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Sample records for anti-breast cancer agents

  1. Largazole as a Novel and Selective Anti-Breast Cancer Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    have recently attracted substantial attention as potential anti-cancer drugs. The selective degradation of many regulatory proteins in eukaryotic...phenolphthalein red and supplemented with 2 mM L-120 glutamine, 100 Units/mL penicillin and 100 µg/mL streptomycin. For low density assays, 121 cells...al., Endocytic protein intersectin-l regulates actin assembly via Cdc42 671 and N- WASP . Nat Cell Biol, 2001. 3(10): p. 927-32. 672 48. Soderling, S.H

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 4,6-diaryl-2-pyrimidinamine derivatives as anti-breast cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linyi; Tang, Zhichao; Wu, Chengze; Li, Xinyu; Huang, Ali; Lu, Xiang; You, Qidong; Xiang, Hua

    2017-12-30

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancers and the leading causes of cancer death among females worldwide. Estrogen receptor positive has been identified as the predominant internal reasons, involving in more than 70% breast cancer patients and SERMs which competes with estradiol for the binding to ERα in breast tissue are widely used in the treatment of ER+ breast cancer, such as tamoxifen, raloxifene. However, many SERMs may cause negative side effects due to their estrogenic activity in other tissues and approximate 50% of patients with ER-positive tumors either initially do not respond or become resistant to these drugs. Here, a series of designed 4,6-diaryl-2-pyrimidinamine derivatives had been synthesized to treat estrogen receptor positive breast cancer by simultaneously antagonizing ER and inhibiting VEGFR-2. Bioactivity evaluation showed that these compounds could significantly inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7, HUVEC and Ishikawa cells. Further studies identified compound III-3A could antagonize against estrogen action and inhibit the phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 as well as inhibit angiogenesis in vivo. The results indicated designed 4,6-diaryl-2-pyrimidinamine derivatives can be used to further study as anti-breast cancer drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Design, Synthesis, in vitro Antiproliferative Activity, Binding Modeling of 1,2,4,-Triazoles as New Anti-Breast Cancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Murat; Karagoz Genc, Zuhal; Tekin, Suat; Sandal, Suleyman; Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Hadda Taibi, Ben; Sekerci, Memet

    2016-12-01

    This article demonstrates the synthesis of 1,2,4-triazole derivatives and their applications in medicine particularly as anti-breast cancer agents which is a major issue of the present. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and NMR. DFT was used to study the quantum chemical calculations of geometries and vibrational wave numbers of 3-hydroxynaphthyl and p-tolyl substituted 1,2,4-triazoles in the ground state. The scaled harmonic vibrational frequencies obtained from the DFT method were compared with those of the FT-IR spectra and found good agreement. The synthesized 1,2,4-triazole-naphthyl hybrids were screened for the anticancer activity against MCF-7 breast cancer lines. Among them compounds 3 and 7 showed broad spectrum anticancer activity with IC50 values 9.7 μM and 7.10 μM, respectively and their activity is comparable to that of the standard drugs. The molecular model for binding between the compounds (1-8) and the active site of BRCA2 was obtained on the basis of the computational docking results and the structure-activity relationship.

  4. Synthesis of Novel β-Keto-Enol Derivatives Tethered Pyrazole, Pyridine and Furan as New Potential Antifungal and Anti-Breast Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaail Radi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a new generation of highly promising inhibitors bearing β-keto-enol functionality has emerged. Reported herein is the first synthesis and use of novel designed drugs based on the β-keto-enol group embedded with heterocyclic moieties such as pyrazole, pyridine, and furan, prepared in a one-step procedure by mixed Claisen condensation. All the newly synthesized compounds were characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, ESI/LC-MS, elemental analysis, and evaluated for their in vitro antiproliferative activity against breast cancer (MDA-MB241 human cell lines and fungal strains (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp albedinis FAO. Three of the synthesized compounds showed potent activity against fungal strains with IC50 values in the range of 0.055–0.092 µM. The results revealed that these compounds showed better IC50 values while compared with positive controls.

  5. MOLECULAR DOCKING OF COMPOUNDS FROM Chaetomium Sp. AGAINST HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA IN SEARCHING ANTI BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maywan Hariono

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on molecular docking-based virtual screening has been conducted to select virtual hit of compounds, reported its existence in fungal endophytes of Chaetomium sp. as cytotoxic agent of breast cancer. The ligands were docked into Human Estrogen Receptor alpha (HERa as the protein which regulates the breast cancer growth via estradiol-estrogen receptor binding intervention. The results showed that two compounds bearing xanthone and two compounds bearing benzonaphtyridinedione scaffolds were selected as virtual hit ligands for HERa leading to the conclusion that these compounds were good to be developed as anti breast cancer.

  6. Newly Synthesized Doxorubicin Complexes with Selected Metals—Synthesis, Structure and Anti-Breast Cancer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Jabłońska-Trypuć

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOX is very effective chemotherapeutic agent, however it has several major drawbacks. Therefore the motivation for developing novel drug complexes as anticancer agents with different mechanism of action has arisen. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of newly synthesized DOX complexes with selected metals (Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Fe, Cu, Zn on apoptosis, cell cycle, viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Complexation of DOX with metals has likewise been the subject of our research. The current work showed that the tested bivalent metals at a given pH condition formed metal:DOX complexes in a ratio of 2:1, while iron complexes with DOX in a ratio of 3:1. The studies also showed that selected metal-DOX complexes (Mg-DOX, Mn-DOX, Ni-DOX at 0.5 µM concentration significantly decreased cell viability and proliferation, however they increased caspase 7 activity. Results also indicated that studied metal-DOX complexes showed high cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. Therefore they were chosen for cell cycle check-points and apoptosis/necrosis analysis studied by flow cytometry. Obtained results suggest that doxorubicin complexed by specified metals can be considered as a potential anti-breast cancer agent, which is characterized by a higher efficacy than a parent drug.

  7. Newly Synthesized Doxorubicin Complexes with Selected Metals-Synthesis, Structure and Anti-Breast Cancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Świderski, Grzegorz; Krętowski, Rafał; Lewandowski, Włodzimierz

    2017-07-04

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is very effective chemotherapeutic agent, however it has several major drawbacks. Therefore the motivation for developing novel drug complexes as anticancer agents with different mechanism of action has arisen. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of newly synthesized DOX complexes with selected metals (Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Fe, Cu, Zn) on apoptosis, cell cycle, viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Complexation of DOX with metals has likewise been the subject of our research. The current work showed that the tested bivalent metals at a given pH condition formed metal:DOX complexes in a ratio of 2:1, while iron complexes with DOX in a ratio of 3:1. The studies also showed that selected metal-DOX complexes (Mg-DOX, Mn-DOX, Ni-DOX) at 0.5 µM concentration significantly decreased cell viability and proliferation, however they increased caspase 7 activity. Results also indicated that studied metal-DOX complexes showed high cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. Therefore they were chosen for cell cycle check-points and apoptosis/necrosis analysis studied by flow cytometry. Obtained results suggest that doxorubicin complexed by specified metals can be considered as a potential anti-breast cancer agent, which is characterized by a higher efficacy than a parent drug.

  8. Antibacterial and anti-breast cancer cell line activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the activity of extracts of Sanghuangporus sp.1 fungus against pathogenic bacteria and a breast cancer cell line. Methods: The wild fruiting body and mycelium of Sanghuangporus sp.1 were extracted with water and ethanol by ultrasonication extraction. The activity of the extracts against pathogenic ...

  9. Anti-breast cancer activity of some novel quinoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S

    2015-09-01

    To discover new bioactive lead compounds for medicinal purposes, 2-cyano-3-(4-substituted)-N-(quinolin-3-yl) acrylamide derivatives 2-24, chromenes 25, 26 and benzochromenes 27, 28 were synthesized. The structures of the newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopies. In addition, the structure of compound 1 was confirmed through X-ray crystallography. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7. The corresponding 2-cyano-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-N-(quinolin-3-yl) acrylamide (15), 3-oxo-N-(quinolin-3-yl)-3H-benzol[f] chromene-2-carboxamide (27), 2-cyano-3-(4-fluorophenyl-N-(quinolin-3-yl) acrylamide (7), 2-cyano-5-(4-(dimethyl-amino) phenyl)-N-(quinolin-3-yl) penta-2,4-dienamide (19) exhibited higher activity compared to doxorubicin (with IC50 value of 47.9 μmol L-1) as a reference drug, with IC50 values of 29.8, 39.0, 40.0, 40.4 μmol L-1, resp. Also, quinoline acrylamides containing 2,3,4-trimethoxyphenyl 17, 2-chlorophenyl 10, benzo[d][1,3]dioxol 12, 2-methoxynaphthalen 22, 2,4-dichlorophenyl 18 and quinoline carrying a chromene-3-carboxamide moiety 25 were nearly as active as doxorubicin, while quinoline acrylamides incorporating unsubstituted phenyl 2, p-tolyl 3, 2,4-dienamide 8, 3-nitrophenyl 13, 4-nitrophenyl 14, 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl 16 and chromene 26 exhibited a moderate activity. In addition, quinoline with acetamide 1, 4-hydroxyphenyl 4, 4-dimethylaminophenyl 9, 4-chlorophenyl 11, 3-bromophenyl 20, 4-bromophenyl 21 and 3-thienyl moiety 24 showed less activity than doxorubicin. On the other hand, quinoline having 2-methoxyphenyl 5, 4-methoxyphenyl 6, 4-metho xynaphthalene 23 and chromene-2-carboxamide 28 showed no activity.

  10. Anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer efficacy of green synthesised silver nanoparticles using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Preethi, Johnson; Vijayan, Raji; Mohd Yusoff, Abdull Rahim; Ameen, Fuad; Suresh, Sadhasivam; Balagurunathan, Ramasamy; Palvannan, Thayumanavan

    2016-10-01

    In this present investigation, AgNPs were green synthesised using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract. The physicochemical properties of AgNPs were characterised using UV-visible spectrophotometer, field emission scanning microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. Further, in vitro anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer efficacy of green synthesised AgNPs were assessed against Propionibacterium acnes MTCC 1951, Malassezia furfur MTCC 1374 and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line, respectively. The flavonoids present in the plant extract were responsible for the AgNPs synthesis. The green synthesised nanoparticles size was found to be ≈37nm. The BET analysis result shows that the surface area of the synthesised AgNPs was found to be 33.72m(2)g(-1). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AgNPs for acne causative agent P. acnes and dandruff causative agent M. furfur was found to be at 3.1 and 25μgmL(-1), respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of the AgNPs for MCF-7 cells was calculated as 30.5μgmL(-1) and complete inhibition was observed at a concentration of 100μgmL(-1). Finally, our results proved that green synthesised AgNPs using C. sativum have great potential in biomedical applications such as anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Phytoestrogen bakuchiol exhibits in vitro and in vivo anti-breast cancer effects by inducing S phase arrest and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae. The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP dose-dependently (0-1 µg/ml, demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 µg/ml induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the antiestrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 µg/ml inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger antiproliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analogue of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4 µg/ml, 7 µg/ml and 10 µg/ml were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15, Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642, p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce

  12. Newly Synthesized Doxorubicin Complexes with Selected Metals—Synthesis, Structure and Anti-Breast Cancer Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Jabłońska-Trypuć; Grzegorz Świderski; Rafał Krętowski; Włodzimierz Lewandowski

    2017-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is very effective chemotherapeutic agent, however it has several major drawbacks. Therefore the motivation for developing novel drug complexes as anticancer agents with different mechanism of action has arisen. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of newly synthesized DOX complexes with selected metals (Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Fe, Cu, Zn) on apoptosis, cell cycle, viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Complexation of DO...

  13. Anti-breast cancer effects of live, heat-killed and cytoplasmic fractions of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus hominis isolated from human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zubaida; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Isa, Nurulfiza Mat

    2016-03-01

    Development of tumour that is resistant to chemotherapeutics and synthetic drugs, coupled with their life-threatening side effects and the adverse effects of surgery and hormone therapies, led to increased research on probiotics' anticancer potentials. The current study investigated the potential of live, heat-killed cells (HKC) and the cytoplasmic fractions (CF) of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus hominis as anti-breast cancer agents. MCF-7 cell line was treated with 25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/mL each of live, HKC and CF of the bacteria; and cytotoxicity was evaluated for 24, 48 and 72 h using MTT assay. The morphological features of the treated cells were examined by fluorescence microscopy. The stage of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were quantified by flow cytometry. The bacterial effect on non-malignant breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, was assessed using MTT assay for 24, 48 and 72 h. All the three forms of the bacteria caused a significant decrease in MCF-7 (up to 33.29%) cell proliferation in concentration- and time-dependent manner. Morphological features of apoptosis like cell death, cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing were observed. Flow cytometry analyses suggested that about 34.60% of treated MCF-7 was undergoing apoptosis. A strong anti-proliferative activity was efficiently induced through sub-G1 accumulation (up to 83.17%) in treated MCF-7 and decreased number in the G0/G1 phase (74.39%). MCF-10A cells treated with both bacteria showed no significant difference with the untreated (>90% viability). These bacteria can be used as good alternative nutraceutical with promising therapeutic indexes for breast cancer because of their non-cytotoxic effects to normal cells.

  14. Identification of Cellular Binding Sites for a Novel Human Anti-Breast Cancer Peptide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeFreest, Lori

    2004-01-01

    ... breast cancer growth. We have developed and optimized an affinity chromatography procedure to identify the receptor for AFPep by using the peptide as "bait" to isolate proteins from solublized cells which have an affinity for the peptide...

  15. Radiolabeling and animal experimental studies of anti-breast cancer McAb 6C6 and mouse-human chimeric antibody 6C6CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhi; Hu Xiaoqian; Li Erqiu

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study bio-distribution and tumor absorption of anti breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 and its chimeric antibody 6C6-CHI. The modified Schwartz method was employed to label 6C6 and 6C6CHI with 99 Tc m . The labeled antibody was injected to mouse via tail vein and the blood clearance and whole body clearance were observed. Nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 were injected with 99 Tc m -labeled antibody and the bio-distribution was studied and imaged with γ-ray camera. The yield of the two labeled antibodies was more than 90% and their immunoactivities were more than 80%. The whole body eliminated half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6 was 4.1h, and the half-times in blood were T α =0.55h and T β =12.42h respectively. The whole body half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI was 4.28h and the half-times in blood were T α =0.98h and T β =12.42h respectively. The bio-distribution of nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 cells was as follows: the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (7.42±0.85) and (5.67±1.44) respectively at 23h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except kidney and the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (4.23±0.64) and (6.97±0.23) respectively at 23 h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except blood and kidney. The γ imaging results showed that the tumor was imaged clearly at 24h after injection of radiolabeled antibodies and the other organs did not concentrate the antibodies except kidney. Anti-breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 can be well located in tumor. Although ID%/g of tumor of the chimeric antibody 6C6CHI was slightly lower than that of 6C6 antibody, and ID%/g of blood was higher than that of 6C6, the tumor imaging of 6C6-CHI was also clear

  16. Largazole as a Novel and Selective Anti-Breast Cancer Agent. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    selective as it does not inhibit a highly related ubiquitin E1 enzyme from the yeast S. pombe and is almost twenty fold less effective in inhibiting the...minutes, the reactions were quenched with EDTA, and 0.5 ml aliquots of the reaction mixtures were spotted on Baker -flexH thin layer chromatography (TLC...polyethylenimine-modified cellulose plates (J.T. Baker , Phillipsburg, NJ) and developed in filtered 0.34 M potassium phosphate pH 7.0 for 20 minutes in

  17. Estrogen-Related Receptor Alpha (ERRa)-Coactivator Interactions as Targets for Discovery of New Anti-Breast Cancer Therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burgess, Richard R

    2006-01-01

    .... ERalpha-negative breast cancers do not respond to anti-estrogen treatment; instead, current therapeutics, such as Herceptin, have focused on the transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor ErbB2 (HER2...

  18. Structural and Functional Analyses of the Six1 Transcriptional Complex for Anti-Breast Cancer Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    expertise of a cancer/molecular biologist with a structural biologist/ biochemist . Within the proposal, we will identify multiple avenues for targeting the...32129‐34.   Ford HL (1998). Homeobox genes: a link between development, cell  cycle , and cancer? Cell Biol  Int 22: 397‐400.   Ford HL, Kabingu EN...Bump EA, Mutter GL, Pardee AB (1998). Abrogation of the G2 cell  cycle   checkpoint associated with overexpression of HSIX1: a possible mechanism of

  19. Synthesis, Anti-Breast Cancer Activity, and Molecular Docking Study of a New Group of Acetylenic Quinolinesulfonamide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marciniec

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a series of regioisomeric acetylenic sulfamoylquinolines are designed, synthesized, and tested in vitro for their antiproliferative activity against three human breast cacer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 and a human normal fibroblast (HFF-1 by 4-[3-(4-iodophenyl-2-(4-nitrophenyl-2H-5-tetrazolio]-1,3-benzene disulfonate (WST-1 assay. The antiproliferative activity of the tested acetylenic quinolinesulfonamides is comparable to that of cisplatin. The bioassay results demonstrate that most of the tested compounds show potent antitumor activities, and that some compounds exhibit better effects than the positive control cisplatin against various cancer cell lines. Among these compounds, 4-(3-propynylthio-7-[N-methyl-N-(3-propynylsulfamoyl]quinoline shows significant antiprolierative activity against T47D cells with IC50 values of 0.07 µM. In addition, 2-(3-Propynylthio-6-[N-methyl-N-(3-propynylsulfa-moyl]quinoline and 2-(3-propynylseleno-6-[N-methyl-N-(3-propynylsulfamoyl]quinoline display highly effective atitumor activity against MDA-MB-231 cells, with IC50 values of 0.09 and 0.50 µM, respectively. Furthermore, most of the tested compounds show a weak cytotoxic effect against the normal HFF-1 cell line. Additionally, in order to suggest a mechanism of action for their activity, all compounds are docked into the binding site of two human cytochrome P450 (CYP isoenzymes. These data indicate that some of the title compounds display significant cytotoxic activity, possibly targeting the CYPs pathways.

  20. Cordycepin, a Natural Antineoplastic Agent, Induces Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells via Caspase-dependent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Zhang, Yongfeng; Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Yang; Wang, Junyue; Meng, Qingfan; Lee, Robert J; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin, a major compound separated from Cordyceps sinensis, is known as a potential novel candidate for cancer therapy. Breast cancer, the most typical cancer diagnosed among women, remains a global health problem. In this study, the anti-breast cancer property of cordycepin and its underlying mechanisms was investigated. The direct effects of cordycepin on breast cancer cells both in in vitro and in vivo experiments were evaluated. Cordycepin exerted cytotoxicity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells confirmed by reduced cell viability, inhibition of cell proliferation, enhanced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species accumulation, induced mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Cordycepin increased the activation of pro-apoptotic proteins, including caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3 and Bax, and suppressed the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). The inhibition on MCF-7-xenografted tumor growth in nude mice further confirmed cordycepin's anti-breast cancer effect. These aforementioned results reveal that cordycepin induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells via caspase-dependent pathways. The data shed light on the possibility of cordycepin being a safe agent for breast cancer treatment.

  1. Infectious Agents and Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) -. I. Adult T-cell leukaemia/ lymphoma. Hepatoccllular carcinoma. Hepatocellular carcinoma. Cervical cancer, other anogenital cancers, laryngeal / cancer, oral cavity cancers. Oncorna virus - Lymphomas, leukaemia. Human herpes virus type 8 - Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma.

