into 14 biotypes. Leucine arylamidase (LA activity was observed only for S. albicans and S. mexicana. The species S. globosaand S. mexicanawere the only species without β-glucosidase (GS activity. Our results may contribute to a better understanding of virulence and resistance among species of the genus Sporothrixin further studies.

  9. Pathophysiologic effects of vascular-targeting agents and the implications for combination with conventional therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Siemann, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    A functional vascular supply is critical for the continued growth and development of solid tumors. It also plays a major role in metastatic spread of tumor cells. This importance has led to the concept of targeting the vasculature of the tumor as a form of cancer therapy. Two major types of vascu...... on the tumor response to more conventional therapies. This review aims to discuss the pathophysiologic changes induced by VTAs and the implications of these effects on the potential use of VTAs in combined modality therapy....... successful in the clinic they will need to be combined with more conventional therapies. However, by affecting the tumor vascular supply, these VTAs should induce pathophysiologic changes in variables, such as blood flow, pH, and oxygenation. Such changes could have negative or positive influences......A functional vascular supply is critical for the continued growth and development of solid tumors. It also plays a major role in metastatic spread of tumor cells. This importance has led to the concept of targeting the vasculature of the tumor as a form of cancer therapy. Two major types...

  10. Searching for synergy: Identifying optimal antiviral combination therapy using Hepatitis C virus (HCV) agents in a replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Justin J; Drusano, George L; Rodriquez, Jaime L; Brown, Ashley N

    2017-10-01

    Direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are potent inhibitors of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) that have revolutionized the treatment landscape for this important viral disease. There are currently four classes of DAAs that inhibit HCV replication via distinct mechanisms of action: nonstructural protein (NS) 3/4a protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, NS5B nucleoside polymerase inhibitors, and NS5B non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitors. Combination therapy with two or more DAAs has great potential to further enhance antiviral potency. The purpose of this study was to identify optimal combinations of DAAs against genotype 1 HCV replicons that maximized the inhibition of replicon replication. All possible two-drug combinations were evaluated against genotype 1a and 1b HCV replicons using a 96-well plate luciferase-based assay in triplicate. The Greco Universal Response Surface Area mathematical model was fit to the luciferase data to identify drug-drug interactions (i.e.: synergy, additivity, and antagonism) for antiviral effect against both genotypes. This information was used to rank-order combinations of DAAs based on their ability to inhibit replicon replication against genotype 1a and 1b HCV. These preclinical findings can provide information as to which antiviral regimens should move on in the development process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Delivery of TLR7 agonist to monocytes and dendritic cells by DCIR targeted liposomes induces robust production of anti-cancer cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauber, Thomas Christopher Bogh; Laursen, Janne Marie; Zucker, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Tumor immune escape is today recognized as an important cancer hallmark and is therefore a major focus area in cancer therapy. Monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), which are central to creating a robust anti-tumor immune response and establishing an anti-tumorigenic microenvironment, are directly...... as their immune activating potential in blood-derived monocytes, myeloid DCs (mDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Monocytes and mDCs were targeted with high specificity over lymphocytes, and exhibited potent TLR7-specific secretion of the anti-cancer cytokines IL-12p70, IFN-α 2a, and IFN-γ. This delivery system...... could be a way to improve cancer treatment either in the form of a vaccine with co-formulated antigen or as an immunotherapeutic vector to boost monocyte and DC activity in combination with other treatment protocols such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Cancer immunotherapy is a powerful new tool...

  12. Effect of a combination of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, T; Sakai, J; Ogata, Y; Urushiyama, Y

    1996-08-01

    Clinical effect of the administration of thiamphenicol (TP) and tylosin (TS) on bovine respiratory disease was investigated. Group I (n = 64) were administered TP (10 mg/kg) and TS (4 mg/kg), group II (n = 26) were given TP (5 mg/kg) and TS (2 mg/kg). For the control, TP group (n = 25) were given 20 mg/kg of TP and ampicillin group (n = 23) were given 10 mg/kg of ampicillin. As a result, improvement of clinical findings was more rapid and the cure rate was significantly higher in group I compared to those in the other 3 groups. These results showed that a combination therapy with minimal basic doses of TP and TS is very effective for some respiratory diseases in cattle.

  13. Glucan–Resveratrol–Vitamin C Combination Offers Protection against Toxic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vetvickova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological immunomodulators are routinely evaluated as a natural source of molecules with profound effects on the immune system. They belong to a group of physiologically active compounds, collectively termed biological response modifiers. Most of the studies were focused on immune system stimulation. Recently, they have become the focus of studies seeking molecules that are able to overcome negative effects of various immunotoxins. This paper concentrates on the effects of a glucan/resveratrol/vitamin C combination on immunosuppressive effects of mercury and perfluorinated hydrocarbons. Effects described in this review have strong clinical potential, as environmental contaminants have adverse effects on all aspects of the immune system and represent a serious threat to the health of both humans and animals.

  14. Effect of alpha-interferon alone and combined with other antineoplastic agents on renal cell carcinoma determined by the tetrazolium microculture assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Y; Aso, Y

    1994-01-01

    The antiproliferative effect of various alpha-interferons (alpha-IFNs), alone or combined with other agents, on a renal cell carcinoma cell line was evaluated by the tetrazolium microculture assay to examine the rationale for combination therapies. Cells incubated in 96-week microculture plates at 5 x 10(3)/well were exposed to various agents for 3 days. There were no obvious differences in the growth inhibition caused by the 5 kinds of alpha-IFN examined as single agents. The combination of alpha-IFN with the following agents was also assessed: 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), mitomycin C, bleomycin, cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (CDDP), vinblastine, etoposide (ETOP), alpha-IFN, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and alpha-difluoromethylornithine. Synergism was observed for the combination of alpha-IFN+TNF, while the other combinations had additive or subadditive effects. No interference or antagonism was found. Trimodal combinations of alpha-IFN+MTX with either 5FU, ETOP, or CDDP all showed subadditive effects. These results indicated that an increased antiproliferative effect, although not necessarily synergistic, was obtained by the combination of alpha-IFN with a variety of antineoplastic agents, providing a rationale to seek for combination therapies including alpha-IFN for treating renal cell carcinoma.

  15. Metformin inhibited esophageal squamous cell carcinoma proliferation in vitro and in vivo and enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Ding, Xianfei; Wang, Tao; Shan, Zhengzheng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Shaoxuan; Chi, Yanyan; Zhang, Yana; Lv, Zhuan; Wang, Liuxing; Fan, Qingxia

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis in China. Chemotherapy now is one of the most frequently used treatments for patients with ESCC in middle or late stage, however the effects were often limited by increased chemoresistance or treatment toxicity. So it is urgent to find new drugs to treat ESCC patients. Metformin with low cost and toxicity has proved to have anti-cancer effects in a numerous cancers, while its role and mechanism in ESCC has seldom been studied. In the present study, we found that metformin exhibited not only an anti-proliferation ability in a dose and time dependent manner but also a proapoptosis effect in a dose dependent manner in ESCC cell line KYSE450. Our in vivo experiment also showed that metformin markedly inhibited KYSE450 xenograft tumors growth compared to those treated with normal saline. What's more, no obvious toxic reactions were observed. To further explore the underlying mechanism, we found that metformin treatment could significantly damp the expression of 4EBP1 and S6K1 in KYSE 450 cells in vitro and in vivo, furthermore, the p-4EBP1 and p-S6K1 expression in KYSE 450 cells were also inhibited greatly in vitro and in vivo. During the therapy of cancer, in order to overcome side effects, combination therapy was often used. In this paper, we demonstrated that metformin potentiated the effects of cisplatin via inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting cell apoptosis. Taken together, metformin owned the potential anti-cancer effect on ESCC in monotherapy or was combined with cisplatin and these results laid solid basis for the use of metformin in ESCC.

  16. Metformin inhibited esophageal squamous cell carcinoma proliferation in vitro and in vivo and enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    Full Text Available Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis in China. Chemotherapy now is one of the most frequently used treatments for patients with ESCC in middle or late stage, however the effects were often limited by increased chemoresistance or treatment toxicity. So it is urgent to find new drugs to treat ESCC patients. Metformin with low cost and toxicity has proved to have anti-cancer effects in a numerous cancers, while its role and mechanism in ESCC has seldom been studied. In the present study, we found that metformin exhibited not only an anti-proliferation ability in a dose and time dependent manner but also a proapoptosis effect in a dose dependent manner in ESCC cell line KYSE450. Our in vivo experiment also showed that metformin markedly inhibited KYSE450 xenograft tumors growth compared to those treated with normal saline. What's more, no obvious toxic reactions were observed. To further explore the underlying mechanism, we found that metformin treatment could significantly damp the expression of 4EBP1 and S6K1 in KYSE 450 cells in vitro and in vivo, furthermore, the p-4EBP1 and p-S6K1 expression in KYSE 450 cells were also inhibited greatly in vitro and in vivo. During the therapy of cancer, in order to overcome side effects, combination therapy was often used. In this paper, we demonstrated that metformin potentiated the effects of cisplatin via inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting cell apoptosis. Taken together, metformin owned the potential anti-cancer effect on ESCC in monotherapy or was combined with cisplatin and these results laid solid basis for the use of metformin in ESCC.

  17. Realizing the Potential of Vascular Targeted Therapy: The Rationale for Combining Vascular Disrupting Agents and Anti-Angiogenic Agents to Treat Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemann, D W; Chaplin, D J; Horsman, M R

    2017-01-01

    Vascular targeted therapies (VTTs) are agents that target tumor vasculature and can be classified into two categories: those that inhibit angiogenesis and those that directly interfere with established tumor vasculature. Although both the anti-angiogenic agents (AAs) and the vascular disrupting a...

  18. Multifunctional gold nanostar conjugates for tumor imaging and combined photothermal and chemo-therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Xin; Dai, Shuhang; Ma, Yuxiang; Cui, Sisi; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-01-01

    Uniform gold nanostars (Au NS) were conjugated with cyclic RGD (cRGD) and near infrared (NIR) fluorescence probe (MPA) or anti-cancer drug (DOX) to obtain multi-functional nanoconstructs, Au-cRGD-MPA and Au-cRGD-DOX respectively. The NIR contrast agent Au-cRGD-MPA was shown to have low cytotoxicity. Using tumor cells and tumor bearing mice, these imaging nanoparticles demonstrated favorable tumor-targeting capability mediated by RGD peptide binding to its over-expressed receptor on the tumor cells. The multi-therapeutic analogue, Au-cRGD-DOX, integrates targeting tumor, chemotherapy and photo-thermotherapy into a single system. The synergistic effect of photo-thermal therapy and chemotherapy was demonstrated in different tumor cell lines and in vivo using S180 tumor-bearing mouse models. The viability of MDA-MB-231 cells was only 40 % after incubation with Au-cRGD-DOX and irradiation with NIR light. Both tail vein and intratumoral injections showed Au-cRGD-DOX treated mice exhibiting the slowest tumor increase. These results indicate that the multifunctional nanoconstruct is a promising combined therapeutic agent for tumor-targeting treatment, with the potential to enhance the anti-cancer treatment outcomes.

  19. Anti-Cancer Effect of Angelica Sinensis on Women’s Reproductive Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hong Zhu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Danggui, the root of Angelica Sinensis, has traditionally been used for the treatment of women’s reproductive disorders in China for thousands of years. This study was to determine whether Danggui have potential anti-cancer effect on women’s cancer and its potential mechanism. Methods: Danggui was extracted by ethanol. The Cell Titer 96® Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay was used to compare the effects of Danggui on human breast (MCF-7 and 7368 and cervical (CaSki and SiHa cancer cells with its effects on normal fibroblasts (HTB-125. A revised Ames test was used to test for antimutagenicity. The standard strains of Salmonella typhimarium (TA 100 and 102 were used in the test. Methyl methane sulfonate (MMS and UV light were used as positive mutagen controls and ethanol and double distilled water (DDW as controls. The SAS statistical software was used to analyze the data. Results: Danggui was found to be much more toxic to all cancer cell lines tested than to normal fibroblasts. There was a significant negative dose-effect relationship between Danggui and cancer cell viability. Average viability of MCF-7 was 69.5%, 18.4%, 5.7%, 5.7%, and 5.0% of control for Danggui doses 0.07, 0.14, 0.21, 0.32, and 0.64 ug/ul, respectively, with a Ptrend < 0.0001. Half maximal inhibitory dose (ID50 of Danggui for cancer cell lines MCF-7, CaSki, SiHa and CRL-7368 was 0.10, 0.09, 0.10 and 0.07 ug/ul, Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(6:242-250respectively. For the normal fibroblasts, ID50 was 0.58 ug/ul. At a dose of 0.32 ug/ul, Danggui killed over 90% of the cells in each cancer cell line, but at the same dose, only 12.3 % of the normal HTB-125 cells were killed. Revertants per plate of TA 100 decreased with the introduction of increasing doses of Danggui extracts with a Ptrend < 0.0001 when UV light was used as a mutagen. There was no difference in revertants per plate between ethanol and DDW control groups. Conclusions

  20. Structure Identification and Anti-Cancer Pharmacological Prediction of Triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yanyan; Qiao, Liansheng; Wu, Lingfang; Sun, Xuefei; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Guanghui; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Mao, Xin; Chen, Wenjing; Liang, Wenyi; Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Lanzhen

    2016-05-21

    Ganoderma triterpenes (GTs) are the major secondary metabolites of Ganoderma lucidum, which is a popularly used traditional Chinese medicine for complementary cancer therapy. In the present study, systematic isolation, and in silico pharmacological prediction are implemented to discover potential anti-cancer active GTs from G. lucidum. Nineteen GTs, three steroids, one cerebroside, and one thymidine were isolated from G. lucidum. Six GTs were first isolated from the fruiting bodies of G. lucidum, including 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid methyl ester (1), 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid (2), 3β,7β,15α,28-tetrahydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid (3), ganotropic acid (4), 26-nor-11,23-dioxo-5α-lanost-8-en-3β,7β,15α,25-tetrol (5) and (3β,7α)-dihydroxy-lanosta-8,24-dien- 11-one (6). (4E,8E)-N-d-2'-hydroxypalmitoyl-l-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-9-methyl-4,8-spingodienine (7), and stigmasta-7,22-dien-3β,5α,6α-triol (8) were first reported from the genus Ganodema. By using reverse pharmacophoric profiling of the six GTs, thirty potential anti-cancer therapeutic targets were identified and utilized to construct their ingredient-target interaction network. Then nineteen high frequency targets of GTs were selected from thirty potential targets to construct a protein interaction network (PIN). In order to cluster the pharmacological activity of GTs, twelve function modules were identified by molecular complex detection (MCODE) and gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. The results indicated that anti-cancer effect of GTs might be related to histone acetylation and interphase of mitotic cell cycle by regulating general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5) and cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2), respectively. This research mode of extraction, isolation, pharmacological prediction, and PIN analysis might be beneficial to rapidly predict and discover pharmacological activities of novel compounds.

  1. Combining insulins with oral antidiabetic agents: effect on hyperglycemic control, markers of cardiovascular risk and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjeld Hermansen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Kjeld Hermansen, Lene Sundahl Mortensen, Marie-Louise HermansenDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism C, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Unfortunately, several potential barriers exist for CVD risk management in diabetes, including the need for significant lifestyle changes, potential problems with hypoglycemia, weight gain, injection tolerability, treatment complexity with current diabetes therapies and other, unmodifiable factors. Improving glycemic control may impact CVD risk. Treatment of T2DM usually starts with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise. When these become insufficient, pharmacotherapy is required. Various oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs are available that reduce hyperglycemia. The first line of therapy is usually metformin, since it does not increase weight and seems to have a beneficial effect on CVD mortality and risk factors. As T2DM progresses, insulin treatment becomes necessary for the majority of patients. The last few years have seen the development of long-acting, rapid-acting, and premixed insulin analog formulations. The treat-to-target algorithms of recent studies combining OADs plus insulin analogs have demonstrated that patients can reach glycemic treatment targets with low risk of hypoglycemia, greater convenience, and – with some analogs – limited weight gain vs conventional insulins. These factors may possibly have a positive influence on CVD risk. Future studies will hopefully elucidate the benefits of this approach.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hyperglycemia, insulin, oral antidiabetic drugs

  2. The effect of combined therapy of exercise and nootropic agent on cognitive function in focal cerebral infarction rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Keun; Seon, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, In-Gyu; Han, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Sung; Lee, Sam-Gyu

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the effect of combined therapy of exercise and nootropic agent on cognitive function in a focal cerebral infarction rat model. Forty 10-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to photothrombotic cerebral infarction of the left parietal lobe. All rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: group A was photothrombotic cerebral infarction rats without any treatment (n=10); group B was photothrombotic cerebral infarction rats with swimming exercise (n=10); group C was photothrombotic cerebral infarction rats with oral administration of acetyl-L-carnitine (n=10); group D was photothrombotic cerebral infarction rats with swimming exercise and oral administration of acetyl-L-carnitine (n=10). Cognitive function was evaluated using the Morris water maze test on the 1st day, and the 1st, 2nd, and 4th week after the induction of cerebral infarction. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the hippocampus were measured. The neuronal cells of the hippocampus were histopathologically evaluated. The escape latency was shorter in groups B, C, and D than in group A. However, the differences were not statistically significant at the 1st, 2nd and 4th week. The activity of SOD was the highest in group D. The level of MDA was the lowest in group D. We observed more normal neuronal cells in groups B, C, and D. The combined therapy of exercise and nootropic agent was helpful in ameliorating oxidative stress in the focal cerebral infarction rat model. However, the effect did not translate into improvement of cognitive function.

  3. Profiling the anti-protozoal activity of anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors against Plasmodium and Trypanosoma parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Engel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase (HDAC enzymes work together with histone acetyltransferases (HATs to reversibly acetylate both histone and non-histone proteins. As a result, these enzymes are involved in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression as well as other important cellular processes. HDACs are validated drug targets for some types of cancer, with four HDAC inhibitors clinically approved. However, they are also showing promise as novel drug targets for other indications, including malaria and other parasitic diseases. In this study the in vitro activity of four anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors was examined against parasites that cause malaria and trypanosomiasis. Three of these inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat®, romidepsin (Istodax® and belinostat (Beleodaq®, are clinically approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma, while the fourth, panobinostat, has recently been approved for combination therapy use in certain patients with multiple myeloma. All HDAC inhibitors were found to inhibit the growth of asexual-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in the nanomolar range (IC50 10–200 nM, while only romidepsin was active at sub-μM concentrations against bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasites (IC50 35 nM. The compounds were found to have some selectivity for malaria parasites compared with mammalian cells, but were not selective for trypanosome parasites versus mammalian cells. All compounds caused hyperacetylation of histone and non-histone proteins in P. falciparum asexual stage parasites and inhibited deacetylase activity in P. falciparum nuclear extracts in addition to recombinant PfHDAC1 activity. P. falciparum histone hyperacetylation data indicate that HDAC inhibitors may differentially affect the acetylation profiles of histone H3 and H4.

  4. In vitro activity of lauric acid or myristylamine in combination with six antimicrobial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Takashi; Aoyama, Yuko; Hirakata, Yoichi; Kamihira, Shimeru; Kohno, Shigeru; Ichikawa, Nobuhiro; Nakashima, Mikiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Higuchi, Shun

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro activities of lauric acid and myristylamine in combination with six antimicrobial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The combination effect of lipids and antimicrobial agents was evaluated by the checkerboard method to obtain a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index. The effects of lauric acid + gentamicin (GM) and lauric acid + imipenem (IPM) combinations were synergistic against the clinical isolates in 12 combinations. An antagonistic FIC index was observed only with the myristylamine + GM combination. We investigated in detail the antimicrobial activity for two combinations that showed a synergistic effect. The cytotoxicity of lauric acid was not enhanced by the addition of GM and IPM. In time-kill studies, lauric acid + GM and lauric acid + IPM combinations at one-eighth of the minimum inhibitory concentration produced a bacteriostatic effect.

  5. Anti-cancer activity of tectona hamiltoniana-an endemic plant of Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mya, K.M.; Shyaula, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The ethanolic extracts of barks and leaves of Tectona hamiltoniana (Verbenaceae) were tested for anti-cancer activity against MCF-7 (Human breast cancer) and NCI-H460 (Lung cancer) cell lines employing sulpho rhodamine B (SRB) bioassay. These extracts demonstrated cytotoxicity with GI/sub 50/ values ranging between 24-33 macro g/mL against both cell lines. Upon further fractionation, dichloromethane fraction appeared to be most active against the MCF-7 cell line (GI/sub 50/ value of 3.4+-0.9 macro g/mL) leading to the isolation of lupane type triterpenoids, betulinic acid (1), betulin aldehyde ( 2 ) and betulin (3). Compound 2 and 3, both showed significant cytotoxic effect against both cancerous cell lines (GI/sub 50/ value range 6-11 macro M). (author)

  6. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  7. Marine algal natural products with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ching; Hou, Ming-Feng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Chang, Fang-Rong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Tang, Jen-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-06-03

    For their various bioactivities, biomaterials derived from marine algae are important ingredients in many products, such as cosmetics and drugs for treating cancer and other diseases. This mini-review comprehensively compares the bioactivities and biological functions of biomaterials from red, green, brown, and blue-green algae. The anti-oxidative effects and bioactivities of several different crude extracts of algae have been evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Natural products derived from marine algae protect cells by modulating the effects of oxidative stress. Because oxidative stress plays important roles in inflammatory reactions and in carcinogenesis, marine algal natural products have potential for use in anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs.

  8. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschinot, C.A.; Pace, J.R.; Hadden, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds. PMID:26310919

  9. Trypanocidal activity of the proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib was tested for in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei. The concentrations of bortezomib required to reduce the growth rate by 50% and to kill all trypanosomes were 3.3 nM and 10 nM, respectively. In addition, bortezomib was 10 times more toxic to trypanosomes than to human HL-60 cells. Moreover, exposure of trypanosomes to 10 nM bortezomib for 16 h was enough to kill 90% of the parasites following incubation in fresh medium. However, proteasomal peptidase activities of trypanosomes exposed to bortezomib were only inhibited by 10% and 30% indicating that the proteasome is not the main target of the drug. The results suggest that bortezomib may be useful as drug for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

  10. Just so stories: the random acts of anti-cancer nanomedicine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Farhangrazi, Zahra Shadi

    2014-11-01

    Contrary to high expectations, the majority of clinically approved anti-cancer nanomedicine, and those under clinical trials, have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in humans. So, why these nanomedicine are not delivering their promise? Here, we discuss likely factors, and call for a paradigm shift in approach and design of future cancer nanotherapeutics based on realistic cancer models representing human disease, and better understanding of integrated pathophysiological processes, including systems immunology, that modulate human tumor functionality and growth. This critical review of the current state of translational oncology research utilizing nanomedicine-based approaches provides a comprehensive discussion of the multiple factors that are responsible for poor outcomes when translating these approaches models to the actual human disease.

  11. NOVEL HYDROXAMIC ACIDS HAVING HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITING ACTIVITY AND ANTI-CANCER COMPOSITION COMPRISING THE SAME AS AN ACTIVE INGREDIENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a pharmaceutical composition for anticancer including novel hydroxamic acid with histone deacetylase inhibiting activity as an active ingredient. Hydroxamic acid compound of the present invention has inhibitory activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and shows...... cytotoxicity to a variety of cancer cells, being useful in strong anti-cancer drug....

  12. Requirement for aspartate-cleaved bid in apoptosis signaling by DNA-damaging anti-cancer regimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Arlette B.; Tait, Stephen W. G.; de Vries, Evert; Eldering, Eric; Borst, Jannie

    2004-01-01

    Lymphoid malignancies can escape from DNA-damaging anti-cancer drugs and gamma-radiation by blocking apoptosis-signaling pathways. How these regimens induce apoptosis is incompletely defined, especially in cells with nonfunctional p53. We report here that the BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bid is

  13. Anti-cancer capacity of plasma-treated PBS: effect of chemical composition on cancer cell cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boxem, Wilma; Van der Paal, Jonas; Gorbanev, Yury; Vanuytsel, Steven; Smits, Evelien; Dewilde, Sylvia; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-11-28

    We evaluate the anti-cancer capacity of plasma-treated PBS (pPBS), by measuring the concentrations of NO 2 - and H 2 O 2 in pPBS, treated with a plasma jet, for different values of gas flow rate, gap and plasma treatment time, as well as the effect of pPBS on cancer cell cytotoxicity, for three different glioblastoma cancer cell lines, at exactly the same plasma treatment conditions. Our experiments reveal that pPBS is cytotoxic for all conditions investigated. A small variation in gap between plasma jet and liquid surface (10 mm vs 15 mm) significantly affects the chemical composition of pPBS and its anti-cancer capacity, attributed to the occurrence of discharges onto the liquid. By correlating the effect of gap, gas flow rate and plasma treatment time on the chemical composition and anti-cancer capacity of pPBS, we may conclude that H 2 O 2 is a more important species for the anti-cancer capacity of pPBS than NO 2 - . We also used a 0D model, developed for plasma-liquid interactions, to elucidate the most important mechanisms for the generation of H 2 O 2 and NO 2 - . Finally, we found that pPBS might be more suitable for practical applications in a clinical setting than (commonly used) plasma-activated media (PAM), because of its higher stability.

  14. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  15. Growth inhibitory effect of the Src inhibitor dasatinib in combination with anticancer agents on uterine cervical adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Eri; Nishimura, Masato; Mineda, Ayuka; Kawakita, Takako; Abe, Akiko; Irahara, Minoru

    2017-11-01

    Uterine cervical adenocarcinoma has a poor clinical prognosis when compared with squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, the development of new treatment strategies for uterine cervical adenocarcinoma is necessary. Src is a proto-oncogene that is important in cancer progression. Dasatinib is a Src inhibitor that has been reported to be effective when used in combination with anticancer drugs. The present study aimed to confirm Src expression in human cervical adenocarcinoma cell lines and to determine the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of dasatinib on Src signaling in vitro . Western blot analysis was performed to investigate Src expression in cervical adenocarcinoma cell lines (HeLa and TCO-2 cells). The cells were cultured for 48 h with the addition of different concentrations of anticancer drugs (paclitaxel or oxaliplatin). Viable cell count was measured using a colorimetric (WST-1) assay. The concentrations of anticancer agents were fixed according to the results obtained, and the same experiments were performed using the drugs in combination with dasatinib at various concentrations to determine the concentrations that significantly affected the number of viable cells. The presence or absence of apoptosis was investigated using a caspase-3/7 assay. Signal transduction in each cell line was examined using western blotting. Src was activated in the two cell lines, and cell proliferation was significantly suppressed by each anticancer drug in combination with 10 µM dasatinib. Caspase-3/7 activity was also increased and Src signaling was suppressed by each anticancer drug in combination with dasatinib. In conclusion, Src is overexpressed in cervical adenocarcinoma cell lines, and dasatinib inhibits intracellular Src signaling and causes apoptosis. The results of the present study suggest that Src may be targeted in novel therapeutic strategies for cervical adenocarcinoma.

  16. Analysis of enhancement at small and large radiation doses for effectiveness of inactivation in cultured cells by combining two agents with radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Kok, H. Petra; Crezee, Johannes; Barendsen, Gerrit W.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the enhancement effect of two combined radiation-sensitizing agents in mammalian cells at small doses as compared to large doses using the linear-quadratic (LQ) mathematical model. Data on clonogenic assays concerning the radio-enhancement effects of combined halogenated pyrimidines and

  17. Combination of Estrogen and Immunosuppressive Agents to Establish a Mouse Model of Candidiasis with Concurrent Oral and Vaginal Mucosal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Wang, Chong; Mei, Huan; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Guixia; Zeng, Rong; Zhan, Ping; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Weida

    2016-02-01

    Mouse model is an appropriate tool for pathogenic determination and study of host defenses during the fungal infection. Here, we established a mouse model of candidiasis with concurrent oral and vaginal mucosal infection. Two C. albicans strains sourced from clinical candidemia (SC5314) and mucosal infection (ATCC62342) were tested in ICR mice. The different combinational panels covering estrogen and immunosuppressive agents, cortisone, prednisolone and cyclophosphamide were used for concurrent oral and vaginal candidiasis establishment. Prednisolone in combination with estrogen proved an optimal mode for concurrent mucosal infection establishment. The model maintained for 1 week with fungal burden reached at least 10(5) cfu/g of tissue. This mouse model was evaluated by in vivo pharmacodynamics of fluconazole and host mucosal immunity of IL-17 and IL-23. Mice infected by SC5314 were cured by fluconazole. An increase in IL-23 in both oral and vaginal homogenates was observed after infection, while IL-17 only had a prominent elevation in oral tissue. This model could properly mimic complicated clinical conditions and provides a valuable means for antifungal assay in vivo and may also provide a useful method for the evaluation of host-fungal interactions.

  18. Combination of Vessel-Targeting Agents and Fractionated Radiation Therapy: The Role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Fu, Sheng-Yung; Yang, Ying-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate vascular responses during fractionated radiation therapy (F-RT) and the effects of targeting pericytes or bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) on the efficacy of F-RT. Methods and Materials: Murine prostate TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in control mice or mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein-tagged bone marrow (GFP-BM), and irradiated with 60 Gy in 15 fractions. Mice were also treated with gefitinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) or AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist) to examine the effects of combination treatment. The responses of tumor vasculatures to these treatments and changes of tumor microenvironment were assessed. Results: After F-RT, the tumor microvascular density (MVD) was reduced; however, the surviving vessels were dilated, incorporated with GFP-positive cells, tightly adhered to pericytes, and well perfused with Hoechst 33342, suggesting a more mature structure formed primarily via vasculogenesis. Although the gefitinib+F-RT combination affected the vascular structure by dissociating pericytes from the vascular wall, it did not further delay tumor growth. These tumors had higher MVD and better vascular perfusion function, leading to less hypoxia and tumor necrosis. By contrast, the AMD3100+F-RT combination significantly enhanced tumor growth delay more than F-RT alone, and these tumors had lower MVD and poorer vascular perfusion function, resulting in increased hypoxia. These tumor vessels were rarely covered by pericytes and free of GFP-positive cells. Conclusions: Vasculogenesis is a major mechanism for tumor vessel survival during F-RT. Complex interactions occur between vessel-targeting agents and F-RT, and a synergistic effect may not always exist. To enhance F-RT, using CXCR4 inhibitor to block BM cell influx and the vasculogenesis process is a better strategy than targeting pericytes by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor

  19. Combined treatment with vitamin C and sulindac synergistically induces p53- and ROS-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Eun-Yeung; Shin, Yu Jin; Hwang, Ih-Yeon; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Seung-Mi; Moon, Jai-Hee; Shin, Jae-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee; Hur, Dae Young; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Seung-Woo; Lee, Won Keun; Lee, Wang-Jae

    2016-09-06

    Sulindac has anti-neoplastic properties against colorectal cancers; however, its use as a chemopreventive agent has been limited due to toxicity and efficacy concerns. Combinatorial treatment of colorectal cancers has been attempted to maximize anti-cancer efficacy with minimal side effects by administrating NSAIDs in combination with other inhibitory compounds or drugs such as l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), which is known to exhibit cytotoxicity towards various cancer cells at high concentrations. In this study, we evaluated a combinatorial strategy utilizing sulindac and vitamin C. The death of HCT116 cells upon combination therapy occurred via a p53-mediated mechanism. The combination therapeutic resistance developed in isogenic p53 null HCT116 cells and siRNA-mediated p53 knockdown HCT116 cells, but the exogenous expression of p53 in p53 null isogenic cells resulted in the induction of cell death. In addition, we investigated an increased level of intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species), which was preceded by p53 activation. The expression level of PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), but not Bim, was significantly increased in HCT116 cells in response to the combination treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that combination therapy with sulindac and vitamin C could be a novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy for p53 wild type colon cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro synergism of magnolol and honokiol in combination with antibacterial agents against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Guo-Ying; Zhang, Xin-Juan; Han, Jun; Li, Yu-Qing; Wang, Gen-Chun

    2015-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a problematic pathogen posing a serious therapeutic challenge in the clinic. It is often multidrug-resistant (MDR) to conventional classes of antibacterial agents and there is an urgent need to develop new agents or strategies for treatment. Magnolol (ML) and honokiol (HL) are two naturally occurring diallylbiphenols which have been reported to show inhibition of MRSA. In this study their synergistic effects with antibacterial agents were further evaluated via checkerboard and time-kill assays. The susceptibility spectrum of clinical MRSA strains was tested by the disk diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of ML and HL were assayed by broth microdilution. The synergy was evaluated through checkerboard microdilution and time-killing experiments. ML and HL showed similar activity against both MSSA and MRSA with MIC/MBC at 16 ~ 64 mg/L, with potency similar to amikacin (AMK) and gentamicin (GEN). When they were used in combination with conventional antibacterial agents, they showed bacteriostatic synergy with FICIs between 0.25 ~ 0.5, leading to the combined MICs decreasing to as low as 1 ~ 2 and 1 ~ 16 mg/L for ML (HL) and the agents, respectively. MIC50 of the combinations decreased from 16 mg/L to 1 ~ 4 mg/L for ML (HL) and 8 ~ 128 mg/L to 2 ~ 64 mg/L for the antibacterial agents, which exhibited a broad spectrum of synergistic action with aminoglycosides (AMK, etilmicin (ETM) and GEN), floroquinolones (levofloxacin (LEV), ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin), fosfomycin (FOS) and piperacillin. The times of dilution (TOD, the extent of decreasing in MIC value) were determined up to 16 for the combined MIC. A more significant synergy after combining was determined as ML (HL) with AMK, ETM, GEN and FOS. ML (HL) combined with antibacterial agents did not show antagonistic effects on any of the ten MRSA strains. Reversal effects of MRSA resistance to

  1. The impact of combinations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-hypertensive agents on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafutova, Stanislava; Juraskova, Bozena; Vlcek, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays NSAIDs are the most frequently used groups of drugs, especially because of their availability. Their consumption is high among older people, who are much more sensitive to the side effects, and who are often also taking other drugs which can interact with them. Moreover, the majority of the older population is suffering from hypertension. This could well explain the commonly encountered experience of drug interaction between NSAIDs and antihypertensive drugs, which is very common in clinical practice. The severity of this drug interaction is classified as class C, with a recommendation to monitor therapy. However, even a minor long-term increase in blood pressure can significantly increase the risk of cardiovascular mortality, while mortality rates can possibly be reduced by sufficiently effective treatment of hypertension. Therefore, in clinical practice, this type of interaction should not be overlooked as a major cause of failure of hypertension treatment in older patients, as well in many cases in general. The present article focusses on the mechanism and the degree of influence on the blood pressure of particular types of antihypertensive agents used in combination with NSAID. Not all groups of antihypertensive drugs are affected to the same degree; some are more affected, and others, such as calcium channel blockers, are not affected at all. Similarly, not every NSAID increases blood pressure. Many studies, some of which are analyzed in this article, present evidence of the degree of the influence NSAIDs have on blood pressure.

