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Sample records for anti-c antibodies diagnosed

  1. Severe hydrops in the infant of a Rhesus D-positive mother due to anti-c antibodies diagnosed antenatally: a case report

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    Sharma Jai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rhesus haemolytic disease of the newborn is a prototype of maternal isoimmunisation and fetal haemolytic disease. There are other rare blood group antigens capable of causing alloimmunisation and haemolytic disease such as c, C, E, Kell and Duffy. In India, after the confirmation of a newborn's blood group, antibodies are screened only if the mother is Rehsus D-negative negative and the father is Rhesus D-positive. Hydrops in Rhesus positive women are investigated along the lines of non-immune hydrops. Case presentation We report the case of a patient from India where irregular antibodies were requested for an O-positive 26-year-old mother in order to investigate fetal hydrops. Anti-c antibody was revealed and the fetus was treated successfully with compatible O negative and c negative intrauterine blood transfusions. The baby was treated postnatally with double volume exchange transfusion with the same compatible blood, and was discharged 30 days after birth. Conclusion We highlight the importance of conducting irregular antibody screening for women with significant obstetric history and fetal hydrops. This could assist in diagnosing and successfully treating the fetus with appropriate antigen negative cross-matched compatible blood. We note, however, that anti-c immunoglobulin is not yet readily available.

  2. Severe hydrops in the infant of a Rhesus D-positive mother due to anti-c antibodies diagnosed antenatally: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Shilpa; Kumar, Sunesh; Roy, Kallol Kumar; Sharma, Jai Bhagwan; Kachhawa, Garima

    2010-02-18

    Rhesus haemolytic disease of the newborn is a prototype of maternal isoimmunisation and fetal haemolytic disease. There are other rare blood group antigens capable of causing alloimmunisation and haemolytic disease such as c, C, E, Kell and Duffy. In India, after the confirmation of a newborn's blood group, antibodies are screened only if the mother is Rehsus D-negative negative and the father is Rhesus D-positive. Hydrops in Rhesus positive women are investigated along the lines of non-immune hydrops. We report the case of a patient from India where irregular antibodies were requested for an O-positive 26-year-old mother in order to investigate fetal hydrops. Anti-c antibody was revealed and the fetus was treated successfully with compatible O negative and c negative intrauterine blood transfusions. The baby was treated postnatally with double volume exchange transfusion with the same compatible blood, and was discharged 30 days after birth. We highlight the importance of conducting irregular antibody screening for women with significant obstetric history and fetal hydrops. This could assist in diagnosing and successfully treating the fetus with appropriate antigen negative cross-matched compatible blood. We note, however, that anti-c immunoglobulin is not yet readily available.

  3. Prevalence and clinical significance of anti-C1q antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoantibodies against C1q are strongly linked to immune-complex disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although anti-C1q antibodies have received much interest in the recent years, their biological functions remain unclear. Anti-C1q antibodies are strongly associated with lupus nephritis. The aim of this ...

  4. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O; Fang, H; Alarcón, G S; Gordon, C; Merrill, Jt; Fortin, P R; Bruce, I N; Isenberg, D A; Wallace, D J; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Bae, S-C; Hanly, J G; Sanchez-Guerrero, J; Clarke, A E; Aranow, C B; Manzi, S; Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Kalunian, K C; Costner, M I; Werth, V P; Zoma, A; Bernatsky, S; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Khamashta, M A; Jacobsen, S; Buyon, J P; Maddison, P; Dooley, M A; Van Vollenhoven, R F; Ginzler, E; Stoll, T; Peschken, C; Jorizzo, J L; Callen, J P; Lim, S S; Fessler, B J; Inanc, M; Kamen, D L; Rahman, A; Steinsson, K; Franks, A G; Sigler, L; Hameed, S; Pham, N; Brey, R; Weisman, M H; McGwin, G; Magder, L S; Petri, M

    2015-01-01

    Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. Information and blood samples were obtained in a cross-sectional study from patients with SLE (n = 308) and other rheumatologic diseases (n = 389) from 25 clinical sites (84% female, 68% Caucasian, 17% African descent, 8% Asian, 7% other). IgG anti-C1q against the collagen-like region was measured by ELISA. Prevalence of anti-C1q was 28% (86/308) in patients with SLE and 13% (49/389) in controls (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.8-4, p lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Hemolytic disease of the newborn- anti c antibody induced hemolysis.

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    Murki, Srinivas; Kandraju, Hemasree; Devi, Surekha A

    2012-02-01

    Hemolytic disease in the newborn, as a cause of early jaundice, is not uncommon. This is mostly due to Rh (D), ABO incompatibility and rarely due to other minor blood group incompatibility. The authors report two cases of Rh anti c isoimmunization presenting as significant early neonatal jaundice within the 20 h of life. Both the babies were treated with intensive phototherapy. One baby underwent exchange transfusion and the other required packed cell transfusion for anemia.

  6. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G

    2015-01-01

    : Prevalence of anti-C1q was 28% (86/308) in patients with SLE and 13% (49/389) in controls (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.8-4, p 4, p = 0.015), anti-dsDNA (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.9-6.1, p ... associated with renal involvement (OR = 14.9, 95% CI: 5.8-38.4, p 

  7. Adjuvant treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves outcome of experimental pneumococcal meningitis: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Kasanmoentalib, E Soemirien; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Morgan, B Paul; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-08-15

    We compared adjunctive treatment with placebo, dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, and the combination of dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. In this prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized trial, 96 mice were infected intracisternally with 10(7) CFU/ml Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, treated with intraperitoneal ceftriaxone at 20 h, and randomly assigned to intraperitoneal adjunctive treatment with placebo (saline), dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, or dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies. The primary outcome was survival during a 72-h observational period that was analyzed with the log-rank test. Secondary outcome was clinical severity, scored on a validated scale using a linear mixed model. Mortality rates were 16 of 16 mice (100%) in the placebo group, 12 of 15 mice (80%) in the dexamethasone group, 25 of 31 mice (80%) in the anti-C5 antibody group, and 18 of 30 mice (60%) in the dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibody group (Fisher's exact test for overall difference, P = .012). Mortality of mice treated with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies was lower compared to the anti-C5 antibody-treated mice (log-rank P = .039) and dexamethasone-treated mice (log-rank P = .040). Clinical severity scores for the dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibody-treated mice increased more slowly (0.199 points/h) as compared to the anti-C5 antibody-treated mice (0.243 points/h, P = .009) and dexamethasone-treated mice (0.249 points/h, P = .012). Modeling of severity data suggested an additive effect of dexamethasone and anti-C5 antibodies. Adjunctive treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves survival in severe experimental meningitis caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 3, posing an important new treatment strategy for patients with pneumococcal meningitis.

  8. Adjuvant treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves outcome of experimental pneumococcal meningitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasanmoentalib, E. Soemirien; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Morgan, B. Paul; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    We compared adjunctive treatment with placebo, dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, and the combination of dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. In this prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized trial, 96 mice were infected intracisternally with 10(7)

  9. Association between the presence of anti-C1q antibodies and active nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Gómez, Graciela; Khoury, Marina; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena; Álvarez, Clarisa; Sarano, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A retrospective analysis was carried out on a group of 24 patients with SLE to evaluate whether the presence of anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q) is related to renal involvement and to explore the behaviour of anti-C1q with respect to LN during a four-year follow-up period. A first serum sample stored at the serum bank, taken not more than three years after SLE diagnosis and one serum sample per year for the subsequent four years were used to detect anti-C1q. Lupus clinical manifestations and serological markers of activity corresponding to the date of each serum sample selected were collected from medical records. In the first serum sample, anti-C1q were found in 8 active SLE. LN was confirmed by histology in 5/8 patients who were positive for anti-C1q and in 1/16 patients who were negative for these autoantibodies (p = 0.0069). Three patients (3/8) had anti-C1q without renal involvement but with lupus skin manifestation. Anti-C1q levels decreased in 3/5 patients with LN who responded to treatment and remained higher in 2/5 patients who needed a new renal biopsy which showed severe renal disease. The 15 patients without severe kidney disease and anti-C1q negative at diagnosis did not develop LN and anti-C1q remained negative in the 4 years of follow up. Anti-C1q were found in SLE patients with active renal involvement or with lupus skin disease. The absence of anti-C1q seemed to be linked to low probabilities of renal involvement.

  10. Association between the presence of anti-c1q antibodies and active nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    María De Los Ángeles Gargiulo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. A retrospective analysis was carried out on a group of 24 patients with SLE to evaluate whether the presence of anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q is related to renal involvement and to explore the behaviour of anti-C1q with respect to LN during a four-year follow-up period. A first serum sample stored at the serum bank, taken not more than three years after SLE diagnosis and one serum sample per year for the subsequent four years were used to detect anti-C1q. Lupus clinical manifestations and serological markers of activity corresponding to the date of each serum sample selected were collected from medical records. In the first serum sample, anti-C1q were found in 8 active SLE. LN was confirmed by histology in 5/8 patients who were positive for anti-C1q and in 1/16 patients who were negative for these autoantibodies (p = 0.0069. Three patients (3/8 had anti-C1q without renal involvement but with lupus skin manifestation. Anti-C1q levels decreased in 3/5 patients with LN who responded to treatment and remained higher in 2/5 patients who needed a new renal biopsy which showed severe renal disease. The 15 patients without severe kidney disease and anti-C1q negative at diagnosis did not develop LN and anti-C1q remained negative in the 4 years of follow up. Anti-C1q were found in SLE patients with active renal involvement or with lupus skin disease. The absence of anti-C1q seemed to be linked to low probabilities of renal involvement.

  11. Correlation of Serum Soluble Interleukin-7 Receptor and Anti-C1q Antibody in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Shuhong Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Serum concentrations of soluble interleukin-7 receptor (sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibody have recently been identified as unique serological markers for lupus nephritis (LN in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In this study, we evaluated the correlation of serum sIL-7R and anti-C1q in SLE patients. Methods. Sera from 134 patients with SLE and 84 healthy cohorts were tested for levels of sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies in terms of ELISA. Correlations of the sIL-7R and anti-C1q autoantibodies were evaluated. Results. The serum concentrations of sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies were significantly higher in SLE patients and LN patients in comparison with healthy individuals/controls and SLE patients with non-LN, respectively. In addition, both sIL-7R and anti-C1q concentrations were found to significantly correlate with the SLE disease activity as evaluated by SLEDAI scores. Interestingly, the serum sIL-7R concentration was strongly correlated with the level of anti-C1q antibodies (r=0.2871, p=0.0008 but not statistically correlated with other serological markers, including the anti-dsDNA and complements C3 and C4 concentrations in SLE patients. Conclusion. Both serum sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies were strongly associated with disease activity and LN in SLE patients, suggesting that they may be reliable serological markers for identification of SLE patients with active diseases and LN.

  12. ELISA to measure neutralizing capacity of anti-C1-inhibitor antibodies in plasma of angioedema patients.

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    Engel, Ruchira; Rensink, Irma; Roem, Dorina; Brouwer, Mieke; Kalei, Asma; Perry, Dawn; Zeerleder, Sacha; Wouters, Diana; Hamann, Dörte

    2015-11-01

    Neutralizing autoantibodies (NAbs) against plasma serpin C1-inhibitor (C1-inh) are implicated in the rare disorder, acquired angioedema (AAE). There is insufficient understanding of the process of antibody formation and its correlation with disease progression and severity. We have developed an ELISA for detecting neutralizing capacity of anti-C1-inh positive plasma samples that can be used to study changes in NAb repertoire in patient plasma over the course of disease. The ELISA is based on the specific interaction of active C1-inh with its target protease C1s. Decrease in the amount of C1s bound to immobilized C1-inh in the presence of test samples is proportional to the neutralizing capacity of the sample. Assay specificity, intra- and inter-assay variation and assay cut-off are determined using anti-C1-inh antibodies. Assay capability is demonstrated using plasma samples from AAE patients. The assay is specific to a neutralizing anti-C1-inh antibody and shows no interference by a non-neutralizing anti-C1-inh antibody or by the plasma matrix. Intra-assay and inter-assay variations are determined as 17 and 18% respectively. Neutralizing capacity of antibody positive AAE patient plasma samples (n=16) with IgG or IgM type antibodies is readily determined. All samples show positive neutralizing capacity. We have developed a robust, specific and semi-quantitative assay to detect the neutralizing capacity of plasma samples containing anti-C1-inh antibodies. This assay can be an important tool for the study of clinical implications of anti-C1-inh NAbs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies as disease activity markers in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Živković Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In spite of the growing number of reports on the study of anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies, there are still controversies on their significance as disease activity markers in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and their use in everyday clinical practice. Objective. Our aim was to assess the presence of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies in SLE patients, as well as to establish their sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and their correlation with SLE and lupus nephritis clinical activity. Methods. The study enrolled 85 patients aged 45.3±9.7 years on the average, with SLE of average duration 10.37±7.99 years, hospitalized at the Institute „Niška Banja“ during 2011, and 30 healthy individuals as controls. Disease activity was assessed using Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI. In all examinees the levels of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies were measured using the ELISA method with Alegria Test Strips Orgentec (Germany. Results. Patients with active lupus nephritis had a higher presence of anti-C1q antibodies and higher co-positivity of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome, and anti-C1q antibodies compared to those with inactive lupus nephritis (77.77% vs. 21.74%; p<0.01. SLE patients with SLEDAI ≥11 had a higher presence of antinucleosome (93.75% vs. 64.15%; p<0.01 and anti-C1q antibodies (46.87% vs. 22.64%; p<0.05, as well as a higher mean level of anti-nucleosome antibodies (107.79±83.46 U/ml vs. 57.81±63.15 U/ml; p<0.05, compared to those with SLEDAI of 0-10. There was a positive correlation between the SLEDAI and the level of anti-dsDNA (r=0.290; p<0.01, anti-nucleosome (r=0.443; p<0.001, and anti-C1q antibodies (r=0.382; p<0.001. Only anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated correlation with proteinuria (r=0.445; p<0.001. Conclusion. Anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated association with SLE and lupus nephritis

  14. Targeted Delivery of Neutralizing Anti-C5 Antibody to Renal Endothelium Prevents Complement-Dependent Tissue Damage

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    Paolo Durigutto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Complement activation is largely implicated in the pathogenesis of several clinical conditions and its therapeutic neutralization has proven effective in preventing tissue and organ damage. A problem that still needs to be solved in the therapeutic control of complement-mediated diseases is how to avoid side effects associated with chronic neutralization of the complement system, in particular, the increased risk of infections. We addressed this issue developing a strategy based on the preferential delivery of a C5 complement inhibitor to the organ involved in the pathologic process. To this end, we generated Ergidina, a neutralizing recombinant anti-C5 human antibody coupled with a cyclic-RGD peptide, with a distinctive homing property for ischemic endothelial cells and effective in controlling tissue damage in a rat model of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI. As a result of its preferential localization on renal endothelium, the molecule induced complete inhibition of complement activation at tissue level, and local protection from complement-mediated tissue damage without affecting circulating C5. The ex vivo binding of Ergidina to surgically removed kidney exposed to cold ischemia supports its therapeutic use to prevent posttransplant IRI leading to delay of graft function. Moreover, the finding that the ex vivo binding of Ergidina was not restricted to the kidney, but was also seen on ischemic heart, suggests that this RGD-targeted anti-C5 antibody may represent a useful tool to treat organs prior to transplantation. Based on this evidence, we propose preliminary data showing that Ergidina is a novel targeted drug to prevent complement activation on the endothelium of ischemic kidney.

  15. Antitumor activity of anti-C-ERC/mesothelin monoclonal antibody in vivo.

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    Inami, Koichi; Abe, Masaaki; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Masahiro; Segawa, Tatsuya; Suyama, Masafumi; Watanabe, Sumio; Hino, Okio

    2010-04-01

    Mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer often caused by chronic asbestos exposure, and its prognosis is very poor despite the therapies currently used. Due to the long latency period between asbestos exposure and tumor development, the worldwide incidence will increase substantially in the next decades. Thus, novel effective therapies are warranted to improve the prognosis. The ERC/mesothelin gene (MSLN) is expressed in wide variety of human cancers, including mesotheliomas, and encodes a precursor protein cleaved by proteases to generate C-ERC/mesothelin and N-ERC/mesothelin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of C-ERC/mesothelin-specific mouse monoclonal antibody, 22A31, against tumors derived from a human mesothelioma cell line, ACC-MESO-4, in a xenograft experimental model using female BALB/c athymic nude mice. Treatment with 22A31 did not inhibit cell proliferation of ACC-MESO-4 in vitro; however, therapeutic treatment with 22A31 drastically inhibited tumor growth in vivo. 22A31 induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by natural killer (NK) cells, but not macrophages, in vitro. Consistently, the F(ab')(2) fragment of 22A31 did not inhibit tumor growth in vivo, nor did it induce antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Moreover, NK cell depletion diminished the antitumor effect of 22A31. Thus, 22A31 induced NK cell-mediated ADCC and exerted antitumor activity in vivo. 22A31 could have potential as a therapeutic tool to treat C-ERC/mesothelin-expressing cancers including mesothelioma.

  16. Isolation and characterization of anti c-met single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies.

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    Qamsari, Elmira Safaie; Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Bagheri, Salman; Riazi-Rad, Farhad; Younesi, Vahid; Abolhassani, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Sepideh Safaei; Baradaran, Behzad; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2017-12-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Met is the cell surface receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) involved in invasive growth programs during embryogenesis and tumorgenesis. There is compelling evidence suggesting important roles for c-Met in colorectal cancer proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, and survival. Hence, a molecular inhibitor of an extracellular domain of c-Met receptor that blocks c-Met-cell surface interactions could be of great thera-peutic importance. In an attempt to develop molecular inhibitors of c-Met, single chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display libraries Tomlinson I + J against a specific synthetic oligopeptide from the extracellular domain of c-Met receptor were screened; selected scFv were then characterized using various immune techniques. Three c-Met specific scFv (ES1, ES2, and ES3) were selected following five rounds of panning procedures. The scFv showed specific binding to c-Met receptor, and significantly inhibited proliferation responses of a human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT-116). Moreover, anti- apoptotic effects of selected scFv antibodies on the HCT-116 cell line were also evaluated using Annexin V/PI assays. The results demonstrated rates of apoptotic cell death of 46.0, 25.5, and 37.8% among these cells were induced by use of ES1, ES2, and ES3, respectively. The results demonstrated ability to successfully isolate/char-acterize specific c-Met scFv that could ultimately have a great therapeutic potential in immuno-therapies against (colorectal) cancers.

  17. An acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to the "anti-c" rhesus antibody: A case report emphasizing the role of transfusion medicine

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    Deepti Sachan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhesus (Rh mediated hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR are usually immunoglobulin G mediated and delayed onset. Rh antibodies being the cause of acute HTR (AHTR and intravascular hemolysis are still under debate. We report here a case of a 53-year-old male who developed AHTR due to "anti-c" antibodies within 3 h of blood transfusion, precipitating fatal acute liver failure in a patient with hepatitis C related chronic liver disease. This case emphasizes the need of inclusion of antibody screening in routine pretransfusion testing as well as a critical role of transfusion medicine specialists for early diagnosis and minimizing transfusion-related morbidity and mortality.

  18. The binding affinity of a soluble TCR-Fc fusion protein is significantly improved by crosslinkage with an anti-C{beta} antibody

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    Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Kobayashi, Eiji [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Jin, Aishun [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150081 (China); Kishi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: immkishi@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Muraguchi, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel soluble TCR composed of TCR V and C regions with Ig Fc region is generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody bound to a p/MHC tetramer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding affinity of TCR-Fc was markedly increased by binding with anti-C{beta} antibody. -- Abstract: The identification and cloning of tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) and the production of the soluble form of the TCR (sTCR) contributed to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for cancer. Recently, several groups have reported the development of technologies for the production of sTCRs. The native sTCR has a very low binding affinity for the antigenic peptide/MHC (p/MHC) complex. In this study, we established a technology to produce high affinity, functional sTCRs. We generated a novel sTCR-Fc fusion protein composed of the TCR V and C regions of the TCR linked to the immunoglobulin (Ig) Fc region. A Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the fusion protein was approximately 60 kDa under reducing conditions and approximately 100-200 kDa under non-reducing conditions. ELISAs using various antibodies showed that the structure of each domain of the TCR-Fc protein was intact. The TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody effectively bound to a p/MHC tetramer. An SPR analysis showed that the TCR-Fc protein had a low binding affinity (KD; 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M) to the p/MHC monomer. Interestingly, when the TCR-Fc protein was pre-incubated with an anti-C{beta} antibody, its binding affinity for p/MHC increased by 5-fold (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M). We demonstrated a novel method for constructing a functional soluble TCR using the Ig Fc region and showed that the binding affinity of the functional sTCR-Fc was markedly increased by an anti-C{beta} antibody, which is probably due to the stabilization of the V

  19. Anti-C.Diff Pill

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    Kumar, Anand [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-30

    The anti- C.diff pill is being developed for patients who are at high risk for Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes diarrhea and serious intestinal conditions like colitis. C-diff is deadly, killing over 30,000 people a year in the United States and costing an average of $42,000 per treatment. The most common treatment is a fecal transplant (FT). The anti- C.diff replaces the invasive and messy FT practice with a pill.

  20. Anti-C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Stojan, G; Petri, M

    2016-07-01

    C1q is the first component of the classical complement pathway. Both clinically validated in-house ELISA assays as well as commercial ELISA kits are used for detection of anti-C1q antibodies. Anti-C1q autoantibodies can be detected in a wide range of autoimmune diseases and are highly sensitive for hypocomplementemic uticarial vasculitis. In SLE, anti-C1q are strongly associated with proliferative lupus nephritis, and their absence carries a negative predictive value for development of lupus nephritis of close to 100%. Anti-C1q in combination with anti-dsDNA and low complement has the strongest serological association with renal involvement. The anti-C1q titers correlate with global disease activity scores in patients with renal involvement, and higher titers seem to precede renal flares. After the successful treatment of a renal flare, anti-C1q has the tendency to decrease or even become undetectable. The main obstacle to the inclusion of anti-C1q in the classification criteria and clinical management of SLE is the lack of standardized laboratory assays. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Short article: Mortality and differential diagnoses of villous atrophy without coeliac antibodies.

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    Schiepatti, Annalisa; Biagi, Federico; Fraternale, Giacomo; Vattiato, Claudia; Balduzzi, Davide; Agazzi, Simona; Alpini, Claudia; Klersy, Catherine; Corazza, Gino R

    2017-05-01

    Villous atrophy (VA) of the small bowel is mainly related to coeliac disease (CD), whose diagnosis is made on the basis of positive endomysial/tissue transglutaminase antibodies while on a gluten-containing diet in the vast majority of patients. However, VA can also occur in other conditions whose epidemiology is little known. Our aim was to study the epidemiology and clinical features of these rare enteropathies. Clinical and laboratory data of all the patients with VA directly diagnosed in our centre in the last 15 years were collected and statistically analysed. Between September 1999 and June 2015, 274 patients were diagnosed with VA. A total of 260 patients were also positive to coeliac antibodies; the other 14 had VA, but no IgA endomysial antibodies: five had common variable immunodeficiency, three had dermatitis herpetiformis, two had IgA deficiency associated with CD, one had abdominal lymphoma, one had unclassified sprue, one had olmesartan-associated enteropathy and one had seronegative CD. Mortality was 6.0 deaths per 100 person years (95% confidence interval: 2.2-16) in patients with VA but negative coeliac antibodies, whereas only 0.2 deaths per 100 person years (95% confidence interval: 0.1-0.6) occurred in coeliac patients. Patients with VA and negative endomysial antibodies are rare. However, these forms of VA identify specific causes that can be diagnosed. These patients are affected by a very high mortality.

  2. Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT and paraneoplastic antibodies in diagnosing cancer in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

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    Vatankulu, B; Yilmaz Aksoy, S; Asa, S; Sager, S; Sayman, H B; Halac, M; Sonmezoglu, K

    2016-01-01

    There is still no consensus about whether to perform PET/CT to detect carcinoma in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) in patients with or without antibodies. The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT and antibodies in patients with PNS. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with clinically suspected PNS between 2008 and 2013. The association between histopathological findings, paraneoplastic antibodies, and PET/CT findings were evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of underlying malignancy were calculated for PET/CT and paraneoplastic antibodies. A total of 42 patients were analyzed. Of these 42 patients, 32 (75%) had a classical PNS, 6 (14%) had positive PET/CT findings, and 34 were tested for the presence of antibodies (anti-Hu Ab, anti-Yo Ab, and anti-Ri Ab). Twenty one of 34 patients had positive antibodies. Of the 6 patients with positive PET/CT findings, 6 had positive histopathological results. Among 21 patients with positive biomarkers, carcinoma was confirmed only in 5 patients. One patient with negative antibodies, but positive PET/CT findings, was diagnosed with a tumor. Gastric carcinoma was detected in 1 patient with negative PET/CT findings and antibodies during follow-up. Based on the results, PET/CT was found to have 85.71% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive and 97.22% negative predictive values in the detection of tumors. PET/CT has a certain diagnostic accuracy for detecting underlying malignancy in patients with PNS, regardless of the presence of paraneoplastic antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. Validity of antibodies in lymphocyte supernatant in diagnosing tuberculosis in severely malnourished children presenting with pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB in young children can be challenging, especially in severely malnourished children. There is a critical need for improved diagnostics for children. Thus, we sought to evaluate the performance of a technique that measures antibodies in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS for the diagnosis of TB in severely malnourished children presenting with suspected pneumonia.Children less than 5 years with severe acute malnutrition and radiological features of pneumonia admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, were enrolled consecutively following informed written consent. In addition to clinical and radiological assessment, samples taken for TB diagnosis included gastric lavage fluid and induced sputum for microbiological confirmation. ALS was measured from venous blood, and results were evaluated in children classified as "confirmed", "non-confirmed TB" or "not TB".Among 224 children who had ALS analysis, 12 (5.4% children had microbiologically "confirmed TB", a further 41 (18% had clinically diagnosed "non-confirmed TB" and the remaining 168 (75% were considered not to have TB. ALS was positive in 89 (40% and negative in 85 (39% of children, with a large number (47 or 21% reported as "borderline". These proportions were similar between the three diagnostic groups. The sensitivity and specificity of ALS when comparing "Confirmed TB" to "Not TB" was only 67% (95% CI: 31-91% and 51% (95% CI: 42-60%, respectively.Our data suggest that ALS is not sufficiently accurate to improve the diagnosis of TB in children with severe malnutrition.

  4. Auto-antibodies and their association with clinical findings in women diagnosed with microscopic colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Roth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microscopic colitis (MC is a disease manifested by diarrhoea and is divided into collagenous and lymphocytic colitis. The aetiology is unknown, but auto-immunity is suggested. Auto-antibodies have been only rarely examined in this entity. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of auto-antibodies, and to examine associations between the presence of antibodies and clinical findings. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Women with MC verified by biopsy and younger than 73 years, at any Department of Gastroenterology, in the district of Skåne, between 2002 and 2010 were invited to participate in this study. The patients were asked to complete both a questionnaire describing their medical history and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS. Blood samples were collected. Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA, anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA, and antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD, islet antigens-like insulin 2 (anti-IA2, thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, and thyrotropin receptor (TRAK were analysed. Of 240 women identified, 133 were finally included in the study, median age 63 (59-67 years. Apart from the MC diagnosis, 52% also suffered from irritable bowel syndrome, 31% from hypertension and 31% from allergy. The prevalence of ANA (14%, ASCA IgG (13%, and anti-TPO antibodies (14% for these patients was slightly higher than for the general population, and were found together with other concomitant diseases. Patients had more of all gastrointestinal symptoms compared with norm values, irrespective of antibody expression. CONCLUSIONS: Women with MC have a slightly increased prevalence of some auto-antibodies. These antibodies are not associated with symptoms, but are expressed in patients with concomitant diseases, obscuring the pathophysiology and clinical picture of MC.

  5. Case report: Severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-C+G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernman, Riina; Stefanovic, Vedran; Korhonen, Anu; Haimila, Katri; Sareneva, Inna; Sulin, Kati; Kuosmanen, Malla; Sainio, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anti-G is commonly present with anti-D and/or anti-C and can confuse serological investigations. in general, anti-G is not considered a likely cause of severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), but it is important to differentiate it from anti-D in women who should be administered anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis. We report one woman with three pregnancies severely affected by anti-C+G requiring intrauterine treatment and a review of the literature. In our case, the identification of the correct antibody was delayed because the differentiation of anti-C+G and anti-D+C was not considered important during pregnancy since the father was D-. In addition, anti-C+G and anti-G titer levels were not found to be reliable as is generally considered in Rh immunization. Severe HDFN occurred at a maternal anti-C+G antibody titer of S and anti-G titer of 1 in comparison with the critical titer level of 16 or more in our laboratory. close collaboration between the immunohematology laboratory and the obstetric unit is essential. In previously affected families, early assessment for fetal anemia is required even when titers are low.

  6. What is it really? Anti-G or Anti-D plus Anti-C: Clinical Significance in Antenatal Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Soumya; Shastry, Shamee; Murugesan, M; B, Poornima Baliga; Shastry, Shamee

    2017-06-01

    G antigen of Rh blood group system is present either along with D and/or C positive red cells. Hence, [serologically anti-G presents with the similar picture as that of multiple antibodies (anti-D + anti-C). Differentiating them is important as anti-D + anti-C causes severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn than anti-G. In pregnancies with anti-G alone, alloimmunization due to D antigen could be prevented by prophylactic administration of RhIg. Differentiating between anti-D + C from anti-G in alloimmunized pregnant mothers becomes essential. Sera from antenatal mothers, whose antibody identification by 11-cell panel gave a pattern for anti-D and anti-C were selected. Extended phenotyping for Rh system was performed for these antenatal cases. Differential adsorption and elution testing using R 2 R 2 cells initially and r'r cells subsequently were performed to distinguish anit-G from anti-D + anti-C. Antibody titers of these antibodies were determined and their clinical outcome in the newborn was followed. A pattern suggestive of anti D and anti C on antibody identification were observed in six antenatal cases. On further workup 50 % of them confirmed to have anti G. Antibody titers of anti-G and anti-C were lower than that of Anti-D. All newborns were sensitized in vivo and the antibody specificity in them were confirmed with elution studies. The mothers who had only anti-G were subsequently administered with an appropriate dose of RhIg.Differential adsorption and elution studies help in identifying anti-G and distinguishing it from anti-D plus anti-C, thus helping in better patient management.

  7. Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Anti-c Isoimmunization: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, C S; Suchitha, S; Manjunath, G V; Murthy, Srinivas

    2013-09-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group is one of the most complex blood groups known in humans. It has remained of primary importance in obstetrics, being the main cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Anti-D causes the most severe form of HDN. Other Rh allo antibodies that are capable of causing severe HDN include anti-c, which clinically is the most important Rh antigen after the D antigen. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh anti-c in an infant of an Rh positive mother.

  8. Anti-c-MET Nanobody - a new potential drug in multiple myeloma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slørdahl, Tobias Schmidt; Denayer, Tinneke; Moen, Siv Helen; Standal, Therese; Børset, Magne; Ververken, Cedric; Rø, Torstein Baade

    2013-11-01

    c-MET is the tyrosine kinase receptor of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). HGF-c-MET signaling is involved in many human malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, multiple agents have been developed directed to interfere at different levels in HGF-c-MET signaling pathway. Nanobodies are therapeutic proteins based on the smallest functional fragments of heavy-chain-only antibodies. In this study, we wanted to determine the anticancer effect of a novel anti-c-MET Nanobody in MM. We examined the effects of an anti-c-MET Nanobody on thymidine incorporation, migration, adhesion of MM cells, and osteoblastogenesis in vitro. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of the Nanobody on HGF-dependent c-MET signaling by Western blotting. We show that the anti-c-MET Nanobody effectively inhibited thymidine incorporation of ANBL-6 MM cells via inhibition of an HGF autocrine growth loop and thymidine incorporation in INA-6 MM cells induced by exogenous HGF. HGF-induced migration and adhesion of INA-6 were completely and specifically blocked by the Nanobody. Furthermore, the Nanobody abolished the inhibiting effect of HGF on bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced alkaline phosphatase activity and the mineralization of human mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, we show that the Nanobody reduced phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in c-MET, MAPK, and Akt. We also compared the Nanobody with anti-c-MET monoclonal antibodies and revealed the similar or better effect. The anti-c-MET Nanobody inhibited MM cell migration, thymidine incorporation, and adhesion, and blocked the HGF-mediated inhibition of osteoblastogenesis. The anti-c-MET Nanobody might represent a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of MM and other cancers driven by HGF-c-MET signaling. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prognostic variables for high titres in a fluorescent antibody test to diagnose tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doveren, R.F.; Goudswaard, J.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Bins, M.C.; Belzen, C.

    2005-01-01

    SETTING: The four hospitals and a tuberculosis clinic in the province of Zeeland, The Netherlands. OBJECTIVE: To assess the usefulness of PPD antibody measurement in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients admitted to hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients presenting with active

  10. Antibodies to a strain-specific citrullinated Epstein-Barr virus peptide diagnoses rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Holm, Bettina Eide; Heiden, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are crucial for the serological diagnosis of RA, where Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been suggested to be an environmental agent in triggering the onset of the disease. This study aimed...

  11. Anti-calreticulin antibodies and calreticulin in sera of patients diagnosed with dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sánchez, Daniel; Gregor, P.; Čurila, K.; Hoffmanová, I.; Hábová, Věra; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 8 (2016), s. 554-562 ISSN 0891-6934 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14608S; GA TA ČR TA04010762 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Anti-calreticulin antibodies * calreticulin * dilated cardiomyopathy Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.629, year: 2016

  12. Thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin auto-antibodies in patients with newly diagnosed overt hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, A.; Laurberg, P.; Knudsen, N.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Thyroid autoimmunity is a major cause for hypothyroidism. We describe thyroid auto-antibodies in patients with various nosological subtypes of hypothyroidism identified in a population study. Design: Population-based follow-up study identifying all new cases of hypothyroidism in an open...

  13. Anti-Nuclear antibodies: Current concepts and future direction for diagnosing connective tissue disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gautam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of antinuclear antibodies has been used for the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases for more than fifty years. Indirect immunofluorescence on human epithelial (HEp-2 cells is considered the gold standard screening method for the detection of antinuclear autoantibodies. As the demand of ANA testing increased, the need for automation and standardization has also come forth. A high level of false positive and false negative cases is seen in various populations making it difficult to take clinical decisions. Newer technologies were introduced for the antibody detection to ensure high sensitivity and specificity. This article intends to provide an overview of the concepts on ANA testing, the different diagnostic methods available, the various patterns and clinical utility, the clinical guidelines to be followed, the drawbacks and what lies ahead in the future of ANA testing.Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2015 Vol. 5, 766-773

  14. Thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin auto-antibodies in patients with newly diagnosed overt hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, A.; Laurberg, P.; Knudsen, N.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Thyroid autoimmunity is a major cause for hypothyroidism. We describe thyroid auto-antibodies in patients with various nosological subtypes of hypothyroidism identified in a population study. Design: Population-based follow-up study identifying all new cases of hypothyroidism in an open...... cohort. Methods: We established a monitoring system, and identified all new cases with primary overt hypothyroidism (n = 685) in a 4 year period in a well-defined population cohort (2,027,208 person-years of observation). Patients were sub-classified into: spontaneous hypothyroidism, presumably...... of autoimmune origin ( n 578); non-spontaneous hypothyroidism ( associated with medication, delivery, neck-irradiation or subacute thyroiditis, n 97); and congenital hypothyroidism ( n 10). A total of 186 adult patients (61% of those invited) underwent thyroid ultrasonography and measurements of antibodies...

  15. Anti-Nuclear antibodies: Current concepts and future direction for diagnosing connective tissue disease

    OpenAIRE

    K Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Identification of antinuclear antibodies has been used for the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases for more than fifty years. Indirect immunofluorescence on human epithelial (HEp-2) cells is considered the gold standard screening method for the detection of antinuclear autoantibodies. As the demand of ANA testing increased, the need for automation and standardization has also come forth. A high level of false positive and false negative cases is seen in various populations making it diffi...

  16. Antibody response to insulin in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, H; Mersebach, H; Kanc, K; Ludvigsson, J

    2008-07-01

    To compare levels of insulin antibodies in children and adolescents after initiation of insulin therapy using either insulin aspart (IAsp) or human insulin (HI) in combination with Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin, and to investigate the relationships between insulin antibodies and HbA(1c) and insulin dose. IAsp-specific antibodies (IAsp-Ab) and antibodies cross-reacting with HI and IAsp (HI-cross-Ab) were analysed by radioimmunoassay at diagnosis of diabetes and every 3-6 months for 30 months. Seventy-two patients (HI = 30, IAsp = 42) with Type 1 diabetes, aged 2-17 years were included. Data on HbA(1c), insulin dose and serious adverse events (SAEs) were collected retrospectively. IAsp-Ab levels remained low throughout the study. After 9 months, the level of HI-cross-Ab increased [mean (SD) HI, 48.8% (21.53); IAsp, 40.2% (17.92)] and remained elevated. Repeated measurement analysis of HI-cross-Ab levels showed no significant difference between treatments (P = 0.16). HI-cross-Ab were significantly associated with total insulin dose (U/kg) (P = 0.001) and time (P IAsp 9.6 +/- 1.62%); HbA(1c) then decreased and stabilized to about 6.0% in both groups. Few SAEs were reported, the majority being hypoglycaemic episodes. Treatment with IAsp and with HI was associated with an increase in HI-cross-Ab in insulin-naive children, but this did not influence treatment efficacy or safety. These results support the safe use of IAsp in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes.

  17. Evaluation of a bovine antibody test for diagnosing Mycobacterium avium complex in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Pressler, Tacjana; Katzenstein, Terese L.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to test a commercial bovine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for investigating antibody activity against Mycobacterium avium complex. Methods: All patients at the Copenhagen Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Center who had culture for nontuberculous mycobacteria......, corresponding to a sensitivity of 100% (54–100), specificity of 66% (60–72), a positive predictive value of 6% (2–13), and negative predictive value of 100% (98–100). Conclusion: While not suited for direct diagnosis of M. avium complex due to a high number of false positive subjects, the assay proved useful...

  18. Usefulness of anti-rabphilin-3A antibodies for diagnosing central diabetes insipidus in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kanako; Yamashita, Rika; Niituma, Satsuki; Iwama, Shintaro; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arihara, Zenei; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-29

    We report a 27-year-old pregnant woman with polyuria, polydipsia and headache in the third trimester of pregnancy. Hypernatremia (153 mEq/L), high plasma osmolality (300 mOsm/kgH 2 O) and low urinary osmolality (92 mOsm/kgH 2 O) were observed at the admission to our hospital. Plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level was inappropriately low (2.2 pg/mL) compared to the high plasma osmolality. Plasma AVP responses to hypertonic-saline infusion were blunted, and her urine osmolality increased in response to desmopressin. The diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus was made from these results. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hypothalamic-pituitary region demonstrated a significant enlargement of the pituitary stalk, suggesting the presence of hypophysitis. In addition, serum anti-rabphilin-3A antibodies that have been recently reported as a biomarker of lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis, were positive. Diabetes insipidus continued after delivery, suggesting that polyuria was not mainly due to excessive vasopressinase activity or reduced renal sensitivity to AVP by prostaglandin E 2 that can cause temporal polyuria during pregnancy. We therefore clinically diagnosed central diabetes insipidus due to lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis, without performing invasive transsphenoidal pituitary biopsy. This case suggested the usefulness of anti-rabphilin-3A antibodies for the etiological diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus during pregnancy.

  19. Fc RIIA Genotypes and Its Association with Anti-C1q Autoantibodies in Lupus Nephritis (LN Patients from Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Pradhan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify Fc RIIA genotypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE patients and their association with anti-C1q antibodies. Methods. Fc RIIA genotyping was done in eighty Indian SLE patients and eighty healthy controls using allele-specific PCR. Anti-C1q antibodies were measured by ELISA. Results. LN patients showed higher SLEDAI (6–32 as compared to SLE patients without renal manifestations and had SLEDAI between 6–23. Fc RIIA polymorphic frequency in SLE patients was R131/H131 (67.5%, R131/R131 (20% and H131/ H131 (12.5% as against that of normal population (62.5%, 10%, and 27.5%, respectively. Sixty two patients (77.5% showed positivity for anti-C1q antibodies. LN patients showed elevated levels of anti-C1q antibodies (258.2u/ml±38.5U/mL as compared to SLE patients without nephritis (134.6±24.6 U/mL. Among anti-C1q positive patients, 71% had R131/H131 genotype, 22.6% had R131/R131 and remaining 6.4%, patients had H131/H131 genotype. All anti-C1q positive patients with R131/R131 genotype had elevated levels of anti-C1q antibodies (>100 U/ml, whereas among anti-C1q negative patients, none had R131/R131 genotype. Conclusion. This first report on Indian SLE patients supports the hypothesis that Fc RIIA R131 variant over expression may constitute a susceptibility factor for development of severe SLE manifestations in LN patients.

  20. Health related quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael; Mukhtyar, Chetan; Mahr, Alfred; Herlyn, Karen; Luqmani, Raashid; Merkel, Peter A.; Jayne, David R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) can present with a broad spectrum of signs and symptoms. The relative effects of different manifestations on health related quality of life (HRQOL) is unknown. Methods We conducted an individual patient data meta-analysis of baseline Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores from four randomized controlled trials of patients with newly diagnosed AAV. We determined the associations between organ manifestations at trial entry and the SF-36 Physical Composite Score (PCS) and Mental Composite Score (MCS) using mixed effects models adjusted for demographic factors. Associations with each of the 8 domains of the SF-36 were further explored using multivariate multiple regression. Results SF-36 data was available from 346 patients. Older age (−0.11 points/year; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] −0.21 to −0.012; p=0.029) and neurologic involvement (−5.84, p<0.001) at baseline were associated with lower Physical Composite Scores. Physical Function scores were the most affected and older age (−0.25 points per year, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] −0.38 to −0.11; p<0.001) scores and neurologic involvement (−8.48 points, 95% CI −12.90 to −4.06; p<0.001) had the largest effects. The MCS was negatively affected only by chest involvement (p=0.027) but this effect was not exerted in any particular domain. Conclusions HRQOL in patients with newly diagnosed AAV are complex and incompletely explained by their organ system manifestations. PMID:21452254

  1. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Stordal, Ketil; Hansen, Tine Plato

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  2. Clinical significance of perineural invasion diagnosed by immunohistochemistry with anti-S100 antibody in Stage I-III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshifumi; Kido, Tomoki; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Nakano, Mae; Yagi, Ryoma; Tajima, Yosuke; Okamura, Takuma; Nakano, Masato; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2015-12-01

    Perineural invasion (PN) diagnosed by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining is an important prognostic factor after curative-intent surgery in patients with colorectal cancer. However, the clinical significance of PN diagnosed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) has not been investigated. The present study assessed the clinical significance of PN diagnosed by IHC with an anti-S100 antibody in patients with colorectal cancer. We retrospectively enrolled 184 consecutive patients with stage I-III colorectal cancer who had undergone curative-intent surgery. We analyzed the absence/presence of PN diagnosed by HE staining (HE-PN) compared to that diagnosed by IHC with the anti-S100 antibody (S100-PN). Potential prognostic factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses of the overall and relapse-free survival. The [Formula: see text] statistics were used to assess the inter-observer reproducibility. The incidence of HE-PN and S100-PN among the 184 patients was 60 patients (32.6%) and 113 patients (61.4%), respectively (P colorectal cancer. An inter-observer assessment showed superior judgment reproducibility for S100-PN compared with HE-PN.

  3. Haemolytic disease of the newborn due to maternal irregular antibodies in the Chinese population in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K H; Chu, S L; Chang, J G; Shih, M C; Peng, C T

    2003-10-01

    From 1991 to 2000, amongst 23,886 full-term healthy Chinese babies delivered at our hospital, 2615 babies developed neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia. After excluding other causes of hyperbilirubinaemia and identifying the irregular antibodies, 15 cases of haemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to maternal irregular antibodies were diagnosed; three cases were born in our hospital and 12 cases were referred. Amongst these 15 babies, six cases had HDN due to anti-E, three cases due to anti-E + c, three cases due to anti-D, one case due to anti-c and two cases due to 'Mi' antibodies reacting with MiIII phenotype cells (anti-Hil and anti-Mur). Although there were four cases of hydrops fetalis, only one of the patients expired. The prevalence of HDN caused by maternal irregular antibodies has been estimated to be 0.01%. Therefore, routine prenatal screening for irregular antibodies was not rational in the Chinese population in Taiwan. Anti-E and anti-E + c were the important irregular antibodies resulting in HDN. Although few cases of HDN due to anti-'Mi' have been reported, Anti-'Mi' is significant in regions with a high prevalence of the MiIII phenotype.