  2. Anti-Breast Cancer Potential of Quercetin via the Akt/AMPK/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR Signaling Cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilcar Rivera Rivera

    Full Text Available The Akt/adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway has emerged as a critical signaling nexus for regulating cellular metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell growth. Thus, dysregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2diabetes, and cancer. We previously reported that a combination of grape polyphenols (resveratrol, quercetin and catechin: RQC, at equimolar concentrations, reduces breast cancer (BC growth and metastasis in nude mice, and inhibits Akt and mTOR activities and activates AMPK, an endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, in metastatic BC cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of individual polyphenols to the effect of combined RQC on mTOR signaling. Metastatic BC cells were treated with RQC individually or in combination, at various concentrations, and the activities (phosphorylation of AMPK, Akt, and the mTOR downstream effectors, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K and 4E binding protein (4EBP1, were determined by Western blot. Results show that quercetin was the most effective compound for Akt/mTOR inhibition. Treatment with quercetin at 15μM had a similar effect as the RQC combination in the inhibition of BC cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. However, cell cycle analysis showed that the RQC treatment arrested BC cells in the G1 phase, while quercetin arrested the cell cycle in G2/M. In vivo experiments, using SCID mice with implanted tumors from metastatic BC cells, demonstrated that administration of quercetin at 15mg/kg body weight resulted in a ~70% reduction in tumor growth. In conclusion, quercetin appears to be a viable grape polyphenol for future development as an anti BC therapeutic.

  3. A Novel Apoptotic Protease Activated in Human Breast Cancer Cells After Poisoning Topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    the unknown protease activated by the active anti -breast cancer agent, B-lapachone (B- lap). The research team showed for the first time that B-lap...protease activated by the active anti -breast cancer agent, B-lapachone (B-lap). The research team showed for the first time that B-lap requires NQ01, a...leukemia cell line HL60 cells peroxide production in Trypanosoma cruzi . Acta Trop., 35: 35-40, 1978. undergoing apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Cancer

  4. Innovative agents in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Margaret M; Farmer, Peter B; Gescher, Andreas; Steward, William P

    2005-01-01

    There are many facets to cancer prevention: a good diet, weight control and physical activity, a healthy environment, avoidance of carcinogens such as those in tobacco smoke, and screening of populations at risk to allow early detection. But there is also the possibility of using drugs or naturally occurring compounds to prevent initiation of, or to suppress, tumour growth. Only a few such agents have been used to date in the clinic with any success, and these include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for colon, finasteride for prostate and tamoxifen or raloxifene for breast tumours. An ideal chemopreventive agent would restore normal growth control to a preneoplastic or cancerous cell population by modifying aberrant signalling pathways or inducing apoptosis (or both) in cells beyond repair. Characteristics for such an agent include selectivity for damaged or transformed cells, good bioavailability and more than one mechanism of action to foil redundancy or crosstalk in signalling pathways. As more research effort is being targeted towards this area, the distinction between chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents is blurring. Chemotherapeutic drugs are now being designed to target over- or under-active signalling molecules within cancer cells, a philosophy which is just as relevant in chemoprevention. Development of dietary agents is particularly attractive because of our long-standing exposure to them, their relative lack of toxicity, and encouraging indications from epidemiology. The carcinogenic process relies on the cell's ability to proliferate abnormally, evade apoptosis, induce angiogenesis and metastasise to distant sites. In vitro studies with a number of different diet-derived compounds suggest that there are molecules capable of modulating each of these aspects of tumour growth. However, on the negative side many of them have rather poor bioavailability. The challenge is to uncover their multiple mechanisms of action in order to predict their

  5. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmad, Nihal

    2007-01-01

    ..., has been shown to possess anti-microbial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Our earlier studies suggested that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent for the management of prostate cancer...

  6. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmad, Nihal

    2008-01-01

    ..., has been shown to possess anti-microbial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Our earlier studies suggested that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent for the management of prostate cancer...

  7. New agents for cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloff, G J; Boone, C W; Crowell, J A; Steele, V E; Lubet, R A; Doody, L A; Malone, W F; Hawk, E T; Sigman, C C

    1996-01-01

    Clinical chemoprevention trials of more than 30 agents and agent combinations are now in progress or being planned. The most advanced agents are well known and are in large Phase III chemoprevention intervention trials or epidemiological studies. These drugs include several retinoids [e.g., retinol, retinyl palmitate, all-trans-retinoic acid, and 13-cis-retinoic acid], calcium, Beta carotene, vitamin E, tamoxifen, and finasteride. Other newer agents are currently being evaluated in or being considered for Phase II and early Phase III chemoprevention trials. Prominent in this group are all-trans-N-(4-hydroxy phenyl)retinamide (4-HPR) (alone and in combination with tamoxifen), 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (aspirin, piroxicam, sulindac), oltipraz, and dehydroepiandrostenedione (DHEA). A third group is new agents showing chemopreventive activity in animal models, epidemiological studies, or in pilot clinical intervention studies. They are now in preclinical toxicology testing or Phase I safety and pharmacokinetics trials preparatory to chemoprevention efficacy trials. These agents include S-allyl-l-cysteine, curcumin, DHEA analog 8354 (fluasterone), genistein, ibuprofen, indole-3-carbinol, perillyl alcohol, phenethyl isothiocyanate, 9-cis-retinoic acid, sulindac sulfone, tea extracts, ursodiol, vitamin D analogs, and p-xylyl selenocyanate. A new generation of agents and agent combinations will soon enter clinical chemoprevention studies based primarily on promising chemopreventive activity in animal models and in mechanistic studies. Among these agents are more efficacious analogs of known chemopreventive drugs including novel carotenoids (e.g., alpha-carotene and lutein). Also included are safer analogs which retain the chemopreventive efficacy of the parent drug such as vitamin D3 analogs. Other agents of high interest are aromatase inhibitors (e.g., (+)-vorozole), and protease inhibitors (e.g., Bowman-Birk soybean trypsin

  8. SENYAWA AKTIF ANTIKANKER PAYUDARA DAN ANTIMALARIA DARI TUMBUHAN DADAP AYAM (ERHYTHRINA VALERIEGATA SECARA IN VITRO (Anti Breast-cancer and anti-malarial Active Compounds of Erithrina Variegata by in Vitro Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Herlina

    2012-03-01

    E. variegata used as medicinal folk of anti-cancer and anti-malarial, however haven’t reported yet of bioactive compounds. The purpose of this research was assayed an anti-cancer and anti-malarial compounds toward breast cancer cell-lines T47D and toward Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 (chloroquine sensitive and K1 (chloroquine resistance in vitro from E. variegata. The research was extraction of methanol and fractionation from the leaves and stem bark of E. variegata by using guide-assay in vitro Sulphorhodamine B (SRB method and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Furthermore, by using the anti-cancer and anti-malarial activity to follow separation, the active fraction was separated by combination of column chromatography to yield three active compounds (1-3. The chemical structure of active compounds (1-3 were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidences and comparison with those previously reported and identified as terpenoid pentacyclic glycoside (1, flavonoid, erystagallin A (2 and steroid, (22E-5α,8α-epidioxyergosta-6,22-diene-3β-ol (3. The compound (1 showed anti-malarial activity in vitro against P. falciparum strain 3D7 and K1 with IC50 1.8 and  3.3  µg/mL, respectively.  The compounds (2-3 showed anti-cancer activity against of breast cancer cell-lines T47D with IC50 of 3.03and 3.2 µg/ml, respectively. This results strongly suggested that E. variegata is a promising sources of anti-cancer and anti-malarial agents.

  9. Overview of mechanisms of cancer chemopreventive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Flora, Silvio; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological data provide evidence that it is possible to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases, some of which share common pathogenetic mechanisms, such as DNA damage, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. An obvious approach is avoidance of exposure to recognized risk factors. As complementary strategies, it is possible to render the organism more resistant to mutagens/carcinogens and/or to inhibit progression of the disease by administering chemopreventive agents. In a primary prevention setting, addressed to apparently healthy individuals, it is possible to inhibit mutation and cancer initiation by triggering protective mechanisms either in the extracellular environment or inside cells, e.g., by modifying transmembrane transport, modulating metabolism, blocking reactive species, inhibiting cell replication, maintaining DNA structure, modulating DNA metabolism and repair, and controlling gene expression. Tumor promotion can be counteracted by inhibiting genotoxic effects, favoring antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, inhibiting proteases and cell proliferation, inducing cell differentiation, modulating apoptosis and signal transduction pathways, and protecting intercellular communications. In a secondary prevention setting, when a premalignant lesion has been detected, it is possible to inhibit tumor progression via the same mechanisms, and in addition by affecting the hormonal status and the immune system in various ways, and by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Although tertiary prevention, addressed to cancer patients after therapy, is outside the classical definition of chemoprevention, it exploits similar mechanisms. It is also possible to affect cell-adhesion molecules, to activate antimetastasis genes, and to inhibit proteases involved in basement membrane degradation

  10. OVULATION INDUCTION AGENTS AND OVARIAN CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Požlep

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ovarian cancer is the most frequentcause of death among gynecologic malignancies. Epidemiologicaldata show that environmental, hormonal and geneticfactors are etiologically significant. Beside the already knownrisk factors, ovulation induction agents have been reported asrisk factors in literature since 1986. Over the last two decades,ovulation induction agents have been widely used in variousassisted reproduction techniques (ART. This study focusedon the question whether in patients receiving ovulation inductionagents the risk for developing pathologic processes onthe ovaries was higher than in those not receiving them, andwhether they were related to the dose and type of ovulationinduction agent.Methods. In a prospective study 380 subjects were enrolled.The study group consisted of 280 women who had undergonean ART procedure three or more times. The control group consistedof 120 infertile women, never included in an ART procedure.All the enrolled subjects underwent the same examinations:a detailed gynecological history was taken, pelvic examinationand vaginal ultrasound were performed, and a bloodsample for tumour marker CA 125 determination was taken.Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test, t test andlogistic regression.Results. Ultrasound examination revealed pathology on thegenital tract in 136 women in the study group and in 60 womenin the control group. Differences in the incidence of ovarian,tubal and uterine pathology were not statistically significant.The analysis of the medical records showed that the incidenceof ovarian pathology was significantly higher in thestudy than in the control group (p < 0.05. We found no correlationbetween the incidence of ovarian pathology and typeor dose of ovulation induction agent. Increased CA 125 levelswere found in 12 women. In none of the women neither malignantnor borderline malignant disease was found.Conclusions. Although the analysis of the data from medicalhistory showed

  11. Antibacterial and anti-breast cancer cell line activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    against acrolein toxicity in vitro, and against stroke in a mouse model [13]. Chang et al. [14] and Ayala-Zavala et al. [6] found that extracts from P. merrillii, P. gilvus, P. rimosus and P. badius have antioxidant activity. Moreover, the extracts from P. gilvus, P. rimosus and P. badius could inhibit growth of the fungus Alternaria.

  12. Aspirin as a Chemopreventive Agent for Cancer: a New Hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isnatin Miladiyah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: inflammation has been shown to play a major role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Inflammatory process activates the immune system through pro-inflammatory mediators and subsequent triggers transformation into malignant cells. Some tumors or cancers has been associated with chronic infections, such as hepatitis B and C viruses (hepatocellular carcinoma, human papilloma virus (cervical cancer, Helicobacter pylori (gastric cancer and lymphoma, and prostatitis (prostate cancer. A considerable study have investigated the benefits of aspirin for the prevention and treatment of cancer or tumors. Objectives: This paper aims to describe the relationship between inflammation and cancer incidence, so that use of aspirin as an anti-inflammatory agent is a rational choice in the treatment and prevention of cancer. Conclusion: Aspirin potential for chemoprevention of various types of cancer. Considering the high risk of side effects of aspirin, aspirin is not intended as a routine therapy to prevent the occurrence of cancer.

  13. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmad, Nihal

    2005-01-01

    .... Therefore, the search for novel agents and approaches for the treatment of CaP continues. Natural plant-based products have shown promise as anticancer agents. Sanguinarine (13-methyl[ 1,3]benzodioxolo[5,6-c]- 1,3-dioxolo[4,5-i]phenanthridinium...

  14. The preparation and characterization of peptide's lung cancer imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianfeng; Chu Liping; Wang Yan; Wang Yueying; Liu Jinjian; Wu Hongying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To screen in vivo lung cancer specific binding seven peptides by T7 phage display peptide library, so as to prepare peptide's lung cancer early diagnostic agent. Methods: Use phage display in vivo technology, the 7-peptide phage that binding the lung cancer specifically was obtained, then the DNA sequence was measured and the seven peptide was synthesized. After labeled by 125 I, the seven peptide was injected into mice via vein and the distribution was observed. Results: One peptide was obtained by four rounds screening, and the peptide can bind lung cancer tissue specifically. Two hours after injection get the best imaging of lung cancer, metabolism of peptide in mice is fast, the distribution in vivo is decrease six hours and almost disappear 20 hours after injection. Conclusion: The peptide can image and diagnose lung cancer better. (authors)

  15. Environmental carcinogenic agents and cancer prevention. Risk assessment and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Many agents in our environment have been established as being carcinogenic, and in most cases, the carcinogenic properties of these agents were identified because of high-dose occupational or accidental exposure. Risk characterization, taking into account the dose-response relationship, and exposure assessment are essential for risk assessment and subsequent cancer prevention. Based on scientific risk assessment, risk management should be conducted practically by considering the economic, social, political, and other technical issues and by balancing the risks and benefits. Asbestos and environmental tobacco smoke are typical examples of established carcinogenic agents in the general environment, contributing to low-dose exposure. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the carcinogenicity of low-dose exposure to known carcinogenic agents such as arsenic and cadmium through dietary intake, radiation via medical and natural exposure, and air pollution due to diesel exhaust. In contrast, occupational chemical exposure to 1,2-dichloropropane and/or dichloromethane, whose carcinogenicity had not been established, was suggested to cause cholangiocarcinoma among workers involved in offset color proof-printing only after a rare situation of high-dose exposure was unveiled. Continuous monitoring of unusual cancer occurrences in target populations such as workers in occupational and regional settings as well as exposure reduction to suspected carcinogenic agents to levels as low as reasonably achievable is essential for reducing the risk of cancer due to environmental carcinogens. (author)

  16. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy as Local Hemostatic Agent in Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Malik Tariq; Manzoor, Najmi Arshad; Mustafa, Syed Arshad; Maqbool, Lone Mohammad; Afroz, Fir

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor bleeding continues to remain a challenge in an oncological setting, and radiotherapy has been studied as a local hemostatic agent. We studied the role of local radiotherapy in controlling bleeding at our center. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 25 treated cases (cancer urinary bladder: 12, lung cancer: 5, cervical cancer: 4, uterine cancer: 1, rectal cancer: 2, schwanoma: 1) at our center from March 2008 to December 2010. All patients had either an advanced or recurrent disease. Radiotherapy schedule was either 20 Gray in 5 fractions or 15 Gray in 5 fractions and was delivered with Cobalt 60. Results and Conclusion: Of 25 patients, 22 (88%) responded, and there was complete cessation of bleeding. Both 15 Gray and 20 Gray dose schedule had equal efficacy. Treatment was well tolerated without any intermission. Radiotherapy is a safe and effective option in controlling tumor bleeding. PMID:22346046

  17. Ad-PUMA sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Q-C; Sun, Y-R; Han, P; Chen, Y

    2015-12-01

    Ovarian cancer accounted for the first cause of death in female reproductive system tumor even with the operation and chemotherapy. We sought to evaluate the therapeutic potential of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) in ovarian cancer. An adenovirus expressing PUMA (Ad-PUMA), alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, was used to treat two different ovarian cancer cell lines. The mechanism of PUMA-mediated growth suppression and apoptosis was investigated by analysis of caspase-9 activation and the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The exogenous PUMA was expressed 6 h after Ad-PUMA infection, which increased the chemosensitivity of the cancer cells and decreased the IC50 of chemotherapeutic agents compared with uninfected cells. The apoptotic percentage of OVCAR-3 and SKOV3 increased greatly compared with Taxol or Cisplatin alone. There was shear zone in caspase-9 and Δψm decrease after Ad-PUMA infection which suggested apoptosis started in mitochondrial mediated pathway. PUMA plays a role in suppressing tumor growth and sensitizing ovarian cancer cells to anticancer drugs and may be a promising tool for cancer biotherapy.

  18. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  19. Novel agents in the management of lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, B

    2012-01-31

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Survival remains poor as approximately 80% of cases present with advanced stage disease. However, new treatments are emerging which offer hope to patients with advanced disease. Insights into cell biology have identified numerous intracellular and extracellular peptides that are pivotal in cancer cell signalling. Disrupting the function of these peptides inhibits intracellular signal transduction and diminishes uncontrolled proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and tumour angiogenesis. The most widely studied signalling pathway is the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) pathway. EGF signalling can be disrupted at numerous points. Blockade of the cell surface receptor is achieved by the monoclonal antibody cetuximab; intracellular tyrosine kinase activity is inhibited by erlotinib. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) regulates another pathway important for tumour growth. Inhibition of VEGF impairs angiogenesis and disrupts metastatic spread. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF and blocks interaction with its cell surface receptor. Clinical trials have demonstrated that disruption of these signalling pathways can improve survival in advanced lung cancer. New compounds including folate antimetabolites such as pemetrexed, proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, modified glutathione analogues such as TLK286, and other agents such as epothilones and other small molecules are currently being evaluated in patients with lung cancer. As more and more signalling peptides are targeted for manipulation, it is hoped that a new era is dawning in the treatment of advanced stage lung cancer. This review will focus on emerging new therapies in the management of lung cancer.

  20. Leukemia after therapy with alkylating agents for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.A.; Meadows, A.T.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The risk of leukemia was evaluated in 9,170 2-or-more-year survivors of childhood cancer in the 13 institutions of the Late Effects Study Group. Secondary leukemia occurred in 22 nonreferred individuals compared to 1.52 expected, based on general population rates [relative risk (RR) = 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9-22]. The influence of therapy for the first cancer on subsequent leukemia risk was determined by a case-control study conducted on 25 cases and 90 matched controls. Treatment with alkylating agents was associated with a significantly elevated risk of leukemia (RR = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.2-18.9). A strong dose-response relationship was also observed between leukemia risk and total dose of alkylating agents, estimated by an alkylator score. The RR of leukemia reached 23 in the highest dose category. Radiation therapy, however, did not increase risk. Although doxorubicin was also identified as a possible risk factor, the excess risk of leukemia following treatment for childhood cancer appears almost entirely due to alkylating agents

  1. [Molecular mechanism regulating effect of anti-cancer agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saya, Hideyuki

    2009-01-01

    Faithful genome duplication is achieved by accurate coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Abnormalities occurring in this process are checked by biochemical signal transduction pathways, called checkpoints, which ensure the orderly progression of events in the cell cycle. Checkpoints prevent transition into subsequent phases until all processes in the previous phase are completed. Defects in cell cycle checkpoints result in gene mutations, chromosome damage, and aneuploidy, all of which contribute to tumorigenesis. However, it has recently been uncovered that the impairment of checkpoint function is the major reason why DNA damaging anti-cancer agents can selectively kill cancer cells. Given that G1 and G2 checkpoint functions are generally impaired in cancer cells, cells with DNA damage are unable to maintain G2 arrest and eventually die as they enter mitosis. This process is known as mitotic catastrophe.