  2. Efficacy and safety of empagliflozin in combination with other oral hypoglycemic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera, Irene; Ampudia-Blasco, Francisco Javier; Pérez, Antonio; Ariño, Bernat; Pfarr, Egon; Giljanovic Kis, Sanja; Naderali, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the efficacy and safety of empagliflozin combined with other oral hypoglycemic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pooled analysis of three phase III trials in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=1,801) who received placebo or empagliflozin 10 or 25mg once daily for 24 weeks, in combination with metformin, metformin+sulphonylurea or pioglitazone ± metformin. Empagliflozin significantly decreased HbA1c (adjusted mean reduction vs placebo with empagliflozin 10mg: -0.58% [95% CI: -0.66; -0.49]; P<.0001, and with empagliflozin 25mg: -0.62% [95% CI: -0.70; -0.53], P<.0001), weight (adjusted mean reduction vs placebo with empagliflozin 10mg: -1.77kg [95% CI: -2.05; -1.48]; P<.0001, and with empagliflozin 25mg: -1.96kg [95% CI: -2.24; -1.67], P<.0001), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP). Adverse effect rates were 64% with placebo, 63.9% with empagliflozin 10mg, and 60.9% with empagliflozin 25mg. Documented episodes of hypoglycemia (≤70mg/dL and/or requiring care) occurred in 3.9% of patients with placebo, 6.9% of patients with empagliflozin 10mg, and 5.3% of patients with empagliflozin 25mg. Urinary tract infections developed in 9.4% of patients with placebo, 10.2% of patients with empagliflozin 10mg, and 8.3% of patients with empagliflozin 25mg. Genital infections were reported in 1.0% of patients with placebo, 4.6% of patients with empagliflozin 10mg, and 3.5% of patients with empagliflozin 25mg. Empagliflozin combined with other oral treatments decreased HbA1c, body weight, and SBP/DBP as compared to placebo, with a good safety and tolerability profile. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Dioscorea bulbifera tuber extract and evaluation of its synergistic potential in combination with antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh S

    2012-02-01

    -positive bacteria. Beta-lactam (piperacillin and macrolide (erythromycin antibiotics showed a 3.6-fold and 3-fold increase, respectively, in combination with silver nanoparticles selectively against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Notable synergy was seen between silver nanoparticles and chloramphenicol or vancomycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and was supported by a 4.9-fold and 4.2-fold increase in zone diameter, respectively. Similarly, we found a maximum 11.8-fold increase in zone diameter of streptomycin when combined with silver nanoparticles against E. coli, providing strong evidence for the synergistic action of a combination of antibiotics and silver nanoparticles.Conclusion: This is the first report on the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using D. bulbifera tuber extract followed by an estimation of its synergistic potential for enhancement of the antibacterial activity of broad spectrum antimicrobial agents.Keywords: Dioscorea bulbifera tuber extract, silver nanoparticles, antimicrobial synergy

  4. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Dioscorea bulbifera tuber extract and evaluation of its synergistic potential in combination with antimicrobial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sougata; Patil, Sumersing; Ahire, Mehul; Kitture, Rohini; Kale, Sangeeta; Pardesi, Karishma; Cameotra, Swaranjit S; Bellare, Jayesh; Dhavale, Dilip D; Jabgunde, Amit; Chopade, Balu A

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of an environmentally benign process for the synthesis of silver nanomaterials is an important aspect of current nanotechnology research. Among the 600 species of the genus Dioscorea, Dioscorea bulbifera has profound therapeutic applications due to its unique phytochemistry. In this paper, we report on the rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles by reduction of aqueous Ag+ ions using D. bulbifera tuber extract. Methods and results Phytochemical analysis revealed that D. bulbifera tuber extract is rich in flavonoid, phenolics, reducing sugars, starch, diosgenin, ascorbic acid, and citric acid. The biosynthesis process was quite fast, and silver nanoparticles were formed within 5 hours. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction confirmed reduction of the Ag+ ions. Varied morphology of the bioreduced silver nanoparticles included spheres, triangles, and hexagons. Optimization studies revealed that the maximum rate of synthesis could be achieved with 0.7 mM AgNO3 solution at 50°C in 5 hours. The resulting silver nanoparticles were found to possess potent antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Beta-lactam (piperacillin) and macrolide (eryth-romycin) antibiotics showed a 3.6-fold and 3-fold increase, respectively, in combination with silver nanoparticles selectively against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Notable synergy was seen between silver nanoparticles and chloramphenicol or vancomycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and was supported by a 4.9-fold and 4.2-fold increase in zone diameter, respectively. Similarly, we found a maximum 11.8-fold increase in zone diameter of streptomycin when combined with silver nanoparticles against E. coli, providing strong evidence for the synergistic action of a combination of antibiotics and silver nanoparticles

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response to enteral intake in children during anti-cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, B U; Paerregaard, A; Schmiegelow, K

    2005-01-01

    apoptosis and decreases mucosal permeability. Lack of GLP-2 may increase the risk of malabsorption and intestinal bacterial translocation. The aim of this study is to evaluate meal stimulated secretion of GLP-2 in children with cancer undergoing anti-cancer treatment. METHODS: Plasma-GLP-2 analysis after......BACKGROUND: Intestinal dysfunction is frequent in cancer and during anti-cancer treatment. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is secreted in a nutrition-dependent manner from the intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells. It accelerates crypt cell proliferation and nutrient absorption, inhibits enterocyte...... an overnight fast and 1 hour after intake of a mixed test meal. Data on gastrointestinal toxicity, blood neutrophile counts and food records were included in the analysis. RESULTS: Forty-four meal stimulation tests were performed in 25 children (median age, 6.0 years; range, 2.5-19) during anti...

  6. In Vivo Anti-Cancer Mechanism of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate (LFCS from Sea Cucumber Cucumaria frondosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The low-molecular-weight fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (LFCS was prepared from native fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS, which was extracted and isolated from sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa, and the anti-cancer mechanism of LFCS on mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC was investigated. The results showed that LFCS remarkably inhibited LLC growth and metastasis in a dose-dependent manner. LFCS induced cell cycle arrest by increasing p53/p21 expression and apoptosis through activation of caspase-3 activity in LLC cells. Meanwhile, LFCS suppressed the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 and downregulated the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs level. Furthermore, LFCS significantly suppressed the activation of ERK1/2/p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway, which played a prime role in expression of MMPs. All of these data indicate LFCS may be used as anti-cancer drug candidates and deserve further study.

  7. Synthesis and in vitro anti-cancer evaluation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-conjugated peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-11-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is a decapeptide hormone released from the hypothalamus and shows high affinity binding to the LHRH receptors. It is reported that several cancer cells also express LHRH receptors such as breast, ovarian, prostatic, bladder and others. In this study, we linked B1, an anti-cancer peptide, to LHRH and its analogs to improve the activity against cancer cells with LHRH receptor. Biological evaluation revealed that TB1, the peptide contains triptorelin sequence, present favorable anti-cancer activity as well as plasma stability. Further investigations disclosed that TB1 trigger apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-cytochrome c-caspase apoptotic pathway, it also exhibited the anti-migratory effect on cancer cells.

  8. In Vitro Characterization of the Pharmacological Properties of the Anti-Cancer Chelator, Bp4eT, and Its Phase I Metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliška Potůčková

    Full Text Available Cancer cells have a high iron requirement and many experimental studies, as well as clinical trials, have demonstrated that iron chelators are potential anti-cancer agents. The ligand, 2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4eT, demonstrates both potent anti-neoplastic and anti-retroviral properties. In this study, Bp4eT and its recently identified amidrazone and semicarbazone metabolites were examined and compared with respect to their anti-proliferative activity towards cancer cells (HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia, MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma, HCT116 human colon carcinoma and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma, non-cancerous cells (H9c2 neonatal rat-derived cardiomyoblasts and 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts and their interaction with intracellular iron pools. Bp4eT was demonstrated to be a highly potent and selective anti-neoplastic agent that induces S phase cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Both semicarbazone and amidrazone metabolites showed at least a 300-fold decrease in cytotoxic activity than Bp4eT towards both cancer and normal cell lines. The metabolites also lost the ability to: (1 promote the redox cycling of iron; (2 bind and mobilize iron from labile intracellular pools; and (3 prevent 59Fe uptake from 59Fe-labeled transferrin by MCF-7 cells. Hence, this study demonstrates that the highly active ligand, Bp4eT, is metabolized to non-toxic and pharmacologically inactive analogs, which most likely contribute to its favorable pharmacological profile. These findings are important for the further development of this drug candidate and contribute to the understanding of the structure-activity relationships of these agents.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization and Anti-Cancer Activity of Hydrazide Derivatives Incorporating a Quinoline Moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingul, Murat; Tan, Owen; Gardner, Christopher R; Sutton, Selina K; Arndt, Greg M; Marshall, Glenn M; Cheung, Belamy B; Kumar, Naresh; Black, David StC

    2016-07-14

    Identification of the novel (E)-N'-((2-chloro-7-methoxyquinolin-3-yl)methylene)-3-(phenylthio)propanehydrazide scaffold 18 has led to the development of a new series of biologically active hydrazide compounds. The parent compound 18 and new quinoline derivatives 19-26 were prepared from the corresponding quinoline hydrazones and substituted carboxylic acids using EDC-mediated peptide coupling reactions. Further modification of the parent compound 18 was achieved by replacement of the quinoline moiety with other aromatic systems. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against the SH-SY5Y and Kelly neuroblastoma cell lines, as well as the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. Analogues 19 and 22 significantly reduced the cell viability of neuroblastoma cancer cells with micromolar potency and significant selectivity over normal cells. The quinoline hydrazide 22 also induced G₁ cell cycle arrest, as well as upregulation of the p27(kip1) cell cycle regulating protein.

  10. Synthesis, Characterization and Anti-Cancer Activity of Hydrazide Derivatives Incorporating a Quinoline Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Bingul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the novel (E-N′-((2-chloro-7-methoxyquinolin-3-ylmethylene-3-(phenylthiopropanehydrazide scaffold 18 has led to the development of a new series of biologically active hydrazide compounds. The parent compound 18 and new quinoline derivatives 19–26 were prepared from the corresponding quinoline hydrazones and substituted carboxylic acids using EDC-mediated peptide coupling reactions. Further modification of the parent compound 18 was achieved by replacement of the quinoline moiety with other aromatic systems. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against the SH-SY5Y and Kelly neuroblastoma cell lines, as well as the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. Analogues 19 and 22 significantly reduced the cell viability of neuroblastoma cancer cells with micromolar potency and significant selectivity over normal cells. The quinoline hydrazide 22 also induced G1 cell cycle arrest, as well as upregulation of the p27kip1 cell cycle regulating protein.

  11. Dose critical in-vivo detection of anti-cancer drug levels in blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly H.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the in vivo and in vitro detection and measurement of dose critical levels of DNA-binding anti-cancer drug levels in biological fluids. The apparatus comprises a laser based fiber optic sensor (optrode) which utilizes the secondary interactions between the drug and an intercalating fluorochrome bound to a probe DNA, which in turn is attached to the fiber tip at one end thereof. The other end of the optical fiber is attached to an illumination source, detector and recorder. The fluorescence intensity is measured as a function of the drug concentration and its binding constant to the probe DNA. Anticancer drugs which lend themselves to analysis by the use of the method and the optrode of the present invention include doxorubicin, daunorubicin, carminomycin, aclacinomycin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-uracil, arabinosyl cytosine, mitomycin, cis-platinum 11 diamine dichloride procarbazine, vinblastine vincristine and the like. The present method and device are suitable for the continuous monitoring of the levels of these and other anticancer drugs in biological fluids such as blood, serum, urine and the like. The optrode of the instant invention also enables the measurement of the levels of these drugs from a remote location and from multiple samples.

  12. Eliciting societal preferences of reimbursement decision criteria for anti cancer drugs in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun-Hong; Park, Sun-Kyeong; Byun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2017-08-01

    In order to look beyond the cost-effectiveness analysis, this study used a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), which reflects societal values with regard to reimbursement decisions. This study aims to elicit societal preferences of the reimbursement decision criteria for anti cancer drugs from public and healthcare professionals. Eight criteria were defined based on a literature review and focus group sessions: disease severity, disease population size, pediatrics targets, unmet needs, innovation, clinical benefits, cost-effectiveness, and budget impacts. Using quota sampling and purposive sampling, 300 participants from the Korean public and 30 healthcare professionals were selected for the survey. Preferences were elicited using an analytic hierarchy process. Both groups rated clinical benefits the highest, followed by cost-effectiveness and disease severity, but differed with regard to disease population size and unmet needs. Innovation was the least preferred criteria. Clinical benefits and other social values should be reflected appropriately with cost-effectiveness in healthcare coverage. MCDA can be used to assess decision priorities for complicated health policy decisions, including reimbursement decisions. It is a promising method for making logical and transparent drug reimbursement decisions that consider a broad range of factors, which are perceived as important by relevant stakeholders.

  13. African medicinal plants and their derivatives: Current efforts towards potential anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbele, Mzwandile; Hull, Rodney; Dlamini, Zodwa

    2017-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide and second only to cardiovascular diseases. Cancer is a challenge in African countries because generally there is limited funding available to deal with the cancer epidemic and awareness and this should be prioritised and all possible resources should be utilized to prevent and treat cancer. The current review reports on the role of African medicinal plants in the treatment of cancer, and also outlines methodologies that can also be used to achieve better outcomes for cancer treatment. This review outlines African medicinal plants, isolated compounds and technologies that can be used to advance cancer research. Chemical structures of isolated compounds have an important role in anti-cancer treatments; new technologies and methods may assist to identify more properties of African medicinal plants and the treatment of cancer. In conclusion, African medicinal plants have shown their potential as enormous resources for novel cytotoxicity compounds. Finally it has been noted that the cytotoxicity depends on the chemical structural arrangements of African medicinal plants compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Melatonin as a multifunctional anti-cancer molecule: Implications in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Moloudizargari, Milad; Ghobadi, Emad; Fallah, Marjan; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-09-15

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a predominant malignancy with a high mortality rate affecting a large population worldwide. The etiology of GC is multifactorial spanning from various genetic determinants to different environmental causes. Current tretaments of GC are not efficient enough and require improvements to minimize the adverse effects. Melatonin, a naturally occurring compound with known potent inhibitory effects on cancer cells is one of the major candidates which can be recruited herein. Here we reviewed the articles conducted on the therapeutic effects of melatonin in gastric cancer in various models. The results are classified according to different aspects of cancer pathogenesis and the molecular mechanisms by which melatonin exerts its effects. Melatonin could be used to combat GC exploiting its effects on multiple aspects of its pathogenesis, including formation of cancer cells, tumor growth and angiogenesis, differentiation and metastasis as well as enhancing the anti-tumor immunity. Melatonin is a pleiotropic anti-cancer molecule that affects malignant cells via multiple mechanisms. It has been shown to benefit cancer patients indirectly by reducing side effects of current therapies which have been discussed in this review. This field of research is still underdeveloped and may serve as an interesting subject for further studies aiming at the molecular mechanisms of melatonin and novel treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural characterization and anti-cancerous potential of gallium bioactive glass/hydrogel composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, T J; Placek, L M; Coughlan, A; Bowers, G M; Hall, M M; Wren, A W

    2016-11-20

    A bioactive glass series (0.42SiO2-0.10Na2O-0.08CaO-(0.40-X)ZnO-(X)Ga2O3) was incorporated into carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/dextran (Dex) hydrogels in three different amounts (0.05, 0.10, and 0.25m(2)), and the resulting composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP MAS-NMR). Composite extracts were also evaluated in vitro against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells. TEM confirmed glass distribution throughout the composites, although some particle agglomeration was observed. DSC revealed that glass composition and content did have small effects on both Tg and Tm. MAS-NMR revealed that both CMC and Dex were successfully functionalized, that cross-linking occurred, and that glass addition did slightly alter bonding environments. Cell viability analysis suggested that extracts of the glass and composites with the largest Ga-content significantly decreased MG-63 osteosarcoma viability after 30days. This study successfully characterized this composite series, and demonstrated their potential for anti-cancerous applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Shafiq

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies.

  17. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies. PMID:25859300

  18. Cannabis and Anti-Cancer Drugs: Societal Usage and Expected Pharmacological Interactions - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquié, Régis; Deslandes, Guillaume; Mazaré, Hélène; Cogné, Marion; Mahé, Julien; Grégoire, Matthieu; Jolliet, Pascale

    2018-04-16

    Cannabis is a plant that has been used for centuries to relieve a wide range of symptoms. Since the 1960s, interest in medical research into this plant has grown steadily. Already very popular for recreational use, a growing number of consumers not accustomed to using cannabis for psychoactive purposes, have begun to use it as an alternative or complement to mainstream pharmaceutical medicines. The principal unsubstantiated or "social" uses of cannabis are based mainly on data that is at best controversial, but usually not scientifically proven. The aim of this review is to identify the scientific basis and reasons that lead patients with cancer to consume cannabis, and also to identify whether there is a risk of interaction between cannabis and anti-cancer medicines through drug transporters (P-glycoprotein and other ABC-superfamily members) Cytochromes P450 (3A, 1A, 2B, 2C 2D families…) and glucuronyl-transferases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-cancer evaluation of quercetin embedded PLA nanoparticles synthesized by emulsified nanoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjeev K; Patel, Dinesh K; Thakur, Ravi; Mishra, Durga P; Maiti, Pralay; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to synthesize quercetin (Qt) embedded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles (PLA-Qt) and to evaluate anti-cancer efficacy of PLA-Qt by using human breast cancer cells. PLA-Qt were synthesized by using novel emulsified nanoprecipitation technique with varying dimension of 32 ± 8 to 152 ± 9 nm of PLA-Qt with 62 ± 3% (w/w) entrapment efficiency by varying the concentration of polymer, emulsifier, drug and preparation temperature. The dimension of PLA-Qt was measured through transmission electron microscopy indicating larger particle size at higher concentration of PLA. The release rate of Qt from PLA-Qt was found to be more sustained for larger particle dimension (152 ± 9 nm) as compared to smaller particle dimension (32 ± 8 nm). Interaction between Qt and PLA was verified through spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. Delayed diffusion and stronger interaction in PLA-Qt caused the sustained delivery of Qt from the polymer matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity study indicate the killing of ∼ 50% breast cancer cells in two days at 100 μg/ml of drug concentration while the ∼ 40% destruction of cells require 5 days for PLA-Qt (46 ± 6 nm; 20mg/ml of PLA). Thus our results propose anticancer efficacy of PLA-Qt nanoparticles in terms of its sustained release kinetics revealing novel vehicle for the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  1. Mesua beccariana (Clusiaceae, A Source of Potential Anti-cancer Lead Compounds in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soek Sin Teh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on biologically active secondary metabolites from the stem bark of Mesua beccariana was carried out. A new cyclodione, mesuadione (1, along with several known constituents which are beccamarin (2, 2,5-dihydroxy-1,3,4-trimethoxy anthraquinone (3, 4-methoxy-1,3,5-trihydroxyanthraquinone (4, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 were obtained from this ongoing research. Structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, GC-MS, IR and UV techniques. Preliminary tests of the in vitro cytotoxic activities of all the isolated metabolites against a panel of human cancer cell lines Raji (lymphoma, SNU-1 (gastric carcinoma, K562 (erythroleukemia cells, LS-174T (colorectal adenocarcinoma, HeLa (cervical cells, SK-MEL-28 (malignant melanoma cells, NCI-H23 (lung adenocarcinoma, IMR-32 (neuroblastoma and Hep-G2 (hepatocellular liver carcinoma were carried out using an MTT assay. Mesuadione (1, beccamarin (2, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 displayed strong inhibition of Raji cell proliferation, while the proliferation rate of SK-MEL-28 and HeLa were strongly inhibited by stigmasterol (6 and beccamarin (2, indicating these secondary metabolites could be anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

  2. Taking a Stab at Cancer; Oncolytic Virus-Mediated Anti-Cancer Vaccination Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Sadie Aitken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines have classically been used for disease prevention. Modern clinical vaccines are continuously being developed for both traditional use as well as for new applications. Typically thought of in terms of infectious disease control, vaccination approaches can alternatively be adapted as a cancer therapy. Vaccines targeting cancer antigens can be used to induce anti-tumour immunity and have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy both pre-clinically and clinically. Various approaches now exist and further establish the tremendous potential and adaptability of anti-cancer vaccination. Classical strategies include ex vivo-loaded immune cells, RNA- or DNA-based vaccines and tumour cell lysates. Recent oncolytic virus development has resulted in a surge of novel viruses engineered to induce powerful tumour-specific immune responses. In addition to their use as cancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses have the added benefit of being directly cytolytic to cancer cells and thus promote antigen recognition within a highly immune-stimulating tumour microenvironment. While oncolytic viruses are perfectly equipped for efficient immunization, this complicates their use upon previous exposure. Indeed, the host’s anti-viral counter-attacks often impair multiple-dosing regimens. In this review we will focus on the use of oncolytic viruses for anti-tumour vaccination. We will explore different strategies as well as ways to circumvent some of their limitations.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, Neil; Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  4. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munju; Gillies, Robert J; Rejniak, Katarzyna A

    2013-11-18

    Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  5. Biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles for enhancement of anti-cancer activities of phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Li; Jia, Zhang; Yu-Jiao, Zu; Shu-Fang, Nie; Jun, Cao; Qian, Wang; Shao-Ping, Nie; Ze-Yuan, Deng; Ming-Yong, Xie; Shu, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Many phytochemicals show promise in cancer prevention and treatment, but their low aqueous solubility, poor stability, unfavorable bioavailability, and low target specificity make administering them at therapeutic doses unrealistic. This is particularly true for (–)-epigallocatechin gallate, curcumin, quercetin, resveratrol, and genistein. There is an increasing interest in developing novel delivery strategies for these natural products. Liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles are biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles. Those nanoparticles can increase the stability and solubility of phytochemicals, exhibit a sustained release property, enhance their absorption and bioavailability, protect them from premature enzymatic degradation or metabolism, prolong their circulation time, improve their target specificity to cancer cells or tumors via passive or targeted delivery, lower toxicity or side-effects to normal cells or tissues through preventing them from prematurely interacting with the biological environment, and enhance anti-cancer activities. Nanotechnology opens a door for developing phytochemical-loaded nanoparticles for prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:26412423

  6. Pectenotoxin-2 from Marine Sponges: A Potential Anti-Cancer Agent—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wun-Jae Kim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2, which was first identified as a cytotoxic entity in marine sponges, has been reported to display significant cytotoxicity to human cancer cells where it inhibits mitotic separation and cytokinesis through the depolymerization of actin filaments. In the late stage of endoreduplication, the effects of PTX-2 on different cancer cells involves: (i down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members and IAP family proteins; (ii up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-receptor 1/receptor 2 (DR4/DR5; and (iii mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, PTX-2 induces apoptotic effects through suppression of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB signaling pathway in several cancer cells. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins showed that PTX-2 increases phosphorylation of Cdc25c and decreases protein levels of Cdc2 and cyclin B1. Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk inhibitor p21 and Cdk2, which are associated with the induction of endoreduplication, were upregulated. Furthermore, it was found that PTX-2 suppressed telomerase activity through the transcriptional and post-translational suppression of hTERT. The purpose of this review was to provide an update regarding the anti-cancer mechanism of PTX-2, with a special focus on its effects on different cellular signaling cascades.

  7. Anti-Cancer Effects of Protein Extracts from Calvatia lilacina, Pleurotus ostreatus and Volvariella volvacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yi Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calvatia lilacina (CL, Pleurotus ostreatus (PO and Volvariella volvacea (VV are widely distributed worldwide and commonly eaten as mushrooms. In this study, cell viabilities were evaluated for a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480 cells and a human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells. Apoptotic mechanisms induced by the protein extracts of PO and VV were evaluated for SW480 cells. The viabilities of THP-1 and SW480 cells decreased in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 h of treatment with the protein extracts of CL, PO or VV. Apoptosis analysis revealed that the percentage of SW480 cells in the SubG1 phase (a marker of apoptosis was increased upon PO and VV protein-extract treatments, indicating that oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation existed concomitantly with cellular death. The PO and VV protein extracts induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, glutathione (GSH depletion and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm loss in SW480 cells. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine, GSH or cyclosporine A partially prevented the apoptosis induced by PO protein extracts, but not that induced by VV extracts, in SW480 cells. The protein extracts of CL, PO and VV exhibited therapeutic efficacy against human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and human monocytic leukemia cells. The PO protein extracts induced apoptosis in SW480 cells partially through ROS production, GSH depletion and mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the protein extracts of these mushrooms could be considered an important source of new anti-cancer drugs.

  8. SINE (selective inhibitor of nuclear export)--translational science in a new class of anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerecitano, John

    2014-10-04

    Regulation of protein trafficking between the nucleus and cytoplasm represents a novel control point for antineoplastic intervention. Several proteins involved with cellular growth and survival depend on precise and timely positioning within the cell to fulfill their functions, and the nuclear membrane defines one of the most important compartmental barriers. Chromosome Region Maintenance 1, or exportin-1 (CRM1/XPO1), is involved with the export of more than 200 nuclear proteins, and has intriguingly been shown to have an increased expression in several tumor cell types. Selinexor (KPT-330) is a first-in-class selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) to be developed for clinical use. Preclinical data has demonstrated antineoplastic activity of SINE compounds in many human solid and hematologic malignancies. The clinical development of Selinexor provides an excellent model for translational research.

  9. Genotoxic anti-cancer agents and their relationship to DNA damage, mitosis, and checkpoint adaptation in proliferating cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Lucy H; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2014-02-25

    When a human cell detects damaged DNA, it initiates the DNA damage response (DDR) that permits it to repair the damage and avoid transmitting it to daughter cells. Despite this response, changes to the genome occur and some cells, such as proliferating cancer cells, are prone to genome instability. The cellular processes that lead to genomic changes after a genotoxic event are not well understood. Our research focuses on the relationship between genotoxic cancer drugs and checkpoint adaptation, which is the process of mitosis with damaged DNA. We examine the types of DNA damage induced by widely used cancer drugs and describe their effects upon proliferating cancer cells. There is evidence that cell death caused by genotoxic cancer drugs in some cases includes exiting a DNA damage cell cycle arrest and entry into mitosis. Furthermore, some cells are able to survive this process at a time when the genome is most susceptible to change or rearrangement. Checkpoint adaptation is poorly characterised in human cells; we predict that increasing our understanding of this pathway may help to understand genomic instability in cancer cells and provide insight into methods to improve the efficacy of current cancer therapies.

  10. Production and evaluation of cytotoxic effects of DT386-BR2 fusion protein as a novel anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a fusion protein consisting of the catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects for targeted eradication of cancer cells. For this purpose, The DT386-BR2 structure was predicted using Modeller 9.14 and the best predicted model was selected based on the minimum DOPE score. A synthetic gene encoding DT386-BR2 was cloned in pET28a expression vector, expressed and purified by affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the expression of the DT386-BR2 fusion protein by revealing a band of about 47kDa after the induction of the expression. Finally, the purified protein was subjected to MTT assay for evaluation of its cyto-lethal effects on cancer and normal cell lines. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction in survival percent of HeLa and MCF-7 cancer cells in comparison to negative control (PBS), while the cytotoxic effect was not significant on the normal cells, i.e. HUVEC and HEK 293. The IC50 of DT386-BR2 for HeLa and MCF-7 was about 0.55 and 2.08μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the production and purification of DT386-BR2 fusion protein was successfully achieved and its cytotoxic effects on the studied cancer cell lines was established. The promising cytotoxic effects of this newly constructed fusion protein made it a suitable candidate for targeted therapy of cancer, and further in vitro and in vivo studies on this fusion protein is underway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vitamin E analogues as a novel group of mitocans: Anti-cancer agents that act by targeting mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dong, L.F.; Ramanathapuram, L.; Hahn, T.; Chladová, Miroslava; Wang, X. F.; Zobalová, Renata; Procházka, L.; Gold, M.; Freeman, R.; Turánek, J.; Akporiaye, E.T.; Dyason, J.C.; Ralph, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, 5-6 (2007), s. 607-645 ISSN 0098-2997 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tocopherol analogues * apoptosis * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.386, year: 2007

  12. Mitocans as anti-cancer agents targeting mitochondria: lessons from studies with vitamin E analogues, inhibitors of complex II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dyason, J.C.; Freeman, R.; Dong, L.F.; Procházka, L.; Wang, X. F.; Scheffler, I.; Ralph, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2007), s. 65-72 ISSN 0145-479X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : mitocans * mitochondria * complex II Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.634, year: 2007

  13. Recent Advances in the Discovery of HIF-1α-p300/CBP Inhibitors as Anti-Cancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jinlian; Yang, Yingrui; Lu, Mengchen; Lei, Yonghua; Xu, Lili; Jiang, Zhengyu; Xu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaoke; Zhang, Xiaojin; Sun, Haopeng; You, Qidong

    2018-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a heterodimeric (containing α and β subunits) transcription factor, is involved in hypoxia response pathway that regulates the expression of many tumorrelated genes. The stabilized HIF-1 heterodimer couples to the general co-activators p300/CBP (CREB binding protein), forming an active transcription factor to initiate hypoxic responses. Inhibiting the transcription factor-coactivator HIF-1α-p300/CBP interaction represents an attractive approach for blocking hypoxia pathway in tumors. Recently, diverse HIF-1α-p300/CBP inhibitors have been designed and their anti-tumor activities have been evaluated. The developments of inhibitors of HIF-1α- p300/CBP are discussed in this review. An outline of structures and biological activities of these inhibitors can be traced, along with the approaches for inhibitors discovery. The challenges in identifying novel and selective potent inhibitors of HIF-1α-p300/CBP are also put forward. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response to enteral intake in children during anti-cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, B U; Paerregaard, A; Schmiegelow, K

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intestinal dysfunction is frequent in cancer and during anti-cancer treatment. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is secreted in a nutrition-dependent manner from the intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells. It accelerates crypt cell proliferation and nutrient absorption, inhibits enterocyte...... if the enteral energy intake is sufficient. Insufficient GLP-2 secretion could influence the gastrointestinal problems seen in the children with a low enteral energy intake....