  4. Development of Anti-G, Anti-C and Anti-Jk(b) in a 22-Year-Old Mother during Her Fourth Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Torsten J; Goebel, Meike; Scharberg, Erwin A; Bugert, Peter; Janetzko, Karin

    2013-06-01

    Anti-G antibodies are rarely found since anti-D, in combination with anti-C, are difficult to discriminate from anti-G antibodies in routine testing. A 22-year-old, gravida-3, para-1, woman with blood group A Rh D neg ccddee and known antibody anti-Jk(b), gave birth to her second child. While anti-Jk(b) could not be detected at birth, a new anti-C was found. Antibody screening tests (IAT) were performed using gel cards and rare G positive rGr erythrocytes. Genotyping for RHD and RHCE was performed using PCR-SSP. The child's blood group was A Rh D neg Ccddee. Genotyping revealed Cde/cde haplotypes. The erythrocytes of the new-born showed a positive direct antiglobulin test with IgG; anti-D and anti-C could be eluted. Erythrocytes with the rare phenotype rGr were reactive with the serum of the mother. The presence of anti-D and anti-C in the eluate from then newborn's Ccddee erythrocytes proved anti-G or anti-G in combination with anti-D. When anti-C and anti-D are seen during a pregnancy, possibly anti-G is present. This observation is of relevance since women with anti-G can still develop anti-D and require rhesus prophylaxis.

  5. Detection of Anti-Asparaginase Antibodies During Therapy with E.coli Asparaginase in Children with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EBEID, E.N.; KAMEL, M.M.; ALI, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Asparaginase is an effective anti leukemic agent which is included in most front-line protocols for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (All) worldwide. Since asparaginase is a bacterial protein, it may induce formation of antibodies. The reported frequency of anti-asparaginase antibodies is highly variable: antibodies have been reported in as many as 79% of adults and as many as 70% of children after intravenous or intramuscular administration of E.coli asparaginase. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine if the presence of antibodies during induction and continuation phases in newly diagnosed children with ALL and lymphoblastic lymphoma during therapy with E.coli asparaginase, had any correlation with various factors such as: age, gender, hypersensitivity reactions, response to therapy and Event Free Survival (EFS). Patients and Methods: Between the period from March 2005 to May 2007, sixty-four children who attended the Menia outpatient pediatric oncology clinic, or were admitted to the in patient department of the Menia oncology center, were enrolled in the study. Forty children had newly diagnosed ALL and 24 had lymphoblastic lymphoma. Patients were 48 males (75%) and 16 females (25%) with a male:female ratio 3:1. Their ages ranged from 3.5 to 17 years with mean age of 9.6 years. All patients received asparaginase therapy according to the St. Jude Total X III protocol, in a dose of 10,000 Iu/m2/dose, intramuscularly for 6-9 doses during the induction phase and another 6-9 doses during continuation phase according to disease status. Results: Forty one patients achieved complete remission, 9 had partial remission, and 14 were lost to followup at different intervals of treatment. Anti asparaginase antibodies were detected in 36 patients (56%) out of 64 patients, and 37 patients (60%) out of 62 patients who were treated with asparaginase at day 8 and day 27 of induction phase respectively. Moreover, 33 patients (61%) out of 54 patients, and

  6. Perturbations in the Lipid Profile of Individuals with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Lipidomics Analysis of a Diabetes Antibody Standardization Program Sample Subset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, Christina M.; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Qibin; Alquier, Thierry; Zhao, Rui; Mueller, Patricia W.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2010-08-01

    Objectives: To characterize the lipid profile of individuals with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus using LC-MS-based lipidomics and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. Design and methods: Lipids were extracted from plasma and sera of 10 subjects from the Diabetes Antibody Standardization Program (years 2000-2005) and 10 non-diabetic subjects and analyzed by capillary liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid ion-trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Lipids were identified and quantified using the AMT tag approach. Results: Five hundred sixty lipid features differentiated (q < 0.05) diabetic from healthy individuals in a partial least-squares analysis, characterizing of individuals with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conclusions: A lipid profile associated with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes may aid in further characterization of biochemical pathways involved in lipid regulation or mobilization and lipotoxicity of pancreatic beta-cells.

  7. Association of anti C1q and ds-DNA levels with the pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis among SLE patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Sohail

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lupus nephritis (LN is the most common and serious complication associated with SLE and it results in significant morbidity and mortality. It is known by several studies that patients of LN have higher levels of anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q compared with SLE patients without renal involvement. The current study was designed to determine and compare the level of anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q in patients of SLE with and without lupus nephritis in the Pakistani population. This current study was also aimed at providing proof that anti-C1q levels are more prominent in LN/non-LN SLE as compared to anti-dsDNA. This project may help in the determination of results in Pakistan and contribute to the further confirmation of the sensitivity of anti-C1q. Method: The patient samples were collected from Sheikh Zayed hospital, Lahore. These patients were clinically diagnosed by the Rheumatologists as SLE and LN positive on the basis of ACR and SLEDAI scoring criteria. This study was performed and samples were analyzed in the Department of Medical and Laboratory Sciences, Imperial College of Business Study, Lahore on the patient’s serum by ELISA technique. Result: About 38% (12 patients with LN were positive for anti-dsDNA and 31% (9 SLE patients without LN were positive whereas about 38.7% (12 were anti-dsDNA negative in LN cases and 58.6% (17 in SLE without LN. In case of anti-C1q 100% (31 of these LN patients were positive and 93.1% (27 patients SLE without LN showed positive anti C1q results. Only 6.9% (2 patients showed negative results for anti-C1q in LN negative patients Conclusion: The higher levels of anti-C1q suggest that it may be a better diagnostic marker for LN than that of anti-dsDNA and that it can be helpful in the prognosis of SLE patients.

  8. Uncoupling of collagen II metabolism in newly diagnosed, untreated rheumatoid arthritis is linked to inflammation and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Christgau, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    . METHODS: One hundred sixty patients with newly diagnosed, untreated RA entered the Cyclosporine, Methotrexate, Steroid in RA (CIMESTRA) trial. Disease activity and radiograph status were measured at baseline and 4 years. The N-terminal propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) and the cross-linked C...... associations of collagen II anabolism (PIIANP) and collagen II degradation (CTX-II) with anti-CCP, synovitis, and radiographic progression indicate that at this early stage of RA, cartilage collagen degradation is mainly driven by synovitis, while anti-CCP antibodies may interfere with cartilage regeneration...

  9. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dydensborg Sander S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stine Dydensborg Sander,1-3 Ketil Størdal,4,5 Tine Plato Hansen,6 Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen,7 Joseph A Murray,8 Søren Thue Lillevang,9 Steffen Husby1,2 1Hans Christian Andersen Children’s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, 2Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, 3Odense Patient Data Explorative Network (OPEN, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; 4Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, 5Department of Pediatrics, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway; 6Department of Pathology, Hvidovre Hospital, 7Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 8Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 9Department of Clinical Immunology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank and information on celiac disease-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA genotypes obtained from patient medical records.Patients and methods: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG and HLA genotypes.Results: We identified 2,247 children who were registered in the Danish National Patient Register with celiac disease. Duodenal biopsies for 1,555 of the children (69% were registered in the Patobank; 1,127 (50% had a biopsy that was compatible with celiac disease (ie, Marsh 2–3. We accessed the medical

  10. Anti-G with concomitant anti-C and anti-D: A case report in a pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeya Yousuf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The G antigen of Rh blood group system is present in almost all D-positive or C-positive red cells but absent from red cells lacking D and C antigens. The differentiation of anti-D and anti-C from anti-G is not necessary for routine transfusion; however, during pregnancy, it is important because anti-G can masquerade as anti-D and anti-C with initial antibody testing. The false presence of anti-D will exclude the patient from receiving anti-D immunoglobulin (RhIG when the patient actually is a candidate for RhIG prophylaxis. Moreover, patients with positive anti-D or anti-G are at risk of developing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and need close monitoring. Thus, proper identification allows the clinicians to manage patients properly. This case report highlights a rare case of anti-G together with anti-D and anti-C in a pregnant woman. This report disseminates knowledge on identification of anti-G and its importance in pregnant women.

  11. Anti-G with concomitant anti-C and anti-D: A case report in a pregnant woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Rabeya; Mustafa, Ahmad Nasirudin; Ho, Siew-Ling; Tang, Yee-Loong; Leong, Chooi-Fun

    2017-01-01

    The G antigen of Rh blood group system is present in almost all D-positive or C-positive red cells but absent from red cells lacking D and C antigens. The differentiation of anti-D and anti-C from anti-G is not necessary for routine transfusion; however, during pregnancy, it is important because anti-G can masquerade as anti-D and anti-C with initial antibody testing. The false presence of anti-D will exclude the patient from receiving anti-D immunoglobulin (RhIG) when the patient actually is a candidate for RhIG prophylaxis. Moreover, patients with positive anti-D or anti-G are at risk of developing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and need close monitoring. Thus, proper identification allows the clinicians to manage patients properly. This case report highlights a rare case of anti-G together with anti-D and anti-C in a pregnant woman. This report disseminates knowledge on identification of anti-G and its importance in pregnant women.

  12. Candida albicans Germ-Tube Antibody: Evaluation of a New Automatic Assay for Diagnosing Invasive Candidiasis in ICU Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Sánchez, Manuel; Zakariya-Yousef Breval, Ismail; Castro Méndez, Carmen; García-Rey, Silvia; Loza Vazquez, Ana; Úbeda Iglesias, Alejandro; Macías Guerrero, Desiree; Romero Mejías, Ana; León Gil, Cristobal; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella

    2017-08-01

    Testing for Candida albicans germ-tube antibody IFA IgG assay (CAGTA) is used to detect invasive candidiasis infection. However, most suitable assays lack automation and rapid single-sample testing. The CAGTA assay was adapted in an automatic monotest system (invasive candidiasis [CAGTA] VirClia ® IgG monotest (VirClia ® ), a chemiluminescence assay with ready-to-use reagents that provides a rapid objective result. CAGTA assay was compared with the monotest automatic VirClia ® assay in order to establish the diagnostic reliability, accuracy, and usefulness of this method. A prospective study with 361 samples from 179 non-neutropenic critically ill adults patients was conducted, including 21 patients with candidemia, 18 with intra-abdominal candidiasis, 84 with Candida spp. colonization, and 56 with culture-negative samples, as well as samples from ten healthy subjects. Overall agreement between the two assays (CAGTA and VirCLIA) was 85.3%. These assays were compared with the gold-standard method to determine the sensitivity, specificity as well as positive and negative predictive values. In patients with candidemia, values for CAGTA and VirCLIA assays were 76.2 versus 85.7%, 80.3 versus 75.8%, 55.2 versus 52.9%, and 91.4 versus 94.3%, respectively. The corresponding values in patients with intra-abdominal candidiasis were 61.1 versus 66.7%, 80.3 versus 75.8%, 45.8 versus 42.9%, and 88.3 versus 89.3%, respectively. No differences were found according to the species of Candida isolated in culture, except for Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis, for which VirClia ® was better than CAGTA. According to these results, the automated VirClia ® assay was a reliable, rapid, and very easy to perform technique as tool for the diagnosis invasive candidiasis.

  13. [Significance of antibodies to the citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase peptides in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D; Sun, L; Li, C H; Yang, L; Zhao, J X; Liu, X Y

    2016-12-18

    To detect the anti-citrullinated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) 70-88 peptide antibody (anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody), anti-citrullinated GPI 435-453 peptide antibody (anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody), anti-GPI 70-88 peptide antibody (anti-GPI(70-88) antibody) and anti-GPI 435-453 peptide antibody(anti-GPI(435-453) antibody) in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and examine the diagnostic values of the anti-C-GPI peptide antibodies in RA. The anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody, anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody, anti-GPI(70-88) antibody and anti-GPI(435-453) antibody were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 191 RA patients, 129 other rheumatic diseases and 74 healthy controls. The clinical and laboratory data of the patients with RA were collected, and the values of anti-C-GPI peptide antibodies in the diagnosis of RA and the relationships of anti-C-GPI peptide antibodies with the clinical and laboratory parameters analyzed. (1) The mean titers of the anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody and the anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody in the RA patients (respectively, 68.71 ± 4.20 and 51.78 ± 3.13) were significantly higher than those with other rheumatic diseases and healthy individuals (P <0.05). However, the mean titers of the anti-GPI(70-88) antibody and anti-GPI(435-453) antibody in the RA patients were similar to those with other rheumatic diseases and healthy individuals. (2) The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody for RA were 41.88% and 84.50% respectively; and the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody for RA were 46.05% and 86.05% respectively. The sensitivity of combined detection of the two anti-C-GPI peptide antibodies was 50.79%, and the specificity was 81.40%. (3) The positive rates of the anti-C-GPI(70-88) antibody and the anti-C-GPI(435-453) antibody were 35% and 45% respectively in those patients with negative anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, anti

  14. Prevalence and clinical significance of anti-C1q antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asmaa Hegazy

    2012-04-21

    Apr 21, 2012 ... system [1]. The complement system is one of the major effector mech- anisms of the innate immune system and it plays an important role in immunity [2]. C1q is the first component of the classical pathway of complement activation, and its main function is to clear immune complexes from tissues and self ...

  15. Comparative evaluation of treatment patterns and healthcare utilization of newly-diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis patients by anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamerato, Lois; Price, Kwanza; Szymialis, Rick; Eaddy, Michael; Ogbonnaya, Augustina; Shih, Huai-Che; Ahmad, Harris

    2018-03-01

    Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody positivity is an established diagnostic factor for severe disease activity and joint damage and a prognostic factor for aggressive disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To compare RA-related treatment, healthcare utilization, and joint erosion between anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative RA patients. Newly-diagnosed RA patients were identified from the Henry Ford Health System database between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2014; the date of the first RA diagnosis within the study period was the index date. Baseline anti-CCP test was used to categorize patients as anti-CCP-positive or anti-CCP-negative, and outcomes were evaluated in the 6 months post-index. There were 217 anti-CCP-positive and 191 anti-CCP-negative RA patients included in the study. A higher proportion of anti-CCP-positive patients were initiated on RA treatment than anti-CCP-negative patients (70.5% vs 23.0%; p CCP-positive patients received methotrexate (73.2% vs 56.8%; p = .0374), while more anti-CCP-negative patients received hydroxychloroquine (31.8% vs 13.1%; p = .0037) in first-line therapy. A higher proportion of anti-CCP-negative patients were tested for rheumatoid factor (RF) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Of those tested, there were more positive test results in the anti-CCP-positive cohort compared to the anti-CCP-negative cohort (RF: 84.4% vs 18.2%, p CCP-positive patients having any outpatient physician office visit (96.3% vs 77.5%, p CCP-negative patients. Among anti-CCP-positive (n = 113) and anti-CCP-negative (n = 58) patients with imaging results, more anti-CCP-positive patients had joint erosion compared to anti-CCP-negative patients (18.6% vs 8.6%; p = .0858); however, statistical significance was not reached. RA patients with positive anti-CCP antibodies had higher degrees of inflammation and disease activity as indicated by laboratory results, which likely contributed to their higher

  16. Approach to a Pregnant Woman with Anti D + Anti C Reactivity Pattern: A Diagnostic Conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Preeti; Sharma, Geetika; Singh, Deeksha; Garg, Jyoti

    2017-09-01

    The Rhesus G antigen is present on all RBCs that are C+ and also on most D+ RBCs. Due to this co-distribution of G with either C or D antigen, it mimics a reactivity pattern of anti C + anti D on Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), though the role of Anti G in causing Hemolytic Disease of Newborn (HDN) is controversial. The differentiation of anti D, anti C, and anti G is essential particularly in pregnant females. We hereby report a rare case of anti G with anti D and anti C in a pregnant woman with emphasis on approach to identify anti D+C+G and its implications.

  17. Approach to a Pregnant Woman with Anti D + Anti C Reactivity Pattern: A Diagnostic Conundrum

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Preeti; Sharma, Geetika; Singh, Deeksha; Garg, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    The Rhesus G antigen is present on all RBCs that are C+ and also on most D+ RBCs. Due to this co-distribution of G with either C or D antigen, it mimics a reactivity pattern of anti C + anti D on Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), though the role of Anti G in causing Hemolytic Disease of Newborn (HDN) is controversial. The differentiation of anti D, anti C, and anti G is essential particularly in pregnant females. We hereby report a rare case of anti G with anti D and anti C in a pregnant woma...

  18. Immunological methods for diagnosing neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, R.E.; Estrada, J.J.; Grogl, M.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described for diagnosing active human neurocysticercosis by detecting the presence of at least one Taenia solium larval antigen in cerebrospinal fluid, which comprises: contacting cerebrospinal fluid from a human to be diagnosed with a solid support, wherein the support binds with a Taenia solium larval antigen if present, contacting the support with a first antibody, wherein the first antibody binds with a larval Taenia solium antigen if present in the cerebrospinal fluid, contacting the solid support with a detectable second antibody which will bind with the first antibody, and detecting the second antibody bound to the support.

  19. Twin pregnancy complicated by severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-g and anti-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevett, Thomas N; Moise, Kenneth J

    2005-11-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-G antibodies is rare, and in most previously reported cases, leads to a mild anemia. The RhG antigen is usually found in association with both RhD and RhC. We report a case of a twin pregnancy affected by both anti-G and anti-C alloantibodies leading to severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn requiring multiple intrauterine transfusions and prolonged postnatal therapy. A patient with a prolonged history of previously affected pregnancies due to anti-D and anti-C was subsequently found to be affected with anti-G instead. She required aggressive therapy during her pregnancy, initially with intravenous immune globulin and plasmapheresis until umbilical blood sampling and intrauterine transfusions were feasible. Although hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-G antibodies is rare and usually mild, these pregnancies should be followed up closely and in utero therapy should be offered if necessary.

  20. Frequency of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies in infertile women referred to Tabriz Al-Zahra hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Sattari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is one of the major issues in society and its incidence is estimated to be almost 10-15%. Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis is an important cause of sexually transmitted diseases leading to infertility. Objective: This study was designed to determine the frequency of anti-C. trachomatis antibodies in infertile women at Al-zahra hospital, Tabriz, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the blood samples were collected randomly from 184 infertile women (case group and 100 pregnant women (control group. The frequency of specific IgG and IgM anti-C. trachomatis antibodies were evaluated using ELISA method. Results: The frequency of IgG anti-C. trachomatis antibody in the control and case groups was 18% and 35.88%, respectively. IgM anti-C. trachomatis antibody was found in 2% of controls and 5.44% of infertile women. Our results showed the significant differences between the case and control groups in anti-C. trachomatis antibodies (IgG, p=0.035 and IgM, p=0.004. Also, no significant relation was seen between the frequency of anti-C. trachomatis antibodies and age, location, and tubal factor infertility in our two study groups. Conclusion: According to high frequency of antibody anti-C. trachomatis among infertile women in competition to the control group, evaluation and treatment of Chlamydia infections is necessary in these patients

  1. The presence of anti-endomysial antibodies and the level of anti-tissue transglutaminases can be used to diagnose adult coeliac disease without duodenal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, R; Imperatore, N; Capone, P; De Palma, G D; De Stefano, G; Gerbino, N; Caporaso, N; Rispo, A

    2014-11-01

    The new ESPGHAN guidelines for diagnosis of paediatric coeliac disease suggest to avoid biopsy in genetically pre-disposed and symptomatic individuals with positive anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA) and anti-tissue transglutaminases (a-tTG). However, duodenal biopsy remains the gold standard in adult coeliac disease. To establish the cut-off values of a-tTG, which would: predict the presence of duodenal histology (Marsh ≥2) diagnostic for coeliac disease; and predict the presence of villous atrophy (Marsh 3) in adults. We performed an observational prospective study including all consecutive adult patients with suspected coeliac disease. All subjects were tested for EMA and a-tTG. Coeliac disease diagnosis was made in presence of Marsh ≥2, a-tTG >7 U/mL and positive EMA. A ROC curve was constructed to establish the best specificity cut-off of a-tTG levels, which would predict the presence of Marsh ≥2 and Marsh 3 at histology. The study included 310 patients with positive antibodies. Histology showed Marsh 1 in 8.7%, Marsh 2 in 3.5%, Marsh 3 in 87.7%. The best cut-off value of a-tTG for predicting Marsh ≥2 was 45 U/mL (sensitivity 70%; specificity 100%; PPV 100%; NPV 24.1%); the best cut-off for predicting villous atrophy was 62.4 U/mL (sensitivity 69%, specificity 100%; PPV 100%; NPV 31%). The diagnosis of coeliac disease can be reached without histology in adult patients with positive EMA and a-tTG levels >45 U/mL. An a-tTG level >62.4 was diagnostic for villous atrophy. These results could contribute to improving the diagnosis of coeliac disease by allowing for a significant reduction in diagnosis-related costs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Getting Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also for those with related disorders. How is Marfan syndrome diagnosed? getting_diagnosed.jpg A Marfan diagnosis can ... spinal column). Is there a genetic test for Marfan syndrome? Genetic testing can provide helpful information in some ...

  3. Persistent High IgG Phase I Antibody Levels against Coxiella burnetii among Veterinarians Compared to Patients Previously Diagnosed with Acute Q Fever after Three Years of Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielders, Cornelia C. H.; Boerman, Anneroos W.; Schimmer, Barbara; van den Brom, René; Notermans, Daan W.; van der Hoek, Wim; Schneeberger, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the development of chronic Q fever in occupational risk groups. The aim of this study was to perform long-term follow-up of Coxiella burnetii seropositive veterinarians and investigate the course of IgG phase I and phase II antibodies against C. burnetii antigens and to compare this course with that in patients previously diagnosed with acute Q fever. Methods Veterinarians with IgG phase I ≥1:256 (immunofluorescence assay) that participated in a previous seroprevalence study were asked to provide a second blood sample three years later. IgG antibody profiles were compared to a group of acute Q fever patients who had IgG phase I ≥1:256 twelve months after diagnosis. Results IgG phase I was detected in all veterinarians (n = 76) and in 85% of Q fever patients (n = 98) after three years (pveterinarians and 12% of patients (OR 3.95, 95% CI: 1.84–8.49). Conclusions IgG phase I persists among veterinarians presumably because of continuous exposure to C. burnetii during their work. Serological and clinical follow-up of occupationally exposed risk groups should be considered. PMID:25602602

  4. [Detection and analysis of anti-Rh blood group antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan-jun; Wu, Yong; Chen, Bao-chan; Liu, Yan

    2008-06-01

    To study the prevalence and distribution of anti-Rh blood group antibodies in Chinese population and its clinical significance. Irregular antibodies were screened and identified by Microcolum Gel Coomb's test. For those identified as positive anti-Rh samples, monoclonal antibodies (anti-D, -C, -c, -E and -e) were used to identify the specific antigen and confirm the accuracy of the irregular antibody tests. The titers, Ig-types and 37 Degrees Celsius-reactivity were tested to confirm its clinical significance. For evaluation of the origin of irregular antibodies, histories of pregnancy and transfusion were reviewed. For the newborns who had positive antibodies, their mothers were tested simultaneously to confirm the origin of the antibodies. 47 out of 54 000 (0.087%) patients were identified as positive with Rh blood group antibodies.Of them, 27 cases had history of pregnancy, 13 had transfusion and 1 had the histories of both. 6 newborns had antibodies derived form their mothers. The specificity of the antibody was as follows: 29 with anti-E (61.70%), 8 with anti-D (17.02%), anti-cE 5(10.64%), 4 with anti-c (8.51%) and 1 with anti-C (2.13%). All the 47 Rh blood group antibodies were IgG or IgG+IgM, and were reactive to red blood cells with corresponding antigens at 37 Degrees Celsius, with a highest titer of 1:4 096. The prevalence of Rh antibodies is lower in Chinese population as compared with that in White population.Of all the antibodies, anti-E is most frequently identified and anti-D was declining. Alloimmunization by pregnancy and transfusion is the major cause of Rh antibody production. Rh blood group antibodies derived from mothers are the major cause of Non-ABO-HDN.

  5. Measurements of the Z partial decay width into c anti c and multiplicity of charm quarks per b decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.

    2000-01-01

    The partial decay width R c of the Z into c anti c quark pair and the number of charm quarks n c per b decay are measured with the DELPHI detector at LEP 1. Particle identification provides clear D 0 , D + , D s + and Λ c + signatures. The charm hadron production rate is measured in each channel by a fit to the scaled energy, impact parameter information and the invariant mass spectrum. Two measurements of R c are presented, from the D *+ production rate and from the overall charm counting, including strange charm baryon production, in c anti c events. The multiplicity n c , which includes hidden c anti c and strange charm baryon production, is inferred from the charm counting in b anti b events. The final results are R c =0.1665±0.0095 and n c =1.166±0.086. (orig.)

  6. Anti-G antibody in alloimmunized pregnant women: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Nath Makroo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-G has been reported as a possible cause of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN, either independently or in association with anti-D, anti-C or both. The antibody mimics the pattern of anti-C and anti-D reactivity in the identification panel and is often present along with either or both of these antibodies. The differentiation of anti-D, -C and-G in routine pretransfusion workup is particularly essential in antenatal cases. We report two antenatal cases where anti-G was identified on advanced immunohematological workup, in addition to other alloantibodies.

  7. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  8. Antigen-dependent fluorescence response of anti-c-Myc Quenchbody studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshiharu; Okumura, Hisashi; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    We performed metadynamics molecular dynamics simulations to reveal mechanism of antigen-dependent fluorescence response observed for site-specifically fluorescent-labeled single-chain antibody against c-Myc peptide antigen. We found that VH and VL bind with each other only when the antigen exists and that the fluorophore labeled at the N-terminus of VH interacts with Trp103 most stably. These results support the mechanism proposed from previous experiments: In the absence of antigen, Trp residues are partially exposed at the interface of VH and quench the fluorophore. In the presence of antigen, the Trp residues are buried between VH and VL , and the quenching is eliminated.

  9. Hemolytic Anemia and Heart Failure Caused by Anti-C and Anti-E Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Huseyin; Eren, Abdulkadir; Kara, Semra

    2016-06-01

    Many different blood group systems, such as Rh, ABO, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, MNS, have been reported as causes of hemolytic disease of the newborn. Hemolysis due to minor blood group incompatibility in the fetus or newborn has been determined in isolated case reports. Here, we report a case of a patient who had received red cell transfusion due to severe Rh c and E incompatibility, leading to hemolytic anemia with heart failure. The mother and the baby were grouped B and B, respectively, both being positive for RhD antigen. The baby's blood group type was C+, c+, E+, e+, K-, while her mother's blood group type was C+, c-, E-, e+, K-. Our patient was diagnosed as Rh c and E incompatibility, leading to the hemolytic anemia. Minor blood group incompatibility should be considered in infants with prolonged jaundice and severe anemia, leading to heart failure.

  10. Reactivity of eleven anti-human leucocyte monoclonal antibodies with lymphocytes from several domestic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Larsen, Else Bang

    1988-01-01

    Nine commercially available monoclonal antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies from The American Type Culture Collection, raised against various human leucocyte surface antigens, were tested on lymphocytes from cow, sheep, goat, swine, horse, cat, dog, mink, and rabbit as well as man. Four...... antibodies bound to lymphocytes from some of the animals. These were the antibodies against CD8 and CD4 antigen, the antibody to C3b-receptor, and the antibody to the HLA-DR antigen. The CD8 antigen-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink, cat, dog, and sheep, while the CD4 antigen......-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink. The anti-C3b-R antibody reacted with lymphocytes from horse, swine, dog, and cat, and the anti-HLA-DR reacted with lymphocytes from cow, goat, sheep, horse, dog, cat, and mink....

  11. Antibodies Against Complement Components: Relevance for the Antiphospholipid Syndrome-Biomarkers of the Disease and Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bećarević, Mirjana

    2017-07-01

    Laboratory criterion for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL Abs). Complement system has a role in mediating aPL Abs-induced thrombosis in animal models. The importance of antibodies against complement components (potential biomarkers of APS) and the importance of antibodies with beneficial anti-complement effects in APS (as biopharmaceuticals) are reviewed. Antibodies against complement components described in APS patients, so far, are anti-C1q and anti-factor H Abs, although anti-factor B Abs and anti-C5a Abs were described in animal models of APS. Clinical studies in APS patients are limited to a small number of case reports. Studies that would confirm potential role of Abs against complement components (as potential biomarkers of APS) are lacking. Lack of randomized clinical trials (that would provide complete data for confirmation of beneficial effects of biopharmaceuticals in complement inhibition) in APS is alarming.

  12. [The incidence of irregular antibodies in pregnancy: a prospective study in the region of the 's-Hertogenbosch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrijer, B; Harthoorn-Lasthuizen, E J; Oosterbaan, H P

    1999-12-11

    To determine the incidence and clinical relevance of irregular erythrocyte antibodies (IEA), in multiparous women and in primigravidal with a history of blood transfusion. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. In the 's-Hertogenbosch area, the Netherlands, both primigravidae with a previous blood transfusion and multiparous women were tested for IEA in addition to the regular blood tests during the first trimester of pregnancy. If IEA were discovered, the partners were tested for the presence of the antigen involved. Blood samples of children of positive fathers were tested immediately post partum for signs of haemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). During a 2.5-year period (August 1995-January 1998) a total of 2392 pregnant women were screened for IEA: 2204 multiparous women and 188 primigravidae women. In 65 women 81 IEA were discovered. In the group of 30 children positive for the antigen involved, 12 (40%) had clinical symptoms of HDN; intrauterine death was diagnosed once, one child died immediately after delivery. One child had signs of hydrops fetalis and two children needed an exchange transfusion. Phototherapy and/or regular blood transfusion were given to 7 children. Most cases of HDN were caused by anti-D, anti-Kell and anti-c antibodies. Non-RhD-IEA were found in 1.6% of pregnant women screened. First-trimester screening for IEA is recommended as it can be of help in early diagnosis and treatment of HDN.

  13. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  14. A specific assay for quantification of human C4c by use of an anti-C4c monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilely, Katrine; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Nielsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The increasing evidence of the implication of the complement system in the pathogenesis of several diseases has emphasized the need for the development of specific and valid assays, optimized for quantitative detection of complement activation in vivo. In the present study, we have developed a mo...

  15. Diagnosing Tic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit" /> Information For… Media Policy Makers Diagnosing Tic Disorders Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... or postviral encephalitis). Persistent (Chronic) Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder To be diagnosed with a persistent tic disorder, ...

  16. [Irregular antierythocytic antibodies outside of the ABO system in the perinatal period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista-González, H A; Rosenfeld-Mann, F; Pérez-Pérez, J D; Quintanar-García, E

    1991-11-01

    Included in this study are the results of the tests done with irregular anti-erythrocytic antibodies outside of the ABO system of women in reproductive stage. In 2,623 cases considered, 279 samples positive for the antibodies were found (10.6%). In 184 cases (65.9%), the antibodies were classified as "immune irregular". The most frequently found antibodies from this group were the anti-D (63.08%), followed by the anti-c (1.07%), the anti-Kell (0.72%), anti-C, anti-E and an anti-Rh system (0.36% for each one). In 52 cases (18.6%) there were irregular "natural" antibodies, predominantly the anti-Lewis (9.68%), followed by anti-P (5.02%), the anti-I (3.2%), an anti-M and an anti-N (0.36% each one). In 43 (15.4%) cases, we were not able to identify the specificity of the antibody found. We include a discussion and a comparison of the frequency of these antibodies in our population. Based on these data, we recommend the clinician to consider the existence and specificity of the irregular anti-erythrocytic antibodies in their obstetric patients, candidates to transfusional therapy, as well as those newborn with hemolytic diseases.

  17. Alloimmunization due to red cell antibodies in Rhesus positive Omani Pregnant Women: Maternal and Perinatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamima Al-Dughaishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study is aimed to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization due to antibodies to red blood cell (RBC antigens (other than rhesus [Rh] antigen and report the maternal, perinatal, and neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of all patients with minor RBCs antibodies alloimmunization who were followed and delivered at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman from June 2011 to June 2013. Maternal characteristics, antibody type, antibody titer in addition to perinatal and neonatal outcomes were reviewed. Results: There were 1160 patients with Rh positive status in the study. The most common ABO blood group was O, followed by A, B, and AB. We found 33 out of 1160 Rh positive women alloimmunized with minor RBCs antibodies that gave a prevalence of minor RBCs alloimmunization of 2.7%. The most frequent antibody was anti-E 38%, followed by anti-c 17% and anti-kell 17%. 6 of these 33 patients were identified to have significant antibody titer, and two cases showed evidence of fetal anemia. Only one case required an intrauterine blood transfusion. The most common neonatal complication was jaundice in 53%, followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28%. Two cases complicated by neonatal anemia required a postnatal blood transfusion. Conclusion: Alloimmunization with anti-E, anti-c, and anti-kell were the most common antibodies among the study group. Minor RBCs alloimmunization was an important cause of neonatal morbidity.

  18. A prospective study of anti-chromatin and anti-C1q autoantibodies in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis treated with cyclophosphamide pulses or azathioprine/methylprednisolone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, Cecile; Dieker, Jurgen W. C.; McGrath, Fabian D.; Roos, Anja; Derksen, Ronald H. W. M.; van der Vlag, Jakob; Daha, Mohamed R.; Berden, Jo H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence and course of anti-chromatin (anti-nucleosome, anti-double-stranded (ds) DNA and anti-histone) and anti-C1q autoantibodies in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN), treated in a randomised controlled trial with either cyclophosphamide or azathioprine

  19. Antibodies against C1q Are a Valuable Serological Marker for Identification of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients with Active Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Chi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. An early diagnosis of lupus nephritis (LN has an important clinical implication in guiding treatments of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in clinical settings. In this study, the diagnostic values of circulating autoantibodies to C1q alone or in combination with other markers for accessing active SLE and LN were evaluated. Methods. The diagnostic value of anti-C1q autoantibodies for identification of patients with active SLE disease and LN was evaluated by analyzing the level of anti-C1q antibodies in sera from 95 SLE patients, 40 non-SLE patients, and 34 healthy cohorts. Results. The prevalence of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in patients with SLE (50/95, 52.6%, active SLE (40/51, 78.4%, and LN (30/35, 85.7% in comparison with non-SLE patient controls, patients with inactive SLE, and non-LN, respectively. A combination of anti-C1q with anti-dsDNA and/or levels of complements C3 and C4 exhibited an increased specificity but a decreased sensitivity for identification of patients with active SLE and LN diseases relative to each of these markers alone. Conclusion. Anti-C1q antibodies were strongly associated with disease activity and LN in SLE patients, suggesting that it may be a reliable serological marker for identification of SLE patients with active LN and active SLE disease.

  20. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize target HLA specificities expressed on cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, J; Nakajima, F; Kamada, H; Tadokoro, K; Nagai, T; Satake, M

    2017-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, which are involved in the development of transfusion-related side effects such as transfusion-related lung injury, are sometimes found in males without a history of alloimmunization (eg, transplantation and transfusion). Whether HLA antibodies in male donors can interact with their target HLA specificities expressed on cells have not been completely investigated. The HLA antibodies detected in 7 male donors were characterized. Flow cytometry and immunocomplex capture fluorescence analysis were performed to evaluate the ability of these antibodies to bind with target HLA specificities expressed on cells. The association of these antibodies with complement was examined using anti-C1q antibody. Sustainability of HLA antibodies over time was compared in 26 male vs 57 female donors. The antibodies from all 7 donors recognized intact HLA molecules coated onto microbeads. The antibodies in 2 of 7 donors also recognized their target HLA specificities expressed on cells. Furthermore, the antibodies in one of these 2 donors showed HLA specificities that involved complement binding. Twenty-one of 26 initially positive male donors had turned negative for HLA antibody at least 1 year after their initial positive screening, whereas HLA antibody positivity was maintained for a long time in most female donors. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize their target HLA specificities on cells and that could potentially modify molecular events in affected cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... and automated, the hybrid cells can be stored for many years in liquid nitrogen and antibodies production is homogeneous. The hybridoma method .... they may be modified to vehicle active molecules such as radio-isotopes, toxins, cytokines, enzyme etc. In these cases, the therapeutic effect is due to ...

  2. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of the highly evolved machinery of immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex ... to Pauling, if the structure of the antigen binding site of antibodies were to be produced in a random ..... where the immune system of the body is destructive, as in autoimmune disorders or after organ transplant.

  3. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While chemistry provides the framework for understanding the structure and function of biomolecules, the immune sys- tem provides a highly evolved natural process to generate one class of complex biomolecules – the antibodies. A combination of the two could be exploited to generate new classes of molecules with novel ...

  4. Delayed and acute hemolytic transfusion reactions resulting from red cell antibodies and red cell-reactive HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Chikako; Ohto, Hitoshi; Miura, Saori; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Ono, Satoshi; Ogata, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    It has been controversial whether HLA antibodies cause hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) or shortened red blood cell (RBC) survival. A patient is reported who had two episodes of HTR, the latter of which was likely due to RBC-reactive HLA antibodies. A 77-year-old woman, admitted for gastric varix rupture, had no RBC-irregular antibodies detected before transfusion. On Hospital Day 12, after transfusion of 2 units of RBCs and 2 units of fresh-frozen plasma, the first delayed hemolytic episode occurred and anti-E, anti-c, anti-Jk(a), and unidentified RBC-reactive antibodies were detected in a serum sample from Day 14. Two additional units of matched RBCs were transfused with a leukoreduction filter on Days 19 and 22. After 4 hours of starting a transfusion on Day 22, the patient had fever, and a second hemolytic episode was recorded. Multireactive HLA antibodies (reactive against 20 of 20 donor panel lymphocytes) were detected in serum samples from Day 15 to Day 21. These HLA antibodies reacted strongly with HLA-A2 and HLA-B7 antigens, corresponding to Bg(c) and Bg(a) antigens on RBCs, respectively. RBCs transfused on Day 22 were found to be HLA-A2 by genotyping. Strong HLA alloantibodies in this recipient appear to have caused a HTR. It is suggested that HLA antibodies be considered in patients with unexplained HTRs.

  5. Anti-peptide antibodies that recognize conformational differences of HLA class I intracytoplasmic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, Alberto; Galati, Rossella; Ogino, Takeshi; Butler, Richard H; Tanigaki, Nobuyuki

    2002-09-01

    Rabbit antibodies were raised against both long and short peptides derived from exon 7 sequences of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alpha chains; anti-A/B against a 13-mer shared by most HLA-A alpha and HLA-B alpha chains, anti-C against a 15-mer characteristic of HLA-C alpha chains, anti-ACT against a 6-mer specific to HLA-A alpha chains, and anti-CCT against a 5-mer specific to HLA-C alpha chains. Binding activity of the antibodies was determined with peptides by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) and with HLA class I transfectants and the parental cells by FACS analysis. Anti-A/B and anti-C were to a greater or lesser extent crossreactive with the long and short peptides, whereas anti-ACT and anti-CCT were specific to the corresponding short peptides. No binding was seen for anti-ACT and anti-CCT with HLA class I transfectants, C1R-A2, C1R-B7, and 221-Cw1 and the parental cells, C1R (Cw4, E) and 721.221 (E, F). Anti-A/B and anti-C were substantially protein-reactive and the binding order was C1R-B7 > C1R-A2, 721.221 > C1R, 221-Cw1 for anti-A/B, and C1R-B7 > 721.221 > C1R, 221-Cw1, C1R-A2 for anti-C. Thus, anti-A/B and anti-C bound better to HLA-B and HLA-E rather than to HLA-A and HLA-C. Computer modeling of the three-dimensional structure of the intracytoplasmic domains demonstrated that this may be due to structural differences despite the sequence similarities.

  6. Anti-K1 (Kell Antibody Expressed in Maternal Breastmilk: A Case Report of a Neonate with Multiple Intrauterine Transfusions and Postnatal Exposure to Kell Antibody in Maternal Breastmilk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick DeMoss

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is a common consideration in newborn medicine, especially among the jaundiced. Maternal breastmilk provides numerous benefits to the infant, including nutrition and immunologic factors. Here, we present an infant who received three intrauterine transfusions for anemia secondary to anti-K1 (Kell, anti-C, and anti-e antibodies and whose maternal breastmilk tested positive for anti-Kell antibodies. The infant required another transfusion at 4 weeks of life for anemia. We review the pathophysiology of anti-Kell antibodies, the immunology of breast milk, and the intersection of these two topics.

  7. Diagnosing plant problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheryl A. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosing Christmas tree problems can be a challenge, requiring a basic knowledge of plant culture and physiology, the effect of environmental influences on plant health, and the ability to identify the possible causes of plant problems. Developing a solution or remedy to the problem depends on a proper diagnosis, a process that requires recognition of a problem and...

  8. Being publicly diagnosed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, Hanne; Lillebaek, Troels; Wilcke, Torgny

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease which affects people worldwide, but there is knowledge lacking about patients' experiences in low-prevalence and high-income countries. AIM: To provide a theoretical framework for the process of being diagnosed with tuberculosis in a Danish setting. ME...

  9. PRODUCTION OF A HUMAN RECOMBINANT ANTIBODY AGAINST SEROTYPE A CANDIDA ALBICANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A. Jafari

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available After using 3 different generations of antibodies including human and non-human hyperimmune sera, monoclonal antibodies and chimeric antibodies, more recently a newer approach has been developed in which the antibody genes are cloned directly from a patient peripheral B-lymphocytes and expressed in a host like E. coli. In this study the Candida albicans serotype A (NCTC 3153 mannan was purified using a modified Fehling method and used for selection of human recombinant antibody from a C. albicans phage antibody library. After four rounds of affinity selecting (panning, 2 predominant clones were chosen by DNA fingerprinting and ELISA. A 248 amino acid DNA fragment coding for anti-C. albicans mannan scFv was sequenced and cloned in a pBAD-TOPO cloning vector to produce a soluble and phage free antibody. The analysis of antibody sequences by V base Index (DNAPLOT confirmed the human antibody origin with the VH4 family in V segment of heavy variable chain and VL3 (Lambda 3 in J segment of the light variable chain. This antibody fragment was purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and inmmunoblotted as a 31kDa recombinant protein.

  10. [Micro-column gel indirect anti-globulin technique for screening and identification of irregular antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Xuan; Liu, Jing-Han; Li, Xi-Jin; Luo, Qun; Chen, Min-Cai; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an antibody screening method based on the micro-column gel indirect anti-globulin technique (MGIAT), using pooled cells and plasma, by comparison with the conventional indirect anti-globulin technique (CIAT) combined with a two-stage papain technique, and to explore the feasibility of the use of plasma instead of serum as test material. The samples of blood recipients in our hospital were screened for irregular antibody using pooled test cells. Screening of the antibodies was identified both by MGIAT and CIAT combined papain technique respectively. The results showed that the irregular erythrocyte antibodies were detected in 20 cases from 5,000 recipients screened by MGIAT, using pooled cells, the positive rate was 0.4%. The specificity of 20 cases of irregular antibodies was as follows: 2 cases of anti-D, 8 cases of anti-E, 1 cases of anti-C, 2 cases of anti-c, 2 cases of anti-Mi(a), 2 cases of anti-Jk(a), 1 case of anti-Le(a) and 2 cases of anti-Fy(a). Antibody was detected from 19 cases using CIAT. Anti-Le(a) was detected with adding complement from Le(a-b-) person. Only 13 cases antibody were found by papain technique. It was concluded that irregular antibody screening by MGIAT using pooled cells can take place of the CIAT combining with papain technique in clinical application. Plasma is superior to serum in antibody screening test.

  11. Functional expression of single-chain variable fragment antibody against c-Met in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Mi-Ae; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, So-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Jin; Chung, Junho; Oh, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2006-05-01

    c-Met, a high affinity receptor for hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor, shown to be overexpressed in a variety of malignant cells, is a potential biomarker as well as a therapeutic target. Thus, single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) specific for c-Met is expected to be efficiently employed in the clinical treatment or imaging of many cancer cells. Here, we constructed the expression system for anti-c-Met scFv fused with T7 tag at its N-terminus using pET vector and investigated the expression conditions to achieve a functional and soluble expression of the scFv in the cytoplasm of recombinant Escherichia coli. The redox potential of E. coli cytoplasm was the most critical factor for the functional expression of anti-c-Met scFv. The employment of a host with oxidizing cytoplasm, E. coli trxB/gor double mutant, improved the productivity of functional anti-c-Met scFv by approximately 10-fold compared to the production of anti-c-Met scFv in the reducing cytoplasm of wild type E. coli. Productivity of functional anti-c-Met scFv could be further enhanced by co-expressing molecular chaperones such as GroELS, trigger factor, and DsbC with the scFv. Coexpression of DsbC increased the yield of functional anti-c-Met scFv about 2.5-fold in the cytoplasm of E. coli trxB/gor mutant compared to the production of scFv without DsbC coexpression. Lowering the IPTG concentration from 1 to 0.05 mM led to the slight enhancement, approximately 1.6-fold, of productivity of functional scFv. Although the use of low temperature for anti-c-Met scFv expression increased the ratio of soluble scFv fraction to insoluble fraction, productivity of soluble scFv decreased owing to the significant reduction of expression rate. The addition of 0.5 M sucrose in the medium inhibited the formation of intracellular insoluble anti-c-Met scFv. To purify the anti-c-Met scFv simply, we fused hexahistidine at the C-terminus of scFv and purified the scFv showing 98% of purity through the interaction

  12. Liability for Diagnosing Malingering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth J; Van Dell, Landon

    2017-09-01

    Malingering is a medical diagnosis, but not a psychiatric disorder. The label imputes that an evaluee has intentionally engaged in false behavior or statements. By diagnosing malingering, psychiatrists pass judgment on truthfulness. Evaluees taking exception to the label may claim that the professional has committed defamation of character (libel or slander) when the diagnosis is wrong and costs the claimant money or benefits. Clinicians may counter by claiming immunity or that the diagnosis was made in good faith. This problem has come into focus in military and veterans' contexts, where diagnoses become thresholds for benefits. Through historical and literary examples, case law, and military/veterans' claims of disability and entitlement, the authors examine the potency of the malingering label and the potential liability for professionals and institutions of making this diagnosis. © 2017 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  13. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed ... for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed ...