  2. Resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Abdur; Imran, Muhammad; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Nadeem, Muhammad; Peters, Dennis G; Mubarak, Mohammad S

    2016-12-21

    Owing to their antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity, grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are the archetypal paradigms of fruits used not only for nutritional purposes, but also for exclusive therapeutics. Grapes are a prominent and promising source of phytochemicals, especially resveratrol, a phytoalexin antioxidant found in red grapes which has both chemopreventive and therapeutic effects against various ailments. Resveratrol's role in reducing different human cancers, including breast, cervical, uterine, blood, kidney, liver, eye, bladder, thyroid, esophageal, prostate, brain, lung, skin, gastric, colon, head and neck, bone, ovarian, and cervical, has been reviewed. This review covers the literature that deals with the anti-cancer mechanism of resveratrol with special reference to antioxidant potential. Furthermore, this article summarizes the literature pertaining to resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent.

  3. Promising oncolytic agents for metastatic breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody JJ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available James J Cody,1 Douglas R Hurst2 1ImQuest BioSciences, Frederick, MD, 2Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: New therapies for metastatic breast cancer patients are urgently needed. The long-term survival rates remain unacceptably low for patients with recurrent disease or disseminated metastases. In addition, existing therapies often cause a variety of debilitating side effects that severely impact quality of life. Oncolytic viruses constitute a developing therapeutic modality in which interest continues to build due to their ability to spare normal tissue while selectively destroying tumor cells. A number of different viruses have been used to develop oncolytic agents for breast cancer, including herpes simplex virus, adenovirus, vaccinia virus, measles virus, reovirus, and others. In general, clinical trials for several cancers have demonstrated excellent safety records and evidence of efficacy. However, the impressive tumor responses often observed in preclinical studies have yet to be realized in the clinic. In order for the promise of oncolytic virotherapy to be fully realized for breast cancer patients, effectiveness must be demonstrated in metastatic disease. This review provides a summary of oncolytic virotherapy strategies being developed to target metastatic breast cancer. Keywords: oncolytic virus, virotherapy, breast cancer, metastasis 

  4. Lung cancer mutations and use of targeted agents in Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, W Douglas; Chiappori, Alberto; Santiago, Pedro; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) are expected to grow to over 24% of the USA population by 2050 and lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death among H/L men. Due to the information that is becoming available via genetic testing, lung cancer molecular profiling is allowing for increasing application of personalized lung cancer therapies. However, to benefit the most people, development of these therapies and genetic tests must include research on as many racial and ethnic groups as possible. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to the fact that the mutations driving lung cancer in H/Ls differ in frequency and nature relative to the non-Hispanic White (WNH) majority that dominate current databases and participate in clinical trials that test new therapies. Clinical trials using new agents targeting genetic alterations (driver mutations) in lung cancer have demonstrated significant improvements in patient outcomes (for example, gefitinib, erlotinib or crizotinib for lung adenocarcinomas harboring EGFR mutations or EML4-ALK fusions, respectively). The nature and frequencies of some lung cancer driver mutations have been shown to be considerably different among racial and ethnic groups. This is particularly true for H/Ls. For example, several reports suggest a dramatic shift in the mutation pattern from predominantly KRAS in a WNH population to predominantly EGFR in multiple H/L populations. However, these studies are limited, and the effects of racial and ethnic differences on the incidence of mutations in lung cancer remain incompletely understood. This review serves as a call to address this problem.

  5. Promising oncolytic agents for metastatic breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, James J; Hurst, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    New therapies for metastatic breast cancer patients are urgently needed. The long-term survival rates remain unacceptably low for patients with recurrent disease or disseminated metastases. In addition, existing therapies often cause a variety of debilitating side effects that severely impact quality of life. Oncolytic viruses constitute a developing therapeutic modality in which interest continues to build due to their ability to spare normal tissue while selectively destroying tumor cells. A number of different viruses have been used to develop oncolytic agents for breast cancer, including herpes simplex virus, adenovirus, vaccinia virus, measles virus, reovirus, and others. In general, clinical trials for several cancers have demonstrated excellent safety records and evidence of efficacy. However, the impressive tumor responses often observed in preclinical studies have yet to be realized in the clinic. In order for the promise of oncolytic virotherapy to be fully realized for breast cancer patients, effectiveness must be demonstrated in metastatic disease. This review provides a summary of oncolytic virotherapy strategies being developed to target metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27512671

  6. Aspirin as a chemoprevention agent for colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Chun Seng

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of mortality in the western world. It is widely accepted that neoplasms such as colonic polyps are precursors to CRC formation; with the polyp-adenoma-carcinoma sequences well described in medical literature [1, 2]. It has been shown that Aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) have a negative effect on polyp and cancer formation. This review aims to describe some of the mechanism behind the chemoprotective properties of aspirin; COX 2 inhibition, regulation of proliferation and apoptosis and effects on the immune system and also the current evidence that supports its use as a chemoprevention agent against CRC. We will also aim to explore the side effects with the use of aspirin and the pitfalls of using aspirin routinely for primary prophylaxis against CRC.

  7. Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Enhanced Microwave Imaging and Thermal Treatment of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Sahakian, J. H. Booske, and S. C. Hagness, “Toward carbon-nanotube-based theranostic agents for microwave detection and treatment of breast cancer ... theranostic agents for microwave detection and treatment of breast cancer : Enhanced dielectric and heating response of tissue-mimicking materials...NO. 8, AUGUST 2010 1831 Toward Carbon-Nanotube-Based Theranostic Agents for Microwave Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer : Enhanced Dielectric

  8. Exploiting Cancer Metal Metabolism using Anti-Cancer Metal-Binding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlot, Angelica M; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Jansson, Patric J; Sahni, Sumit; Huang, Michael L; Lane, Darius L; Lok, Hiu; Richardson, Des R

    2017-07-05

    Metals are vital cellular elements necessary for multiple indispensable biological processes of living organisms, including energy transduction and cell proliferation. Interestingly, alterations in metal levels and also changes in the expression of proteins involved in metal metabolism have been demonstrated in a variety of cancers. Considering this and the important role of metals for cell growth, the development of drugs that sequester metals have become an attractive target for the development of novel anti-cancer agents. Interest in this field has surged with the design and development of new generations of chelators of the thiosemicarbazone class. These ligands have shown potent anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activity in vitro and in vivo. Due to their efficacy and safe toxicological assessment, some of these agents have recently entered multi-center clinical trials as therapeutics for advanced and resistant tumors. This review highlights the role, and changes in homeostasis, of metals in cancer and emphasizes the pre-clinical development and clinical assessment of metal ion-binding agents, namely, thiosemicarbazones, as anti-tumor agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States); Sethakorn, Nan [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States); Bissonnette, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Puri, Neelu, E-mail: neelupur@uic.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  10. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC

  11. National Cancer Institute Formulary: A Public-Private Partnership Providing Investigators Access to Investigational Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, J V; Ansher, S S; Zwiebel, J A; Ivy, P; Conley, B; Abrams, J S; Doroshow, J H

    2017-05-01

    As part of the White House Cancer Moonshot Initiative, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed a drug formulary to provide investigational anticancer agents to the extramural research community. This article describes how the NCI Formulary functions, how researchers may apply for access to drugs in the formulary, and the NCI's initial goals for formulary participation. Approved investigators may apply for access to formulary agents at: https://nciformulary.cancer.gov. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  12. Molecular MR Imaging of CD44 in Breast Cancer with Hyaluronan-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    both Gd groups for MR imaging and cytotoxic moieties can be used as a unique biocompatible platform for theranostic applications in breast cancer ...TITLE: Molecular MR Imaging of CD44 in Breast Cancer with Hyaluronan-Based Contrast Agents PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dmitri Artemov, Ph.D...AUG 2009 - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular MR Imaging of CD44 in Breast Cancer with Hyaluronan-Based Contrast Agents 5a. CONTRACT

  13. Fragment-based in silico modeling of multi-target inhibitors against breast cancer-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2017-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer reported in women, being responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths. Chemotherapy has proven to be effective against this malignant neoplasm depending on different biological factors such as the histopathology, grade, and stage, among others. However, breast cancer cells have become resistant to current chemotherapeutic regimens, urging the discovery of new anti-breast cancer drugs. Computational approaches have the potential to offer promising alternatives to accelerate the search for potent and versatile anti-breast cancer agents. In the present work, we introduce the first multitasking (mtk) computational model devoted to the in silico fragment-based design of new molecules with high inhibitory activity against 19 different proteins involved in breast cancer. The mtk-computational model was created from a dataset formed by 24,285 cases, and it exhibited accuracy around 93% in both training and prediction (test) sets. Several molecular fragments were extracted from the molecules present in the dataset, and their quantitative contributions to the inhibitory activities against all the proteins under study were calculated. The combined use of the fragment contributions and the physicochemical interpretations of the different molecular descriptors in the mtk-computational model allowed the design of eight new molecular entities not reported in our dataset. These molecules were predicted as potent multi-target inhibitors against all the proteins, and they exhibited a desirable druglikeness according to the Lipinski's rule of five and its variants.

  14. Early-life exposures to infectious agents and later cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedham, Vidya; Verma, Mukesh; Mahabir, Somdat

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing understanding that several infectious agents are acquired in early life and this is the reason why available vaccines target the new born, infants, and adolescents. Infectious agents are associated with cancer development and it is estimated that about 20% of the world's cancer burden is attributed to infectious agents. There is a growing evidence that certain infectious agents acquired in early life can give rise to cancer development, but estimates of the cancer burden from this early-life acquisition is unknown. In this article, we have selected five cancers (cervical, liver, Burkitt's lymphoma-leukemia, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma) and examine their links to infectious agents (HPV, HBV, HCV, EBV, and HTLV-1) acquired in early life. For these agents, the acquisition in early life is from mother-to-child transmission, perinatal contact (with genital tract secretions, amniotic fluids, blood, and breast milk), saliva, sexual intercourse, and blood transfusion. We also discuss prevention strategies, address future directions, and propose mechanisms of action after a long latency period from the time of acquisition of the infectious agent in early life to cancer development. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Anti-cancer effects of newly developed chemotherapeutic agent, glycoconjugated palladium (II) complex, against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Kamiya, Takeshi; Joh, Takashi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Ohi, Hiromi; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Shibahara, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Mori, Yoshinori; Tanida, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various types of advanced cancer, including gastric cancer. However, almost all cancer cells acquire resistance against CDDP, and this phenomenon adversely affects prognosis. Thus, new chemotherapeutic agents that can overcome the CDDP-resistant cancer cells will improve the survival of advanced cancer patients. We synthesized new glycoconjugated platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes, [PtCl 2 (L)] and [PdCl 2 (L)]. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure to CDDP, and gene expression in the CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells was analyzed. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by [PtCl 2 (L)] and [PdCl 2 (L)] in CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells were evaluated. DNA double-strand breaks by drugs were assessed by evaluating phosphorylated histone H2AX. Xenograft tumor mouse models were established and antitumor effects were also examined in vivo. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells exhibit ABCB1 and CDKN2A gene up-regulation, as compared with CDDP-sensitive gastric cancer cells. In the analyses of CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells, [PdCl 2 (L)] overcame cross-resistance to CDDP in vitro and in vivo. [PdCl 2 (L)] induced DNA double-strand breaks. These results indicate that [PdCl 2 (L)] is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CDDP-resistant gastric cancer and may have clinical applications

  16. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  17. Quinones derived from plant secondary metabolites as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wu, Guo-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Shan; Huang, Ming-Qing; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2013-03-01

    Quinones are plant-derived secondary metabolites that present some anti-proliferation and anti-metastasis effects in various cancer types both in vitro and in vivo. This review focuses on the anti-cancer prospects of plant-derived quinones, namely, aloe-emodin, juglone, β-lapachol, plumbagin, shikonin, and thymoquinone. We intend to summarize their anti-cancer effects and investigate the mechanism of actions to promote the research and development of anti-cancer agents from quinones.

  18. Towards safety of oral anti-cancer agents, the need to educate our pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Saeed Mekdad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The global prevalence of cancer is rising. Use of oral anticancer medications has expanded exponentially. Knowledge about these medications as well as safe handling guidelines has not kept abreast with the rapidity these medications are applied in clinical practice. They pose serious hazards on all personal involved in handling these medications as well as on patients and their caregivers. We addressed the gaps in knowledge and safe handling of oral anticancer agents among pharmacists in institutional based cancer care. Materials and Methods: We used a 41 item questionnaire to explore three domains, pharmacists’ knowledge, safe handling practice and confidence and self-improving strategies towards these agents among pharmacists in multicentre specialized cancer care. Results: Participants included 120 pharmacists dedicated to handle and dispense oral anticancer agents. About 20% of Pharmacists have adequate knowledge about oral anticancer agents. Less than 50% apply safe handling principles adequately. Only a quarter are confident in educating cancer patients and their caregivers about Oral Anti-Cancer Agents. Conclusions: Pharmacists’ knowledge about Oral Anticancer agents needs to be improved. Safe handling and dispensing practice of these medications should be optimized. Pharmacists’ confidence towards educating patients and their caregiver needs to be addressed. Enhancing safety of oral anticancer agents should be a priority. Involving all key players, research and quality improving projects are needed to improve all aspects of the safety of oral anticancer agents.

  19. TRAIL: A Novel Therapeutic Agent for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Honglin

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the signaling pathway of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, and to examine the therapeutic effect of TRAIL on prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo...

  20. TRAIL: A Novel Therapeutic Agent for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Honglin

    2002-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the signaling pathway of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, and to examine the therapeutic effect of TRAIL on prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo...

  1. TRAIL: A Novel Therapeutic Agent for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Honglin

    2003-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the signaling pathway of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, and to examine the therapeutic effect of TRAIL on prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo...

  2. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0238 TITLE: Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL...of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Oxygen-rich environments can create pro- mutagenic DNA lesions such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) that can be misreplicated during translesion DNA synthesis

  3. Development of the MASCC Teaching Tool for Patients Receiving Oral Agents for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kav, Sultan; Schulmeister, Lisa; Nirenberg, Anita; Barber, Linda; Johnson, Judi; Rittenberg, Cynthia

    2010-05-01

    Oral agents for cancer treatment commonly are prescribed throughout the world. Since oral agents usually are self-administered or administered by lay caregivers, patient education is vital to help ensure that the oral agents are being stored, handled, and taken correctly. When oral agents are taken as prescribed and patients are well informed about signs and symptoms to report, patient outcomes are optimized. Patient education varies globally; consequently, there is a need for a consistent and comprehensive approach to educate patients about oral cancer treatment. To create a teaching tool to be used with patients receiving oral cancer agents for worldwide use. Six oncology nurse experts conducted a literature review and convened as an expert panel to draft a teaching tool for patients receiving oral cancer agents. The tool includes key assessment questions, generic education discussion points, drug-specific education, and evaluation questions to help ensure that patients/caregivers understand the information provided. Eighteen healthcare providers from 15 countries reviewed the tool for clarity and usefulness in practice by scoring each item in the teaching tool on a 0-10 scale ("0 = not at all to "10" = most clear/useful"). Items that scored 5 or below required comments. At the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) Symposium in 2008, the healthcare providers who reviewed the teaching tool met with the oncology nurse experts who had developed the tool to review the item scores and revise the tool as necessary. All items on the teaching tool received high scores, with the exception of items on refilling prescriptions and insurance issues, which vary from country to country. There was consensus that the MASCC Teaching Tool for Patients Receiving Oral Agents for Cancer was ready to be used and further evaluated in clinical practice. The MASCC Teaching Tool for Patients Receiving Oral Agents for Cancer is an available resource to assist

  4. Tumor-selective coronaviruses as potential anti-cancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Würdinger, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Despite much progress in the treatment of certain types of cancer, generally the successes of cancer therapy are still largely insufficient and new treatment options are therefore urgently needed. Oncolytic virotherapy may offer an unconventional approach to selectively eradicate cancer cells, while

  5. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaniselvam Kuppusamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  6. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-06-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  7. In vitro and In vivo Studies on Stilbene Analogs as Potential Treatment Agents for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based upon the potential of resveratrol as a cancer chemopreventive agent, 27 stilbenes analogs were synthesized and tested against colon cancer cell line HT-29. Among these compounds, amino derivative (Z)-4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) aniline (4), (Z)-methyl 4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) benzoate (6) and (Z)-1...

  8. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A; Vovk, Mykhaylo V; Mel& #x27; nychenko, Nina V; Sukach, Volodymyr A

    2012-10-23

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  9. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Vovk, Mykhaylo V.; Mel' nychenko, Nina V.; Sukach, Volodymyr A.

    2012-08-14

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  10. New phytopharmaceutical anti-breast cancer formulations: immunoliposomes containing extra virgin olive oil polyphenols

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolosi, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil has compounds that provide health benefits, including the prevention and treatment of diseases. Among olive oil compounds, the phenolic fraction has received considerable attention in recent years. Most common problems are poor absorption, low half-life, due to rapid clearance and inactivation by metabolic enzymes. The development of suitable drug delivery systems and, in particular, of liposomes and immunoliposomes, may be an appropriate strategy for the effective administratio...

  11. Identification of Cellular Binding Sites for a Novel Human Anti-Breast Cancer Peptide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeFreest, Lori

    2003-01-01

    .... A logical first step in this process is to identify the receptor for COP. We have developed and optimized an affinity chromatography procedure to isolate cellular proteins which bind to COP by linking COP to an Affi Gel 10 column...

  12. Combination of chemotherapy and cancer stem cell targeting agents: Preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Atkinson, Katharine; Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-28

    The cancer stem cell model claims that the initiation, maintenance, and growth of a tumor are driven by a small population of cancer cells termed cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells possess a variety of phenotypes associated with therapeutic resistance and often cause recurrence of the diseases. Several strategies have been investigated to target cancer stem cells in a variety of cancers, such as blocking one or more self-renewal signaling pathways, reducing the expression of drug efflux and ATP-binding cassette efflux transporters, modulating epigenetic aberrations, and promoting cancer stem cell differentiation. A number of cell and animal studies strongly support the potential benefits of combining chemotherapeutic drugs with cancer stem cell targeting agents. Clinical trials are still underway to address the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of combination treatment. This mini-review provides an updated discussion of these preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Flavonoids as Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Agents Against Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Cabrera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present review is to study the relationship between flavonoids and lung cancer, proposing that their regular consumption in Western diets could be beneficial for protecting patients against lung cancer. An extensive search of the scientific literature was performed in the following electronic specialized databases (PubMed central (PMC-NBCI, Elsevier Journal, SciELO Spain, Scirus, Science Direct, including studies in animals, cells, and humans, in order to establish the effect of flavonoids in the prevention and development of lung cancer. Although in vitro and animal studies show the potential ability of flavonoids to act against different types of cancers, especially against lung cancers, the diverse results reported within epidemiological studies, together with the lack of experiments in humans, are the major factors in limiting making dietary recommendations based on scientific evidence for the management of patients with lung cancer. Therefore, the authors of the present study recommend following the dietary health practice guidelines which promotes the consumption of food enriched in flavonoids and reflects the current state of knowledge of an effective and appropriate diet in lung cancer patients.Erratum in: Rev Esp Nutr Hum Diet. 2013;17(2:91-92Link: http://www.renhyd.org/index.php/renhyd/article/view/6/17

  14. Prodigiosins as anti cancer agents: living upto their name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R; Chander, R; Sainis, K B

    2009-01-01

    Prodigiosins are a family of bright red colored bacterial pigment and derive their name from the miraculous (prodigious) events associated with their occurrence. They indeed seem to be living upto their name as a host of activities such as anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-cancer and immunosuppressive have been associated with them. Out of these, immunosuppressive and anti-cancer activity has received more importance as it has a clinical promise. Prodigiosins, isolated mostly from Gram negative bacteria are characterized by a common pyrryldipyrrylmethene structure with varying side chains. The review discusses the mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activity of this class of compounds. In vitro, prodigiosins have been shown to primarily target the cancer cells independently of the p53 status while little or no effect has been observed on normal cells. In addition, prodigiosins are effective in cancer cells with multidrug resistance phenotype and defects in the apoptotic pathways. These make prodigiosins attractive candidates for further development. Though the molecular targets of prodigiosins have not been clearly defined, they have been found to target different signaling pathways possibly through induction of DNA double strand breaks and/ or neutralization of pH gradients leading to changes in cell cycle proteins and apoptosis. The review will discuss the recent findings related to the mechanism involved in the anti-cancer activity of this class of molecules.