  15. Cell type-specific anti-cancer properties of valproic acid: independent effects on HDAC activity and Erk1/2 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfryd, Kamil; Skladchikova, Galina; Lepekhin, Eugene E

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The anti-epileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) has attracted attention as an anti-cancer agent. Methods: The present study investigated effects of VPA exposure on histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition, cell growth, cell speed, and the degree of Erk1/2 phosphorylation in 10 cell...... lines (BT4C, BT4Cn, U87MG, N2a, PC12-E2, CSML0, CSML100, HeLa, L929, Swiss 3T3). Results: VPA induced significant histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition in most of the cell lines, but the degree of inhibition was highly cell type-specific. Moreover, cell growth, motility and the degree of Erk1....../2 phosphorylation were inhibited, activated, or unaffected by VPA in a cell type-specific manner. Importantly, no relationship was found between the effects of VPA on HDAC inhibition and changes in the degree of Erk1/2 phosphorylation, cell growth, or motility. In contrast, VPA-induced modulation of the MAPK...

  16. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kanegan, Michael J; Dunn, Denise E; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C

    2016-05-12

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0-4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0-4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD.

  17. Agent-Based Control of Distributed Electricity Generation with Micro Combined Heat and Power : Cross-Sectoral Learning for Process and Infrastructure Engineers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, K.H.; Houwing, M.; Lukszo, Z.; Bouwmans, I.

    2007-01-01

    For the distributed control of an electricity infrastructure incorporating clusters of residential combined heat and power units (micro-CHP or ?CHP) a Multi-Agent System approach is considered. The network formed by households generating electricity with ?CHP units and the facilitating energy

  18. Evaluating national pricing policies of innovative anti-cancer drugs: correlation analysis between costs and survival in 15 European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Mengato

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating national pricing policies of innovative anti-cancer drugs: correlation analysis between costs and survival in 15 European countriesIntroductionIn recent years, public health systems in Europe have faced the challenge of sustainability in different ways. The aim of this study is to analyse the pricing policies of 15 European countries by studying the correlation between cost and survival of a series of anti-cancer drugs.MethodsOur study assessed nine anti-cancer drugs licensed by EMA in the last decade. Clinical benefits, measured as overall survival (OS and progression free survival (PFS, were obtained from EPAR or randomized controlled trials, while nominal and real prices in the 15 different countries (including discounts were derived from a published study. We performed a correlation analysis between cost and OS for each indication of any given drug.ResultsOnly two countries (Hungary and Lithuania demonstrated a strong correlation coefficient in the OS analysis. The PFS analysis has shown better results with 12 countries, with R values higher than 0.20.DiscussionTo the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in which the correlation between costs and outcomes has been studied in a large number of countries. Our results showed that, in these countries, prices had generally a poor correlation with OS and a better correlation with PFS.

  19. Efficacy and safety of combining intra-articular methylprednisolone and anti-TNF agent to achieve prolonged remission in patients with recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To control local inflammation, the role of intra-articular corticosteroid is well established; similarly, with time there are more reports on the experience of intra-articular anti-TNF agent for localized joint inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the safety, local tolerability and clinical response after combining intra-articular administration of corticosteroids and anti-TNF agents for recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis. METHODS: Patients with recurrent monoarthritis of the knee were recruited from our inflammatory arthritis clinics. These patients required intra-articular corticosteroids every 8-12 weeks, with good short-term results. Five such consecutive patients were invited to partake in this study. Patients were maintained on their baseline immunosuppressive therapy. After aspiration of knee joint, the involved joint was injected with 80mg of methylprednisolone mixed with 5ml of lignocaine 1%; this was followed by the injection of an anti-TNF agent. RESULTS: In majority of our patients (three out of five), combining anti-TNF agent and methylprednisolone led to prolonged anti-inflammatory response, and these patients remain in remission to date (mean follow-up of 12 months). These responders were noted to be naive to anti-TNF therapy. Conversely, the remaining two patients were found to be on baseline systemic anti-TNF therapy, and both of them failed to respond either partly or completely. CONCLUSION: Combining intra-articular corticosteroid and anti-TNF agent has proved to be safe in our cohort of patients. We conclude that in particular subset of patients who suffer from recurrent inflammatory monoarthritis or oligoarthritis, combination therapy of intra-articular corticosteroids and anti-TNF agents appears attractive and promising.

  20. Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2-CuxS double-shelled hollow spheres for enhanced chemo-/photothermal anti-cancer therapy and dual-modal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Yang, Guixin; Wang, Xingmei; Lv, Ruichan; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; Gulzar, Arif; Yang, Piaoping

    2015-07-01

    Multifunctional composites have gained significant interest due to their unique properties which show potential in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the design of an efficient combination of multiple diagnostic and therapeutic modes is still a challenge. In this contribution, Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2 double-shelled hollow spheres (DSHSs) with up-conversion fluorescence have been successfully prepared through a facile integrated sacrifice template method, followed by a calcination process. It is found that the double-shelled structure with large specific surface area and uniform shape is composed of an inner shell of luminescent Y2O3:Yb,Er and an outer mesoporous silica shell. Ultra small CuxS nanoparticles (about 2.5 nm) served as photothermal agents, and a chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin, DOX) was then attached onto the surface of mesoporous silica, forming a DOX-DSHS-CuxS composite. The composite exhibits high anti-cancer efficacy due to the synergistic photothermal therapy (PTT) induced by the attached CuxS nanoparticles and the enhanced chemotherapy promoted by the heat from the CuxS-based PTT when irradiated by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) light. Moreover, the composite shows excellent in vitro and in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) and up-conversion fluorescence (UCL) imaging properties owing to the doped rare earth ions, thus making it possible to achieve the target of imaging-guided synergistic therapy.Multifunctional composites have gained significant interest due to their unique properties which show potential in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the design of an efficient combination of multiple diagnostic and therapeutic modes is still a challenge. In this contribution, Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2 double-shelled hollow spheres (DSHSs) with up-conversion fluorescence have been successfully prepared through a facile integrated sacrifice template method, followed by a calcination process. It is found that the double-shelled structure with large

  1. Cranberry as promising natural source of potential anticancer agents: current evidence and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsargyris, Athanasios; Tampaki, Ekaterini-Christina; Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2012-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that dietary modification can lower the risk for several cancer types' development. Cranberry in particular, has been shown to have anti-oxidative, -inflammatory and -proliferative properties in vitro. To present the latest knowledge regarding the role of cranberry extracts against human cancer several types. A review of the literature documenting both in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects of whole cranberry and/or its extracts is conducted. Current data provide evidence for several anti-cancer properties of either whole cranberry and/or its extracts. The discovery of the specific cranberry components and the appropriate concentrations that exert such beneficial effects along with verification of the preliminary in vitro results in in vivo settings could potentially lead to the invention of novel safer and efficient anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  2. Chemopreventive Agents and Inhibitors of Cancer Hallmarks: May Citrus Offer New Perspectives?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santa Cirmi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and vegetables have long been recognized as potentially important in the prevention of cancer risk. Thus, scientific interest in nutrition and cancer has grown over time, as shown by increasing number of experimental studies about the relationship between diet and cancer development. This review attempts to provide an insight into the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits, with a focus on their bioactive compounds, elucidating the main cellular and molecular mechanisms through which they may protect against cancer. Scientific literature was selected for this review with the aim of collecting the relevant experimental evidence for the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits and their flavonoids. The findings discussed in this review strongly support their potential as anti-cancer agents, and may represent a scientific basis to develop nutraceuticals, food supplements, or complementary and alternative drugs in a context of a multi-target pharmacological strategy in the oncology.

  3. Chemopreventive Agents and Inhibitors of Cancer Hallmarks: May Citrus Offer New Perspectives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirmi, Santa; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Lombardo, Giovanni E; Maugeri, Alessandro; Calapai, Gioacchino; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Navarra, Michele

    2016-11-04

    Fruits and vegetables have long been recognized as potentially important in the prevention of cancer risk. Thus, scientific interest in nutrition and cancer has grown over time, as shown by increasing number of experimental studies about the relationship between diet and cancer development. This review attempts to provide an insight into the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits, with a focus on their bioactive compounds, elucidating the main cellular and molecular mechanisms through which they may protect against cancer. Scientific literature was selected for this review with the aim of collecting the relevant experimental evidence for the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits and their flavonoids. The findings discussed in this review strongly support their potential as anti-cancer agents, and may represent a scientific basis to develop nutraceuticals, food supplements, or complementary and alternative drugs in a context of a multi-target pharmacological strategy in the oncology.

  4. Modeling protective anti-tumor immunity via preventative cancer vaccines using a hybrid agent-based and delay differential equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter S; Lee, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    A next generation approach to cancer envisions developing preventative vaccinations to stimulate a person's immune cells, particularly cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), to eliminate incipient tumors before clinical detection. The purpose of our study is to quantitatively assess whether such an approach would be feasible, and if so, how many anti-cancer CTLs would have to be primed against tumor antigen to provide significant protection. To understand the relevant dynamics, we develop a two-compartment model of tumor-immune interactions at the tumor site and the draining lymph node. We model interactions at the tumor site using an agent-based model (ABM) and dynamics in the lymph node using a system of delay differential equations (DDEs). We combine the models into a hybrid ABM-DDE system and investigate dynamics over a wide range of parameters, including cell proliferation rates, tumor antigenicity, CTL recruitment times, and initial memory CTL populations. Our results indicate that an anti-cancer memory CTL pool of 3% or less can successfully eradicate a tumor population over a wide range of model parameters, implying that a vaccination approach is feasible. In addition, sensitivity analysis of our model reveals conditions that will result in rapid tumor destruction, oscillation, and polynomial rather than exponential decline in the tumor population due to tumor geometry.

  5. An Evaluation Of Anti Cancer Potential Of Annona Muricata Linn (Durian Belanda) Tea Product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Fakhrurazi Ahmad Fadzil; Zainah Adam; Shafii Khamis

    2014-01-01

    Though the number of cancer survivors continues to increase due to the improvements in early detection, cancer incidence and deaths still escalating each year. Even though there are major advancement in medicine technology such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine, people in developing countries especially in Asian countries are looking towards natural product as an alternative medicine especially in cancer treatment and prevention; primarily because of the general belief that herbal drugs are without any side effects besides being cheap and locally available. One of them is the leaves of Annona Muricata L. from the Annonaceae family is well known for their anti cancer activity by the local people in Malaysia and is commonly known as Soursoup or in local name of Durian Belanda. In the local market the most of the product of Annona Muricata L. is in the form of tea bag. This present study was aimed to evaluate the anti cancer potential of the extract of Annona Muricata L. The tea bag of Annona Muricata L. was obtain from a local market and was physically identified and confirmed by botanist as the leaves of Annona Muricata L. Sequential extraction was done using hexane, chloroform, methanol and hot aqueous. All of these extracts will be screen for alkaloid, saponin, cardiac glucoside and flavonoid. Then quantitative estimation of phenolics adn flavonoid content was conducted. These extract are also being tested on MDPA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma cells) and HTB-43 (head and neck cancer) by MTT assay. These extract was also evaluated for their reducing power and DPPH radical scavenging assay. The parameters obtained from the test was IC50 values, a value that produce inhibitory cancer cells by 50 % and a value that produce radical scavenging at 50 % for both MTT assay and DPPH assay. Results revealed that the IC50 of hexane, chloroform, methanol and aqueous extract for MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma cells) was 35.1μg/ml, 26.8 μg/ml, 19.1

  6. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Boss

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols.

  7. The anti-cancer effects of poi (Colocasia esculenta) on colonic adenocarcinoma cells In vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy C; Reitzenstein, Jonathan E; Liu, Jessie; Jadus, Martin R

    2005-09-01

    Hawaiians tend to have lower incidence rates of colorectal cancer and it was hypothesized that this may be due to ethnic differences in diet, specifically, their consumption of poi, a starchy paste made from the taro (Colocasia esulenta L.) plant corm. Soluble extracts of poi were incubated at 100 mg/mL in vitro for antiproliferative activity against the rat YYT colon cancer cell line. (3)H-thymidine incorporation studies were conducted to demonstrate that the poi inhibited the proliferation of these cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. The greatest suppression of YYT colon cancer growth occurred when 25% concentration was used. When poi was incubated with the YYT cells after 2 days, the YYT cells underwent apoptotic changes as evidenced by a positive terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) stain. Poi enhanced the proliferation of normal mouse splenocyte control cells, suggesting that poi is not simply toxic to all cells but even has a positive immunostimulatory role. By flow cytometry, T cells (CD4+ and CD8+) were predominantly activated by the poi. Although numerous factors can contribute to the risk of colon cancer, perhaps poi consumption may contribute to the lower colon cancer rates among Hawaiians by two distinct mechanisms. First, by inducing apoptosis within colon cancer cells; second, by non-specifically activating lymphocytes, which in turn can lyse cancerous cells. Our results suggest for the first time that poi may have novel tumor specific anti-cancer activities and future research is suggested with animal studies and human clinical trials. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Phytochemical, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of Euphorbia tirucalli Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Munro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Euphorbia tirucalli is a succulent shrub or small tree that is native to the African continent, however, it is widely cultivated across the globe due to its use in traditional medicines to treat ailments, ranging from scorpion stings to HIV. Recent studies have identified compounds present in the latex of the plant, including a range of bi- and triterpenoids that exhibit bioactivity, including anticancer activity. This study aimed to optimize water extraction conditions for high-yield total phenolic content recovery, to prepare methanol and aqueous extracts from the aerial sections of the plant, and to test the phytochemical, antioxidant, and anti-cancer properties of these extracts. Water extraction of total phenolic compounds (TPC was optimized across a range of parameters including temperature, extraction time, and plant mass-to-solvent ratio. The water extract of the E. tirucalli powder was found to contain TPC of 34.01 mg GAE (gallic acid equivalents/g, which was approximately half that of the methanol extract (77.33 mg GAE/g. The results of antioxidant assays showed a uniform trend, with the methanol extract’s antioxidant reducing activity exceeding that of water extracts, typically by a factor of 2:1. Regression analysis of the antioxidant assays showed the strongest correlation between extract TPC and antioxidant activity for the ABTS (2,2-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl methods. The methanol extract also showed greater growth inhibition capacity towards the MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell line. These data suggest that further investigations are required to confirm the source of activity within the E. tirucalli leaf and stems for potential use in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

  9. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P G; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-08-19

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols.

  10. Challenges and strategies in anti-cancer nanomedicine development: An industry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jennifer I; Lammers, Twan; Ashford, Marianne B; Puri, Sanyogitta; Storm, Gert; Barry, Simon T

    2017-01-01

    Successfully translating anti-cancer nanomedicines from pre-clinical proof of concept to demonstration of therapeutic value in the clinic is challenging. Having made significant advances with drug delivery technologies, we must learn from other areas of oncology drug development, where patient stratification and target-driven design have improved patient outcomes. We should evolve our nanomedicine development strategies to build the patient and disease into the line of sight from the outset. The success of small molecule targeted therapies has been significantly improved by employing a specific decision-making framework, such as AstraZeneca's 5R principle: right target/efficacy, right tissue/exposure, right safety, right patient, and right commercial potential. With appropriate investment and collaboration to generate a platform of evidence supporting the end clinical application, a similar framework can be established for enhancing nanomedicine translation and performance. Building informative data packages to answer these questions requires the following: (I) an improved understanding of the heterogeneity of clinical cancers and of the biological factors influencing the behaviour of nanomedicines in patient tumours; (II) a transition from formulation-driven research to disease-driven development; (III) the implementation of more relevant animal models and testing protocols; and (IV) the pre-selection of the patients most likely to respond to nanomedicine therapies. These challenges must be overcome to improve (the cost-effectiveness of) nanomedicine development and translation, and they are key to establishing superior therapies for patients. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Network pharmacology analysis of the anti-cancer pharmacological mechanisms of Ganoderma lucidum extract with experimental support using Hepa1-6-bearing C57 BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruo-Lin; He, Yu-Min

    2018-01-10

    important roles in the process of GLE treatment. GLE effectively inhibited tumor growth in Hepa1-6-bearing C57 BL/6 mice. Finally, consistent with the results of qRT-PCR data, the results of western-blot assay demonstrated the expression levels of PGR and ESR1 were up-regulated, as well as the expression levels of NR3C2 and AR were down-regulated, while the change of NR3C1 and CHRM2 had no statistical significance. The results indicated that these 4 hub target genes, including NR3C2, AR, ESR1 and PGR, might act as potential markers to evaluate the curative effect of GLE treatment in tumor. And, the combined data provide preliminary study of the pharmacological mechanisms of GLE, which may be a promising potential therapeutic and chemopreventative candidate for anti-cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashynska, Vlada; Stepanian, Stepan; Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms

  13. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashynska, Vlada, E-mail: vlada@vl.kharkov.ua [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Stepanian, Stepan [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly [Institute of Organic Chemistry of Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudosok korutja, 2, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary); Adamowicz, Ludwik [University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms.

  14. Novel Agent Based-approach for Industrial Diagnosis: A Combined use Between Case-based Reasoning and Similarity Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Zohra Benkaddour

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In spunlace nonwovens industry, the maintenance task is very complex, it requires experts and operators collaboration. In this paper, we propose a new approach integrating an agent- based modelling with case-based reasoning that utilizes similarity measures and preferences module. The main purpose of our study is to compare and evaluate the most suitable similarity measure for our case. Furthermore, operators that are usually geographically dispersed, have to collaborate and negotiate to achieve mutual agreements, especially when their proposals (diagnosis lead to a conflicting situation. The experimentation shows that the suggested agent-based approach is very interesting and efficient for operators and experts who collaborate in INOTIS enterprise.

  15. Preparation, characterization and in vitro release kinetics of polyaspartamide-based conjugates containing antimalarial and anticancer agents for combination therapy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aderibigbe, BA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is treated by combination of two drugs in order to overcome drug resistance. Antimalarials have been found to be more effective by combining them with low doses of anticancer drugs. Polymer-drug conjugates containing aminoquinoline...

  16. Structure and Potential Cellular Targets of HAMLET-like Anti-Cancer Compounds made from Milk Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Håkansson, Anders P; Vacher, Catherine S; Liu, Guo Jun; Knott, Robert B; Church, William Bret

    2015-01-01

    The HAMLET family of compounds (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumours) was discovered during studies on the properties of human milk, and is a class of protein-lipid complexes having broad spectrum anti-cancer, and some specific anti-bacterial properties. The structure of HAMLET-like compounds consists of an aggregation of partially unfolded protein making up the majority of the compound's mass, with fatty acid molecules bound in the hydrophobic core. This is a novel protein-lipid structure and has only recently been derived by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The structure is the basis of a novel cytotoxicity mechanism responsible for anti-cancer activity to all of the around 50 different cancer cell types for which the HAMLET family has been trialled. Multiple cytotoxic mechanisms have been hypothesised for the HAMLET-like compounds, but it is not yet clear which of those are the initiating cytotoxic mechanism(s) and which are subsequent activities triggered by the initiating mechanism(s). In addition to the studies into the structure of these compounds, this review presents the state of knowledge of the anti-cancer aspects of HAMLET-like compounds, the HAMLET-induced cytotoxic activities to cancer and non-cancer cells, and the several prospective cell membrane and intracellular targets of the HAMLET family. The emerging picture is that HAMLET-like compounds initiate their cytotoxic effects on what may be a cancer-specific target in the cell membrane that has yet to be identified. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  17. The Study on Acute Subacute Toxicity and Anti-cancer Effect of K-herbal-acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho, Kim

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study was to investigate Acute· Subacute Toxicity and Anti-cancer Effect of K-Herbal-acupuncture in mice and rats. Methods : Balb/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with K- herbal-acupuncture for LD50 and acute toxicity test. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally with K-herbal-acupuncture for subacute toxicity test. K-Herbal-acupuncture was injected on abdomen of mice with S-180 cancer cell line. Result : 1. LD50 of K-Herbal-acupuncture was limited 4×10-3ml/kg~2×10-3ml/kg by the test. 2. In acute toxicity test, all of mice were down to the moving reflex, but the weight of mice was increased in treatment group, compared with the normal group. (p<0.05 3. In acute toxicity test of serum biochemical values of mice, glucose was increased in treatment II group, total cholesterol was increased both treatments.(p<0.05 4. In subacute toxicity test, the clinical signs of toxication was down to the moving reflex, but it is not severe like acute toxicity test, and observed weight loss at the treatments. 5. In subacute toxicity test, liver weight was decreased compared with the normal group. (p<0.05 6. In subacute toxicity test of complete blood count test (CBC of rat, HCT was decreased in treatments, compared with the normal group.(p<0.05 7. In subacute toxicity test of serum biochemical values of rat, uric acid and triglyceride were decreased, and glucose was increased in treatment groups compared with the control group. (p<0.05 8. Median survival time was increased about 45% in treatment groups compared with the control group.(p<0.05 9. Natural killer cell activity was increased in B16F10 lung cancer model, but it was not in sarcoma-180 abdomen cancer. 10. In interleukin-2 productivity test, treatment groups didn't show significant change in lung cancer and abdomen cancer, compared with the normal group.(p<0.005 11. In making an examination of metastatic cancer with the naked eye, melanoma

  18. Algae extracts and methyl jasmonate anti-cancer activities in prostate cancer: choreographers of ‘the dance macabre’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooqi Ammad Ahmad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an overwhelmingly increasing trend of analysis of naturally occurring ingredients in treatment of prostate cancer. Substantial fraction of information has been added that highlights activity at various levels and steps of deregulated cellular proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis. Among such ingredients, algae extracts and jasmonates are documented to have anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo and induce growth inhibition in cancer cells, while leaving the non-transformed cells intact. In this short review we outline systematically, how these ingredients predispose prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis.

  19. Algae extracts and methyl jasmonate anti-cancer activities in prostate cancer: choreographers of 'the dance macabre'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Butt, Ghazala; Razzaq, Zubia

    2012-11-26

    There is an overwhelmingly increasing trend of analysis of naturally occurring ingredients in treatment of prostate cancer. Substantial fraction of information has been added that highlights activity at various levels and steps of deregulated cellular proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis. Among such ingredients, algae extracts and jasmonates are documented to have anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo and induce growth inhibition in cancer cells, while leaving the non-transformed cells intact. In this short review we outline systematically, how these ingredients predispose prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis.

  20. Combined effects of biocontrol agents and soil amendments on soil microbial populations, plant growth and incidence of charcoal rot of cowpea and wilt of cumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijeta SINGH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted for 2 years to determine the effectiveness of combined use of two biocontrol agents, Bacillus firmus and Aspergillus versicolor for control of Macrophomina phaseolina induced charcoal rot of cowpea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cumini induced wilt of cumin. The lowest level of plant mortality (3‒4% due to charcoal rot of cowpea was recorded when bacterium coated seeds were sown in radish compost amended soil compared to the non-amended soil (13.8‒20.5%, but this was not significantly better than some other treatments. Cowpea roots from B. firmus coated seeds had better nodulation than any of the individual A. versicolor treatments. Although B. firmus coated seeds + A. versicolor + farmyard manure resulted in maximum nodulation this was not significantly different to B. firmus seed coating. Root colonization by the combined biocontrol agent treatments was better than the individual biocontrol agent treatments. Combining A. versicolor with farmyard manure supported the maximum populations of total fungi and actinomycetes. In both winter seasons, the lowest incidence of wilt (1.0‒5.2% on cumin was recorded when A. versicolor was amended with neem compost compared to the non-amended soil (5.7‒10.5%. Maximum colonization of A. versicolor on roots was observed in B. firmus + A. versicolor + farmyard manure amended plots. During both years, the treatment combination of A. versicolor in neem compost amended plots resulted in maximum populations of fungi, bacteria and A. versicolor in the soil, which was greater than in the non-amended soil. Significant increases in disease control were not recorded after single or repeated delivery of A. versicolor. These results suggest that combining B. firmus as seed coatings with A. versicolor as soil applications gives improved control of M. phaseolina and Fusarium induced diseases on legume and seed spice crops in arid soils.

  1. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States); Sethakorn, Nan [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States); Bissonnette, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Puri, Neelu, E-mail: neelupur@uic.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  2. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC

  3. Cytotoxic effects of the newly-developed chemotherapeutic agents 17-AAG in combination with oxaliplatin and capecitabine in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Mahshid; Zeynali, Shima; Azarbaijani, Anahita Fathi; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad Hassan; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2017-12-01

    The use of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors like 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-AAG) has been recently introduced as an attractive anticancer therapy. It has been shown that 17-AAG may potentiate the inhibitory effects of some classical anticolorectal cancer (CRC) agents. In this study, two panels of colorectal carcinoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effects of 17-AAG in combination with capecitabine and oxaliplatin as double and triple combination therapies on the proliferation of CRC cell lines. HT-29 and all HCT-116 cell lines were seeded in culture media in the presence of different doses of the mentioned drugs in single, double, and triple combinations. Water-soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1) assay was used to investigate cell proliferation 24 h after treatments. Then, dose-response curves were plotted using WST-1outputs, and IC 50 values were determined. For double and triple combinations respectively 0.5 × IC 50 and 0.25 × IC 50 were used. Data was analyzed with the software CompuSyn. Drug interactions were analyzed using Chou-Talalay method to calculate the combination index (CI).The data revealed that 17-AAG shows a potent synergistic interaction (CI 1) in HT-29 and a synergistic effect (CI AAG with oxaliplatin or capecitabine might be effective against HCT-116 and HT-29 cell lines. However, in triple combinations, positive results were seen only against HCT-116. Further investigation is suggested to confirm the effectiveness of these combinations in clinical trials.

  4. The relative efficacy and safety of targeted agents used in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with untreated advanced gastric cancer: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuping; Zhang, Huixiang; Wang, Xueyan; Ge, Quanxing; Hu, Junhong

    2017-04-18

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading mortal causes. Targeted therapy is a new type of cancer treatment, which precisely identifies and attacks cancer cells and significantly reduces side effects. In this network meta-analysis, we focused on the efficacy and safety of 12 targeted agents on gastric cancer among a total of 8,405 patients from 24 trials. Hazard ratio (HR) with 95% credible interval (CrI) were calculated for primary outcomes, including overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), while odds ratio (OR) with 95% CrI were calculated for secondary outcomes. Surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) were calculated to illustrate the rank probability of various agents for different outcomes. Compared with other analyzed treatments, ramucirumab is outstanding in survival outcomes. However, higher risk of hematological events should be noted during its application. Lapatinib is also efficacious in progression reduction, while it is always combined with severe gastrointestinal events. Trastuzumab is proposed for its high efficacy in improving survival rate and safety, which is proper for most patients. In conclusion, trastuzumab was recommended as the optimal targeted agent combined with chemotherapy for gastric cancer patients.

  5. Antifungal activities of diphenyl diselenide and ebselen alone and in combination with antifungal agents against Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Tarcieli Pozzebon; Chassot, Francieli; Loreto, Érico Silva; Keller, Jéssica Tairine; Azevedo, Maria Izabel; Zeni, Gilson; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2016-07-01

    Herein, we describe the in vitro activity of a combination of the organoselenium compounds diphenyl diselenide and ebselen alone and in combination with amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole, and voriconazole against 25 clinical isolates of Fusarium spp. For this analysis, we used the broth microdilution method based on the M38-A2 technique and checkerboard microdilution method. Diphenyl diselenide (MIC range = 4-32 μg/ml) and ebselen (MIC range = 2-8 μg/ml) showed in vitro activity against the isolates tested. The most effective combinations were (synergism rates): ebselen + amphotericin B (88%), ebselen + voriconazole (80%), diphenyl diselenide + amphotericin B (72%), and diphenyl diselenide + voriconazole (64%). Combination with caspofungin resulted in low rates of synergism: ebselen + caspofungin, 36%, and diphenyl diselenide + caspofungin, 28%; combination with itraconazole demonstrated indifferent interactions. Antagonistic effects were not observed for any of the combinations tested. Our findings suggest that the antifungal potential of diphenyl diselenide and ebselen deserves further investigation in in vivo experimental models, especially in combination with amphotericin B and voriconazole. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Macroalgae of Izmir Gulf: Dictyotaceae exhibit high in vitro anti-cancer activity independent from their antioxidant capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelenk, Fatma Gül; Özkaya, Ali Burak; Sukatar, Atakan

    2016-12-01

    In this study, 24 marine macroalgae collected from the coastline of Izmir Gulf were examined for their antioxidant activities and their effects on cell proliferation. Crude extracts were obtained from samples with cold methanol extraction. Antioxidant activity was evaluated as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content (TPC); growth inhibitory effects of the extracts were determined by using WST-8. Amongst the species, Polysiphonia denuata (Rhodophyta) and Cystoseira species (Phaeophyceae) have been noticed by their high DPPH radical scavenging activities and TPCs. As expected, there was a strong correlation between these tests. Dictyota dichotoma (Phaeophyceae) showed the highest anti-cancer activity on MCF-7 cells with an IC 50 of 17.2 ng mL -1 . Flow cytometry analyses demonstrated that D. dichotoma methanolic extract strongly induced apoptosis. This extract exhibited moderate viability inhibition on MCF10A cells (IC 50 : 49.3 ng mL -1 ), suggesting a potential use of the extracts or its compounds for cancer therapy. There was no correlation between anti-cancer potential and antioxidant content of the extracts.

  7. Through the Looking Glass: Time-lapse Microscopy and Longitudinal Tracking of Single Cells to Study Anti-cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Russell T; Orth, James D

    2016-05-14

    The response of single cells to anti-cancer drugs contributes significantly in determining the population response, and therefore is a major contributing factor in the overall outcome. Immunoblotting, flow cytometry and fixed cell experiments are often used to study how cells respond to anti-cancer drugs. These methods are important, but they have several shortcomings. Variability in drug responses between cancer and normal cells, and between cells of different cancer origin, and transient and rare responses are difficult to understand using population averaging assays and without being able to directly track and analyze them longitudinally. The microscope is particularly well suited to image live cells. Advancements in technology enable us to routinely image cells at a resolution that enables not only cell tracking, but also the observation of a variety of cellular responses. We describe an approach in detail that allows for the continuous time-lapse imaging of cells during the drug response for essentially as long as desired, typically up to 96 hr. Using variations of the approach, cells can be monitored for weeks. With the employment of genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors numerous processes, pathways and responses can be followed. We show examples that include tracking and quantification of cell growth and cell cycle progression, chromosome dynamics, DNA damage, and cell death. We also discuss variations of the technique and its flexibility, and highlight some common pitfalls.

  8. Use of Telemorace Inhibition in Combination with Anti-Cancer Drugs to Induce Cell Death in Tumor Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cerone, Maria A

    2006-01-01

    .... Therefore targeting telomerase may represent a promising approach for cancer therapy. Inhibition of telomerase would result in telomere shortening and cell death due to dysfunctional telomeres...