  14. Severe hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn caused by red blood cell antibodies undetected at first-trimester screening (CME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajak, Slavica; Stefanović, Vedran; Capkun, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The objective was to determine clinical consequences of anti-D and non-D antibodies undetected at first-trimester screening for infant or fetus. This retrospective cohort study included all pregnant women with red blood cell (RBC) antibodies who were tested between 1993 and 2008. Data were obtained from the forms for tracking immunization at the transfusion department. Each form was analyzed for three data sets: the order of screening at which the antibodies were detected (initial or repeated screening), the order of pregnancy (first pregnancy or higher), and whether the antibodies caused severe hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn (HDFN). In D- women, anti-D was detected in 1.3% of cases. The anti-D was undetected in 72 (37%) cases on the first-trimester screening, of which eight cases were complicated by severe HDFN. In this group, three patients were primigravidae. An overall non-D incidence of 0.2% was observed. In 16 cases, non-D were undetected on the first-trimester screening (10 anti-c, two anti-E, two anti-C, one anti-S, and one case of anti-Rh17). Non-D antibodies undetected on initial screening caused 11 cases of severe HDFN (27% of all severe non-D HDFN). Ten of them were in multiparous women. Seven of 11 cases with severe HDFN that were missed were caused by anti-c. The third-trimester screening may detect RBC antibodies that were not present or detected on the first-trimester screening. Such screening may be especially relevant in D+ multiparous women due to the risk of HDFN. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find ... Print How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit ...

  16. Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  17. Association of Distinct Fine Specificities of Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies With Elevated Immune Responses to Prevotella intermedia in a Subgroup of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Anja; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Marzeda, Anna M; Wong, Alicia; Montgomery, Anna B; Sayles, Harlan R; Eick, Sigrun; Gawron, Katarzyna; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Davis, Simon; Potempa, Jan; Kessler, Benedikt M; Fischer, Roman; Venables, Patrick J; Payne, Jeffrey B; Mikuls, Ted R; Midwood, Kim S

    2017-12-01

    In addition to the long-established link with smoking, periodontitis (PD) is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism by which PD could induce antibodies to citrullinated peptides (ACPAs), by examining the antibody response to a novel citrullinated peptide of cytokeratin 13 (CK-13) identified in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), and comparing the response to 4 other citrullinated peptides in patients with RA who were well-characterized for PD and smoking. The citrullinomes of GCF and periodontal tissue from patients with PD were mapped by mass spectrometry. ACPAs of CK13 (cCK13), tenascin-C (cTNC5), vimentin (cVIM), α-enolase (CEP-1), and fibrinogen β (cFIBβ) were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients with RA (n = 287) and patients with osteoarthritis (n = 330), and cross-reactivity was assessed by inhibition assays. A novel citrullinated peptide cCK13-1 ( 444 TSNASGR-Cit-TSDV-Cit-RP 458 ) identified in GCF exhibited elevated antibody responses in RA patients (24%). Anti-cCK13-1 antibody levels correlated with anti-cTNC5 antibody levels, and absorption experiments confirmed this was not due to cross-reactivity. Only anti-cCK13-1 and anti-cTNC5 were associated with antibodies to the periodontal pathogen Prevotella intermedia (P = 0.05 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with antibodies to Porphyromonas gingivalis arginine gingipains. Levels of antibodies to CEP-1, cFIBβ, and cVIM correlated with each other, and with smoking and shared epitope risk factors in RA. This study identifies 2 groups of ACPA fine specificities associated with different RA risk factors. One is predominantly linked to smoking and shared epitope, and the other links anti-cTNC5 and cCK13-1 to infection with the periodontal pathogen P intermedia. © 2017 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Effect of screening for red cell antibodies, other than anti-D, to detect hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: a population study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelewijn, J M; Vrijkotte, T G M; van der Schoot, C E; Bonsel, G J; de Haas, M

    2008-05-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is a severe disease, resulting from maternal red cell (RBC) alloantibodies directed against fetal RBCs. The effect of a first-trimester antibody screening program on the timely detection of HDFN caused by antibodies other than anti-D was evaluated. Nationwide, all women (1,002 in 305,000 consecutive pregnancies during 18 months) with alloantibodies other than anti-D, detected by a first-trimester antibody screen, were included in a prospective index-cohort study. In a parallel-coverage validation study, patients with HDFN caused by antibodies other than anti-D, that were missed by the screening program, were retrospectively identified. The prevalence of positive antibody screens at first-trimester screening was 1,232 in 100,000; the prevalence of alloantibodies other than anti-D was 328 in 100,000, of which 191 of 100,000 implied a risk for occurrence of HDFN because the father carried the antigen. Overall, severe HDFN, requiring intrauterine or postnatal (exchange) transfusions, occurred in 3.7 percent of fetuses at risk: for anti-K in 11.6 percent; anti-c in 8.5 percent; anti-E in 1.1 percent; Rh antibodies other than anti-c, anti-D, or anti-E in 3.8 percent; and for antibodies other than Rh antibodies or anti-K, in none of the fetuses at risk. All affected children, where antibodies were detected, were promptly treated and healthy at the age of 1 year. The coverage validation study showed a sensitivity of the screening program of 75 percent. Five of 8 missed cases were caused by anti-c, with delay-induced permanent damage in at least 1. First-trimester screening enables timely treatment of HDFN caused by antibodies other than anti-D, however, with a sensitivity of only 75 percent. A second screening at Week 30 of c- women will enhance the screening program. Severe HDFN, caused by antibodies other than anti-D, is associated with anti-K, anti-c, and to a lesser extent with other Rh-alloantibodies.

  19. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  20. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  1. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  2. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  3. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  4. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho

    1998-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs

  6. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Provider Pocket Guides Provider Guides Fertility Preservation for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed ... Patient Pocket Guides Patient Guides Fertility Preservation for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed ...

  7. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Baldwin, W. Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. PMID:27381905

  8. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F; Parker, Ernest T; Baldwin, W Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete; Meeks, Shannon L

    2016-10-20

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. [Hemolytic disease of the newborn and irregular blood group antibodies in the Netherlands: prevalence and morbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, B A; Hirasing, R A; Overbeeke, M A

    1999-07-10

    To inventory prevalence and morbidity of haemolytic disease of newborn caused by irregular anti-erythrocyte antibodies other than antirhesus-D. Prospective registration study. All paediatricians (n = 380) in general hospitals and contact persons (n = 79) in university hospitals were asked for monthly reports of clinical cases of haemolytic disease of newborn during 2 years (1996-1997). Response was 97%. A total of 130 reports were received in two study years, 49 of which could not be confirmed as non-RhD-non-AB0 antagonism. In the group of which the transfusion history was known (n = 60), 29 pregnant women (48%) had received transfused blood at some time. Of the antibodies found, anti-c, anti-E and anti-K were the most frequent. The direct antiglobulin test was positive in 61 of the 81 cases, negative in 10 cases, while in 10 cases it was unknown or false-negative due to earlier intrauterine transfusions (in three neonates). The highest bilirubin levels recorded were 572, 559 and 520 mumol/l (all three with maternal anti-c antagonism). Therapeutic data were known concerning 80 of the 81 newborn: 21 (16%) received no treatment, 24 (29%) only phototherapy and the others--in addition to phototherapy if any--also blood transfusion, exchange transfusion or intrauterine transfusion, or a combination of these. It was calculated that the actual prevalence of irregular anti-erythrocyte antibodies in Dutch pregnant women probably amounts to approximately 0.25%. This finding may possibly be confirmed since starting 1 July 1998 all pregnant women in the country are screened for the presence of these antibodies. It is recommended that girls and women in the reproductive age group should receive primary prevention of development of irregular anti-erythrocyte antibodies by application of a selective blood transfusion policy, taking into account the occurrence of the antigens c, E and K.

  10. Conventional versus single-ladder-splitting contributions to double parton scattering production of two quarkonia, two Higgs bosons and c anti cc anti c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Maciula, Rafal [Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Szczurek, Antoni [Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Rzeszow Univ. (Poland)

    2014-07-15

    The double parton distributions (dPDF), both conventional and those corresponding to parton splitting, are calculated and compared for different two-parton combinations. The conventional and splitting dPDFs have very similar shape in x{sub 1} and x{sub 2}. We make a first quantitative evaluation of the single-ladder-splitting contribution to double parton scattering (DPS) production of two S- or P-wave quarkonia, two Higgs bosons and c anti cc anti c. The ratio of the single-ladder-splitting to conventional contributions is discussed as a function of centre-of-mass energy, mass of the produced system and other kinematical variables. Using a simple model for the dependence of the conventional two-parton distribution on transverse parton separation (Gaussian and independent of x{sub i} and scales), we find that the 2v1 contribution is as big as the 2v2 contribution discussed in recent years in the literature. This means that the phenomenological analyses of σ{sub eff} including only the conventional DPS mechanism have to be revised including explicitly the single-ladder-splitting contributions discussed here. The differential distributions in rapidity and transverse momenta calculated for conventional and single-ladder-splitting DPS processes are however very similar which causes their experimental separation to be rather difficult, if not impossible. The direct consequence of the existence of the two components (conventional and splitting) is the energy and process dependence of the empirical parameter σ{sub eff}. This is illustrated in our paper for the considered processes.

  11. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vs Cancer Contact Us Newly Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prostate ... when my.. Donors Patient Stories About the Prostate Cancer Foundation The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is the world’s leading philanthropic ...

  12. How to diagnose cardiac tamponade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steijn, JHM; Sleijfer, DT; van der Graaf, WTA; van der Sluis, A; Nieboer, P

    Malignant pericardial effusion is a potentially fatal complication of malignancy unless recognised and treated promptly. Patients with this condition are often difficult to diagnose. Physical examination, chest radiography and electrocardiography have poor diagnostic values in identification of

  13. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage and primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Iturrospe, C.; Quilez, I.J.; Echevarria, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is an uncommon entity that is difficult to diagnose given the ambiquity of the clinical signs. Computerized tomography plays a major role in the diagnosis, disclosing enlarged adrenal glands presenting the hyperdense aspect that characterizes this disorders. We present a case of bilateral adrenal hemoorrhage in a patient diagnosed as having primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, which is a less common cause of adrenal hemorrhage than those classically reported, such as anticoagulant therapy, sepsis, shock and abdominal injury. (Author) 8 refs

  14. Detection of anti-Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 70 antibody and anti-canine heat shock protein 70 antibody in sera from Babesia gibsoni-infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Ishida, Mikiko; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Kumara, Wickramasekara Rajapakshage Bandula; Tamura, Yu; Lim, Sue Yee; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-08-25

    Antibodies that recognized either Babesia gibsoni or canine red blood cell (RBC) 70-kilodalton (kDa) protein were detected in serum from acutely and chronically B. gibsoni-infected. In those sera, antibodies that reacted with recombinant B. gibsoni and canine heat shock protein 70 (rBgHsp70 and rcHsp70) were detected; therefore, B. gibsoni and canine RBC 70-kDa proteins seemed to be BgHsp70 and cHsp70, respectively. In infected dogs, the amounts of these antibodies increased after infection. Interestingly, polyclonal antibody raised against rBgHsp70 in two rabbits reacted not only with rBgHsp70 but also with rcHsp70 and native cHsp70 from canine RBCs. Because BgHsp70 showed high homology with cHsp70 (70.8%), anti-rBgHsp70 antibody might cross-react with cHsp70. Additionally, the localizations of both BgHsp70 and cHsp70 were observed by indirect fluorescence assay. As a result, cHsp70 was not found on the membrane surface of erythrocytes, suggesting that erythrocytes would not be targets of anti-cHsp70 antibody. Meanwhile, only exoerythrocytic parasites were stained by anti-rBgHsp70 antibody. This result showed that BgHsp70 would be expressed on the surface of parasites during the exoerythrocytic stage. These results indicated that BgHsp70 was a highly immunogenic protein in canine B. gibsoni infection, and that exoerythrocytic parasites might be targets of anti-BgHsp70 antibody. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... Departments of Internal Medicine and Anatomical Pathology, University of Stellenbosch and MRC. Pigment Metabolism Research Unit, ... at the production of antibodies against natural melanoprotein. and a consideration of our negative .... the random polymerization of several monomers, antibody formed ...

  16. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  17. Diagnoser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaddegaard, Mette; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Schousboe, Birgitte Hartvig

    2012-01-01

    Spiseforstyrrelser er psykiske sygdomme, hvor forholdet til mad, krop og spisning er så forstyrret, at det går ud over ens sundhed og sociale liv. Man skelner typisk mellem anoreksi, bulimi og tvangsoverspisning, men der findes næsten lige så mange kombinationer af spiseforstyrrelsessymptomer, som...

  18. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  19. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  20. Correlation of antemortem diagnoses and postmortem diagnoses in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The postmortem examination is a veritable means of ascertaining the correct diagnoses. Over the years, there has been a severe drop in the number of requests for postmortem examination despite its numerous advantages and benefits. The study is aimed at showing the pivotal role of the autopsy in medical ...

  1. Gaucher's disease diagnosed by splenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adas, Mine; Adas, Gokhan; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Altiok, Merih; Ozcan, Deniz

    2009-08-01

    Splenectomy continues to find common therapeutic indications for hematologic disorders. In addition, recently it is also performed in surgical clinics to assist diagnose of some illnesses. Gaucher's disease, especially Type I, is the most frequently encountered lysosomal storage disorder in man. Manifestations of it are highly variable. The most frequently found symptoms include splenomegaly with anaemia and thrombocytopenia, mostly due to hypersplenism, hepatomegaly and bone disease. Four patients were reported in the present study. Three of them were easily diagnosed with Gaucher's disease via bone marrow cytology, and one with Gaucher's disease was detected by pathological examination following the splenectomy. For the pouse of diagnosis of the Gaucher's disease, performing surgery is generally not necessary. However, for the cases of difficult to diagnose by classical methods, the corect diagnosis of Gaucher's disease can only be made by a special operation.

  2. Nursing diagnoses in overweight adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela Santos do Nascimento Rodrigues

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify nursing diagnoses in overweight adolescents from public schools, according to the International Classification for Nursing Practice. A population-based cross-sectional study that investigated the socio-demographic, behavioural and psychological characteristics of adolescents aged from 10 to 14 years. 11 nursing diagnoses were identified: "Risk of overweight", "Risk of impaired adolescent development", "Risk of insecurity in parental role performance", "Risk of the family impaired ability to manage diet regime", "Risk of impaired ability to manage diet regime", "Risk of lack of knowledge of dietary regime", "Risk of excess food intake", "Risk of negative self-image", "Risk of low self-esteem", "Risk of impaired social well-being" and "Impaired exercise pattern". These diagnoses reflect the multifactorial nature of obesity, highlighting the need for interdisciplinary and intersectoral articulation of nursing interventions for prevention and control of overweight.

  3. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  4. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with adrenal hemorrhage in a child : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Han Wook; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    1999-01-01

    Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a disease that is clinically diagnosed if a patient suffers recurrent thromboses, stroke, recurrent fetal loss, livedo reticularis, and thrombocytopenia, without evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective diseases. Adrenal hemorrhage in a patient with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rarely recognized, but potentially catastrophic disorder. We recently encountered bilateral adrenal hemorrhaging in a child with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and casem as well as reviewing the literature

  5. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with adrenal hemorrhage in a child : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Han Wook; Yoon, Chong Hyun [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a disease that is clinically diagnosed if a patient suffers recurrent thromboses, stroke, recurrent fetal loss, livedo reticularis, and thrombocytopenia, without evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective diseases. Adrenal hemorrhage in a patient with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rarely recognized, but potentially catastrophic disorder. We recently encountered bilateral adrenal hemorrhaging in a child with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and casem as well as reviewing the literature.

  6. How to diagnose acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mostbeck, Gerhard; Adam, E Jane; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2016-01-01

    and complementary imaging with MRI/CT if indicated. Accordingly, both ionizing radiation to our patients and cost of pre-therapeutic diagnosis of AA will be low, with low negative appendectomy and perforation rates. Main Messages • Ultrasound (US) should be the first imaging modality for diagnosing acute...... to keep both the negative appendectomy rate and the perforation rate low. Introduced in 1986, graded-compression ultrasound (US) has well-established direct and indirect signs for diagnosing AA. In our opinion, US should be the first-line imaging modality, as graded-compression US has excellent...

  7. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide......-antibody interface and the antibody intraface.the microenvironment and ecology of Acaryochloris and Prochloron, and in this thesis we attempted to further describe the distribution, growth characteristics and adaptive/regulatory mechanisms of these two cyanobacteria, both in their natural habitat and under defined...

  8. Production and purification of polyclonal antibody against bovine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibodies are important tools in medical researches which have led to many advances in this field. Anti-bovine immunoglobulins and its conjugate with horse radish peroxidase (HRP) is used to diagnose cows' disease by ELISA or western blotting tests. In this study, the production, purification and horse radish peroxidase ...

  9. A radioimmunoassay for anti-virus antibodies in farm animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodak, L.; Smid, B.; Sedlacek, M.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for determination of antibodies to Aujeszky's disease virus in piq serum is described. The results show a number of advantaqes of this method over the routinely employed virus-neutralization test. The possibility of using the RIA method in diagnosing other viral diseases of farm animals is suggested. (authors)

  10. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  11. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  12. Bifunctional antibodies for radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Bardies, M; Peltier, P; Gautherot, E; Barbet, J

    1995-04-01

    In two-step targeting technique using bifunctional antibodies, a nonradiolabeled immunoconjugate with slow uptake kinetics (several days) is initially injected, followed by a small radiolabeled hapten with fast kinetics (several hours) that binds to the bispecific immunoconjugate already taken up by the tumor target. In patients with colorectal or medullary thyroid cancer, clinical studies performed with an anti-CEA/anti-DTPA-indium bifunctional antibody and an indium-111-labeled di-DTPA-TL bivalent hapten showed that tumor uptake was not modified compared to results for F(ab')2 fragments of the same anti-CEA antibody directly labeled with indium-111, whereas the radioactivity of normal tissues was significantly reduced (3- to 6-fold). The fast tumor uptake kinetics (several hours) and high or very high tumor-to-normal tissue ratios obtained with the bifunctional antibody technique are favorable parameters for efficient radioimmunotherapy.

  13. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody Blood Tests Researchers have discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of ... do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? ...

  14. Diagnoses and interventions in podiatry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuijderduin, W.M.; Dekker, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study a quantitative description is given of diagnoses and interventions in podiatry. Data are used from a survey on podiatry practice in The Netherlands. Data have been recorded by 36 podiatrists on 897 patients. Information was gathered on patient characteristics, the medical

  15. Validation of commercial Mas receptor antibodies for utilization in Western Blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghi, Valeria; Fernández, Natalia Cristina; Gándola, Yamila Belén; Piazza, Verónica Gabriela; Quiroga, Diego Tomás; Guilhen Mario, Érica; Felix Braga, Janaína; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Dominici, Fernando Pablo; Muñoz, Marina Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Mas receptor (MasR) is a G protein-coupled receptor proposed as a candidate for mediating the angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2-Ang (1-7) protective axis of renin-angiotensin system. Because the role of this receptor is not definitively clarified, determination of MasR tissue distribution and expression levels constitutes a critical knowledge to fully understanding its function. Commercially available antibodies have been widely employed for MasR protein localization and quantification, but they have not been adequately validated. In this study, we carried on an exhaustive evaluation of four commercial MasR antibodies, following previously established criteria. Western Blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry studies starting from hearts and kidneys from wild type (WT) mice revealed that antibodies raised against different MasR domains yielded different patterns of reactivity. Furthermore, staining patterns appeared identical in samples from MasR knockout (MasR-KO) mice. We verified by polymerase chain reaction analysis that the MasR-KO mice used were truly deficient in this receptor as MAS transcripts were undetectable in either heart or kidney from this animal model. In addition, we evaluated the ability of the antibodies to detect the human c-myc-tagged MasR overexpressed in human embryonic kidney cells. Three antibodies were capable of detecting the MasR either by WB or by immunofluorescence, reproducing the patterns obtained with an anti c-myc antibody. In conclusion, although three of the selected antibodies were able to detect MasR protein at high expression levels observed in a transfected cell line, they failed to detect this receptor in mice tissues at physiological expression levels. As a consequence, validated antibodies that can recognize and detect the MasR at physiological levels are still lacking.

  16. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs

  18. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Ask Your Doctor Information for ...

  19. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Ask Your Doctor Information for Patients Many adult ...

  20. Disseminated histoplasmosis diagnosed on bone marrow aspirate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TB) and other causes of hepatosplenomegaly such as visceral leishmaniasis. Laboratory diagnosis includes culture, direct staining, antigen and antibody detection. Antibody detection may give false negative in the immunocompromised patient.

  1. Diagnosing GORD in respiratory medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris James Timms

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is increasing in prevalence and is associated with several lung diseases such as asthma and COPD. Current diagnostic methods are imperfect, being insensitive, nonspecific, expensive or invasive. An accurate diagnosis of GORD can aid effective treatment with a significant clinical impact. Novel methods such as exhaled breath condensate analysis and electronic nose technology have the potential to improve the accuracy of diagnosing GORD.

  2. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  3. Radioimmunoscintigraphy in lung cancer diagnosing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjikostova, H.

    1999-01-01

    As the lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer at males, the exact staging is essential. Monoclonal antibodies marked with radionuclides like 131 I, 111 In, 99m Tc, etc., allow detecting and staging the small cell lung cancer with sensibility 90%, specificity 45% and accuracy 85%. It is suggested this method to be applied simultaneously with computerized tomography. The diagnostic possibility of radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) in earlier detection, recurrence or metastasis as well as follow up the effect of therapy performed at patients with lung cancer are reviewed. RIS is performed with IODOMAB-R-2 (Sorin Biomedica) 131 I antiCEA Mob F(ab') 2 , dose 92.5-185 MBq. Planar images were performed 72 hours after i.v. injection. Four patients with epidermoid squamous cell cancer were examined. Positive results were obtained at 3 patients and one false negative. In general sensitivity of radioimmunoscintigraphy of lung cancer is 75-90%. However there are difficulties at its application linked with necessity of permanent availability of radiolabelled antibodies with high specific activity at the moment of their injection. Despite all radioimmunoscintigraphy is developing as an useful diagnostic method for evaluation and follow up of lung cancer patients

  4. Longitudinal study of interferon-gamma, serum antibody and milk antibody responses in cattle infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jungersen, Gregers; Lind, Peter

    2004-01-01

    -blood lymphocytes (IFN-gamma test), and measurement of antibody responses against M. paratuberculosis in serum and milk by an in-house absorbed ELISA. The IFN-gamma test diagnosed higher proportions of infected and exposed animals than the antibody ELISAs. The highest sensitivity of IFN-gamma test was in infected...... cattle of 2+ years of age. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses supported the assumption that the IFN-gamma test had a better performance than antibody tests of animals of 1+ and 2+ years of age. However, for animals of 3+ years all tests performed equally well. Application of single sampling...... compared with repeated samplings showed better performance of the IFN-gamma test by repeated samplings, and the milk antibody ELISA in animals of 3+ years of age performed significantly better with repeated sampling compared with single sampling. In conclusion, the IFN-gamma test may be applied...

  5. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  6. Utility of Shear Wave Elastography for Diagnosing Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Fukuhara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of shear wave elastography (SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI for diagnosing chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT and to verify the effect of fibrotic thyroid tissue on shear wave velocity (SWV. The subjects were 229 patients with 253 normal thyroid lobes (controls and 150 CAT lobes. The SWV for CAT (2.47 ± 0.57 m/s was significantly higher than that for controls (1.59 ± 0.41 m/s (P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve for CAT was 0.899, and the SWV cut-off value was 1.96 m/s. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 87.4%, 78.7%, and 85.1%, respectively. Levels of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies and thyroid isthmus thickness were correlated with tissue stiffness in CAT. However, there was no correlation between levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and tissue stiffness. Quantitative SWE is useful for diagnosing CAT, and it is possible that SWE can be used to evaluate the degree of fibrosis in patients with CAT.

  7. Probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Takahito; Yamamoto, Izumi; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kamejima, Sahoko; Katsumata, Haruki; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Furuya, Maiko; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies. A 44 year-old male was admitted to our hospital for a kidney transplant. The donor, his wife, was an ABO minor mismatch (blood type O to A) and had Gitelman syndrome. Graft function was delayed; his serum creatinine level was 10.1 mg/dL at 3 days after transplantation. Open biopsy was performed immediately; no venous thrombosis was observed during surgery. Histology revealed moderate peritubular capillaritis and mild glomerulitis without C4d immunoreactivity. Flow cytometric crossmatching was positive, but no panel-reactive antibodies against HLA or donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) were detected. Taken together, we diagnosed him with probable C4d-negative accelerated antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA, non-MICA antibodies, the patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day for 3 days), plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin (40 g/body), and rituximab (200 mg/body) were performed. Biopsy at 58 days after transplantation, at which time S-Cr levels were 1.56 mg/dL, found no evidence of rejection. This case, presented with a review of relevant literature, demonstrates that probable C4d-negative accelerated acute AMR can result from non-HLA antibodies. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  9. [Effect of anti-D prevention on the incidence of irregular erythrocyte antibodies in pregnant patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, H; Drechsler, H J; Wirsing von König, C H

    1987-11-01

    The immunohaematology results found during antenatal care from 1963-1981 were used to try to answer the question whether and how much the anti-D-prophylaxis, which was started in 1967 and was given to German and foreign pregnant women post partum or after abortion, had affected the frequency of immunization to D and other erythrocyte antigens. The results allow the following statements: 1. From 1973-3 or 4 years after the general introduction of anti-D prophylaxis-until 1981, a continuously sustained decline in the frequency of anti-D in the German pregnant women was found. This could not be found in the corresponding group of foreign pregnant mothers. 2. Additionally, a statistically significant reduction in the frequency of anti-D + C could only be found in the German group. 3. After 1973, other erythrocyte antibodies in combination with anti-D were only found sporadically. A rise in the frequency of other erythrocyte antibodies, such as anti-C, was not observed. 4. The frequency of "non-anti-D antibodies" was significantly higher in the foreigners than in the German group during the whole observation period. This was due to the significant increase in anti-Lea, anti-Leb, anti-H, anti-P1 and the nonidentifiable antibodies in the foreign group.

  10. The importance of serological tests implementation in disseminated candidiasis diagnose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegić, Merima; Numanović, Fatima; Delibegović, Zineta; Tihić, Nijaz; Nurkić, Mahmut; Hukić, Mirsada

    2013-03-01

    Candidiasis is defined as an infection or disease caused by a fungus of the genus Candida. Rate of disseminated candidiasis increases with the growth of the number of immunocompromised patients. In the the last few decades the incidence of disseminated candidiasis is in growth as well as the mortality rate. The aim of this survey is to show the importance of serological tests implementation in disseminated candidiasis diagnose. This is a prospective study involving 60 patients with malign diseases with and without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis and 30 healthy people who represent the control group. Apart from hemoculture, detection of circulating mannan antigen and adequate antibodies of Candida species applying comercial ELISA test was determined in each patient. This survey deals with relevant factors causing disseminated candidiasis. This survey showed that the group of patients with clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis had more patients with positive hemoculture to Candida species, then the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis. The number of patients being examined and positive to antigens and antibodies was higher (p candidiasis (7/30; 23.3%), then in the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis (0/30; 0%): Average value of titra antigen was statistically higher (p candidiasis 6/30 (20%) of patients had Candida spp.positive hemocultures while in the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis 1/30 (3.3%) of patients had Candida spp. positive hemocultures, which was considerably higher (p candidiasis were statistically significant, while correlation of results of hemoculture and antibodies was insignificant. Because of low sensitivity of hemoculture and time needed for isolation of Candida spp., introducing serological tests in regular procedures would speed disseminated candidiasis diagnose.

  11. Anticardiolipin antibody and anti-beta 2 glycoprotein I antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, Anne; Moffat, Karen; Crowther, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease and is a risk factor for a number of clinical manifestations; the classic presentations include fetal death or thrombosis (arterial or venous thromboembolism), in the presence of persistently increased titers of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The actual cause of APS is unknown but thought to be multifactorial. The disease is characterized by the presence of a heterogenous population of autoantibodies against phospholipid-binding proteins. APS presents either in isolation with no evidence of an underlying disease or in concert with an autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. The wide diversity in clinical presentation often causes difficulty in identifying and treating patients and therefore a concise laboratory report containing interpretative comments is required to provide needed guidance to the clinician. For a diagnosis of APS to be made both clinical and laboratory classification criteria must be met. Laboratory testing to identify aPL antibodies includes lupus anticoagulant (liquid-based clotting assays) and immunological solid-phase assays (usually enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay formats) for IgG and/or IgM anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies and anti-beta 2 glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) antibodies. Other autoantibodies, such as those directed against anionic phospholipids, can also be assayed; however they are not of clinical significance. Participation in a quality assurance program and an in-depth technical and clinical understanding of testing for aPL antibodies are required, as methods are limited by poor robustness, reproducibility, specificity, and standardization. Testing is further complicated by the lack of a "gold standard" laboratory test to diagnose or classify a patient as having APS. This chapter discusses the clinical and laboratory theoretical and technical aspects of aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody assays.

  12. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you have a higher chance of developing thyroid disease in the future. Antithyroid microsomal antibodies may be ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. Weiss RE, Refetoff S. Thyroid function testing. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and ... Lupus Read more ...

  13. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    determine their targets on the cell. The newly discovered antibodies will then be engineered for utility as new highly specific drugs and diagnostics in...are from the aldo-keto reductase family (AKRs). Remarkably, 3 of the top 10 genes with induction in the mesenchymal TES2b cells Figure 1. Amino

  14. Monoclonal antibodies in haematopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignani, F.; Martelli, M.F.; Mason, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Oncogene (c-myc, c-myb) amplification in acute myelogenous leukaemia; Ultrastructural characterization of leukaemic cells with monoloclonal antibodies; Origin of B-cell malignancies; Immunohistology of gut lymphomas; and Spurious evidence of lineage infidelity in monocytic leukaemia.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  16. Antiphospholipid syndrome, antiphospholipid antibodies and solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Moreno, J; Callejas-Rubio, J L; Ríos-Fernández, R; Ortego-Centeno, N

    2015-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is considered a high risk factor for any kind of surgery. Considering that all solid organ transplants are critically dependent on the patency of vascular anastomosis, there is much concern about the consequences this pro-thrombotic condition may have on transplantation. Relatively little information is available in the literature assessing the real risk that antiphospholipid syndrome or the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies represent in solid organ transplantation. The aim of this article is to review the literature related to transplantation of solid organs in patients diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome or patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Matowicka-Karna

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  18. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2014-05-15

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  19. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  20. Anti-microbial antibodies in celiac disease: Trick or treat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Maria; Foldi, Ildiko; Altorjay, Istvan; Palyu, Eszter; Udvardy, Miklos; Tumpek, Judit; Sipka, Sandor; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma Rita; Nemes, Eva; Veres, Gabor; Dinya, Tamas; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Norman, Gary L; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of a new set of anti-glycan and anti-outer membrane protein (anti-OMP) antibodies in a Hungarian cohort of adult Celiac disease (CD) patients. METHODS: 190 consecutive CD patients [M/F: 71/119, age:39.9 (SD:14.1) years], 100 healthy, and 48 gastrointestinal controls were tested for glycan anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (gASCA), anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-chitobioside, anti-mannobioside, anti-OMP antibodies and major NOD2/CARD15 mutations. Thirty out of 82 CD patients enrolled at the time of diagnosis were re-evaluated for the same antibodies after longstanding gluten-free diet (GFD). RESULTS: 65.9% of the CD patients were positive for at least one of the tested antibodies at the time of the diagnosis. Except anti-OMP and ALCA, anti-microbial antibodies were exclusively seen in untreated CD; however, the overall sensitivity was low. Any glycan positivity (LR+: 3.13; 95% CI: 2.08-4.73) was associated with an increased likelihood ratio for diagnosing CD. Significant correlation was found between the levels of anti-glycan and anti-endomysial or anti-transglutaminase antibodies. Anti-glycan positivity was lost after longstanding GFD. Anti-glycan antibody titers were associated with symptoms at presentation, but not the presence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations. Patients with severe malabsorption more frequently had multiple antibodies at diagnosis (P = 0.019). CONCLUSION: The presence of anti-glycan antibodies in CD seems to be secondary to the impaired small bowel mucosa which can lead to increased antigen presentation. Furthermore, anti-glycan positivity may be considered an additional marker of CD and dietary adherence. PMID:19701969

  1. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  2. The prevalence of irregular erythrocyte antibodies among antenatal women in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahuja, Sangeeta; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Pujani, Mukta; Jain, Manjula

    2011-10-01

    Universal screening of all antenatal women, including D antigen-positive pregnant ones, is mandatory in most developed countries. However, no guidelines on this issue are available for developing countries such as India. Furthermore, there is limited information on immunisation rates in pregnant women (D antigen-positive and D antigen-negative) from India. We, therefore, studied the prevalence of alloantibodies among multigravida women in India. In this prospective study, carried out to detect the prevalence of alloantibodies among multigravida women in India, 3,577 multigravida women attending antenatal clinics were typed for ABO and D antigens and screened for alloantibodies by column agglutination technology. The medical history and detailed obstetric history of these women were reviewed and information recorded on any prior haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn among siblings and/or blood transfusions. The overall prevalence of alloantibodies in this study was 1.25%. There was a statistically significant difference between alloimmunisation rates in the D antigen-negative and D antigen-positive groups (10.7% versus 0.12%, respectively). Anti-D antibody contributed to 78.4% of total alloimmunisations in our study. Anti-D was the most common culprit responsible for alloimmunisation. Other alloantibodies found included anti-C, anti-M, anti-S and anti-c. Large-scale population-based studies are required to assess the real magnitude of alloimmunisation in pregnant women in India.

  3. Paraphilic diagnoses in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Richard B; Kaplan, Meg S

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 has been under revision since 1999 and is scheduled for publication in 2013. This article will review the major proposed modifications of the Paraphilias. The information reviewed was obtained from PubMed, PsychInfo, the DSM-5.org website and other sources and reviewed. Pedohebephilia, Hypersexual Disorder and Paraphilic Coercive Disorder are new proposed diagnoses. Paraphilias have been assigned their own chapter in DSM- 5 and a distinction has been made between Paraphilias and Paraphilic Disorders. Victim numbers have been included in diagnosis of paraphilias that involve victims and remission and severity measures have been added to all paraphilias. Transvestic Disorder can apply to males or females, Fetishistic Disorder now includes partialism, and Sexual Masochism Disorder has Asphyxiophilia as a specifier. This study is based on a literature review and influenced by the knowledge and biases of the authors. The Paraphilic Disorders Section of the DSM-5 represents a significant departure from DSMIV-TR.

  4. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  5. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  6. Analysis of 303 Ro/SS-A antibody-positive patients: is this antibody a possible marker for malignancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckle, B C; Stanarevic, G; Ratzinger, G; Sepp, N T

    2012-11-01

    The risk of cancer in patients with autoimmune diseases has been investigated in several studies. Ro/SS-A antibodies are frequent and specific autoantibodies among patients with various autoimmune diseases. To assess the risk of cancer in individuals with positive Ro/SS-A antibodies and to analyse their clinical and laboratory characteristics. Consecutive patients (n = 303) with Ro/SS-A antibody positivity were collected during 11 years in our outpatient clinic for autoimmune diseases and were retrospectively analysed. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all cancers were calculated. In addition, we identified further clinical and laboratory characteristics of Ro/SS-A antibody-positive patients indicating the development or existence of a malignancy. Fifty (16·5%) patients were diagnosed with malignancies. Ro/SS-A antibody was strongly associated with malignant diseases (SIR 2·6, 95% CI 1·9-6·1), particularly melanoma (SIR 33·3, 95% CI 5·2-188·6), T-cell lymphoma (SIR 16·7, 95% CI 2·9-128·9), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SIR 10·6, 95% CI 1·5-78·9) and breast carcinoma (SIR 4·98, 95% CI 1·3-28·3). Logistic regression modelling revealed that Ro/SS-A antibody-positive patients aged 55 years or older, presenting with fever, anaemia and cutaneous lupus erythematosus, have a greater probability of developing cancer and are considered high-risk patients, as compared with Ro/SS-A antibody-positive patients with none of the mentioned clinical criteria. In our cohort of Ro/SS-A antibody-positive patients, an overall increased risk of malignancy was noticed. Regular screening tests including imaging and laboratory values are justified in Ro/SS-A antibody-positive patients who exhibit the mentioned clinical criteria. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  7. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... website. Skip to main content SaveMyFertility An Online Fertility Preservation Toolkit for Patients and Their Providers Open ... Diagnosed with Cancer You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation ...

  8. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Children Diagnosed with Cancer You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer ... SJ, et al. Incorporating fertility preservation into the care of young oncology patients. Cancer. 2010;117:4- ...

  9. Magnetic Purification of Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar Laxman

    This work aimed at the development of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody purification and at the evaluation of their performance in Magnetic fishing and in a newly developed hybrid technology Magnetic Aqueous Two Phase Systems. Magnetic materials were produced by coprecipitation and solvothermal approaches. Natural polymers such as dextran, extracellular polysaccharide and gum Arabic were employed for coating of iron oxide magnetic supports. Polymer coated magnetic supports were then modified with synthetic antibody specific ligands,namely boronic acid, a triazine ligand (named 22/8) and an Ugi ligand (named A2C7I1). To optimize the efficacy of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody magnetic fishing, various solutions of pure and crude antibody solutions along with BSA as a non-specific binding protein were tested. The selectivity of magnetic nanoparticle for antibody, IgG, was found effective with boronic acid and ligand 22/8. Magnetic supports were then studied for their performance in high gradient magnetic separator for effective separation capability as well as higher volume handling capability. The magnetic materials were also supplemented to aqueous two phase systems, devising a new purification technology. For this purpose, magnetic particles modified with boronic acid were more effective. This alternative strategy reduced the time of operation,maximized separation capability (yield and purity), while reducing the amount of salt required. Boronic acid coated magnetic particles bound 170 +/- 10 mg hIgG/g MP and eluted 160 +/- 5 mg hIgG/g MP, while binding only 15 +/- 5 mg BSA/g MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 x 105 M-1 (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed/g MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely

  10. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Clamfication) Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever 𔃼 PERSONAL AjTHOR(S...FELD GROUP SUBGROUP Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever . 19...clinically diagnosed as dengue hemorrhagic fever . Antibody-dependent enhancement of virus growth was quantitated by measurement of virus yields in

  11. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Parodis

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204 or without (n = 294 LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous, before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes. Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all, but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are

  12. Clinical use of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Hoer, Gustav; Cox, P.H.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies as tumour specific carrier molecules for therapeutic agents or as in vivo diagnostic reagents when labelled with radionuclides or NMR signal enhancers is attracting more and more attention. The potential is enormous but the technical problems are also considerable requiring the concerted action of many different scientific disciplines. This volume is based upon a symposium organised in Frankfurt in 1990 under the auspices of the European Association of Nuclear Medicines' Specialist Task Groups on Cardiology and the Utility of Labelled Antibodies. It gives a multidisciplinary review of the state of the art and of problems to be solved as well as recording the not inconsiderable successes which have been booked to date. The book will be of value as a reference to both clinicians and research scientists. refs.; figs.; tabs

  13. New cases of irregular blood group antibodies other than anti-D in pregnancy. Frequency and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornstad, L

    1983-01-01

    The frequency of irregular blood group antibodies detected for the first time in pregnant women during the period 1975-80 has been examined. Whereas Rh(D)-negative gravidae in Norway are examined immuno-hematologically three times during pregnancy, Rh(D)-positive women are tested once only, usually early in pregnancy. Nevertheless, about one-third of the new cases of immunization within the Rh system were found in the Rh-positive women. In the latter, anti-E and anti-c were the Rh antibodies most frequently encountered. Among other irregular antibodies which can cause hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), those of the Kell and Duffy systems are the ones second in frequency and clinical significance to the Rh antibodies. In the present series about 40% of the new cases of immunization within the Rh, Kell and Duffy systems were found in Rh-positive women. This proportion would undoubtedly have been greater if also the Rh-positive women had been retested for the presence of irregular blood group antibodies towards the end of the gestation. Such a retesting of Rh-positive gravidae is desirable both for a better prediction and early diagnosis of HDN and to facilitate the procurement of compatible blood if the woman should need an emergency blood transfusion.

  14. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column.

  15. [Differential diagnoses of West syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Natalio

    2013-09-06

    This study describes the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of epileptic spasms, and more especially those that occur during the first two years of life (infantile spasms). West syndrome has been clearly defined as the association between infantile spasms with an electroencephalographic pattern of hypsarrhythmia. Although intellectual deficit appears in almost all cases in which infantile spasms are not controlled with medication, this is a developmental aspect of the condition and not a manifestation that must necessarily be present in order to define the syndrome. The analysis of the interictal and ictal electroencephalogram readings, together with the clinical characteristics of the spasms and the neurological examination of patients, provides some orientation as regards the causations. Despite the spectrum that the title of this work focuses on, the study does not cover the treatment of early infants with West syndrome. Emphasis is placed on the differential diagnoses of West syndrome with other epileptic syndromes that manifest in the first two years of life, and more especially with a series of abnormal non-epileptic motor phenomena that occur in early infants. All these last non-epileptic disorders are displayed in a table, but benign myoclonus of early infancy or Fejerman syndrome is given as a paradigmatic example for the differential diagnosis. The primordial aim is to prevent neurologically healthy early infants from receiving antiepileptic drugs and even adrenocorticotropic hormone or corticoids due to a mistaken diagnosis.

  16. PMab-52: Specific and Sensitive Monoclonal Antibody Against Cat Podoplanin for Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Itai, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Takuro; Yanaka, Miyuki; Saidoh, Noriko; Chang, Yao-Wen; Handa, Saori; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Ichii, Osamu; Konnai, Satoru; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-10-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is expressed in several normal tissues, such as lymphatic endothelial cells, podocytes of renal glomerulus, and type I alveolar cells of lung. PDPN activates platelet aggregation by binding to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) on platelet. Although monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human PDPN, mouse PDPN, rat PDPN, rabbit PDPN, dog PDPN, and bovine PDPN have been established, anticat PDPN (cPDPN) mAbs have not been developed. In this study, we immunized mice with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cell lines expressing cPDPN, and developed anti-cPDPN mAbs. One of the clones, PMab-52 (IgM, kappa), detected cPDPN specifically in flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. PMab-52 is also useful for detecting feline squamous cell carcinoma cells in immunohistochemical analysis. PMab-52 is expected to be useful for investigating the function of cPDPN in feline carcinomas.

  17. Studies on the detection of erythrocytic antibodies with a radioimmuno-antiglobulin assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djibey, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    The RIA with I-125-anti-IgG and I-125-anti-C3b was used. Various factors in RIA were tested for the purpose of optimisation. As a rule, incomplete anti-D (test serum of one charge) was used. Anti-Kell was used for specific problems. After optimisation of the method, patient sera were studied which contained auto- or allo-antibodies in the fresh state. More significant findings were obtained with the direct RIAGT. Indirect methods did not show a clearly enhanced detection sensitivity of erythrocyte autoantibodies, but they may serve for a closer investigation of diffuse reactions of patient sera in the enzyme test. The direct RIA is clearly of advantage in cases in which the complement Coombs test alone is positive. (orig./MG) [de

  18. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  19. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  20. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zider, Alexander; Drakeman, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commer...

  1. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  2. Efforts to enrich evidence for accurate diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There are always difficulties to gain accurate diagnoses for complicated disease conditions, especially for the diagnoses of disorders with similar characteristics. With advanced technology, clinicians are able to detect tiny changes during the on-going diseased processes. Research papers in the current issue help to understand some features of some disorders. In this case, the current issue would provide some references or hints to the accurate diagnoses and the precisional therapies for some disorders.