  15. Chemopreventive Agents and Inhibitors of Cancer Hallmarks: May Citrus Offer New Perspectives?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santa Cirmi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and vegetables have long been recognized as potentially important in the prevention of cancer risk. Thus, scientific interest in nutrition and cancer has grown over time, as shown by increasing number of experimental studies about the relationship between diet and cancer development. This review attempts to provide an insight into the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits, with a focus on their bioactive compounds, elucidating the main cellular and molecular mechanisms through which they may protect against cancer. Scientific literature was selected for this review with the aim of collecting the relevant experimental evidence for the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits and their flavonoids. The findings discussed in this review strongly support their potential as anti-cancer agents, and may represent a scientific basis to develop nutraceuticals, food supplements, or complementary and alternative drugs in a context of a multi-target pharmacological strategy in the oncology.

  16. Chemopreventive Agents and Inhibitors of Cancer Hallmarks: May Citrus Offer New Perspectives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirmi, Santa; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Lombardo, Giovanni E; Maugeri, Alessandro; Calapai, Gioacchino; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Navarra, Michele

    2016-11-04

    Fruits and vegetables have long been recognized as potentially important in the prevention of cancer risk. Thus, scientific interest in nutrition and cancer has grown over time, as shown by increasing number of experimental studies about the relationship between diet and cancer development. This review attempts to provide an insight into the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits, with a focus on their bioactive compounds, elucidating the main cellular and molecular mechanisms through which they may protect against cancer. Scientific literature was selected for this review with the aim of collecting the relevant experimental evidence for the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits and their flavonoids. The findings discussed in this review strongly support their potential as anti-cancer agents, and may represent a scientific basis to develop nutraceuticals, food supplements, or complementary and alternative drugs in a context of a multi-target pharmacological strategy in the oncology.

  17. Folic acid as a cancer-preventing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, E

    1995-09-01

    Higher intakes of folic acid-rich foods such as vegetables, legumes, and whole grains are associated with lower incidence of carcinomas in international comparisons and case-control studies. Deficiency of folic acid in experimental studies causes DNA damage that resembles the DNA damage seen in cancer cells. The requirement for folic acid in DNA synthesis and DNA methylation provides a plausible mechanism for a mutagenic effect of a low-folate diet. It is suggested that cancer can be initiated by DNA damage that results from folic acid deficiency. The relatively low level of folic acid in North American diets might be the underlying reason for high rates of many cancers in North America.

  18. Cancers related to viral agents that have a direct role in carcinogenesis: pathological and diagnostic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Antonino; De Paoli, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has recently reassessed the carcinogenicity of the biological agents classified as 'carcinogenic to humans'. Among the biological agents having a direct role in carcinogenesis, Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus and human papillomavirus contribute to a variety of malignancies worldwide in humans including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, several types of lymphomas, genital tract carcinomas and Kaposi's sarcoma. The authors review the current knowledge on cancers that have been attributed to Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus and human papillomavirus looking at the pathological classification of these cancers and description of the implicated viruses, highlighting a wide range of pathological and virological diagnostic techniques. This review also focuses on the new oncological scenario ahead, once strategies against carcinogenic infectious agents are found to be effective.

  19. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Asfar S

    2013-01-01

    “ Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24358870

  20. New cancer cells apoptosis agents: Fluorinated aza-heterocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prima, D. O.; Baev, D. S.; Vorontsova, E. V.; Frolova, T. S.; Bagryanskaya, I. Yu.; Slizhov, Yu. G.; Tolstikova, T. G.; Makarov, A. Yu.; Zibarev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Fluorinated benzo-fused 1,3-diazoles, 1,2,3-triazoles, 1,2,5-thia/selenadiazoles and 1,4-diazines were synthesized and tried for cytotoxicity towards the Hep2 (laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma) cells. The diazoles, triazoles and selenadiazoles were cytotoxic with IC50 = 2.2-26.4 µM and induced the cells apoptosis at concentrations C = 1-25 µM. At the same time, they were nontoxic towards normal cells. Due to this, these scaffolds were used in the computer-aided molecular design of new antitumor agents. Particularly, novel 1,2,3-triazole and 1,3-diazole derivatives for the binding site of the PAS domain of the transcription factor HIF were designed and some of them synthesized for further study. Overall, new anticancer agents featuring apoptotic activity are suggested.

  1. Benzofuran as a promising scaffold for the synthesis of antimicrobial and antibreast cancer agents: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadamali Khodarahmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzofuran as an important heterocyclic compound is extensively found in natural products as well as synthetic materials. Since benzofuran drivatives display a diverse array of pharmacological activities, an interest in developing new biologically active agents from benzofuran is still under consideration. This review highlights recent findings on biological activities of benzofuran derivatives as antimicrobial and antibreast cancer agents and lays emphasis on the importance of benzofurans as a major source for drug design and development.

  2. Development of Antidepressants as Novel Agents to Treat Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ (Leave blank) Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0211 TITLE: Development of Antidepressants as Novel Agents to Treat Small Cell Lung...DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2013 - 31 Jul 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Antidepressants as Novel Agents to Treat Small Cell Lung Cancer 5a... antidepressants and related molecules potently induce apoptosis in both chemonaïve and chemoresistant SCLC cells. The candidate drugs activate stress pathways

  3. Antibody-Based Cancer Therapy : Successful Agents and Novel Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, D; Choi, G; de Bruyn, M; Wiersma, V R; Bremer, E; Galluzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio

    2017-01-01

    Since their discovery, antibodies have been viewed as ideal candidates or "magic bullets" for use in targeted therapy in the fields of cancer, autoimmunity, and chronic inflammatory disorders. A wave of antibody-dedicated research followed, which resulted in the clinical approval of a first

  4. Nanobodies As Novel Agents for Targeting Angiogenesis in Solid Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghaye Arezumand

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid cancers are dependent on angiogenesis for sustenance. The FDA approval of Bevacizumab in 2004 inspired many scientists to develop more inhibitors of angiogenesis. Although several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are being administered to successfully combat various pathologies, the complexity and large size of mAbs seem to narrow the therapeutic applications. To improve the performance of cancer therapeutics, including those blocking tumor angiogenesis, attractive strategies such as miniaturization of the antibodies have been introduced. Nanobodies (Nbs, small single-domain antigen-binding antibody fragments, are becoming promising therapeutic and diagnostic proteins in oncology due to their favorable unique structural and functional properties. This review focuses on the potential and state of the art of Nbs to inhibit the angiogenic process for therapy and the use of labeled Nbs for non-invasive in vivo imaging of the tumors.

  5. Tanshinones as Effective Therapeutic Agents for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    on Multiple Targets. Bio-Pearl River Forum and the 14th Annual Conference of Chinese Biopharmaceutical Association, Guangzhou, China, 2009 (3) Gong...prostate cancer research. The use of plants for medicinal purposes is as old as human history. All traditional and indigenous healing sys- tems used...all, traditional medical systems rely primarily on botanicals as a mainstay of therapy or prevention. Plants and other botanicals have also been the

  6. Glucose-lowering agents and the patterns of risk for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Staa, T P; Patel, D; Gallagher, A M

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recent studies suggesting an increased cancer risk with glucose-lowering agents have received widespread publicity. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the comparability in underlying cancer risk and patterns of cancer risk over time with different glucose-lowering agents....... RESULTS: A total of 206,940 patients was identified. There was no difference in cancer risk and quartile for HbA(1c) value. There were differences in cancer incidence in the first 6 months after starting treatment (adjusted relative rate of 0.83 [95% CI 0.70, 0.99] with thiazolidinediones, 1.34 [95% CI 1.......77 [95% CI 0.56, 1.07] and 0.60 [95% CI 0.36, 1.02], respectively, for 6-24, 25-60 and >60 months). CONCLUSIONS: These findings do not provide evidence of either beneficial or adverse effects of glucose-lowering agents on cancer risk and are consistent with changes in diabetes treatment in the few months...

  7. Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system for breast cancer risk assessment and insurance premium assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatari, Farzaneh; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Sabahi, Ahmad

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present an agent-based system for distributed risk assessment of breast cancer development employing fuzzy and probabilistic computing. The proposed fuzzy multi agent system consists of multiple fuzzy agents that benefit from fuzzy set theory to demonstrate their soft information (linguistic information). Fuzzy risk assessment is quantified by two linguistic variables of high and low. Through fuzzy computations, the multi agent system computes the fuzzy probabilities of breast cancer development based on various risk factors. By such ranking of high risk and low risk fuzzy probabilities, the multi agent system (MAS) decides whether the risk of breast cancer development is high or low. This information is then fed into an insurance premium adjuster in order to provide preventive decision making as well as to make appropriate adjustment of insurance premium and risk. This final step of insurance analysis also provides a numeric measure to demonstrate the utility of the approach. Furthermore, actual data are gathered from two hospitals in Mashhad during 1 year. The results are then compared with a fuzzy distributed approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ent-Rosane and abietane diterpenoids as cancer chemopreventive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Marvin J; Reyes, Carolina P; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Hayashi, Hirotaka; Tokuda, Harukuni; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2011-04-01

    Two ent-rosane- (cuzcol, 1 and 6-dehydroxycuzcol, 2) and a abietatriene- (salvadoriol, 3) type diterpenoids have been isolated from Maytenus cuzcoina and Crossopetalum uragoga, respectively, along with five known diterpene compounds (4-8). Their stereostructures have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques, and computational data. The absolute configuration of cuzcol was determined by application of Riguera ester procedure. This is the first instance of isolation of ent-rosane diterpenoids from species of the Celastraceae. The isolated diterpenes were found to be potent anti-tumour-promoter agents, and carnosol (7) also showed a remarkable chemopreventive effect in an in vivo two-stage carcinogenesis model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Systematic review of anti-inflammatory agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Bowen, Joanne; Di Palma, Mario; Kouloulias, Vassilios E.; Niscola, Pasquale; Riesenbeck, Dorothea; Stokman, Monique; Tissing, Wim; Yeoh, Eric; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this project was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of anti-inflammatory agents for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients. Materials and methods A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study

  10. Sea Cucumbers Metabolites as Potent Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveena B. Janakiram

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sea cucumbers and their extracts have gained immense popularity and interest among researchers and nutritionists due to their nutritive value, potential health benefits, and use in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. Many areas of the world use sea cucumbers in traditional foods and folk medicine. Though the actual components and their specific functions still remain to be investigated, most sea cucumber extracts are being studied for their anti-inflammatory functions, immunostimulatory properties, and for cancer prevention and treatment. There is large scope for the discovery of additional bioactive, valuable compounds from this natural source. Sea cucumber extracts contain unique components, such as modified triterpene glycosides, sulfated polysaccharides, glycosphingolipids, and esterified phospholipids. Frondanol A5, an isopropyl alcohol/water extract of the enzymatically hydrolyzed epithelia of the edible North Atlantic sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, contains monosulfated triterpenoid glycoside Frondoside A, the disulfated glycoside Frondoside B, the trisulfated glycoside Frondoside C, 12-methyltetradecanoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and fucosylated chondroitin sulfate. We have extensively studied the efficacy of this extract in preventing colon cancer in rodent models. In this review, we discuss the anti-inflammatory, immunostimulatory, and anti-tumor properties of sea cucumber extracts.

  11. Neoflavonoids and tetrahydroquinolones as possible cancer chemopreventive agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Singh, Pragya; Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Marler, Laura E.; Pezzuto, John M.; Negi, Arvind Singh

    2012-01-01

    Several lactone and lactam based neoflavonoids and tetrahydroquinolones were synthesized and evaluated for cancer chemopreventive studies using cell and molecular target based in vitro bioassays, namely NFκB, aromatase, and quinone reductase 1 (QR1). These analogues blocked TNF-α-induced NFκB activation in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values in the range of 0.11–3.2 μM. In addition, compound 8 inhibited aromatase activity with an IC50 value of 12.12 μM and compound 10 affected QR1 induction (IR: 3.6, CD: 19.57 μM). Neoflavonoids 8 and 10 exhibiting good results, can further be optimized for improved therapeutic profiles. However, investigations into the actions of neoflavonoids and tetrahydroquinolones, especially those related to the NFκB signaling pathway, aromatase inhibition, induction of QR1 expression and in vivo studies could provide new insights into the cancer chemopreventive ability of these molecules. PMID:22726671

  12. Evolving perspectives of the role of novel agents in androgen-independent prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Kalmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer presents an intriguing clinical challenge, with a subtle interaction between hormone-responsive and refractory tumor cell elements. The treatment of advanced prostate carcinoma, which had remained stagnant for several decades following the understanding of the link between androgenic stimulation and carcinogenesis, has now started to make steady headway with chemotherapy and targeted approaches. Metastatic prostate cancer is almost always treated with initial androgen deprivation, in various forms. However, despite such treatment androgen-independent prostate cancer cells eventually emerge and progress to threaten life. The therapeutic objectives for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer are to maintain the quality of life and prolong survival. The out-dated nihilistic dogma of deferring chemotherapy until the most advanced stages in advanced prostate cancer is now falling by the wayside with the development of newer effective, tolerable agents.

  13. Ganoderma lucidum Polysaccharides as An Anti-cancer Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohretoglu, Didem; Huang, Shile

    2017-11-13

    The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been used for centuries in Asian countries to treat various diseases and to promote health and longevity. Clinical studies have shown beneficial effects of G. lucidum as an alternative adjuvant therapy in cancer patients without obvious toxicity. G. lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) is the main bioactive component in the water soluble extracts of this mushroom. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has demonstrated that GLP possesses potential anticancer activity through immunomodulatory, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects. Here, we briefly summarize these anticancer effects of GLP and the underlying mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Proteomics of cancer cell lines resistant to microtubule-stabilizing agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Angeletti, Ruth H; Horwitz, Susan Band

    2014-01-01

    was compared with two drug-resistant daughter cell lines, an EpoB-resistant cell line (EpoB8) and an ixabepilone-resistant cell line (Ixab80). All 2D DIGE results were validated by Western blot analyses. A variety of cytoskeletal and cytoskeleton-associated proteins were differentially expressed in drug......Despite the clinical success of microtubule-interacting agents (MIA), a significant challenge for oncologists is the inability to predict the response of individual patients with cancer to these drugs. In the present study, six cell lines were compared by 2D DIGE proteomics to investigate cellular...... resistance to the class of MIAs known as microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSA). The human lung cancer cell line A549 was compared with two drug-resistant daughter cell lines, a taxol-resistant cell line (AT12) and an epothilone B (EpoB)-resistant cell line (EpoB40). The ovarian cancer cell line Hey...

  15. Enhancing the efficacy of cytotoxic agents for cancer therapy using photochemical internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Pinillos Bayona, Alejandra; Moore, Caroline M; Loizidou, Marilena; MacRobert, Alexander J; Woodhams, Josephine H

    2016-03-01

    Photochemical internalisation (PCI) is a technique for improving cellular delivery of certain bioactive agents which are prone to sequestration within endolysosomes. There is a wide range of agents suitable for PCI-based delivery including toxins, oligonucleotides, genes and immunoconjugates which demonstrates the versatility of this technique. The basic mechanism of PCI involves triggering release of the agent from endolysosomes within the target cells using a photosensitiser which is selectively retained with the endolysosomal membranes. Excitation of the photosensitiser by visible light leads to disruption of the membranes via photooxidative damage thereby releasing the agent into the cytosol. This treatment enables the drugs to reach their intended subcellular target more efficiently and improves their efficacy. In this review we summarise the applications of this technique with the main emphasis placed on cancer chemotherapy. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  16. Clinical trials of antioxidants as cancer prevention agents: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael; Bostick, Roberd M; Kucuk, Omer; Jones, Dean P

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the most important human clinical trials of antioxidants as cancer prevention agents conducted to date, provide an overview of currently ongoing studies, and discuss future steps needed to advance research in this field. To date there have been several large (at least 7000 participants) trials testing the efficacy of antioxidant supplements in preventing cancer. The specific agents (diet-derived direct antioxidants and essential components of antioxidant enzymes) tested in those trials included β-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin C, selenium, retinol, zinc, riboflavin, and molybdenum. None of the completed trials produced convincing evidence to justify the use of traditional antioxidant-related vitamins or minerals for cancer prevention. Our search of ongoing trials identified six projects at various stages of completion. Five of those six trials use selenium as the intervention of interest delivered either alone or in combination with other agents. The lack of success to date can be explained by a variety of factors that need to be considered in the next generation research. These factors include lack of good biological rationale for selecting specific agents of interest; limited number of agents tested to date; use of pharmacological, rather than dietary, doses; and insufficient duration of intervention and follow-up. The latter consideration underscores the need for alternative endpoints that are associated with increased risk of neoplasia (i.e., biomarkers of risk), but are detectable prior to tumor occurrence. Although dietary antioxidants are a large and diverse group of compounds, only a small proportion of candidate agents have been tested. In summary, the strategy of focusing on large high-budget studies using cancer incidence as the endpoint and testing a relatively limited number of antioxidant agents has been largely unsuccessful. This lack of success in previous trials should not preclude us from seeking novel

  17. STUDY ON STUDENTS’ AWARENESS CONCERNING ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HAZARDOUS AGENTS OF CANCER RISK AND PREVENTION METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina Cebulska-Wasilewska

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of our study was to assess the level of awareness and knowledge on environmental and occupational risk of cancer and its prevention among Polish students. We were interested also in their sources of knowledge. Methods. Survey, using the questionnaire, was conducted among 1080 respondents, who are or probably will be in their future work, exposed to harmful agents, due to study profile. Results. Students rated their knowledge on environmental and occupational cancer agents and cancer prevention mostly as limited (over 77%. Participation in “Safety Work and Environment” courses did not differentiate their level of cancer risk awareness. 901 students (84% responded to question about specific substances, which may cause cancer. Almost 2% of students indicated none from 10 given agents as carcinogenic. About 34% of respondents pointed all given agents, 39% pointed on 8–9 of them, 5–7 agents 13.2% of surveyed and 9% of them indicated on 1–4 agents. Students were aware of carcinogenic features of radiation, asbestos, cigarettes smoking (93.2–93.8%, benzene, benzo[?]pirene and pesticides (79,2 –83,6%. Less of them declared carcinogenic features of PAHs (75.4%, heavy metals (73.9%, electromagnetic field (64.8% and infections (60.8%. Only 48% of respondents specified possible lowering of the cancer by risk intervention practices. Medical and engineering profile, as well as attendance in courses covering the issues of health safety at work or environment (SWE significantly decreased percentage of respondents who didn’t specified any procedure (but it was still high: 48–62%. Conclusion. Our results demonstrate that most students, only to some extent, are aware of the most well known cancer-causing substances occurrence. Their knowledge is mostly limited and they do not know prevention procedures and ways to lower or eliminate the risk. Therefore the modernization of educational programs and development of more efficient

  18. Highly adaptable triple-negative breast cancer cells as a functional model for testing anticancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance.