  9. An agent-based simulation combined with group decision-making technique for improving the performance of an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yousefi

    Full Text Available This study presents an agent-based simulation modeling in an emergency department. In a traditional approach, a supervisor (or a manager allocates the resources (receptionist, nurses, doctors, etc. to different sections based on personal experience or by using decision-support tools. In this study, each staff agent took part in the process of allocating resources based on their observation in their respective sections, which gave the system the advantage of utilizing all the available human resources during the workday by being allocated to a different section. In this simulation, unlike previous studies, all staff agents took part in the decision-making process to re-allocate the resources in the emergency department. The simulation modeled the behavior of patients, receptionists, triage nurses, emergency room nurses and doctors. Patients were able to decide whether to stay in the system or leave the department at any stage of treatment. In order to evaluate the performance of this approach, 6 different scenarios were introduced. In each scenario, various key performance indicators were investigated before and after applying the group decision-making. The outputs of each simulation were number of deaths, number of patients who leave the emergency department without being attended, length of stay, waiting time and total number of discharged patients from the emergency department. Applying the self-organizing approach in the simulation showed an average of 12.7 and 14.4% decrease in total waiting time and number of patients who left without being seen, respectively. The results showed an average increase of 11.5% in total number of discharged patients from emergency department.

  10. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang Xu,1,2,* Xiaobo Wu,3,* Chun Hu,1,2 Zhiying Zhang,4 Le Zhang,1,2 Shujing Liang,1,2 Yingchun Xu,5 Fengchun Zhang1,2 1Department of Oncology, Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Suzhou, 2Department of Oncology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Prevention and Cure Center of Breast Disease, Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, 4Graduate School, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, 5Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015 comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR, and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR and pooled risk ratio (RR were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002, PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001, and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001. Notably, subgroup analysis

  11. Combining a Multi-Agent System and Communication Middleware for Smart Home Control: A Universal Control Platform Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the smart home field has gained wide attention for its broad application prospects. However, families using smart home systems must usually adopt various heterogeneous smart devices, including sensors and devices, which makes it more difficult to manage and control their home system. How to design a unified control platform to deal with the collaborative control problem of heterogeneous smart devices is one of the greatest challenges in the current smart home field. The main contribution of this paper is to propose a universal smart home control platform architecture (IAPhome based on a multi-agent system and communication middleware, which shows significant adaptability and advantages in many aspects, including heterogeneous devices connectivity, collaborative control, human-computer interaction and user self-management. The communication middleware is an important foundation to design and implement this architecture which makes it possible to integrate heterogeneous smart devices in a flexible way. A concrete method of applying the multi-agent software technique to solve the integrated control problem of the smart home system is also presented. The proposed platform architecture has been tested in a real smart home environment, and the results indicate that the effectiveness of our approach for solving the collaborative control problem of different smart devices.

  12. Combining a Multi-Agent System and Communication Middleware for Smart Home Control: A Universal Control Platform Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Song; Zhang, Qi; Zheng, Rong; Huang, Bi-Qin; Song, Yi-Lin; Chen, Xin-Chu

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the smart home field has gained wide attention for its broad application prospects. However, families using smart home systems must usually adopt various heterogeneous smart devices, including sensors and devices, which makes it more difficult to manage and control their home system. How to design a unified control platform to deal with the collaborative control problem of heterogeneous smart devices is one of the greatest challenges in the current smart home field. The main contribution of this paper is to propose a universal smart home control platform architecture (IAPhome) based on a multi-agent system and communication middleware, which shows significant adaptability and advantages in many aspects, including heterogeneous devices connectivity, collaborative control, human-computer interaction and user self-management. The communication middleware is an important foundation to design and implement this architecture which makes it possible to integrate heterogeneous smart devices in a flexible way. A concrete method of applying the multi-agent software technique to solve the integrated control problem of the smart home system is also presented. The proposed platform architecture has been tested in a real smart home environment, and the results indicate that the effectiveness of our approach for solving the collaborative control problem of different smart devices. PMID:28926957

  13. Whitening Agents from Reseda luteola L. and Their Chemical Characterization Using Combination of CPC, UPLC-HRMS and NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Burger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Skin whitening agents occupy an important part of the dermo-cosmetic market nowadays. They are used to treat various skin pigmentation disorders, or simply to obtain a lighter skin tone. The use of traditional skin bleachers (e.g., hydroquinone, corticoids is now strictly regulated due to their side effects. When considering this and the growing consumers’ interest for more natural ingredients, plant extracts can be seen as safe and natural alternatives. In this perspective, in vitro bioassays were undertaken to assess cosmetic potential of Reseda luteola, and particularly its promising whitening activities. A bioguided purification procedure employing centrifugal partition chromatography, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS and NMR was developed to isolate and identify the whitening agents (i.e., luteolin and apigenin from aerial parts of R. luteola. UPLC-HRMS also enabled the characterization of acetylated luteolin- and apigenin-O-glycosides, which occurrence is reported for the first time in R. luteola.

  14. Combining a Multi-Agent System and Communication Middleware for Smart Home Control: A Universal Control Platform Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Song; Zhang, Qi; Zheng, Rong; Huang, Bi-Qin; Song, Yi-Lin; Chen, Xin-Chu

    2017-09-16

    In recent years, the smart home field has gained wide attention for its broad application prospects. However, families using smart home systems must usually adopt various heterogeneous smart devices, including sensors and devices, which makes it more difficult to manage and control their home system. How to design a unified control platform to deal with the collaborative control problem of heterogeneous smart devices is one of the greatest challenges in the current smart home field. The main contribution of this paper is to propose a universal smart home control platform architecture (IAPhome) based on a multi-agent system and communication middleware, which shows significant adaptability and advantages in many aspects, including heterogeneous devices connectivity, collaborative control, human-computer interaction and user self-management. The communication middleware is an important foundation to design and implement this architecture which makes it possible to integrate heterogeneous smart devices in a flexible way. A concrete method of applying the multi-agent software technique to solve the integrated control problem of the smart home system is also presented. The proposed platform architecture has been tested in a real smart home environment, and the results indicate that the effectiveness of our approach for solving the collaborative control problem of different smart devices.

  15. Repurposing antipsychotic drugs into antifungal agents: Synergistic combinations of azoles and bromperidol derivatives in the treatment of various fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Selina Y L; Garzan, Atefeh; Dennis, Emily K; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2017-10-20

    As the number of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients continues to rise, invasive fungal infections, such as invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis, threaten the life of millions of patients every year. The azole antifungals are currently the most prescribed drugs clinically that display broad-spectrum antifungal activity and excellent oral bioavailability. Yet, the azole antifungals have their own limitations and are unable to meet the challenges associated with increasing fungal infections and the accompanied development of resistance against azoles. Exploring combination therapy that involves the current azoles and another drug has been shown to be a promising strategy. Haloperidol and its derivative, bromperidol, were originally discovered as antipsychotics. Herein, we synthesize and report a series of bromperidol derivatives and their synergistic antifungal interactions in combination with a variety of current azole antifungals against a wide panel of fungal pathogens. We further select two representative combinations and confirm the antifungal synergy by performing time-kill assays. Furthermore, we evaluate the ability of selected combinations to destroy fungal biofilm. Finally, we perform mammalian cytotoxicity assays with the representative combinations against three mammalian cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative biorelease study of fluticasone in combination with antibacterial (Neomycin and or antifungal (coltrimazol, miconazole agents by histamine percutaneous reaction method in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahani S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluticasone propionate is a novel, potent and topically active synthetic corticosteroid preparation with a much reduced potential, in relation to its anti-inflammatory potency, for unwanted systemic side effects. It is indicated for the treatment of eczema, dermatitis etc. The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare the biorelease of fluticassone with placebo (base formulation; its combination with antifungal (miconazole, clotrimazole and / or antibacterial agents based on the attenuation of histamine induced wheal and flare reaction and flare intensity (on visual analouge scale by McNemar test. In the present study, fluticasone alone and in combination with clotrimazole, miconazole and neomycin significantly reduced the wheal and flare response of histamine prick test. The flare intensity response was also significantly inhibited by these treatments. Furthermore, there was no difference in the anti-inflammatory activity of various treatment groups. It may, therefore, be concluded that antibacterial (neomycin and / or antifungal (miconazole, clotrimazole agents in combination with steroid (fluticasone do not alter the pharmacodynamic response of the latter.

  17. Biofilm imaging in porous media by laboratory X-Ray tomography: Combining a non-destructive contrast agent with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Maxence; Beltran, Mario A; Morales, Verónica L; Derlon, Nicolas; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Kaufmann, Rolf; Holzner, Markus

    2017-01-01

    X-ray tomography is a powerful tool giving access to the morphology of biofilms, in 3D porous media, at the mesoscale. Due to the high water content of biofilms, the attenuation coefficient of biofilms and water are very close, hindering the distinction between biofilms and water without the use of contrast agents. Until now, the use of contrast agents such as barium sulfate, silver-coated micro-particles or 1-chloronaphtalene added to the liquid phase allowed imaging the biofilm 3D morphology. However, these contrast agents are not passive and potentially interact with the biofilm when injected into the sample. Here, we use a natural inorganic compound, namely iron sulfate, as a contrast agent progressively bounded in dilute or colloidal form into the EPS matrix during biofilm growth. By combining a very long source-to-detector distance on a X-ray laboratory source with a Lorentzian filter implemented prior to tomographic reconstruction, we substantially increase the contrast between the biofilm and the surrounding liquid, which allows revealing the 3D biofilm morphology. A comparison of this new method with the method proposed by Davit et al (Davit et al., 2011), which uses barium sulfate as a contrast agent to mark the liquid phase was performed. Quantitative evaluations between the methods revealed substantial differences for the volumetric fractions obtained from both methods. Namely, contrast agent-biofilm interactions (e.g. biofilm detachment) occurring during barium sulfate injection caused a reduction of the biofilm volumetric fraction of more than 50% and displacement of biofilm patches elsewhere in the column. Two key advantages of the newly proposed method are that passive addition of iron sulfate maintains the integrity of the biofilm prior to imaging, and that the biofilm itself is marked by the contrast agent, rather than the liquid phase as in other available methods. The iron sulfate method presented can be applied to understand biofilm development

  18. Biofilm imaging in porous media by laboratory X-Ray tomography: Combining a non-destructive contrast agent with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxence Carrel

    Full Text Available X-ray tomography is a powerful tool giving access to the morphology of biofilms, in 3D porous media, at the mesoscale. Due to the high water content of biofilms, the attenuation coefficient of biofilms and water are very close, hindering the distinction between biofilms and water without the use of contrast agents. Until now, the use of contrast agents such as barium sulfate, silver-coated micro-particles or 1-chloronaphtalene added to the liquid phase allowed imaging the biofilm 3D morphology. However, these contrast agents are not passive and potentially interact with the biofilm when injected into the sample. Here, we use a natural inorganic compound, namely iron sulfate, as a contrast agent progressively bounded in dilute or colloidal form into the EPS matrix during biofilm growth. By combining a very long source-to-detector distance on a X-ray laboratory source with a Lorentzian filter implemented prior to tomographic reconstruction, we substantially increase the contrast between the biofilm and the surrounding liquid, which allows revealing the 3D biofilm morphology. A comparison of this new method with the method proposed by Davit et al (Davit et al., 2011, which uses barium sulfate as a contrast agent to mark the liquid phase was performed. Quantitative evaluations between the methods revealed substantial differences for the volumetric fractions obtained from both methods. Namely, contrast agent-biofilm interactions (e.g. biofilm detachment occurring during barium sulfate injection caused a reduction of the biofilm volumetric fraction of more than 50% and displacement of biofilm patches elsewhere in the column. Two key advantages of the newly proposed method are that passive addition of iron sulfate maintains the integrity of the biofilm prior to imaging, and that the biofilm itself is marked by the contrast agent, rather than the liquid phase as in other available methods. The iron sulfate method presented can be applied to understand

  19. Combination treatment with erlotinib and ampelopsin overcomes erlotinib resistance in NSCLC cells via the Nox2-ROS-Bim pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Woo; Park, Nam-Sook; Noh, Min Hye; Shim, Ju A; Ahn, Byul-Nim; Kim, Yeong Seok; Kim, Daejin; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Hur, Dae Young

    2017-04-01

    Erlotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), has been shown to have a dramatic effect in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutation. However, the presence of primary resistance or acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI is the most common reason for switching to other anti-cancer agents. Even though there are newer agents that have activity in the presence of the T790M mutation, identification of potential agents that could overcome resistance to EGFR-TKI is still needed for the treatment of NSCLC patients. In this study, we used erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cell lines to investigate the effects of combination treatment with erlotinib and ampelopsin. After treatment with either single or combination, cell viability and cell death were determined with WST-1 assay, trypan blue exclusion method, colony forming assay, annexin-V staining assay and western blot assay. The content of ROS was evaluated by FACS analysis using H 2 DCF-staining method. To determine the effect of Nox2 and Bim on the combined treatment with erlotinib and ampelopsin-induced cell death, we transfected with Nox2 or Bim specific siRNA and performed with western blot assay for evaluation of its expression. Combined treatment with erlotinib and ampelopsin at non-cytotoxic concentrations significantly induced caspase-dependent cell death in erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cells. Furthermore, cell death resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through upregulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (Nox2) expression, a direct source of ROS. The expression level of Bim increased with combination treatment, but not with either treatment alone. Here in this study, we demonstrate that the combination of erlotinib and ampelopsin induces cell death via the Nox2-ROS-Bim pathway, and ampelopsin could be used as a novel anti-cancer agent combined with EGFR-TKI to overcome resistance to erlotinib in EGFR-mutant NSCLC

  20. The design and synthesis of novel heterodinuclear complexes combining a DNA-cleaving agent and a DNA-targeting moiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoog, Paul de

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Nowadays, the treatment of cancer by chemotherapy can consist of a combination of antitumor drugs. Nevertheless, chemotherapy is accompanied by serious side effects and intrinsic and acquired resistance to the drugs. This thesis describes the design and

  1. Analysis of combining ability and heredity parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    heterosis of anti-cancer glucosinolates of their hybrid was very high. By analyzing the SCA effects, 1 × 2 ... The in vitro test of human rectal cancer cells has proved that sulforaphane has the function of inhibiting .... The value of general combining ability effect of parents. Parents. PRO. Significant level of 5%. Significant.

  2. Anti-cancer effect of Annona Muricata Linn Leaves Crude Extract (AMCE) on breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Najmuddin, Syed Umar Faruq; Romli, Muhammad Firdaus; Hamid, Muhajir; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Nik Abd Rahman, Nik Mohd Afizan

    2016-08-24

    Annona muricata Linn which comes from Annonaceae family possesses many therapeutic benefits as reported in previous studies and to no surprise, it has been used in many cultures to treat various ailments including headaches, insomnia, and rheumatism to even treating cancer. However, Annona muricata Linn obtained from different cultivation area does not necessarily offer the same therapeutic effects towards breast cancer (in regards to its bioactive compound production). In this study, anti-proliferative and anti-cancer effects of Annona muricata crude extract (AMCE) on breast cancer cell lines were evaluated. A screening of nineteen samples of Annona muricata from different location was determined by MTT assay on breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and 4 T1) which revealed a varied potency (IC50) amongst them. Then, based on the IC50 profile from the anti-proliferative assay, further downward assays such as cell cycle analysis, Annexin V/FITC, AO/PI, migration, invasion, and wound healing assay were performed only with the most potent leaf aqueous extract (B1 AMCE) on 4 T1 breast cancer cell line to investigate its anti-cancer effect. Then, the in vivo anti-cancer study was conducted where mice were fed with extract after inducing the tumor. At the end of the experiment, histopathology of tumor section, tumor nitric oxide level, tumor malondialdehyde level, clonogenic assay, T cell immunophenotyping, and proteome profiler analysis were performed. Annona muricata crude extract samples exhibited different level of cytotoxicity toward breast cancer cell lines. The selected B1 AMCE reduced the tumor's size and weight, showed anti-metastatic features, and induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo of the 4 T1 cells. Furthermore, it decreased the level of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde in tumor while also increased the level of white blood cell, T-cell, and natural killer cell population. The results suggest that, B1 AMCE is a promising candidate for cancer

  3. In Vitro Synergistic Activity of Antimicrobial Agents in Combination against Clinical Isolates of Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Seongman; Kim, Min-Chul; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Hee Sueng; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Sung-Han; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Yang Soo; Chong, Yong Pil

    2016-01-01

    Emerging resistance to colistin in clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates is of growing concern. Since current treatment options for these strains are extremely limited, we investigated the in vitro activities of various antimicrobial combinations against colistin-resistant A. baumannii. Nine clinical isolates (8 from bacteremia cases and 1 from a pneumonia case) of colistin-resistant A. baumannii were collected in Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea, between January 2010 and December ...

  4. Low-cost fabrication of ternary CuInSe2 nanocrystals by colloidal route using a novel combination of volatile and non-volatile capping agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Parul; Narain Sharma, Shailesh; Singh, Son

    2014-11-01

    Wet-route synthesis of CuInSe2 (CISe) nanocrystals has been envisaged with the utilization of the unique combination of coordinating ligand and non coordinating solvent. Our work demonstrates the formation of a single-phase, nearly stoichiometric and monodispersive, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals (band gap (Eg)~1.16 eV) using a novel combination of ligands; viz. volatile arylamine aniline and non-volatile solvent 1-octadecene. The synthesis and growth conditions have been manoeuvred using the colligative properties of the mixture and thus higher growth temperature (~250 °C) could be attained that promoted larger grain growth. The beneficial influence of the capping agents (aniline and 1-octadecene) on the properties of chalcopyrite nanocrystals has enabled us to pictorally model the structural, morphological and optoelectronic aspects of CISe nanoparticles.

  5. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... as anti-bacterial and anti-fungal agents against various microorganisms. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests of the ligand and its copper complex were carried out in two different human tumour cell lines, HCT-116 and MDA – MB - 231. The cytotoxicity studies showed that the complex exhibited higher activity than cisplatin and ...

  6. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    copper complex have been investigated as anti-bacterial and anti-fungal agents against various microorganisms. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests of the ..... integration curves and those obtained from the values of the expected CHN analysis, ... two imino nitrogen atoms to form the equatorial plane, with atoms of the same type in ...

  7. Coupling Deep Transcriptome Analysis with Untargeted Metabolic Profiling in Ophiorrhiza pumila to Further the Understanding of the Biosynthesis of the Anti-Cancer Alkaloid Camptothecin and Anthraquinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Mami; Mochida, Keiichi; Asano, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Chiba, Motoaki; Udomson, Nirin; Yamazaki, Yasuyo; Goodenowe, Dayan B.; Sankawa, Ushio; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Toyoda, Atsushi; Totoki, Yasushi; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Buell, C. Robin; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    The Rubiaceae species, Ophiorrhiza pumila, accumulates camptothecin, an anti-cancer alkaloid with a potent DNA topoisomerase I inhibitory activity, as well as anthraquinones that are derived from the combination of the isochorismate and hemiterpenoid pathways. The biosynthesis of these secondary products is active in O. pumila hairy roots yet very low in cell suspension culture. Deep transcriptome analysis was conducted in O. pumila hairy roots and cell suspension cultures using the Illumina platform, yielding a total of 2 Gb of sequence for each sample. We generated a hybrid transcriptome assembly of O. pumila using the Illumina-derived short read sequences and conventional Sanger-derived expressed sequence tag clones derived from a full-length cDNA library constructed using RNA from hairy roots. Among 35,608 non-redundant unigenes, 3,649 were preferentially expressed in hairy roots compared with cell suspension culture. Candidate genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway for the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid camptothecin were identified; specifically, genes involved in post-strictosamide biosynthetic events and genes involved in the biosynthesis of anthraquinones and chlorogenic acid. Untargeted metabolomic analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) indicated that most of the proposed intermediates in the camptothecin biosynthetic pathway accumulated in hairy roots in a preferential manner compared with cell suspension culture. In addition, a number of anthraquinones and chlorogenic acid preferentially accumulated in hairy roots compared with cell suspension culture. These results suggest that deep transcriptome and metabolome data sets can facilitate the identification of genes and intermediates involved in the biosynthesis of secondary products including camptothecin in O. pumila. PMID:23503598

  8. Synthesis, Identification and Anti-Cancer Activity of 1-(4-Methylpent-2-enyl-2-(4-phenylbut-2-enyldisulfane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we synthesized 1-(4-methylpent-2-enyl-2-(4-phenylbut-2- enyldisulfane using sodium sulfide, 1-bromine-4-methyl-2-amylene and 1-(4-bromine-2- butylenebenzene as raw materials. The yield rate of target product was 84%. The structure of the target product was confirmed by GC-MS, 1H-NMR and elemental analysis. The results of anti-cancer activity experiments showed that 1-(4-methylpent-2-enyl-2-(4- phenylbut-2-enyldisul-fane could significantly inhibit the proliferation, induce the apoptosis of CNE2 cells in a dose dependent manner, and could significantly enhance the activity of XIAP.

  9. Cytotoxicity Enhancement in Breast Cancer Cells with Carbonate Apatite-Facilitated Intracellular Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemian, Tahereh; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2018-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy as the mainstay in the management of breast cancer has demonstrated various drawbacks, including non-targeted bio distribution and narrow therapeutic and safety windows. Thus, enhancements in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of the classical anti-cancer drugs could lead to improved efficacy against cancer cells. Therefore, inorganic pH-dependent carbonate apatite (CA) nanoparticles were utilized to efficiently deliver various drugs into cancer cells. Following characterization and various modifications in the structure of CA complexes with different drugs, lifted outcomes were achieved. Markedly, complexing paclitaxel with CA resulted in 20.71 ± 4.34% loading efficiency together with 24.14 ± 2.21% enhancement in cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells plus superior in vivo anti-tumour efficacy compared to free paclitaxel. PMID:29401738

  10. Cytotoxicity Enhancement in Breast Cancer Cells with Carbonate Apatite-Facilitated Intracellular Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Fatemian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacotherapy as the mainstay in the management of breast cancer has demonstrated various drawbacks, including non-targeted bio distribution and narrow therapeutic and safety windows. Thus, enhancements in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of the classical anti-cancer drugs could lead to improved efficacy against cancer cells. Therefore, inorganic pH-dependent carbonate apatite (CA nanoparticles were utilized to efficiently deliver various drugs into cancer cells. Following characterization and various modifications in the structure of CA complexes with different drugs, lifted outcomes were achieved. Markedly, complexing paclitaxel with CA resulted in 20.71 ± 4.34% loading efficiency together with 24.14 ± 2.21% enhancement in cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells plus superior in vivo anti-tumour efficacy compared to free paclitaxel.

  11. Cytotoxicity and cell-cycle effects of paclitaxel when used as a single agent and in combination with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Nalin; Hu, Lily J.; Deen, Dennis F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to determine the extent of paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity and cell-cycle perturbations when used alone and in combination with radiation in human glioma cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of paclitaxel alone on three human glioma cells lines--SF-126, U-87 MG, and U-251 MG--was assessed after 24, 48, 72, or 96 h treatment. For experiments in combination with radiation, cells were exposed to either a long (48-h) or short (8-h) duration of paclitaxel treatment prior to irradiation. Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle perturbations were assessed by using flow cytometry to measure the proportion of cells in G 1 , S, and G 2 /M phases. Results: When cells were treated with paclitaxel alone for ≥24 h, cytotoxicity increased up to a threshold dose, after which it plateaued. When treatment duration was ≤24 h, cytotoxicity was appreciably greater in U-251 MG cells than in SF-126 and U-87 MG cells. After 24 h of paclitaxel treatment, cells in plateau phase growth had increased survival compared to cells in log phase growth. In contrast, after 8 h paclitaxel treatment, mitotic cells had reduced survival compared to cells from an asynchronous population. Cell-cycle perturbations were consistent with the presence of a mitotic block after paclitaxel treatment, although changes in other cell-cycle phase fractions varied among cell lines. For experiments in combination with radiation, cytotoxicity was increased when cells were irradiated after 48 h of paclitaxel treatment but not after 8 h of treatment. Conclusion: The duration of paclitaxel treatment and the location of cells in the cell cycle modify the degree of radiation cytotoxicity. The mechanisms of paclitaxel cytotoxicity are likely to be multifactorial because varying effects are seen in different cell lines. Furthermore, it is clear that simply increasing the number of cells in G 2 /M is insufficient in itself to increase the response of cells to radiation

  12. Coronal leakage in endodontically treated teeth restored with posts and complete crowns using different luting agent combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, Joseph; Rosner, Ofir; Gross, Ora; Pilo, Raphael; Lin, Shaul

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of different cement combinations on coronal microleakage in restored endodontically treated teeth using dye penetration. Human, noncarious single-rooted extracted premolars (n = 60) were divided into four experimental groups (each n = 15). After endodontic treatment, different combinations of cements were used to lute prefabricated posts and complete crown restorations: zinc phosphate cement applied on posts and cast crowns (Z) or on zinc phosphate cement posts and resin cement applied on cast crowns (ZR); resin cement applied on posts and zinc phosphate cement applied on cast crowns (RZ); and resin cement applied on posts and cast crowns (R). After artificial aging through thermal cycling (5°C to 55°C) for 2,000 cycles at 38 seconds for each cycle and 15 seconds of dwell time, specimens were immersed for 72 hours in basic fuchsin at 37°C. A buccolingual section was made through the vertical axis of specimens. A Toolmaker's microscope (Mitutoyo) was used to measure (um) dye penetration. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test was used to determine intergroup difference. A nonparametric Mann-Whitney test compared each group regarding its maximal linear penetration depths on the mesial and distal aspects of each specimen (a = 0.05). Dye staining was evident to some degree in all specimens. Among groups Z, ZR, and RZ, no significant difference was shown in dye-penetration depths (mean penetration scores 1,518 to 1,807 um). However, dyepenetration depth was significantly lower in group R compared to the other groups (mean penetration score 1,073 um) (P cement combination offering the best coronal sealing was the one using only resin cement for both posts and crown restorations.

  13. Analysis of the antiproliferative effects of 3-deazaneoplanocin A in combination with standard anticancer agents in rhabdoid tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, Rebekka; Borchardt, Christiane; Clemens, Dagmar; Kool, Marcel; Dirksen, Uta; Frühwald, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    Rhabdoid tumors (RTs) are highly aggressive pediatric malignancies with a rather poor prognosis. New therapeutic approaches and optimization of already established treatment protocols are urgently needed. The histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is highly overexpressed in RTs and associated strongly with epigenetic silencing in cancer. EZH2 is involved in aggressive cell growth and stem cell maintenance. Thus, EZH2 is an attractive therapeutic target in RTs. The aim of the study presented here was to analyze the effects of a pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 alone and in combination with other anticancer drugs on RTs cells in vitro. The antitumor activity of the S-adenosyl-homocysteine-hydrolase inhibitor 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) alone and in combination with conventional cytostatic drugs (doxorubicin, etoposide) or epigenetic active compounds [5-Aza-CdR, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)] was assessed by MTT cell proliferation assays on three RT cell lines (A204, BT16, G401). Combinatorial treatment with DZNep synergistically and significantly enhanced the antiproliferative activity of etoposide, 5-Aza-CdR, and SAHA. In functional analyses, pretreatment with DZNep significantly increased the effects of 5-Aza-CdR and SAHA on apoptosis, cell cycle progression, and clonogenicity. Microarray analyses following sequential treatment with DZNep and 5-Aza-CdR or SAHA showed changes in global gene expression affecting apoptosis, neuronal development, and metabolic processes. In-vitro analyses presented here show that pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 synergistically affects the antitumor activity of the epigenetic active compounds 5-Aza-CdR and SAHA. Sequential treatment with these drugs combined with DZNep may represent a new therapeutic approach in RTs.

  14. A quinoxaline derivative as a potent chemotherapeutic agent, alone or in combination with benznidazole, against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jean Henrique da Silva; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Corrêa, Arlene Gonçalves; Sangi, Diego Pereira; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2014-01-01

    Chagas' disease is a condition caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi that affects millions of people, mainly in Latin America where it is considered endemic. The chemotherapy for Chagas disease remains a problem; the standard treatment currently relies on a single drug, benznidazole, which unfortunately induces several side effects and it is not successful in the cure of most of the chronic patients. In order to improve the drug armamentarium against Chagas' disease, in the present study we describe the synthesis of the compound 3-chloro-7-methoxy-2-(methylsulfonyl) quinoxaline (quinoxaline 4) and its activity, alone or in combination with benznidazole, against Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. Quinoxaline 4 was found to be strongly active against Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain and more effective against the proliferative forms. The cytotoxicity against LLCMK2 cells provided selective indices above one for all of the parasite forms. The drug induced very low hemolysis, but its anti-protozoan activity was partially inhibited when mouse blood was added in the experiment against trypomastigotes, an effect that was specifically related to blood cells. A synergistic effect between quinoxaline 4 and benznidazole was observed against epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, accompanied by an antagonistic interaction against LLCMK2 cells. Quinoxaline 4 induced several ultrastructural alterations, including formations of vesicular bodies, profiles of reticulum endoplasmic surrounding organelles and disorganization of Golgi complex. These alterations were also companied by cell volume reduction and maintenance of cell membrane integrity of treated-parasites. Our results demonstrated that quinoxaline 4, alone or in combination with benznidazole, has promising effects against all the main forms of T. cruzi. The compound at low concentrations induced several ultrastructural alterations and led the parasite to an autophagic-like cell death. Taken together these results may support the

  15. A quinoxaline derivative as a potent chemotherapeutic agent, alone or in combination with benznidazole, against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Henrique da Silva Rodrigues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas' disease is a condition caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi that affects millions of people, mainly in Latin America where it is considered endemic. The chemotherapy for Chagas disease remains a problem; the standard treatment currently relies on a single drug, benznidazole, which unfortunately induces several side effects and it is not successful in the cure of most of the chronic patients. In order to improve the drug armamentarium against Chagas' disease, in the present study we describe the synthesis of the compound 3-chloro-7-methoxy-2-(methylsulfonyl quinoxaline (quinoxaline 4 and its activity, alone or in combination with benznidazole, against Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Quinoxaline 4 was found to be strongly active against Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain and more effective against the proliferative forms. The cytotoxicity against LLCMK2 cells provided selective indices above one for all of the parasite forms. The drug induced very low hemolysis, but its anti-protozoan activity was partially inhibited when mouse blood was added in the experiment against trypomastigotes, an effect that was specifically related to blood cells. A synergistic effect between quinoxaline 4 and benznidazole was observed against epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, accompanied by an antagonistic interaction against LLCMK2 cells. Quinoxaline 4 induced several ultrastructural alterations, including formations of vesicular bodies, profiles of reticulum endoplasmic surrounding organelles and disorganization of Golgi complex. These alterations were also companied by cell volume reduction and maintenance of cell membrane integrity of treated-parasites. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrated that quinoxaline 4, alone or in combination with benznidazole, has promising effects against all the main forms of T. cruzi. The compound at low concentrations induced several ultrastructural alterations and led the

  16. The impact of quality-of-life data in relative effectiveness assessments of new anti-cancer drugs in European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Sarah; Leonardo Alves, Teresa; Meijboom, Kim; Lipska, Iga; De Boer, Anthonius; Leufkens, Hubertus G; Goettsch, Wim G

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of health-related quality-of-life (QoL) data in relative effectiveness assessments (REAs) of new anti-cancer drugs across European jurisdictions, during health technology assessment procedures. Comparative analysis of guidelines and publicly available REAs in six European jurisdictions of anti-cancer drugs approved by EMA between 2011 and 2013. Fourteen anti-cancer drugs were included, adding up to 79 REAs. Whilst all guidelines state that QoL is a relevant endpoint to determine the relative effectiveness of new cancer drugs, QoL data were included in only 54% of the 79 reports and their impact on the recommendations was limited. Whilst national guidelines recognize the relevance of QoL to determine the relative effectiveness of new anti-cancer drugs, this is not well-reflected in current assessments. Developing and implementing into REAs specific evidence requirements for QoL data would improve the use of this patient-centred outcome in future reimbursement and pricing decisions.