  3. Characterization of changes in serum anti-glycan antibodies in Crohn's disease--a longitudinal analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Rieder

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Anti-glycan antibodies are a promising tool for differential diagnosis and disease stratification of patients with Crohn's disease (CD. We longitudinally assessed level and status changes of anti-glycan antibodies over time in individual CD patients as well as determinants of this phenomenon. METHODS: 859 serum samples derived from a cohort of 253 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients (207 CD, 46 ulcerative colitis (UC were tested for the presence of anti-laminarin (Anti-L, anti-chitin (Anti-C, anti-chitobioside (ACCA, anti-laminaribioside (ALCA, anti-mannobioside (AMCA and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (gASCA antibodies by ELISA. All patients had at least two and up to eleven serum samples taken during the disease course. RESULTS: Median follow-up time for CD was 17.4 months (Interquartile range (IQR 8.0, 31.6 months and for UC 10.9 months (IQR 4.9, 21.0 months. In a subgroup of CD subjects marked changes in the overall immune response (quartile sum score and levels of individual markers were observed over time. The marker status (positive versus negative remained widely stable. Neither clinical phenotype nor NOD2 genotype was associated with the observed fluctuations. In a longitudinal analysis neither changes in disease activity nor CD behavior led to alterations in the levels of the glycan markers. The ability of the panel to discriminate CD from UC or its association with CD phenotypes remained stable during follow-up. In the serum of UC patients neither significant level nor status changes were observed. CONCLUSIONS: While the levels of anti-glycan antibodies fluctuate in a subgroup of CD patients the antibody status is widely stable over time.

  4. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... of the humanization experiment protocol....

  5. Antibody-nanoparticle conjugates to enhance the sensitivity of ELISA-based detection methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M Billingsley

    Full Text Available Accurate antigen detection is imperative for clinicians to diagnose disease, assess treatment success, and predict patient prognosis. The most common technique used for the detection of disease-associated biomarkers is the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In an ELISA, primary antibodies are incubated with biological samples containing the biomarker of interest. Then, detectible secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP bind the primary antibodies. Upon addition of a color-changing substrate, the samples provide a colorimetric signal that directly correlates to the targeted biomarker concentration. While ELISAs are effective for analyzing samples with high biomarker content, they lack the sensitivity required to analyze samples with low antigen levels. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of ELISAs could be enhanced by replacing freely delivered primary antibodies with antibody-nanoparticle conjugates that provide excess binding sites for detectible secondary antibodies, ultimately leading to increased signal. Here, we investigated the use of nanoshells (NS decorated with antibodies specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR as a model system (EGFR-NS. We incubated one healthy and two breast cancer cell lines, each expressing different levels of EGFR, with EGFR-NS, untargeted NS, or unconjugated EGFR antibodies, as well as detectable secondary antibodies. We found that EGFR-NS consistently increased signal intensity relative to unconjugated EGFR antibodies, with a substantial 13-fold enhancement from cells expressing high levels of EGFR. Additionally, 40x more unconjugated antibodies were required to detect EGFR compared to those conjugated to NS. Our results demonstrate that antibody-nanoparticle conjugates lower the detection limit of traditional ELISAs and support further investigation of this strategy with other antibodies and nanoparticles. Owing to their enhanced sensitivity, we anticipate that

  6. Anti-HCV antibody among newly diagnosed HIV patients in Ughelli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    persistent HCV to cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular car- cinoma has also been shown to be associated with HIV ..... 52. Park Y, Lee JH, Kim BS, et al. New Automated. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Core Antigen Assay as an Al- ternative to Real-Time PCR for HCV RNA Quantifica- tion. J. Clin. Microbiol. 2010; 48(6): 2253–56. 53.

  7. Anti-HCV antibody among newly diagnosed HIV patients in Ughelli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15.0%) with no tattoos. We found no significant correlation with transfusion, intravenous drug use (IDU), men that have sex with men (MSM), tattooing and the seroprevalence of HCV. However, significant correlation existed with age, sex and ...

  8. The use of anti-intercellular substance antibody in diagnosing patients with clinical suspicion of pemphigus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Han Wang

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This study provided practical statistics for the accuracy of anti-ICS IIF tests. Due to the high false-positive rate and low positive-predictive rate, the results of anti-ICS IIF for pemphigus diagnosis should be carefully interpreted.

  9. Molecular and serological diagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi infection among patients with diagnosed Erythema migrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrusik, Maciej; Grygorczuk, Sambor; Skotarczak, Bogumila; Wodecka, Beata; Rymaszewska, Anna; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Zajkowska, Joanna; Swierzbińska, Renata; Hermanowska-Szpakowicz, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of Borrelia burgdorferi DNA detection in the blood and urine of patients diagnosed with erythema migrans, and compare the results of PCR-based methods with ELISA methodology. The latter was used to detect serum antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi of the IgM and IgG classes, before and after antibiotic therapy. The study included 86 patients hospitalized in the Department of Infectious Diseases and Neuroinfections in the Medical Academy in Białystok, diagnosed with the erythema migrans phase of Lyme borreliosis. Examinations were carried out twice: the first at the moment of diagnosis (Trial 1), the second after 4 weeks of antibiotic therapy. The study showed that antibiotic therapy in the early phase of borreliosis does not decrease the sensitivity of PCR and that after 4 weeks of therapy (Trial 2), spirochete DNA is still detectable in most patients (45/86). There was no correlation between detectability of spirochete DNA and the presence of antibodies against B. burgdorferi s.l. (assessed by ELISA) during the course of erythema migrans. The largest percentage of positive results in the detection of B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA was observed in patients who simultaneously possessed IgM and IgG antibodies against B. burgdorferi, while the lowest percentage of PCR positive results was among patients with only IgM antibodies.

  10. Glycine receptor antibody mediated Progressive Encephalomyelitis with Rigidity and Myoclonus (PERM): a rare but treatable neurological syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, W M; Howard, R; Chalmers, R M; Woodhall, M R; Waters, P; Vincent, A; Wickremaratchi, M M

    2014-04-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with respiratory compromise and was intubated. After tracheostomy, he was found to have ophthalmoplegia, severe limb rigidity, stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and autonomic dysfunction. For 1 week before admission, there had been a prodromal illness with low mood, hallucinations and limb myoclonus. Serum glycine receptor antibodies were strongly positive: we diagnosed progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Despite a relapse, he has done well following immunotherapies. The clinical syndrome of encephalomyelitis with rigidity, described in 1976, often has a severe progressive course. A minority of patients have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The association with glycine receptor antibody was first reported in 2008, and we briefly review subsequent case reports to illustrate the range of clinical features. The antibody is likely to be disease mediating, although this remains unproven. The spectrum of diagnosable and treatable antibody mediated neurological syndromes is expanding. It is vital to recognise these conditions early to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  11. Targeted cancer therapy through antibody fragments-decorated nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibakhshi, Abbas; Abarghooi Kahaki, Fatemeh; Ahangarzadeh, Shahrzad; Yaghoobi, Hajar; Yarian, Fatemeh; Arezumand, Roghaye; Ranjbari, Javad; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2017-12-28

    Active targeting in cancer nanomedicine, for improved delivery of agents and diagnose, has been reviewed as a successful way for facilitating active uptake of theranostic agents by the tumor cells. The application of a targeting moiety in the targeted carrier complexes can play an important role in differentiating between tumor and healthy tissues. The pharmaceutical carriers, as main part of complexes, can be polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes, nanogels and carbon nanotubes. The antibodies are among the natural ligands with highest affinity and specificity to target pharmaceutical nanoparticle conjugates. However, the limitations, such as size and long circulating half-lives, hinder reproducible manufacture in clinical studies. Therefore, novel approaches have moved towards minimizing and engineering conventional antibodies as fragments like scFv, Fab, nanobody, bispecific antibody, bifunctional antibody, diabody and minibody preserving their functional potential. Different formats of antibody fragments have been reviewed in this literature update, in terms of structure and function, as smart ligands in cancer diagnosis and therapy of tumor cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients of vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhokhar, A.; Shaikh, Z.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients suffering from vitiligo with healthy control group. Type of Study: Case control study. Settings: Dermatology Department, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 20th March 2010 to 20th July 2011. Material and Methods: Fifty clinically diagnosed patients of vitiligo, age = 18 yrs and both genders with no history of thyroid disease, past or current use of drugs for thyroid disorder or thyroid surgery were included as cases (Group A). Fifty healthy individuals with no evidence of vitiligo or thyroid disorder on history and physical examination and with no family history of vitiligo, matched for age and gender with cases, were included as control (Group B). Serum anti thyroid peroxidase (anti TPO) antibodies were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both cases and control. Results: Eight (16%) patients in Group A were anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive and forty two (84%) patients were negative while one (2%) patient was anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive in Group B and forty nine (98%) patients were negative (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Anti TPO antibody is significantly more common in patients of vitiligo as compared to general population. (author)

  13. Detection of IgM and IgG antibodies to Chlamydophila pneumoniae in pediatric community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae is an emerging infectious agent with a spectrum of clinical manifestations including lower and upper respiratory tract infections. Aims: To investigate the role of C. pneumoniae in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs in children using serological tests. Settings and Design: Two hundred children, age 2 months to 12 years, hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs were investigated for C. pneumoniae etiology. Materials and Methods: We investigated 200 children hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs, using ELISA for detecting anti-C. pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies. The demographic, clinical and radiological findings for C. pneumoniae antibody positive and C. pneumoniae antibody negative cases were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Data analysis was performed by Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact tests using Epi Info (2002. Results: Clinical and radiological findings in both the groups were comparable. Serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection was observed in 12 (6% patients; specific IgM antibodies were detected in 11 (91.67%; specific IgG antibodies in 1 (8.33% patients, while 4-fold rise in C. pneumoniae IgG antibody titers were noted in none of the patients. Conclusions: C. pneumoniae has a role in community-acquired LRTIs, even in children aged < 5 years. Serological detection using ELISA would enable pediatricians in better management of C. pneumoniae infections.

  14. Theranostics Using Antibodies and Antibody-Related Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moek, Kirsten L; Giesen, Danique; Kok, Iris C; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Jalving, Mathilde; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Brouwers, Adrienne H; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    In theranostics, radiolabeled compounds are used to determine a treatment strategy by combining therapeutics and diagnostics in the same agent. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody-related therapeutics represent a rapidly expanding group of cancer medicines. Theranostic approaches using these

  15. Seroprevalence ofCoxiella burnetiiAntibodies Among Ruminants and Occupationally Exposed People in Thailand, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doung-Ngern, Pawinee; Chuxnum, Teerasak; Pangjai, Decha; Opaschaitat, Pattarin; Kittiwan, Nattinee; Rodtian, Pranee; Buameetoop, Noppawan; Kersh, Gilbert J; Padungtod, Pawin

    2017-04-01

    AbstractLittle is known about the burden of Q fever in Thailand. We conducted a serological study to describe the prevalence of anti- Coxiella burnetii antibodies among ruminants and occupationally exposed persons in response to the report of the first two Q fever endocarditis patients in Thailand in 2012. We randomly selected ruminant sera from brucellosis surveillance and examined sera of 661 occupationally exposed subjects from two provinces of Thailand: Chiangmai and Nakornratchasima. Animal and human sera were tested using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Environmental samples, vaginal swab, and milk from cows in Chiangmai farms with detectable anti- C. burnetii serum antibodies were tested using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among the 1,632 animal sera tested, 64 (3.9%) were seropositive. The prevalence was highest in dairy cattle (4.6%, 45/988), followed by goats (3.5%, 18/516) and sheep (2.1%, 1/48). The prevalence of anti- C. burnetii antibodies in each species varied significantly by province: the prevalence in cattle was higher in Chiangmai (5.5% versus 0%), however, the prevalence in sheep and goats was higher in Nakornratchasima (5.9% versus 1.0%). Four out of 60 milk samples were positive by PCR (6.7%). No environmental samples were positive. Among 661 human samples, 83 (12.6%) were ELISA positive. Seroprevalence was statistically higher in Chiangmai compare with Nakornratchasima (42.8% versus 3.0%). Coxiella burnetii infection exists in Thailand, but the prevalence varies by geographic distribution and animal reservoirs. Further studies focusing on the burden and risk factors of C. burnetii infection among high-risk groups should be conducted.

  16. Serum Antibody Profile during Colonization of the Mouse Gut by Candida albicans: Relevance for Protection during Systemic Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Blanca; Prieto, Daniel; Pitarch, Aida; Gil, Concha; Pla, Jesús; Díez-Orejas, Rosalía

    2017-01-06

    Candida albicans is a commensal microorganism in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts of most individuals that acts as an opportunistic pathogen when the host immune response is reduced. Here, we established different immunocompetent murine models to analyze the antibody responses to the C. albicans proteome during commensalism, commensalism followed by infection, and infection (C, C+I, and I models, respectively). Serum anti-C. albicans IgG antibody levels were higher in colonized mice than in infected mice. The antibody responses during gut commensalism (up to 55 days of colonization) mainly focused on C. albicans proteins involved in stress response and metabolism and differed in both models of commensalism. Different serum IgG antibody-reactivity profiles were also found over time among the three murine models. C. albicans gut colonization protected mice from an intravenous lethal fungal challenge, emphasizing the benefits of fungal gut colonization. This work highlights the importance of fungal gut colonization for future immune prophylactic therapies.

  17. From experience: applying the risk diagnosing methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, Jimme A.; Halman, Johannes I.M.; Song, Michael

    2002-01-01

    No risk, no reward. Companies must take risks to launch new products speedily and successfully. The ability to diagnose and manage risks is increasingly considered of vital importance in high-risk innovation. This article presents the Risk Diagnosing Methodology (RDM), which aims to identify and

  18. The failure diagnoses of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Huanxing.

    1986-01-01

    The earlier period failure diagnoses can raise the safety and efficiency of nuclear reactors. This paper first describes the process abnormality monitoring of core barrel vibration in PWR, inherent noise sources in BWR, sodium boiling in LMFBR and nuclear reactor stability. And then, describes the plant failure diagnoses of primary coolant pumps, loose parts in nuclear reactors, coolant leakage and relief valve location

  19. Immunoparesis in newly diagnosed Multiple Myeloma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørrig, Rasmus; Klausen, Tobias W; Salomo, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Immunoparesis (hypogammaglobulinemia) is associated to an unfavorable prognosis in newly diagnosed Multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, this finding has not been validated in an unselected population-based cohort. We analyzed 2558 newly diagnosed MM patients in the Danish Multiple Myeloma...

  20. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... website. Skip to main content SaveMyFertility An Online Fertility Preservation Toolkit for Patients and Their Providers Open ... Diagnosed with Cancer You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation ...

  1. Immunoparesis in newly diagnosed Multiple Myeloma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørrig, Rasmus; Klausen, Tobias W.; Salomo, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Immunoparesis (hypogammaglobulinemia) is associated to an unfavorable prognosis in newly diagnosed Multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, this finding has not been validated in an unselected population-based cohort. We analyzed 2558 newly diagnosed MM patients in the Danish Multiple Myeloma Reg...

  2. Prevalence and associated factors of incidentally diagnosed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prostatic carcinoma carries a high morbidity and mortality if it is not diagnosed early. In resource limited countries, patients are at increased risk of being diagnosed late as they are operated for presumed benign prostatic hyperplasia. The information on the magnitude and risk factors of this problem in

  3. Antibodies and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Ramasamy, M; Yasawardena, S

    There is considerable interest in using merozoite proteins in a vaccine against falciparum malaria. Observations that antibodies to merozoite surface proteins block invasion are a basis for optimism. This article draws attention to important and varied aspects of how antibodies to Plasmodium

  4. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  5. Antiphospholipid antibodies: standardization and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R S; Friedline, J; Rogers, J S

    1997-09-01

    A phenomenon originally scorned as a laboratory nuisance has turned out to be an important cause of thromboembolism, fetal death, and other forms of human disease. Investigations of this inaptly named "lupus anticoagulant" has led to the discovery of at least two distinct types of autoimmune antibodies. In spite of recent discoveries regarding the pathophysiology of these antibodies, their clinical significance is still controversial.

  6. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA

  7. [Antibody induction after intrauterine interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, J; Giers, G; Bald, R; Hansmann, M; Hanfland, P

    1993-06-01

    Immunohematologic and clinical data, i.e., antibody profile, location of the placenta, mode of cordocentesis, obtained from 48 pregnant patients with irregular erythrocyte antibodies during the last 2 years have been retrospectively evaluated. All fetuses of the patients received intrauterine transfusions for the treatment of fetal erythroblastosis. In 16 (33%) patients (group I) a secondarily induced antibody was detected after the onset of intrauterine transfusion therapy. 32 (67%) patients (group II) did not further develop new antibody specificities. Group I exhibited a significantly different distribution in the location of the placenta (p pregnant women. In group I a 5-fold higher rate of anterior than posterior placenta location was found. The mode of cordocentesis differed significantly (p antibodies by invasive intrauterine interventions in our patients depended indirectly on the location of the placenta and directly on the mode of the puncture (trans- vs. paraplacental access).

  8. Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) in England and Wales, 2004 to 2013: testing and diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Georgina; Croxford, Sara; Tosswill, Jennifer; Raghu, Rajani; Davison, Katy; Hewitt, Patricia; Simmons, Ruth; Taylor, Graham

    2017-05-18

    Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection has been under enhanced surveillance in England and Wales since 2002, however, little is known about testing patterns. Using data from two surveillance systems held at Public Health England, we described HTLV antibody testing patterns between 2008 and 2013 and the demographic and clinical characteristics of persons diagnosed with HTLV in England and Wales between 2004 and 2013. An increase in HTLV testing was observed in England between 2008 and 2013 (3,581 to 7,130). Most tests (82%; 7,597/9,302) occurred within secondary care, 0.5% (48/9,302) of persons were reactive for HTLV antibodies and 0.3% (27/9,302) were confirmed positive. Increasing age and female sex were predictors of a reactive HTLV screen and confirmed diagnosis. Testing in primary care including sexual health and antenatal services was infrequent. Between 2004 and 2013, 858 people were diagnosed with HTLV, most of whom were female (65%; 549/851), of black Caribbean ethnicity (60%), not born in the United Kingdom (72%; 369/514) and asymptomatic at diagnosis (45%; 267/595). Despite increased testing, the epidemiology and clinical features of those diagnosed with HTLV have remained consistent. Apart from donor screening, testing for HTLV infection remains uncommon, except to diagnose associated disease. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  9. Validation studies of nursing diagnoses in neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlína Rabasová

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the review was the analysis of Czech and foreign literature sources and professional periodicals to obtain a relevant comprehensive overview of validation studies of nursing diagnoses in neonatology. Design: Review. Methods: The selection criterion was studies concerning the validation of nursing diagnoses in neonatology. To obtain data from relevant sources, the licensed professional databases EBSCO, Web of Science and Scopus were utilized. The search criteria were: date of publication - unlimited; academic periodicals - full text; peer-reviewed periodicals; search language - English, Czech and Slovak. Results: A total of 788 studies were found. Only 5 studies were eligible for content analysis, dealing specifically with validation of nursing diagnoses in neonatology. The analysis of the retrieved studies suggests that authors are most often concerned with identifying the defining characteristics of nursing diagnoses applicable to both the mother (parents and the newborn. The diagnoses were validated in the domains Role Relationship; Coping/Stress tolerance; Activity/Rest, and Elimination and Exchange. Diagnoses represented were from the field of dysfunctional physical needs as well as the field of psychosocial and spiritual needs. The diagnoses were as follows: Parental role conflict (00064; Impaired parenting (00056; Grieving (00136; Ineffective breathing pattern (00032; Impaired gas exchange (00030; and Impaired spontaneous ventilation (00033. Conclusion: Validation studies enable effective planning of interventions with measurable results and support clinical nursing practice.

  10. Eating Disorders in Connection with other Diagnoses

    OpenAIRE

    Vavrušková, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Poruchy příjmu potravy ve spojitosti s jinými diagnózami. Eating Disorders in Connection with other Diagnoses Bc. Marie Vavrušková The aim of this thesis, which focuses on the topic "Eating Disorders in Connection with Other Diagnoses," is to introduce the different types of eating disorders that have been previously diagnosed (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, psychogenic overeating and new forms of eating disorders), to specify the medical treatment offered to patients in the Czech Republi...

  11. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vaginitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used to diagnose vaginitis. 1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Self-study STD ... Halvorson New Chief of Gynecologic Health and Disease Branch Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, ...

  12. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Surgery is currently the only ... larger incision—is used to make a diagnosis. Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  13. Nursing diagnoses in women deprived of freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabelle de Freitas Ferreira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the nursing diagnoses profile of women deprived of freedom, using the International Classification for Nursing® Practice version 1.0. Methods: a descriptive study, conducted with 186 women deprived of freedom. Nursing Diagnoses were extrapolated based on the clinical data of the participants, collected through a structured form and clinical reasoning. Results: there were 44 nursing diagnostic statements, among the most common, there were: infection risk (70.9%; fluid intake, decreased (61.2%; Sleep, impaired (60.7%; tobacco abuse, started (51.6%; health seeking behavior, committed (50.0%. Conclusion: the diagnoses are related to factors that compromise the biopsychosocial health. The nurse, health staff member in the prison setting, must recognize and assess the individual and collective needs of women deprived of freedom. The inference of nursing diagnoses, based on clinical reasoning, contributes to a humanized, empathic and special care.

  14. How Are Obesity and Overweight Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How are obesity & overweight diagnosed? Using Body Mass Index The most common way to determine if a person is overweight or obese is to calculate body mass index ( ...

  15. ADHD: the impact when not diagnosed

    OpenAIRE

    Souza,Isabella de; Mattos,Paulo; Pina,Camila; Fortes,Didia

    2008-01-01

    ADHD is a highly prevalent disorder in childhood with social, academic and familial difficulties when not diagnosed and treated correctly. The aim of this case report is to demonstrate the impairment of ADHD among generations of the same family.

  16. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a ... Care Providers Home Health A to Z List Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Condition Information How is it diagnosed? Share ...

  17. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Ask Your Doctor Information for Patients Many adult survivors of childhood cancer ... study approved by an IRB . Resources For more information about infertility risk and fertility preservation options for ...

  18. How Are Pelvic Floor Disorders Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How are pelvic floor disorders diagnosed? A physical exam may be all ... fee ). This test is used to evaluate the pelvic floor and rectum while the patient is having a ...

  19. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... study approved by an IRB . Resources For more information about infertility risk and fertility preservation options for children diagnosed with cancer: Visit SaveMyFertility. ...

  20. Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning about Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the past 2 to 3 months. The advantages of being diagnosed this way are that you ... Email: Sign Up Thank you for signing up ' + ' '); $('.survey-form').show(); }, success: function (data) { $('#survey-errors').remove(); $('. ...

  1. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be fertility preservation options available and having your child see a reproductive specialist in a timely manner ... there are options for preserving fertility in your child diagnosed with cancer. You may be focused on ...

  2. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies during gestation are a marker for subsequent depression postpartum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpens, J. L.; Vader, H. L.; Drexhage, H. A.; Wiersinga, W. M.; van Son, M. J.; Pop, V. J.

    2001-01-01

    Depression is not adequately diagnosed in many cases. Therefore, the question arises as to whether markers exist for depression. We investigated whether the presence of thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) during pregnancy can be regarded as a marker for depression in the first year postpartum,

  3. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever. Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85–113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73–0.93], P antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine

  4. Challenges in diagnosing tuberculosis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahman, Nadia; Pedersen, Karin Kæreby; Rosenfeldt, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    Clinical investigations of childhood tuberculosis (TB) are challenged by the paucibacillary nature of the disease and the difficulties in obtaining specimens. We investigated the challenges in diagnosing TB in children in a low-incidence country.......Clinical investigations of childhood tuberculosis (TB) are challenged by the paucibacillary nature of the disease and the difficulties in obtaining specimens. We investigated the challenges in diagnosing TB in children in a low-incidence country....

  5. Diagnosing, managing, and preventing cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward F; Bartoloni, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) can be a perplexing disorder to diagnose and manage. Many practitioners wonder whether the latest dental materials and adhesives can or should be used when restoring these teeth. The authors reviewed the literature and developed recommendations for how to diagnose and manage CTS and prevent it in susceptible teeth. As the population continues to age and people retain their teeth longer, it is anticipated that patients will present even more frequently with symptoms of CTS.

  6. Hashimoto encephalopathy in pediatric patients: Homogeneity in clinical presentation and heterogeneity in antibody titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwon; Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun

    2018-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is an autoimmune encephalopathy characterized by elevated antithyroid antibodies and a favorable response to corticosteroid. This study delineated the clinical characteristics of pediatric Hashimoto encephalopathy and the significance of low antithyroid antibody titers in diagnosis and treatment. Clinical manifestations, antibody titers, and treatment responses were retrospectively reviewed in six consecutive children diagnosed with Hashimoto encephalopathy between August 2008 and July 2016. Age at diagnosis was 10-17years. Presenting symptoms were seizures, altered consciousness, behavioral changes, psychosis, tremor, and dystonia. Thyroid function was normal in five patients, and one had hypothyroidism prior to the encephalopathy. Antithyroid antibody titer was increased at presentation in five patients and one week later in the other. Antibody levels were extremely varied (anti-thyroglobulin, 20.5-2318.0U/ml; anti-thyroid peroxidase, 12.5-2231.0U/ml; reference range, Hashimoto encephalopathy were similar, irrespective of antithyroid antibody titer. Because the initial antithyroid antibody titers can be normal or mildly-elevated, follow-up testing of antithyroid antibodies is required in patients who are clinically suspect for Hashimoto encephalopathy. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Biotechnological Applications of Recombinant Single-Domain Antibodies are Optimized by the C-Terminal Fusion to the EPEA Sequence (C Tag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Djender

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We designed a vector for the bacterial expression of recombinant antibodies fused to a double tag composed of 6xHis and the EPEA amino acid sequence. EPEA sequence (C tag is tightly bound by a commercial antibody when expressed at the C-term end of a polypeptide. The antigen is released in the presence of 2 M MgCl2. Consequently, constructs fused to the 6xHis-C tags can be purified by two successive and orthogonal affinity steps. Single-domain antibodies were produced either in the periplasmic or in the cytoplasmic space of E. coli. Surprisingly, the first affinity purification step performed using the EPEA-binding resin already yielded homogeneous proteins. The presence of the C tag did not interfere with the binding activity of the antibodies, as assessed by FACS and SPR analyses, and the C tag was extremely effective for immunoprecipitating HER2 receptor. Finally, the Alexa488-coupled anti-C tag allowed for simplification of FACS and IF analyses. These results show that a tag of minimal dimensions can be effectively used to improve the applicability of recombinant antibodies as reagents. In our hands, C tag was superior to His-tag in affinity purification and pull-down experiments, and practical in any other standard immune technique.

  8. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  9. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  10. Antisperm antibodies and fertility association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, B; Cardona-Maya, W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the relation between antisperm antibodies (ASA) and human fertility by reviewing the scientific literature of the last 45 years. We carried out a review of scientific literature about antisperm antibodies and infertility published in spanish or english in databases as Pubmed, Medline, Scielo, some books and another gray literature include information related to this review and that is published in the last 45 years. Infertile couples suffer infertility by immunological mechanisms mainly by the presence of antisperm antibodies ASA in blood, semen or cervicovaginal secretions; the formation of ASA in men and women may be associated with disturbance in immunomodulatory mechanisms that result in functional impairment of sperm and thus its inability to fertilize the oocyte. Immunological infertility caused by ASA is the result of interference of these antibodies in various stages of fertilization process, inhibiting the ability of interaction between sperm and oocyte. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibody Drug Conjugates: Preclinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Gadi G

    2015-05-01

    The development path for antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) is more complex and challenging than for unmodified antibodies. While many of the preclinical considerations for both unmodified and antibody drug conjugates are shared, special considerations must be taken into account when developing an ADC. Unlike unmodified antibodies, an ADC must preferentially bind to tumor cells, internalize, and traffic to the appropriate intracellular compartment to release the payload. Parameters that can impact the pharmacological properties of this class of therapeutics include the selection of the payload, the type of linker, and the methodology for payload drug conjugation. Despite a plethora of in vitro assays and in vivo models to screen and evaluate ADCs, the challenge remains to develop improved preclinical tools that will be more predictive of clinical outcome. This review will focus on preclinical considerations for clinically validated small molecule ADCs. In addition, the lessons learned from Mylotarg®, the first in class FDA-approved ADC, are highlighted.

  12. Development of Antibody-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles for Biomarker Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Chapa Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have great potential in biomedical applications because of their magnetic response offers the possibility to direct them to specific areas and target biological entities. Magnetic separation of biomolecules is one of the most important applications of MNPs because their versatility in detecting cancer biomarkers. However, the effectiveness of this method depends on many factors, including the type of functionalization onto MNPs. Therefore, in this study, magnetite nanoparticles have been developed in order to separate the 5′-nucleotidase enzyme (5eNT. The 5eNT is used as a bio-indicator for diagnosing diseases such as hepatic ischaemia, liver tumor, and hepatotoxic drugs damage. Magnetic nanoparticles were covered in a core/shell type with silica, aminosilane, and a double shell of silica-aminosilane. A ScFv (fragment antibody and anti-CD73 antibody were attached to the coated nanoparticles in order to separate the enzyme. The magnetic separation of this enzyme with fragment antibody was found to be 28% higher than anti-CD73 antibody and the enzyme adsorption was improved with the double shell due to the increased length of the polymeric chain. Magnetite nanoparticles with a double shell (silica-aminosilane were also found to be more sensitive than magnetite with a single shell in the detection of biomarkers.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  14. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  15. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  16. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. The prevalence of ANA antibodies, anticentromere antibodies, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome compared to patients with dryness symptoms without primary Sjögren's syndrome confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślińska, Maria; Mańczak, Małgorzata; Wojciechowska, Bożena; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2017-01-01

    Our study analyses the prevalence of ANA, anti-SS-A, anti-SS-B, and ACA and ACPA antibodies in patients with pSS and with dryness symptoms without pSS confirmation, and the association of ACPA and ACA antibodies with specific clinical symptoms. 113 patients were divided into two groups: I - with diagnosed pSS ( N = 75); and II - with dryness without pSS evidence ( N = 38). Diagnostics: indirect immunofluorescence (IF; Hep-2 cell line) of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-SS-A anti-SS-B antibodies determined with semi-quantitative method, autoantibody profile (14 antigens, ANA Profil 3 EUROLINE); basic laboratory, ophthalmic examination tests, minor salivary gland biopsy with focus score (FS), joint and lung evaluation, and ESSDAI questionnaire (pSS activity). 88% of group I had ANA antibodies (1 : 320 titre), 5.3% at 1 : 160. Anti-SS-A antibodies were present in 88% of group I, including all ANA 1 : 160. Anti-SS-A antibodies positively correlated with greater and moderate activity of ESSDAI 5 ( p = 0.046) and FS. The presence of SS-B antibodies significantly affected disease activity. ACPA present: group I - 13% (associated with higher arthritis incidence; p = 0.003); group II - 8%. ACA antibodies present in 4% of group I, but not in group II. No ACA association with interstitial lung changes (small ACA + group excludes full conclusions). ANA antibodies should also be considered in a titre of less than 1 : 320, but the presence of anti-SS-A antibodies is still the most important immunological marker for pSS. Anti-SS-A antibodies correlate with higher disease activity (ESSDAI ≥ 5) and higher FS. The presence of the anti-SS-B antibody was significantly affected by higher activity of the disease. The incidence of arthritis was higher in patients with ACPA+ pSS compared to ACPA- ( p = 0.003). There was no relationship between ACPA and arthritis in patients with dry-type syndrome without diagnosis of pSS.

  18. [Autoimmune diseases with the presence of anti-ku antibodies - analysis of three cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielosz, Ewa; Majdan, Maria; Jeleniewicz, Radosław; Mazurek, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    a-Ku are rare antibodies, which are reported in course of connective tissue diseases. Their prevalence ranges from 0 to 10% , 2%, on average. The main symptoms associated with the presence of a-Ku antibodies include: myositis, arthritis, Raynaud`s phenomenon and skin lesions. The above features are often defined as autoimmune clinical syndrome associated with a-Ku antibodies. In recent years, three cases with the presence of a-Ku antibodies were observed at the Department of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Diseases. Case 1, a 77-year-old man, with the diagnosis of mixed connective tissue disease according to Raynaud`s phenomenon, myositis, arthritis and presence of a-ribonucleoprotein antibodies. Moreover, secondary Sjögren syndrome (SS) and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed. Case 2, a 56-year-old woman with longstanding history of Raynaud`s phenomenon, sclerodactyly, myositis and arthritis. Based on clinical manifestations and additional tests, systemic sclerosis and myositis were diagnosed. Case 3, a 46-year-old woman with SS diagnosis, long-standing history of Raynaud`s phenomenon, arthralgia and polyneuropathy. Moreover, HCV infection with the presence of cryoglobulin was confirmed. The presence of a-Ku antibodies in high titers was found in all cases. The clinical conditions improved after steroid and immunosuppressive therapy. In conclusion, clinical syndromes with the presence of a-Ku antibodies are associated with a wide range of non-specific symptoms, regarding muscle, joint and skin involvement, in particular. The conditions are more often diagnosed in the elderly; in the majority of cases, they are characterized by mild courses, good response to steroid therapy and good prognosis.

  19. Replacing reprogramming factors with antibodies selected from combinatorial antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Joel W; Xie, Jia; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Gross, Simon; Lee, Sohyon; Lerner, Richard A; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2017-10-01

    The reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is usually achieved by exogenous induction of transcription by factors acting in the nucleus. In contrast, during development, signaling pathways initiated at the membrane induce differentiation. The central idea of this study is to identify antibodies that can catalyze cellular de-differentiation and nuclear reprogramming by acting at the cell surface. We screen a lentiviral library encoding ∼100 million secreted and membrane-bound single-chain antibodies and identify antibodies that can replace either Sox2 and Myc (c-Myc) or Oct4 during reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into iPSCs. We show that one Sox2-replacing antibody antagonizes the membrane-associated protein Basp1, thereby de-repressing nuclear factors WT1, Esrrb and Lin28a (Lin28) independent of Sox2. By manipulating this pathway, we identify three methods to generate iPSCs. Our results establish unbiased selection from autocrine combinatorial antibody libraries as a robust method to discover new biologics and uncover membrane-to-nucleus signaling pathways that regulate pluripotency and cell fate.

  20. Radioiodination of antibodies for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the great potential of radioiodinated antibody for the detection and treatment of cancer, the present article deals with the various techniques of radioiodination of antibody and their uses. Topics include methods of iodination of antibody, advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and effects of radioiodination on the antibody molecules with respect to their physiochemical and immunologic reactivity. In addition, the clinical usefulness of radioiodinated antibodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  1. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgue, Gueven; Twyman, Richard M; Beiss, Veronique; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as 'green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of antibodies, ranging from laboratory-scale expression to industrial-scale manufacturing. The key features of plant-based production include safety, speed, low cost, and convenience, allowing newcomers to rapidly master the technology and use it to its full advantage. Manufacturing in plants has recently achieved significant milestones and offers more than just an alternative to established microbial and mammalian cell platforms. The use of plants for product development in particular offers the power and flexibility to easily coexpress many different genes, allowing the plug-and-play construction of novel bionanomaterials, perfectly complementing existing approaches based on plant virus-like particles. As well as producing single antibodies for applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry, plants can be used to produce antibody-based supramolecular structures and scaffolds as a new generation of green bionanomaterials that promise a bright future based on clean and renewable nanotechnology applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1462. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1462 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  3. Antibody Validation by Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Michele; Manganelli, Valeria; Hodge, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Validation of antibodies is an integral part of translational research, particularly for biomarker discovery. Assaying the specificity of the reagent (antibody) and confirming the identity of the protein biomarker is of critical importance prior to implementing any biomarker in clinical studies, and the lack of such quality control tests may result in unexpected and/or misleading results.Antibody validation is the procedure in which a single antibody is thoroughly assayed for sensitivity and specificity. Although a plethora of commercial antibodies exist, antibody specificity must be extensively demonstrated using diverse complex biological samples, rather than purified recombinant proteins, prior to use in clinical translational research. In the simplest iteration, antibody specificity is determined by the presence of a single band in a complex biological sample, at the expected molecular weight, on a Western blot.To date, numerous Western blotting procedures are available, based on either manual or automated systems and spanning the spectrum of single blots to multiplex blots. X-ray film is still employed in many research laboratories, but digital imaging has become a gold standard in immunoblotting. The basic principles of Western blotting are (a) separation of protein mixtures by gel electrophoresis, (b) transfer of the proteins to a blot, (c) probing the blot for a protein or proteins of interest, and (d) subsequent detection of the protein by chemiluminescent, fluorescent, or colorimetric methods. This chapter focuses on the chemiluminescent detection of proteins using a manual Western blotting system and a vacuum-enhanced detection system (SNAP i.d.™, Millipore).

  4. An Approach to Differential Diagnosis of Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Related Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Emmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a systemic, acquired, immune-mediated disorder characterized by episodes of venous, arterial, or microcirculation thrombosis and/or pregnancy abnormalities, associated with the persistent presence of autoantibodies, confirmed at least in two occasions 12 weeks apart, directed to molecular complexes consisting of phospholipids and proteins. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome should always be considered as a potential diagnosis especially for young patients presenting with a history of thrombotic events, in particular when they occur without any obvious external trigger or any inherited thrombophilic mutation (even if 2006 criteria do not exclude antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in patients with other inherited or acquired prothrombotic conditions, or for women with recurrent pregnancy losses or later fetal deaths. Many other disorders are able to mimic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, so a broad range of alternative diagnoses should be investigated and ruled out during clinical workup.

  5. Vancomycin-induced Immune Thrombocytopenia Proven by the Detection of Vancomycin-dependent Anti-platelet Antibody with Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanouchi, Jun; Hato, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Sanshiro; Takeuchi, Kazuto; Yakushijin, Yoshihiro; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia is a rare adverse reaction that may be overlooked because no specific diagnostic test is currently available. We herein report a patient with vancomycin-induced immune thrombocytopenia who was diagnosed by the detection of vancomycin-dependent anti-platelet antibody with flow cytometry. An IgG antibody in the patient's serum reacted with platelets only in the presence of vancomycin. Severe thrombocytopenia gave rise to life-threatening gastrointestinal blee...

  6. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

  7. Reliability of clinical ICD-10 schizophrenia diagnoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Klaus D; Frederiksen, Julie N; Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Concern has been expressed as to the reliability of clinical ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia. This study was designed to assess the diagnostic reliability of the clinical ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia in a random sample of Danish in- and outpatients with a history of psychosis. A sample...... value (87%) of ICD-10 schizophrenia and an overall good agreement between clinical and OPCRIT-derived diagnoses (kappa=0.60). An even higher positive predictive value was obtained when diagnoses were amalgamated into a diagnostic entity of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (98%). Near perfect agreement...... was seen between OPCRIT-derived ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnoses (kappa=0.87). Thus, this study demonstrates high reliability of the clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia and even more so of the diagnosis of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder....

  8. Is raised helicobacter pylori antibody titre enough to decide retreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Ahmed, W.; Arif, A.; Alam, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection causes a rise in its antibodies which take almost a year to come to baseline following successful eradication treatment. Checking these values in between a year may give falsely high values and many patients may thus be over treated. Aims: To serially determine Helicobacter pylori antibody titres in patients after giving them triple therapy for H. pylori eradication and see how these values drop over time. Study type, Settings and duration: Longitudinal study conducted in Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pakistan Medical Research Council, Research Centre, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from May 2006 to April 2010. Subjects and Methods: Over the period of four years, 186 patients who were found positive for campylobacter like organism test during endoscopy were further tested for anti H. pylori IgG titre before being treated for H. pylori. Patients were given triple therapy comprising of Omeprazole (20 mg twice daily), Amoxicillin (1 gm twice daily) and Clarythromycin (500 mg twice daily) for a week and were followed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months to check symptomatic relief and they were tested again for H.Pylori antibody titres. Data was collected on pre-designed proforma which included patient's demography, symptoms and diagnosis. Results: Out of 186 patients who had a positive campylobacter like organism test, 173 patients consented to participate in the study. Serology for H.Pylori was positive in 119(68%) cases. A decline in mean antibody titres was observed as 11%, 21.5%, 54.7% and 59.2% at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. Conclusions: Sensitivity of serology for diagnosing H. pylori infection is good but using these as a tool for monitoring response to treatment is doubtful. A slow drop in H.pylori antibodies was seen over 12 months and therefore, physicians are cautioned not to retreat the already treated cases till about one year post treatment. Policy message: H. pylori antibodies should

  9. [Community pneumonia - fundamentals of diagnosing and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolek, Vítězslav

    Pneumonia is the most serious respiratory disease which causes more than 3 000 deaths per year in the Czech Republic. Community-acquired pneumonia is contracted in the ordinary life environment outside of hospitals, its development is caused by known infectious agents which mostly exhibit satisfactory sensitivity to antibiotics. Diagnosing, prevention and treatment of the disease are described including considerations of individual evaluation of the risk of complications and possible death. The strategy of administering antibiotics is discussed.Key words: antibiotics - community-acquired pneumonias - diagnosing - treatment.

  10. Why Is Diagnosing Pediatric Malnutrition Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkins, Mark R

    2017-02-01

    The literature indicates that pediatric malnutrition is more common than the number of times it is actually diagnosed. A new pediatric malnutrition definition is now available with criteria to make the diagnosis. If pediatric malnutrition is present, it should be diagnosed for financial, educational, and research purposes as well as the effects on patient development and mortality. These reasons extend beyond the health of an individual patient to potential impacts on society as a whole. When all of these reasons are examined and added, making the diagnosis of pediatric malnutrition becomes an obligation of the pediatric caregiver.

  11. Prevalence of irregular red cell antibody in healthy blood donors attending a tertiary care hospital in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Rajput, Saroj; Agarwal, Soma; Chowdhry, Mohit; Prakash, Bindu; Karna, Prashant

    2018-01-01

    Alloantibodies may be detected in blood donors who have either been transfused previously or female donors with previous obstetric events. These antibodies can occasionally cause severe transfusion reaction, if a large amount of plasma or whole blood is transfused, as in massive transfusions and pediatric patients. The present study aims to assess the prevalence of red cell antibodies in healthy blood donors at a tertiary care hospital-based blood bank in India. A total of 82,153 donor samples were screened for irregular red cell antibodies between January 2012 and December 2015 at the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi. Antibody screening was performed by solid phase method using Immucor Capture-R ready screen (pooled cells) on fully automated immunohematology analyzer Galileo Neo (Immucor Inc., Norcross, GA, USA). Positive tests were further confirmed using Capture-R ready screen (4 cell panel). Advanced investigations to identify the antibody/ies were performed on confirmed positive samples. Antibody identification was conducted using various cell panels (Immucor Capture-R Ready-ID, Panocell-10, Ficin Treated). An advanced technique such as adsorption and elution was performed as per requirement. Screening with pooled cells and 4 cell panel was positive in 227 donors (0.27%), 150 of these donors had autoantibodies, 1 had autoantibodies with underlying alloantibody anti-Jk a (0.001%), and 76 had alloantibodies (0.09%) alone in their plasma. Anti-M was the most common antibody (43 donors) identified, followed by anti-D (21 donors). Anti-N was detected in 4; anti-Jk a , anti-C, and anti-E in two donors each followed by anti-P1 and anti-Le b in 1 donor. Antibodies against red cells can be present in healthy donors detection of which is important in providing safe blood to the patient. The prevalence of red blood cell antibody in healthy donors in this study was found to be 0.27%, while the prevalence of alloantibodies was 0

  12. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases.

  13. Nanobodies as Versatile Tools to Understand, Diagnose, Visualize and Treat Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Van Audenhove

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, nanobodies have been used extensively in the fields of research, diagnostics and therapy. These antigen binding fragments, originating from Camelid heavy-chain antibodies, possess unusual hallmarks in terms of (small size, stability, solubility and specificity, hence allowing cost-effective production and sometimes outperforming monoclonal antibodies. In this review, we evaluate the current status of nanobodies to study, diagnose, visualize or inhibit cancer-specific proteins and processes. Nanobodies are highly adaptable tools for cancer research as they enable specific modulation of targets, enzymatic and non-enzymatic proteins alike. Molecular imaging studies benefit from the rapid, homogeneous tumor accumulation of nanobodies and their fast blood clearance, permitting previously unattainable fast tumor visualization. Moreover, they are endowed with considerable therapeutic potential as inhibitors of receptor-ligand pairs and deliverers of drugs or drug-loaded nanoparticles towards tumors. More in vivo and clinical studies are however eagerly awaited to unleash their full potential.