  19. Thiol-reducing agents prevent sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Choi, Boyun; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory potential of sulforaphane against cancer has been suggested for different types of cancer, including ovarian cancer. We examined whether this effect is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules related to cell survival and proliferation, in ovarian cancer cells. Sulforaphane at a concentration of 10 μM effectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that activation of MAPK pathways by sulforaphane is unlikely to mediate sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Sulforaphane did not generate significant levels of intracellular ROS. Pretreatment with thiol reducers, but not ROS scavengers, prevented sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Furthermore, diamide, a thiol-oxidizing agent, enhanced both growth inhibition and cell death induced by sulforaphane, suggesting that the effect of sulforaphane on cell growth may be related to oxidation of protein thiols or change in cellular redox status. Our data indicate that supplementation with thiol-reducing agents should be avoided when sulforaphane is used to treat cancer.

  20. Study of anti-cancer effects of chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithra, K.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Prakasarao, Aruna; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of the variations in the spectroscopic patterns of the key bio molecules using Native fluorescence spectroscopy, without exogenous labels, has emerged as a new trend in the characterization of the Physiological State and the Discrimination of Pathological from normal conditions of cells and tissues as the relative concentration of these bio-molecules serve as markers in evaluating the presence of cancer in the body. The aim of this unique study is to use these features of Optical spectroscopy in monitoring the behavior of cells to treatment and thus to evaluate the response to Chemotherapeutic agents and Radiation in Breast Cancer Patients. The results of the study conducted using NFS of Human blood plasma of biopsy proved Breast Cancer patients undergoing treatment are promising, enhancing the scope of Native fluorescence Spectroscopy emerging as a promising technology in the evaluation of Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancer Patients.

  1. Targeting inflammatory pathways by dietary agents for prevention and treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infections, obesity, alcohol, tobacco, radiation, environmental pollutants and high-calorie diet have been recognized as major risk factors for the most common types of cancer. All these risk factors are linked to cancer through inflammation. While acute inflammation that persists for short-term mediates host defense against infections, chronic inflammation that lasts for long-term can predispose the host to various chronic illnesses, including cancer. Linkage between cancer and inflammation is indicated by numerous lines of evidence; first, transcription factors NF-kB and STAT3, two major pathways for inflammation, are activated by most cancer risk factors; second, an inflammatory condition precedes most cancers; third, NFkB and STAT3 are constitutively active in most cancers; fourth, hypoxia and acidic conditions found in solid tumors activate NF-kB; fifth, chemotherapeutic agents and γ-irradiation activate NF-kB and lead to chemoresistance and radioresistance; sixth, most gene products linked to inflammation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis are regulated by NF-kB and STAT3; seventh, suppression of NF-kB and STAT3 inhibits the proliferation and invasion of tumors; and eighth, most chemopreventive agents mediate their effects through inhibition of NF-kB and STAT3 activation pathways. Thus, the suppression of these proinflammatory pathways may provide opportunities for both prevention and treatment of cancer. We will discuss the potential of nutraceuticals derived from spices and from traditional Indian medicine in suppression of inflammatory pathways and their role inprevention and therapy of cancer. (author)

  2. Combination of nanotechnology with vascular targeting agents for effective cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanban-Esfahlan, Rana; Seidi, Khaled; Banimohamad-Shotorbani, Behnaz; Jahanban-Esfahlan, Ali; Yousefi, Bahman

    2018-04-01

    As a young science, nanotechnology promptly integrated into the current oncology practice. Accordingly, various nanostructure particles were developed to reduce drug toxicity and allow the targeted delivery of various diagnostic and therapeutic compounds to the cancer cells. New sophisticated nanosystems constantly emerge to improve the performance of current anticancer modalities. Targeting tumor vasculature is an attractive strategy to fight cancer. Though the idea was swiftly furthered from basic science to the clinic, targeting tumor vasculature had a limited potential in patients, where tumors relapse due to the development of multiple drug resistance and metastasis. The aim of this review is to discuss the advantages of nanosystem incorporation with various vascular targeting agents, including (i) endogen anti-angiogenic agents; (ii) inhibitors of angiogenesis-related growth factors; (iii) inhibitors of tyrosine kinase receptors; (iv) inhibitors of angiogenesis-related signaling pathways; (v) inhibitors of tumor endothelial cell-associated markers; and (vi) tumor vascular disrupting agents. We also review the efficacy of nanostructures as natural vascular targeting agents. The efficacy of each approach in cancer therapy is further discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Preclinical Evaluation of Antimycin A as a Potential Antilung Cancer Stem Cell Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Tai Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance and tumor recurrence are major obstacles in treating lung cancer patients. Accumulating evidence considers lung cancer stem cells (CSCs as the major contributor to these clinical challenges. Agents that can target lung CSCs could potentially provide a more effective treatment than traditional chemotherapy. Here, we utilized the side-population (SP method to isolate lung CSCs from A549 and PC-9 cell lines. Subsequently, a high throughput platform, connectivity maps (CMAPs, was used to identify potential anti-CSC agents. An antibiotic, antimycin A (AMA, was identified as a top candidate. SP A549 cells exhibited an elevated stemness profile, including Nanog, β-catenin, Sox2, and CD133, and increased self-renewal ability. AMA treatment was found to suppress β-catenin signaling components and tumor sphere formation. Furthermore, AMA treatment decreased the proliferation of gefitinib-resistant PC-9/GR cells and percentage of SP population. AMA demonstrated synergistic suppression of PC-9/GR cell viability when combined with gefitinib. Finally, AMA treatment suppressed tumorigenesis in mice inoculated with A549 SP cells. Collectively, we have identified AMA using CMAP as a novel antilung CSC agent, which acts to downregulate β-catenin signaling. The combination of AMA and targeted therapeutic agents could be considered for overcoming drug resistance and relapse in lung cancer patients.

  4. Development of Lipid-Based Nanoparticles for In Vivo Targeted Delivery of Imaging Agents into Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    targeted therapy. Targeted delivery of a combined imaging and therapy agent to cancer cells is an avenue to develop a new generation of effective and...ligands for targeting HER-2/neu on breast cancer cells . In near future we will test these nanoparticles with SK-BR-3 (HER-2/neu+) and MDA-MD-468 (HER-2/neu-) breast cancer cell lines.

  5. Preclinical therapeutic potential of a nitrosylating agent in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Giri

    Full Text Available This study examines the role of s-nitrosylation in the growth of ovarian cancer using cell culture based and in vivo approaches. Using the nitrosylating agent, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, a physiological nitric oxide molecule, we show that GSNO treatment inhibited proliferation of chemoresponsive and chemoresistant ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, C200, SKVO3, ID8, OVCAR3, OVCAR4, OVCAR5, OVCAR7, OVCAR8, OVCAR10, PE01 and PE04 in a dose dependent manner. GSNO treatment abrogated growth factor (HB-EGF induced signal transduction including phosphorylation of Akt, p42/44 and STAT3, which are known to play critical roles in ovarian cancer growth and progression. To examine the therapeutic potential of GSNO in vivo, nude mice bearing intra-peritoneal xenografts of human A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line (2 × 10(6 were orally administered GSNO at the dose of 1 mg/kg body weight. Daily oral administration of GSNO significantly attenuated tumor mass (p<0.001 in the peritoneal cavity compared to vehicle (phosphate buffered saline treated group at 4 weeks. GSNO also potentiated cisplatin mediated tumor toxicity in an A2780 ovarian carcinoma nude mouse model. GSNO's nitrosylating ability was reflected in the induced nitrosylation of various known proteins including NFκB p65, Akt and EGFR. As a novel finding, we observed that GSNO also induced nitrosylation with inverse relationship at tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of STAT3, an established player in chemoresistance and cell proliferation in ovarian cancer and in cancer in general. Overall, our study underlines the significance of S-nitrosylation of key cancer promoting proteins in modulating ovarian cancer and proposes the therapeutic potential of nitrosylating agents (like GSNO for the treatment of ovarian cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs.

  6. Metal ion cage complexes as imaging agents for cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Bartolo, N.; Smith, S.; Sargeson, A.

    2000-01-01

    , food intake and hunching). Radiotoxic effects were monitored at predetermined time points (2 days, 1, 2, 3, 4 weeks, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 months). Indicators for the endpoint of the study were body weight loss > 20 %, rapid weight loss of > 10 % overnight, ulceration of tumour, limitation of normal behaviour (e.g. ability to feed or drink) and tumour size > 10 x 10 mm (UK Cancer Council). A significant extension of mouse life was achieved with doses of greater than 20 MBq (from 25 to 46 days for 30 MBq) with no major radiotoxic effects. Complexation of copper by SarAr is extremely fast making the production of 64 Cu-SarArB-72.3 immunoconjugate attractive for kit formulation and applicable for use in Nuclear Medicine Departments. Biological studies show the radioimmunoconjugate is stable in vivo and able to induce a therapeutic effect in tumour bearing animals. The shorter half life of 64 Cu and the MIRDOSE calculations support the potential of 64 Cu for use in treatment on an outpatient basis

  7. Targeted nanodiamonds as phenotype-specific photoacoustic contrast agents for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M Laird

    2015-03-01

    The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly targeted contrast agent for high-resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with PEG to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-HER2 peptide with a final nanoparticle size of approximately 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2-positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near-infrared laser. PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 h. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are nontoxic. PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high-resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype-specific monitoring of cancer growth.

  8. Modern dose-finding designs for cancer phase I trials drug combinations and molecularly targeted agents

    CERN Document Server

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Daimon, Takashi; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2018-01-01

    This book deals with advanced methods for adaptive phase I dose-finding clinical trials for combination of two agents and molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) in oncology. It provides not only methodological aspects of the dose-finding methods, but also software implementations and practical considerations in applying these complex methods to real cancer clinical trials. Thus, the book aims to furnish researchers in biostatistics and statistical science with a good summary of recent developments of adaptive dose-finding methods as well as providing practitioners in biostatistics and clinical investigators with advanced materials for designing, conducting, monitoring, and analyzing adaptive dose-finding trials. The topics in the book are mainly related to cancer clinical trials, but many of those topics are potentially applicable or can be extended to trials for other diseases. The focus is mainly on model-based dose-finding methods for two kinds of phase I trials. One is clinical trials with combinations of tw...

  9. Natural Forms of Vitamin E as Effective Agents for Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qing

    2017-11-01

    Initial research on vitamin E and cancer has focused on α-tocopherol (αT), but recent clinical studies on cancer-preventive effects of αT supplementation have shown disappointing results, which has led to doubts about the role of vitamin E, including different vitamin E forms, in cancer prevention. However, accumulating mechanistic and preclinical animal studies show that other forms of vitamin E, such as γ-tocopherol (γT), δ-tocopherol (δT), γ-tocotrienol (γTE), and δ-tocotrienol (δTE), have far superior cancer-preventive activities than does αT. These vitamin E forms are much stronger than αT in inhibiting multiple cancer-promoting pathways, including cyclo-oxygenase (COX)- and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX)-catalyzed eicosanoids, and transcription factors such as nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3). These vitamin E forms, but not αT, cause pro-death or antiproliferation effects in cancer cells via modulating various signaling pathways, including sphingolipid metabolism. Unlike αT, these vitamin E forms are quickly metabolized to various carboxychromanols including 13'-carboxychromanols, which have even stronger anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects than some vitamin precursors. Consistent with mechanistic findings, γT, δT, γTE, and δTE, but not αT, have been shown to be effective for preventing the progression of various types of cancer in preclinical animal models. This review focuses on cancer-preventive effects and mechanisms of γT, δT, γTE, and δTE in cells and preclinical models and discusses current progress in clinical trials. The existing evidence strongly indicates that these lesser-known vitamin E forms are effective agents for cancer prevention or as adjuvants for improving prevention, therapy, and control of cancer. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Mitochondrial complex II, a novel target for anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klučková, Katarína; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1827, č. 5 (2013), s. 552-564 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1937; GA ČR GAP301/12/1851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrion * Complex II * Anti- cancer agent Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  11. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian J. Raffoul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted.

  12. Novel MUC1 aptamer selectively delivers cytotoxic agent to cancer cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Hu

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is a primary treatment for cancer, but its efficacy is often limited by the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Targeted drug delivery may reduce the non-specific toxicity of chemotherapy by selectively directing anticancer drugs to tumor cells. MUC1 protein is an attractive target for tumor-specific drug delivery owning to its overexpression in most adenocarcinomas. In this study, a novel MUC1 aptamer is exploited as the targeting ligand for carrying doxorubicin (Dox to cancer cells. We developed an 86-base DNA aptamer (MA3 that bound to a peptide epitope of MUC1 with a K(d of 38.3 nM and minimal cross reactivity to albumin. Using A549 lung cancer and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as MUC1-expressing models, MA3 was found to preferentially bind to MUC1-positive but not MUC1-negative cells. An aptamer-doxorubicin complex (Apt-Dox was formulated by intercalating doxorubicin into the DNA structure of MA3. Apt-Dox was found capable of carrying doxorubicin into MUC1-positive tumor cells, while significantly reducing the drug intake by MUC1-negative cells. Moreover, Apt-Dox retained the efficacy of doxorubicin against MUC1-positive tumor cells, but lowered the toxicity to MUC1-negative cells (P<0.01. The results suggest that the MUC1 aptamer may have potential utility as a targeting ligand for selective delivery of cytotoxic agent to MUC1-expressing tumors.

  13. Ultrasound molecular imaging of ovarian cancer with CA-125 targeted nanobubble contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong; Hernandez, Christopher; Yuan, Hai-Xia; Lilly, Jacob; Kota, Pavan; Zhou, Haoyan; Wu, Hanping; Exner, Agata A

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound is frequently utilized in diagnosis of gynecologic malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Because epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is often characterized by overexpression of cancer antigen 125 (CA-125), ultrasound contrast agents able to target this molecular signature could be a promising complementary strategy. In this work, we demonstrate application of CA-125-targeted echogenic lipid and surfactant-stabilized nanobubbles imaged with standard clinical contrast harmonic ultrasound for imaging of CA-125 positive OVCAR-3 tumors in mice. Surface functionalization of the nanobubbles with a CA-125 antibody achieved rapid significantly (P CA-125 negative SKOV-3 tumors. Targeted nanobubbles also exhibited increased tumor retention and prolonged echogenicity compared to untargeted nanobubbles. Data suggest that ultrasound molecular imaging using CA-125 antibody-conjugated nanobubbles may contribute to improved diagnosis of EOC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tea: age-old beverage as an effective cancer chemopreventive agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine George

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the major public health problem, causing approximately 7 million deaths every year worldwide. The existing treatment approaches and surgical techniques have not been able to cope effectively with this dreaded disease. Because of this, the concept of chemoprevention is now considered a valid approach to reduce the incidence of cancer. There is convincing epidemiological and experimental evidence to show that dietary polyphenolic plant-derived compounds have cancer preventive properties. Based on evidence from in vitro, in vivo data and epidemiological studies, tea has received considerable attention over recent years for reducing the risk of several cancers. Much of the cancer preventive effects of tea, and in particular green tea, appear to be mediated by the polyphenols they contain. In addition to inhibiting mutagenesis and proliferation, tea is relatively non-toxic, is low cost, and can be taken orally or as a part of the daily diet. Therefore it is logical that future clinical studies should focus on examining the efficacy of tea and its active constituents, such as epigallocatechin- 3-gallate (EGCG and theaflavins (TFs, in chemoprevention as an alternative to pharmacological agents. In this review, we address the use of tea and its constituents for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Further mechanistic and dose-response studies will help us to understand the effects of tea consumption on human carcinogenesis.

  15. Genetically Engineered Vaccinia Viruses As Agents for Cancer Treatment, Imaging, and Transgene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in technology, the formidable challenge of treating cancer, especially if advanced, still remains with no significant improvement in survival rates, even with the most common forms of cancer. Oncolytic viral therapies have shown great promise for the treatment of various cancers, with the possible advantages of stronger treatment efficacy compared to conventional therapy due to higher tumor selectivity, and less toxicity. They are able to preferentially and selectively propagate in cancer cells, consequently destroying tumor tissue mainly via cell lysis, while leaving non-cancerous tissues unharmed. Several wild-type and genetically engineered vaccinia virus (VACV strains have been tested in both preclinical and clinical trials with promising results. Greater understanding and advancements in molecular biology have enabled the generation of genetically engineered oncolytic viruses for safer and more efficacious treatment, including arming VACVs with cytokines and immunostimulatory molecules, anti-angiogenic agents, and enzyme prodrug therapy, in addition to combining VACVs with conventional external and systemic radiotherapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and other virus strains. Furthermore, novel oncolytic vaccinia virus strains have been generated that express reporter genes for the tracking and imaging of viral therapy and monitoring of therapeutic response. Further study is needed to unlock VACVs’ full potential as part of the future of cancer therapy.

  16. Targeting the centriolar replication factor STIL synergizes with DNA damaging agents for treatment of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Noa; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Brown, Kevin R.; Checa-Rodriguez, Cintia; Castiel, Asher; Moskovich, Oren; Zarfati, Giulia; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Levy-Barda, Adva; Jiang, Dahai; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Pradeep, Sunila; van Praag, Yael; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; David, Ahuvit; Novikov, Ilya; Huertas, Pablo; Rottapel, Robert; Sood, Anil K.; Izraeli, Shai

    2017-01-01

    Advanced ovarian cancer is an incurable disease. Thus, novel therapies are required. We wished to identify new therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. ShRNA screen performed in 42 ovarian cancer cell lines identified the centriolar replication factor STIL as an essential gene for ovarian cancer cells. This was verified in-vivo in orthotopic human ovarian cancer mouse models. STIL depletion by administration of siRNA in neutral liposomes resulted in robust anti-tumor effect that was further enhanced in combination with cisplatin. Consistent with this finding, STIL depletion enhanced the extent of DNA double strand breaks caused by DNA damaging agents. This was associated with centrosomal depletion, ongoing genomic instability and enhanced formation of micronuclei. Interestingly, the ongoing DNA damage was not associated with reduced DNA repair. Indeed, we observed that depletion of STIL enhanced canonical homologous recombination repair and increased BRCA1 and RAD51 foci in response to DNA double strand breaks. Thus, inhibition of STIL significantly enhances the efficacy of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic drugs in treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:28423708

  17. Early Access to Investigational Agents through the National Cancer Institute's Treatment Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tali M; Boron, Matthew J

    2012-12-01

    The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD), as an investigational new drug sponsor, may provide early access to investigational agents for treatment use. Until recently, the NCI had 3 protocol mechanisms for distributing investigational agents through the Treatment Referral Center (TRC), a service provided by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch (PMB) within the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program of the NCI's DCTD. The first mechanism is the Group C protocol, the second mechanism is the TRC protocol, and the third, and most common, mechanism is the Special Exception protocol. The purpose of this article is to describe and report on the activities of the TRC at the PMB since 2000 through the end of 2011. Capital Technology Information Services performed PMB data mining for all treatment protocols from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Requests to PMB were sorted in spreadsheet format by disposition, either as referred, approved, or denied, and were counted by type, either as Group C, TRC, or Special Exception. More than 60% of requests were either referred or approved between 2000 and 2011. The peak number of requests was 1664 between 2000 and 2011 and occurred in 2003. The peak was mostly a result of Special Exception requests; however, more than 400 TRC requests and 20 Group C requests were approved that year. The total number of requests dropped precipitously after 2003, and since 2008 have totaled fewer than 50 annually. All Group C and TRC protocols were completed by March 2006. The lowest number of treatment use requests occurred in 2011. Providing agents through the Special Exception mechanism is one way that promising investigational new drug agents can get to patients with life-threatening illnesses. In general, the PMB's TRC is a useful drug information resource for sites conducting clinical research in oncology, and it provides a valuable service to the oncology community.