  17. Characterization of the apoptotic response induced by the cyanine dye D112: a potentially selective anti-cancer compound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yang

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic drugs that are used in anti-cancer treatments often cause the death of both cancerous and noncancerous cells. This non-selective toxicity is the root cause of untoward side effects that limits the effectiveness of therapy. In order to improve chemotherapeutic options for cancer patients, there is a need to identify novel compounds with higher discrimination for cancer cells. In the past, methine dyes that increase the sensitivity of photographic emulsions have been investigated for anti-cancer properties. In the 1970's, Kodak Laboratories initiated a screen of approximately 7000 dye structural variants for selective toxicity. Among these, D112 was identified as a promising compound with elevated toxicity against a colon cancer cell line in comparison to a non-transformed cell line. Despite these results changing industry priorities led to a halt in further studies on D112. We decided to revive investigations on D112 and have further characterized D112-induced cellular toxicity. We identified that in response to D112 treatment, the T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat showed caspase activation, mitochondrial depolarization, and phosphatidylserine externalization, all of which are hallmarks of apoptosis. Chemical inhibition of caspase enzymatic activity and blockade of the mitochondrial pathway through Bcl-2 expression inhibited D112-induced apoptosis. At lower concentrations, D112 induced growth arrest. To gain insight into the molecular mechanism of D112 induced mitochondrial dysfunction, we analyzed the intracellular localization of D112, and found that D112 associated with mitochondria. Interestingly, in the cell lines that we tested, D112 showed increased toxicity toward transformed versus non-transformed cells. Results from this work identify D112 as a potentially interesting molecule warranting further investigation.

  18. Colon-available raspberry polyphenols exhibit anti-cancer effects on in vitro models of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDougall Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a probable association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and reduced risk of cancer, particularly cancer of the digestive tract. This anti-cancer activity has been attributed in part to anti-oxidants present in these foods. Raspberries in particular are a rich source of the anti-oxidant compounds, such as polyphenols, anthocyanins and ellagitannins. Methods A "colon-available" raspberry extract (CARE was prepared that contained phytochemicals surviving a digestion procedure that mimicked the physiochemical conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The polyphenolic-rich extract was assessed for anti-cancer properties in a series of in vitro systems that model important stages of colon carcinogenesis, initiation, promotion and invasion. Results The phytochemical composition of CARE was monitored using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The colon-available raspberry extract was reduced in anthocyanins and ellagitannins compared to the original raspberry juice but enriched in other polyphenols and polyphenol breakdown products that were more stable to gastrointestinal digestion. Initiation – CARE caused significant protective effects against DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide in HT29 colon cancer cells measured using single cell microgelelectrophoresis. Promotion – CARE significantly decreased the population of HT29 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, effectively reducing the number of cells entering the cell cycle. However, CARE had no effect on epithelial integrity (barrier function assessed by recording the trans-epithelial resistance (TER of CACO-2 cell monolayers. Invasion – CARE caused significant inhibition of HT115 colon cancer cell invasion using the matrigel invasion assay. Conclusion The results indicate that raspberry phytochemicals likely to reach the colon are capable of inhibiting several important stages in colon carcinogenesis in vitro.

  19. The Study on Acute and Subacute Toxicity and Anti-Cancer Effects of cultivated wild ginseng Herbal acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Rok, Kwon

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study was to investigate acute and subacute toxicity and sarcoma-180 anti-cancer effects of herbal acupuncture with cultivated wild ginseng (distilled in mice and rats. Methods : Balb/c mice were injected intravenous with cultivated wild ginseng herbal acupuncture for LD50 and acute toxicity test. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenous with cultivated wild ginseng herbal acupuncture for subacute toxicity test. The cultivated wild ginseng herbal-acupuncture was injected at the tail vein of mice. Results : 1. In acute LD50 toxicity test, there was no mortality thus unable to attain the value. 2. Examining the toxic response in the acute toxicity test, there was no sign of toxication. 3. In acute toxic test, running biochemical serum test couldn't yield any differences between the control and experiment groups. 4. In subacute toxicity test, there was no sign of toxication in the experimental groups and didn't show any changes in weight compared to the normal group. 5. In subacute toxicity test, biochemical serum test showed significant increase of Total albumin, Albumin, and Glucose in the experimental group I compared with the control group. Significant decrease of GOT, ALP, GPT, and Triglyceride were shown. In experiment group II, only Glucose showed significant increase compared with the control group. 6. Measuring survival rate for anti-cancer effects of Sarcoma-180 cancer cell line, all the experimental groups showed significant increase in survival rate. 7. Measuring NK cell activity rate, no significant difference was shown throughout the groups. 8. Measuring Interleukin-2 productivity rate, all the experimental groups didn't show significant difference. 9. For manifestation of cytokine mRNA, significant decrease of interleukin-10 was witnessed in the experimental group compared to the control group. Conclusion : According to the results, we can conclude cultivated wild ginseng herbal acupuncture

  20. Enhancing graft-versus-leukemia after transplant: the rise of anti-cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusic, Ana; Wu, Catherine J

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only truly effective curative treatment for refractory hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, relapse and transplant rejection continue to be of major concern. In order to enhance the effectiveness of the HSCT, various strategies have been explored to amplify the graft versus leukemia (GvL) effect. Cancer vaccines have emerged in recent years as a promising strategy for the immunotherapeutic treatment of cancer. Evidence shows that they are most likely to have the greatest effect in the setting of minimal residual disease and as adjuvant agents. With this in mind, researchers have begun to explore the use of cancer vaccines in conjunction with HSCT, with exciting results. There has also been recent work examining the effect of novel adjuvants or blockers of negative immune regulation to augment the effect of cancer vaccines in both the transplant and non-transplant settings. The addition of these agents may prove.

  1. Characterization of mechanical properties of hybrid contrast agents by combining atomic force microscopy with acoustic/optic assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gepu; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Huang, Pintong; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2016-02-08

    Multi-parameter fitting algorithms, which are currently used for the characterization of coated-bubbles, inevitably introduce uncertainty into the results. Therefore, a better technique that can accurately determine the microbubbles' mechanical properties is urgently needed. A comprehensive technology combining atomic force microscopy, optical, and acoustic measurements with simulations of coated-bubble dynamics was developed. Using this technique, the mechanical parameters (size distribution, shell thickness, elasticity, and viscosity) of hybrid (ultrasound/magnetic-resonance-imaging) contrast microbubbles and their structure-property relationship were determined. The measurements indicate that when more superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are embedded in the microbubbles' shells, their mean diameter and effective viscosity increase, and their elastic modulus decreases. This reduces the microbubbles' resonance frequency and thus enhances acoustic scattering and attenuation effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Combination Pod-Intravaginal Ring Delivers Antiretroviral Agents for HIV Prophylaxis: Pharmacokinetic Evaluation in an Ovine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, John A.; Butkyavichene, Irina; Churchman, Scott A.; Gunawardana, Manjula; Fanter, Rob; Miller, Christine S.; Yang, Flora; Easley, Jeremiah T.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Hendrix, Craig W.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV using oral regimens based on the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) has been effective to various degrees in multiple clinical trials, and the CCR5 receptor antagonist maraviroc (MVC) holds potential for complementary efficacy. The effectiveness of HIV PrEP is highly dependent on adherence. Incorporation of the TDF-MVC combination into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery could increase product adherence and efficacy compared with oral and vaginal gel formulations. A novel pod-IVR technology capable of delivering multiple drugs is described. The pharmacokinetics and preliminary local safety characteristics of a novel pod-IVR delivering a combination of TDF and MVC were evaluated in the ovine model. The device exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over the 28-day study and maintained steady-state drug levels in cervicovaginal fluids (CVFs). Dilution of CVFs during lavage sample collection was measured by ion chromatography using an inert tracer, allowing corrected drug concentrations to be measured for the first time. Median, steady-state drug levels in vaginal tissue homogenate were as follows: for tenofovir (TFV; in vivo hydrolysis product of TDF), 7.3 × 102 ng g−1 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.0 × 102, 4.0 × 103); for TFV diphosphate (TFV-DP; active metabolite of TFV), 1.8 × 104 fmol g−1 (IQR, 1.5 × 104, 4.8 × 104); and for MVC, 8.2 × 102 ng g−1 (IQR, 4.7 × 102, 2.0 × 103). No adverse events were observed. These findings, together with previous pod-IVR studies, have allowed several lead candidates to advance into clinical evaluation. PMID:27067321

  3. Anti-cancer activity of metformin: new perspectives for an old drug

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Emmanuel; Scheen, André

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with a higher risk of cancer, which appears more obvious since the reduction of cardiovascular mortality. All glucose-lowering oral agents do not have the same impact on cancer: the risk is increased with sulfonylureas and decreased with metformin (and glitazones). Numerous epidemiological observational and case-control studies showed that metformin is associated with a lower incidence of cancer and a lower cancer-related death rate. A dose-response relationship ...

  4. Low-cost fabrication of ternary CuInSe{sub 2} nanocrystals by colloidal route using a novel combination of volatile and non-volatile capping agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, Parul; Narain Sharma, Shailesh, E-mail: shailesh@nplindia.org; Singh, Son

    2014-11-15

    Wet-route synthesis of CuInSe{sub 2} (CISe) nanocrystals has been envisaged with the utilization of the unique combination of coordinating ligand and non coordinating solvent. Our work demonstrates the formation of a single-phase, nearly stoichiometric and monodispersive, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals (band gap (E{sub g})∼1.16 eV) using a novel combination of ligands; viz. volatile arylamine aniline and non-volatile solvent 1-octadecene. The synthesis and growth conditions have been manoeuvred using the colligative properties of the mixture and thus higher growth temperature (∼250 °C) could be attained that promoted larger grain growth. The beneficial influence of the capping agents (aniline and 1-octadecene) on the properties of chalcopyrite nanocrystals has enabled us to pictorally model the structural, morphological and optoelectronic aspects of CISe nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Without resorting to any post-selenization process and using the colligative properties of the mixture comprising of volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene to manoeuvre the growth conditions to promote Ostwald ripening, a single phase, monodispersive and nearly stoichiometric ternary CISe nanocrystals are formed by wet-synthesis route. - Highlights: • Wet-route synthesis of CISe nanocrystals reported without post-selenization process. • Single-phase, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals formed. • Novel combination of capping agents: volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene. • Higher growth temperature attained using the colligative properties of the mixture. • Metallic salts presence explains exp. and theoretical boiling point difference.

  5. In vitro synergistic anticancer activity of the combination of T-type calcium channel blocker and chemotherapeutic agent in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Joon Seok; Sohn, Joo Mi; Leem, Dong Gyu; Park, Byeongyeon; Nam, Ji Hye; Shin, Dong Hyun; Shin, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2016-02-01

    As a result of our continuous research, new 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivative containing ureido group, KCP10043F was synthesized and evaluated for T-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav3.1) blockade, cytotoxicity, and cell cycle arrest against human non-small cell lung (A549) cells. KCP10043F showed both weaker T-type Ca(2+) channel blocking activity and less cytotoxicity against A549 cells than parent compound KYS05090S [4-(benzylcarbamoylmethyl)-3-(4-biphenylyl)-2-(N,N',N'-trimethyl-1,5-pentanediamino)-3,4-dihydroquinazoline 2 hydrochloride], but it exhibited more potent G1-phase arrest than KYS05090S in A549 cells. This was found to be accompanied by the downregulations of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D2, cyclin D3, and cyclin E at the protein levels. However, p27(KIP1) as a CDK inhibitor was gradually upregulated at the protein levels and increased recruitment to CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 after KCP10043F treatment. Based on the strong G1-phase cell cycle arrest of KCP10043F in A549 cells, the combination of KCP10043F with etoposide (or cisplatin) resulted in a synergistic cell death (combination index=0.2-0.8) via the induction of apoptosis compared with either agent alone. Taken together with these overall results and the favorable in vitro ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) profiles of KCP10043F, therefore, it could be used as a potential agent for the combination therapy on human lung cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. PQR309 Is a Novel Dual PI3K/mTOR Inhibitor with Preclinical Antitumor Activity in Lymphomas as a Single Agent and in Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantelli, Chiara; Gaudio, Eugenio; Arribas, Alberto J; Kwee, Ivo; Hillmann, Petra; Rinaldi, Andrea; Cascione, Luciano; Spriano, Filippo; Bernasconi, Elena; Guidetti, Francesca; Carrassa, Laura; Pittau, Roberta Bordone; Beaufils, Florent; Ritschard, Reto; Rageot, Denise; Sele, Alexander; Dossena, Barbara; Rossi, Francesca Maria; Zucchetto, Antonella; Taborelli, Monica; Gattei, Valter; Rossi, Davide; Stathis, Anastasios; Stussi, Georg; Broggini, Massimo; Wymann, Matthias P; Wicki, Andreas; Zucca, Emanuele; Cmiljanovic, Vladimir; Fabbro, Doriano; Bertoni, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Activation of the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway is recurrent in different lymphoma types, and pharmacologic inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway has shown activity in lymphoma patients. Here, we extensively characterized the in vitro and in vivo activity and the mechanism of action of PQR309 (bimiralisib), a novel oral selective dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor under clinical evaluation, in preclinical lymphoma models. Experimental Design: This study included preclinical in vitro activity screening on a large panel of cell lines, both as single agent and in combination, validation experiments on in vivo models and primary cells, proteomics and gene-expression profiling, and comparison with other signaling inhibitors. Results: PQR309 had in vitro antilymphoma activity as single agent and in combination with venetoclax, panobinostat, ibrutinib, lenalidomide, ARV-825, marizomib, and rituximab. Sensitivity to PQR309 was associated with specific baseline gene-expression features, such as high expression of transcripts coding for the BCR pathway. Combining proteomics and RNA profiling, we identified the different contribution of PQR309-induced protein phosphorylation and gene expression changes to the drug mechanism of action. Gene-expression signatures induced by PQR309 and by other signaling inhibitors largely overlapped. PQR309 showed activity in cells with primary or secondary resistance to idelalisib. Conclusions: On the basis of these results, PQR309 appeared as a novel and promising compound that is worth developing in the lymphoma setting. Clin Cancer Res; 24(1); 120-9. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Effects of cytochalasin congeners, microtubule-directed agents, and doxorubicin alone or in combination against human ovarian carcinoma cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trendowski, Matthew; Christen, Timothy D.; Acquafondata, Christopher; Fondy, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Although the actin cytoskeleton is vital for carcinogenesis and subsequent pathology, no microfilament-directed agent has been approved for cancer chemotherapy. One of the most studied classes of microfilament-directed agents has been the cytochalasins, mycotoxins known to disrupt the formation of actin polymers. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of cytochalasin congeners toward human drug sensitive and multidrug resistant cell lines. SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma and several multidrug resistant derivatives were tested for sensitivity against a panel of nine cytochalasin congeners, as well as three clinically approved chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and vinblastine). In addition, verapamil, a calcium ion channel blocker known to reverse P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated drug resistance, was used in combination with multiple cytochalasin congeners to determine whether drug sensitivity could be increased. While multidrug resistant SKVLB1 had increased drug tolerance (was more resistant) to most cytochalasin congeners in comparison to drug sensitive SKOV3, the level of resistance was 10 to 1000-fold less for the cytochalasins than for any of the clinically approved agents. While cytochalasins did not appear to alter the expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, several cytochalasins appeared to inhibit the activity of ABC transporter-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123 (Rh123), suggesting that these congeners do have affinity for drug efflux pumps. Cytochalasins also appeared to significantly decrease the F/G-actin ratio in both drug sensitive and drug resistant cells, indicative of marked microfilament inhibition. The cytotoxicity of most cytochalasin congeners could be increased with the addition of verapamil, and the drug sensitivity of resistant SKVLB1 to the clinically approved antineoplastic agents could be increased with the addition of cytochalasins. As assessed by isobolographic analysis and Chou

  8. Removal of inhaled 241Am oxide particles from beagle dogs by combined treatment with lung lavage and a chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Mo, T.; Slauson, D.O.

    1978-01-01

    This experiment was performed to evaluate combined therapy of lung lavage and chelation treatments to remove inhaled particles of 241 Am oxide. Twenty-four Beagle dogs were divided into four groups of 6 dogs each. Each group was exposed to an aerosol of different-sized particles of 241 Am oxide: monodisperse particles with AD of 0.75, 1.5 or 3.0 μm; polydisperse particles with AMAD = 1.5 μm. Three dogs in each group were treated with 5 lung lavages of the right lung (day 2, 7, 14, 28 and 42), and 5 lavages of the left lung (days 2, 10, 21, 35, and 49). In addition, each of the treated dogs was given 22 μmoles of trisodium calcium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Na 3 Ca DTPA) by intravenous injection 18 times from day 1 to 52 after exposure. The remaining 3 dogs in each group were untreated control dogs. All of the dogs were sacrificed 64 days after exposure and tissues, excreta, and lavage fluids were analyzed for 241 Am activity. Tissue distribution of 241 Am activity at sacrifice varied with aerosol particle size. Less 241 Am activity was found in the lungs of the dogs exposed to 0.75 and 1.5 μm AD aerosols groups than in those exposed to 3.0 μm particles. Lung lavage removed from 24 to 58% of the initial lung burden (ILB). Particle size did not affect the usefulness of lung lavage but it did influence the effectiveness of Na 3 Ca DTPA treatment. Na 3 Ca DTPA enhanced urinary excretion of 241 Am; dogs exposed to 0.75 μm particles excreted 31% of the ILB, and those exposed to 3.0 μm particles excreted only 10%. This experiment showed the effectiveness of combined treatment with lung lavage and chelation therapy for the removal of 241 Am oxide in the first 64 days after exposure. (author)

  9. Combined effects of radiation and other agents on the stomach cancer incidence among Mayak Atomic Plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Rovny, S.I.; Sirchikov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gravity of a problem of the combined action of radiation and other factors again was confirmed sessions UNSCEAR in May, 1998. It especially is important at study of cancer diseases in connection with the polyetiology and multistage of them development. The estimation of radiation, medico-biological factors and condition of life in occurrence of a stomach cancer among Mayak personnel was specified by case-cohort research. For a quota 503 men (157 cases of a stomach cancer, 346 men of the healthy personnel) attributive risk of the radiation factors was 8.8%, medico-biological - 57,2% (from them by greatest was influence chronic gastritis with secreting insufficiency - 35.4%), tobacco consumption - 31,6%. At an estimation of risk of a stomach cancer depending on external γ-irradiation best fitting was received at use of square-law model. The excess relative risk was 0,27 Gr -2 (F=44,5; P=0,007). For 239 Pu incorporation was not revealed of distinct connection with stomach cancer incidences. Interaction of the radiation and non-radiation factors also was appreciated. The interaction of gastritis with external γ-irradiation or 239 Pu was multiplicate. The interaction of smoking with γ-irradiation or 239 Pu incorporation was multiplicate also. The distribution histological types of a stomach cancer among the workers of Mayak plant differed in comparison with not working. Among the workers the increase poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was observed. (author)

  10. Combined effects of radiation and other agents on the stomach cancer incidence among Mayak Atomic Plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Branch No 1 of State Research Center of Public Health Ministry of the Russian Federation, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation). Biophysics Inst.; Rovny, S.I.; Sirchikov, V.A.

    2000-05-01

    The gravity of a problem of the combined action of radiation and other factors again was confirmed sessions UNSCEAR in May, 1998. It especially is important at study of cancer diseases in connection with the polyetiology and multistage of them development. The estimation of radiation, medico-biological factors and condition of life in occurrence of a stomach cancer among Mayak personnel was specified by case-cohort research. For a quota 503 men (157 cases of a stomach cancer, 346 men of the healthy personnel) attributive risk of the radiation factors was 8.8%, medico-biological - 57,2% (from them by greatest was influence chronic gastritis with secreting insufficiency - 35.4%), tobacco consumption - 31,6%. At an estimation of risk of a stomach cancer depending on external {gamma}-irradiation best fitting was received at use of square-law model. The excess relative risk was 0,27 Gr{sup -2} (F=44,5; P=0,007). For {sup 239}Pu incorporation was not revealed of distinct connection with stomach cancer incidences. Interaction of the radiation and non-radiation factors also was appreciated. The interaction of gastritis with external {gamma}-irradiation or {sup 239}Pu was multiplicate. The interaction of smoking with {gamma}-irradiation or {sup 239}Pu incorporation was multiplicate also. The distribution histological types of a stomach cancer among the workers of Mayak plant differed in comparison with not working. Among the workers the increase poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was observed. (author)

  11. Examination of intra-gastrointestinal tract signal elimination in MRCP. Combined use of positive contrast agent and fast inversion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Joji; Kawamura, Yoshihiko

    1999-01-01

    To examine the effects of removing the gastrointestinal signal in MRCP, investigations were carried out on the combined use of intestine-positive contrast medium FerriSeltz with Ferric ammonium citrate as the main component and high-speed imaging using fast inversion recovery. The contrast effect was significantly elevated to 9.90±1.77 after administration, compared with 5.3±2.45 before administration (p<0.001). The enhancement effect also was significantly elevated to 14.45±3.18 after administration, compared with 3.50±3.10 before administration (p<0.001). These results were obtained because the null point of FerriSeltz aqueous solution (5.97 mmol/1) was in the range of about 150-200 ms. With the present method, adequate suppression of the signal intensity of the digestive tract was obtained relatively easily on MRCP, and the technique was found to be effective. (author)

  12. The dataset from administration of single or combined immunomodulation agents to modulate anti-FVIII antibody responses in FVIII plasmid or protein primed hemophilia A mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lien Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A mice with pre-existing inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII were treated with single agents, AMD3100 and GCS-F, respectively. Inhibitor titers in treated mice and control HemA inhibitors mice were followed over time. Total B cells and plasma cells (PCs were characterized by flow cytometry. HemA inhibitor mice were then treated with a combination regimen of IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin and AMD3100. Finally, HemA inhibitor mice were treated with a new combination therapy using include IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + Anti-CD20+AMD3100+G-CSF. The timeline of combination therapy was illustrated. Inhibitor titers following treatment in FVIII plasmid or protein induced inhibitor mice were evaluated overtime. A representative figure and gating strategies to characterize the subsets of Treg cells and B cells are presented. Please see http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cellimm.2016.01.005 [1] for interpretation and discussion of these data and results.

  13. Agent Programming Languages and Logics in Agent-Based Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John

    2018-01-01

    and social behavior, and work on verification. Agent-based simulation is an approach for simulation that also uses the notion of agents. Although agent programming languages and logics are much less used in agent-based simulation, there are successful examples with agents designed according to the BDI......Research in multi-agent systems has resulted in agent programming languages and logics that are used as a foundation for engineering multi-agent systems. Research includes reusable agent programming platforms for engineering agent systems with environments, agent behavior, communication protocols...... paradigm, and work that combines agent-based simulation platforms with agent programming platforms. This paper analyzes and evaluates benefits of using agent programming languages and logics for agent-based simulation. In particular, the paper considers the use of agent programming languages and logics...

  14. Prevention of enzymatic browning of yacon flour by the combined use of anti-browning agents and the study of its chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Romero Lopes Rodrigues

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Yacon roots present functional properties because of the high levels of fructooligosaccharides (FOS, which are considered as prebiotic fibers. In addition, yacon roots are rich in phenolic compounds. During the processing of yacon, the freshly cut surface undergoes rapid enzymatic browning. Control of enzymatic browning during processing is very important to preserve the appearance of yacon flour. In this study, it was evaluated the combined effect of anti-browning agents (ascorbic acid, citric acid and L-cysteine on the inhibition of enzymatic browning of yacon, using Response Surface Methodology. The yacon pre-treated with anti-browning agents in concentrations of 15.0 mM for ascorbic acid, 7.5 mM for citric acid and 10.0 mM for L-cysteine was used for the processing of flour. Yacon flour presented an attractive color and good sensory properties, without residual aroma. The contents of FOS and phenolic compounds obtained in yacon flour were 28.60 g.100 g- 1 and 1.35 g.100 g- 1. Yacon flour can be considered as a potential functional food, especially due to high levels of FOS, which allows for its use in formulation of various foods.

  15. Using response surface methodology to optimize process parameters and cross-linking agents for production of combined-cross-linked bovine serum albumin gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Chee-Yuen; Alkarkhi, Abbas F M; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2009-04-01

    D-optimal design was employed to optimize the mixture of cross-linking agents formulation: microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) and ribose, and the processing parameters (i.e. incubation and heating time) in the mixture in order to obtain combined-cross-linked bovine serum albumin gels that have high gel strength, pH close to neutral and yet medium in browning. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the contribution of quadratic term to the model over the linear was significant for pH and L* value, whereas linear model was significant for gel strength. Optimization study using response surface methodology (RSM) was performed to the mixture components and process variables and the optimum conditions obtained were: MTGase of 1.34-1.43 g/100 mL, ribose of 1.07-1.16 g/100 mL, incubation time of 5 h at 40 degrees C and heating time of 3 h at 90 degrees C.

  16. In vitro study of cytotoxicity by U.V. radiation and differential sensitivity in combination with alkylating agents on established cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramudu, K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of U.V. radiation or alkylating agents, such as actinomycin-D, cycloheximide and mitomycin-C (MMC), was studied on CHO, BHK and HeLa cells. U.V. radiation caused DNA ssb and dsb and were prevented by cycloheximide and actinomycin-D. MMC is known to be cytotoxic in CHO/BHK cells by forming free radical generation. MMC in combination with U.V. radiation enhanced DNA ssb ampersand dsb in these cell types. However, HeLa cells were insensitive to U.V. radiation. This insensitivity to U.V. radiation could be ascribed to the presence of glutathione transferase which is absent in CHO/BHK cell line

  17. Apoptosis of human carcinoma cells in the presence of potential anti-cancer drugs: III. Treatment of Colo-205 and SKBR3 cells with: cis -platin, Tamoxifen, Melphalan, Betulinic acid, L-PDMP, L-PPMP, and GD3 ganglioside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Subhash; Ma, Rui; Boyle, Patrick J; Mikulla, Brian; Bradley, Mathew; Smith, Bradley; Basu, Manju; Banerjee, Sipra

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer, predominantly among women over 20, whereas colo-rectal cancer occurs in both men and women over the age of 50. Chemotherapy of both cancers affect rapidly growing normal as well as cancer cells. Cancer cells are non-apoptotic. Seven anti-cancer agents (cis -platin, Tamoxifen, Melphalan, Betulinic acid, D-PDMP, L-PPMP, and GD3) have been tested with human breast (SKBR3) and colon (Colo-205) carcinoma cells for their apoptotic effect and found to be positive by several assay systems. Colo-205 cells were obtained from ATCC, and the SKBR3 cells were a gift from the Cleveland Clinic. All of these six agents killed those two cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. In the early apoptotic stage (6 h), these cells showed only a flopping of phosphatidylserine on the outer lamella of the plasma membranes as evidenced by the binding of a novel fluorescent dye PSS-380. After 24 h of the treatment, those apoptotic cells showed damage of the plasma as well as the nuclear membrane as evidenced by binding of propidium iodide to the nuclear DNA. DNA laddering assay viewed further breakdown of DNA by 1% agarose gel electrophoresis analysis. It is concluded that during apoptosis the signaling by Mitochondrial Signaling Pathway (MSP) is stimulated by some of these agents. Caspase 3 was activated with the concomitant appearance of its p17 polypeptide as viewed by Westernblot analyses. Incorporation of radioactivity from [U-(14)C]-L-serine in total sphingolipid mixture was observed between 2 and 4 micromolar concentrations of most of the agents except ci s-platin. However, apoptosis in carcinoma cells in the presence of cis -platin is induced by a caspase 3 activation pathway without any increase in synthesis of ceramide.

  18. Intravitreal anti-VEGF agents, oral glucocorticoids, and laser photocoagulation combination therapy for macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiao Feng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF agents, oral glucocorticoid, and laser photocoagulation therapy for macular edema (ME secondary to retinal vein occlusion (RVO. METHODS: This study included 16 eyes of 16 patients with RVO-associated ME. Patients were initially treated with oral prednisone and an intravitreal anti-VEGF agent. Two weeks later, patients underwent standard laser photocoagulation. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, central retinal thickness (CRT, and retinal vessel oxygenation were examined over 12mo. RESULTS: Patients received 1.43±0.81 anti-VEGF injections. Mean baseline and 12-month logMAR BCVA were 0.96±0.51 (20/178 and 0.31±0.88 (20/40, respectively, in eyes with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO (P<0.00, and 1.02±0.45 (20/209 and 0.60±0.49 (20/80, respectively, in eyes with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO (P<0.00. At 12mo, CRT had significantly decreased in eyes with CRVO (P<0.00 and BRVO (P<0.00. Venous oxygen saturation had significantly increased in eyes with CRVO (P<0.00 and BRVO (P<0.00. No examined parameters were significantly different between the 2 RVO groups. No serious adverse effects occurred. CONCLUSION: Anti-VEGF, glucocorticoid, and photocoagulation combination therapy improves visual outcome, prolongs therapeutic effect, and reduces the number of intravitreal injections in eyes with RVO-associated ME.