  14. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Methods for diagnosing ... Tumors To diagnose an adrenal gland tumor, a health care provider may order one or more tests. 3 ...

  15. High prevalence of tuberculosis diagnosed during autopsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary aims of tuberculosis (TB) control programmes is early diagnosis and prompt treatment of infectious cases to limit transmission. Failure to diagnose and adequately treat TB could lead to premature death and unrecognized transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The proportion of missed TB cases has not ...

  16. Chest Radiographic Findings in Newly Diagnosed Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five hundred newly diagnosed cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis were treated with directly observed short-course treatment and 100 of them had chest radiographic examination done. The various chest radiographic patterns in the 100 subjects were studied and included: Fluffy exudative changes 80(80%), fibrosis 70(70%) ...

  17. Demographic profile of patients diagnosed with intracranial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Meningiomas are common brain tumours and display gender, racial and ethnic differences in their demographic profile. The demographic profile of our patients diagnosed with intracranial meningiomas is presented and compared with the literature. Objectives: To determine the age, gender, racial and ethnic ...

  18. Pijnlijke temporomandibulaire disfuncties: diagnose en behandeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Aarab, G.; Knibbe, W.; Koutris, M.; Warnsinck, C.J.; Wetselaar, P.; Visscher, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD pain) are common among the general population. The most common sub diagnoses are myalgia (jaw-muscle pain) and arthralgia (temporomandibular joint pain). The aetiology of TMD pain has a multifactorial nature, and its diagnosis and possible treatment often

  19. Diagnosing the Diagnostics: Misconceptions of Twelfth Grade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosing the Diagnostics: Misconceptions of Twelfth Grade Students on Selected Chemistry Concepts in Two Preparatory Schools in Eastern Ethiopia. ... African Journal of Chemical Education ... To attain these goals, respective data were gathered through open-ended test and three-tier chemistry misconception test.

  20. Histologically diagnosed cancers in South Africa, 1988

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    causing familial hypercholesterolemia in a South African of Indian origin. Biochim Biophys Acta 1993; 1182: 75-82. Mricans: familial hypercholesterolemia in Indians and familial defective apolipoprotein B-IOO. PhD thesis, Universiry of Cape. Town, 1992. Histologically diagnosed cancers in South Africa, 1988. F. SITAS.

  1. Eating Disorder Diagnoses: Empirical Approaches to Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.; Keel, Pamela K.; Williamson, Donald A.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2007-01-01

    Decisions about the classification of eating disorders have significant scientific and clinical implications. The eating disorder diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) reflect the collective wisdom of experts in the field but are frequently not supported in…

  2. Diagnosing Chronic Rhinosinusitis: a Literature update | Lobo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosing chronic rhinosinusitis has undergone significant changes since the advent of sensitive but costly diagnostic aids like endoscopy, computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging. Other new conditions like migraine without aura, mid-segment facial pain and atypical facial pain can present with ...

  3. Clinical heterogeneity in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Bart; Speelman, Johannes D.; de Haan, Rob J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical heterogeneity in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease using cluster analysis and to describe the subgroups in terms of impairment, disability, perceived quality of life, and use of dopaminergic therapy. METHODS: We conducted a k-means cluster analysis in a prospective

  4. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Soza, Gabriela M.; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison; Ryan, Caitriona

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4+ count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed.

  5. Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis | Gotlieb | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 45, No 4 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis. D Gotlieb. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text:.

  6. Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis | Gotlieb | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 45, No 4 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis. D Gotlieb. Abstract.

  7. A pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor diagnosed during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) are increasingly being discovered. A case of PNET diagnosed and treated during the management of acute appendicitis is presented and discussed. The importance of imaging modalities in patients with acute abdominal pain is emphasized. To the best our knowledge, this is the ...

  8. Diagnosing Febrile Illness in a Returned Traveler

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-01

    This podcast will assist health care providers in diagnosing febrile illness in patients returning from a tropical or developing country.  Created: 3/1/2012 by National Center for Enteric, Zoonotic, and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/1/2012.

  9. Medicinalindustrien har brug for diagnoser som ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugl, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Det er ikke første gang, at medicinalindustriens evne til at finde nye markeder har medført nye eller bredere diagnoser. I det forrige årti så vi et parallelt forløb mellem et boom i antallet af depressionsdiagnoser og forbruget af lykkepiller. Interview med sociolog Thomas Brante. Udgivelsesdato...

  10. Bordetella pertussis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Heron, I; Skjødt, K

    1994-01-01

    The object of this work was to test the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for demonstration of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in nasopharyngeal secretions. The method was applied to patients with recently diagnosed pertussis, as verified by BP culture. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity...

  11. Experiences of being diagnosed with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothmann, Mette Juel; Jakobsen, P R; Myhre Jensen, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review provides synthesised knowledge and guidance to health professionals on the experiences and perspectives of being diagnosed with osteoporosis from the patient's point of view. Using individuals' experiences and meanings can promote tailored and targeted information and guida......This systematic review provides synthesised knowledge and guidance to health professionals on the experiences and perspectives of being diagnosed with osteoporosis from the patient's point of view. Using individuals' experiences and meanings can promote tailored and targeted information...... and guidance on osteoporosis, bone care and treatment at different stages of the osteoporosis trajectory. INTRODUCTION: To be diagnosed with osteoporosis with or without fragility fractures affects individuals differently. The aim of this review was firstly to aggregate existing qualitative evidence regarding...... an individual's experience of being diagnosed with osteoporosis at different stages, and secondly, to use a systematic approach to develop a conceptual understanding of central issues relevant for health professionals in order to provide support and guidance to patients/individuals. METHODS: This study used...

  12. IgM antibody and colony fungal load impacts of orally administered ethanol extract of Plectranthus scutellarioides on mice with systemic candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni Br. Karo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Candida albicans is a pathogenic fungus that causes vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC, which presents significant clinical problems in immunocompromised patients. There are no studies that correlate IgM antibody responses and fungal loads following the use of ethanol leaf extract of Plectranthus scutellarioides (L. R.Br. (ELEP on VVC. Aims: To examine colony fungi loads, IgM antibody responses, and their correlation in Balb/c mice infected with C. albicans treated with orally administered ELEP. Methods: Twenty-five female Balb/c mice were randomly divided into five groups (five mice in each group: normal group (oral ELEP + not infected, VVC control (VCC group (infected + oral 0.2 mL saline, ketoconazole-treated in VCC group (infected + oral antifungal agents, and two treatment groups (infected + oral ELEP with 500 and 750 mg/kg b.w.. Treatments were administered for 14 days after infection with C. albicans. Colony fungal loads and IgM antibodies were measured by counting colony forming units and flow cytometry using anti-C. albicans antibody kits, respectively. Results: Ingestion of the ELEP significantly affected fungal load clearance and decreased IgM antibody levels compared to that in the VCC group (p<0.001. Furthermore, ingestion of the ELEP was associated with significantly lower concentrations of IgM antibodies and colony forming units (p<0.001. Conclusions: These data strongly suggest that IgM antibody response is involved in of the mechanism by which ELEP decreases C. albicans infection. Furthermore, these results provide important information for the potential application of ELEP in the treatment of Balb/C mice with systemic candidiasis.

  13. Afghanistan and Iraq War Veterans: Mental Health Diagnoses are Associated with Respiratory Disease Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatore, Christopher G; Falvo, Michael J; Nugent, Shannon; Carlson, Kathleen

    2018-02-06

    Many veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have concomitant respiratory conditions and mental health conditions. We wanted to evaluate the association of mental health diagnoses with respiratory disease diagnoses among post-deployment veterans. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans who were discharged from the military or otherwise became eligible to receive Veterans Health Administration services. The primary exposure was receipt of a mental health diagnosis and the primary outcome was receipt of a respiratory diagnosis as recorded in the electronic health record. We used multivariable adjusted logistic regression to measure the associations of mental health diagnoses with respiratory diagnoses and conducted several analyses exploring the timing of the diagnoses. Among 182,338 post-deployment veterans, 14% were diagnosed with a respiratory condition, 77% of whom had a concomitant mental health diagnosis. The incidence rates were 5,363/100,000 person-years (p-y), 587/100,000 p-y, 1,450/100,000 p-y, and 233/100,000 p-y for any respiratory disease diagnosis, bronchitis, asthma, and chronic obstructive lung disease diagnoses, respectively, after the date of first Veterans Health Administration utilization. Any mental health diagnosis was associated with increased odds for any respiratory diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio 1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.37-1.46). The association of mental health diagnoses and subsequent respiratory disease diagnoses was stronger and more consistent than the converse. Many Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans are diagnosed with both respiratory and mental illnesses. Comprehensive plans that include care coordination with mental health professionals and treatments for mental illnesses may be important for many veterans with respiratory diseases.

  14. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  15. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vickie S.

    2013-01-01

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  16. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  17. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  18. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  19. Hu and Yo antibodies have heterogeneous avidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, Cecilie; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2007-04-01

    Onconeural antibodies such as anti-Hu and anti-Yo may be important in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. The avidity of these antibodies is not known. In this study, we compared the avidity of Hu and Yo antibodies both at single time points and over a time range of 2 months to 6 years. The avidity of Yo and Hu antibodies differed among the patients, but anti-Yo generally had higher avidity than anti-Hu. Whether Yo antibodies are more pathogenic than Hu antibodies are presently unknown.

  20. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD... Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic antigens...

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to Treponema Pallidum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; J.D.A. van Embden; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThree successive fusions of mouse myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes of a mouse immunized with Treponema Pallidum resulted in one hybridoma producing anti T. pallidum antibodies for each fusion. The mice were immunized with live pallidum cells respectively 1, 3 and 5 months before

  2. Modern immunological approaches to assess malaria transmission and immunity and to diagnose plasmodial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Daniel-Ribeiro

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews our recent data concerning the use of immunological methods employing monoclonal antibodies and synthetic peptides to study malaria transmission and immunity and to diagnose plasmodial infection. As concerns malaria transmission, we studied the main vectors of human malaria and the plasmodial species transmitted in endemic areas of Rondônia state, Brazil. The natural infection on anopheline was evaluated by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA using monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant sporozoite surface antigen (CS protein demonstrated to be species specific. Our results showed that among six species of Anopheles found infected, An. darlingi was the main vector transmitting Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria in the immediate vicinity of houses. In order to assess the level of anti-CS antibodies we studied, by IRMA using the synthetic peptide corresponding to the repetitive epitope of the sporozoite CS protein, sera of individuals living in the same areas where the entomological survey has been performed. In this assay the prevalence of anti-CS antibodies was very low and did not reflect the malaria transmission rate in the studied areas. In relation to malaria diagnosis, a monoclonal antibody specific to an epitope of a 50 kDa exoantigen, the major component of supernatant collected at the time of schizont rupture, was used as a probe for the detection of P. falciparum antigens. This assay seemed to be more sensitive than parasitological examination for malaria diagnosis since it was able to detect plasmodial antigens in both symptomatic and asymtomatic individuals with negative thick blood smear at different intervals after a last parasitologically confirmed confirmed attack of malaria.

  3. Hospital-diagnosed dementia and suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study aims to examine the risk of suicide in persons diagnosed with dementia during a hospitalization and its relationship to mood disorders. DESIGN: Event-history analysis using time-varying covariates. SETTING: Population-based record linkage. PARTICIPANTS: All individuals....... During this period, 136 persons who previously had been diagnosed with dementia died by suicide. Men and women aged 50-69 years with hospital presentations of dementia have a relative suicide risk of 8.5 (95% confidence interval: 6.3-11.3) and 10.8 (95% confidence interval: 7.4-15.7), respectively. Those...... who are aged 70 or older with dementia have a threefold higher risk than persons with no dementia. The time shortly after diagnosis is associated with an elevated suicide risk. The risk among persons with dementia remains significant when controlling for mood disorders. As many as 26% of the men...

  4. Sarcoidosis Incidentally Diagnosed: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besir Kesici

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a chronic, granulomatous condition with unknown cause. Because most of the patients are free of clinical symptoms, sarcoidosis should be considered in differential diagnosis if noncaseous granuloma is noted in biopsies, performed for other reasons. With no clinical symptoms, our patient was diagnosed with sarcoidosis upon identifying noncaseous granuloma in the lymph node biopsy material collected during the laparoscopic operation, performed for gallbladder polyp.

  5. Missed opportunities to diagnose child physical abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Elizabeth L; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Wolford, Jennifer E; Berger, Rachel P

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the incidence of missed opportunities to diagnose abuse in a cohort of children with healing abusive fractures and to identify patterns present during previous medical visits, which could lead to an earlier diagnosis of abuse. This is a retrospective descriptive study of a 7-year consecutive sample of children diagnosed with child abuse at a single children's hospital. Children who had a healing fracture diagnosed on skeletal survey and a diagnosis of child abuse were included. We further collected data for the medical visit that lead to the diagnosis of child abuse and any previous medical visits that the subjects had during the 6 months preceding the diagnosis of abuse. All previous visits were classified as either a potential missed opportunity to diagnose abuse or as an unrelated previous visit, and the differences were analyzed. Median age at time of abuse diagnosis was 3.9 months. Forty-eight percent (37/77) of the subjects had at least 1 previous visit, and 33% (25/77) of those had at least 1 missed previous visit. Multiple missed previous visits for the same symptoms were recorded in 7 (25%) of these patients. The most common reason for presentation at missed previous visit was a physical examination sign suggestive of trauma (ie, bruising, swelling). Missed previous visits occurred across all care settings. One-third of young children with healing abusive fractures had previous medical visits where the diagnosis of abuse was not recognized. These children most commonly had signs of trauma on physical examination at the previous visits.

  6. CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DIAGNOSING SEPSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Tepaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the leading causes of child lethality. Timely diagnostics is the most important condition for treating sepsis successfully. This study contains analysis of recommendations on diagnosing the syndrome of systemic inflammatory response, sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012,published in 2013. The modern perceptions of systemic inflammation during sepsis and sterile inflammation are highlighted.

  7. Diagnosing dying: an integrative literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catriona; Brooks-Young, Patricia; Brunton Gray, Carol; Larkin, Phil; Connolly, Michael; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Larsson, Maria; Smith, Tracy; Chater, Susie

    2014-01-01

    Background To ensure patients and families receive appropriate end-of-life care pathways and guidelines aim to inform clinical decision making. Ensuring appropriate outcomes through the use of these decision aids is dependent on timely use. Diagnosing dying is a complex clinical decision, and most of the available practice checklists relate to cancer. There is a need to review evidence to establish diagnostic indicators that death is imminent on the basis of need rather than a cancer diagnosis. Aim To examine the evidence as to how patients are judged by clinicians as being in the final hours or days of life. Design Integrative literature review. Data sources Five electronic databases (2001–2011): Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL. The search yielded a total of 576 hits, 331 titles and abstracts were screened, 42 papers were retrieved and reviewed and 23 articles were included. Results Analysis reveals an overarching theme of uncertainty in diagnosing dying and two subthemes: (1) ‘characteristics of dying’ involve dying trajectories that incorporate physical, social, spiritual and psychological decline towards death; (2) ‘treatment orientation’ where decision making related to diagnosing dying may remain focused towards biomedical interventions rather than systematic planning for end-of-life care. Conclusions The findings of this review support the explicit recognition of ‘uncertainty in diagnosing dying’ and the need to work with and within this concept. Clinical decision making needs to allow for recovery where that potential exists, but equally there is the need to avoid futile interventions. PMID:24780536

  8. Can Crohn's disease be diagnosed at laparotomy?

    OpenAIRE

    Butterworth, R J; Williams, G T; Hughes, L E

    1992-01-01

    The typical macroscopic features of Crohn's disease have been well described and are widely regarded as sufficient to diagnose the disease at laparotomy. We report six patients undergoing laparotomy for symptomatic Crohn's disease, shown radiologically, who were found to have macroscopically normal small bowel despite careful examination of the bowel by an experienced surgeon. In four cases resection was deferred, but all subsequently deteriorated and required further surgery. Minor abnormali...

  9. CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DIAGNOSING SEPSIS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    R. F. Tepaev

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of child lethality. Timely diagnostics is the most important condition for treating sepsis successfully. This study contains analysis of recommendations on diagnosing the syndrome of systemic inflammatory response, sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012,published in 2013. The modern perceptions of systemic inflammation during sepsis and sterile ...

  10. Neural network to diagnose lining condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemelyanov, V. A.; Yemelyanova, N. Y.; Nedelkin, A. A.; Zarudnaya, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents data on the problem of diagnosing the lining condition at the iron and steel works. The authors describe the neural network structure and software that are designed and developed to determine the lining burnout zones. The simulation results of the proposed neural networks are presented. The authors note the low learning and classification errors of the proposed neural networks. To realize the proposed neural network, the specialized software has been developed.

  11. Thrombotic Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome: the profile of antibody positivity in patients from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Sreedharanunni, Sreejesh; Kumar, Narender; Masih, Joseph; Bose, Sunil Kumar; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash; Singh, Surjit

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the frequency of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) in patients presenting with thrombosis of various vascular beds from North India and report the antibody profiles encountered. A retrospective analysis was performed on the laboratory results of aCL (anticardiolipin), aβ2 Gp1 (anti-βeta-2 glycoprotein 1) antibody and LAC (lupus anticoagulant) of 1222 consecutive patients referred to the coagulation laboratory work-up for a hypercoagulable/thrombophilic state over a period of 4 years between 2009 and 2013. LAC was screened with dRVVT (diluted Russel Viper Venom Test) and KCT (Kaolin clotting time), and aCL and aβ2 Gp1 antibodies with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assy kits. The current APS criteria was satisfied in 3.85% of all patients and 4.2% of pediatric patients with thrombosis. The venous circulation was more frequently affected (59.6%). Cerebral arterial and intra-abdominal vein involvement was common. Transient antibody positivity was seen in 44 (3.6%) cases. aβ2 Gp1, aCL and LAC were positive in 95%, 54.5% and 23% of patients with APS, respectively, during the initial visit and 93.6%, 23% and 17%, respectively, during the follow-up visit. Persistent triple positivity was seen in only three cases. At initial testing, positivity for both aCL and aβ2 Gp1 was the most frequent pattern (38% of cases). aβ2 Gp1 antibody was the commonest antibody that was persistently positive in patients with thrombosis. Triple positivity for all antibodies had the highest specificity and positive predictive value to diagnose APS in the first visit, whereas aβ2 Gp1 antibody had the highest sensitivity and negative predictive value. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Test Differences in Diagnosing Reading Comprehension Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Janice M.; Meenan, Chelsea E.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the implications of test differences for defining and diagnosing comprehension deficits using reading comprehension tests. We had 995 children complete the Gray Oral Reading Test-3, the Qualitative Reading Inventory-3, the Woodcock-Johnson Passage Comprehension-3, and the Peabody Individual Achievement Test, and compared which children were identified by each test as being in the lowest 10%. Although a child who performs so poorly might be expected to do poorly on all tests, we found that the average overlap between tests in diagnosing comprehension difficulties was only 43%. Consistency in diagnosis was greater for younger children, when comprehension deficits are due to weaker decoding skills, than for older children. Inconsistencies between tests were just as evident when identifying the top performers. The different children identified as having a comprehension deficit by each test were compared on four profile variables - word decoding skill, IQ, ADHD symptoms, and working memory skill – to understand the nature of the different deficits assessed by each test. Theoretical and practical implications of these test differences in defining and diagnosing comprehension deficits are discussed. PMID:22442251

  13. Fuzzy expert system for diagnosing diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani Katigari, Meysam; Ayatollahi, Haleh; Malek, Mojtaba; Kamkar Haghighi, Mehran

    2017-02-15

    To design a fuzzy expert system to help detect and diagnose the severity of diabetic neuropathy. The research was completed in 2014 and consisted of two main phases. In the first phase, the diagnostic parameters were determined based on the literature review and by investigating specialists' perspectives ( n = 8). In the second phase, 244 medical records related to the patients who were visited in an endocrinology and metabolism research centre during the first six months of 2014 and were primarily diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy, were used to test the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the fuzzy expert system. The final diagnostic parameters included the duration of diabetes, the score of a symptom examination based on the Michigan questionnaire, the score of a sign examination based on the Michigan questionnaire, the glycolysis haemoglobin level, fasting blood sugar, blood creatinine, and albuminuria. The output variable was the severity of diabetic neuropathy which was shown as a number between zero and 10, had been divided into four categories: absence of the disease, (the degree of severity) mild, moderate, and severe. The interface of the system was designed by ASP.Net (Active Server Pages Network Enabled Technology) and the system function was tested in terms of sensitivity (true positive rate) (89%), specificity (true negative rate) (98%), and accuracy (a proportion of true results, both positive and negative) (93%). The system designed in this study can help specialists and general practitioners to diagnose the disease more quickly to improve the quality of care for patients.

  14. Diagnosing Homo sapiens in the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Christopher Brian; Buck, Laura Tabitha

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosing Homo sapiens is a critical question in the study of human evolution. Although what constitutes living members of our own species is straightforward, in the fossil record this is still a matter of much debate. The issue is complicated by questions of species diagnoses and ideas about the mode by which a new species is born, by the arguments surrounding the behavioural and cognitive separateness of the species, by the increasing appreciation of variation in the early African H. sapiens record and by new DNA evidence of hybridization with extinct species. This study synthesizes thinking on the fossils, archaeology and underlying evolutionary models of the last several decades with recent DNA results from both H. sapiens and fossil species. It is concluded that, although it may not be possible or even desirable to cleanly partition out a homogenous morphological description of recent H. sapiens in the fossil record, there are key, distinguishing morphological traits in the cranium, dentition and pelvis that can be usefully employed to diagnose the H. sapiens lineage. Increasing advances in retrieving and understanding relevant genetic data provide a complementary and perhaps potentially even more fruitful means of characterizing the differences between H. sapiens and its close relatives.

  15. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies related to depression in early clinical course of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Karimifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric lupus is still a major challenge in clinical practice. We investigated the association between depression and anti-ribosomal P (anti-P antibodies in a sample of Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on adult patients with SLE referring to a referral out-patient clinic of rheumatology. Demographic data and clinical data with regards to measuring disease activity with the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index were gathered. Anti-P antibodies were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Depression severity was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Results: One hundred patients (80% female and 20% male, age = 34.8 ± 10.9 years were included. Anti-P antibodies were present more frequently in depressed than non-depressed patients (30% vs. 10%, P = 0.015. Depression severity was correlated with anti-P antibodies level only in patients with disease duration of less than 2 years (r = 0.517, P = 0.019. There was no association between the depression severity and disease activity. Binary logistic regression analysis showed age (B = 0.953, CI 95%: 0.914-0.993 and positive anti-P antibodies (B = 4.30, CI 95%: 1.18-15.59 as factors that independently associated with depression. Conclusion: We found an association between depression and presence of anti-P antibodies, and also strong correlation between depression severity and anti-P antibodies level in newly diagnosed SLE patients. Depression severity in newly diagnosed SLE patients may reflect a neuropsychiatric involvement, and in later phases, it is more affected by the chronicity of the disease as well as other environmental factors.

  16. Radioimmunological determination of growth hormone antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracmar, P.; Hnikova, O.

    1979-01-01

    The method is based on the assumption of the presence of antibodies in the serum of the patient and the formation of the complex antibody-tracer ( 125 I-STH). For separation the principle is used of two antibodies and subsequent ultrafiltration with membrane ultrafilters. Clinical experience, reproducibility and the procedure recommended for simple monitoring and the determination of the amount of antibodies in the serum of patients are presented. (author)

  17. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody resp...... against the infection. On the other hand, immune complexes between the beta-lactamase and corresponding antibodies could play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary injury in CF by mediating hyperimmune reactions....

  19. Clinical Utility of Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Testing in Ocular Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Crandall E; De Lott, Lindsey B; Nagia, Lina; Lemos, Joao; Eggenberger, Eric R; Cornblath, Wayne T

    2015-10-01

    The sensitivity of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody testing is thought to be lower in ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG) compared with generalized disease, although estimates in small-scale studies vary. There is little information in the literature about the implications of AChR antibody levels and progression from OMG to generalized myasthenia gravis. To test the hypothesis that serum AChR antibody testing is more sensitive in OMG than previously reported and to examine the association between AChR antibody levels and progression from OMG to generalized myasthenia gravis. A retrospective, observational cohort study was conducted of 223 patients (mean [SD] age, 59.2 [16.4] years; 139 [62.3%] male) diagnosed with OMG between July 1, 1986, and May 31, 2013, at 2 large, academic medical centers. Baseline characteristics, OMG symptoms, results of AChR antibody testing, and progression time to generalized myasthenia gravis (if this occurred) were recorded for each patient. Multiple logistic regression was used to measure the association between all clinical variables and antibody result. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to examine time to generalization. Among the 223 participants, AChR antibody testing results were positive in 158 participants (70.9%). In an adjusted model, increased age at diagnosis (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; P = .007) and progression to generalized myasthenia gravis (OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.18-7.26; P = .02) were significantly associated with positive antibody test results. Women were less likely to have a positive antibody test result (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.19-0.68; P = .002). Patients who developed symptoms of generalized myasthenia gravis had a significantly higher mean (SD) antibody level than those who did not develop symptoms of generalized myasthenia gravis (12.7 [16.5] nmol/L vs 4.2 [7.9] nmol/L; P = .002). We demonstrate a higher sensitivity of AChR antibody testing than previously reported in the

  20. Radioimmunoassay method for detection of gonorrhea antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A novel radioimmunoassay for the detection of gonorrhea antibodies in serum is described. A radionuclide is bound to gonorrhea antigens produced by a growth culture. In the presence of gonorrhea antibodies in the serum, an antigen-antibody conjugate is formed, the concentration of which can be measured with conventional radiometric methods. The radioimmunoassay is highly specific

  1. Antibodies Against Melanin | Wassermann | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports on unsuccessful attempts to produce antibodies against melanoprotein in rabbits. Available evidence suggests antibodies against melanocytes in the aetiology of vitiligo, but there is no convincing evidence for antibodies against melanin per se. It is suggested that the demonstration of antibodif's against ...

  2. Detection of antibodies to co-trimoxazole (preservative drug interfering with routine red cell antibody screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sachan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-dependent antibodies can rarely cause interference in pretransfusion antibody screening. The diluents for commercial reagent red blood cells contain different antibiotics, such as chloramphenicol, neomycin sulfate, and gentamycin as a preservative. The presence of antibodies to a given drug in patient may lead to positive results when performing antibody identification. We present a rare case of detection of anti-co-trimoxazole antibody during routine antibody screening in a female patient undergoing neurosurgery. These antibodies mimicked as antibody against high-frequency red cell antigens reacting in both saline phase as well as antiglobulin phase. Anti-co-trimoxazole antibody was confirmed by repeating antibody screen using reagent red cells of different manufacturers with and without co-trimoxazole drug as preservative as well as using washed red cell panels. There were no associated clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis.

  3. Clinical analysis of thyroglobulin antibody and thyroid peroxidase antibody and their association with vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, the abnormal presence of thyroglobulin antibody (TG-Ab and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab has been reported in vitiligo patients, but presence of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab in patients of different ages and gender, and its association with vitiligo and thyroid autoimmunity has rarely been reported. The aim of our research was to determine whether vitiligo was associated with thyroid autoimmunity and figure out its relationship with age and gender. Materials and Methods: We analyzed TG-Ab, TPO-Ab in age and gender matched 87 vitiligo patients and 90 healthy controls, the patients of vitiligo who were positive for the presence of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab were followed up to confirm autoimmune thyroid disease subsequently. Results: Results showed that the frequencies of TG-Ab (23.0%, 20/87 positivity and TPO-AB (24.1%, 21/87 in vitiligo patients were significantly higher than that in healthy controls (P < 0.05. Moreover, The positivity for of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab was higher in 11-20-year age group and 21-40-year age group than that in age matched healthy controls. We found female patients with vitiligo had higher positive frequencies of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab than healthy female controls. (34.1% vs. 8.8% and 34.1% vs. 11.1%, P = 0.000 and P = 0.011. When 20 patients with TG-Ab and TPO-Ab positivity were followed up for three monthes, 14 of them (70% were diagnosed as having autoimmune thyroid disease compared with age-matched healthy controls (16.7%, χ 2 = 5.4, P = 0.02. Conclusion: TG-Ab and TPO-Ab are likely to be found in female teenagers with vitiligo, and are relevant with respect to subsequent development autoimmune thyroid disease.

  4. High prevalence of human anti-mouse antibodies in the serum of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Maki; Kuribayashi, Kageaki; Umemori, Yoshifumi; Ohe, Yui; Asanuma, Koichi; Tanaka, Maki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody treatment induces the expression of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA), which in turn interfere with the therapy. However, whether HAMAs are expressed before the initiation of antibody therapy in patients with colorectal cancer remains unknown. Serum samples were collected from 40 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Serum samples from 157 individuals without cancer were used as controls. None of the patients received imaging or therapeutic antibodies before the study. The expression of HAMAs was evaluated by ELISA with murine immunoglobulin G1 (mIgG)1, mIgG2a and mIgG2b as the antigen. Of the 40 colorectal cancer patients, 9 (22.5%) expressed either IgG- or IgM-type HAMAs while only 13/157 (8.2%) of the individuals without cancer expressed the HAMAs (pHAMAs are prevalent in the serum of colorectal cancer patients even before antibody administration. Medical practitioners should be alert to the possibility of HAMA expression when administering antibody therapy.

  5. Solid phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niswender, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is concerned with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for assaying body fluid content of an antigenic substance which may either be an antigen itself or a hapten capable of being converted, such as by means of reaction with a protein, to an antigenic material. The present invention is concerned with a novel and improved modification of a double-antibody RIA technique in which there is a first antibody that is specific to the antigenic substance suspected to be present in a body fluid from which the assay is intended. The second antibody, however, is not specific to the antigenic substance or analyte, but is an antibody against the first antibody

  6. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140?250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  7. Antibody pretargeting advances cancer radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, David M; Sharkey, Robert M; Paganelli, Giovanni; Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François

    2006-02-10

    This article reviews the methods of pretargeting, which involve separating the targeting antibody from the subsequent delivery of an imaging or therapeutic agent that binds to the tumor-localized antibody. This provides enhanced tumor:background ratios and the delivery of a higher therapeutic dose than when antibodies are directly conjugated with radionuclides, as currently practiced in cancer radioimmunotherapy. We describe initial promising clinical results using streptavidin-antibody constructs with biotin-radionuclide conjugates in the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, and of bispecific antibodies with hapten-radionuclides in the therapy of tumors expressing carcinoembryonic antigen, such as medullary thyroid and small-cell lung cancers.

  8. Malignant monoblasts can function as effector cells in natural killer cell and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, P; Hokland, M; Ellegaard, J

    1981-01-01

    This is the first report describing natural killer (NK) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of malignant monoblasts. Pure acute monoblastic leukemia was diagnosed in bone marrow aspirations from two patients by use of conventional cytochemical methods as well as multiple immunologic...

  9. Serum Antibody Biomarkers for ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    45-56. Singh VK. (2009) Phenotypic expression of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD): A major subset of autism. Ann Clin Psychiat. 21:148-160. 5...spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in communication (verbal and nonverbal), social interactions, and... autoimmunity ; in particular, the generation of antibodies reactive against brain and CNS proteins. The goal of this grant is to identify serum

  10. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Wertz, N.; Šinkora, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, FEB 17 (2017), s. 255-279 ISSN 2165-8102 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09296S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : swine * pre-immune antibody repertoire * ileal Peyer's patches Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.708, year: 2016

  11. Best waveform score for diagnosing keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Luz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test whether corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF can discriminate between keratoconus and normal eyes and to evaluate whether the averages of two consecutive measurements perform differently from the one with the best waveform score (WS for diagnosing keratoconus. METHODS: ORA measurements for one eye per individual were selected randomly from 53 normal patients and from 27 patients with keratoconus. Two groups were considered the average (CH-Avg, CRF-Avg and best waveform score (CH-WS, CRF-WS groups. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate whether the variables had similar distributions in the Normal and Keratoconus groups. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves were calculated for each parameter to assess the efficacy for diagnosing keratoconus and the same obtained for each variable were compared pairwise using the Hanley-McNeil test. RESULTS: The CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS and CRF-WS differed significantly between the normal and keratoconus groups (p<0.001. The areas under the ROC curve (AUROC for CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS, and CRF-WS were 0.824, 0.873, 0.891, and 0.931, respectively. CH-WS and CRF-WS had significantly better AUROCs than CH-Avg and CRF-Avg, respectively (p=0.001 and 0.002. CONCLUSION: The analysis of the biomechanical properties of the cornea through the ORA method has proved to be an important aid in the diagnosis of keratoconus, regardless of the method used. The best waveform score (WS measurements were superior to the average of consecutive ORA measurements for diagnosing keratoconus.

  12. Diagnosing stuttering in the school environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, Michael

    2002-08-01

    School speech-language pathologists work in settings that present multiple challenges to diagnosing stuttering in students. Perceiving stuttering as a communication impairment allows integration of various issues with criteria from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 1997 into an effective diagnostic plan. Assessment from multiple perspectives reveals motor, linguistic, social, affective, and cognitive issues related to communication and educational competencies. Common sense and pragmatic communication concerns related to children who stutter are described. Clinical questions, observations, issues, and tasks are explored as parts of the assessment process. The multidimensional assessment of student-centered issues helps the clinician determine eligibility qualifications, develop individual education plans, and meet full-inclusion educational requirements.

  13. Benign intracranial hypertension diagnosed with bilateral papilloedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Phillips

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a case of benign intracranial hypertension (BIH diagnosed from the presence of papilloedema. This potentially sight-threatening condition particularly affects younger obese females and can be idiopathic, caused by adverse reaction to certain prescription medications or by systemic disease. Prompt treatment is essentialto avoid optic atrophy and low energy diet and exercise forms part of long-term treatment to avoid relapse. Optometrists can play a critical primary health care role in the detection of papilloedema and referring appropriately.

  14. CT heads diagnosing chest pathology? Whatever next?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdsworth, Gary, E-mail: gary.holdsworth@midyorks.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Midyorks Hospitals NHS Trust, Pinderfields General Hospital Aberford Road Wakefield, West Yorkshire, WF1 4DG (United Kingdom); Clarke, Ruth, E-mail: ruth.clarke@midyorks.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Midyorks Hospitals NHS Trust, Pinderfields General Hospital Aberford Road Wakefield, West Yorkshire, WF1 4DG (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    This case report presents two cases where subcutaneous emphysema visualised on computerised tomography examinations of the head subsequently led to the diagnoses of pathology within the thorax. The pathophysiology of traumatic subcutaneous emphysema within the head and neck is briefly discussed, along with examples of other causes of this condition within this anatomical region. The primary aim of this report is to draw attention to the necessity for a thorough review of any CT head examination, including both intra- and extra-cranial structures, undertaken at a variety of window settings.

  15. Neuroimaging differential diagnoses to abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Nadine [AP-HM Timone 2, Department of Neuroradiology, Marseille cedex 05 (France); Aix Marseille University, UMR CNRS 7339, Marseille (France); Brunel, Herve; Dory-Lautrec, Philippe [AP-HM Timone 2, Department of Neuroradiology, Marseille cedex 05 (France); Chabrol, Brigitte [AP-HM Timone, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Marseille (France)

    2016-05-15

    Trauma is the most common cause of death in childhood, and abusive head trauma is the most common cause of traumatic death and morbidity in infants younger than 1 year. The main differential diagnosis of abusive head trauma is accidental traumatic brain injury, which is usually witnessed. This paper also discusses more uncommon diagnoses such as congenital and acquired disorders of hemostasis, cerebral arteriovenous malformations and metabolic diseases, all of which are extremely rare. Diagnostic imaging including CT and MRI is very important for the distinction of non-accidental from accidental traumatic injury. (orig.)

  16. Patient specific modelling in diagnosing depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a very common disease. Approximately 10% of people in the Western world experience severe depression during their lifetime and many more experience a mild form of depression. It is commonly believed that depression is caused by malfunctions in the biological system constituted...... diagnoses more precise and to offer individual treatment plans and drug design. Efficient and reliable methods for parameter estimation are crucial. Presently we are investigating how well the Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm of the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for estimating the parameters...

  17. Diagnosing ADHD in Danish primary school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tegtmejer, Thyge; Hjörne, Eva; Säljö, Roger

    2017-01-01

    This study of institutional categorization reports an investigation of the practices, procedures and assumptions of psychiatric staff members when diagnosing ADHD. The main data upon which the study is based consist of transcribed audio recordings of meetings in the psychiatric clinic. Here...... children referred from primary schools on the suspicion of ADHD are attended to. The tools and procedures for gathering information are shown to produce decontextualized and individualizing representations of children’s conduct. The evaluation against a number of norms is found to be central. Finally...

  18. Neuroimaging differential diagnoses to abusive head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Nadine; Brunel, Herve; Dory-Lautrec, Philippe; Chabrol, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of death in childhood, and abusive head trauma is the most common cause of traumatic death and morbidity in infants younger than 1 year. The main differential diagnosis of abusive head trauma is accidental traumatic brain injury, which is usually witnessed. This paper also discusses more uncommon diagnoses such as congenital and acquired disorders of hemostasis, cerebral arteriovenous malformations and metabolic diseases, all of which are extremely rare. Diagnostic imaging including CT and MRI is very important for the distinction of non-accidental from accidental traumatic injury. (orig.)

  19. Tryptase in diagnosing adverse suspected anaphylactic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska-Krzanowska, Grazyna

    2012-01-01

    Determination of serum mast cell tryptase (MCT) is becoming more widely used in diagnosing allergic reactions involving mast cells. It can help evaluate the allergenic effects of drugs administered during anesthesia and the perioperative period. Until now, data about the role of tryptase in the body has not been clarified yet. Patients with elevated MCT levels should undergo further testing to find out the causative agent of a potential allergic reaction. Patients with normal tryptase concentration should also undergo further diagnosis if they manifest clinical symptoms of a severe anaphylactic reaction.

  20. Problems in diagnosing odontogenic myxoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, F M A; Chindia, M L; Wakoli, K A

    2007-03-01

    Tumours and tumour-like growths arising from odontogenic tissues constitute a heterogenous group of lesions whose diagnosis can be particularly challenging on the part of both surgeons and pathologists. In children, these lesions are even more difficult to clinically and histopathologically diagnose definitively because of the concurrent diverse embryologic differentiation of dental tissues. A case is presented of a 12 year-old boy who was subjected to inappropriate primary management of a left mandibular mass, due apparently to inadequate consultation to establish an accurate diagnosis.

  1. Diagnosing method for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Yukio.

    1991-01-01

    When an abnormality occurs in a nuclear power plant, the abnormality is diagnosed, at present, graphic waveforms obtained by applying signal processing such as high speed Fourier transformation, etc. to fluctuation ingredients (noises) of process signals such as neutron fluxes, and plotting a power spectral density relative to a frequency. However, expert technical knowledges are required for interpreting the waveforms and it is difficult for field operators and persons for maintenance to judge them. Then, in the present invention, patterns of the power spectral density are inputted for pattern recognition by using a neural net so that any of patterns experienced in the past can be identified. If an unknown pattern appears, it is automatically studied for identification in subsequent cases. Then, the known abnormality of the plant can be monitored and causes thereof can be identified in an early stage, as well as it is possible to diagnose unknown abnormalities in subsequent situation. This method is effective for monitoring and maintaining the integrity, and can avoid unnecessary scram to improve plant operation factor. (N.H.)

  2. Vehicle Fault Diagnose Based on Smart Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhining, Li; Peng, Wang; Jianmin, Mei; Jianwei, Li; Fei, Teng

    In the vehicle's traditional fault diagnose system, we usually use a computer system with a A/D card and with many sensors connected to it. The disadvantage of this system is that these sensor can hardly be shared with control system and other systems, there are too many connect lines and the electro magnetic compatibility(EMC) will be affected. In this paper, smart speed sensor, smart acoustic press sensor, smart oil press sensor, smart acceleration sensor and smart order tracking sensor were designed to solve this problem. With the CAN BUS these smart sensors, fault diagnose computer and other computer could be connected together to establish a network system which can monitor and control the vehicle's diesel and other system without any duplicate sensor. The hard and soft ware of the smart sensor system was introduced, the oil press, vibration and acoustic signal are resampled by constant angle increment to eliminate the influence of the rotate speed. After the resample, the signal in every working cycle could be averaged in angle domain and do other analysis like order spectrum.

  3. Comparison of radiological measures for diagnosing flatfoot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Huan-Chu; Chu, Wencheng; Wu, Weikai; Hsieh, Hsin; Chou, Chiehping; Sun, Shaoen; Chou, Pinya; Liao, Chenhui; Guan, Xiaoyun; Li, Shuchee

    2012-01-01

    Background. In the Taiwanese military, flatfoot is indicated by a calcaneal-fifth metatarsal angle (arch angle) =165 deg . However, the arch angle is not always easily defined. Purpose. To assess correlations between the arch angle and other radiographic measures and thus identify an alternative radiographic measure for diagnosing flatfoot. Material and Methods Eighty-seven male Taiwanese military recruits were studied (median age 22 years, interquartile range 20-23 years). Lateral, weight-bearing radiographs were taken. Five radiographic measurements, including the calcaneal-fifth metatarsal angle (arch angle), medial arch angle (MAA), calcaneal pitch angle (CP), talus angle (TA), and talar-first metatarsal angle (TFM) were made. Correlations between the arch angle and all other measures were determined. A cut-off value for predicting flatfoot (arch angle ≥165 deg ) was determined for each measure using the Youden index and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for each measure to assess diagnostic accuracy. Results. All measures were significantly correlated with arch angle (P 9.5 deg ) had the highest specificity (90.3% vs. 88.75 for CP <12.3 deg ). Conclusion. CP is inversely correlated with arch angle in Taiwanese male military recruits. CP < 12.3 deg is a significant predictor of flatfoot. Assessment of CP may be used as an alternative means of diagnosing flatfoot when the arch angle is not easily defined

  4. Beyond the DSM: trends in psychiatry diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Russowsky Brunoni

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Although widely used in clinical practice and research, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM diagnoses have low validity: patients with different mental disorders can share similar symptoms, while those with the same diagnosis might have different symptoms. In fact, the DSM diagnostic system has been considered one of the main obstacles for further development of psychiatric research. Recently, it has been proposed that psychiatry nosology should be reframed according to a biologically-based etiology. Objectives: To review present and past endeavors of establishing an etiology-based nosology. Methods: Comprehensive review of articles on the topic. Results: From Hippocrates onwards, multiple attempts have been undertaken aiming to move etiology and nosology closer. The most recent efforts are represented by Developmental Psychopathology (DP and the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC, which presents an operational matrix recommended to be used in clinical research instead of the DSM diagnoses. Discussion: The DSM-based nosology is faulty. RDoC and DP might be interesting alternatives for an etiology-based nosology. However, while DP has already brought promising results, RDoC is a novel proposal, whose advantages and disadvantages should gradually be identified in the upcoming years.

  5. Illness perspectives of Thais diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseeha, Ladda; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Sethabouppha, Hunsa; Disayavanish, Chamlong; Turale, Sue

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the perceptions of 18 people diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1-10 years to uncover how they perceived themselves and their illness. It also involved 12 family members who added their perceptions. The data were collected using in-depth interviews, reflective journaling, and observations. The data were analyzed through the lens of Heidegger's hermeneutic phenomenology. Four themes emerged: perceptions of mental illness, perceptions of the causes of illness, perceptions of discrimination, and attempting to live with schizophrenia. The findings included strong underlying cultural and spiritual beliefs, and attitudes unique to the Thai participants, including the causation of schizophrenia by supernatural powers, black magic, and bad karma stemming from past deeds. Understanding the perceptions of the participants might help health-care providers to be more sensitive to those living with schizophrenia in Thailand and elsewhere. In particular, the findings could be useful in informing psychiatric careproviders about developing better caring systems for clients diagnosed with schizophrenia. This should help the sufferers of schizophrenia to live their lives to their own satisfaction and as normally as possible.

  6. Seroprevalence of antibodies to Chlamydophila abortus in Ovine in the State of Alagoas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro Junior, José Wilton; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; Piatti, Rosa Maria; Oliveira, Andréa Alice da Fonseca; da Silva, Aline Melo; de Oliveira Abreu, Sílvio Romero; Anderlini, Giulliano Aires; Valença, Rômulo Menna Barreto

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a seroepidemiological investigation and to identify risk factors associated with infection of Chlamydophila abortus of sheep herds in the Brazilian state of Alagoas. The study was conducted with samples of 274 ewes with ages equal to or higher than 24 months in 25 herds and in 23 towns located in three regions of the state (Sertão, Agreste and Eastern Alagoas). Anti-C. abortus antibodies were detected using the microcomplement fixation test. The risk factors, were determined based on questionnaires consisting of objective questions, about the farmer and general characteristics of the herd like size, sanitary situation and reproductive management. Among 274 sera samples analyzed for C. abortus, 59 (21.5%) were positive with titers ≥32, 187 (68.3%) negative and 28 (10.2%) suspect with titers ≥16. In the 23 towns studied, 20 had positive animals. Among herds 21 (77.7%) of had positive animals. The only variable which appeared to be significant in the multivariate analysis was the region, and Sertão was the most significant (pagent in order to confirm the role of the bacteria is reproductive disturbances in sheeps. In addition to that, control and prophylactic measures along with health promoting programs have to be encouraged on the studied farms so that infection reates are reduced.