  18. Comparing stochastic differential equations and agent-based modelling and simulation for early-stage cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Grazziela P; Siebers, Peer-Olaf; Owen, Markus R; Reps, Jenna; Aickelin, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    There is great potential to be explored regarding the use of agent-based modelling and simulation as an alternative paradigm to investigate early-stage cancer interactions with the immune system. It does not suffer from some limitations of ordinary differential equation models, such as the lack of stochasticity, representation of individual behaviours rather than aggregates and individual memory. In this paper we investigate the potential contribution of agent-based modelling and simulation when contrasted with stochastic versions of ODE models using early-stage cancer examples. We seek answers to the following questions: (1) Does this new stochastic formulation produce similar results to the agent-based version? (2) Can these methods be used interchangeably? (3) Do agent-based models outcomes reveal any benefit when compared to the Gillespie results? To answer these research questions we investigate three well-established mathematical models describing interactions between tumour cells and immune elements. These case studies were re-conceptualised under an agent-based perspective and also converted to the Gillespie algorithm formulation. Our interest in this work, therefore, is to establish a methodological discussion regarding the usability of different simulation approaches, rather than provide further biological insights into the investigated case studies. Our results show that it is possible to obtain equivalent models that implement the same mechanisms; however, the incapacity of the Gillespie algorithm to retain individual memory of past events affects the similarity of some results. Furthermore, the emergent behaviour of ABMS produces extra patters of behaviour in the system, which was not obtained by the Gillespie algorithm.

  19. Agent Orange exposure, Vietnam War veterans, and the risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamie, Karim; DeVere White, Ralph W; Lee, Dennis; Ok, Joon-Ha; Ellison, Lars M

    2008-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that Agent Orange exposure increases the risk of developing several soft tissue malignancies. Federally funded studies, now nearly a decade old, indicated that there was only a weak association between exposure and the subsequent development of prostate cancer. Because Vietnam War veterans are now entering their 60s, the authors reexamined this association by measuring the relative risk of prostate cancer among a cohort of men who were stratified as either exposed or unexposed to Agent Orange between the years 1962 and 1971 and who were followed during the interval between 1998 and 2006. All Vietnam War era veterans who receive their care in the Northern California Veteran Affairs Health System were stratified as either exposed (n=6214) or unexposed (n=6930) to Agent Orange. Strata-specific incidence rates of prostate cancer (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision code 185.0) were calculated. Differences in patient and disease characteristics (age, race, smoking history, family history, body mass index, finasteride exposure, prebiopsy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, clinical and pathologic stage, and Gleason score) were assessed with chi-square tests, t tests, a Cox proportional hazards model, and multivariate logistic regression. Twice as many exposed men were identified with prostate cancer (239 vs 124 unexposed men, respectively; odds ratio [OR], 2.19; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.75-2.75). This increased risk also was observed in a Cox proportional hazards model from the time of exposure to diagnosis (hazards ratio [HR], 2.87; 95% CI, 2.31-3.57). The mean time from exposure to diagnosis was 407 months. Agent Orange-exposed men were diagnosed at a younger age (59.7 years; 95% CI, 58.9-60.5 years) compared with unexposed men (62.2 years; 95% CI, 60.8-63.6 years), had a 2-fold increase in the proportion of Gleason scores 8 through 10 (21.8%; 95% CI, 16.5%-27%) compared with unexposed men (10.5%; 95% CI, 5

  20. Hypomethylating agents synergize with irinotecan to improve response to chemotherapy in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Sharma

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In the metastatic setting, the majority of patients respond to initial therapies but eventually develop resistance and progress. In this study, we test the hypothesis that priming with epigenetic therapy sensitizes CRC cell lines, which were previously resistant to subsequent chemotherapeutic agents. When multiple CRC cell lines are first exposed to 500 nM of the DNA demethylating agent, 5-aza-cytidine (AZA in-vitro, and the cells then established as in-vivo xenografts in untreated NOD-SCID mice; there is an enhanced response to cytotoxic chemotherapy with agents commonly used in CRC treatment. For irinotecan (IRI, growth diminished by 16-62 fold as assessed, by both proliferation (IC50 and anchorage independent cell growth soft agar assays. Treatment of resistant HCT116 cell line along with in-vivo, for CRC line xenografts, AZA plus IRI again exhibits this synergistic response with significant improvement in survival and tumor regression in the mice. Genome-wide expression correlates changes in pathways for cell adhesion and DNA repair with the above responses. A Phase 1/2 clinical trial testing this concept is already underway testing the clinical efficacy of this concept in IRI resistant, metastatic CRC (NCT01896856.

  1. The potential for substance P antagonists as anti-cancer agents in brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer treatment and diagnosis, the prognosis for patients with CNS tumours remains extremely poor. This is, in part, due to the difficulty in completely removing tumours surgically, and also because of the presence of the blood brain barrier, which can prevent the entry of chemotherapeutic agents typically used in cancer treatment. Despite the presence of the blood brain barrier, tumour cells are capable of entering and colonising the brain to form secondary brain tumours. Additionally, tumour related disruption of the blood brain barrier is associated with the clinical presentation of many patients, with accompanying increases in intracranial pressure due, in part, to the development of vasogenic oedema. Vasogenic oedema results because the newly formed angiogenic vessels within brain tumours do not retain the highly selective properties of the blood brain barrier, and thus allow for the extravasation of plasma proteins and water into the brain parenchyma. Tachykinins, and in particular substance P, have been implicated in blood brain barrier disruption and the genesis of cerebral oedema in other CNS insults via a process known as neurogenic inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that substance P may play a similar role in CNS tumours. It has been well established that an upregulation of substance P and its receptors occurs in a number of different cancer types, including CNS neoplasms. In addition to disrupting blood brain barrier permeability, substance P and the NK1 receptors facilitate promotion of tumour growth and the development of cerebral oedema. Accordingly, recent patents describe the potential of NK1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer agents suggesting that substance P may provide a novel cancer treatment target. This review will examine the role of substance P in the development of CNS tumours.

  2. Prolactin receptor-mediated internalization of imaging agents detects epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Karthik M.

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic malignant tumors. Diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) presents two main challenges. The first challenge is detecting low volume (prolactin receptor (PRLR) - a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that is over-expressed in moderate to high levels on > 98% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Upon binding of native ligands to PRLR, the ligand:PRLR complex is internalized by cells. By conjugating gadolinium-chelates, molecules normally used as contrast agents diagnostically, to human placental lactogen (hPL), a native ligand of PRLR, we show that MRI becomes highly sensitive and specific for detecting PRLR (+) tumors in a nude mouse model of EOC. We further establish the adaptability of this approach for fluorescence-based imaging techniques using an hPL conjugated Cy5.5 dye. We conclude that molecular imaging of PRLR with hPL-conjugated imaging agents can address the current challenges that limit EOC diagnosis.

  3. Anti-VEGF agents in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC: are they all alike?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif MW

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Wasif Saif GI Oncology Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds and neutralizes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, a key player in the angiogenesis pathway. Despite benefits of bevacizumab in cancer therapy, it is clear that the VEGF pathway is complex, involving multiple isoforms, receptors, and alternative ligands such as VEGF-B, and placental growth factor, which could enable escape from VEGF-A-targeted angiogenesis inhibition. Recently developed therapies have targeted other ligands in the VEGF pathway (eg, aflibercept, known as ziv-aflibercept in the United States, VEGF receptors (eg, ramucirumab, and their tyrosine kinase signaling (ie, tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The goal of the current review was to identify comparative preclinical data for the currently available VEGF-targeted therapies. Sources were compiled using PubMed searches (2007 to 2012, using search terms including, but not limited to: “bevacizumab,” “aflibercept,” “ramucirumab,” and “IMC-18F1.” Two preclinical studies were identified that compared bevacizumab and the newer agent, aflibercept. These studies identified some important differences in binding and pharmacodynamic activity, although the potential clinical relevance of these findings is not known. Newer antiangiogenesis therapies should help further expand treatment options for colorectal and other cancers. Comparative preclinical data on these agents is currently lacking. Keywords: aflibercept, antiangiogenesis, metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF

  4. Feasibility of using lower doses of chemopreventive agents in a combination regimen for cancer protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, C

    1988-04-01

    In experimental cancer chemoprevention studies, the doses of the agent used to produce an inhibitory response are generally very high, sometimes bordering on levels that will result in toxicity to the test animals. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of two or more agents may be just as effective as high doses of a single agent. An earlier report from our laboratory showed that vitamin E, although ineffective by itself, potentiates the anti-carcinogenic potency of selenite. Our objective was to complete a comprehensive set of dose titration experiments in the quantitative analysis of the synergism between selenium (Se) and vitamin E. Results indicated that the minimal amount of vitamin E required was around 500 ppm, which when combined with as little as 1 ppm Se, produced a significant protective effect in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumor model. This level of Se is 5 times below the marginal toxicity level of 5 ppm observed in our previous experience. With a 3-agent combination protocol involving Se (1 ppm), vitamin E (500 ppm) and vitamin A (66 ppm), it was found that vitamin A at this particular dose did not contribute any further chemoprevention than that provided by the Se/vitamin E duo. Both Se and vitamin E were present at a concentration 10 times, while vitamin A was present at 30 times their respective nutritional requirement. Our findings thus suggest that the minimum effective dose has to be systematically established for each micronutrient, and that it is feasible to use lower doses of a combination of agents if the threshold level of each agent can be determined under a prescribed set of conditions.

  5. Novel cancer immunotherapy agents with survival benefit: recent successes and next steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Padmanee; Wagner, Klaus; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.

    2012-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved two novel immunotherapy agents, sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab, which showed a survival benefit for patients with metastatic prostate cancer and melanoma, respectively. The mechanisms by which these agents provide clinical benefit are not completely understood. However, knowledge of these mechanisms will be crucial for probing human immune responses and tumour biology in order to understand what distinguishes responders from non-responders. The following next steps are necessary: first, the development of immune-monitoring strategies for the identification of relevant biomarkers; second, the establishment of guidelines for the assessment of clinical end points; and third, the evaluation of combination therapy strategies to improve clinical benefit. PMID:22020206

  6. The human cyclin B1 protein modulates sensitivity of DNA mismatch repair deficient prostate cancer cell lines to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L J; Rasmussen, M; Lützen, A; Bisgaard, H C; Singh, K K

    2000-05-25

    DNA damage caused by alkylating agents results in a G2 checkpoint arrest. DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficient cells are resistant to killing by alkylating agents and are unable to arrest the cell cycle in G2 phase after alkylation damage. We investigated the response of two MMR-deficient prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and LNCaP to the alkylating agent MNNG. Our studies reveal that DU145 cancer cells are more sensitive to killing by MNNG than LNCaP. Investigation of the underlying reasons for lower resistance revealed that the DU145 cells contain low endogenous levels of cyclin B1. We provide direct evidence that the endogenous level of cyclin B1 modulates the sensitivity of MMR-deficient prostate cancer cells to alkylating agents.

  7. Molecular predictors of therapeutic response to specific anti-cancer agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Heiser, Laura M.; Gibb, William J.; Kuo, Wen-lin; Wang, Nicholas J.

    2016-11-29

    Herein is described the use of a collection of 50 breast cancer cell lines to match responses to 77 conventional and experimental therapeutic agents with transcriptional, proteomic and genomic subtypes found in primary tumors. Almost all compounds produced strong differential responses across the cell lines produced responses that were associated with transcriptional and proteomic subtypes and produced responses that were associated with recurrent genome copy number abnormalities. These associations can now be incorporated into clinical trials that test subtype markers and clinical responses simultaneously.

  8. Systematic review of natural agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Noam; Ariyawardana, Anura; Hovan, Allan

    2013-01-01

    , suggestion, and no guideline possible. RESULTS: A total of 49 papers across 15 interventions were examined. A new suggestion was developed in favor of systemic zinc supplements administered orally in the prevention of oral mucositis in oral cancer patients receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation (Level...... III evidence). A recommendation was made against the use of intravenous glutamine for the prevention of oral mucositis in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplant (Level II evidence). No guideline was possible for any other agent, due to inadequate and...

  9. Systematic review of miscellaneous agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Jarvis, Virginia; Zadik, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    : A total of 32 papers across 10 interventions were examined. New suggestions were developed against the use of systemic pilocarpine administered orally for prevention of OM during RT in head and neck cancer patients and in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy, with or without total body irradiation......, prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A suggestion was also made against the use of systemic pentoxifylline administered orally for the prevention of OM in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. No guideline was possible for any other agent reviewed due to inadequate and...

  10. Ethanolic periwinkle leaf extract reduces telomerase expression in T47D cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Purwaningsih

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cancer cells have a relatively high telomerase activity and a lower p53 protein expression than normal cells, so that cancer cells have the ability to continue to proliferate and do not undergo apoptosis. One of the cancer treatments is chemotherapy using bioactive ingredients from synthesis or isolation of natural materials. One of the plants that have potential as anticancer agent is periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus L. The research objective was to evaluate the effect of ethanolic periwinkle leaf extract against p53 protein and telomerase expression in T47D cancer cells. METHODS An experimental study with controls was conducted involving T47D breast cancer cells. They were divided into 3 groups (control, ½ dose of IC50/26.849 µg/mL, and one dose of IC50/53.699 µg/mL at a cell density of 1 x 104 cells/well. Expression of p53 and telomerase was measured by the immunohistochemistry method. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by a multiple comparison test. RESULTS Periwinkle leaf extract significantly increased p53 protein expression (p<0.05 at both treatment doses, ½ IC50 and IC50, compared to the control group and it highly significantly reduced telomerase expression (p<0.01, in comparison with the control group at both treatment doses. CONCLUSION Periwinkle leaf extract has potential as an anti-breast cancer agent by increasing p53 protein expression and inhibiting telomerase expression.

  11. Consistent metagenes from cancer expression profiles yield agent specific predictors of chemotherapy response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiyuan; Eklund, Aron Charles; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    : We describe an unsupervised method to extract robust, consistent metagenes from multiple analogous data sets. We applied this method to expression profiles from five "double negative breast cancer" (DNBC) (not expressing ESR1 or HER2) cohorts and derived four metagenes. We assessed these metagenes...... in four similar but independent cohorts and found strong associations between three of the metagenes and agent-specific response to neoadjuvant therapy. Furthermore, we applied the method to ovarian and early stage lung cancer, two tumor types that lack reliable predictors of outcome, and found...... that the metagenes yield predictors of survival for both. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the use of multiple data sets to derive potential biomarkers can filter out data set-specific noise and can increase the efficiency in identifying clinically accurate biomarkers....

  12. Finding more active antioxidants and cancer chemoprevention agents by elongating the conjugated links of resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiang-Jiang; Fan, Gui-Juan; Dai, Fang; Ding, De-Jun; Wang, Qi; Lu, Dong-Liang; Li, Ran-Ran; Li, Xiu-Zhuang; Hu, Li-Mei; Jin, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Bo

    2011-05-15

    Resveratrol is the subject of intense research as a natural antioxidant and cancer chemopreventive agent. There has been a great deal of interest and excitement in understanding its action mechanism and developing analogs with antioxidant and cancer chemoprevention activities superior to that of the parent compound in the past decade. This work delineates that elongation of the conjugated links is an important strategy to improve the antioxidant activity of resveratrol analogs, including hydrogen atom- or electron-donating ability in homogeneous solutions and antihemolysis activity in heterogeneous media. More importantly, C3, a triene bearing 4,4'-dihydroxy groups, surfaced as an important lead compound displaying remarkably increased antioxidant, cytotoxic, and apoptosis-inducing activities compared with resveratrol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection and impact on cancer causation of persons exhibiting abnormal susceptibility to carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Morrison, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    The so-called 'late biological effects', like cancer and genetic consequences and cytotoxic effects (cell killing, at higher doses), were once thought to be an inevitable consequence of a given level of exposure, whether to background radiation, to chemicals in our biosphere, or form spontaneous damage, the 'wear and tear' of living. The measurement of exposure, which results in living organisms in the formation of a related amount of DNA damage, became a surrogate for the end-effects that constitute risk. This may not be entirely appropriate. The concept of 'equal exposure -- equal risk' assumes a homogeneous response of individuals. However, there are subgroups within the human population of persons whose cultured cells exhibit abnormal sensitivity to specific carcinogenic agents and who may be at increased risk of cancer induced by these of similar agents. Modern molecular biology has shown that the majority of the damage in DNA is repaired by enzymatic DNA repair processes that restitute or ameliorate the lesions and restore normal DNA structure and function. In this view, it is not the initial damage that is of consequence but rather the residual damage left after the repair processes have acted. Since the vast majority of the initial DNA damage undergoes repair normally, variation in the efficiency of these processes in different persons may affect the actual risk of exposure. The human side of the cancer causation formula, that is, considerable importance. To understand how human DNA repair processes function, our laboratories at Chalk River have studied 'mutant' human cell strains in tissue culture. Generally, these DNA repair-defective cell strains are derived from individual donors with heritable disorders that are associated with carcinogen-hypersensitivity and cancer-proneness. Such studies, together with related epidemiological research, have highlighted the importance of this new 'human' factor in carcinogenesis

  14. Lovastatin augments apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, B; Bhendwal, S; Halmos, B; Moss, S F; Ramey, W G; Holt, P R

    1999-08-01

    Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl coA reductase inhibitors (HRIs) inhibit isoprenylation of several members of the Ras superfamily of proteins and therefore have important cellular effects, including the reduction of proliferation and increasing apoptosis. Significant toxicity at high doses has precluded the use of HRIs as a monotherapy for cancers. We therefore studied whether combinations of the HRI lovastatin with standard chemotherapeutic agents would augment apoptosis in colon cancer cells. In the colon cancer cell lines SW480, HCT116, LoVo, and HT29, lovastatin induced apoptosis with differing sensitivity. Pretreatment with lovastatin significantly increased apoptosis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or cisplatin in all four cell lines. Lovastatin treatment resulted in decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein bcl-2 and increased the expression of the proapoptotic protein bax. The addition of geranylgeranylpyrophospate (10 microM) prevented lovastatin-induced augmentation of 5-FU and cisplatin-induced apoptosis; mevalonate (100 microM) was partially effective, whereas cotreatment with farnesyl pyrophosphate (100 microM) had no effect. These data imply that lovastatin acts by inhibiting geranylgeranylation and not farnesylation of target protein(s). Our data suggest that lovastatin may potentially be combined with 5-FU or cisplatin as chemotherapy for colon cancers.

  15. Estrogen receptor targeted contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer hormonal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi ePais

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor α (ER is over expressed in most breast cancers and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer, as well as in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging effects of two novel ER- targeted contrast agents (CAs based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd. The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as up-regulating cMyc oncogene and down-regulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors’ ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also

  16. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geninatti Crich, S; Cadenazzi, M; Lanzardo, S; Conti, L; Ruiu, R; Alberti, D; Cavallo, F; Cutrin, J C; Aime, S

    2015-04-21

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml(-1) (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.