  19. Growth-inhibitory effects of the chemopreventive agent indole-3-carbinol are increased in combination with the polyamine putrescine in the SW480 colon tumour cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, E Ann; Howells, Lynne M; Gallacher-Horley, Barbara; Fox, Louise H; Gescher, Andreas; Manson, Margaret M

    2003-01-01

    Background Many tumours undergo disregulation of polyamine homeostasis and upregulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity, which can promote carcinogenesis. In animal models of colon carcinogenesis, inhibition of ODC activity by difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has been shown to reduce the number and size of colon adenomas and carcinomas. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) has shown promising chemopreventive activity against a range of human tumour cell types, but little is known about the effect of this agent on colon cell lines. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of ODC by I3C could contribute to a chemopreventive effect in colon cell lines. Methods Cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. Ornithine decarboxylase activity was determined by liberation of CO2 from 14C-labelled substrate, and polyamine levels were measured by HPLC. Results I3C inhibited proliferation of the human colon tumour cell lines HT29 and SW480, and of the normal tissue-derived HCEC line, and at higher concentrations induced apoptosis in SW480 cells. The agent also caused a decrease in ODC activity in a dose-dependent manner. While administration of exogenous putrescine reversed the growth-inhibitory effect of DFMO, it did not reverse the growth-inhibition following an I3C treatment, and in the case of the SW480 cell line, the effect was actually enhanced. In this cell line, combination treatment caused a slight increase in the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and increased the proportion of cells undergoing necrosis, but did not predispose cells to apoptosis. Indole-3-carbinol also caused an increase in intracellular spermine levels, which was not modulated by putrescine co-administration. Conclusion While indole-3-carbinol decreased ornithine decarboxylase activity in the colon cell lines, it appears unlikely that this constitutes a major mechanism by which the agent exerts its antiproliferative effect, although accumulation

  20. Growth-inhibitory effects of the chemopreventive agent indole-3-carbinol are increased in combination with the polyamine putrescine in the SW480 colon tumour cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gescher Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many tumours undergo disregulation of polyamine homeostasis and upregulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity, which can promote carcinogenesis. In animal models of colon carcinogenesis, inhibition of ODC activity by difluoromethylornithine (DFMO has been shown to reduce the number and size of colon adenomas and carcinomas. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C has shown promising chemopreventive activity against a range of human tumour cell types, but little is known about the effect of this agent on colon cell lines. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of ODC by I3C could contribute to a chemopreventive effect in colon cell lines. Methods Cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. Ornithine decarboxylase activity was determined by liberation of CO2 from 14C-labelled substrate, and polyamine levels were measured by HPLC. Results I3C inhibited proliferation of the human colon tumour cell lines HT29 and SW480, and of the normal tissue-derived HCEC line, and at higher concentrations induced apoptosis in SW480 cells. The agent also caused a decrease in ODC activity in a dose-dependent manner. While administration of exogenous putrescine reversed the growth-inhibitory effect of DFMO, it did not reverse the growth-inhibition following an I3C treatment, and in the case of the SW480 cell line, the effect was actually enhanced. In this cell line, combination treatment caused a slight increase in the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and increased the proportion of cells undergoing necrosis, but did not predispose cells to apoptosis. Indole-3-carbinol also caused an increase in intracellular spermine levels, which was not modulated by putrescine co-administration. Conclusion While indole-3-carbinol decreased ornithine decarboxylase activity in the colon cell lines, it appears unlikely that this constitutes a major mechanism by which the agent exerts its antiproliferative

  1. Management of symptomatic erosive-ulcerative lesions of oral lichen planus in an adult Egyptian population using Selenium-ACE combined with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, Mahmoud Helmy

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease with an immunological etiology. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of selenium combined with Vitamins A, C & E (Selenium-ACE) in the treatment of erosive-ulcerative OLP as an adjunctive to topical corticosteroids plus antifungal agent. Subjects and Methods: Thirty patients with a confirmed clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of OLP participated in this clinical trial. Patients were randomly allocated into one of three groups and treated as follows: (I) Topical corticosteroids, (II) topical corticosteroids plus antifungal, and (III) SE-ACE combined with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal. The patients were followed for 6 weeks. The pain and severity of the lesions were recorded at the initial and follow-up visits. All recorded data were analyzed using paired t-test and ANOVA test. A P ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The experimental groups showed a marked reduction in pain sensation and size of lesions, particularly in the final follow-up period, but there was no significant difference between the first two Groups I and II. However, healing of lesions and improvement of pain sensation was effective in Group III since a significant difference was found favoring Group III over both Groups I and II. Conclusion: No significant difference was found in treating erosive-ulcerative lesions of OLP by topical corticosteroids alone or combined with antifungal. However, when using SE-ACE in combination with topical corticosteroids plus antifungal, this approach may be effective in managing ulcerative lesions of OLP; but more research with a larger sample size and a longer evaluation period may be recommended. PMID:26681847

  2. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  3. Improving outcomes in cancer patients on oral anti-cancer medications using a novel mobile phone-based intervention: study design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, Stephen; Flanagan, Clare; Searl, Meghan; Elfiky, Aymen; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

    2014-12-23

    The widespread and increasing use of oral anti-cancer medications has been ushered in by a rapidly increasing understanding of cancer pathophysiology. Furthermore, their popular ease of administration and potential cost savings has highlighted their central position in the health care system as a whole. These facts have heightened appreciation of the unique challenges associated with the use of oral anti-cancer medications; especially in the long-term use of these medications and the associated side effects that may impede optimal adherence to their use. Therefore, we developed ChemOtheRapy Assistant, CORA, a personalized mobile phone-based self-management application to help cancer patients on oral anti-cancer medications. Our objective is to evaluate the effect of CORA on adherence to oral anti-cancer medications and other clinically relevant outcomes in the management of patients with renal and prostate cancer. The study will be implemented as a 2-parallel group randomized controlled trial in 104 patients with renal or prostate cancer on oral anti-cancer medications over a 3-month study period. The intervention group will use CORA in addition to usual care for self-management while the control group will continue care as usual. Medication adherence will be measured objectively by a Medication Event Monitoring System device and is defined as the percentage of prescribed doses taken. We will also assess the effect of the intervention on cancer-related symptoms measured by the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory and unplanned hospital utilizations. Other outcomes that will be measured at study start, midpoint, and endpoint are health-related quality of life, cancer-related fatigue, and anxiety. Group differences in medication adherence will be examined by t tests or by non-parametric Mann-Whitney tests if the data are not normally distributed. Logistic regression will be used to identify potential predictors of adherence. We expect to have results for this study before

  4. Synergistic Enhancement of Cancer Therapy Using a Combination of Ceramide and Docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xia Feng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide (CE-based combination therapy (CE combination as a novel therapeutic strategy has attracted great attention in the field of anti-cancer therapy. The principal purposes of this study were to investigate the synergistic effect of CE in combination with docetaxel (DTX (CE + DTX and to explore the synergy mechanisms of CE + DTX. The 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and combination index (CI assay showed that simultaneous administration of CE and DTX with a molar ratio of 0.5:1 could generate the optimal synergistic effect on murine malignant melanoma cell (B16, CI = 0.31 and human breast carcinoma cell (MCF-7, CI = 0.48. The apoptosis, cell cycle, and cytoskeleton destruction study demonstrated that CE could target and destruct the microfilament actin, subsequently activate Caspase-3 and induce apoptosis. Meanwhile, DTX could target and disrupt the microtubules cytoskeleton, leading to a high proportion of cancer cells in G2/M-phase arrest. Moreover, CE plus DTX could cause a synergistic destruction of cytoskeleton, which resulted in a significantly higher apoptosis and a significantly higher arrest in G2/M arrest comparing with either agent alone (p < 0.01. The in vivo antitumor study evaluated in B16 tumor-bearing mice also validated the synergistic effects. All these results suggested that CE could enhance the antitumor activity of DTX in a synergistic manner, which suggest promising application prospects of CE + DTX combination treatment.

  5. Extracts and compounds with anti-diabetic complications and anti-cancer activity from Castanea mollissina Blume (Chinese chestnut).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Gao, Hui-yuan; Baba, Masaki; Okada, Yoshihito; Okuyama, Toru; Wu, Li-jun; Zhan, Li-bin

    2014-10-28

    Castanea mollissima Blume (Chinese chestnut), as a food product is known for its various nutrients and functional values to the human health. The present study was carried out to analyze the anti-diabetic complications and anti-cancer activities of the bioactive compounds present in C. mollissima. The kernels (CK), shells (CS) and involucres (CI) parts of C. Blume were extracted with 90% alcohol. The water suspension of these dried alcohol extracts were extracted using EtOAc and n-BuOH successively. The n-BuOH fraction of CI (CI-B) was isolated by silica gel column, Sephadex LH 20 column and preparative HPLC. The isolated compounds were identified by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HMBC, HMQC and ESI-Q-TOF MS, All the fractions and compounds isolated were evaluated on human recombinant aldose reductase (HR-AR) assay, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation assay and human COLO 320 DM colon cancer cells inhibitory assay. CI-B was found to show a significant inhibitory effect in above biological screenings. Six flavonoids and three polyphenolic acids were obtained from CI-B. They were identified as kaempferol (1), kaempferol-3-O-[6''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), kaempferol-3-O-[6''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-galactopyranoside (3), kaempferol-3-O-[2''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (4), kaempferol-3-O-[2", 6"-di-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (5) and kaempferol-3-O-[2", 6"-di-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-galactopyranoside (6), casuariin (7), casuarinin (8) and castalagin (9). Compounds 2-9 were found to show higher activity than quercetin (positive control) in the AR assay. Compounds 3-6, 8, and 9 showed stronger inhibitory effects than amino guanidine (positive control) on AGEs production. Compounds 4-6, 7, and 8 showed much higher cytotoxic activity than 5-fluorouracil (positive control) against the human COLO 320 DM colon cancer cells. Our results suggest that flavonoids and polyphenolic acids possesses anti-diabetes complications and anti-cancer

  6. Prolonged local persistence of cisplatin-loaded gelatin microspheres and their chemoembolic anti-cancer effect in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinichi; Nitta, Norihisa; Sonoda, Akinaga; Seko, Ayumi; Tanaka, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Masashi; Takemura, Shizuki; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2009-12-01

    To confirm prolonged cisplatin release from drug-loaded gelatin microspheres (GMSs) and their improved chemoembolic anti-cancer effect against VX2 liver tumors in rabbits. Two groups of twelve rabbits each were treated intraarterially either with 2 mg/kg cisplatin-loaded GMSs (=0.04 mg/kg cisplatin) or 0.04 mg/kg cisplatin solution by administering them into the right renal artery. Platinum concentrations within the renal parenchyma were analyzed immediately following infusion (day 0) and on days 1, 3, and 7 using the atomic absorption method. In a second experiment four groups of five rabbits each with implanted VX2 liver tumors were treated intraarterially through the hepatic artery with the following drugs: 2 mg/kg cisplatin-loaded GMSs (=0.04 mg/kg cisplatin) (group I), 2 mg/kg GMSs without any drug (group II), 1.5 mg/kg cisplatin solution (group III) and saline (group IV). Tumor volumes were analyzed pre-injection and 7 days after with MRI allowing calculating the relative tumor growth rate (%). Degree of liver cell necrosis was assessed on the histopathological specimens. The renal parenchymal platinum concentrations (microg/ml) with 4.51+/-2.25 (day 0), 1.59+/-0.70 (day 1), 0.72+/-0.10 (day 3) and 0.20+/-0.06 (day 7) were significantly more pronounced after cisplatin-loaded GMS on days one and three compared to cisplatin with 1.99+/-0.55, 0.08+/-0.03, 0.18+/-0.01 and 0.10+/-0.07, respectively. Relative tumor growth rates resulted in 84.5%+/-26.4 (group I); 241.4%+/-145.1 (II); 331.9%+/-72.2 (III), and 413.6%+/-103.6 (IV) with statistical significant differences between groups I and III, and groups I and IV. Similar degrees of necrosis were observed in both GMSs treated groups, while ballooning of hepatocytes was highest in cisplatin-loaded GMSs. With cisplatin-loaded GMSs more pronounced and prolonged local parenchymal cisplatin concentrations may be achieved offering the advantage of an increased and prolonged anti-cancer effect compared to cisplatin alone

  7. Prolonged local persistence of cisplatin-loaded gelatin microspheres and their chemoembolic anti-cancer effect in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Shinichi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu City, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)], E-mail: junryuhei@yahoo.co.jp; Nitta, Norihisa; Sonoda, Akinaga; Seko, Ayumi; Tanaka, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Masashi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu City, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Takemura, Shizuki [Department of Pathology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu City, Shiga (Japan); Tabata, Yasuhiko [Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawara-cho Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Murata, Kiyoshi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu City, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To confirm prolonged cisplatin release from drug-loaded gelatin microspheres (GMSs) and their improved chemoembolic anti-cancer effect against VX2 liver tumors in rabbits. Materials and methods: Two groups of twelve rabbits each were treated intraarterially either with 2 mg/kg cisplatin-loaded GMSs (=0.04 mg/kg cisplatin) or 0.04 mg/kg cisplatin solution by administering them into the right renal artery. Platinum concentrations within the renal parenchyma were analyzed immediately following infusion (day 0) and on days 1, 3, and 7 using the atomic absorption method. In a second experiment four groups of five rabbits each with implanted VX2 liver tumors were treated intraarterially through the hepatic artery with the following drugs: 2 mg/kg cisplatin-loaded GMSs (=0.04 mg/kg cisplatin) (group I), 2 mg/kg GMSs without any drug (group II), 1.5 mg/kg cisplatin solution (group III) and saline (group IV). Tumor volumes were analyzed pre-injection and 7 days after with MRI allowing calculating the relative tumor growth rate (%). Degree of liver cell necrosis was assessed on the histopathological specimens. Results: The renal parenchymal platinum concentrations ({mu}g/ml) with 4.51 {+-} 2.25 (day 0), 1.59 {+-} 0.70 (day 1), 0.72 {+-} 0.10 (day 3) and 0.20 {+-} 0.06 (day 7) were significantly more pronounced after cisplatin-loaded GMS on days one and three compared to cisplatin with 1.99 {+-} 0.55, 0.08 {+-} 0.03, 0.18 {+-} 0.01 and 0.10 {+-} 0.07, respectively. Relative tumor growth rates resulted in 84.5% {+-} 26.4 (group I); 241.4% {+-} 145.1 (II); 331.9% {+-} 72.2 (III), and 413.6% {+-} 103.6 (IV) with statistical significant differences between groups I and III, and groups I and IV. Similar degrees of necrosis were observed in both GMSs treated groups, while ballooning of hepatocytes was highest in cisplatin-loaded GMSs. Conclusions: With cisplatin-loaded GMSs more pronounced and prolonged local parenchymal cisplatin concentrations may be achieved offering

  8. Prolonged local persistence of cisplatin-loaded gelatin microspheres and their chemoembolic anti-cancer effect in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Shinichi; Nitta, Norihisa; Sonoda, Akinaga; Seko, Ayumi; Tanaka, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Masashi; Takemura, Shizuki; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To confirm prolonged cisplatin release from drug-loaded gelatin microspheres (GMSs) and their improved chemoembolic anti-cancer effect against VX2 liver tumors in rabbits. Materials and methods: Two groups of twelve rabbits each were treated intraarterially either with 2 mg/kg cisplatin-loaded GMSs (=0.04 mg/kg cisplatin) or 0.04 mg/kg cisplatin solution by administering them into the right renal artery. Platinum concentrations within the renal parenchyma were analyzed immediately following infusion (day 0) and on days 1, 3, and 7 using the atomic absorption method. In a second experiment four groups of five rabbits each with implanted VX2 liver tumors were treated intraarterially through the hepatic artery with the following drugs: 2 mg/kg cisplatin-loaded GMSs (=0.04 mg/kg cisplatin) (group I), 2 mg/kg GMSs without any drug (group II), 1.5 mg/kg cisplatin solution (group III) and saline (group IV). Tumor volumes were analyzed pre-injection and 7 days after with MRI allowing calculating the relative tumor growth rate (%). Degree of liver cell necrosis was assessed on the histopathological specimens. Results: The renal parenchymal platinum concentrations (μg/ml) with 4.51 ± 2.25 (day 0), 1.59 ± 0.70 (day 1), 0.72 ± 0.10 (day 3) and 0.20 ± 0.06 (day 7) were significantly more pronounced after cisplatin-loaded GMS on days one and three compared to cisplatin with 1.99 ± 0.55, 0.08 ± 0.03, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.10 ± 0.07, respectively. Relative tumor growth rates resulted in 84.5% ± 26.4 (group I); 241.4% ± 145.1 (II); 331.9% ± 72.2 (III), and 413.6% ± 103.6 (IV) with statistical significant differences between groups I and III, and groups I and IV. Similar degrees of necrosis were observed in both GMSs treated groups, while ballooning of hepatocytes was highest in cisplatin-loaded GMSs. Conclusions: With cisplatin-loaded GMSs more pronounced and prolonged local parenchymal cisplatin concentrations may be achieved offering the advantage of an

  9. Empagliflozin in combination with oral agents in young and overweight/obese Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: A pooled analysis of three randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera, Irene; Gomis, Ramon; Crowe, Susanne; de Pablos-Velasco, Pedro; Aranda, Unai; García, Arantxa; Kis, Sanja Giljanovic; Naderali, Ebrahim

    This analysis aimed to evaluate efficacy and safety of empagliflozin in combination therapy in empagliflozin 10mg (n=160), or empagliflozin 25mg (n=141) once daily (24weeks) as add-on to metformin, to metformin plus sulfonylurea, or to pioglitazone ± metformin. At week 24, adjusted mean (SE) changes from baseline in HbA1c were -0.19% (0.07) for placebo vs. -1.10% (0.07) and -1.10% (0.07) for empagliflozin 10 and 25mg, respectively (both pempagliflozin 10 and 25mg, respectively (both pempagliflozin 10mg and 59.6% on empagliflozin 25mg. Genital infection AEs were reported in 1.4% on placebo, 3.8% on empagliflozin 10mg, and 5.0% on empagliflozin 25mg. In this specific population, empagliflozin in combination with other oral agents, significantly reduced HbA1c and body weight and was well tolerated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evolution of systemic treatment for hormone-sensitive breast cancer: from sequential use of single agents to the upfront administration of drug combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Imyanitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current standards of treatment of endocrine-dependent cancers (breast cancer (BC, prostate cancer imply sequential use of endocrine therapy and cytotoxic agents: it is believed, that steroid hormone antagonists cease the division of transformed cells and therefore make them resistant to other therapeutic modalities. It is important to recognize that conceptual investigations in this field were carried out dozens of years ago, and often involved relatively non-efficient drugs, imperfect laboratory tests, etc. There are several recent examples of combined use of endocrine therapy and other compounds. The addition of docetaxel (6 cycles to androgen deprivation resulted in significant improvement of overall survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Clinical trial involving the combined use of exemestane and everolimus demonstrated promising results. There are ongoing studies on inhibitors of cycline-dependent kinases. Use of these drugs in the beginning of endocrine therapy may significantly delay resistance to the antagonists of estrogen signaling.

  11. Anti-Cancer Activity of Lobaric Acid and Lobarstin Extracted from the Antarctic Lichen Stereocaulon alpnum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ju-Mi; Suh, Sung-Suk; Kim, Tai Kyoung; Kim, Jung Eun; Han, Se Jong; Youn, Ui Joung; Yim, Joung Han; Kim, Il-Chan

    2018-03-14

    Lobaric acid and lobarstin, secondary metabolites derived from the antarctic lichen Stereocaulon alpnum , exert various biological activities, including antitumor, anti-proliferation, anti-inflammation, and antioxidant activities. However, the underlying mechanisms of these effects have not yet been elucidated in human cervix adenocarcinoma and human colon carcinoma. In the present study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of lobaric acid and lobarstin on human cervix adenocarcinoma HeLa cells and colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. We show that the proliferation of Hela and HCT116 cells treated with lobaric acid and lobarstin significantly decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using flow cytometry analysis, we observed that the treatment with these compounds resulted in significant apoptosis in both cell lines, following cell cycle perturbation and arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, using immunoblot analysis, we investigated the expression of cell cycle and apoptosis-related marker genes and found a significant downregulation of the apoptosis regulator B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of the cleaved form of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a DNA repair and apoptosis regulator. These results suggest that lobaric acid and lobarstin could significantly inhibit cell proliferation through cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cervix adenocarcinoma and colon carcinoma cells. Taken together, our data suggests that lobaric acid and lobarstin might be novel agents for clinical treatment of cervix adenocarcinoma and colon carcinoma.

  12. Anti-Cancer Activity of Lobaric Acid and Lobarstin Extracted from the Antarctic Lichen Stereocaulon alpnum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Mi Hong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lobaric acid and lobarstin, secondary metabolites derived from the antarctic lichen Stereocaulon alpnum, exert various biological activities, including antitumor, anti-proliferation, anti-inflammation, and antioxidant activities. However, the underlying mechanisms of these effects have not yet been elucidated in human cervix adenocarcinoma and human colon carcinoma. In the present study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of lobaric acid and lobarstin on human cervix adenocarcinoma HeLa cells and colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. We show that the proliferation of Hela and HCT116 cells treated with lobaric acid and lobarstin significantly decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using flow cytometry analysis, we observed that the treatment with these compounds resulted in significant apoptosis in both cell lines, following cell cycle perturbation and arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, using immunoblot analysis, we investigated the expression of cell cycle and apoptosis-related marker genes and found a significant downregulation of the apoptosis regulator B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 and upregulation of the cleaved form of the poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, a DNA repair and apoptosis regulator. These results suggest that lobaric acid and lobarstin could significantly inhibit cell proliferation through cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cervix adenocarcinoma and colon carcinoma cells. Taken together, our data suggests that lobaric acid and lobarstin might be novel agents for clinical treatment of cervix adenocarcinoma and colon carcinoma.

  13. Data of a fluorescent imaging-based analysis of anti-cancer drug effects on three-dimensional cultures of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Itou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D cell culture is a powerful tool to study cell growth under 3D condition. To perform a simple test for anti-cancer drugs in 3D culture, visualization of non-proliferated cells is required. We propose a fluorescent imaging-based assay to analyze cancer cell proliferation in 3D culture. We used a pulse-labeling technique with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede to identify non-proliferated cells. This assay allows us to observe change in cell proliferation in 3D culture by simple imaging. Using this assay, we obtained the data of the effects of anti-cancer drugs, 5-fluorouracil and PD0332991 in a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7.

  14. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin Boo [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lee, Seong-Ho, E-mail: slee2000@umd.edu [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  15. Role of SNARE proteins in tumourigenesis and their potential as targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianghui; Wang, Jiafu

    2015-08-01

    The function of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) in cellular trafficking, membrane fusion and vesicle release in synaptic nerve terminals is well characterised. Recent studies suggest that SNAREs are also important in the control of tumourigenesis through the regulation of multiple signalling and transportation pathways. The majority of published studies investigated the effects of knockdown/knockout or overexpression of particular SNAREs on the normal function of cells as well as their dysfunction in tumourigenesis promotion. SNAREs are involved in the regulation of cancer cell invasion, chemo-resistance, the transportation of autocrine and paracrine factors, autophagy, apoptosis and the phosphorylation of kinases essential for cancer cell biogenesis. This evidence highlights SNAREs as potential targets for novel cancer therapy. This is the first review to summarise the expression and role of SNAREs in cancer biology at the cellular level, their interaction with non-SNARE proteins and modulation of cellular signalling cascades. Finally, a strategy is proposed for developing novel anti-cancer therapeutics using targeted delivery of a SNARE-inactivating protease into malignant cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-01

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017

  17. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. ► PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. ► PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. ► These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  18. Biomimetic synthesis of sericin and silica hybrid colloidosomes for stimuli-responsive anti-cancer drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Cai, Yurong; Sun, Ning; Li, Ruijing; Li, Wenhua; Kundu, Subhas C; Kong, Xiangdong; Yao, Juming

    2017-03-01

    Colloidosomes are becoming popular due to their significant flexibility with respect to microcapsule functionality. This study reports a facile approach for synthesizing silica colloidosomes by using sericin microcapsule as the matrix in an environment-friendly method. The silica colloid arrangement on the sericin microcapsules are orchestrated by altering the reaction parameters. Doxorubicin (DOX), used as a hydrophilic anti-cancer drug model, is encapsulated into the colloidosomes in a mild aqueous solution and becomes stimuli-responsive to different external environments, including pH values, protease, and ionic strength are also observed. Colloidosomes with sub-monolayers, close-packed monolayers, and close-packed multi-layered SiO 2 colloid shells can be fabricated under the optimized reaction conditions. A flexible DOX release from colloidosomes can be obtained via modulating the SiO 2 colloid layer arrangement and thickness. The close-packed and multi-layered SiO 2 colloid shells can best protect the colloidosomes and delay the rapid cargo release. MG-63 cells are killed when doxorubicin is released from the microcapsules due to degradation in the microenvironment of cancer cells. The drug release period is prolonged as SiO 2 shell thickness and integrity increase. This work suggests that the hybrid colloidosomes can be effective in a bioactive molecule delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-cancer and anti-oxidant efficacies of wild ginseng and cultivated wild ginseng of Korea and China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Min,Ahn

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim of this study was to verify anti-cancer and anti-oxidant efficacies of Korean wild ginseng and cultivated wild ginseng of Korea and China. Methods : For the measurement of anti-oxidation, SOD-like activity was evaluated using xanthine oxidase reduction method under in vitro environment. Subcutaneous and abdominal cancer were induced using CT-26 human colon cancer cells for the measurement of growth inhibition of cancer cells and differences in survival rate. Results : 1. Measurement of anti-oxidant activity of ginseng, Chinese and Korean cultivated wild ginseng, and natural wild ginseng samples showed concentration dependent anti-oxidant activity in HX/XOD system. Anti-oxidant activity showed drastic increase at 1mg/ml in all samples. 2. For the evaluation of growth inhibition of cancer cells after hypodermic implantation of CT-26 cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice, Chinese and Korean cultivated wild ginseng and natural wild ginseng groups showed significant inhibition of tumor growth from the 12th day compared to the control group. Similar inhibitory effects were also shown on the 15th and 18th days. But there was no significant difference between the experiment groups. 3. For the observation of increase in survival rate of the natural wild ginseng group, CT-26 cancer cells were implanted in the peritoneal cavity of mice.

  20. Investigation of carboxylation of carbon nanotube in the adsorption of anti-cancer drug: A theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesabi, Maryam; Behjatmanesh-Ardakani, Reza

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, an important process applied in the design of novel composite materials and drug delivery fields is the carboxylation of carbon nanotubes. In this work, we study the interaction of the anti-cancer drug hydroxyurea with carboxyl-functionalized zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by employing the method of the density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP levels in gas and solvent phases. The results show that all complexes are energetically favorable, especially in the aqueous phase. The enthalpy energy values are negative in all cases, which indicate their exothermic adsorption nature. The presence of sbnd COOH groups would create enough free space on the nanotube surface for the adsorption between interacting atoms. Thus, these can increase the activity of CNTs. Data indicates that adsorption is dependent on the carboxyl sites of the nanotube as well as on the sites of the drug. Furthermore, the hydrogen-bonding interactions between drug and sbnd COOH-CNTs play an important role for the different kinds of adsorption observed.

  1. Performance evaluation of structure based and ligand based virtual screening methods on ten selected anti-cancer targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Thilagavathi; Selvam, Chelliah

    2015-10-15

    Virtual screening has become an important tool in drug discovery process. Structure based and ligand based approaches are generally used in virtual screening process. To date, several benchmark sets for evaluating the performance of the virtual screening tool are available. In this study, our aim is to compare the performance of both structure based and ligand based virtual screening methods. Ten anti-cancer targets and their corresponding benchmark sets from 'Demanding Evaluation Kits for Objective In silico Screening' (DEKOIS) library were selected. X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes were selected based on their resolution. Openeye tools such as FRED, vROCS were used and the results were carefully analyzed. At EF1%, vROCS produced better results but at EF5% and EF10%, both FRED and ROCS produced almost similar results. It was noticed that the enrichment factor values were decreased while going from EF1% to EF5% and EF10% in many cases. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-15

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017.

  3. Development of Lipid-Shell and Polymer Core Nanoparticles with Water-Soluble Salidroside for Anti-Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Long Fang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside (Sal is a potent antitumor drug with high water-solubility. The clinic application of Sal in cancer therapy has been significantly restricted by poor oral absorption and low tumor cell uptake. To solve this problem, lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (Sal-LPNPs loaded with Sal were developed by a double emulsification method. The processing parameters including the polymer types, organic phase, PVA types and amount were systemically investigated. The obtained optimal Sal-LPNPs, composed of PLGA-PEG-PLGA triblock copolymers and lipids, had high entrapment efficiency (65%, submicron size (150 nm and negatively charged surface (−23 mV. DSC analysis demonstrated the successful encapsulation of Sal into LPNPs. The core-shell structure of Sal-LPNPs was verified by TEM. Sal released slowly from the LPNPs without apparent burst release. MTT assay revealed that 4T1 and PANC-1 cancer cell lines were sensitive to Sal treatment. Sal-LPNPs had significantly higher antitumor activities than free Sal in 4T1 and PANC-1 cells. The data indicate that LPNPs are a promising Sal vehicle for anti-cancer therapy and worthy of further investigation.

  4. Chinese Anti-Cancer Association as a non-governmental organization undertakes systematic cancer prevention work in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become the first leading cause of death in the world, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Facing the increasing trend of cancer incidence and mortality, China issued and implemented “three-early (early prevention, early diagnosis and early treatment)” national cancer prevention plan. As the main body and dependence of social governance, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) take over the role of government in the field of cancer prevention and treatment. American Cancer Society (ACS) made a research on cancer NGOs and civil society in cancer control and found that cancer NGOs in developing countries mobilize civil society to work together and advocate governments in their countries to develop policies to address the growing cancer burden. Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), Cancer Council Australia (CCA), and Malaysian cancer NGOs are the representatives of cancer NGOs in promoting cancer control. Selecting Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (CACA) as an example in China, this article is to investigate how NGOs undertake systematic cancer prevention work in China. By conducting real case study, we found that, as a NGO, CACA plays a significant role in intensifying the leading role of government in cancer control, optimizing cancer outcomes, decreasing cancer incidence and mortality rates and improving public health. PMID:26361412

  5. Thujone-Rich Fraction of Thuja occidentalis Demonstrates Major Anti-Cancer Potentials: Evidences from In Vitro Studies on A375 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Raktim; Mandal, Sushil Kumar; Dutta, Suman; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Boujedaini, Naoual; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Crude ethanolic extract of Thuja occidentalis (Fam: Cupressaceae) is used as homeopathic mother tincture (TOΦ) to treat various ailments, particularly moles and tumors, and also used in various other systems of traditional medicine. Anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing properties of TOΦ and the thujone-rich fraction (TRF) separated from it have been evaluated for their possible anti-cancer potentials in the malignant melanoma cell line A375. On initial trial by S-diphenyltetrazolium brom...

  6. Two likely targets for the anti-cancer effect of indole derivatives from cruciferous vegetables: PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolo, Ada; Pinto, Aldo; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rastrelli, Luca

    2017-10-01

    Diets containing high quantities of plant foods are linked with a decreased likelihood of incidence of cancer. Several common plant-based dietary components exert effects on DNA methylation levels, and can positively influence genome stability and the transcription of tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a substance present in vegetables of the Brassicaeae family, especially broccoli, white cabbage, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower. The in vivo biological effects of I3C are ascribed to a series of oligomeric products (including 3,3'-diindolylmethane), developed under acidic conditions. I3C is one of the many natural products and bioactive compounds found in foods which have recently received much attention for its potential effects in cancer prevention and treatment. In vitro studies report that I3C suppresses the proliferation of different tumor cells, including those isolated from breast, prostate, endometrium, and colon cancers. I3C resulted to be a potent in vivo chemopreventive agent for certain hormone-dependent cancers, including breast and cervical cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not well defined. In this review, we have analysed recent literature on the use of indole derivatives against various forms of cancer, and have identified the main signalling pathways involved in their anti-cancer effect as PI3K/Akt/mTOR and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Stabilized radiographic scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzi, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Stable compositions useful as technetium 99m-based scintigraphic agents comprise gentisic acid or a pharmaceutically-acceptable salt or ester thereof in combination with a pertechnetate reducing agent or dissolved in pertechnetate-99m (sup(99m)TcOsub(4)sup(-)) solution. The compositions are especially useful in combination with a phosphate or phosphonate material that carries the radionuclide to bone, thus providing a skeletal imaging agent

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, and Anti-Cancer Activity of Some New N'-(2-Oxoindolin-3-ylidene)-2-propylpentane hydrazide-hydrazones Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faham, Ayman; Farooq, Muhammad; Khattab, Sherine N; Abutaha, Nael; Wadaan, Mohammad A; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2015-08-13

    Eight novel N'-(2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene)-2-propylpentane hydrazide-hydrazone derivatives 4a-h were synthesized and fully characterized by IR, NMR ((1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR), elemental analysis, and X-ray crystallography. The cyto-toxicity and in vitro anti-cancer evaluation of the prepared compounds have been assessed against two different human tumour cell lines including human liver (HepG2) and leukaemia (Jurkat), as well as in normal cell lines derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK293) using MTT assay. The compounds 3e, 3f, 4a, 4c, and 4e revealed promising anti-cancer activities in tested human tumour cells lines (IC50 values between 3 and 7 μM) as compared to the known anti-cancer drug 5-Fluorouracil (IC50 32-50 μM). Among the tested compounds, 4a showed specificity against leukaemia (Jurkat) cells, with an IC50 value of 3.14 μM, but this compound was inactive in liver cancer and normal cell lines.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization, and Anti-Cancer Activity of Some New N′-(2-Oxoindolin-3-ylidene-2-propylpentane hydrazide-hydrazones Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Faham

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eight novel N′-(2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene-2-propylpentane hydrazide-hydrazone derivatives 4a–h were synthesized and fully characterized by IR, NMR (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR, elemental analysis, and X-ray crystallography. The cyto-toxicity and in vitro anti-cancer evaluation of the prepared compounds have been assessed against two different human tumour cell lines including human liver (HepG2 and leukaemia (Jurkat, as well as in normal cell lines derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK293 using MTT assay. The compounds 3e, 3f, 4a, 4c, and 4e revealed promising anti-cancer activities in tested human tumour cells lines (IC50 values between 3 and 7 μM as compared to the known anti-cancer drug 5-Fluorouracil (IC50 32–50 μM. Among the tested compounds, 4a showed specificity against leukaemia (Jurkat cells, with an IC50 value of 3.14 μM, but this compound was inactive in liver cancer and normal cell lines.