  7. Cytoplasmic-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies targeting myeloperoxidase in Wegener′s granulomatosis: A rare phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana M Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wegener′s granulomatosis (WG patients can rarely have antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs directed against myeloperoxidase (MPO, producing a cytoplasmic pattern on indirect immunofluorescence (IIF. This has important implications in the diagnosis and pathophysiology of the disease. We present to you a report of three cases of WG, demonstrating a cytoplasmic-ANCA pattern on indirect IIF, but directed against MPO. It is necessary to diagnose a patient taking into account both the autoimmune test results and the clinical features.

  8. Anti-JK-a Antibody in a Case of SLE Patient with Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Suvro Sankha; Mukherjee, Somnath; Bhattacharya, Prasun; Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2013-06-01

    A 58 year old lady presented with high grade fever, pallor, abdominal pain, loss of appetite and swelling of legs. She was subsequently diagnosed with SLE along with infection of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. She was clinically pale and advised for two units of packed red cell transfusion. One of the two units was incompatible, so only one unit was issued. Subsequently, DAT and auto control were positive. Later antibody specificity was identified, which came out to be anti JK-a. Because of recent transfusion 2 weeks back, her antigenic phenotype could not be elicited. Though we could not make out whether this antibody was the result of pregnancy or transfusion induced allo anti-JK-a or SLE induced auto anti JK-a, this antibody is highly clinically significant from transfusion point of view.

  9. Novel anti-suprabasin antibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Kunihiro; Ohyama, Kaname; Furukawa, Kaori; Higuchi, Osamu; Mukaino, Akihiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Nakane, Shunya; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Umeda, Masataka; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakajima, Hideki; Koga, Tomohiro; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Yoshida, Mari; Kuroda, Naotaka; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-11-21

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is often difficult to diagnose and distinguish from other diseases, because no NPSLE-specific antibodies have been identified. We developed a novel proteomic strategy for identifying and profiling antigens in immune complexes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and applied this strategy to 26 NPSLE patients. As controls, we also included 25 SLE patients without neuropsychiatric manifestations (SLE), 15 with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We identified immune complexes of suprabasin (SBSN) in the CSF of the NPSLE group. The titer of anti-SBSN antibodies was significantly higher in the CSF of the NPSLE group compared to those of the SLE, MS and NPH groups. Microarray data showed that the senescence and autophagy pathways were significantly changed in astrocytes exposed to anti-SBSN antibodies. Our findings indicate that SBSN could be a novel autoantibody for the evaluation of suspected NPSLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Donor-derived HLA antibody production in patients undergoing SCT from HLA antibody-positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Hayashi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Onuma, T; Fujii, N; Kusunoki, Y; Soma, T; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-10-01

    Pre-existing donor-specific HLA antibodies in patients undergoing HLA-mismatched SCT have increasingly been recognized as a risk factor for primary graft failure. However, the clinical implications of the presence of HLA antibodies in donors remain unknown. We prospectively examined 123 related donors for the presence of HLA antibodies by using a Luminex-based single antigen assay. Of these, 1/57 (1.8%) male, 6/27 (22%) parous female and 0/39 (0%) nonparous female donors were HLA antibody-positive. Then, we determined the presence of HLA antibodies in seven patients who received SCT from antibody-positive donors. Of these, four became HLA antibody-positive after SCT. The specificities of the antibodies that emerged in the patients closely resembled those of the antibodies found in the donors, indicating their production by donor-derived plasma cells. Moreover, the kinetics of the HLA antibody levels were similar in all four patients: levels started increasing within 1 week after SCT and peaked at days 10-21, followed by a gradual decrease. These results suggest that donor-derived HLA antibody production frequently occurs in patients undergoing SCT from antibody-positive donors. Further studies are warranted for clarifying the clinical significance of donor-derived HLA antibodies, including the role of these antibodies in post transplant platelet transfusion refractoriness.

  11. Detection of AA76, a Common Form of Amyloid A Protein, as a Way of Diagnosing AA Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junji; Okuda, Yasuaki; Kuroda, Takeshi; Yamada, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Reactive amyloid deposits consist of amyloid A (AA) proteins, the degradation products of serum amyloid A (SAA). Since the most common species of AA is the amino terminal portion produced by cleavage between residues 76 and 77 of SAA (AA76), the presence of AA76 in tissues could be a consequence of AA amyloid deposition. This study assessed the diagnostic significance of the detection of AA76 for AA amyloidosis using two different approaches. Biopsy specimens (n=130 from 54 subjects) from gastroduodenal mucosa or abdominal fat (n=9 from 9 subjects) of patients who had already been diagnosed with or were suspected of having AA amyloidosis were used. Fixed mucosal sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry using a newly developed antibody recognizing the carboxyl terminal end of AA76 (anti-AA76). The non-fixed materials from gastroduodenal mucosa or abdominal fat were subjected to immunoblotting for detection of the size of AA76. Among the gastroduodenal specimens (n=115) from already diagnosed patients, the positive rates of Congo red staining, immunohistochemistry using anti-AA76, and immunoblotting were 68.4%, 73.0%, and 92.2%, respectively. The anti-AA76 did not stain the supposed SAA in the blood or leakage, which was stained by anti-SAA antibody. AA76 was not detected either by immunohistochemistry or by immunoblot in the materials from patients in whom AA amyloidosis had been ruled out. In the abdominal fat, the immunoblot detected AA76 in 8 materials from 8 already diagnosed patients and did not in 1 patient whose gastroduodenal mucosa was negative. In conclusion, the detection of AA76 may alter the ability to diagnose AA amyloidosis. In immunohistochemistry for fixed specimens, the new anti-AA76 antibody can improve the specificity. Immunoblot for non-fixed materials, which can considerably improve the sensitivity, should be beneficial for small materials like abdominal fat. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  12. Hypocomplementaemia caused by C3 nephritic factors (C3 NeF): clinical findings and the coincidence of C3 NeF type II with anti-C1q autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skattum, L; Mårtensson, U; Sjöholm, A G

    1997-12-01

    The main purposes were to document manifestations associated with prolonged or clinically unexplained C3 deficiency and to approximate how often hypocomplementaemia of this kind is caused by C3 nephritic factors (C3 NeF), i.e. autoantibodies to alternative pathway C3 convertases. We also wished to distinguish between C3 NeF types I and II and to assess coincident autoantibody responses to the collagen-like region of C1q (C1qCLR). The investigation was based on serum samples referred to a specialized laboratory for complement analysis in the course of several years. Twenty-five persons with C3 concentrations lower than 0.43 g L-1, a third of the normal, were included in the study. Analysis using three methods provided evidence of C3 NeF in 20 persons with equal frequencies of C3 NeF types I and II. We also gave evidence of antibody specificity differences for the two types of C3 NeF. Six patients with C3 NeF type II showed antibodies to C1qCLR. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis was the predominant diagnosis and two patients had partial lipodystrophy reflecting the well-known association between these diseases and C3 NeF. Anaphylactoid purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus, and severe infection, mainly meningococcal disease, were also observed. The study group was probably fairly representative of C3 deficiency syndromes as encountered in clinical practice. The findings emphasize the heterogeneity of C3 NeF, and that acquired C3 deficiency syndromes caused by C3 NeF should perhaps be considered more often in diagnostic work.

  13. [A patient of sensorimotor neuropathy with small cell lung carcinoma and anti-GM1 antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Takashi; Enomoto, Setsu; Makita, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Kenji; Kimura, Takashi; Hashimoto, Kazuki; Yahara, Osamu

    2002-09-01

    We reported a 62-year-old woman had sensorimotor neuropathy with small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and anti-GM1 antibody. She was admitted with several months history of progressive numbness, walking disturbance and anorexia. Neurologic examination revealed severe numbness and deep sensory disturbance of extremities and body, and mild weakness of distal extremities. Deep tendon reflexes were absent. Her limbs were ataxic. Nerve conduction studies showed no sensory evoked responses. CSF protein was elevated. Sural nerve biopsy revealed severe loss of myelinated fibers and perivascular mononuclear cells surrounding the perineurial vessel. Vasculitic neuropathy was diagnosed, and prednisolone was started, with no benefit. In the clinical course, she developed cough attacks and was found the lymphnode swelling in the mediastinum and supraclavicular fossa, which was diagnosed SCLC. Although anti-Hu antibody were not detected, anti-GM1 antibody was positive. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, with transient improvement. The rare case of the paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy with SCLC and anti-GM1 antibody was reported.

  14. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome showing elevated levels of antinuclear and anticentromere antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Seisuke; Kasahara, Akinori; Tada, Shoko; Tanaka, Takehiro; Umena, Sachio; Fukatsu, Haruka; Noguchi, Toshio; Matsumura, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    A 56-year-old female initially visited an otorhinolaryngologist because of an impaired sense of taste in September, 2010 and was referred to our facility in October, 2010. She was diagnosed with Basedow's disease for which she underwent subtotal thyroidectomy in 1984 and arthritis involving multiple joints, primarily affecting her hands. In addition, the anticentromere antibody (ACA) level was markedly high. On physical examination, alopecia as well as hyperpigmentation of the dorsum of the hands and back was observed. Dystrophic changes of the fingernails and a bilateral thumb abduction deformity were observed. Antinuclear antibodies were elevated. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed the mucosa carpeted with strawberry-like polypoid lesions. Histopathological examination of the biopsied specimen of the stomach revealed a corkscrew-like appearance. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS). She admitted to our hospital in November, 2010. Oral prednisolone was administered with success. In July, 2012, her antimitochondrial M2 antibody level was elevated. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first patient with CCS, a history of Basedow's disease, and elevated levels of ACA and antimitochondrial M2 antibody. We consider the present case suggests CCS could be caused by immunological abnormality.

  15. [Significance of serum antibodies ANCA, ASCA, ABBA in diagnostics of idiopathic intestinal inflammations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, M; Pintérová, Kolesárová M; Drahosová, M; Rejchrt, S; Douda, T; Tachecí, I; Kopácová, M; Bures, J

    2007-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis still remain a heterogeneous group of diseases with an unclear aetiology. Serologic methods play important role in their diagnosing though there is still not an ideal marker. We tried to determine the importance of serological testing of ASCA IgA, IgG, ANCA, ABBA antibodies in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. ASCA IgG, ASCA IgA; ANCA, ABBA antibodies and C-reactive protein were detected by indirect fluorescence assay. ASCA IgA, ASCA IgG, ABBA, ANCA were examined in 40 patients (28 Crohn's disease, 12 ulcerative colitis, 32 health controls). Specificity of ASCA IgA, IgG in CD patients was high (both 96.2%), specificity ANCA in UC 100%. ABBA antibodies had low sensitivity and specificity in both diseases. Combination of ASCA, ANCA, ABBA makes the specificity higher. We showed the importance of combination ASCA, ANCA with ABBA antibodies to improve the serological diagnosing of IBD.

  16. N-type calcium channel antibody-mediated paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Blas-Boria, David; Williams, Michelle D; Garciarena, Pedro; Tummala, Sudhakar; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W

    2014-03-15

    The etiology of encephalitis presents a diagnostic challenge and often remains a mystery. However, current technological advances using antibodies can enable a definitive diagnosis in cases that would previously have been suspected to be idiopathic or viral encephalitis. Our objective is to show that tonsil neuroendocrine carcinoma can present initially as limbic encephalitis mediated by N-type calcium channel antibodies and to highlight the diagnostic confusion before cancer detection. We report a rare case of neuroendocrine cancer presenting as limbic encephalopathy, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and neuropathy. The patient was diagnosed and treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in November 2011. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis was diagnosed based on clinical presentation of seizures, short-term memory loss, retrograde amnesia, disorientation, distractibility, and abulia; on the exclusion of brain metastases, CNS infection, stroke, metabolic or nutritional deficits, or medication-related events; and on CSF results with inflammatory findings and an abnormal electroencephalography study that showed seizure activity in the left temporal lobe. Serum paraneoplastic panel was positive for P/Q-type calcium channel antibody and N-type calcium channel antibody. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain was unremarkable. This case highlights limbic encephalitis as an atypical presentation of neuroendocrine cancer. It also illustrates how treatment of the underlying cancer can reverse limbic encephalitis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome in a neuroendocrine carcinoma patient even before the paraneoplastic panel becomes negative. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Parasite Specific Antibody Increase Induced by an Episode of Acute P. falciparum Uncomplicated Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Kaddumukasa

    Full Text Available There is no approved vaccine for malaria, and precisely how human antibody responses to malaria parasite components and potential vaccine molecules are developed and maintained remains poorly defined. In this study, antibody anamnestic or memory response elicited by a single episode of P. falciparum infection was investigated.This study involved 362 malaria patients aged between 6 months to 60 years, of whom 19% were early-diagnosed people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA. On the day malaria was diagnosed and 42 days later, blood specimens were collected. Parasite density, CD4+ cells, and antibodies specific to synthetic peptides representing antigenic regions of the P. falciparum proteins GLURP, MSP3 and HRPII were measured.On the day of malaria diagnosis, Immunoglobulin (IgG antibodies against GLURP, MSP3 and HRP II peptides were present in the blood of 75%, 41% and 60% of patients, respectively. 42 days later, the majority of patients had boosted their serum IgG antibody more than 1.2 fold. The increase in level of IgG antibody against the peptides was not affected by parasite density at diagnosis. The median CD4+ cell counts of PLWHAs and HIV negative individuals were not statistically different, and median post-infection increases in anti-peptide IgG were similar in both groups of patients.In the majority (70% of individuals, an infection of P. falciparum elicits at least 20% increase in level of anti-parasite IgG. This boost in anti-P. falciparum IgG is not affected by parasite density on the day of malaria diagnosis, or by HIV status.

  18. Construction of Rabbit Immune Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha; Lee, Jong Seo; Shim, Hyunbo

    2018-01-01

    Rabbits have distinct advantages over mice as a source of target-specific antibodies. They produce higher affinity antibodies than mice, and may elicit strong immune response against antigens or epitopes that are poorly immunogenic or tolerated in mice. However, a great majority of currently available monoclonal antibodies are of murine origin because of the wider availability of murine fusion partner cell lines and well-established tools and protocols for fusion and cloning of mouse hybridoma. Phage-display selection of antibody libraries is an alternative method to hybridoma technology for the generation of target-specific monoclonal antibodies. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies from nonmurine species can readily be obtained by constructing immune antibody libraries from B cells of the immunized animal and screening the library by phage display. In this article, we describe the construction of a rabbit immune Fab library for the facile isolation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies. After immunization, B-cell cDNA is obtained from the spleen of the animal, from which antibody variable domain repertoires are amplified and assembled into a Fab repertoire by PCR. The Fab genes are then cloned into a phagemid vector and transformed to E. coli, from which a phage-displayed immune Fab library is rescued. Such a library can be biopanned against the immunization antigen for rapid identification of high-affinity, target-specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies.

  19. Acute HIV Discovered During Routine HIV Screening With HIV Antigen-Antibody Combination Tests in 9 US Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas A E; Giordano, Thomas P; Pasalar, Siavash; Jacobson, Kathleen R; Glick, Nancy R; Sha, Beverly E; Mammen, Priya E; Hunt, Bijou R; Todorovic, Tamara; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Adomolga, Vincent; Feaster, Daniel J; Branson, Bernard M

    2018-01-05

    Newer combination HIV antigen-antibody tests allow detection of HIV sooner after infection than previous antibody-only immunoassays because, in addition to HIV-1 and -2 antibodies, they detect the HIV-1 p24 antigen, which appears before antibodies develop. We determine the yield of screening with HIV antigen-antibody tests and clinical presentations for new diagnoses of acute and established HIV infection across US emergency departments (EDs). This was a retrospective study of 9 EDs in 6 cities with HIV screening programs that integrated laboratory-based antigen-antibody tests between November 1, 2012, and December 31, 2015. Unique patients with newly diagnosed HIV infection were identified and classified as having either acute HIV infection or established HIV infection. Acute HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result, a negative HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay, or Western blot result, but detectable HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA); established HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result and a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay or Western blot result. The primary outcomes were the number of new HIV diagnoses and proportion of patients with laboratory-defined acute HIV infection. Secondary outcomes compared reason for visit and the clinical presentation of acute HIV infection. In total, 214,524 patients were screened for HIV and 839 (0.4%) received a new diagnosis, of which 122 (14.5%) were acute HIV infection and 717 (85.5%) were established HIV infection. Compared with patients with established HIV infection, those with acute HIV infection were younger, had higher RNA and CD4 counts, and were more likely to have viral syndrome (41.8% versus 6.5%) or fever (14.3% versus 3.4%) as their reason for visit. Most patients with acute HIV infection displayed symptoms attributable to acute infection (median symptom count 5 [interquartile range 3 to 6]), with fever often

  20. Diagnosing MOV problems using comparative trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the concept of comparative trace analysis and shows it to be very effective in diagnosing motor operated valve (MOV) problems. Comparative trace analysis is simply the process of interpreting simultaneously gathered traces, each presenting a different perspective on the same series of events. The opening and closing of a motor operated valve is such a series of events. The simultaneous traces are obtained using Liberty Technologies' Valve Operation Test and Evaluation System (VOTES)reg-sign. The traces include stem thrust, motor current, motor power factor, motor power, switch actuations, vibration in three different frequency bands, spring pack displacement, and spring pack force. Spare and auxiliary channels enable additional key parameters to be measured, such as differential pressure and stem displacement. Though not specifically illustrated in this paper, the VOTES system also provides for FFT analysis on all traces except switches

  1. Discrete event systems diagnosis and diagnosability

    CERN Document Server

    Sayed-Mouchaweh, Moamar

    2014-01-01

    Discrete Event Systems: Diagnosis and Diagnosability addresses the problem of fault diagnosis of Discrete Event Systems (DES). This book provides the basic techniques and approaches necessary for the design of an efficient fault diagnosis system for a wide range of modern engineering applications. The different techniques and approaches are classified according to several criteria such as: modeling tools (Automata, Petri nets) that is used to construct the model; the information (qualitative based on events occurrences and/or states outputs, quantitative based on signal processing and data analysis) that is needed to analyze and achieve the diagnosis; the decision structure (centralized, decentralized) that is required to achieve the diagnosis. The goal of this classification is to select the efficient method to achieve the fault diagnosis according to the application constraints. This book focuses on the centralized and decentralized event based diagnosis approaches using formal language and automata as mode...

  2. Automated diagnostic kiosk for diagnosing diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, John Frederick; Birch, James Michael

    2014-02-11

    An automated and autonomous diagnostic apparatus that is capable of dispensing collection vials and collections kits to users interesting in collecting a biological sample and submitting their collected sample contained within a collection vial into the apparatus for automated diagnostic services. The user communicates with the apparatus through a touch-screen monitor. A user is able to enter personnel information into the apparatus including medical history, insurance information, co-payment, and answer a series of questions regarding their illness, which is used to determine the assay most likely to yield a positive result. Remotely-located physicians can communicate with users of the apparatus using video tele-medicine and request specific assays to be performed. The apparatus archives submitted samples for additional testing. Users may receive their assay results electronically. Users may allow the uploading of their diagnoses into a central databank for disease surveillance purposes.

  3. Diagnosing organizational culture: An empirical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Jofreh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the behavior of members of an organization is a basic step in understanding the organization's culture. In fact, it is always necessary to consider organization culture when a new action is about to happen. In fact, by leveraging culture, it is getting easier to accomplish other tasks within organization. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to find important factors influencing organizational culture in banking industry. The proposed study uses Denison’s standard questionnaire for diagnosing organizational culture. Cronbach alpha has been calculated as 0.927, which is well about the acceptable limit. The results indicate that dimensions of job involvement (2.961 and organizational mission (2.914 are in better position compared with dimensions of compatibility (2.724 and consistency (2.621. The study proposes a new comprehensive organizational framework, which helps building new strategies.

  4. Method of diagnosing the control rod operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaniwa, Tomoko; Kudo, Mitsuru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To confirm the soundness of a control rod operation at high accuracy. Method: By utilizing the fact that a control rod position indicating system outputs digitalized decimal signals, position signals are outputted as below: a stop position signal when a magnet is opposed to an odd number limit switch; a drift position signal when it is opposed to an even number limit switch; and a blank position signal when it is not opposed to a limit switch. Since the standard signal pattern is present for the order of signal change due to the displacement of the magnet i.e., stop position→blank position→drift position, absolute position change and the time for passing the limit switch, the standard pattern is stored in an operation diagnosis unit and compared with the data upon actual driving to diagnose the control rod operation collectively. (Sekiya, K.)

  5. Diagnosing ectopic pregnancy in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert; Dupuis, Carolyn; Chen, Byron; Smith, Andrew; Kim, Young H

    2018-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is the implantation of a fertilized egg outside the uterine endometrial cavity. For women presenting to the emergency department with abdominal pain and/or vaginal bleeding, ectopic pregnancy is an important diagnostic consideration. The diagnosis is made based on laboratory values and ultrasound imaging findings. The ultrasound appearance of both normal early pregnancy and ectopic pregnancy are variable and often subtle, presenting diagnostic challenges for radiologists. This pictorial essay describes and illustrates the sonographic findings of ectopic pregnancy and reviews the differential diagnoses that can mimic ectopic pregnancy on ultrasound. With the possibility of medical management, the value of early detection and prompt initiation of treatment has increased in improving clinical outcomes and preventing the complications of ectopic pregnancy.

  6. Diagnosing ectopic pregnancy in the emergency setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pregnancy is the implantation of a fertilized egg outside the uterine endometrial cavity. For women presenting to the emergency department with abdominal pain and/or vaginal bleeding, ectopic pregnancy is an important diagnostic consideration. The diagnosis is made based on laboratory values and ultrasound imaging findings. The ultrasound appearance of both normal early pregnancy and ectopic pregnancy are variable and often subtle, presenting diagnostic challenges for radiologists. This pictorial essay describes and illustrates the sonographic findings of ectopic pregnancy and reviews the differential diagnoses that can mimic ectopic pregnancy on ultrasound. With the possibility of medical management, the value of early detection and prompt initiation of treatment has increased in improving clinical outcomes and preventing the complications of ectopic pregnancy.

  7. Diagnosing kidney disease in the genetic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Sindhuri; Gharavi, Ali G

    2015-07-01

    Recent technological improvements have increased the use of genetic testing in the clinic. This review serves to summarize the many practical benefits of genetic testing, discusses various methodologies that can be used clinically, and exemplifies ways in which genetics is propelling the field forward in nephrology. The advent of next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies has heralded an unprecedented number of discoveries in the field of nephrology, providing many opportunities for incorporating genomic diagnostics into clinical care. The use of genetic testing, particularly in pediatrics, can provide accurate diagnoses in puzzling cases, resolve misclassification of disease, and identify subsets of individuals with treatable conditions. Genetic testing may have broad benefits for patients and their families. Knowing the precise molecular etiology of disease can help clinicians determine the exact therapeutic course, and counsel patients and their families about prognosis. Genetic discoveries can also improve the classification of kidney disease and identify new targets for therapy.

  8. Dermoscopy of difficult-to-diagnose Melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou Chrysoula

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dermoscopy is a non-invasive procedure that allows the evaluation of cutaneous lesions, and is considered to be a useful tool that improves the diagnostic accuracy of melanoma. Many dermoscopic criteria of melanoma have been established and several algorithms have been created for melanoma detection. However, the recognition of some melanomas remains challenging. Melanomas on specific body sites, melanomas in patients with multiple atypical moles, and nodular melanomas represent the most difficult-to-recognize melanoma subtypes, since they typically lack the “classic” melanoma-specific criteria. This paper provides an update on dermoscopy of difficult-to-diagnose melanomas by summarizing the newest data. Lastly, we highlight the importance of digital dermoscopy in the follow-up of melanocytic lesions for the detection of incipient melanomas while maintaining a low excision rate.

  9. Diagnosing dehydration? Blend evidence with clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kavouras, Stavros A; Walsh, Neil P; Roberts, William O

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the review is to provide recommendations to improve clinical decision-making based on the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used hydration biomarkers and clinical assessment methods. There is widespread consensus regarding treatment, but not the diagnosis of dehydration. Even though it is generally accepted that a proper clinical diagnosis of dehydration can only be made biochemically rather than relying upon clinical signs and symptoms, no gold standard biochemical hydration index exists. Other than clinical biomarkers in blood (i.e., osmolality and blood urea nitrogen/creatinine) and in urine (i.e., osmolality and specific gravity), blood pressure assessment and clinical symptoms in the eye (i.e., tear production and palpitating pressure) and the mouth (i.e., thirst and mucous wetness) can provide important information for diagnosing dehydration. We conclude that clinical observations based on a combination of history, physical examination, laboratory values, and clinician experience remain the best approach to the diagnosis of dehydration.

  10. Optical coherence tomography for diagnosing periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Everett, Matthew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.; Nathel, Howard

    1997-05-01

    We have, in this preliminary study, investigated the use of optical coherence tomography for diagnosis of periodontal disease. We took in vitro OCT images of the dental and periodontal tissues from a young pig and compared them to histological sections. These images distinguish tooth and soft tissue relationships that are important in diagnosing and assessing periodontal disease. We have imaged the attachment of gingiva to the tooth surface and located the cemento-enamel junction. This junction is an important reference point for defining attachment level in the diagnosis of periodontal disease. the boundary between enamel and dentin is also visible for most of the length of the anatomical crown, allowing quantitation of enamel thickness and character.

  11. Diagnosing Myocardial Contusion after Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alborzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A myocardial contusion refers to a bruise of the cardiac muscle, the severity of which can vary depending on the severity of the injury and when the injury occurs. It is a major cause of rapid death which happens after blunt chest trauma and should be suspected at triage in the emergency department. We demonstrated that suspected myocardial contusion patients who have normal electrocardiograms (ECGs and biomarker tests can be safely discharged. However, if the test results are abnormal, the next steps should be echocardiography and more advanced measures. Diagnosing myocardial contusion is very difficult because of its nonspecific symptoms. If a myocardial contusion happens, cardiogenic shock or arrhythmia must be anticipated, and the patient must be carefully monitored.

  12. Excess mortality in patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thvilum, Marianne; Brandt, Frans; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although hypothyroidism is associated with increased morbidity, an association with increased mortality is still debated. Our objective was to investigate, at a nationwide level, whether a diagnosis of hypothyroidism influences mortality. Methods: In an observational cohort study from...... January 1, 1978 until December 31, 2008 using record-linkage data from nationwide Danish health registers, 3587 singletons and 682 twins diagnosed with hypothyroidism were identified. Hypothyroid individuals were matched 1:4 with nonhypothyroid controls with respect to age and gender and followed over...... a mean period of 5.6 years (range 0-30 years). The hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was calculated using Cox regression analyses. Comorbidity was evaluated using the Charlson score (CS). Results: In singletons with hypothyroidism, the mortality risk was increased (HR 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1...

  13. Diagnosing chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadinnapola C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Charaka Hadinnapola, Deepa Gopalan, David P Jenkins Papworth Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust, Papworth Everard, Cambridge, United Kingdom Abstract: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a rare and relatively poorly understood disease. It remains underdiagnosed and is often not recognized in primary and secondary care, as its symptoms are nonspecific and there are few clinical signs until late in the disease process. However, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA offers a potential cure for patients with this type of pulmonary hypertension; therefore, it is important that they are identified and diagnosed in a timely manner. PEA is associated with a 2.2%–5% risk of significant morbidity and mortality, even in experienced PEA centers. Therefore, once chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is diagnosed, further assessment of operability and patient selection is crucial. Assessment of operability involves determining the distribution and burden of chronic thromboembolic disease, assessing pulmonary hemodynamics, and assessing the functional impairment of the patient. Ventilation perfusion scintigraphy is of value in screening for the presence of chronic thromboembolic disease. However, computer tomography pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography are now increasingly used to image the vascular occlusions directly. This allows assessment of the surgically accessible disease burden. Some centers still advocate conventional selective pulmonary angiography for the latter. Right-heart catheterization remains the gold standard for assessing pulmonary hemodynamics. Higher pulmonary vascular resistances are associated with poorer outcomes as well as increased risks at the time of surgery. This is in part because of the presence of more distal chronic thromboembolic material and distal pulmonary artery remodeling. However, in experienced centers, these patients are being operated on safely and with good

  14. Causes and outcome of prenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadzadeh, Ali; Tahmasebi, Morteza; Gharibvand, Mohammad Momen

    2009-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is the most common abnormal finding in the urinary tract on prenatal screening with ultrasonography (U/S). Hydronephrosis may be obstructive or nonobstructive; obstructive lesions are more harmful to the developing kidneys. The aim of the study was to evaluate the causes of renal pelvic dilatation and the outcome of postnatal treatment in infants with hydronephrosis diagnosed prenatally with U/S. We prospectively studied 67 (60 males) newborns with hydronephrosis diagnosed prenatally and confirmed postnatally with U/S from Sept. 2005 to Oct. 2007. The patients were allocated to three groups based on the mea-surement of the anteroposterior renal pelvic diameter (APRPD) in transverse plane: mild (6-9.9 mm), moderate (10-14.9 mm) and severe (> 15 mm) hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) was obtained in all of the patients to rule out vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). In cases with negative VUR, Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) scan with diuretic renography was performed to detect ureteropelvic joint obstruction (UPJO). Twenty two cases (32.8%) had mild, 20 (29.9%) had moderate, and 25 (37.3%) had severe hydronephrosis. The causes of hydronephrosis were VUR (40.2%), UPJO (32.8%), posterior urethral valves (PUVs) (13.4 %), and transient hydronephrosis (13.4 %). The lesion was obstructive in 37 (55.2%) infants. Totally, 33 (49.2%) patients with hydronephrosis (9 mild, 9 moderate, and 15 severe) subsequently developed complications such as UTI and renal insufficiency, or required surgery. Associated abnormalities were observed in 15 (22.4%) patients. We conclude that every newborn with any degree of hydronephrosis should be assessed postnatally for specific diagnosis and treatment. (author)

  15. Provocation tests in diagnosing drug hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Philippe-Jean; Gaeta, Francesco; Bousquet-Rouanet, Laure; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Demoly, Pascal; Romano, Antonino

    2008-01-01

    A position paper by the European Network for Drug Allergy (ENDA), the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) interest group on drug hypersensitivity, defines drug provocation tests (DPTs) as "the controlled administration of a drug in order to diagnose drug hypersensitivity reactions". The DPT is widely considered to be the "gold standard" to establish or exclude the diagnosis of hypersensitivity to a certain substance, as it not only reproduces hypersensitivity symptoms, but also any other adverse clinical manifestation, irrespective of the mechanism. The DPT can be harmful and thus should only be considered after balancing the risk-benefit ratio in the individual patient. The ENDA position paper specifies two main indications for DPTs with the suspected compounds: 1. to exclude hypersensitivity in non-suggestive histories of drug hypersensitivity and in patients with non-specific symptoms, such as vagal symptoms under local anesthesia; 2. to establish a firm diagnosis in suggestive histories of drug hypersensitivity with negative, non-conclusive, or non-available allergologic tests. A positive DPT result optimizes allergen avoidance, while a negative one allows a false label of drug hypersensitivity to be removed. For these reasons, DPTs are often carried out to exclude a diagnosis of hypersensitivity to beta-lactams when other allergologic tests are negative. DPTs are also performed when the sensitivity of allergologic tests for evaluating allergic reactions to certain drugs, such as non-beta-lactam antibiotics, heparins, and glucocorticoids, is limited. On the other hand, DPTs are also performed to diagnose hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in subjects with the cross-reactive pattern, because both skin tests and in vitro diagnostic methods are ineffective in such patients.

  16. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Michelle Remião Ugolini; Danowski, Adriana; Funke, Andreas; Rêgo, Jozelia; Levy, Roger; Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira de

    2017-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations) add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  17. Nursing diagnoses determined by first year students: a vignette study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Korhan, Esra Akın; Erdemir, Firdevs; Müller-Staub, Maria

    2014-02-01

    The study aimed to determine the ability of first year students in identifying nursing diagnoses. In a descriptive evaluation study, an expert-validated vignette containing 18 nursing diagnoses was used. The students determined 15 nursing diagnoses. The highest percentages of diagnoses identified were disturbed sleep pattern and nutrition imbalance. Students also considered medical diagnoses as nursing diagnoses: hypertension and tachycardia. Despite the fact that students were only at the end of their first semester and had limited clinical experience, they successfully identified the majority of nursing diagnoses. Patient case study vignettes are recommended for education. To foster students' knowledge and experience, it is also suggested that evaluating nursing diagnoses in clinical practicals becomes a requirement. © 2013 NANDA International, Inc.

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Phenylketonuria (PKU)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose phenylketonuria (PKU)? Nearly all cases of PKU are diagnosed ... Human Services. Baby's First Test. (n.d.). Classic phenylketonuria . Retrieved May 15, 2012, from http://www.babysfirsttest. ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Spina Bifida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose spina bifida? Doctors diagnose spina bifida before or after the infant is born. Spina bifida occulta might not be identified until late childhood ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Health care providers use a combination of physical ... the X chromosomes is partially or completely missing. Turner syndrome also can be diagnosed during pregnancy by testing ...

  2. Queer diagnoses revisited: The past and future of homosexuality and gender diagnoses in DSM and ICD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) recently completed a several year process of revising the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). During that time, there were objections raised to retaining DSM's gender identity disorder diagnoses and calls to remove them, just as homosexuality had been removed from DSM-II in 1973. At the conclusion of the DSM-5 revision process, the gender diagnoses were retained, albeit in altered form and bearing the new name of 'gender dysphoria'. The author of this paper was a member of the DSM-5 Workgroup on Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders and presently serves on the WHO Working Group on Sexual Disorders and Sexual Health. Both groups faced similar tasks: reconciling patients' needs for access to care with the stigma of being given a psychiatric diagnosis. The differing nature of the two diagnostic manuals led to two different outcomes. As background, this paper updates the history of homosexuality and the gender diagnoses in the DSM and in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) as well as what is expected to happen to the homosexuality and gender diagnoses following the current ICD-11 revision process.

  3. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  4. The future of antibodies as cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M; Dhimolea, Eugen

    2012-09-01

    Targeted therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have proven successful as cancer drugs. To profile products that could be marketed in the future, we examined the current commercial clinical pipeline of mAb candidates for cancer. Our analysis revealed trends toward development of a variety of noncanonical mAbs, including antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), bispecific antibodies, engineered antibodies and antibody fragments and/or domains. We found substantial diversity in the antibody sequence source, isotype, carbohydrate residues, targets and mechanisms of action (MOA). Although well-validated targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and CD20, continue to provide opportunities for companies, we found notable trends toward targeting less-well-validated antigens and exploration of innovative MOA such as the generation of anticancer immune responses or recruitment of cytotoxic T cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Time trend in diagnosing dementia in secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Waltoft, Berit Lindum; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2010-01-01

    To study the trend of diagnosing dementia in the secondary health care sector over time, we conducted a nationwide longitudinal study of the incidence and prevalence of registered dementia diagnoses in the Danish national hospital registers.......To study the trend of diagnosing dementia in the secondary health care sector over time, we conducted a nationwide longitudinal study of the incidence and prevalence of registered dementia diagnoses in the Danish national hospital registers....

  6. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  7. An anti vimentin antibody promotes tube formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mathias Lindh; Møller, Carina Kjeldahl; Rasmussen, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    antibody technology, promotes tube formation of endothelial cells in a 2D matrigel assay. By binding vimentin, the antibody increases the tube formation by 21% after 5 hours of incubation. Addition of the antibody directly to cultured endothelial cells does not influence endothelial cell migration...... or proliferation. The enhanced tube formation can be seen for up to 10 hours where after the effect decreases. It is shown that the antibody-binding site is located on the coil 2 domain of vimentin. To our knowledge this is the first study that demonstrates an enhanced tube formation by binding vimentin in a 2D...

  8. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2018-04-10

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  9. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Gearhart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  10. High throughput discovery of influenza virus neutralizing antibodies from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Chiu, Yi-Kai; Yu, Chung-Ming; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Tung, Chao-Ping; Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chen, Hong-Sen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Yang, An-Suei

    2017-10-31

    Pandemic and epidemic outbreaks of influenza A virus (IAV) infection pose severe challenges to human society. Passive immunotherapy with recombinant neutralizing antibodies can potentially mitigate the threats of IAV infection. With a high throughput neutralizing antibody discovery platform, we produced artificial anti-hemagglutinin (HA) IAV-neutralizing IgGs from phage-displayed synthetic scFv libraries without necessitating prior memory of antibody-antigen interactions or relying on affinity maturation essential for in vivo immune systems to generate highly specific neutralizing antibodies. At least two thirds of the epitope groups of the artificial anti-HA antibodies resemble those of natural protective anti-HA antibodies, providing alternatives to neutralizing antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. With continuing advancement in designing and constructing synthetic scFv libraries, this technological platform is useful in mitigating not only the threats of IAV pandemics but also those from other newly emerging viral infections.

  11. Not All Antibodies Are Created Equal: Factors That Influence Antibody Mediated Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie L. Butler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with Dr. Paul Terasaki’s “humoral theory of rejection” numerous studies have shown that HLA antibodies can cause acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection (AMR and decreased graft survival. New evidence also supports a role for antibodies to non-HLA antigens in AMR and allograft injury. Despite the remarkable efforts by leaders in the field who pioneered single antigen bead technology for detection of donor specific antibodies, a considerable amount of work is still needed to better define the antibody attributes that are associated with AMR pathology. This review highlights what is currently known about the clinical context of pre and posttransplant antibodies, antibody characteristics that influence AMR, and the paths after donor specific antibody production (no rejection, subclinical rejection, and clinical dysfunction with AMR.

  12. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES AND GENE MUTATIONS IN HEMOSTASIS OF CHILDREN WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Solntseva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombophilia in children with diffuse connective tissue disorders as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM could arise from various causes including peripherial blood circulation of antiphospholipid antibodies (APH and genetic mutations in the system of hemostasis. Thrombosis is a serious and prognostically unfavorable complication that has negative impact on the underlying disease course. The study included 96 children, 65 of them had diagnosed SLE and the other 31 had JDM. The Elisa method was used to detect antiphospholipid antibodies, coagulation method was used to detect lupus anticoagulant (LAC and antibodies to cardiolipins (anticl, ?2:glycoprotein 1 (anti ? 2 gp 1 and prothrombin (APT. The PCR method (DNA diagnostics was used to detect DNA mutations as factor resistance to of activated protein c (Leiden 5,10 methylen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene polymorphism. The incidence of APL antibodies was registered in 61.5% patients with SLE and in 32.2% of patients with JDM. Ac ligg, anti ?2 gp 1 Igg were clinically significant in thrombotic events in patients with SLE and JDM, and so was LAC in patients with SLE. The prevalence of the hemostasis system mutations is concordant with reported data. Conclusion thrombophilia is frequently associated with APH antibodies or combination of APH antibodies with genetic abnormalities. Sole genetic mutations are salient in patients with JDM.Key words: thrombophilia, systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, leiden, prothrombin, methylentet rahydrofolate reductase.

  13. A biopsy is not always necessary to diagnose celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubarak, Amani; Wolters, Victorien M.; Gerritsen, Susan A. M.; Gmelig-Meyling, Frits H. J.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal histology is the criterion standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). However, results of serological tests such as anti-endomysium antibodies and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGA) are becoming increasingly reliable. This raises the question of whether a small

  14. Socio - demographic characteristics of HIV patients diagnosed at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty four mothers and infants tested positive for HIV antibodies. After confirmatory tests using HIV Deoxyribosenucleic acid (DNA PCR), 14(58.3%) out of 24 antibody seropositive infants were infected. The transmission rate after confirmation was 58.3%. Conclusion: Parental education, social class and low maternal ...

  15. Human anti-Dectin-1 antibody, hybridoma producing said antibody and applications thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, Leonor; Llorente Gómez, María de las Mercedes; Casasnovas, José María; Fernández Ruíz, Elena; Galán Díez, Marta

    2008-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to hybridoma MGD3 and the monoclonal antibody produced thereby (also called MGD3), which specifically recognises the human Dectin-1 membrane receptor. Antibody MGD3 is capable of inhibiting the binding of Dectin-1 to the natural ligand thereof, the ss-glucans that are components of the fungal wall. In addition, the aforementioned antibody specifically blocks binding to Candida albicans and the secretion of cytokines induced thereby. The MGD3 antibody obtained enable...

  16. Stratification of Antibody-Positive Subjects by Antibody Level Reveals an Impact of Immunogenicity on Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A.; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J.; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic....

  17. Investigation of Anti-Myeloperoxidase Antibodies in a Dog with Bilateral Necrotizing Scleritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Cazalot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing scleritis is uncommon in dogs and presumed to be immune-mediated. Its clinical pattern and histopathology are similar to ocular lesions observed in humans suffering from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, formerly named Wegener’s granulomatosis, where the pathogenesis revolves around anti-neutrophil antibodies (e.g., anti-myeloperoxidase. These antibodies are used to diagnose and follow-up the disease in humans, but variants that only affect the eyes often test negative. Here, we present the first case of canine necrotizing scleritis where measurement of anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies was attempted. A 1.5 year-old female Scottish Terrier was presented with bilateral deep multifocal scleromalacia, severe inflammation of corneal/uveal/retrobulbar tissues, perilimbal corneal oedema and neovascularization, hypotony, and mild exophthalmos. Corticosteroids and antibiotics had been administrated (topically and orally without success. Due to painful multifocal scleral perforation with vitreal haemorrhage, the left eye underwent enucleation, so did the right eye one week later. The histopathology of the left eye revealed a neutrophilic and histiocytic scleral infiltration with extension of pyogranulomatous inflammation to the cornea, choroid, ciliary body, and orbital fat. Levels of plasma anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies were not statistically significant to those of 13 healthy dogs. Further research is warranted to investigate the presence and role of anti-neutrophil antibodies in canine necrotizing scleritis.

  18. [Antibody deficiencies. A survey from three Clinical Immunology Centers for adults in Buenos Aires city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Romero, Diego S; Juri, María Cecilia; Paolini, María Virginia; Malbrán, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Antibody deficiency (AD) comprises a group of diseases characterized by the inability to develop an effective antibody mediated immune response. These patients suffer mainly of encapsulated extracellular bacterial infections of the respiratory tract. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical characteristics of 128 patients with suspected or confirmed AD who were referred to 3 immunodeficiency centers for adults, from June 2004 to December 2009. Three of these patients (2.3%) consulted for recurrent infections only once, without sufficient data for a proper classification, and were excluded. Of the remaining 125 patients, in 21 (16.8%) AD was excluded, 8 cases (6.4%) were diagnosed with secondary antibody immunodeficiency (SAD) and 96 (76.8%) with primary antibody immunodeficiency (PAD). SAD causes were: one renal failure, one phenytoin use, two monoclonal gammopathy and four B cell lymphoma. The causes of these 96 PAD were: 57 common variable immunodeficiency, 12 X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, 10 selective IgA deficiency, seven IgG1 deficiency, three hyper-IgM syndrome, three IgM deficiency, two X-linked proliferative syndrome, one Good syndrome and one antibody functional deficiency. Sixty-seven patients were in follow up at the time of completion of the study, 25 of them were on follow up at the beginning of the study. Among the 58 patients with indication of gamma globulin replacement therapy, 54 were in treatment at the end of the study. In four patients the initial diagnosis of PAD was not confirmed.

  19. Anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus antibodies in commercial immunoglubulin preparations, human serum and milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hahn-Zoric; B. Carlsson; S. Jeansson; H.P. Ekre; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D. Roberton; L.A. Hanson

    1993-01-01

    textabstractOur previous studies have suggested that fetal antibody production can be induced by maternal antiidiotypic antibodies transferred to the fetus via the placenta. We tested commercial Ig, sera, and milk for the presence of anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus type 1, using affinity

  20. Fetal MRI clues to diagnose cloacal malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Patel, Manish N.; Kraus, Steven [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Levitt, Marc A.; Pena, Alberto [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Colorectal Center for Children, Pediatric Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lim, Foong-Yen; Crombleholme, Timothy M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Fetal Care Center of Cincinnati, Pediatric Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Linam, Leann E. [Arkansas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Prenatal US detection of cloacal malformations is challenging and rarely confirms this diagnosis. To define the prenatal MRI findings in cloacal malformations. We performed a retrospective study of patients with cloacal malformations who had pre- and post-natal assessment at our institution. Fetal MRI was obtained in six singleton pregnancies between 26 and 32 weeks of gestation. Imaging analysis was focused on the distal bowel, the urinary system and the genital tract and compared with postnatal clinical, radiological and surgical diagnoses. The distal bowel was dilated and did not extend below the bladder in five fetuses. They had a long common cloacal channel (3.5-6 cm) and a rectum located over the bladder base. Only one fetus with a posterior cloacal variant had a normal rectum. Three fetuses had increased T2 signal in the bowel and two increased T1/decreased T2 signal bladder content. All had renal anomalies, four had abnormal bladders and two had hydrocolpos. Assessment of the anorectal signal and pelvic anatomy during the third trimester helps to detect cloacal malformations in the fetus. The specificity for this diagnosis was highly increased when bowel fluid or bladder meconium content was identified. (orig.)