  17. Targeted Nanodiamonds as Phenotype Specific Photoacoustic Contrast Agents for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly-targeted contrast agent for high resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Materials & Methods The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) peptide (KCCYSL) with a final nanoparticle size of ca. 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2 positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near infrared laser. Results PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 hours. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are non-toxic. Conclusions PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype specific monitoring of cancer growth. PMID:25723091

  18. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical trials as anti-cancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrillo Richard L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Histone deacetylases (HDACs can regulate expression of tumor suppressor genes and activities of transcriptional factors involved in both cancer initiation and progression through alteration of either DNA or the structural components of chromatin. Recently, the role of gene repression through modulation such as acetylation in cancer patients has been clinically validated with several inhibitors of HDACs. One of the HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat, has been approved by FDA for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL for patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies. Other inhibitors, for example, FK228, PXD101, PCI-24781, ITF2357, MGCD0103, MS-275, valproic acid and LBH589 have also demonstrated therapeutic potential as monotherapy or combination with other anti-tumor drugs in CTCL and other malignancies. At least 80 clinical trials are underway, testing more than eleven different HDAC inhibitory agents including both hematological and solid malignancies. This review focuses on recent development in clinical trials testing HDAC inhibitors as anti-tumor agents.

  19. Innovative Treatments for Cancer:. The Impact of Delivering siRNAs, Chemotherapies, and Preventative Agents Using Nanoformulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Sara S.; Farrell, Dorothy; Hinkal, George W.; Ptak, Krzystzof; Grodzinski, Piotr; Panaro, Nicholas J.

    2013-09-01

    A multi-disciplinary approach to research epitomized by the emerging field of cancer nanotechnology can catalyze scientific developments and enable clinical translation beyond what we currently utilize. Engineers, chemists, and physical scientists are teaming up with cancer biologists and clinical oncologists to attack the vast array of cancer malignancies using materials at the nanoscale. We discuss how nanoformulations are enabling the targeted, efficient, delivery of not only genetic therapies such silencing RNAs, but also conventional cytotoxic agents and small molecules which results in decreased systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. As preventative approaches, there are various imaging agents and devices are being developed for screening purposes as well as new formulations of sunscreens, neutraceuticals, and cancer vaccines. The goal then of incorporating nanotechnology into clinical applications is to achieve new and more effective ways of diagnosing, treating, and preventing cancer to ultimately change the lives of patients worldwide.

  20. Targeted delivery of cancer-specific multimodal contrast agents for intraoperative detection of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ronald X.; Xu, Jeff S.; Huang, Jiwei; Tweedle, Michael F.; Schmidt, Carl; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2010-02-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of tumor boundaries and intraoperative detection of therapeutic margins are important oncologic principles for minimal recurrence rates and improved long-term outcomes. However, many existing cancer imaging tools are based on preoperative image acquisition and do not provide real-time intraoperative information that supports critical decision-making in the operating room. Method: Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microbubbles (MBs) and nanobubbles (NBs) were synthesized by a modified double emulsion method. The MB and NB surfaces were conjugated with CC49 antibody to target TAG-72 antigen, a human glycoprotein complex expressed in many epithelial-derived cancers. Multiple imaging agents were encapsulated in MBs and NBs for multimodal imaging. Both one-step and multi-step cancer targeting strategies were explored. Active MBs/NBs were also fabricated for therapeutic margin assessment in cancer ablation therapies. Results: The multimodal contrast agents and the cancer-targeting strategies were tested on tissue simulating phantoms, LS174 colon cancer cell cultures, and cancer xenograft nude mice. Concurrent multimodal imaging was demonstrated using fluorescence and ultrasound imaging modalities. Technical feasibility of using active MBs and portable imaging tools such as ultrasound for intraoperative therapeutic margin assessment was demonstrated in a biological tissue model. Conclusion: The cancer-specific multimodal contrast agents described in this paper have the potential for intraoperative detection of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins.

  1. Vitamin D: considerations in the continued development as an agent for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Deeb, Kristin K; Johnson, Candace S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable preclinical and epidemiologic data suggest that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis, progression, and therapy for cancer. Numerous epidemiologic studies support the hypothesis that individuals with lower serum vitamin D levels have a higher risk of a number of cancers. Measures of vitamin D level in such studies include both surrogate estimates of vitamin D level (residence in more northern latitudes, history of activity, and sun exposure) as well as measured serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol levels. Perhaps, the most robust of these epidemiologic studies is that of Giovannucci et al, who developed and validated an estimate of serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol level and reported that among >40,000 individuals in the Health Professionals Study, an increase in 25(OH) cholecalciferol level of 62.5 ng/mL was associated with a reduction in the risk of head/neck, esophagus, pancreas cancers, and acute leukemia by >50%. Unfortunately, very limited data are available to indicate whether or not giving vitamin D supplements reduces the risk of cancer. Many preclinical studies indicate that exposing cancer cells, as well as vascular endothelial cells derived from tumors, to high concentrations of active metabolites of vitamin D halts progression through cell cycle, induces apoptosis and will slow or stop the growth of tumors in vivo. There are no data that one type of cancer is more or less susceptible to the effects of vitamin D. Vitamin D also potentiates the antitumor activity of a number of types of cytotoxic anticancer agents in in vivo preclinical models. Vitamin D analogues initiate signaling through a number of important pathways, but the pathway(s) essential to the antitumor activities of vitamin D are unclear. Clinical studies of vitamin D as an antitumor agent have been hampered by the lack of a suitable pharmaceutical preparation for clinical study. All commercially available formulations are inadequate because of the necessity to administer large

  2. Development of novel epidermal growth receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals: Imaging agents for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Brocklin, Henry F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nuclear medicine breast cancer imaging agents. Our approach was to synthesize small molecule inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosine kinase (tk) suitable for labeling with single photon or positron-emitting radioisotopes and evaluate the imaging potential of these new molecules.We have synthesized and fully characterized 22 quinazoline compounds. All compounds inhibit EGFR tk phosphorylation activity in the nanomolar range. All compounds tested exhibited specificity for the EGFR tk versus the ErbB2 and ErbB4 tyrosine kinases. A radiometric binding assay using an iodine-125 labeled quinazoline was developed to determine the affinity of the quinazolines for the EGFR tk ATP binding site. The affinities ranged from 0.4-51 nM. The octanol/water partition coefficients (Log P; lipophilicity) of the new compounds ranged from 2.2-5.5. Six compounds have been labeled with fluorine-18. Biodistribution in EGFR overexpressing tumor bearing mice demonstrated tumor uptake but highlighted delivery and metabolism issues. The 2-fluoro quinazoline was not metabolized in an in vitro hepatocyte study. From this work a breadth of agent characteristics was created establishing the foundation for future research toward the optimal EGFR imaging agent

  3. [Antidepressants agents in breast cancer patients using tamoxifen: review of basic and clinical evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irarrázaval O, María Elisa; Gaete G, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Tamoxifen (Tmf), is a standard of care for women with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Endoxifen is a Tmf metabolite generated by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Antidepressive agents (AD) are often prescribed to women with breast cancer not only for depression, but also for anxiety and hot flashes. Some AD are substrates or inhibitors of the Tmf metabolic pathway. Therefore there may be interactions when Tmf and AD are prescribed simultaneously. Oncologic protection afforded by Tmf may become less effective or null when AD are indicated, especially in poor metabolizing patients. We performed an update of the literature about the criteria for choosing AD in women receiving Tmf. Tricyclic AD, paroxetine and fluoxetine should be avoided in patients receiving Tmf, because they are strong inhibitors of CYP2D6. Bupropion, duloxetine and sertraline are only moderate inhibitors of the cytochrome and are not contraindicated. Citalopram, desvenlafaxine, escitalopram, milnacipran and venlafaxine are recommended, because they do not influence the metabolism and clinical efficacy of Tmf and have fewer drug interactions. However, other additional pharmacological and clinical issues should be considered when choosing an antidepressant in women with breast cancer.

  4. Platinum anticancer agents and antidepressants: desipramine enhances platinum-based cytotoxicity in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Engelmann, Brigitte J; Pullen, Nicholas; Stewart, Jennifer K; Ryan, John J; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2012-01-01

    A unique synergistic effect on platinum drug cytotoxicity is noted in the presence of the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine is used for treating neuropathic pain, particularly in prostate cancer patients. The clinically used drugs cisplatin (cis-[PtCl(2)(NH(3))(2)]), oxaliplatin [1,2-diaminocyclohexaneoxalatoplatinum(II)], and the cationic trinuclear agent BBR3464 [{trans-PtCl(NH(3))(2)}(2)-μ-(trans-Pt(NH(3))(2)(H(2)N(CH(2))(6)NH(2))(2))](4+), which has undergone evaluation in phase II clinical trials for activity in lung and ovarian cancers, were evaluated. Surprisingly, desipramine greatly augments the cytotoxicity of all the platinum-based chemotherapeutics in HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Desipramine enhanced cellular accumulation of cisplatin, but had no effect on the accumulation of oxaliplatin or BBR3464, suggesting that enhanced accumulation could not be a consistent means by which desipramine altered the platinum-drug-mediated cytotoxicity. The desipramine/cisplatin combination resulted in increased levels of p53 as well as mitochondrial damage, caspase activation, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage, suggesting that desipramine may synergize with cisplatin more than with other platinum chemotherapeutics partly by activating distinct apoptotic pathways. The study argues that desipramine may be a means of enhancing chemoresponsiveness of platinum drugs and the results warrant further investigation. The results emphasize the importance of understanding the differential pharmacological action of adjuvants employed in combinations with cancer chemotherapeutics. © SBIC 2011

  5. The fatty acid synthase inhibitor triclosan: repurposing an anti-microbial agent for targeting prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Martin C; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Gunter, Jennifer H; Lubik, Amy A; Quinn, Ronald J; Nelson, Colleen C

    2014-10-15

    Inhibition of FASN has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, and numerous inhibitors have been investigated. However, severe pharmacological limitations have challenged their clinical testing. The synthetic FASN inhibitor triclosan, which was initially developed as a topical antibacterial agent, is merely affected by these pharmacological limitations. Yet, little is known about its mechanism in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Here we compared the cellular and molecular effects of triclosan in a panel of eight malignant and non-malignant prostate cell lines to the well-known FASN inhibitors C75 and orlistat, which target different partial catalytic activities of FASN. Triclosan displayed a superior cytotoxic profile with a several-fold lower IC50 than C75 or orlistat. Structure-function analysis revealed that alcohol functionality of the parent phenol is critical for inhibitory action. Rescue experiments confirmed that end product starvation was a major cause of cytotoxicity. Importantly, triclosan, C75 and orlistat induced distinct changes to morphology, cell cycle, lipid content and the expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism, demonstrating that inhibition of different partial catalytic activities of FASN activates different metabolic pathways. These finding combined with its well-documented pharmacological safety profile make triclosan a promising drug candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. Synergistic antitumor effect of S-1 and HER2-targeting agents in gastric cancer with HER2 amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Junko; Okamoto, Isamu; Takezawa, Ken; Tsukioka, Sayaka; Uchida, Junji; Kiniwa, Mamoru; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2010-05-01

    Amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has been detected in 20% to 30% of gastric cancers and is associated with a poor outcome. Combination therapies with HER2-targeting agents and cytotoxic agents are considered a potential therapeutic option for gastric cancer with HER2 amplification. We have now investigated the effects of combination treatment with the oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 and the HER2-targeting agents lapatinib or trastuzumab in gastric cancer cells with or without HER2 amplification. We used 5-fluorouracil (5FU) instead of S-1 for in vitro experiments, given that tegafur, a component of S-1, is metabolized to 5FU in the liver. The combination of 5FU and HER2-targeting agents synergistically inhibited cell proliferation and exhibited an enhanced proapoptotic effect in gastric cancer cells with HER2 amplification, but not in those without it. Lapatinib or trastuzumab also induced downregulation of thymidylate synthase (TS) expression and activity only in cells with HER2 amplification. The combination of 5FU and TS depletion by RNA interference also exhibited an enhanced proapoptotic effect in cells with HER2 amplification. These observations thus suggest that lapatinib-induced or trastuzumab-induced downregulation of TS is responsible, at least in part, for the synergistic antitumor effect of combined treatment with 5FU and HER2-targeting agents. The antitumor effect of the combination of S-1 and HER2-targeting agents in vivo was also greater than that of either drug alone. Our preclinical findings thus indicate that the combination of S-1 and HER2-targeting agents is a promising treatment option for gastric cancer with HER2 amplification.

  7. A Cisplatin Derivative Tetra-Pt(bpy) as an Oncotherapeutic Agent for Targeting ALT Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Nie, Xin; Fang, Yiming; Zhang, Zepeng; Xiao, Yingnan; Mao, Zongwan; Liu, Haiying; Ren, Jian; Wang, Feng; Xia, Lixin; Huang, Junjiu; Zhao, Yong

    2017-10-01

    In approximately 15% of human cancers, telomere length is maintained independently of telomerase by the homologous recombination (HR)-mediated alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway. Whether the ALT pathway can be exploited for therapeutic treatment remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to develop oncotherapeutic agent to target ALT cancers. Surface plasmon resonance assay, antibody to G-quadruplex, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to discover Tetra-Pt(bpy), a cisplatin derivative that specifically targets telomeric G-quadruplex. We used immunofluorescence, FISH, C-circle assay, and chromosome orientation FISH to evaluate the inhibitory effect of Tetra-Pt(bpy) on ALT activity in human ALT cancers. The shortening of telomere length induced by Tetra-Pt(bpy) was determined by telomere restriction fragment or Q-FISH. Cell destination after Tetra-Pt(bpy) treatment was determined by β-gal staining or apoptosis assay. Nude mice (n = 4 per group) were injected with U2OS cells to evaluate the effects of Tetra-Pt(bpy) on tumor growth. All statistical tests were two-sided. Tetra-Pt(bpy) inhibits the strand invasion/annealing step of telomeric homologous recombination by selectively converting telomeric ssDNA to a G-quadruplex. ALT-cells treated with Tetra-Pt(bpy) show fewer ALT-associated promyelocytic leukemia bodies (untreated: mean±SD = 5.9±0.2 vs treated: mean±SD = 3.1±0.1, P ALT-cell xenograft tumors in mice (untreated: mean±SD = 57.1±3.7 mm 3 vs treated: mean±SD = 19.0±3.2 mm 3 , P ALT cancer cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mfouo-Tynga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS, to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events.

  9. A Review of Promising Natural Chemopreventive Agents for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, Kyle; Aliani, Rana; Ananth, Megha; Arnold, Levi; Anant, Shrikant; Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2018-03-30

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) accounts for 300,000 deaths per year worldwide and overall survival rates have shown little improvement over the past three decades. Current treatment methods including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy leave patients with secondary morbidities. Thus, treatment of HNSCC may benefit from exploration of natural compounds as chemopreventive agents. With excellent safety profiles, reduced toxicities, antioxidant properties, and general acceptance for use as dietary supplements, natural compounds are viewed as a desirable area of investigation for chemoprevention. Though most of the field is early in development, numerous studies display the potential utility of natural compounds against HNSCC. These compounds face additional challenges such as low bioavailability for systemic delivery, potential toxicities when consumed in pharmacological doses, and acquired resistance. However, novel delivery vehicles and synthetic analogs have shown overcome some of these challenges. This review covers eleven promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention of HNSCC including vitamin A, curcumin, isothiocyanate, green tea, luteolin, resveratrol, genistein, lycopene, bitter melon, withaferin A, and guggulsterone. The review discusses the therapeutic potential and associated challenges of these agents in the chemopreventive efforts against HNSCC. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Standard of Care and Promising New Agents for Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Patrizia, E-mail: patrizia.mancini@uniroma1.it [Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, Rome 00161 (Italy); Angeloni, Antonio [Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, Rome 00161 (Italy); Risi, Emanuela [Department of Radiology, Oncology and Human Pathology, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, Rome 00161 (Italy); Orsi, Errico [Department of Surgical Science, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, Rome 00161 (Italy); Mezi, Silvia [Department of Radiology, Oncology and Human Pathology, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, Rome 00161 (Italy)

    2014-10-24

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a cluster of heterogeneous diseases, all of them sharing the lack of expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER2 protein. They are characterized by different biological, molecular and clinical features, including a poor prognosis despite the increased sensitivity to the current cytotoxic therapies. Several studies have identified important molecular features which enable further subdivision of this type of tumor. We are drawing from genomics, transcription and translation analysis at different levels, to improve our knowledge of the molecular alterations along the pathways which are activated during carcinogenesis and tumor progression. How this information should be used for the rational selection of therapy is an ongoing challenge and the subject of numerous research studies in progress. Currently, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), HSP90 and Aurora inhibitors are most used as targeting agents in metastatic setting clinical trials. In this paper we will review the current knowledge about the genetic subtypes of TNBC and their different responses to conventional therapeutic strategies, as well as to some new promising molecular target agents, aimed to achieve more tailored therapies.

  11. Standard of Care and Promising New Agents for Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Mancini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a cluster of heterogeneous diseases, all of them sharing the lack of expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER2 protein. They are characterized by different biological, molecular and clinical features, including a poor prognosis despite the increased sensitivity to the current cytotoxic therapies. Several studies have identified important molecular features which enable further subdivision of this type of tumor. We are drawing from genomics, transcription and translation analysis at different levels, to improve our knowledge of the molecular alterations along the pathways which are activated during carcinogenesis and tumor progression. How this information should be used for the rational selection of therapy is an ongoing challenge and the subject of numerous research studies in progress. Currently, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, HSP90 and Aurora inhibitors are most used as targeting agents in metastatic setting clinical trials. In this paper we will review the current knowledge about the genetic subtypes of TNBC and their different responses to conventional therapeutic strategies, as well as to some new promising molecular target agents, aimed to achieve more tailored therapies.

  12. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  13. Global DNA hypermethylation-associated cancer chemotherapy resistance and its reversion with the demethylating agent hydralazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benitez-Bribiesca Luis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy continues to be a major obstacle for successful anticancer therapy. It has been shown that cells exposed to toxic concentrations of commonly used cancer chemotherapy agents develop DNA hypermetylation. Hence, demethylating agents could play a role in overcoming drug resistance. Methods MCF-7 cells were rendered adriamycin-resistant by weekly treatment with adriamycin. Wild-type and the resulting MCF-7/Adr cells were analyzed for global DNA methylation. DNA methyltransferase activity and DNA methyltransferase (dnmt gene expression were also determined. MCF-7/Adr cells were then subjected to antisense targeting of dnmt1, -3a, and -b genes and to treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitor hydralazine to investigate whether DNA demethylation restores sensitivity to adriamycin. Results MCF-7/Adr cells exhibited the multi-drug resistant phenotype as demonstrated by adriamycin resistance, mdr1 gene over-expression, decreased intracellular accumulation of adriamycin, and cross-resistance to paclitaxel. The mdr phenotype was accompanied by global DNA hypermetylation, over-expression of dnmt genes, and increased DNA methyltransferase activity as compared with wild-type MCF-7 cells. DNA demethylation through antisense targeting of dnmts or hydralazine restored adriamycin sensitivity of MCF-7/Adr cells to a greater extent than verapamil, a known inhibitor of mdr protein, suggesting that DNA demethylation interferes with the epigenetic reprogramming that participates in the drug-resistant phenotype. Conclusion We provide evidence that DNA hypermethylation is at least partly responsible for development of the multidrug-resistant phenotype in the MCF-7/Adr model and that hydralazine, a known DNA demethylating agent, can revert the resistant phenotype.