  10. Determination of the Relative Efficacy of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid for Anti-Cancer Effects in Human Breast Cancer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurak, Vera C.; Damaraju, Sambasivarao

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated high fish oil consumption with decreased risk of breast cancer (BC). n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) found in fish and fish oils exert anti-cancer effects. However, few studies have examined the relative efficacy of EPA and DHA alone and in mixtures on BC subtypes. This was the objective of the present review, as this research is a necessity for the translation of findings to human health and disease. The literature suggests that DHA has a greater anti-cancer effect in triple negative BC (TNBC). In estrogen positive (ER+) BC, DHA has a greater effect on cell viability, while both fatty acids have similar effects on apoptosis and proliferation. These effects are associated with preferential uptake of DHA into TNBC lipid rafts and EPA in ER+ BC. EPA:DHA mixtures have anti-cancer activity; however, the ratio of EPA:DHA does not predict the relative incorporation of these two fatty acids into membrane lipids as EPA appears to be preferentially incorporated. In summary, DHA and EPA should be considered separately in the context of BC prevention. The elucidation of optimal EPA:DHA ratios will be important for designing targeted n-3 LCPUFA treatments. PMID:29207553

  11. Enhanced Production of Gypenoside LXXV Using a Novel Ginsenoside-Transforming β-Glucosidase from Ginseng-Cultivating Soil Bacteria and Its Anti-Cancer Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hao Cui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Minor ginsenosides, such as compound K, Rg3(S, which can be produced by deglycosylation of ginsenosides Rb1, showed strong anti-cancer effects. However, the anticancer effects of gypenoside LXXV, which is one of the deglycosylated shapes of ginsenoside Rb1, is still unknown due to the rarity of its content in plants. Here, we cloned and characterized a novel ginsenoside-transforming β-glucosidase (BglG167b derived from Microbacterium sp. Gsoil 167 which can efficiently hydrolyze gypenoside XVII into gypenoside LXXV, and applied it to the production of gypenoside LXXV at the gram-scale with high specificity. In addition, the anti-cancer activity of gypenoside LXXV was investigated against three cancer cell lines (HeLa, B16, and MDA-MB231 in vitro. Gypenoside LXXV significantly reduced cell viability, displaying an enhanced anti-cancer effect compared to gypenoside XVII and Rb1. Taken together, this enzymatic method would be useful in the preparation of gypenoside LXXV for the functional food and pharmaceutical industries.

  12. OSU-2S/sorafenib synergistic antitumor combination against hepatocellular carcinoma: The role of PKCδ/p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany A Omar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sorafenib (Nexavar® is an FDA-approved systemic therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, the low efficacy and adverse effects at high doses limit the clinical application of sorafenib and strongly recommend its combination with other agents aiming at ameliorating its drawbacks. OSU-2S, a PKCδ activator, was selected as a potential candidate anticancer agent to be combined with sorafenib to promote the anti-cancer activity through synergistic interaction. Methods: The antitumor effects of sorafenib, OSU-2S and their combination were assessed by MTT assay, caspase activation, Western blotting, migration/invasion assays in four different HCC cell lines. The synergistic interactions were determined by Calcusyn analysis. PKCδ knockdown was used to elucidate the role of PKCδ activation as a mechanism for the synergy. The knockdown/over-expression of p53 was used to explain the differential sensitivity of HCC cell lines to sorafenib and/or OSU-2S. Results: OSU-2S synergistically enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of sorafenib in the four used HCC cell lines with combination indices < 1. This effect was accompanied by parallel increases in caspase 3/7 activity, PARP cleavage, PKCδ activation and HCC cell migration/invasion. In addition, PKCδ knockdown abolished the synergy between sorafenib and OSU-2S. Furthermore, p53 restoration in Hep3B cells through the over-expression rendered them more sensitive to both agents while p53 knockdown from HepG2 cells increased their resistance to both agents. Conclusions: OSU-2S augments the anti-proliferative effect of sorafenib in HCC cell lines, in part, through the activation of PKCδ. The p53 status in HCC cells predicts their sensitivity towards both sorafenib and OSU-2S. The proposed combination represents a therapeutically relevant approach that can lead to a new HCC therapeutic protocol.

  13. Contrast-enhanced computerized tomography combined with a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent for screening for early-phase non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ninglu; Zhang, Xiaohe; Cao, Yonghui; Jiang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Si; Feng, Yingying; Fan, Yimeng; Lu, Zhitao; Gao, Hongmei

    2017-11-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and patients with NSCLC are frequently diagnosed at an advanced stage. This is primarily due to a lack of advanced and sensitive protocols for the detection of early stage NSCLC. Therefore, methods for the accurate diagnosis of early stage NSCLC are urgently required to improve survival rates. The present study investigated the use of contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CECT) combined with a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent (TNCA) to diagnose early-stage NSCLC in a mice xenograft model. The TNCA used was lenvatinib, a multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1-4, platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase receptor Ret and mast/stem cell growth factor receptor Kit. Xenograft NSCLC mice were established and used to analyze the efficacy of CECT-TNCA compared with CT scanning alone. The TNCA was inhaled with the use of an atomizer. The results demonstrated that CECT-TNCA improved the sensitivity of the diagnosis of early stage NSCLC. In addition, imaging using the TNCA enabled the visualization of nodules in the lung in mice with early stage NSCLC. In addition, lung nodule signal enhancement was increased in CECT-TNCA compared with CT, suggesting a high accurate accumulation of the TNCA in tumor nodules. Mice diagnosed with early stage NSCLC exhibited a higher eradication rate of NSCLC after treatment with cisplatin compared with mice with advanced stage NSCLC. These data indicate that the sensitivity and accuracy of CT imaging for the diagnosis of early stage NSCLC was improved through combination with the liposome-encapsulated TNCA.

  14. Evaluation of the synergistic potential of vancomycin combined with other antimicrobial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Viganor da Silva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp (CNS are the most common pathogens that cause serious long term infections in patients. Despite the existence of new antimicrobial agents, such as linezolid, vancomycin (VAN remains the standard therapy for the treatment of infections caused by these multidrug-resistant strains. However, the use of VAN has been associated with a high frequency of therapeutic failures in some clinical scenarios, mainly with decreasing concentration of VAN. This work aims to evaluate the synergic potential of VAN plus sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT, VAN plus rifampin (RIF and VAN plus imipenem (IPM in sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations against 22 clinical strains of MRSA and CNS. The checkerboard method showed synergism of VAN/RIF and VAN/SXT against two and three of the 22 strains, respectively. The combination of VAN with IPM showed synergistic effects against 21 out of 22 strains by the E-test method. Four strains were analyzed by the time-kill curve method and synergistic activity was observed with VAN/SXT, VAN/RIF and especially VAN/IPM in sub-inhibitory concentrations. It would be interesting to determine if synergy occurs in vivo. Evidence of in vivo synergy could lead to a reduction of the standard VAN dosage or treatment time.

  15. Combined magnetic resonance imaging of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary arteries after a single injection of a blood pool contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansch, Andreas; Neumann, Steffi; Baltzer, Pascal; Waginger, Matthias; Kaiser, Werner A.; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Betge, Stefan; Poehlmann, Gunther [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine I, Jena (Germany); Pfeil, Alexander; Wolf, Gunter [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena (Germany); Boettcher, Joachim [SRH Klinikum Gera, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Gera (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Agreement rate between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler ultrasound (DUS) for the detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremities was attempted by using the intravascular MRI contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium. The potential of this method to detect pulmonary embolism (PE) was also evaluated. Forty-three consecutive inpatients with ultrasound-confirmed DVT but no clinical signs of PE were prospectively enrolled in this feasibility study. MRI was performed after a single injection of gadofosveset trisodium. The pulmonary arteries were imaged using a 3D Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) gradient recalled echo sequence. Additionally, pulmonary arteries, abdominal veins, pelvic and leg veins were imaged using a fat-suppressed 3D gradient echo Volume Interpolated Breath-hold Examination (VIBE FS). Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced MRI detected more thrombi in the pelvic region, upper leg and lower leg than the initial DUS. In addition, PE was detected in 16 of the 43 DVT patients (37%). This study shows the feasibility of a combined protocol for the MRI diagnosis of DVT and PE using gadofosveset trisodium. This procedure is not only more sensitive in detecting DVT compared to standard DUS, but is also able to detect PE in asymptomatic patients. (orig.)

  16. Non-surgical treatment of deep wounds triggered by harmful physical and chemical agents: a successful combined use of collagenase and hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesti, Maria G; Fino, Pasquale; Ponzo, Ida; Ruggieri, Martina; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-02-01

    Some chronic ulcers often occur with slough, not progressing through the normal stages of wound healing. Treatment is long and other therapies need to be performed in addition to surgery. Patients not eligible for surgery because of ASA class (American Society of Anesthesiologists class) appear to benefit from chemical therapy with collagenase or hydrocolloids in order to prepare the wound bed, promoting the healing process. We describe four cases of traumatic, upper limb deep wounds caused by different physical and chemical agents, emphasising the effectiveness of treatment based on topical application of collagenase and hyaluronic acid (HA) before standardised surgical procedures. We performed careful disinfection of lesions combined with application of topical cream containing hyaluronic acid, bacterial fermented sodium hyaluronate (0·2%w/w) salt, and bacterial collagenase obtained from non-pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus (>2·0 nkat1/g). In one patient a dermo-epidermal graft was used to cover the wide loss of substance. In two patients application of a HA-based dermal substitute was done. We obtained successful results in terms of wound healing, with satisfactory aesthetic result and optimal recovery of the affected limb functionality. Topical application of collagenase and HA, alone or before standardised surgical procedures allows faster wound healing. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Novel Role of Rural Official Organization in the Biomass-Based Power Supply Chain in China: A Combined Game Theory and Agent-Based Simulation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyan Luo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Developing biomass-based power generation is helpful for China to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to release the targets of carbon emission peak. The decentralized farming method leads to Chinese farmers’ weak willingness to collect and sell crop residues to biomass-based power plants. The purpose of this paper is to solve the issue by proposing a novel biomass feedstock supply model with China’s rural official organization—villagers’ committee, which has great influence on villagers’ decision making. Introducing it into the biomass-based power supply chain is beneficial to motivating farmers’ supplying enthusiasm. A combined game theory and agent-based simulation approach is applied to study the effectiveness of this new supply model. Multiple simulation scenarios are built to study impacts of different simulation parameters, and results show that farmers tend to supply more biomass material for electricity production in the proposed villagers’ committee model, compared with the two conventional supply models, direct-deal and broker models. The supply model incorporating the rural official organization can ensure the feedstock sufficiency for plants. A proper model design depends on the feed-in tariff subsidy for biomass-based electricity, feedstock shipping distance, performance appraisal system of the villagers’ committee, as well as farmers’ utility weights on net income and public service improvement.

  18. Augmenting Anti-Cancer Natural Products with a Small Molecule Adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G. Wahome

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic microbes produce diverse secondary metabolites with interesting biological activities. Cytotoxic metabolites have the potential to become lead compounds or drugs for cancer treatment. Many cytotoxic compounds, however, show undesirable toxicity at higher concentrations. Such undesirable activity may be reduced or eliminated by using lower doses of the cytotoxic compound in combination with another compound that modulates its activity. Here, we have examined the cytotoxicity of four microbial metabolites [ethyl N-(2-phenethyl carbamate (NP-1, Euglenophycin, Anabaenopeptin, and Glycolipid 652] using three in vitro cell lines [human breast cancer cells (MCF-7, mouse neuroblastoma cells (N2a, and rat pituitary epithelial cells (GH4C1]. The compounds showed variable cytotoxicity, with Euglenophycin displaying specificity for N2a cells. We have also examined the modulatory power of NP-1 on the cytotoxicity of the other three compounds and found that at a permissible concentration (125 µg/mL, NP-1 sensitized N2a and MCF-7 cells to Euglenophycin and Glycolipid 652 induced cytotoxicity.

  19. An ezetimibe-policosanol combination has the potential to be an OTC agent that could dramatically lower LDL cholesterol without side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2005-01-01

    Although many risk factors influence atherogenesis, LDL appears to play a primary role in this process. In prospective epidemiology, coronary risk increases as LDL cholesterol increases, throughout the entire range of concentrations encountered in healthy humans. Coronary risk is minimal in individuals and populations whose serum cholesterol remains quite low throughout life. Thus, practical strategies for achieving large reductions of LDL cholesterol in the general population could have a dramatic impact on coronary mortality rates. Dietary measures have limited potential in this regard; modest restriction of saturated fat has a rather trivial effect on LDL cholesterol, and the very-low-fat quasi-vegan diets that do have a notable effect in this regard currently have little appeal to the majority of the population. With respect to pharmacotherapy, most available hypolipidemic agents with reasonably potent activity entail side effects or compliance difficulties that would render their use too expensive or impractical for population-wide application. However, two agents may have great potential in this regard: policosanol and ezetimibe. The former, a mixture of long-chain alcohols derived from sugar cane wax, has effects on serum lipids comparable to those of statins, and may work by down-regulating expression of HMG-CoA reductase. However, unlike statins, policosanol appears to be devoid of side effects or risks. Ezetimibe is a newly approved drug that is a potent and highly specific inhibitor of an intestinal sterol permease; in daily doses as low as 10 mg, it suppresses intestinal absorption of cholesterol and decreases serum LDL cholesterol by approximately 18%. No side effects have been seen in clinical doses, and the fact that its hypolipidemic activity is additive to that of statins has generated considerable interest. Both policosanol and ezetimibe can be administered once daily. Future studies should determine whether policosanol, like statins, interacts

  20. Identification on the content of micronuclei and nature of DNA damaging agent using cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay in combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamizh Selvan, G.; Bhavani, M.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are continuously exposed to many types of DNA damaging agents which could affect normal function of the cells. While many biomarkers are available to monitor the exposed individuals, limited tools have the ability to discriminate the nature of genotoxic agents. Such identification is an important measure in case of lack of information on the nature of exposure during accidents where many peoples can be exposed. Hence, we aimed to study the capability of cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay in combination with centeromere specific fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to discriminate the radiation from chemicals. Peripheral blood was exposed to γ radiation (0.25 and 2Gy), bleomycin (40 and 80 μg/ml), mitomycin-C (4 and 8 μg/ml) and colchicine (0.05 and 0.1 μg/ml); then cultured for 72 hours to prepare the binucleated cells (BN). The BN were hybridized with pan-centromeric FISH probe and counter stained with DAPI to count the MN with centromere (MNCN + ) and without centromere (MNCN - ) using fluorescence microscope. The unexposed cells showed 0.014±0.004 (MNCN - ) and exposed cells showed both MNCN + and MNCN - . The obtained total MN frequencies were 0.050±0.007 (0.25 Gy) and 0.188±0.017 (2 Gy) for γ irradiated cells, 0.072±0.011 (40 μg/ml) and 0.112±0.012 (80 μg/ml) for bleomycin, 0.029±0.006 (21 μg/ml) and 0.066±0.009 (4 μg/ml) for MMC, 0.072±0.004 (0.05 μg/ml) and 0.106±0.005 (0.1 μg/ml) for colchicine exposed cells. The γ-irradiated cells exhibited dose dependent decrease of MNCN + (32.6 and 16.7%); however, bleomycin exposed cells showed 20.5 and 20.7%; whereas, colchicine exposed cells showed 79.6 and 82.4% and MMC exposed cells exhibited MNCN + of 18.5 and 26.7% for the different concentrations. The obtained results suggest that colchicine alone induced more CNMN + and differences in the induction of MNCN + by using different chemicals as compare to ionizing radiation. Hence, CBMN assay using

  1. Production of anti-cancer triterpene (betulinic acid) from callus cultures of different Ocimum species and its elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Harshita; Pandey, Pallavi; Singh, Sailendra; Gupta, Ruby; Banerjee, Suchitra

    2015-03-01

    Betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid, is gaining unmatched attention owing to its unique anti-cancer activity with selective melanoma growth inhibition without damaging normal cells. It is also well-known for its multifaceted pharmacokinetics, entailing antibacterial, antimalarial, anti-HIV and antioxidant merits. Considering the escalating demand with diminishing bioresource of this molecule, the present study was undertaken that revealed the untapped potentials of Ocimum calli, contrasting to that in the in vitro derived leaves, as effective production alternative of BA in three out of four tested species (i.e. Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum kilimandscharicum, Ocimum sanctum excluding Ocimum grattisimum). Callus inductions were obtained in all the four species with different 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)/α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) concentrations with kinetin. Notably, 2,4-D favoured maximum callus growth in all whereas NAA proved beneficial for the highest metabolite yield in the calli of each BA-producing species. The O. basilicum calli demonstrated the maximum growth (growth index (GI) 678.7 ± 24.47) and BA yield (2.59 ± 0.55 % dry weight [DW]), whereas those in O. kilimandscharicum (GI 533.33 ± 15.87; BA 1.87 ± 0.6 % DW) and O. sanctum (GI 448 ± 16.07; BA 0.39 ± 0.12 % DW) followed a descending order. The O. gratissimum calli revealed minimum growth (GI 159 ± 13.25) with no BA accumulation. Elicitation with methyl jasmonate at 200-μM concentration after 48-h exposure doubled the BA yield (5.10 ± 0.18 % DW) in NAA-grown O. basilicum calli compared to that in the untreated counterpart (2.61 ± 0.19 % DW), which further enthused its future application.

  2. Anti-cancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of gypenosides on human colorectal cancer SW-480 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gypenosides (Gyp, the main components from Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino, are widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-cancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of Gyp on human colorectal cancer cells SW-480. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The inhibitory effect of Gyp on SW-480 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Apoptotic cell death was detected by nuclear Hoechst 33342 staining and DNA fragmentation analysis. Apoptosis was analyzed using Annexin V-PE/7-amino-actinomycin D staining. Cell membrane integrity was evaluated with flow cytometry following PI staining. Changes of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm were detected through flow cytometry analysis of rhodamine 123 (Rh123. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in Gyp induced cell death was investigated by intracellular ROS generation and general ROS scavenger. Wound-healing assay was carried out to investigate Gyp-inhibited migration of SW-480 cells in vitro. Additionally, the alterations in F-actin microfilaments were analyzed by FITC-labeled phalloidin toxin staining and the morphological changes were evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM. RESULTS: After the Gyp treatment, the plasma membrane permeability of SW-480 cell was increased, Δψm was decreased significantly, the level of intracellular ROS level was increased, DNA fragmentation and apoptotic morphology were observed. Cells treated with Gyp exert serious microfilament network collapse as well as the significant decrease in the number of microvilli. Gyp induced the changes of cell viability, cell migration, intracellular ROS generation and nuclear morphology were alleviated obviously by NAC. CONCLUSION: The results in this study implied that ROS play an important role in Gyp induced cell toxicity and apoptosis, and the mitochondria damage may be upstream of ROS generation post Gyp treatment. The findings of the present study provide new evidences for anti

  3. Minimalism in fabrication of self-organized nanogels holding both anti-cancer drug and targeting moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Park, Kyong Mi; Ko, Jin Young; Kwon, Ick Chan; Cho, Hyeon Geun; Kang, Dongmin; Yu, In Tag; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Na, Kun

    2008-05-01

    Recent researches to develop nano-carrier systems in anti-cancer drug delivery have focused on more complicated design to improve therapeutic efficacy and to reduce side effects. Although such efforts have great impact to biomedical science and engineering, the complexity has been a huddle because of clinical and economic problems. In order to overcome the problems, a simplest strategy to fabricate nano-carriers to deliver doxorubicin (DOX) was proposed in the present study. Two significant subjects (i) formation of nanoparticles loading and releasing DOX and (ii) binding specificity of them to cells, were examined. Folic acid (FA) was directly coupled with pullulan (Pul) backbone by ester linkage (FA/Pul conjugate) and the degree of substitution (DS) was varied, which were confirmed by 1H NMR and UV spectrophotometry. Light scattering results revealed that the nanogels possessed two major size distributions around 70 and 270 nm in an aqueous solution. Their critical aggregation concentrations (CACs) were less than 10 microg/mL, which are lower than general critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of low-molecular-weight surfactants. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed well-dispersed nanogel morphology in a dried state. Depending on the DS, the nanogels showed different DOX-loading and releasing profiles. The DOX release rate from FA8/Pul (with the highest DS) for 24h was slower than that from FA4/or FA6/Pul, indicating that the FA worked as a hydrophobic moiety for drug holding. Cellular uptake of the nanogels (KB cells) was also monitored by confocal microscopy. All nanogels were internalized regardless of the DS of FA. Based on the results, the objectives of this study, to suggest a new method overcoming the complications in the drug carrier design, were successfully verified.

  4. Anti-cancer effect of Cordyceps militaris in human colorectal carcinoma RKO cells via cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwan Hee; Lee, Seulki; Lee, Kanghyo; Shin, Yu Su; Kang, Hyojeung; Cho, Hyosun

    2015-07-04

    Cordyceps militaris has been used as a traditional medicine in Asian countries for a long time. Different types of Cordyceps extract were reported to have various pharmacological activities including an anti-cancer effect. We investigated the inhibitory effect of Cordyceps militaris ethanol extract on a human colorectal cancer-derived cell line, RKO. RKO cells were treated with various concentrations of nucleosides-enriched ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris for 48 h and cytotoxicity was measured using a CCK-8 assay. Then, xenograft Balb/c nude mice were injected with RKO cells and subsequently orally administered with ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris every day for 3 weeks to examine the inhibitory effect on tumor growth. Lastly, the effect of Cordyceps militaris on cell cycle as well as apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry. Also, the expression of p53, caspase 9, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bim, Bax, Bak, and Bad were detected using western blot assay. RKO cells were highly susceptible to the ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris (CME) and the growth of RKO cells-derived tumor was significantly delayed by the treatment of Cordyceps militaris. Cordyceps militaris induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase (untreated; 20.5 %, CME 100 μg/ml; 61.67 %, CME 300 μg/ml; 66.33 %) and increased early apoptosis (untreated; 1.01 %, CME 100 μg/ml; 8.48 %, CME 300 μg/ml; 18.07 %). The expression of p53, cleaved caspase 9, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bim, Bak, and Bad were upregulated by the treatment of Cordyceps militaris. Ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris was highly cytotoxic to human colorectal carcinoma RKO cells and inhibited the growth of tumor in xenograft model. The anti-tumor effect of Cordyceps militaris was associated with an induction of cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

  5. The anti-cancer effect of octagon and spherical silver nanoparticles on MCF-7 breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Khatami

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The modern science of nanotechnology is an interdisciplinary science that has contributed to advances in cancer treatment. This study was performed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles on breast cancer cell of line MCF-7 in vitro. Methods: This analytical study was performed in Kerman and Bam University of Medical Sciences, Bam City, Kerman Province, Iran from March 2015 to March 2016. Silver nanoparticles suspension was synthesized using palm kernel extract. The resulting silver nanoparticles were studied and characterized. The ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy used for screening of physicochemical properties. The average particle size of the biosynthesized silver nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy. The properties of different concentrations of synthesized silver nanoparticles (1 to 3 μg/ml and palm kernel extract (containing the same concentration of the extract was used for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles against MCF-7 human breast cancer cells were determined by MTT assay. MTT is used to assess cell viability as a function of redox potential. Actively respiring cells convert the water-soluble MTT to an insoluble purple formazan. Results: The ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy showed strong absorption peak at 429 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM images revealed the formation of silver nanoparticles with spherical and octagon shape and sizes in the range between 1-40 nm, with an average size approximately 17 nm. The anti-cancer effect of silver nanoparticles on cell viability was strongly depends on the concentration of silver nanoparticles and greatly decrease with increasing the concentration of silver nanoparticles. The IC50 amount of silver nanoparticle was 2 μg/ml. Conclusion: The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles showed a dose-dependent toxicity against MCF-7 human breast

  6. Tailored-CuO-nanowire decorated with folic acid mediated coupling of the mitochondrial-ROS generation and miR425-PTEN axis in furnishing potent anti-cancer activity in human triple negative breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahir, Manisha; Bhattacharya, Saurav; Karmakar, Soumendu; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Mukherjee, Sudeshna; Ghosh, Swatilekha; Chattopadhyay, Sreya; Patra, Prasun; Adhikary, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are the forthcoming anti-tumor therapeutics and provide a versatile platform in the development of therapeutic approaches for drug-resistant cancers such as triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Copper oxide nanoparticles have been characterized as anti-cancer agents but its toxicity has been a matter of concern. Herein, we have developed a targeted CuO Nanowire fabricated with Folic acid (CuO-Nw-FA) that enables enhanced cellular uptake in TNBC cells without imparting significant toxicity in normal cellular system. In the present study, we enumerated that CuO-Nw-FA caused mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in MDAMB-231 cells. Furthermore, CuO-Nw-FA mediated cytosolic retardation of NF-κB favoured inactivation of miR-425 and henceforth activated PTEN to induce apoptosis in TNBC cells. Simultaneously, CuO-Nw-FA also restricted the in-vitro cell migration through the miR-425/PTEN axis via pFAK. Studies extended to ex-ovo and in-vivo mice models further validated the efficacy of CuO-Nw-FA. Additionally, the accumulations of nanoparticles in tumor as well as different organs in mice were examined by in-vivo biodistribution and ex-vivo optical imaging studies. Thus our results cumulatively propose that CuO-Nw-FA cross-talks two distinct signalling pathways to induce apoptosis and retard migration in TNBC cells and raises the possibility for the use of CuO-Nw-FA as a potent anti-tumor agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antitumor effect of combined NAMPT and CD73 inhibition in an ovarian cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sociali, Giovanna; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Magnone, Mirko; Zamporlini, Federica; Emionite, Laura; Sturla, Laura; Bianchi, Giovanna; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Nahimana, Aimable; Nencioni, Alessio; Raffaelli, Nadia; Bruzzone, Santina

    2016-01-19

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a crucial enzyme in the biosynthesis of intracellular NAD+. NAMPT inhibitors have potent anticancer activity in several preclinical models by depleting NAD+ and ATP levels. Recently, we demonstrated that CD73 enables the utilization of extracellular NAD+/nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) by converting them to Nicotinamide riboside (NR), which can cross the plasmamembrane and fuel intracellular NAD+ biosynthesis in human cells. These processes are herein confirmed to also occur in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line (OVCAR-3), by means of CD73 or NRK1 specific silencing. Next, we investigated the anti-tumor activity of the simultaneous inhibition of NAMPT (with FK866) and CD73 (with α, β-methylene adenosine 5'-diphosphate, APCP), in an in vivo human ovarian carcinoma model. Interestingly, the combined therapy was found to significantly decrease intratumor NAD+, NMN and ATP levels, compared with single treatments. In addition, the concentration of these nucleotides in ascitic exudates was more remarkably reduced in animals treated with both FK866 and APCP compared with single treatments. Importantly, tumors treated with FK866 in combination with APCP contained a statistically significant lower proportion of Ki67 positive proliferating cells and a higher percentage of necrotic area. Finally, a slight but significant increase in animal survival in response to the combined therapy, compared to the single agents, could be demonstrated. Our results indicate that the pharmacological inhibition of CD73 enzymatic activity could be considered as a means to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of NAMPT inhibitors.

  8. Interaction of celecoxib with different anti-cancer drugs is antagonistic in breast but not in other cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Awady, Raafat A.; Saleh, Ekram M.; Ezz, Marwa; Elsayed, Abeer M.

    2011-01-01

    Celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, is being investigated for enhancement of chemotherapy efficacy in cancer clinical trials. This study investigates the ability of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to sensitize cells from different origins to several chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of the drug's mechanism of action and sequence of administration are also investigated. The sensitivity, cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA damage of five different cancer cell lines (HeLa, HCT116, HepG2, MCF7 and U251) to 5-FU, cisplatin, doxorubicin and etoposide ± celecoxib following different incubation schedules were analyzed. We found antagonism between celecoxib and the four drugs in the breast cancer cells MCF7 following all incubation schedules and between celecoxib and doxorubicin in all cell lines except for two combinations in HCT116 cells. Celecoxib with the other three drugs in the remaining four cell lines resulted in variable interactions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that celecoxib exerts different molecular effects in different cells. In some lines, it abrogates the drug-induced G2/M arrest enhancing pre-mature entry into mitosis with damaged DNA thus increasing apoptosis and resulting in synergism. In other cells, it enhances drug-induced G2/M arrest allowing time to repair drug-induced DNA damage before entry into mitosis and decreasing cell death resulting in antagonism. In some synergistic combinations, celecoxib-induced abrogation of G2/M arrest was not associated with apoptosis but permanent arrest in G1 phase. These results, if confirmed in-vivo, indicate that celecoxib is not a suitable chemosensitizer for breast cancer or with doxorubicin for other cancers. Moreover, combination of celecoxib with other drugs should be tailored to the tumor type, drug and administration schedule. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → Celecoxib may enhance effects of anticancer drugs. → Its combination with four drugs was tested in five cancer cell

  9. Efficacy of cinnamon bark oil and cinnamaldehyde on anti-multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the synergistic effects in combination with other antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utchariyakiat, Itsaraporn; Surassmo, Suvimol; Jaturanpinyo, Montree; Khuntayaporn, Piyatip; Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of drug resistant pathogens becomes a crucial problem for infectious diseases worldwide. Among these bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of which highly resists to many currently used drugs and becomes a major concern in public health. Up till now, the search for potential antimicrobial agents has been still a challenge for researchers. Broth microdilution assay was used to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the essential oils and antibiotics against P. aeruginosa. Inhibition activity of the essential oils under vapor condition was examined to obtain the minimum inhibitory dose (MID). Time-kill assay included in this study was performed according to CLSI guideline. Bioautographic assay was used to detect active components of the essential oil. Synergistic effect with currently used antibiotics was further examined by checkerboard assay. In this study, a variety of essential oils were examined for anti-multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa (MDR-PA) activity, of which cinnamon bark oil showed the strongest antimicrobial activity against all clinical-isolated MDR-PA strains with MIC of 0.0562-0.225 % v/v and MBC of 0.1125-1.8 % v/v. Bioautographic results demonstrated that the active compounds of cinnamon bark oil were cinnamaldehyde and eugenol which showed strong inhibitory effect against P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, cinnamaldehyde, a major constituent of cinnamon bark oil, possessed stronger antimicrobial effect to P. aeruginosa than eugenol. Under gaseous condition, cinnamon bark oil and cinnamaldehyde showed antibacterial activity against MDR-PA strains with MID of 0.5-1 mg/L. Moreover, combination of cinnamon bark oil or cinnamaldehyde with currently used antibiotics was further studied by checkerboard assay to examine synergistic interactions on clinically isolated MDR-PA strains. Cinnamon bark oil and cinnamaldehyde combined with colistin demonstrated synergistic rates at 16

  10. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Ignatiadis

    Full Text Available EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC in combination with paclitaxel.HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2 every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (% reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI estimated Gadolinium (Gd enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated.Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001 for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04.The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment, especially in ER-/HER2

  11. Synthesis, characterisation, and preliminary anti-cancer photodynamic therapeutic in vitro studies of mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick; Magnusen, Anthony R.; Moffett, Erick T.; Meyer, Kyle; Hong, Yiling; Ramsdale, Stuart E.; Gordon, Michelle; Stubbs, Javelyn; Seymour, Luke A.; Acharya, Dhiraj; Weber, Ralph T.; Smith, Paul F.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Ji, Ping; Menocal, Laura; Bai, Fengwei; Williams, Jennie L.; Cropek, Donald M.; Jarrett, William L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes, which were used as potential photodynamic therapeutic agents for melanoma cell growth inhibition. The novel complexes, [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)](PF6)2•1.5H2O 1 (where phen2DTT = 1,4-bis(1,10-phenanthrolin-5-ylsulfanyl)butane-2,3-diol and pbt = 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzothiazole) and [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)](PF6)2•3H2O 2 (where tpphz = tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c:3″,2″-h:2‴,3‴-j]phenazine) were synthesised and characterised. Compound 1 was reacted with [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] (where sal-L-tryp = N-salicylidene-L-tryptophanate) to produce [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2•5H2O 4; while [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] was reacted with compound 2 to produce [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2•6H2O 3. All complexes were characterised by elemental analysis, HRMS, ESI MS, UV-visible absorption, ESR spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry, where appropriate. In vitro cell toxicity studies (with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) via dark and light reaction conditions were carried out with sodium diaqua-4,4',4”,4”'tetrasulfophthalocyaninecobaltate(II) (Na4[Co(tspc)(H2O)2]), [VO(sal-L-tryp)(phen)]•H2O, and the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4. Such studies involved A431, human epidermoid carcinoma cells; human amelanotic malignant melanoma cells; and HFF, non-cancerous human skin fibroblast cells. Both chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 were found to be more toxic to melanoma cells than to non-cancerous fibroblast cells, and preferentially led to apoptosis of the melanoma cells over non-cancerous skin cells. The anti-cancer property of the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 was further enhanced when treated cells were exposed to light, while no such effect was observed on non-cancerous skin fibroblast cells. ESR and 51V NMR spectroscopic studies were also used to assess the stability of the chloride salts of