  1. [How to diagnose and treat limb apraxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovern, A; Fink, G R; Weiss, P H

    2011-06-01

    Apraxia is a disorder of higher motor cognition. Deficits in imitating abstract and symbolic gestures as well as deficits in appropriate tool use are common apraxic symptoms which, importantly, cannot be explained by primary sensorimotor deficits alone. In spite of the relevance of apraxia for neurorehabilitation and the individual stroke patient's prognosis, apraxia is to date still too rarely diagnosed and treated. In this review the currently published assessments for the diagnosis of apraxia are evaluated. Based on this, an apraxia screening instrument as well as a diagnostic test for clinical use are recommended. In addition, different published approaches to the therapy for apraxia are described. Although current evidence is scarce, the gesture training suggested by Smania and co-workers can be recommended as a therapy for apraxia, because its effects were shown to extend to activities of daily living and to persist for at least two months after completion of the training. This review aims at directing the clinician's attention to the importance of apraxia. Moreover, it provides the interested reader with instruments for a reliable diagnosis and effective treatment of apraxia. These are also important prerequisites for further research into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying apraxia and the development of new therapy strategies leading to an evidence-based effective treatment of apraxia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  3. Optical coherence tomography in diagnosing cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Myakov, Alexey V.; Iksanov, Rashid R.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    2000-05-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the most significant problem in oncogynecology. It tends towards treatment approaches that provide termination of pathological processes along with preservation of the patient's life quality. There is a need in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of pathological states, objective assessment of physiological processes, and adequate monitoring of the course of treatment. In our previous publications we have reported unique capabilities of the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to image in vivo the mucosa structure of the cervix and to monitor various physiological and pathological alterations. In this report, we present results of OCT application to diagnose different stages of cervical cancer and to control its treatment at early stages. We have performed OCT-colposcopy in 11 female patients with cervical cancer to derive OCT criteria of this disease, to provide exact demarcation of a pathological area, and to determine a real size of a tumor. We have found that, in general, borders of a tumor, defined visually and detected with OCT by violation of the basement membrane in exocervix, do not coincide. The mismatch depends on a stage of cancer and can be as much as several millimeters. This information is especially important for evaluation of linear dimension of tumors with 3 - 5 mm invasion and also for differential diagnosis between the T1 and T2 stages with cancer extension onto vagina.

  4. Diagnosing Beijing 2020: Mapping the Ungovernable City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Visser

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beijing Municipality, characterised by the ‘off-ground’ architecture distinguishing neo-liberal privatisation, is attempting to mitigate the damaging effects of rampant development on the social fabric, cultural heritage, and the environment by adopting sustainable urban planning. I argue that the sustainability rhetoric in the Beijing Municipality 2020 Plans functions in part as strategic metaphors masking unnamed, imminent threats to governance. In this article I diagnose four Beijing plans (Beijing 2006-2015 ‘Rail Transit Plan’ for Compact City, Beijing 2005-2020 ‘Underground Space Plan’ for Alternative Space, Beijing 2006-2020 ‘Undeveloped Area Plan’ for Ecological Responsibility, and Beijing 2006-2010 ‘Low-income Housing Plan’ for Affordability and Liveability. A diagrammatics of the plans illuminates not so much a mapping of Beijing’s future as the forms of spontaneity preoccupying the nation at this historical juncture. The Beijing 2020 plan, as city mapping more generally, discloses the imminence of ungovernable city. The fact that citizens are demanding greater authority over Beijing governance suggests that radical alterations to its urban fabric and quality of life have incited the imminent sociability that is the city.

  5. Diagnosing and managing patients with drug hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Javier; Doña, Inmaculada

    2018-01-01

    Diagnosing and managing drug hypersensitivity is challenging because there are no clear limits between different types of drug reactions. Distinguishing between type A (predictable) and type B (hypersensitivity) reactions when a drug is introduced on the market is not easy. When many people use a drug, adverse reactions can occur, conditioned by diverse genetic profiles, viral infections or concomitant therapy. Occasionally the only tool clinicians have on which to base the diagnosis is the clinical history. Skins tests or in vitro tests sometimes have low sensitivity or are unavailable, and drug provocation tests may be dangerous or strictly forbidden in case of severe cutaneous reactions. Areas covered: This paper reviews the diagnosis and management of the two main types of immunological reactions: IgE-mediated immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (IDHRs) and non-immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (NIDHRs). Expert commentary: Although Europe and the United States use different diagnostic methods, patients with history of drug hypersensitivity must avoid the suspicious drug, and clinicians must assess tolerance to safe alternatives under medical surveillance. Sometimes desensitization may be required. There is a consensus about the need to perform genetic testing for specific drugs and give patients proper documentation to prevent future exposure to culprit drugs.

  6. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: neuroradiologic findings in 11 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Choi, Soo Jung; Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul

    2000-01-01

    To describe the neuroradiologic findings of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). During a recent two-year period, abnormally elevated antiphospholipid antibodies were detected in a total of 751 patients. In any cases in which risk factors for stroke were detected - hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and the presence of SLE or other connective tissue diseases - PAPS was not diagnosed. Neuroradiologic studies were performed in 11 of 32 patients with PAPS. We retrospectively reviewed brain CT (n = 7), MR (n = 8), and cerebral angiography (n = 8) in 11 patients with special attention to the presence of brain parenchymal lesions and cerebral arterial or venous abnormalities. CT or MR findings of PAPS included nonspecific multiple hyper-intensity foci in deep white matter on T2-weighted images (5/11), a large infarct in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (4/11), diffuse cortical atrophy (2/11), focal hemorrhage (2/11), and dural sinus thrombosis (1/11). Angiographic findings were normal (5/8) or reflected either occlusion of a large cerebral artery (2/8) or dural sinus thrombosis (1/8). Neuroradiologic findings of PAPS are nonspecific but in young or middle- aged adults who show the above mentioned CT or MR findings, and in whom risk factors for stroke are not present, the condition should be suspected

  7. Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: neuroradiologic findings in 11 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Choi, Soo Jung; Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To describe the neuroradiologic findings of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). During a recent two-year period, abnormally elevated antiphospholipid antibodies were detected in a total of 751 patients. In any cases in which risk factors for stroke were detected - hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and the presence of SLE or other connective tissue diseases - PAPS was not diagnosed. Neuroradiologic studies were performed in 11 of 32 patients with PAPS. We retrospectively reviewed brain CT (n = 7), MR (n = 8), and cerebral angiography (n = 8) in 11 patients with special attention to the presence of brain parenchymal lesions and cerebral arterial or venous abnormalities. CT or MR findings of PAPS included nonspecific multiple hyper-intensity foci in deep white matter on T2-weighted images (5/11), a large infarct in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (4/11), diffuse cortical atrophy (2/11), focal hemorrhage (2/11), and dural sinus thrombosis (1/11). Angiographic findings were normal (5/8) or reflected either occlusion of a large cerebral artery (2/8) or dural sinus thrombosis (1/8). Neuroradiologic findings of PAPS are nonspecific but in young or middle- aged adults who show the above mentioned CT or MR findings, and in whom risk factors for stroke are not present, the condition should be suspected.

  8. [Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies not related to gluten intake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Peris, Mónica; Donat Aliaga, Ester; Roca Llorens, María; Masip Simó, Etna; Polo Miquel, Begoña; Ribes Koninckx, Carmen

    2018-03-16

    Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG) have high specificity for coeliac disease (CD). However, positive anti-tTG antibodies have been described in non-coeliac patients. Aim To assess positive anti-tTG antibodies not related to gluten intake. Retrospective review and follow up conducted on patients with suspected CD (increase anti-tTG levels and gastrointestinal symptoms) but with atypical serology results, positive anti-tTG with gluten free diet and a decrease in anti-tTG levels despite gluten intake. A total of 9 cases were reviewed in which 5 cases had Marsh 3 involvement in the initial biopsy, and were diagnosed with CD (Group A). They began a gluten free diet and also a cow's milk protein (CMP) free diet because of their nutritional status. When CMP was re-introduced, anti-tTG increased, and returned to normal after the CMP was withdrawn again. The other 4 patients had a normal initial biopsy (Group B). Gluten was not removed from their diet, but they started a CMP free diet because a non IgE mediated CMP allergy was suspected. Symptoms disappeared, and anti-tTG was normal after CMP free diet with gluten intake. All the patients had susceptibility haplotype HLA DQ2/DQ8. CMP ingestion after an exclusion diet can induce an increase in anti-tTG in some coeliac subjects. CMP can produce this immune response if there were no gluten transgressions. This response has also been observed in non-IgE mediated CMP allergy patients with the susceptibility haplotype HLA DQ2/DQ8. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. [A case of progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus associated with anti-GAD, anti-glycine receptor and anti-GM1 antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Yuka; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Konno, Takuya; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman with one-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with progressive weakness in the lower extremities and urinary dysfunction following high fever. On admission, she had rigidity and myoclonus in the upper extremities with sensory ataxia. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed mild pleocytosis and oligoclonal band. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies were detected at high titer in serum, but antibodies to glycine receptor (GlyR), thyroid peroxidase, mitochondrial M2, and GM1 were also detected. She was diagnosed with progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), which probably developed on the basis of polyglandular autoimmune syndromes. The clinical symptoms began to improve after initiation of intravenous high-dose methylprednisolone. Muscle weakness might be related to GM1 antibodies. This is the first report of PERM, in which GM1 antibodies were detected with GAD and GlyR antibodies.

  10. Do clinical diagnoses correlate with pathological diagnoses in cardiac transplant patients? The importance of endomyocardial biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luk, Adriana; Metawee, Mohammed; Ahn, Eric

    2009-01-01

    . Patient records were reviewed for preoperative clinical diagnoses and other relevant data, including pretransplant endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) results, information regarding left ventricular assist devices and, finally, evidence of disease recurrence in the grafted heart. RESULTS: A shift......BACKGROUND: Heart transplantation remains the last treatment option for patients with end-stage cardiac disease. Such diseases include ischemic cardiomyopathy, nonischemic cardiomyopathy and other conditions such as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, cardiac sarcoidosis and cardiac...

  11. Antinuclear, Cytoskeletal, Antineuronal Antibodies in the Serum Samples of Children with Tic Disorders and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işık Görker

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available streptococcus infections in the development of tic and obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD is controversial. The autoimmune hypothesis states that during infection, formation of autoantibodies leads to an autoimmune disorder, which in turn results in movement disorders, tic disorders and/or OCD. In order to test this hypothesis, we assayed these antibodies in children and adolescents diagnosed with tic disorders and/or OCD.Material and Methods: Children and adolescents who were diagnosed with either tic disorders or OCD according to DSM-IV criteria (n=28, were compared with healthy controls (n=15 having similar age and gender characteristics. Regardless of a streptococcus infection history, serum samples of all patients and controls underwent antinuclear, cytoskeletal, and antineuronal antibody assay using indirect immunofluorescence.Results: The rates of antinuclear antibody positivity were 21% and 20% in the patient and control groups respectively (p>0.05. Antineuronal antibody was positive in 2 (7% of 28 patients versus in 1 (6% of 15 controls (p>0.05.Conclusion: These results suggest that such antibodies may not be involved in the pathogenesis of tic disorders/OCD.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  13. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Remião Ugolini Lopes

    Full Text Available Summary Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  14. Nano antibody therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachallam, M.; Sivakumar, T.; Nazeema; Venkateswari, P.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomedicine, an offshoot of nanotechnology, refers to highly specific medical intervention at the molecular scale for curing disease or repairing damaged tissues, such as bone, muscle, or nerve. Nanotechnology can have an early, paradigm-changing impact on how clinicians will detect cancer in its earliest stages. Exquisitely sensitive devices constructed of nanoscale components-such as nanocantilevers, nanowires and nanochannels-offer the potential for detecting even the rarest molecular signals associated with malignancy. One of the most pressing needs in clinical oncology is for imaging agents that can identify tumors that are far smaller than is possible with today's technology, at a scale of 100,000 cells rather than 1,000,000,000 cells. A new approach in nanotechnology for treating cancer incorporates nano iron particles and attaches them to an antibody that has targets only cancer cells and not healthy cells. The treatment works in two steps. This treatment is an ingenious way to make localized tumor ablation a systemic treatment. The advantages are incredible. There are absolutely no side effects from this treatment. It is not painful or even uncomfortable. The iron particles get flushed harmlessly from the body. It is not a drug and so the cancer cannot build up a resistance to the treatment. It is a systematic treatment; even cancer cells and tumors that are not known about get heated up and ablated. This treatment can even be used to enhance imaging of the cancer because once the cancer cells are coated with the iron particles, they are easy to identify. Everything depends on how reliably the antibodies target cancer cells and not healthy cells. When used in conjunction with other systemic treatments, such as vaccine treatments, we could be looking at a time when even advanced cancers can be brought under control. (author)

  15. [Radiolabeled antibodies for cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2009-12-01

    The first treatment ever by radio-immunotherapy (RIT) was performed by William H. Beierwaltes in 1951 and was a success. Fifty years later, the main question is to find ways of extending the success of radiolabelled anti-CD20 antibodies in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to other forms of cancer. Solid tumours are much more radioresistant than lymphomas, but they respond to RIT if the lesions are small. Clinical situations of residual or minimal disease are thus the most likely to benefit from RIT in the adjuvant or consolidation settings. For disseminated disease, like leukemias or myelomas, the problem is different: beta- particles emitted by the radioactive atoms classically used for cancer treatment (iodine-131 or yttrium-90) disperse their energy in large volumes (ranges 1 mm to 1 cm) and are not very effective against isolated cells. Advances in RIT progress in two directions. One is the development of pretargeting strategies in which the antibody is not labelled but used to provide binding sites to small molecular weight radioactivity vectors (biotin, haptens). These techniques have been shown to increase tumour to non-target uptake ratios and anti-tumour efficacy has been demonstrated in the clinic. The other approach is the use of radionuclides adapted to the various clinical situations. Lutetium-177 or copper-67, because of the lower energy of their emission, their relatively long half-life and good gamma emission, may significantly improve RIT efficacy and acceptability. Beyond that, radionuclides emitting particles such as alpha particles or Auger electrons, much more efficient to kill isolated tumour cells, are being tested for RIT in the clinic. Finally, RIT should be integrated with other cancer treatment approaches in multimodality protocols. Thus RIT, now a mature technology, should enter a phase of well designed and focused clinical developments that may be expected to afford significant therapeutic advances.

  16. Applications of recombinant antibodies in plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Angelika; Torrance, Lesley

    2002-09-01

    Summary Advances in molecular biology have made it possible to produce antibody fragments comprising the binding domains of antibody molecules in diverse heterologous systems, such as Escherichia coli, insect cells, or plants. Antibody fragments specific for a wide range of antigens, including plant pathogens, have been obtained by cloning V-genes from lymphoid tissue, or by selection from large naive phage display libraries, thus avoiding the need for immunization. The antibody fragments have been expressed as fusion proteins to create different functional molecules, and fully recombinant assays have been devised to detect plant viruses. The defined binding properties and unlimited cheap supply of antibody fusion proteins make them useful components of standardized immunoassays. The expression of antibody fragments in plants was shown to confer resistance to several plant pathogens. However, the antibodies usually only slowed the progress of infection and durable 'plantibody' resistance has yet to be demonstrated. In future, it is anticipated that antibody fragments from large libraries will be essential tools in high-throughput approaches to post-genomics research, such as the assignment of gene function, characterization of spatio-temporal patterns of protein expression, and elucidation of protein-protein interactions.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against rat leukocyte surface antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Puklavec, M. J.; Barclay, A. N.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be powerful tools for studying the properties of leukocyte surface antigens and the cells that express them. In the past decades many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for identifying the different rat leukocyte surface antigens have been described. A list of mAb is

  18. Quantitative Changes In Antibodies Against Onchocercal Native ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative Changes In Antibodies Against Onchocercal Native Antigens Two Months Postivermectin Treatment Of Onchocerciasis Patients. ... Those without onchocercal skin disease, OSD (n=18) had a significant increase of 20.5±29.6%, with pre- and posttreatment values of 0.59±0.15 versus 0.68±0.13 for IgG antibody ...

  19. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  20. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  1. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  2. Serum Antiphospholipid Antibodies Among Healthy Adults In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Antiphospholipid antibodies have been associated with variety of conditions. There is no standard health associated reference values required for the interpretation of antiphospholipid antibodies result available among adults in North- eastern Nigeria and Nigeria in general. The aim of this study is to determine ...

  3. Radiolabeled antibodies for cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Jacques; Bardiès, Manuel; Bourgeois, Mickael; Chatal, Jean-François; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Gestin, Jean-François; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies were studied first for tumor detection by single-photon imaging, but FDG PET stopped these developments. In the meantime, radiolabeled antibodies were shown to be effective in the treatment of lymphoma. Radiolabeling techniques are well established and radiolabeled antibodies are a clinical and commercial reality that deserves further studies to advance their application in earlier phase of the diseases and to test combination and adjuvant therapies including radiolabeled antibodies in hematological diseases. In solid tumors, more resistant to radiations and less accessible to large molecules such as antibodies, clinical efficacy remains limited. However, radiolabeled antibodies used in minimal or small-size metastatic disease have shown promising clinical efficacy. In the adjuvant setting, ongoing clinical trials show impressive increase in survival in otherwise unmanageable tumors. New technologies are being developed over the years: recombinant antibodies and pretargeting approaches have shown potential in increasing the therapeutic index of radiolabeled antibodies. In several cases, clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies. Finally, new radionuclides, such as lutetium-177, with better physical properties will further improve the safety of radioimmunotherapy. Alpha particle and Auger electron emitters offer the theoretical possibility to kill isolated tumor cells and microscopic clusters of tumor cells, opening the perspective of killing the last tumor cell, which is the ultimate challenge in cancer therapy. Preliminary preclinical and preliminary clinical results confirm the feasibility of this approach.

  4. Determination of antiphospholipid antibodies and Thrombophilia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recurrent miscarriage is a critical problem in which many factors play a crucial role such as antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) and anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA). Recent studies pointed to a potential role of thrombophilias as a possible cause of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Objectives: This study was ...

  5. A novel polyclonal antibody against human cytomegalovirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Future research should be directed to epitope screening of synthetic HMCV peptides, which could help to understand HCMV infection and virus-neutralising antibodies more fully and to prepare HCMV vaccines and antiviral drugs. Key words: Human cytomegalovirus, AD169 strain, Towne strains, polyclonal antibody.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  7. Frequency of Aquaporin-4 Immunoglobulin G in Longitudinally Extensive Transverse Myelitis With Antiphospholipid Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Hilda; Pittock, Sean J; Moder, Kevin G; Fryer, James P; Gadoth, Avi; Flanagan, Eoin P

    2018-04-11

    Antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies have historically been postulated to cause a poorly understood inflammatory myelitis. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) causes an inflammatory longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). In 2004, aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G (AQP4-IgG) was first reported as a highly specific (>99%) serum diagnostic biomarker of NMOSD, distinguishing it from other disorders (eg, multiple sclerosis). We sought to assess the frequency of AQP4-IgG (and thus NMOSD diagnosis) in LETM with aPL antibodies. We searched Mayo Clinic records (from January 1, 1996, through December 31, 2014) for patients with (1) LETM and (2) aPL or β 2 -glycoprotein I antibodies and (3) a serum sample available. AQP4-IgG was evaluated in the 24 included patients and in 20 controls with aPL antibodies but without myelitis. Seropositivity for AQP4-IgG was confirmed in 11 of 24 patients with LETM (46%), confirming an AQP4-IgG-seropositive NMOSD diagnosis rather than aPL-associated LETM. Six of 11 AQP4-IgG-seropositive patients (54%) were initially diagnosed as having aPL/lupus-associated myelitis. Recurrent LETM was exclusive to AQP4-IgG-seropositive patients (P=.003). Alternative diagnoses assigned to the remaining 13 AQP4-IgG-seronegative patients included idiopathic transverse myelitis (n=5), seronegative NMOSD (n=2), spinal cord infarct attributed to aPL antibodies (n=2), spinal cord sarcoidosis (n=1), varicella-zoster virus myelitis (n=1), postinfectious myelitis (n=1), and multiple sclerosis (n=1). All 20 controls were seronegative for AQP4-IgG. Clotting disorders occurred in 36% of patients (4 of 11) with LETM with both aPL antibodies and AQP4-IgG. AQP4-IgG should be tested in all patients with LETM and aPL antibodies because AQP4-IgG-seropositive NMOSD accounts for almost half of all cases. Clotting disorders are common in patients with LETM with dual positivity for AQP4-IgG and aPL antibodies. Copyright © 2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education

  8. Anti-neosporal IgG and IgE antibodies in canine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, E E V; Almeida, M A O; Atta, A M

    2007-01-01

    Neospora caninum infection provokes neurological disorders, recurrent abortion and death in dogs and cattle. Dogs are both intermediate and definitive host of N. caninum. Thus, the development of sensitive and specific immunoassays to diagnose canine neosporosis is essential to control this disease. This work investigated serum anti-neosporal IgG and IgE antibodies in 140 dogs represented by 30 healthy animals (group I), 11 dogs showing acute N. caninum infection (group II), 50 urban dogs with serological evidence of canine neosporosis in indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) (group III) and 49 urban dogs without clinical and laboratory evidences of neosporosis (group IV). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western immunoblotting, both using a soluble N. caninum tachyzoite antigen (SNA), investigated these two isotypes of antibodies, while a Urea-ELISA measured the avidity of the IgG antibodies. Anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibodies were also investigated in the animals. Anti-neosporal IgG was found in all animals from groups II and III, whereas 32.7% (16/49) of dogs from group IV were reactive. IgG antibodies of low avidity were demonstrated in dogs from group II (median 35.3%), while animals from groups III and IV had IgG antibodies of high avidity (medians of 61.5% and 61.7% respectively). IgE antibodies were found in four (13.3%) and five (16.6%) dogs from groups III and IV respectively. Dogs presenting acute infection (group II) or chronic infection (group III) had IgG antibodies to several neosporal antigens, mainly of 29-30 and 35 kDa, while 13 of 16 dogs from group IV recognized antigens from 14 to 170 kDa. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 36 of 50 (72%) sera from group III and 25 of 49 (51%) sera from group IV. We concluded that IgG-ELISA and Urea-ELISA with SNA may substitute for IFAT in both laboratory routine and epidemiological studies of canine neosporosis.

  9. The early course of newly diagnosed asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Pierre; Cai, Bing; Blais, Lucie; Suissa, Samy

    2002-01-01

    We describe the intensity of therapy for patients with newly diagnosed asthma and how it changed during subsequent years in relation to age, sex, and initial level of therapy. We examined a cohort of 13,671 patients in Saskatchewan, Canada, who were initially between the ages of 5 and 44 years. Patients were followed prospectively, and the intensity of asthma therapy was measured during successive 12-month periods. Based on the intensity of asthma drug therapy during the first year after entry into the cohort, 6661 patients (48.7%) were initially prescribed therapy judged to be appropriate for mild asthma, and 977 (7.1%) were dispensed medications in a manner suggesting their asthma was severe; the remaining 6033 (44.1%) were classified as receiving treatment of intermediate intensity. Among patients initially classified as receiving treatment appropriate for mild disease, only about 3% were dispensed medications that suggested that their asthma had become severe during up to 5 years of follow-up. Intensity of therapy waned in a substantial proportion of patients who were initially classified as having severe asthma, especially if they were initially younger than 15 years of age. Thirty-four per 100 patients initially younger than 15 years old were receiving medications appropriate for mild asthma, and 23 per 100 such patients received no medication for asthma during a 12-month period when followed up to 5 years. Patients with asthma who are initially treated with therapy appropriate for mild asthma are rarely treated later with therapy suggesting the advent of severe disease. Patients initially dispensed medications suggesting the presence of severe asthma often see the intensity of treatment wane over time.

  10. Diagnosing delayed ettringite formation in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Michael; Folliard, Kevin; Drimalas, Thano; Ramlochan, Terry

    2008-01-01

    There has been a number of cases involving deteriorated concrete structures in North America where there has been considerable controversy surrounding the respective contributions of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and delayed ettringite formation (DEF) to the observed damage. The problem arises because the macroscopic symptoms of distress are not unequivocal and microscopical examinations of field samples often reveal evidence of both processes making it difficult to separate the individual contributions. This paper presents the results of an investigation of a number of concrete columns carrying a raised expressway in North America; prior studies had implicated both DEF and ASR as possible causes of deterioration. Although the columns were not deliberately heat-cured, it is estimated that the peak internal temperature would have exceeded 70 deg. C and perhaps even 80 deg. C, in some cases. The forensic investigation included scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and expansion testing of cores extracted from the structure. Small-diameter cores stored in limewater expanded significantly (0.3 to 1.3%) and on the basis of supplementary tests on laboratory-produced concrete specimens it was concluded that expansion under such conditions is caused by DEF as the conditions of the test will not sustain ASR. In at least one column, DEF was diagnosed as the sole contributory cause of damage with no evidence of any contribution from ASR or any other deterioration process. In other cases, both ASR and DEF were observed to have contributed to the apparent damage. Of the columns examined, only concrete containing fly ash appeared to be undamaged. The results of this study confirm that, under certain conditions, the process of DEF (acting in isolation of other processes) can result in significant deterioration of cast-in-place reinforced concrete structures

  11. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors...... such as structure, accessibility and amino acid composition are crucial. Since small peptides tend not to be immunogenic, it may be necessary to conjugate them to carrier proteins in order to enhance immune presentation. Several strategies for conjugation of peptide-carriers applied for immunization exist...

  12. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  13. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody...... response was studied with serum samples collected in 1992 from 56 CF patients in a cross-sectional study and with serum samples from 18 CF patients in a longitudinal study. Anti-beta-lactamase immunoglobulin G antibodies were present in all of the serum samples from the patients with chronic...... bronchopulmonary P. aeruginosa infection (CF + P) but in none of the CF patients with no or intermittent P. aeruginosa infection. Anti-beta-lactamase antibodies were present in serum from CF + P patients after six antipseudomonal courses (median) and correlated with infection with a beta-lactam-resistant strain...

  14. Onconeural antibodies: improved detection and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storstein, Anette; Monstad, Sissel Evy; Haugen, Mette; Mazengia, Kibret; Veltman, Dana; Lohndal, Emilia; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Onconeural antibodies are found in many patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and define the disease as paraneoplastic. The study describes the presence of onconeural antibodies and PNS in 555 patients with neurological symptoms and confirmed cancer within five years, and compares the diagnostic accuracy of different antibody assays (immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence and immunoblot). Onconeural antibodies were found in 11.9% of the patients by immunoprecipitation, in 7.0% by immunofluorescence and in 6.3% by immunoblot. PNS were present in 81.8% of the cancer patients that were seropositive by immunoprecipitation. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot failed to detect onconeural antibodies in almost one third of the PNS cases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thrombocytopenia: diagnosis with flow cytometry and antiplatelet antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, João Carlos de Campos; Kanayama, Ruth Hissae; Nozawa, Sonia Tsukasa; Ioshida, Márcia Regina; Takiri, Irina Yoko; Lazaro, Robson José; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Rosenfeld, Luiz Gastão Mange; Guerra, Celso Carlos de Campos; Bacal, Nydia Strachman

    2011-06-01

    To identify antiplatelet antibodies by flow cytometry (direct method) in patients with thrombocytopenia. Between January 1997 and March 2004 a total of 15100 patients were referred to the Centro de Hematologia de São Paulo for hematological investigation of several diagnoses (anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, adenomegaly, leukemia and others). Of those, 1057 were referred because of thrombocytopenia and were divided into two groups: Group Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, with no identifiable cause; and Group Other thrombocytopenia, which included low normal platelet counts cause to be established, hepatitis C and HIV infection, hypersplenism, EDTA-induced artifacts, laboratory error, and other causes. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping was done in 115 cases to identify platelet autoantibodies (direct method). Of the total number of patients, 1057 (7%) presented low platelet counts, 670 were females (63.4%) and age range of one to 75 years. Of the 115 cases (9.7%) submitted to immunophenotyping, the results were positive in 40% and the test was inconclusive in 5%. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was found in 52% of patients, more often in women. Hepatitis C virus infection was found in 7% and HIV infection in 1%. Low normal platelet counts were found in 17%, laboratory errors in 6%, and laboratory artifacts in 1% of cases. Platelet autoantibodies were found in 76.9% of all idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura cases. It was negative in 83.3% of the low normal counts. antiplatelet autoantibodies when present help to diagnose idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. When absent, suggest other causes of thrombocytopenia.

  16. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Amin I.; Khawli, Leslie A.

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  17. Docking of Antibodies into Cavities in DNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quyang, X; Stefano, Mattia De; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart

    2017-01-01

    microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) validated efficient antibody immobilization in the origami structures. The increased ability to control the orientation of antibodies in nanostructures and at surfaces has potential for directing the interactions of antibodies with targets...

  18. Recipient-derived HPA-1a antibodies: a cause of prolonged thrombocytopenia after unrelated donor stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Geoff; Culliford, Steven; Green, Frances; Sidra, Gamal; Calvert, Anthony; Green, Ann; Harrison, Penny; Harvey, John; Allen, Dave; Smillie, David; Masurekar, Ashish; Marks, David; Russell, Nigel; Massey, Edwin

    2010-02-01

    Patients with human platelet antigen (HPA) specific antibodies in cases of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and platelet (PLT) refractoriness derive clinical benefit from the use of HPA-selected PLTs. This study describes three patients with underlying diagnoses of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and myelodysplasia, respectively, who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with unrelated donors matched at the HLA-A, B, C, Dr, and DQ loci but who failed to achieve an adequate PLT count. Investigation using PLT immunofluorescence test, monoclonal antibody immobilization of PLT antigens assay, and genotyping revealed the presence of recipient-derived HPA-1a antibodies. In two patients, anti-HPA-1a was detected post-BMT and in the third patient, anti-HPA-1a was detected during pre-BMT chemotherapy. Despite apparent 100% engraftment of donor cells, the patients' PLT counts failed to recover 9-10 months posttransplant. The patients remained PLT-transfusion dependent and failed to achieve satisfactory increments following random donor or HLA-matched PLT transfusions. After the identification of HPA-1a antibodies, the patients were supported by HPA-1a(-) PLTs and satisfactory posttransfusion PLT increments were obtained. These cases illustrate that HPA-1a antibodies may remain detectable for 10 months following apparently successful donor engraftment and the disappearance of recipient-derived HLA antibodies. The prolonged persistence of recipient-derived PLT-specific antibodies following BMT has to our knowledge not been described previously. HPA-1a antibodies were associated with protracted PLT-transfusion dependence and significant hemorrhagic complications. Appropriate and timely laboratory investigation for HPA-specific antibodies followed by transfusion support with HPA-selected PLTs provided the cornerstone of the hemostatic management in these cases.

  19. Diagnosing family health and programming action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    This discussion considers the concepts of health and primary health before focusing on diagnosing community health. It is important to know what the concepts of health, of various diseases, and death represent for the population in which one is working. The primary health care (PHC) policy, for which many countries have opted since 1978, aimed at providing a more satisfactory response to the health needs expressed by the people, both felt and true needs. Frequently, health policy is defined at the national level. Guidelines for work are sent to the small clinics at the grassroots level, but this downward flowing system does not respect the PHC policy. The objective of PHC is to consider the grassroots level as the point of departure. The starting point is families, both urban and rural population groups, the underprivileged as well as the others, those who attend the health units and those who never attend because there are none. This system, which goes from the bottom to the top, is still far from being operational everywhere and often is in conflict with the classical system, with which it coexists. If a health team is to achieve a community health diagnosis, it must have sufficient knowledge of the geographic sector served by the health unit. The techniques used for diagnosis are epidemiological studies, listening to individuals, observations of the surroundings and of behavior, and sociological or epidemiological surveys. Quantitative data and the results of listening, observation, and surveys should be written down regularly. A "health notebook" or "daily narration" book for the neighborhood, village, or district should tell of the life of the people, or at least of those elements of it which affect health or nutrition. The health of each family should be recorded in a "family file" containing information on the sociocultural and economic background of the family, how it is housed, a "record card" for each of its members, so that the evolution of his

  20. {sup 99m} Tc labelled monoclonal antibodies: preclinical and clinical evaluation of anti granulocyte monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janoki, Gyozo A. [National FJC Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-12-31

    bearing mice showed significant localization of {sup 99m} Tc M Ab 47 in the relevant tumour. Clinical experiences with a {sup 123} I and {sup 99m} Tc labeled M Abs exceed 1200 cases. The main indications for the immuno scintigraphy were suspected acute or chronic osteomyelitis, infection of prosthesis or grafts, search for hidden abscesses and inflammatory bowel diseases and most recently for the diagnoses of tumorous invasion of the bone marrow. Depending on these different clinical situations we found very high rates of sensitivity (up to 97%) and specificity (95%). HAMAs were detected in 1,6% (i-123 M ab-47)-12% (B W 250/183) of cases and in 26% after repeated injections, obviously correlating with the amount of injected M Abs and the number of repetitions. but, no adverse reaction or clinically relevant side effects have been seen. After a ten years experience we can conclude that a simple labeling procedure with Tc-99 m, employing a carefully prepared antibody and a well-controlled kit formulation, is a powerful and reliable tool which is easily applied for the diagnoses of infection or tumorous bone marrow invasion

  1. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome diagnosed four years after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Keiko; Kawanishi, Kunio; Sato, Masayo; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Fujii, Akiko; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Huchinoue, Shouhei; Ohashi, Ryuji; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in allograft kidney transplantation is caused by various factors including rejection, infection, and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a case of a 32 year old woman with aHUS four years after an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from a living relative. The primary cause of end-stage renal disease was unknown; however, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was suspected from her clinical course. She underwent pre-emptive kidney transplantation from her 60 year old mother. The allograft preserved good renal function [serum creatinine (sCr) level 110-130 μmol/L] until a sudden attack of abdominal pain four years after transplant, with acute renal failure (sCr level, 385.3 μmol/L), decreasing platelet count, and hemolytic anemia with schizocytes. On allograft biopsy, there was thrombotic microangiopathy in the glomeruli, with a cellular crescent formation and mesangial IgA and C3 deposition. Microvascular inflammation, such as glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and arteriole endarteritis were also detected. A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) did not decrease and Shiga toxin was not detected. Donor-specific antibodies or autoantibodies, including anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody, were negative. The patient was diagnosed with aHUS and received three sessions of plasmapheresis and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, followed by oral methylprednisolone (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) instead of tacrolimus. She temporarily required hemodialysis (sCr level, 658.3 μmol/L). Thereafter, her sCr level improved to 284.5 μmol/L without dialysis therapy. This case is clinically considered as aHUS after kidney transplantation, associated with various factors, including rejection, glomerulonephritis, and toxicity from drugs such as tacrolimus. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  2. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of “preneoplastic antigen”-like molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongying [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Yoshimura, Kazunori [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Sawada, Jun-ichi; Saito, Yoshiro [Division of Biochemistry and Immunochemistry, National Institute of Health Sciences, Kamiyoga 1-18-1, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D. [Department of Entomology and Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8584 (United States); Akatsuka, Toshitaka, E-mail: akatsuka@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. -- Highlights: ► Monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH were developed. ► They discriminate between the membrane-bound and the linearized forms of mEH. ► We analyze the antigenic structure of the altered form of mEH in tumor cells. ► Preneoplastic antigen is a multimolecular complex of mEH with

  3. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of “preneoplastic antigen”-like molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Hongying; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Sawada, Jun-ichi; Saito, Yoshiro; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. -- Highlights: ► Monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH were developed. ► They discriminate between the membrane-bound and the linearized forms of mEH. ► We analyze the antigenic structure of the altered form of mEH in tumor cells. ► Preneoplastic antigen is a multimolecular complex of mEH with

  4. Outcome of Endodontically Treated Teeth Diagnosed With Cracked Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    population of 8, 175 patients (3). When diagnosed with reversible pulpitis and restored with a crown, 21 % of these teeth were reported to require...3.7% with split tooth, and 1.9% as fractured cusp (13). Other possible diagnoses include reversible pulpitis , postoperative sensitivity, galvanic...irreversible pulpitis , RCT followed by crown placement is the recommended treatment (4). In a study of 49 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis , teeth

  5. Structure Based Antibody-Like Peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Greene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb and soluble receptors represent new classes of therapeutic agents for treatment of several diseases. High affinity and high specificity biologics can be utilized for variety of clinical purposes. Monoclonal antibodies have been used as diagnostic agents when coupled with radionuclide, immune modulatory agents or in the treatment of cancers. Among other limitations of using large molecules for therapy the actual cost of biologics has become an issue. There is an effort among chemists and biologists to reduce the size of biologics which includes monoclonal antibodies and receptors without a reduction of biological efficacy. Single chain antibody, camel antibodies, Fv fragments are examples of this type of deconstructive process. Small high-affinity peptides have been identified using phage screening. Our laboratory used a structure-based approach to develop small-size peptidomimetics from the three-dimensional structure of proteins with immunoglobulin folds as exemplified by CD4 and antibodies. Peptides derived either from the receptor or their cognate ligand mimics the functions of the parental macromolecule. These constrained peptides not only provide a platform for developing small molecule drugs, but also provide insight into the atomic features of protein-protein interactions. A general overview of the reduction of monoclonal antibodies to small exocyclic peptide and its prospects as a useful diagnostic and as a drug in the treatment of cancer are discussed.

  6. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  7. Glycosylation profiles of therapeutic antibody pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Christoph; Berger, Christoph N; Girard, Philippe; Meier, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are often used as therapeutics and represent a major class of drug products. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of antibody complexes resulting in the elimination of a target molecule or the modulation of specific signalling pathways. The physiological effects of antibody therapeutics are known to depend on the structural characteristics of the antibody molecule, specifically on the glycosylation which is the result of posttranslational modifications. Hence, production of therapeutic antibodies with a defined and consistent glycoform profile is needed which still remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. To provide an insight into the industries capability to control their manufacturing process and to provide antibodies of highest quality, we conducted a market surveillance study and compared major oligosaccharide profiles of a number of monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals sampled on the Swiss market. Product lot-to-lot variability was found to be generally low, suggesting that a majority of manufacturers have implemented high quality standards in their production processes. However, proportions of G0, G1 and G2 core-fucosylated chains derived from different products varied considerably and showed a bias towards the immature agalactosidated G0 form. Interestingly, differences in glycosylation caused by the production cell type seem to be of less importance compared with process related parameters such as cell growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David M; Koup, Richard A; Ferrari, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However, antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Furthermore, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small-molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David M.; Koup, Richard A.; Ferrari, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Summary The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Further, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. PMID:28133794

  10. Reduced parasympathetic tone in newly diagnosed essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar Goit

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that HRV is reduced in subjects with newly diagnosed essential hypertension and the parasympathetic dysregulation is present in the early stage of essential hypertension.

  11. Lupus pneumonitis presenting with high titre of anti-Ro antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Chuan; Wu, Yueh-Lin; Lee, Kai-Ling; Lai, Kevin S; Chung, Chi-Li

    2018-01-01

    Lupus pneumonitis carries high mortality and is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, it is difficult to diagnose and is often mistaken as pneumonia, alveolar haemorrhage, or organizing pneumonia. Previous studies demonstrated that serum anti-Ro antibodies are elevated more frequently in SLE patients with pneumonitis than in those without. We report a 21-year-old female who was newly diagnosed as having SLE with nephritis and who suddenly developed right lung opacity and rapidly progressed to severe hypoxaemia despite the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The serum titre of anti-Ro antibody was greater than 240 U/mL. She underwent lung biopsy and lupus pneumonitis was confirmed by the pathological findings. Subsequently, she showed a favourable response to plasma exchange, steroid pulse therapy, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment. For SLE patients with pulmonary infiltrates, high degree of clinical suspicion of lupus pneumonitis is required and measurement of serum anti-Ro antibody may help to make the diagnosis.

  12. Isolation of poliovirus shedding following vaccination in children with antibody deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Nermeen M; Bassiouny, Laila; Nasr, Eman; Abdelmeguid, Naglaa

    2012-12-15

    Prolonged excretion of oral poliovirus may occur in primary antibody deficiency states. Those patients who persistently excrete the virus may pose the risk of aiding viral propagation in the environment. This study therefore aimed to identify the potential for prolonged poliovirus shedding by patients diagnosed with congenital antibody deficiency disorders. A cohort of children later diagnosed with antibody deficiency disorders was included in the study. Patient history was taken for each participant, with emphasis on vaccination data. Laboratory investigations included immunoglobulin profiles and stool sample collection at one month intervals from each patient, with follow-up for six months. The virus isolates were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and molecular reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. On the initial sample screens, one patient revealed excretion one for Sabin-like strain 1 (SL1) and one patient revealed excretion for Sabin like strain 2 (SL2). Only one patient continued to shed the virus (SL1) on three successive samples and on follow-up. There was no correlation between the level of immunoglobulins and duration of virus shedding. The study demonstrates the low occurrence of prolonged vaccine polioviruses shedding in a group of children exposed to a live vaccine.

  13. Stratification of antibody-positive subjects by antibody level reveals an impact of immunogenicity on pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic. The antibody responses displayed a wide range of relative concentrations (30 ng/mL to >13 μg/mL) and peaked at various times during the study. To evaluate the impact of immunogenicity on PK, AMG 317 concentration data were analyzed following stratification by dose group, time point, antibody status (positive or negative), and antibody level (relative concentration). With dose group as a stratifying variable, a moderate reduction in AMG 317 levels (AMG 317 levels was revealed when antibody data was stratified by both time point and antibody level. In general, high ADA concentrations (>500 ng/mL) and later time points (week 12) were associated with significantly (up to 97%) lower trough AMG 317 concentrations. The use of quasi-quantitative antibody data and appropriate statistical methods was critical for the most comprehensive evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity on PK.

  14. Difficulties in diagnosing atypical primary HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Casseb, Jorge Simão do Rosário; Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele

    1994-01-01

    Several cases of primary HIV-1 infection are not identified, either because the diagnosis is not suspected or because they test negative for HIV-1 antibody. This work presents an uncommon case of primary HIV-1 infection in an young parenteral drug abuser man, who presented symptoms of acute hepatitis. During the initial acute phase the serum sample of the patient tested negative for the presence of antibodies against several viruses, including HIV-1. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of primary HIV...

  15. Engineering bispecific antibodies with defined chain pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Sellmann, Carolin; Rhiel, Laura; Schröter, Christian; Dickgiesser, Stephan; Beck, Jan; Zielonka, Stefan; Toleikis, Lars; Hock, Björn; Kolmar, Harald; Becker, Stefan

    2017-10-25

    Bispecific IgG-like antibodies can simultaneously interact with two epitopes on the same or on different antigens. Therefore, these molecules facilitate novel modes of action, which cannot be addressed by conventional monospecific IgGs. However, the generation of such antibodies still appears to be demanding due to their specific architecture comprising four different polypeptide chains that need to assemble correctly. This review focusses on different strategies to circumvent this issue or to enforce a correct chain association with a focus on common-chain bispecific antibodies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  17. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  18. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  19. Immunotherapy with GD2 specific monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.K.V.; Medof, E.M.; Munn, D.