  12. The effectiveness of therapeutic patient education on adherence to oral anti-cancer medicines in adult cancer patients in ambulatory care settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, Gilly; Simpson, Janice; Brown, Andrea; Kyaw, Ohnma; Shyrier, Sharon; Concert, Catherine M

    2015-06-12

    Adherence to oral cancer medicines is a challenge for adult patients with cancer. Education specifically tailored for an individual patient with cancer may improve adherence. Therapeutic patient education when utilized effectively may maximize health outcomes and positively affect the quality of life of adult patients with cancer. Currently, there are no published systematic reviews specific to the effectiveness of therapeutic patient education on improvement of oral anti-cancer medicines adherence in patients with cancer. To synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of therapeutic patient education on adherence to oral anti-cancer medicines in adult cancer patients 18 years and older in an ambulatory care setting. Types of participants: This review considered studies involving adults of any ethnicity, race or gender, aged 18 years or older who were diagnosed with any form of cancer, receiving oral anti-cancer medicines in an ambulatory care setting. Types of intervention(s): This review considered studies on the use of therapeutic patient education as the additional intervention to routine patient education for promoting oral anti-cancer medicine adherence in adult patients with cancer in an ambulatory care setting. Routine patient education was considered as a comparator. Types of outcomes: The outcome considered was adherence to prescribed oral anti-cancer medicines. Types of studies: This review considered experimental and observational studies. The literature search included published and unpublished studies in the English Language from 1953 through August 2014. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, Excerpta Medica Database, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition was conducted using identified keywords and indexed terms across all included databases. A search for grey literature and electronic hand searching of relevant journals was also performed. Two reviewers independently evaluated the

  13. Lichen Secondary Metabolites in Flavocetraria cucullata Exhibit Anti-Cancer Effects on Human Cancer Cells through the Induction of Apoptosis and Suppression of Tumorigenic Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yoon, Somy; Yang, Yi; Lee, Ho-Bin; Oh, Soonok; Jeong, Min-Hye; Kim, Jong-Jin; Yee, Sung-Tae; Crişan, Florin; Moon, Cheol; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2014-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms which produce distinct secondary metabolic products. In the present study, we tested the cytotoxic activity of 17 lichen species against several human cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer activity. We found that among 17 lichens species, F. cucullata exhibited the most potent cytotoxicity in several human cancer cells. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the acetone extract of F. cucullata contains usnic acid, salazinic acid, Squamatic acid, Baeomycesic acid, d-protolichesterinic acid, and lichesterinic acid as subcomponents. MTT assay showed that cancer cell lines were more vulnerable to the cytotoxic effects of the extract than non-cancer cell lines. Furthermore, among the identified subcomponents, usnic acid treatment had a similar cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines but with lower potency than the extract. At a lethal dose, treatment with the extract or with usnic acid greatly increased the apoptotic cell population and specifically activated the apoptotic signaling pathway; however, using sub-lethal doses, extract and usnic acid treatment decreased cancer cell motility and inhibited in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic potentials. In these cells, we observed significantly reduced levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and phosphor-Akt, while phosphor-c-Jun and phosphor-ERK1/2 levels were only marginally affected. Overall, the anti-cancer activity of the extract is more potent than that of usnic acid alone. Taken together, F. cucullata and its subcomponent, usnic acid together with additional component, exert anti-cancer effects on human cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of EMT. PMID:25360754

  14. The direct anti-cancer efficacy of Sapylin on breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guimei; Ge, Tingting; Yang, Xiangju; Li, Xuehua

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of our previous study in which we studied cancer cells under in vitro and in vivo hypoxia conditions, we have now investigated the anti-cancer efficacy of Sapylin on breast cancer cells in mice and human. We used different concentrations of Sapylin and the three kinds of breast cancer cells. We used water-soluble tetrazolium salt cell proliferation test (WST-1) to detect changes in cell proliferation and Fluorescein Iothiocyanate-Propidium Iodide (Anexin V FITC-PI) to detect changes in the rate of apoptosis by flow cytometry. We also used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect possible changes of mRNA expression and used western blot in order to test changes related to protein expression that could lead to cell death. The anti-tumor effect was studied by locally injecting Sapylin into an animal tumor model of breast cancer. We also studied the possible postoperative adverse clinical side effects in 60 female breast cancer patients, stage II-III, aged 25-55 years. The patients underwent a modified, radical operation with smooth incisions which healed well. Sapylin was able to inhibit by 10%-15% the proliferation of all three kinds of breast cancer cells and also to present positive correlation in vivo with some phenomenona which were time and concentration dependent. After applying Sapylin for 48h, the apoptosis rate was significantly increased by 12%-20%. Apoptosis of breast cancer cells may be related to biological effects supporting cells survival, through B-cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2nd) Ki67 mRNA expression descent and Bcl-2 associated X Protein (Bax mRNA) expression. This process ultimately promotes cell death. At the same time this process also showed a significant anti-tumor effect (50%-60%) in a mice model. We found no significant adverse reactions, the patients had no significant pain and the postoperative wound was partially healed. After 5 days, the drainage was well reduced and remained so more in the study group

  15. To Investigate the Therapeutic Efforts of the COX-2 Inhibitor NS-398 as a Single Agent, and in Combination with Vitamin D, in Vitro and in Vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Yi-Fen

    2008-01-01

    .... We have identified a cross-talk between vitamin D and COX-2 inhibitor, two chemopreventative agents for prostate cancer, and conducted series investigations of their anti-prostate cancer effects...

  16. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors as potent novel anti-cancer agents: suppression of hormone-dependent breast cancer by the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor RO 48-8071.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yayun; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Aebi, Johannes D; Mafuvadze, Benford; Cook, Matthew T; Zou, Xiaoqin; Hyder, Salman M

    2014-07-01

    In most human breast cancers, tumor cell proliferation is estrogen dependent. Although hormone-responsive tumors initially respond to anti-estrogen therapies, most of them eventually develop resistance. Our goal was to identify alternative targets that might be regulated to control breast cancer progression. Sulforhodamine B assay was used to measure the viability of cultured human breast cancer cell lines exposed to various inhibitors. Protein expression in whole-cell extracts was determined by Western blotting. BT-474 tumor xenografts in nude mice were used for in vivo studies of tumor progression. RO 48-8071 ([4'-[6-(Allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate]; RO), a small-molecule inhibitor of oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis), potently reduced breast cancer cell viability. In vitro exposure of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human breast cancer cells to pharmacological levels of RO or a dose close to the IC50 for OSC (nM) reduced cell viability. Administration of RO to mice with BT-474 tumor xenografts prevented tumor growth, with no apparent toxicity. RO degraded ERα while concomitantly inducing the anti-proliferative protein ERβ. Two other cholesterol-lowering drugs, Fluvastatin and Simvastatin, were less effective in reducing breast cancer cell viability and were found not to induce ERβ. ERβ inhibition or knockdown prevented RO-dependent loss of cell viability. Importantly, RO had no effect on the viability of normal human mammary cells. RO is a potent inhibitor of hormone-dependent human breast cancer cell proliferation. The anti-tumor properties of RO appear to be in part due to an off-target effect that increases the ratio of ERβ/ERα in breast cancer cells.

  17. Synthesis and in vitro cytotoxicity of novel C-12 substituted-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives as potent anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandanur, Sai Giridhar Sarma; Golakoti, Nageswara Rao; Nanduri, Srinivas

    2015-12-15

    Andrographolide, the major labdane diterpenoid from Andrographis paniculata has been reported to be cytotoxic against various cancer cells in vitro. Our research efforts led to the discovery of novel 12-phenyl thio and 12-aryl amino-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives (III q and III r) with potent cytotoxic activity, 12-benzyl amino-14-deoxy-andrographolide analogues showing broad range of cytotoxic activity against most of the cell lines and 12-alkyl amino-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives being selective to few cell lines (PC-3 and HOP-92), when the selected analogues were evaluated against 60 human cancer cell line panel at National Cancer Institute (N.C.I.), USA. The SAR (structure activity relationship) studies demonstrated potent activity for the compounds containing the following functionalities at C-12: substituted aryl amino/phenyl thio>benzylamine>alkyl amine. The significant cytotoxic activity observed for compounds III q and III r suggest that these could serve as templates for further optimization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design and docking of novel series of hybrid xanthones as anti-cancer agent to target human DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Mohan Nainwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase (topo IIα is a homodimeric protein catalyzes topological vicissitudes by adding or by soothing super coiling transpiration, occurs in human DNA during DNA replication as an outcome chromosome segregation and condensation occurs during meiosis I and recombination. To prevent the cleavage and religation activity we administered novel hybrid substituted Xanthone series of drugs. The toxicity prediction showed outstanding results which impetus to study its anticancer activities by targeting topoisomerase (topo IIα. We developed the homology model of the topoisomerase (topo IIα due to the unavailability of 3D structure in the Protein Data Bank. Structural assessment of the modeled protein and confirmed the quality of the model. The ligands were docked using Autodock4.2 software and binding energy was reported. The compound XM9, XN2, XM7, XLNU and XNS scored lowest binding energy and highest binding affinity. The interaction sites and the hydrogen bond were observed.

  19. A novel peptide enhances therapeutic efficacy of liposomal anti-cancer drugs in mice models of human lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Kuan Chang

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The lack of tumor specificity remains a major drawback for effective chemotherapies and results in dose-limiting toxicities. However, a ligand-mediated drug delivery system should be able to render chemotherapy more specific to tumor cells and less toxic to normal tissues. In this study, we isolated a novel peptide ligand from a phage-displayed peptide library that bound to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines. The targeting phage bound to several NSCLC cell lines but not to normal cells. Both the targeting phage and the synthetic peptide recognized the surgical specimens of NSCLC with a positive rate of 75% (27 of 36 specimens. In severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice bearing NSCLC xenografts, the targeting phage specifically bound to tumor masses. The tumor homing ability of the targeting phage was inhibited by the cognate synthetic peptide, but not by a control or a WTY-mutated peptide. When the targeting peptide was coupled to liposomes carrying doxorubicin or vinorelbine, the therapeutic index of the chemotherapeutic agents and the survival rates of mice with human lung cancer xenografts markedly increased. Furthermore, the targeting liposomes increased drug accumulation in tumor tissues by 5.7-fold compared with free drugs and enhanced cancer cell apoptosis resulting from a higher concentration of bioavailable doxorubicin. The current study suggests that this tumor-specific peptide may be used to create chemotherapies specifically targeting tumor cells in the treatment of NSCLC and to design targeted gene transfer vectors or it may be used one in the diagnosis of this malignancy.

  20. Fascaplysin Exerts Anti-Cancer Effects through the Downregulation of Survivin and HIF-1α and Inhibition of VEGFR2 and TRKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taek-In Oh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fascaplysin has been reported to exert anti-cancer effects by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4; however, the precise mode of action by which fascaplysin suppresses tumor growth is not clear. Here, we found that fascaplysin has stronger anti-cancer effects than other CDK4 inhibitors, including PD0332991 and LY2835219, on lung cancer cells that are wild-type or null for retinoblastoma (RB, indicating that unknown target molecules might be involved in the inhibition of tumor growth by fascaplysin. Fascaplysin treatment significantly decreased tumor angiogenesis and increased cleaved-caspase-3 in xenografted tumor tissues. In addition, survivin and HIF-1α were downregulated in vitro and in vivo by suppressing 4EBP1-p70S6K1 axis-mediated de novo protein synthesis. Kinase screening assays and drug-protein docking simulation studies demonstrated that fascaplysin strongly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 and tropomyosin-related kinase A (TRKA via DFG-out non-competitive inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that fascaplysin inhibits TRKA and VEGFR2 and downregulates survivin and HIF-1α, resulting in suppression of tumor growth. Fascaplysin, therefore, represents a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple types of solid cancer.

  1. In Silico-Based Repositioning of Phosphinothricin as a Novel Technetium-99m Imaging Probe with Potential Anti-Cancer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Sakr

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available l-Phosphinothricin (glufosinate or 2-amino-4-((hydroxy(methyl phosphinyl butyric acid ammonium salt (AHPB, which is a structural analog of glutamate, is a recognized herbicide that acts on weeds through inhibition of glutamine synthetase. Due to the structural similarity between phosphinothricin and some bisphosphonates (BPs, this study focuses on investigating the possibility of repurposing phosphinothricin as a bisphosphonate analogue, particularly in two medicine-related activities: image probing and as an anti-cancer drug. As BP is a competitive inhibitor of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (HFPPS, in silico molecular docking and dynamic simulations studies were established to evaluate the binding and stability of phosphinothricin with HFPPS, while the results showed good binding and stability in the active site of the enzyme in relation to alendronate. For the purpose of inspecting bone-tissue accumulation of phosphinothricin, a technetium (99mTc–phosphinothricin complex was developed and its stability and tissue distribution were scrutinized. The radioactive complex showed rapid, high and sustained uptake into bone tissues. Finally, the cytotoxic activity of phosphinothricin was tested against breast and lung cancer cells, with the results indicating cytotoxic activity in relation to alendronate. All the above results provide support for the use of phosphinothricin as a potential anti-cancer drug and of its technetium complex as an imaging probe.

  2. A synthetic coumarin (4-methyl-7 hydroxy coumarin) has anti-cancer potentials against DMBA-induced skin cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Soumya S; Paul, Saili; Mandal, Sushil K; Banerjee, Antara; Boujedaini, Naoual; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur R

    2009-07-01

    Scopoletin, an alkaloid separated from ethanolic extract of the medicinal plant, Gelsemium sempervirens (Fam: Loganiaceae) has been reported to have anti-cancer potentials. The synthetic coumarin (4-Methyl-7 hydroxy coumarin) derived from resorcinol and ethyl aceto-acetate in presence of concentrated sulphuric acid is structurally close to scopoletin, being a coumarin derivative. Whether this synthetic compound also has anti-cancer potentials has been evaluated in vivo on DMBA (7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene) induced skin cancer in mice by analyzing results of several cytogenetic endpoints, Comet assay, and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Further, expressions of signal proteins like Aryl hydrocarbon receptor , p53, PCNA, Akt, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Bad, Bax, NF-kappaB Apaf, IL-6, Cytochrome-c, Caspase-3 and Caspase-9 were studied by immunoblot analysis along with histology of skin and immuno-histochemical localization of Aryl hydrocarbon receptor and PCNA in DMBA treated mice vis-a-vis carcinogen treated synthetic coumarin fed mice. Feeding of this synthetic coumarin induced positive modulations in expression of all biomarkers in DMBA administered mice, giving clues on its possible signaling pathway(s) - primarily through down-regulation of Aryl hydrocarbon receptor and PCNA and up-regulation of apoptotic proteins like Bax, Bad, Cytochrome c, Apaf, Caspase-3 and Caspase-9, resulting in an appreciable reduction in growth of papilloma in mice. Therefore, this synthetic coumarin shows promise for use in cancer therapy, particularly in skin cancer.

  3. Three-dimensional prostate tumor model based on a hyaluronic acid-alginate hydrogel for evaluation of anti-cancer drug efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yadong; Huang, Boxin; Dong, Yuqin; Wang, Wenlong; Zheng, Xi; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Kun; Du, Zhiyun

    2017-10-01

    In vitro cell-based assays are widely applied to evaluate anti-cancer drug efficacy. However, the conventional approaches are mostly based on two-dimensional (2D) culture systems, making it difficult to recapitulate the in vivo tumor scenario because of spatial limitations. Here, we develop an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) prostate tumor model based on a hyaluronic acid (HA)-alginate hybrid hydrogel to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo anticancer drug evaluations. In situ encapsulation of PCa cells was achieved by mixing HA and alginate aqueous solutions in the presence of cells and then crosslinking with calcium ions. Unlike in 2D culture, cells were found to aggregate into spheroids in a 3D matrix. The expression of epithelial to mesenchyme transition (EMT) biomarkers was found to be largely enhanced, indicating an increased invasion and metastasis potential in the hydrogel matrix. A significant up-regulation of proangiogenic growth factors (IL-8, VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was observed in 3D-cultured PCa cells. The results of anti-cancer drug evaluation suggested a higher drug tolerance within the 3D tumor model compared to conventional 2D-cultured cells. Finally, we found that the drug effect within the in vitro 3D cancer model based on HA-alginate matrix exhibited better predictability for in vivo drug efficacy.

  4. Carbohydrase inhibition and anti-cancerous and free radical scavenging properties along with DNA and protein protection ability of methanolic root extracts of Rumex crispus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwani, Supriya; Singh, Naresh Kumar; Wang, Myeong Hyeon

    2012-10-01

    The study elucidated carbohydrase inhibition, anti-cancerous, free radical scavenging properties and also investigated the DNA and protein protection abilities of methanolic root extract of Rumex crispus (RERC). For this purpose, pulverized roots of Rumex crispus was extracted in methanol (80% and absolute conc.) for 3 hrs for 60℃ and filtered and evaporated with vacuum rotary evaporator. RERC showed high phenolic content (211 µg/GAE equivalent) and strong 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging (IC(50) = 42.86 (absolute methanol) and 36.91 µg/mL (80% methanolic extract)) and reduced power ability. Furthermore, RERC exhibited significant protective ability in H(2)O(2)/Fe(3+)/ascorbic acid-induced protein or DNA damage and percentage inhibition of the HT-29 cell growth rate following 80% methanolic RERC exposure at 400 µg/mL was observed to be highest (10.2% ± 1.03). Moreover, methanolic RERC inhibited α-glucosidase and amylase effectively and significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusively, RERC could be considered as potent carbohydrase inhibitor, anti-cancerous and anti-oxidant.

  5. Anti-Cancerous Potential of Polysaccharide Fractions Extracted from Peony Seed Dreg on Various Human Cancer Cell Lines Via Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Shi, Jun-Jun; Thakur, Kiran; Hu, Fei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Wei, Zhao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    In this study, four homo/heterogenous polysaccharides (HBSS, CHSS, DASS, and CASS) extracted from peony seed dreg with respective molecular weights of 3467, 4677, 229, and 56 kDa were evaluated for anti-cancerous attributes in prostate cancer cells (Pc-3), colon cancer cells (HCT-116), human breast cancer cells (MCF-7), cervical cancer (Hela cells) and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells as control. Among them, CASS and DASS extracted by alkali, consisted of 34.43% Gal , 26.39% Ara , 21.80% Glc and 35.77% Ara , 19.35% Gal , 17.77% Man , respectively. CASS fraction had the most significant inhibitory effects on all the cell lines used whereas HBSS had least effect. The CASS shown remarkable inhibition and cytotoxic effects in Hela cells followed by other cell lines as compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). CASS arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase except MCF-7 cells and increased apoptotic cells percentage varied in different treated cells. CASS down regulated the expression of Cyclin A/B1/D1/E1, CDK-1/2/4/6 and p15/16/21/27 excluding p53. The notable change in expression of proteins (Cytochrome C, Bax, Bcl-2, p-Caspase-3, -8, -9, and PARP) was observed followed by Apaf-1 and Survivin. These findings indicated that CASS has an anti-cancerous potential in the treatment of human cancers which make it a potent candidate in functional foods.

  6. Role of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in the resistance of mouse spermatogenic cells to O6-alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M J; Abdul-Rahman, S; Baker, T G; Rafferty, J A; Margison, G P; Bibby, M C

    2000-07-01

    The O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase inactivator O(6)-benzylguanine was administered to BALB/c mice either alone or before exposure to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea to study the role of the DNA repair protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in the protection of the testis against anti-cancer O(6)-alkylating agents. Exposure of the mice to 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea or O(6)-benzylguanine alone did not produce any marked testicular toxicity at the times studied. Testicular O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase concentrations were assayed between 0 and 240 min after O(6)-benzylguanine treatment and were shown to be > 95% depleted 15 min after treatment with O(6)-benzylguanine and remained at > 95% at all the times assayed. Histological examination, the reduction in testicular mass and the induction of spermatogenic cell apoptosis showed that this depletion significantly potentiated 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea-induced testicular damage after treatment. Major histological damage was apparent 42 days after treatment, demonstrating that the stem spermatogonia were significantly affected by the combination. These results demonstrate that O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase plays a significant role in protecting the spermatogenic cells from damage caused by DNA alkylation and indicate that the observed toxicity may result from damage to stem spermatogonia.

  7. Quercetin as an Emerging Anti-Melanoma Agent: A four-focus area therapeutic development strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoey Harris

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Replacing current refractory treatments for melanoma with new prevention and therapeutic approaches is crucial in order to successfully treat this aggressive cancer form. Melanoma develops from neural crest cells, which express tyrosinase -- a key enzyme in the pigmentation pathway. The tyrosinase enzyme is highly active in melanoma cells and metabolizes polyphenolic compounds; tyrosinase expression thus makes a feasible a target for polyphenol-based therapies. For example, quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone is a highly ubiquitous and well-classified dietary polyphenol found in various fruits, vegetables and other plant products including onions, broccoli, kale, oranges, blueberries, apples, and tea. Quercetin has demonstrated anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity in various cancer cell types. Quercetin is readily metabolized by tyrosinase into various compounds that promote anti-cancer activity; additionally, given that tyrosinase expression increases during tumorigenesis, and its activity is associated with pigmentation changes in both early- and late-stage melanocytic lesions, it suggests that quercetin can be used to target melanoma. In this review we explore the potential of Quercetin as an anti-melanoma agent utilizing and extrapolating on evidence from previous in vitro studies in various human malignant cell lines and propose a four-focus area strategy to develop quercetin as a targeted anti-melanoma compound for use as either a preventative or therapeutic agent. The four areas of focus include utilizing quercetin to i modulate cellular bioreduction potential and associated signaling cascades, ii affect transcription of relevant genes, iii regulate epigenetic processes, and iv develop effective combination therapies and delivery modalities/protocols. In general, quercetin could be used to exploit tyrosinase activity to prevent, and/or treat, melanoma with minimal additional side effects.

  8. Efficacy, safety, quality control, marketing and regulatory guidelines for herbal medicines (phytotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Calixto

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the current advances in knowledge about the safety, efficacy, quality control, marketing and regulatory aspects of botanical medicines. Phytotherapeutic agents are standardized herbal preparations consisting of complex mixtures of one or more plants which contain as active ingredients plant parts or plant material in the crude or processed state. A marked growth in the worldwide phytotherapeutic market has occurred over the last 15 years. For the European and USA markets alone, this will reach about $7 billion and $5 billion per annum, respectively, in 1999, and has thus attracted the interest of most large pharmaceutical companies. Insufficient data exist for most plants to guarantee their quality, efficacy and safety. The idea that herbal drugs are safe and free from side effects is false. Plants contain hundreds of constituents and some of them are very toxic, such as the most cytotoxic anti-cancer plant-derived drugs, digitalis and the pyrrolizidine alkaloids, etc. However, the adverse effects of phytotherapeutic agents are less frequent compared with synthetic drugs, but well-controlled clinical trials have now confirmed that such effects really exist. Several regulatory models for herbal medicines are currently available including prescription drugs, over-the-counter substances, traditional medicines and dietary supplements. Harmonization and improvement in the processes of regulation is needed, and the general tendency is to perpetuate the German Commission E experience, which combines scientific studies and traditional knowledge (monographs. Finally, the trend in the domestication, production and biotechnological studies and genetic improvement of medicinal plants, instead of the use of plants harvested in the wild, will offer great advantages, since it will be possible to obtain uniform and high quality raw materials which are fundamental to the efficacy and safety of herbal drugs.

  9. A polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin in combination with sorafenib synergistically inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic model of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bo [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Sun, Ding [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Sun, Chao; Sun, Yun-Fan; Sun, Hai-Xiang [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Zhu, Qing-Feng [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Pathology, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Yang, Xin-Rong [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Gao, Ya-Bo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Tang, Wei-Guo [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Fan, Jia [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Maitra, Anirban [The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Departments of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); and others

    2015-12-25

    Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of turmeric root (Curcuma longa) has potent anti-cancer properties in many types of tumors with ability to reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. However, widespread clinical application of this agent in cancer and other diseases has been limited due to its poor aqueous solubility. The recent findings of polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (NFC) have shown the potential for circumventing the problem of poor solubility, however evidences for NFC's anti-cancer and reverse multidrug resistance properties are lacking. Here we provide models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer, in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the efficacy of NFC alone and in combination with sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor approved for treatment of HCC. Results showed that NFC not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. Moreover, in combination with sorafenib, NFC induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, NFC and sorafenib synergistically down-regulated the expression of MMP9 via NF-κB/p65 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased the population of CD133-positive HCC cells, which have been reported as cancer initiating cells in HCC. Taken together, NanoCurcumin provides an opportunity to expand the clinical repertoire of this agent. Additional studies utilizing a combination of NanoCurcumin and sorafenib in HCC are needed for further clinical development. - Highlights: • Polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. • In combination with sorafenib, NanoCurcumin induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. • NanoCurcumin and

  10. A polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin in combination with sorafenib synergistically inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic model of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Bo; Sun, Ding; Sun, Chao; Sun, Yun-Fan; Sun, Hai-Xiang; Zhu, Qing-Feng; Yang, Xin-Rong; Gao, Ya-Bo; Tang, Wei-Guo; Fan, Jia; Maitra, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of turmeric root (Curcuma longa) has potent anti-cancer properties in many types of tumors with ability to reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. However, widespread clinical application of this agent in cancer and other diseases has been limited due to its poor aqueous solubility. The recent findings of polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (NFC) have shown the potential for circumventing the problem of poor solubility, however evidences for NFC's anti-cancer and reverse multidrug resistance properties are lacking. Here we provide models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer, in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the efficacy of NFC alone and in combination with sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor approved for treatment of HCC. Results showed that NFC not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. Moreover, in combination with sorafenib, NFC induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, NFC and sorafenib synergistically down-regulated the expression of MMP9 via NF-κB/p65 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased the population of CD133-positive HCC cells, which have been reported as cancer initiating cells in HCC. Taken together, NanoCurcumin provides an opportunity to expand the clinical repertoire of this agent. Additional studies utilizing a combination of NanoCurcumin and sorafenib in HCC are needed for further clinical development. - Highlights: • Polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. • In combination with sorafenib, NanoCurcumin induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. • NanoCurcumin and

  11. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roizin-Towle, L.; Hall, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer dates back to the late 19th century, but the modern era of chemotherapy drugs was ushered in during the 1940's with the development of the polyfunctional alkylating agent. Since then, numerous classes of drugs have evolved and the combined use of antineoplastic agents with other treatment modalities such as radiation or heat, remains a large relatively unexplored area. This approach, combining local hyperthermia with chemotherapy agents affords a measure of targeting and selective toxicity not previously available for drugs. In this paper, the effects of adriamycin, bleomycin and cis-platinum are examined. The adjuvant use of heat may also reverse the resistance of hypoxic cells noted for some chemotherapy agents

  12. Isolation and Characterisation of a Proanthocyanidin With Antioxidative, Antibacterial and Anti-Cancer Properties from Fern Blechnum orientale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, How-Yee; Lim, Yau-Yan; Kim, Kah-Hwi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Blechnum orientale Linn. (Blechnaceae), a fern, is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments, such as skin diseases, stomach pain, urinary bladder complaints, and also as a female contraceptive. Previously, we reported a strong radical scavenging activity, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity against HT29 colon cancer cells by aqueous extract of B. orientale. Objective: In this study, we attempted to isolate and identify the active compound from the aqueous extract of B. orientale. Materials and Methods: Aqueous extract of B. orientale was subjected to repeated MCI gel chromatography, Sephadex-LH-20, Chromatorex C18 and semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography and was characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry spectroscopic methods. Antioxidant activity was determined using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay. Antibacterial assays were conducted using disc diffusion whereas the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined using the broth microdilution assay. Cytotoxicity was assessed using thiazolylblue tetrazoliumbromide. Results: A polymeric proanthocyanidin consisting of 2-12 epicatechin extension units and epigallocathecin terminal units linked at C4-C8 was elucidated. Bioactivity studies showed strong radical scavenging activity (IC50 = 5.6 ± 0.1 µg/mL), antibacterial activity (MIC = 31.3-62.5 µg/mL) against five gram-positive bacteria and selective cytotoxicity against HT29 colon cancer cells (IC50 = 7.0 ± 0.3 µg/mL). Conclusion: According to our results, the proanthocyanidin of B. orientale demonstrated its potential as a natural source of antioxidant with antibacterial and anti-cancer properties. SUMMARY A bioactive proanthocyanidin was isolated from the aqueous extract of medicinal fern Blechnum orientale Linn and the structure was elucidated using NMR and ESI-MS spectral studies

  13. Investigation of the biological and anti-cancer properties of ellagic acid-encapsulated nano-sized metalla-cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubey A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abhishek Dubey,1,* Dae Won Park,2,* Jung Eun Kwon,2 Yong Joon Jeong,2 Taegeun Kim,1 Inhye Kim,3 Se Chan Kang,2 Ki-Whan Chi1 1Department of Chemistry, University of Ulsan, Ulsan, 2Department of Life Science, Gachon University, Seongnam, 3Laboratory of Bio-Resources, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-Do, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Three new large hexanuclear metalla-prisms 9–11 incorporating 1,3,5-tris(pyridin-4-ylethynylbenzene (tpeb 4 and one of the dinuclear arene ruthenium clips [Ru2(p-iPrC6H4Me2(OO∩OO][CF3SO3]2 (OO∩OO =2,5-dioxydo-1,4-benzoquinonato [dobq] 1, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthaquinonato (donq 2, and 6,11-dihydroxy-5,12-naphthacenedionato [dotq] 3, which encapsulate the guest molecule ellagic acid (2,3,7,8-tetrahydroxy-chromeno[5,4,3-cde]chromene-5,10-dione, 5 were prepared. All complexes were isolated as triflate salts in good yields and were fully characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The photophysical properties of these metalla-prisms were also investigated. Compounds 9 and 10 showed potent antioxidant activity, but 10 had the superior ORACPE value (1.30±0.020. Ellagic acid (5 and compound 11 showed weaker activity than that of Trolox. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that the metalla-prism compounds exhibit anticancer properties in vitro. Compound 10 inhibited the growth of all cancer cell lines at micromolar concentrations, with the highest cytotoxicity observed against A549 human lung cancer cells (IC50 =25.9 µM. However, these compounds had a lower anti-cancer activity than that of doxorubicin. In a tumoricidal assay, ellagic acid (5 and compound 10 induced cytotoxicity in tumor cells, while doxorubicin did not. While free ellagic acid had no effect on the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted protein, the encapsulated metalla

  14. Bottom up design of nanoparticles for anti-cancer diapeutics: "put the drug in the cancer's food".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, David; Arslanagic, Amina; Glud, Kasper; Hervella, Pablo; Karimi, Leena; Høeilund-Carlsen, Poul-Flemming; Kinoshita, Koji; Mollenhauer, Jan; Parra, Elisa; Utoft, Anders; Walke, Prasad

    2016-11-01

    The story starts in Basel at CLINAM in 2013, when I asked Pieter about making nanoparticles and he advised me to "try this solvent-exchange method we have developed for making limit sized particles". We are particularly interested in what are "limit size materials" because we want to test the feasibility of an idea: could we design, make, develop, and test the concept for treating metastatic cancer by, "Putting the Drug in the Cancer's Food? "Limit size" is the size of the cancer's food, ?