    1988-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapy focuses anti-tumor activity of antibodies and effector cells, which are actively developed by the host or adoptively transferred, onto tumor cells and into tumor sites. Such tumor selective therapy can be more specific and efficient. The value of such an approach is evident in the classical interaction of antibodies. This paper reports that the ganglioside G D2 is an ideal antigen for specific tumor targeting because of its relative lack of heterogeneity among human neuroblastoma, its high density on tumor cells, its lack of antigen modulation upon binding to antibody, and its restricted distribution in normal tissues

  20. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated

  1. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  2. Vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae does not induce antibodies against HLA or MICA in clinically stable kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Monika; Heinemann, Falko M; Horn, Peter A; Witzke, Oliver

    2013-10-01

    There are concerns in the community that immune activation after vaccination could lead to (subclinical) rejection. Our aim was to define if pneumococcal vaccination induced HLA antibodies using highly sensitive methods. Forty-nine kidney transplant recipients were immunized with Pneumovax 23. The median interval between transplantation and vaccination was 6.5 years, the median serum creatinine concentration 1.3, 1.3 and 1.4 mg/dL pre-vaccination, at month 1 and 15 post-vaccination, respectively. In none of the patients biopsy-proven acute rejection was diagnosed within three years post-vaccination. Pneumococcal, HLA class I and II and major histocompatibility class I-related chain A (MICA) antibodies were determined by Luminex™ technology (xMAP™ Pneumococcal Immunity Panel and LABScreen™ Mixed beads, respectively) and HLA antibodies also by ELISA (Lambda Antigen Tray™). While pneumococcal antibodies were significantly higher at month 1 and 15 post- vs. pre-vaccination (p<0.0001 each), HLA/MICA antibodies remained unchanged as determined by Luminex™ and ELISA. Positive Luminex™ reactions were present in 63%, 67% and 63% (HLA class I), 47%, 47% and 55% (HLA class II) and 29%, 29% and 29% (MICA) pre-vaccination, at month 1 and 15, respectively. In clinically stable kidney transplant recipients there is no evidence for an increase in HLA antibodies after pneumococcal vaccination. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibody deficiency in patients with frequent exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian N McCullagh

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is the third leading cause of death in the US, and is associated with periodic exacerbations, which account for the largest proportion of health care utilization, and lead to significant morbidity, mortality, and worsening lung function. A subset of patients with COPD have frequent exacerbations, occurring 2 or more times per year. Despite many interventions to reduce COPD exacerbations, there is a significant lack of knowledge in regards to their mechanisms and predisposing factors. We describe here an important observation that defines antibody deficiency as a potential risk factor for frequent COPD exacerbations. We report a case series of patients who have frequent COPD exacerbations, and who were found to have an underlying primary antibody deficiency syndrome. We also report on the outcome of COPD exacerbations following treatment in a subset with of these patients with antibody deficiency. We identified patients with COPD who had 2 or more moderate to severe exacerbations per year; immune evaluation including serum immunoglobulin levels and pneumococcal IgG titers was performed. Patients diagnosed with an antibody deficiency syndrome were treated with either immunoglobulin replacement therapy or prophylactic antibiotics, and their COPD exacerbations were monitored over time. A total of 42 patients were identified who had 2 or more moderate to severe COPD exacerbations per year. Twenty-nine patients had an underlying antibody deficiency syndrome: common variable immunodeficiency (8, specific antibody deficiency (20, and selective IgA deficiency (1. Twenty-two patients had a follow-up for at least 1 year after treatment of their antibody deficiency, which resulted in a significant reduction of COPD exacerbations, courses of oral corticosteroid use and cumulative annual dose of oral corticosteroid use, rescue antibiotic use, and hospitalizations for COPD exacerbations. This case series identifies

  4. Plasma anti-serotonin and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies are elevated in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, J D; Tamir, H; Calaprice, D; DeJesus, M; de la Nuez, M; Pine, D; Papp, L A; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1999-04-01

    The psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. Alterations within brain stress systems that secondarily influence the immune system have been documented. A recent report indicated elevations of serotonin (5-HT) and ganglioside antibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia, a condition with documented associations with panic disorder. In line with our interest in dysregulated 5-HT systems in panic disorder (PD), we wished to assess if antibodies directed at the 5-HT system were elevated in patients with PD in comparison to healthy volunteers. Sixty-three patients with panic disorder and 26 healthy volunteers were diagnosed by the SCID. Employing ELISA, we measured anti-5-HT and 5-HT anti-idiotypic antibodies (which are directed at 5-HT receptors). To include all subjects in one experiment, three different batches were run during the ELISA. Plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies: there was a significant group effect [patients > controls (p = .007)] and batch effect but no interaction. The mean effect size for the three batches was .76. Following Z-score transformation of each separate batch and then combining all scores, patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies. Neither sex nor age as covariates affected the significance of the results. There was a strong correlation between anti-serotonin antibody and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibody measures. Plasma anti-serotonin antibodies: there was a significant diagnosis effect [patients > controls (p = .037)]. Mean effect size for the three batches was .52. Upon Z-score transformation, there was a diagnosis effect with antibody elevations in patients. Covaried for sex and age, the result falls below significance to trend levels. The data raise the possibility that psychoimmune dysfunction, specifically related to the 5-HT system, may be present in PD. Potential interruption of 5-HT neurotransmission through autoimmune mechanisms may be of

  5. De novo HIV infection diagnoses in a Department of Dermatology and Venereology in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Bastos, Pedro; Brasileiro, Ana; Matos-Pires, Eugénia; Rodrigues, Isaura; Marques, Cristina; Coelho-Macias, Vasco; Fernandes, Cândida

    2017-08-01

    Background Portugal has the highest prevalence rate of HIV infection in Western Europe. The proportion of patients with a late diagnosis, carried out in full-blown AIDS stage, remains high. Skin and mucous membrane manifestations are not rare in these patients. Objective A demographic, clinical, and laboratorial characterization of patients with de novo HIV infection diagnosis made in the Department of Dermatology and Venereology of a central hospital in Lisbon, Portugal. Methods Retrospective review of medical records of adult patients newly diagnosed with HIV infection (reactive immunoassay for antibodies to HIV-1/HIV-2 or HIV p24 antigen) in the Dermatology and Venereology Department of a Portuguese central hospital in the period between January 2005 and December 2013. Results During the study period, 97 new cases were diagnosed, 70 men and 27 women. The median age at diagnosis was 36 years. Of the total, 50 cases were diagnosed with a concomitant sexually transmitted infection (STI), more frequently syphilis and ano-genital HPV infection. The remaining 47 patients were diagnosed with other dermatological conditions such as prurigo nodularis, psoriasis, and Kaposi's sarcoma. The duration of complaints that lead to medical attention ranged from Portugal. As in the past, the importance of Dermato-Venereology for HIV infection diagnosis remains present in daily clinical practice.

  6. Clinical significance of serum anti-human papillomavirus 16 and 18 antibodies in cervical neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chay, Doo Byung; Cho, Hanbyoul; Kim, Bo Wook; Kang, Eun Suk; Song, Eunseop; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2013-02-01

    To estimate the clinical significance of serum anti-human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies and high-risk cervical HPV DNA in cervical neoplasia. The study population comprised patients who were histopathologically diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1 (n=64), CIN 2 and 3 (n=241), cervical cancer (n=170), and normal control participants (n=975). Cervical HPV DNA tests were performed through nucleic acid hybridization assay tests, and serum anti-HPV 16 and 18 antibodies were measured by competitive immunoassay. The associations of HPV DNA and anti-HPV antibodies were evaluated with demographic characteristics and compared according to the levels of disease severity. Anti-HPV antibodies were also investigated with clinicopathologic parameters, including survival data. Among various demographic characteristics, factors involving sexual behavior had a higher tendency of HPV DNA positivity and HPV seropositivity. Human papillomavirus DNA mean titer and positivity were both increased in patients with cervical neoplasia compared with those with normal control participants, but there was no statistical difference among types of cervical neoplasia. Serum anti-HPV 16 antibodies were also able to differentiate cervical neoplasia from a normal control participant and furthermore distinguished CIN 1 from CIN 2 and 3 (odd ratio 2.87 [1.43-5.78], P=.002). In cervical cancer, HPV 16 seropositivity was associated with prolonged disease-free survival according to the univariable analysis (hazard ratio=0.12 [0.01-0.94], P=.044). Serum anti-HPV 16 antibodies can distinguish cervical neoplasia from a normal control and has the advantage of identifying high-grade CIN. Moreover, in cervical cancer, HPV 16 seropositivity may be associated with a more favorable prognosis. II.

  7. [Analysis of HIV antibody positive cases in Peking University Hospital of Stomatology during 9 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian-fen; Qiu, Juan; Shen, Shu-ming

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of HIV patients found in Peking University Hospital of Stomatology during 9 years, and provide management strategy for early diagnosis and control of HIV in Stomatology Hospital. A retrospective study of the HIV positive patients diagnosed by HIV antibody screening was carried out. The related information about these patients found in Peking University School of Stomatology during 2005-2013 was obtained from China Disease Control Information System. 68,562 patients accepted HIV antibody screening in Peking University Hospital of Stomatology during 2005-2013. Thirty one patients were found HIV antibody positive. The ratio of HIV antibody positive was about 0.045%, which was composed of 25 males and 6 females. 61.29% patients aged between 20-40 years, and their career was mainly commercial service with a education level of junior high school. The proportion of sexual route of transmission was about 74.91%, and 34.78% of them were male homosexuality. Most of the patients with HIV antibody positive were found in the out-patient clinic, especially in the department of oral mucosal diseases, accounting for 70.97%. HIV antibody positive rate in Peking University School of Stomatology was slightly lower than that in general hospitals. Medical staff should increase their awareness of AIDS prevention and control, for higher HIV risk departments, such as oral mucosal diseases and periodontal disease, efforts should be made to increase HIV screening, expand the scope of screening, and promote provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling.

  8. Reviewing the pathogenesis of antibody-mediated rejection and renal graft pathology after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, Kunio; Takeda, Asami; Otsuka, Yasuhiro; Horike, Keiji; Gotoh, Norihiko; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2016-07-01

    The clinicopathological context of rejection after kidney transplantation was well recognized. Banff conferences greatly contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis and to establish the pathologic criteria of rejection after kidney transplantation. The most important current problem of renal transplantation is de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) production leading chronic rejection and graft loss. Microvascular inflammation is considered as a reliable pathological marker for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the presence of DSA. Electron microscopic study allowed us to evaluate early changes in peritubular capillaries in T-lymphocyte mediated rejection and transition to antibody-mediated rejection. Severe endothelial injuries with edema and activated lymphocyte invaded into subendothelial space with early multi-layering of peritubular capillary basement membrane suggest T-lymphocyte mediated rejection induce an unbounded chain of antibody-mediated rejection. The risk factors of AMR after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation are important issues. Anti-ABO blood type antibody titre of IgG excess 32-fold before transplant operation is the only predictable factor for acute AMR. Characteristics of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAAMR) are one of the most important problems. Light microscopic findings and C4d stain of peritubular capillary and glomerular capillary are useful diagnostic criteria of CAAMR. Microvascular inflammation, double contour of glomerular capillary and thickening of peritubular capillary basement are good predictive factors of the presence of de novo DSA. C4d stain of linear glomerular capillary is a more sensitive marker for CAAMR than positive C4d of peritubular capillary. Early and sensitive diagnostic attempts of diagnosing CAAMR are pivotal to prevent chronic graft failure. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  9. The impact of bevacizumab treatment on survival and quality of life in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Urup, Thomas; Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Staberg, Mikkel; Villingshøj, Mette; Lassen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains one of the most devastating tumors, and patients have a median survival of 15 months despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, including maximal surgical resection, radiation therapy, and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. The purpose of antineoplastic treatment is therefore to prolong life, with a maintenance or improvement of quality of life. GBM is a highly vascular tumor and overexpresses the vascular endothelial growth factor A, which promotes angiogenesis. Preclinical data have suggested that anti-angiogenic treatment efficiently inhibits tumor growth. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor A, and treatment has shown impressive response rates in recurrent GBM. In addition, it has been shown that response is correlated to prolonged survival and improved quality of life. Several investigations in newly diagnosed GBM patients have been performed during recent years to test the hypothesis that newly diagnosed GBM patients should be treated with standard multimodality treatment, in combination with bevacizumab, in order to prolong life and maintain or improve quality of life. The results of these studies along with relevant preclinical data will be described, and pitfalls in clinical and paraclinical endpoints will be discussed

  10. Limited role of HLA DQ2/8 genotyping in diagnosing coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Siba P; Hoghton, Matthew; Sandhu, Bhupinder

    2017-02-01

    The European guidelines for diagnosing coeliac disease in children were revised in 2012. These recommend that in symptomatic children, a diagnosis of coeliac disease can be made without small-bowel biopsies provided their anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) titre is >10 times of upper-limit-of-normal (>10×ULN) and anti-endomysial antibody is positive. In order to firm up the diagnosis in these children with very high anti-tTG titre, HLA-DQ2/DQ8 should be checked and be positive. Approximately 25-40% of white Caucasian population has HLA-DQ2/DQ8 haplotype. However, only 0.1-1% of the population will develop coeliac disease. Therefore, HLA-DQ2/DQ8 testing must not be done to 'screen' or 'diagnose' children with coeliac disease. Its use by paediatricians should be limited to children with anti-tTG>10×ULN, where the diagnosis of coeliac disease is being made on serology alone. A review of case referrals made to a tertiary paediatric gastroenterology centre in Southwest England demonstrated that HLA-DQ2/DQ8 testing is being requested inappropriately both in primary and secondary care suggesting a poor understanding of its role in diagnosis of coeliac disease. This article aims to clarify the role of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 testing for clinicians working in non-specialist settings.

  11. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-07-01

    Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever.Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85-113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73-0.93], P antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine, which has been

  12. New haptens and antibodies for ractopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liu, Meixuan; Shi, Weimin; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-09-15

    In this work, three unreported immunizing haptens of ractopamine (RAC) were synthesized and used to produce highly sensitive and specific polyclonal antibody. The spacer arms of haptens for coupling to protein carrier were located on different position of RAC with different length. High affinity polyclonal antibodies were obtained and characterized in terms of titer and sensitivity by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The best antibody employed in a heterologous competitive ELISA exhibited an IC50 value as low as 0.12ngmL(-1) and could not recognize other 10 β-agonists including clenbuterol and salbutamol. The heterologous competitive ELISA was preliminary applied to swine urine and the results showed the new antibody was sufficiently sensitive and specific, and potentially used for the detection of RAC at trace level in real samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antiphospholipids antibodies and migraine | Nyandaiti | Sahel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thrombotic neurological conditions such as migraine. We set out to estimate the concentration of antiphospholipids antibody among patients with migraine and normal population. Methods: This is prospective case-control study of 158 subjects ...

  14. Characterization of methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate specific polyclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Nadia Muhammad Akram; Schulz, Alexander; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    that it was highly selective for methionine-derived aliphatic glucosinolates with a methyl-sulfinyl group in the side chain. Use of crude plant extracts from Arabidopsis mutants with different glucosinolate profiles showed that the antibodies recognized aliphatic glucosinolates in a plant extract and did not cross......Antibodies towards small molecules, like plant specialized metabolites, are valuable tools for developing quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques. Glucosinolates are the specialized metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order. Here we describe the characterization of polyclonal...... rabbit antibodies raised against the 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate, glucoraphanin that is one of the major glucosinolates in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (hereafter Arabidopsis). Analysis of the cross-reactivity of the antibodies against a number of glucosinolates demonstrated...

  15. Radionuclide therapy of cancer with radiolabeled antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, O.C.; Koppe, M.J.; Postema, E.J.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against tumor-associated antigens has evolved from an appealing concept to one of the standard treatment options for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Inefficient localization of radiolabeled MAbs to

  16. Dissecting the Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    The potential of mononclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  17. Immunoglobulin Classification Using the Colored Antibody Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonissone, Stefano R; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2016-06-01

    The somatic recombination of V, D, and J gene segments in B-cells introduces a great deal of diversity, and divergence from reference segments. Many recent studies of antibodies focus on the population of antibody transcripts that show which V, D, and J gene segments have been favored for a particular antigen, a repertoire. To properly describe the antibody repertoire, each antibody must be labeled by its constituting V, D, and J gene segment, a task made difficult by somatic recombination and hypermutation events. While previous approaches to repertoire analysis were based on sequential alignments, we describe a new de Bruijn graph-based algorithm to perform VDJ labeling and benchmark its performance.

  18. Opposites attract in bispecific antibody engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, Marit J.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies show great promise as intrinsic combination therapies, but often suffer from poor physiochemical properties, many times related to poor heterodimerization. De Nardis et al. identify specific electrostatic interactions that facilitate efficient heterodimerization, resulting in

  19. Antibody conjugate radioimmunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Alan; Hopper, Melanie; Murray, Andrea; Frier, Malcolm; Bishop, Mike

    2002-01-01

    The administration of antibody conjugates for cancer therapy is now proving to be of clinical value. We are currently undertaking a programme of clinical studies using the monoclonal antibody C 595 (gG3) which reacts with the MUC1 glycoprotein antigen that is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of bladder tumours. Radio immuno conjugates of the C 595 antibody have been produced with high radiolabelling efficiency and immuno reactivity using Tc-99 m and In-111 for diagnostic imaging, and disease staging and the cytotoxic radionuclides Cu-67 and Re-188 for therapy of superficial bladder cancer. A Phase I/II therapeutic trail involving the intravesical administration of antibody directly into the bladder has now begun. (author)

  20. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  1. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  2. Characteristics of children presenting with newly diagnosed type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of these, half a million are children under the age of 15 years diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is increasing in incidence worldwide at a rate of 2 - 5% per year, and roughly 200 children are diagnosed with new-onset type 1 diabetes every day.[1] The condition is increasing in all age groups, with a ...

  3. Terahertz otoscope and potential for diagnosing otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young Bin; Moon, In-Seok; Bark, Hyeon Sang; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Huh, Yong-Min; Suh, Jin-Seok; Oh, Seung Jae; Jeon, Tae-In

    2016-04-01

    We designed and fabricated a novel terahertz (THz) otoscope to help physicians to diagnose otitis media (OM) with both THz diagnostics and conventional optical diagnostics. We verified the potential of this tool for diagnosing OM using mouse skin tissue and a human tympanic membrane samples prior to clinical application.

  4. Terahertz otoscope and potential for diagnosing otitis media

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Young Bin; Moon, In-Seok; Bark, Hyeon Sang; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Huh, Yong-Min; Suh, Jin-Seok; Oh, Seung Jae; Jeon, Tae-In

    2016-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a novel terahertz (THz) otoscope to help physicians to diagnose otitis media (OM) with both THz diagnostics and conventional optical diagnostics. We verified the potential of this tool for diagnosing OM using mouse skin tissue and a human tympanic membrane samples prior to clinical application.

  5. Quality of life in children with undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, R.; van Essen, L.E.; Rovers, M.M.; Kimpen, J.L.; van der Ent, C.K.; de Meer, G.

    This study describes the impact of undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma on quality of life in schoolchildren aged 7-10 years and their caregivers in a cross-sectional community-based study. Diagnosed asthma was defined as the parents' confirmation of a physician's diagnosis of asthma. Undiagnosed asthma

  6. Problems faced by newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes mellitus can be a frightening experience for newly diagnosed patients. The aim of this study was to determine and describe the problems faced by newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients at primary healthcare facilities at Mopani district, Limpopo Province. A qualitative, descriptive and contextual research ...

  7. Collective Thomson scattering capabilities to diagnose fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Bindslev, Henrik; Furtula, Vedran

    2010-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) is a versatile technique for diagnosing fusion plasmas. In particular, experiments on diagnosing the ion temperature and fast ion velocity distribution have been executed on a number of fusion devices. In this article the main aim is to describe the technique, ...

  8. Diagnosing and reporting of occupational diseases: a quality improvement study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, D.; de Boer, A. G. E. M.; Verbeek, J. H. A. M.; van Beurden, M. M.; van Dijk, F. J. H.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the need for quality improvement of diagnosing and reporting of noise-induced occupational hearing loss and occupational adjustment disorder. METHODS: Performance indicators and criteria for the quality of diagnosing and reporting were developed. Self-assessment questionnaires were

  9. Suicide Attempt in a Recently Diagnosed HIV Positive Subject: Is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suicide Attempt in a Recently Diagnosed HIV Positive Subject: Is Pre and Post Counseling Still Being Adequately Practiced? ... A case of attempted suicide in a recently diagnosed HIV positive subject without adequate counseling is reported. Subject ... Key Words: Suicide Attempt, HIV/AIDS, Pre and Post test Counseling.

  10. Assessment for markers of nephropathy in newly diagnosed type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess for markers of nephropathy in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, using blood pressure levels, endogenous creatinine clearance and urinary protein excretion as markers of renal disease. Study design: Ninety newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics were studied within 6 weeks of diagnosis. They were in ...

  11. Profile of clinically-diagnosed dementias in a neuropsychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), whose prevalence ranges between 1.41 % and 1.86%, being the most common type.6,7. However, in a previous retrospective study of clinically- diagnosed dementing illnesses in Ibadan, 37 cases of dementia diagnosed according to the ICD-9 and DSM-IIIR criteria were seen over a six year ...

  12. Developing of a Computerized Brain Diagnosing System for Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose of this project is to design a computerized brain diagnosing system that would be used in carrying out the daily diagnosing activity in the clinic. The developed computerized system has numerous advantages over manual operation which is very tedious and time consuming. As part of the research method ...

  13. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  14. Generalized Platform for Antibody Detection using the Antibody Catalyzed Water Oxidation Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, M. Elizabeth; Ritzert, Nicole L.; Chen, Hongjun; Smith, Norah L.; Tague, Michele E.; Xu, Youyong; Baird, Barbara A.; Abru?a, H?ctor D.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases, such as influenza, present a prominent global problem including the constant threat of pandemics that initiate in avian or other species and then pass to humans. We report a new sensor that can be specifically functionalized to detect antibodies associated with a wide range of infectious diseases in multiple species. This biosensor is based on electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide generated through the intrinsic catalytic activity of all antibodies: the antibody ...

  15. Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 antibodies in women from São Paulo, Brazil: association with behavioral factors and Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterino-de-Araujo Adele

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the spread of AIDS, many HIV-infected women have been diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, especially in Africa. Since the discovery of a novel herpesvirus as the causative agent of KS (human herpesvirus 8 - HHV-8 several seroepidemiological studies have been conducted to identify groups at risk for KS. The risk for women in Brazil has not been studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched for HHV-8 antibodies in sera obtained from a bank made up of samples from 3 groups of individuals: Group I: 163 HIV-1-infected women attended at an ambulatory clinic in 1994; Group II: 108 children born to HIV-1-infected mothers from 1990 to 1992, their antibodies reflected maternal infection, and Group III: 630 HIV-1-seronegative, healthy women. In-house immunofluorescence and Western-Blot assays based on the BCBL-1 cell line were used to detect anti-latent and anti-lytic HHV-8 antibodies. RESULTS: Group I had an overall frequency of antibodies of 8.6%, with a 1.2% frequency of anti-latent antibodies and an 8.0% frequency of anti-lytic antibodies. Similar results were detected in Group II, i.e., no cases with anti-latent antibodies and a 7.4% frequency of anti-lytic antibodies. In contrast, prevalences of 1.1% anti-latent antibodies and 0.3% anti-lytic antibodies were observed in Group III. CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiologic pattern of HHV-8 in women from São Paulo varies according to behavioral factors, with emphasis on the sexual and blood routes of virus transmission/acquisition. Although HHV-8 anti-lytic antibodies were found in HIV-1-infected women, no case of KS was detected. Protective factors against KS are probably related to gender and/or to antiretroviral therapies introduced in Brazil since 1994.

  16. Heterophile antibody interference in qualitative urine/serum hCG devices: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Khushbu K; Gronowski, Ann M

    2016-06-01

    This case report investigates the origin of a false positive result on a serum qualitative human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) device. A 46-year-old woman diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia presented with nausea and vomiting. A qualitative serum hCG test was interpreted as positive; however, a quantitative serum hCG test was negative (hCG devices composed of antibodies from different animal sources. Blocking reagent from an automated quantitative immunoassay was also tested for its ability to inhibit the heterophile antibody interference. The qualitative test result was negative after pretreatment with heterophilic blocking reagent. Other devices composed of antibodies from different animal sources also demonstrated mixed results with the patient's sample. Blocking reagent obtained from the automated quantitative assay inhibited the heterophile antibody interference in the patient's sample. This case demonstrates that positive serum point-of-care hCG results should be interpreted with caution and confirmed with a quantitative serum hCG immunoassay when clinical suspicion is raised. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Salmonella typhi vaccination response study reveals defective antibody production selective IgA deficiency patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleguezuelo, Daniel E; Gianelli, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most prevalent immunodeficiency worldwide, progressing to common variable immunodeficiency only in few reported cases. We report the case of a Spanish female aged 22 and diagnosed of selective IgA deficiency, a long history of bronchitis, several episodes of pneumonia, bilateral bronchiectasis, normal IgG, IgM, IgG subclasses, and detectable pre-vaccination IgG antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Streptococcus pneumoniae. She was evaluated in our clinic in order to rule out common variable immunodeficiency. We observed good antibody response to tetanus toxoid, absence of circulating switched memory B cells, decreased response to pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens and a lack of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine. Most SIgAD patients presents with upper respiratory tract infections or mild diarrhea. Those with lower tract infections, pneumonia or untreatable diarrhea should follow B-cell subpopulations' study and antibody response to vaccines. Absence of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine allowed us to expose the defective antibody production.

  18. Correlation between sonography and antibody activity in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willms, Arnulf; Bieler, Dan; Wieler, Helmut; Willms, Diana; Kaiser, Klaus P; Schwab, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis show structural changes of the thyroid that can be identified by a variety of sonographic criteria. We conducted this study to investigate whether there is a correlation between sonography and antibody activity and to assess the role of sonography in the diagnosis and follow-up of Hashimoto thyroiditis. In addition, we present a new classification system (termed the VESINC system [volume, echogenicity, sonographic texture, pseudonodular hypoechoic infiltration, nodules, and cysts]), which helps improve the clarity of sonographic findings. The study included 223 consecutive patients with previously diagnosed Hashimoto autoimmune thyroiditis who attended the thyroid clinic of the German Armed Forces Central Hospital in Koblenz for follow-up examinations between 2006 and 2008. Laboratory tests were performed to measure the levels of free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, thyrotropin, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs), and antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs). Sonography was performed according to a strict protocol. We then assessed whether a correlation existed between antibody activity and the 6 sonographic variables of the VESINC system. Hypoechogenicity, heterogeneity, and pseudonodular hypoechoic infiltration were associated with significantly higher TPOAb activity (P Hashimoto thyroiditis.

  19. Detection of Antibodies against Human and Plant Aquaporins in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristo Vojdani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease that affects the body’s central nervous system. Around 90% of MS sufferers are diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS. We used ELISA to measure IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies against linear epitopes of human and plant aquaporins (AQP4 as well as neural antigens in RRMS patients and controls to determine whether patients suffering from RRMS have simultaneous elevations in antibodies against these peptides and antigens. In comparison to controls, significant elevations in isotype-specific antibodies against human and plant AQP4 and neural antigens such as MBP, MOG, and S100B were detected in RRMS patients, indicating a high correlation in antibody reaction between plant aquaporins and brain antigens. This correlation between the reactivities of RRMS patients with various tested antigens was the most significant for the IgM isotype. We conclude that a subclass of patients with RRMS reacts to both plant and human AQP4 peptides. This immune reaction against different plant aquaporins may help in the development of dietary modifications for patients with MS and other neuroimmune disorders.

  20. Radioimmunoassay of measles virus antibodies in SSPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, M.A.; Gut, W.; Kantoch, M.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) was introduced for detecting measles virus IgG and IgM antibodies. The hyperimmune response to the measles virus could be demonstrated more accurately by RIA than by haemagglutination inhibition (HI). The ratio between RIA and HI antibody titres was decidedly higher in sera and cerebrospinal fluids of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis than in those of other groups tested. (author)

  1. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  2. Ethical dilemma and moral distress: proposed new NANDA diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopala, Beverly; Burkhart, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    To propose two NANDA diagnoses--ethical dilemma and moral distress--and to distinguish between the NANDA diagnosis decisional conflict and the proposed nursing diagnosis of ethical dilemma. Journal articles, books, and focus group research findings. Moral/ethical situations exist in health care. Nurses' experiences of ethical dilemmas and moral distress are extrapolated to the types and categories of ethical dilemmas and moral distress that patients experience and are used as the basis for development of two new nursing diagnoses. The two proposed NANDA diagnoses fill a void in current standardized terminology. It is important that nurses have the ability to diagnose ethical or moral situations in health care. Currently, NANDA does not offer a means to document this important phenomenon. The creation of two sets of nursing diagnoses, ethical dilemma and moral distress, will enable nurses to recognize and track nursing care related to ethical or moral situations.

  3. Nursing diagnoses in a Brazilian intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Lucena, Amália; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite

    2006-01-01

    To identify the nursing diagnoses and their most frequent related factors or risk factors in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Descriptive cross-sectional study with information from 991 admissions to an ICU during a 6-month period. Sixteen nursing diagnoses resulting from hospitalization were most frequently identified; six had percentages greater than 40% with 29 related/risk factors. The resulting averages were 6.9 diagnoses per hospitalization and 1.2 related/risk factors per nursing diagnoses. The nursing diagnoses identified seemed to be common to the clinical practice of nursing and their fundamental related/risk factors to precise clinical judgment, thus providing a basis for interventions for a desired outcome. The findings have contributed to the development of the standardized nursing language usage in Brazilian nursing practices.

  4. Nursing diagnoses in patients with chronic venous ulcer: observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glycia de Almeida Nogueira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze nursing diagnoses in people with chronic venous ulcer. An observational, descriptive, quantitative research conducted in an ambulatory specialized in wound treatment, with a non-probabilistic sample of 20 patients.  Data collection was performed in an institutional form denominated Assessment Protocol for Clients with Tissue Lesions. Diagnoses were established by consensus among four researchers with experience in nursing diagnoses and wound treatments. From data analysis, 16 diagnoses were identified, with 100% of participants presenting: Impaired tissue integrity, Ineffective peripheral tissue perfusion, Risk of infection, Impaired physical mobility and Ineffective health self-control. These diagnoses are found in Safety/Protection, Activity/Rest and Health promotion domains, which from the clinical practice stand point should be priority focuses in nursing intervention and assessment.

  5. Increase in depression diagnoses and prescribed antidepressants among young girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Mørch, Lina Steinrud

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To analyse trends in depression diagnoses and antidepressant use according to age and gender. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study including all women and men of 10-49 years living in Denmark during 2000-2013. The Psychiatric Registry and Prescription Registry provided data on depression...... diagnoses and antidepressant medication, respectively. Incidence rates as well as 1-year prevalence rates were calculated. RESULTS: The incidence and 1-year prevalence rates of depression diagnoses increased during 2000-2013. The women/men rates were 2.0 for both 1-year prevalence of depressions diagnoses...... and antidepressant use. For adolescent girls, the absolute increase was 3 per 1000 for depression diagnoses and 8 per 1000 for first use of antidepressants, compared to boys who had an increase of 1.1 and 3 per 1000, respectively. Before puberty, boys and girls had almost the same incidence rates of both depression...

  6. Do clinical diagnoses correlate with pathological diagnoses in cardiac transplant patients? The importance of endomyocardial biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luk, Adriana; Metawee, Mohammed; Ahn, Eric

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart transplantation remains the last treatment option for patients with end-stage cardiac disease. Such diseases include ischemic cardiomyopathy, nonischemic cardiomyopathy and other conditions such as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, cardiac sarcoidosis and cardiac...... of 296 surgically excised hearts over a 20-year period (January 1987 to July 2006) at one institution were examined. Patients were separated into groups based on year of heart transplantation. The tissue was examined to determine the underlying cardiac pathology leading to congestive heart failure...... amyloidosis. OBJECTIVE: To review the changes that have occurred over time in the etiology of heart disease in patients requiring heart transplantation, and to compare the clinical and histological diagnoses of explanted hearts from patients with progressive cardiac disease. METHODS: The pathological findings...

  7. IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH HLA ANTIBODIES CLASS I AND II, AND MICA ANTIBODIES IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of HLA and MICA antibodies in patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation and their influence on the course of post-transplant period. Determination of HLA antibodies class I and II, and MICA antibodies was performed on a platform of Luminex (xMAP-tech- nology using sets LABScreen ONE LAMBDA (U.S.. A total of 156 patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Revealed the presence of HLA and MICA antibodies in the serum of 31.4% of patients. Regraf- ted patients increased the content of antibodies to the antigens of HLA system was noted in 88.2% of cases, 47% met the combination of antibodies to the I, II classes and MICA. In patients awaiting first kidney transplantation, HLA and MICA antibodies were determined in 23.7% of cases. The presence of pretransplant HLA and MICA antibodies had a significant influence on the course of post-transplant period. Patients with the presence of HLA and MICA in 50% of cases delayed graft function. Sessions of plasmapheresis can reduce the concentration of HLA and MICA antibodies on average by 61.1%. 

  8. Microangiopathic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex IgM antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yumi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    Herein we describe a case of microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome (MAPS) due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) IgM antibody successfully treated with rituximab. A significant correlation was observed between the clinical course and the aPS/PT IgM antibody titer, which can rise earlier before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Rituximab can be safely and effectively used for MAPS. Although detection of only aPS/PT IgM antibody is rare, aPS/PT IgM antibody might be associated with the pathogenesis of MAPS and might be a useful marker of disease activity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  10. Principles for computational design of binding antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Dror; Pszolla, M Gabriele; Lapidoth, Gideon D; Norn, Christoffer; Dym, Orly; Unger, Tamar; Albeck, Shira; Tyka, Michael D; Fleishman, Sarel J

    2017-10-10

    Natural proteins must both fold into a stable conformation and exert their molecular function. To date, computational design has successfully produced stable and atomically accurate proteins by using so-called "ideal" folds rich in regular secondary structures and almost devoid of loops and destabilizing elements, such as cavities. Molecular function, such as binding and catalysis, however, often demands nonideal features, including large and irregular loops and buried polar interaction networks, which have remained challenging for fold design. Through five design/experiment cycles, we learned principles for designing stable and functional antibody variable fragments (Fvs). Specifically, we ( i ) used sequence-design constraints derived from antibody multiple-sequence alignments, and ( ii ) during backbone design, maintained stabilizing interactions observed in natural antibodies between the framework and loops of complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 2. Designed Fvs bound their ligands with midnanomolar affinities and were as stable as natural antibodies, despite having >30 mutations from mammalian antibody germlines. Furthermore, crystallographic analysis demonstrated atomic accuracy throughout the framework and in four of six CDRs in one design and atomic accuracy in the entire Fv in another. The principles we learned are general, and can be implemented to design other nonideal folds, generating stable, specific, and precise antibodies and enzymes.

  11. Antibody-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arruebo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way into the fields of Biotechnology and Medicine. Nanoparticles by themselves offer specific physicochemical properties that they do not exhibit in bulk form, where materials show constant physical properties regardless of size. Antibodies are nanosize biological products that are part of the specific immune system. In addition to their own properties as pathogens or toxin neutralizers, as well as in the recruitment of immune elements (complement, improving phagocytosis, cytotoxicity antibody dependent by natural killer cells, etc., they could carry several elements (toxins, drugs, fluorochroms, or even nanoparticles, etc. and be used in several diagnostic procedures, or even in therapy to destroy a specific target. The conjugation of antibodies to nanoparticles can generate a product that combines the properties of both. For example, they can combine the small size of nanoparticles and their special thermal, imaging, drug carrier, or magnetic characteristics with the abilities of antibodies, such as specific and selective recognition. The hybrid product will show versatility and specificity. In this review, we analyse both antibodies and nanoparticles, focusing especially on the recent developments for antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, offering the researcher an overview of the different applications and possibilities of these hybrid carriers.

  12. Decay of maternal antibodies in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Mahmoud, Kamel

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the decay rate of maternal antibodies against major broiler chicken pathogens. A total of 30 one-day-old broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and reared in isolation. These chicks were retrieved from a parent flock that received a routine vaccination program. Chicks were bled at hatch and sequentially thereafter every 5 d through 30 d of age. Maternal antibody titers were measured by ELISA for avian encephalomyelitis (AEV), avian influenza virus (AIV), chicken anemia virus (CAV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), and reovirus (Reo). Maternal antibody titers for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition test. Half-life estimates of maternal antibody titers were 5.3, 4.2, 7, 5.1, 3.9, 3.8, 4.9, 4.1, 6.3, and 4.7 d for AEV, AIV, CAV, IBDV, IBV, ILTV, MG, MS, NDV, and Reo, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences among half-lives of maternal antibody titers against certain pathogens. Furthermore, all maternal antibody titers were depleted by 10 d of age except for IBDV.

  13. Depression diagnoses following the identification of bipolar disorder: costly incongruent diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Jennifer F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has documented that the symptoms of bipolar disorder are often mistaken for unipolar depression prior to a patient's first bipolar diagnosis. The assumption has been that once a patient receives a bipolar diagnosis they will no longer be given a misdiagnosis of depression. The objectives of this study were 1 to assess the rate of subsequent unipolar depression diagnosis in individuals with a history of bipolar disorder and 2 to assess the increased cost associated with this potential misdiagnosis. Methods This study utilized a retrospective cohort design using administrative claims data from 2002 and 2003. Patient inclusion criteria for the study were 1 at least 2 bipolar diagnoses in 2002, 2 continuous enrollment during 2002 and 2003, 3 a pharmacy benefit, and 4 age 18 to 64. Patients with at least 2 unipolar depression diagnoses in 2003 were categorized as having an incongruent diagnosis of unipolar depression. We used propensity scoring to control for selection bias. Utilization was evaluated using negative binomial models. We evaluated cost differences between patient cohorts using generalized linear models. Results Of the 7981 patients who met all inclusion criteria for the analysis, 17.5% (1400 had an incongruent depression diagnosis (IDD. After controlling for background differences, individuals who received an IDD had higher rates of inpatient and outpatient psychiatric utilization and cost, on average, an additional $1641 per year compared to individuals without an IDD. Conclusions A strikingly high proportion of bipolar patients are given the differential diagnosis of unipolar depression after being identified as having bipolar disorder. Individuals with an IDD had increased acute psychiatric care services, suggesting higher levels of relapses, and were at risk for inappropriate treatment, as antidepressant therapy without a concomitant mood-stabilizing medication is contraindicated in bipolar

  14. Seroprevalence of antibodies to Chlamydophila abortus in ovine in the State of Alagoas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wilton Pinheiro Junior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to perform a seroepidemiological investigation and to identify risk factors associated with infection of Chlamydophila abortus of sheep herds in the Brazilian state of Alagoas. The study was conducted with samples of 274 ewes with ages equal to or higher than 24 months in 25 herds and in 23 towns located in three regions of the state (Sertão, Agreste and Eastern Alagoas. Anti-C. abortus antibodies were detected using the microcomplement fixation test. The risk factors, were determined based on questionnaires consisting of objective questions, about the farmer and general characteristics of the herd like size, sanitary situation and reproductive management. Among 274 sera samples analyzed for C. abortus, 59 (21.5% were positive with titers >32, 187 (68.3% negative and 28 (10.2% suspect with titers >16. In the 23 towns studied, 20 had positive animals. Among herds 21 (77.7% of had positive animals. The only variable which appeared to be significant in the multivariate analysis was the region, and Sertão was the most significant (p<0.001; OR=3.48; T.I. 1.79 - 6.76. Results indicate that infection by Chlamydophila abortus is widespread on sheep farms in the State of Alagoas. Others studies, however, have to be conducted to isolate the agent in order to confirm the role of the bacteria is reproductive disturbances in sheeps. In addition to that, control and prophylactic measures along with health promoting programs have to be encouraged on the studied farms so that infection reates are reduced.

  15. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  16. GAD antibody-associated limbic encephalitis in a young woman with APECED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kopczak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy–candidiasis–ectodermal dystrophy (APECED syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene. Immune deficiency, hypoparathyroidism and Addison’s disease due to autoimmune dysfunction are the major clinical signs of APECED. We report on a 21-year-old female APECED patient with two inactivating mutations in the AIRE gene. She presented with sudden onset of periodic nausea. Adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed by means of the ACTH stimulation test. Despite initiation of hormone replacement therapy with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone, nausea persisted and the patient developed cognitive deficits and a loss of interest which led to the diagnosis of depression. She was admitted to the psychiatric department for further diagnostic assessment. An EEG showed a focal epileptic pattern. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD antibodies, which had been negative eight years earlier, were now elevated in serum and in the cerebrospinal fluid. Oligoclonal bands were positive indicating an inflammatory process with intrathecal antibody production in the central nervous system (CNS. The periodic nausea was identified as dialeptic seizures, which clinically presented as gastrointestinal aura followed by episodes of reduced consciousness that occurred about 3–4 times per day. GAD antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE was diagnosed. Besides antiepileptic therapy, an immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids was initiated followed by azathioprine. The presence of nausea and vomiting in endocrine patients with autoimmune disorders is indicative of adrenal insufficiency. However, our case report shows that episodic nausea may be a symptom of epileptic seizures due to GAD antibodies-associated LE in patients with APECED.

  17. Antibody Fragments and Their Purification by Protein L Affinity Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies and related proteins comprise one of the largest and fastest-growing classes of protein pharmaceuticals. A majority of such molecules are monoclonal antibodies; however, many new entities are antibody fragments. Due to their structural, physiological, and pharmacological properties, antibody fragments offer new biopharmaceutical opportunities. In the case of recombinant full-length antibodies with suitable Fc regions, two or three column purification processes centered around Protein A affinity chromatography have proven to be fast, efficient, robust, cost-effective, and scalable. Most antibody fragments lack Fc and suitable affinity for Protein A. Adapting proven antibody purification processes to antibody fragments demands different affinity chromatography. Such technology must offer the unit operation advantages noted above, and be suitable for most of the many different types of antibody fragments. Protein L affinity chromatography appears to fulfill these criteria—suggesting its consideration as a key unit operation in antibody fragment processing.

  18. Avidity of onconeural antibodies is of clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, Cecilie; Ying, Ming; Haugen, Mette; Mazengia, Kibret; Storstein, Anette; Aarseth, Jan; Martinez, Aurora; Vedeler, Christian

    2013-08-01

    Onconeural antibodies are important in the detection of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). The avidity of Hu, Yo, and CRMP5 antibodies from 100 patients was determined by immunoprecipitation (IP), and 13 of the Yo positive sera were also tested by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). There was a significant association between the results from IP and SPR. Yo antibodies had higher avidity than Hu and CRMP5 antibodies, and both high- and low-avidity antibodies were associated with tumors and PNS. High-avidity Yo antibodies were mainly associated with ovarian cancer, whereas high-avidity Hu and CRMP5 antibodies were mainly associated with small-cell lung cancer. Low-avidity CRMP5 and Yo antibodies were less often detected by a commercial line blot than high-avidity antibodies. The failure to detect low-avidity onconeural antibodies may result in under diagnosis of PNS.

  19. Tethered-variable CL bispecific IgG: an antibody platform for rapid bispecific antibody screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hok Seon; Dunshee, Diana Ronai; Yee, Angie; Tong, Raymond K; Kim, Ingrid; Farahi, Farzam; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Ernst, James A; Sonoda, Junichiro; Spiess, Christoph

    2017-09-01

    Bispecific antibodies offer a clinically validated platform for drug discovery. In generating functionally active bispecific antibodies, it is necessary to identify a unique parental antibody pair to merge into a single molecule. However, technologies that allow high-throughput production of bispecific immunoglobulin Gs (BsIgGs) for screening purposes are limited. Here, we describe a novel bispecific antibody format termed tethered-variable CLBsIgG (tcBsIgG) that allows robust production of intact BsIgG in a single cell line, concurrently ensuring cognate light chain pairing and preserving key antibody structural and functional properties. This technology is broadly applicable in the generation of BsIgG from a variety of antibody isotypes, including human BsIgG1, BsIgG2 and BsIgG4. The practicality of the tcBsIgG platform is demonstrated by screening BsIgGs generated from FGF21-mimetic anti-Klotho-β agonistic antibodies in a combinatorial manner. This screen identified multiple biepitopic combinations with enhanced agonistic activity relative to the parental monoclonal antibodies, thereby demonstrating that biepitopic antibodies can acquire enhanced functionality compared to monospecific parental antibodies. By design, the tcBsIgG format is amenable to high-throughput production of large panels of bispecific antibodies and thus can facilitate the identification of rare BsIgG combinations to enable the discovery of molecules with improved biological function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. CT-MPR invaluable in diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Hideaki; Shimazu, Kaoru; Kamada, Morito; Shiroyama, Akihiro; Mouri, Daisuke; Yamashita, Masashi; Kawasaki, Yasunori; Koseki, Takakazu; Mouri, Manabu [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    In everyday examination, it is usual to encounter odontogenic maxillary sinusitis patients. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis is generally best diagnosed by dental X-ray imaging. Many medical facilities not having a dental X-ray unit use coronal computed tomography (CT) images to diagnose odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Coronal CT imaging causes artifacts, however due to dental prosthesises. Computed tomography-Multiplanar reformation (CT-MPR) imaging has proved useful in evaluating the paranasal sinus because it is not influenced by dental prosthesises. We evaluated the usefulness of CT-MPR for diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis by retrospectively analyzing 16 patients, with the following results. We couldn't diagnose all cases of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in posteroanterior and Waters projection images. Panoramic radiography is needed to diagnose odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Dental X-ray imaging missed some cases, but all cases were diagnosed by CT-MPR imaging, giving a 100% diagnosestic rate. CT-MPR imaging is thus at least as valuable or better than dental X-ray imaging in diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. (author)