  14. Blocking Internalization of Phosphatidylethanolamine at Cleavage Furrow of Mitosis as a Novel Mechanism of Anti-Breast Cancer Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cui, Zhen

    2002-01-01

    During the formation of cleavage furrow of mitosis, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) flips from inner leaflet of the plasma membrane to the outer leaflet specifically in the furrow region near the contractile ring...

  15. Blocking Internalization of Phosphatidylethanolamine at Cleavage Furrow of Mitosis as a Novel Mechanism of Anti-Breast-Cancer Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cui, Zheng

    2003-01-01

    During the formation of cleavage furrow of mitosis, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) flips from inner leaflet of the plasma membrane to the outer leaflet specifically in the furrow region near the contractile ring...

  16. Potential Protein Phosphatase 2A Agents from Traditional Chinese Medicine against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Chung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is an important phosphatase which regulates various cellular processes, such as protein synthesis, cell growth, cellular signaling, apoptosis, metabolism, and stress responses. It is a holoenzyme composed of the structural A and catalytic C subunits and a regulatory B subunit. As an environmental toxin, okadaic acid, is a tumor promoter and binds to PP2A catalytic C subunit and the cancer-associated mutations in PP2A structural A subunit in human tumor tissue; PP2A may have tumor-suppressing function. It is a potential drug target in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we screen the TCM compounds in TCM Database@Taiwan to investigate the potent lead compounds as PP2A agent. The results of docking simulation are optimized under dynamic conditions by MD simulations after virtual screening to validate the stability of H-bonds between PP2A-α protein and each ligand. The top TCM candidates, trichosanatine and squamosamide, have potential binding affinities and interactions with key residues Arg89 and Arg214 in the docking simulation. In addition, these interactions were stable under dynamic conditions. Hence, we propose the TCM compounds, trichosanatine and squamosamide, as potential candidates as lead compounds for further study in drug development process with the PP2A-α protein.

  17. New Techniques and Agents in the Adjuvant Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raraty, Michael G.T.; Magee, Conor J.; Ghaneh, Paula; Neoptolemos, John P

    2002-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma represents a major oncological challenge. Despite improvements in surgical techniques, long-term survival after resection is poor, with few patients surviving after 5 years. Until recently, there have been no large randomized trials of adjuvant therapy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However, major trials such as the European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer (ESPAC-1) and ESPAC-3 trials have set new standards for patient recruitment and development in this field. Adjuvant therapy has the potential to improve both patient survival and quality of life after curative resection. Currently, the best treatment is with 5-fluorouracil with folinic acid, but in the light of ongoing clinical trials, this may be supplanted by gemcitabine as the treatment of choice. Chemoradiotherapy does not appear to be beneficial in the adjuvant setting, but trials of a wide variety of other techniques and agents in the treatment of advanced disease are being undertaken and some of these will almost certainly be extended into the adjuvant setting in time. Great progress has been made in the adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer in the past 10 years and similar advances are likely over the next decade.

  18. Magnesium silicide nanoparticles as a deoxygenation agent for cancer starvation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Ni, Dalong; Liu, Yanyan; Yao, Heliang; Bu, Wenbo; Shi, Jianlin

    2017-05-01

    A material that rapidly absorbs molecular oxygen (known as an oxygen scavenger or deoxygenation agent (DOA)) has various industrial applications, such as in food preservation, anticorrosion of metal and coal deoxidation. Given that oxygen is vital to cancer growth, to starve tumours through the consumption of intratumoral oxygen is a potentially useful strategy in fighting cancer. Here we show that an injectable polymer-modified magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) nanoparticle can act as a DOA by scavenging oxygen in tumours and form by-products that block tumour capillaries from being reoxygenated. The nanoparticles are prepared by a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis strategy. In the acidic tumour microenvironment, the Mg2Si releases silane, which efficiently reacts with both tissue-dissolved and haemoglobin-bound oxygen to form silicon oxide (SiO2) aggregates. This in situ formation of SiO2 blocks the tumour blood capillaries and prevents tumours from receiving new supplies of oxygen and nutrients.

  19. Radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells by the phytochemical agent sulforaphane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Fahim, Tammer; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery; Czembirek, Cornelia; Eder-Czembirek, Christina [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Cranio-, Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery; Schmidt, Rainer [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and -biology

    2011-09-15

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables. Recently it gained attention because of its antiproliferative properties in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane could act as a radiosensitizer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Four head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (i.e., (HNSCC) SCC9, SCC25, CAL27, and FADU) were treated with sulforaphane and subsequently irradiated. Then proliferation and clonogenic assays were performed. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Possible regulation of Akt and Mcl-1 was investigated by western blotting. Sulforaphane and radiation in combination leads to stronger inhibition of cell proliferation and of clonogenic survival than each treatment method alone. Western blot analysis of Akt and Mcl-1 showed no changed expression. Sulforaphane is a promising agent in the treatment of head and neck cancer due to its antiproliferative and radio-sensitizing properties. A combination of sulforaphane and radiation decreases clonogenic survival. Apoptosis is not regulated through Akt or the Mcl-1 protein. (orig.)

  20. Barnase as a new therapeutic agent triggering apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Edelweiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNases are currently studied as non-mutagenic alternatives to the harmful DNA-damaging anticancer drugs commonly used in clinical practice. Many mammalian RNases are not potent toxins due to the strong inhibition by ribonuclease inhibitor (RI presented in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In search of new effective anticancer RNases we studied the effects of barnase, a ribonuclease from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, on human cancer cells. We found that barnase is resistant to RI. In MTT cell viability assay, barnase was cytotoxic to human carcinoma cell lines with half-inhibitory concentrations (IC(50 ranging from 0.2 to 13 microM and to leukemia cell lines with IC(50 values ranging from 2.4 to 82 microM. Also, we characterized the cytotoxic effects of barnase-based immunoRNase scFv 4D5-dibarnase, which consists of two barnase molecules serially fused to the single-chain variable fragment (scFv of humanized antibody 4D5 that recognizes the extracellular domain of cancer marker HER2. The scFv 4D5-dibarnase specifically bound to HER2-positive cells and was internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis. The intracellular localization of internalized scFv 4D5-dibarnase was determined by electronic microscopy. The cytotoxic effect of scFv 4D5-dibarnase on HER2-positive human ovarian carcinoma SKOV-3 cells (IC(50 = 1.8 nM was three orders of magnitude greater than that of barnase alone. Both barnase and scFv 4D5-dibarnase induced apoptosis in SKOV-3 cells accompanied by internucleosomal chromatin fragmentation, membrane blebbing, the appearance of phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, and the activation of caspase-3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that barnase is a potent toxic agent for targeting to cancer cells.

  1. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was

  2. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, Deborah P.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Allemano, Justin; Bossi, Paolo; van de Wetering, Marianne D.; Rao, Nikhil G.; Potting, Carin; Cheng, Karis K.; Freidank, Annette; Brennan, Michael T.; Bowen, Joanne; Dennis, Kristopher; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. A systematic review of the available literature was conducted. The body

  3. Digital PCR quantification of MGMT methylation refines prediction of clinical benefit from alkylating agents in glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barault, L.; Amatu, A.; Bleeker, F. E.; Moutinho, C.; Falcomatà, C.; Fiano, V.; Cassingena, A.; Siravegna, G.; Milione, M.; Cassoni, P.; de Braud, F.; Rudà, R.; Soffietti, R.; Venesio, T.; Bardelli, A.; Wesseling, P.; de Witt Hamer, P.; Pietrantonio, F.; Siena, S.; Esteller, M.; Sartore-Bianchi, A.; di Nicolantonio, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background: O6-methyl-guanine-methyl-transferase (MGMT) silencing by promoter methylation may identify cancer patients responding to the alkylating agents dacarbazine or temozolomide. Patients and methods: We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT methylation testing both in tumor and

  4. Digital PCR quantification of MGMT methylation refines prediction of clinical benefit from alkylating agents in glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barault, L.; Amatu, A.; Bleeker, F. E.; Moutinho, C.; Falcomatà, C.; Fiano, V.; Cassingena, A.; Siravegna, G.; Milione, M.; Cassoni, P.; de Braud, F.; Rudà, R.; Soffietti, R.; Venesio, T.; Bardelli, A.; Wesseling, P.; de Witt Hamer, P.; Pietrantonio, F.; Siena, S.; Esteller, M.; Sartore-Bianchi, A.; Di Nicolantonio, F.

    2015-01-01

    O(6)-methyl-guanine-methyl-transferase (MGMT) silencing by promoter methylation may identify cancer patients responding to the alkylating agents dacarbazine or temozolomide. We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT methylation testing both in tumor and cell-free circulating DNA

  5. Digital PCR quantification of MGMT methylation refines prediction of clinical benefit from alkylating agents in glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barault, L.; Amatu, A.; Bleeker, F.E.; Moutinho, C.; Falcomata, C.; Fiano, V.; Cassingena, A.; Siravegna, G.; Milione, M.; Cassoni, P.; Braud, F. De; Ruda, R.; Soffietti, R.; Venesio, T.; Bardelli, A.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P. de Witt; Pietrantonio, F.; Siena, S. Di; Esteller, M.; Sartore-Bianchi, A.; Nicolantonio, F. Di

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: O(6)-methyl-guanine-methyl-transferase (MGMT) silencing by promoter methylation may identify cancer patients responding to the alkylating agents dacarbazine or temozolomide. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT methylation testing both in tumor

  6. Flaxseed Lignans Enhance the Cytotoxicity of Chemotherapeutic Agents against Breast Cancer Cell Lines MDA-MB-231 and SKBR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Yunyun; De Silva, Franklyn; Krol, Edward S; Alcorn, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of metastatic breast cancer; however, prognosis and overall survival is unfavorable due to inadequate treatment response and/or unacceptable toxicity. Natural compounds and their active metabolites receive increasing attention as possible adjuvant therapy with cancer chemotherapeutics to improve treatment response, survival rates, and quality of life of breast cancer patients. This study investigated the combination of flaxseed lignans (Secoisolariciresinol and Enterolactone) with classic chemotherapeutic agents (Docetaxel, Doxorubicin, and Carboplatin) with different mechanisms of action to determine whether flaxseed lignans could enhance the cytotoxic effect of such drugs in the metastatic breast cancer cell lines, SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231. The experimental data suggests that flaxseed lignans significantly enhanced the ability of chemotherapeutic agents to cause cytotoxicity in SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A three compound combination study found that enterolactone and metformin together in combination with relatively low concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs were able to significantly decrease cancer cell viability, compared to low concentrations of the individual chemotherapeutic drug alone. Our in vitro evaluation suggests a future direction in improving chemotherapeutic efficacy in breast cancer by adjuvant therapy with the flaxseed lignans.

  7. Optimizing therapeutic efficacy of chemopreventive agents: A critical review of delivery strategies in oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Holpuch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its characterized progression from recognized premalignant oral epithelial changes (i.e., oral epithelial dysplasia to invasive cancer, oral squamous cell carcinoma represents an optimal disease for chemopreventive intervention prior to malignant transformation. The primary goal of oral cancer chemoprevention is to reverse, suppress, or inhibit the progression of premalignant lesions to cancer. Over the last several decades, numerous oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials have assessed the therapeutic efficacy of diverse chemopreventive agents. The standard of care for more advanced oral dysplastic lesions entails surgical excision and close clinical follow-up due to the potential (~33% for local recurrence at a similar or more advanced histological stage. The purpose of this review was to identify prominent oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials, assess their overall therapeutic efficacy, and delineate effects of local versus systemic drug administration. In addition, these compiled clinical trial data present concepts for consideration in the design and conduction of future clinical trials.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of quinoline derivatives as potential anti-prostate cancer agents and Pim-1 kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Li, Ying; Zhou, Di; Fan, Yinbo; Guo, Hongye; Ma, Tianyi; Wen, Jiachen; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Linxiang

    2016-04-15

    In this work, a series of quinoline derivatives were designed and synthesized as antitumor agents. Most quinolines showed potent anti-proliferative activity against human prostatic cancer PC-3 cell line. Among which, 9d, 9f and 9g were the most effective compounds with GI50 values of 2.60, 2.81 and 1.29 μM, respectively. Structure-activity relationship analysis indicated that the secondary amine linked quinoline and pyridine ring played an important role in the anti-proliferative effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that 9g was a potential Pim-1 kinase inhibitor with abilities of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. Considering of the increased activity of Pim-1 in prostate cancer, such compounds have potential to be developed as anti-prostate cancer agents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory, and Genomic Stability Enhancement Effects of Zinc l-carnosine: A Potential Cancer Chemopreventive Agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Chan, Kok Meng; Sharif, Razinah

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide, and the incidence and mortality rates of cancer are expected to rise tremendously in the near future. Despite a better understanding of cancer biology and advancement in cancer management, current strategies in cancer treatment remain costly and ineffective. Hence, instead of putting more efforts to search for new cancer cures, attention has now been shifted to the development of cancer chemopreventive agents as a preventive measure for cancer formation. It is well known that neoplastic transformation of cells is multifactorial, and the occurrence of oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and genomic instability events has been implicated in the carcinogenesis of cells. Zinc l-carnosine (ZnC), which is clinically used as gastric ulcer treatment in Japan, has been suggested to have the potential in preventing cancer development. Multiple studies have revealed that ZnC possesses potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and genomic stability enhancement effects. Thus, this review provides some mechanistic insight into the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and genomic stability enhancement effects of ZnC in relevance to its chemopreventive potential.

  10. Collagen based magnetic nanobiocomposite as MRI contrast agent and for targeted delivery in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A; Sekar, S; Kanagavel, M; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, A; Sastry, T P

    2013-10-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made with the advent of technology to prepare a multifunctional nanobiocomposite (NBC) for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy. Collagen (C) was fabricated as nanofibers with multifunctional moieties viz. CFeAb*D by incorporating iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe), coupling with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled antibody (Ab*) and loading an anticancer gemcitabine drug (D). This NBC was characterized by conventional methods and evaluated for its biological activities. The UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopic studies revealed the fluorescein to protein ratio and revealed the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles and their interaction with the collagen molecules, respectively. While SDS-PAGE showed the proteinaceous nature of collagen, VSM and TEM studies revealed magnetic saturation as 54.97emu/g and a magnetic nanoparticle with a diameter in the range of 10-30nm and the dimension of nanofiber ranging from 97 to 270nm. A MRI scan has shown a super paramagnetic effect, which reveals that the prepared NBC can be used as a MRI contrast agent. The MTT assay has shown biocompatibility and an apoptotic effect while phase contrast microscopy exhibited receptor mediated uptake of endocytosis. The novelty in the prepared NBC lies in the collagen nanofibers, which have a higher penetrating property without causing much cell damage, biocompatibility and multifunctional properties and is able to carry multifunctional agents. The study has demonstrated the possible use of CFeAb*D as a multifunctional NBC for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Photochemical internalization of therapeutic macromolecular agents: a novel strategy to kill multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbo, Pål K; Weyergang, Anette; Bonsted, Anette; Bown, Stephen G; Berg, Kristian

    2006-11-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem for chemotherapy. Entrapment of anticancer drugs in endolysosomal compartments or active extrusions by plasma membrane proteins of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily are important resistance mechanisms. This study evaluated photochemical internalization (PCI) of membrane-impermeable macromolecules that are not the target of ABC drug pumps for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells. We used the drug-sensitive uterine fibrosarcoma cell line MES-SA and its MDR, P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing derivative MES-SA/Dx5 with the photosensitizer disulfonated meso-tetraphenylporphine (TPPS(2a)) and broad spectrum illumination. The PCI of doxorubicin, the ribosome-inactivating protein gelonin and adenoviral transduction were assessed in both cell lines, together with the uptake and excretion of TPPS(2a) and of two fluid phase markers easily detectable by fluorescence [lucifer yellow (LY) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran], as a model of gelonin uptake. Both cell lines were resistant to PCI of doxorubicin, but equally sensitive to PCI of gelonin, even though the endocytosis rates of LY and FITC-dextran were significantly lower in the MDR cells. In control studies, MES-SA/Dx5 cells were more resistant to photodynamic therapy (TPPS(2a) + light only). This was not mediated by P-gp, as there were no differences in the uptake and efflux of TPPS(2a) between the cell lines. After adenoviral infection, PCI enhanced gene delivery in both cell lines. In conclusion, PCI of macromolecular therapeutic agents that are not targets of P-gp is a novel therapeutic strategy to kill MDR cancer cells.

  12. Advances in the Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolly, Saoirse O; Collins, Dearbhaile C; Sundar, Raghav; Popat, Sanjay; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-05-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a significant global health challenge and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The traditional 'one-size-fits-all' treatment approach has now evolved into one that involves personalized strategies based on histological and molecular subtypes. The molecular era has revolutionized the treatment of patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 gene aberrations. In the appropriately selected population, anti-tumor agents against these molecular targets can significantly improve progression-free survival. However, the emergence of acquired resistance is inevitable. Novel potent compounds with much improved and rational selectivity profiles, such as third-generation EGFR T790M resistance mutation-specific inhibitors, have been developed and added to the NSCLC armamentarium. To date, attempts to overcome resistance bypass pathways through downstream signaling blockade has had limited success. Furthermore, the majority of patients still do not harbor known driver genetic or epigenetic alterations and/or have no new available treatment options, with chemotherapy remaining their standard of care. Several potentially actionable driver aberrations have recently been identified, with the early clinical development of multiple inhibitors against these promising targets currently in progress. The advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors has led to significant benefit for advanced NSCLC patients with durable responses observed. Further interrogation of the underlying biology of NSCLC, coupled with modern clinical trial designs, is now required to develop novel targeted therapeutics rationally matched with predictive biomarkers of response, so as to further advance NSCLC therapeutics through the next decade.

  13. 2,2'-diphenyl-3,3'-diindolylmethane: a potent compound induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by inhibiting EGFR pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Bhowmik

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in medicine, 30-40% of patients with breast cancer show recurrence underscoring the need for improved effective therapy. In this study, by in vitro screening we have selected a novel synthetic indole derivative 2,2'-diphenyl-3,3'-diindolylmethane (DPDIM as a potential anti- breast cancer agent. DPDIM induces apoptosis both in vitro in breast cancer cells MCF7, MDA-MB 231 and MDA-MB 468 and in vivo in 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA induced Sprague-Dawley (SD rat mammary tumor. Our in vitro studies show that DPDIM exerts apoptotic effect by negatively regulating the activity of EGFR and its downstream molecules like STAT3, AKT and ERK1/2 which are involved in the proliferation and survival of these cancer cells. In silico predictions also suggest that DPDIM may bind to EGFR at its ATP binding site. DPDIM furthermore inhibits EGF induced increased cell viability. We have also shown decreased expression of pro-survival factor Bcl-XL as well as increase in the level of pro-apoptotic proteins like Bax, Bad, Bim in DPDIM treated cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results further indicate that the DPDIM induced apoptosis is mediated through mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involving the caspase-cascade. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of DPDIM for its anticancer activity. Altogether this report suggests that DPDIM could be an effective therapeutic agent for breast cancer.

  14. Use of Adjuvant Bisphosphonates and Other Bone-Modifying Agents in Breast Cancer: A Cancer Care Ontario and American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhesy-Thind, Sukhbinder; Fletcher, Glenn G; Blanchette, Phillip S; Clemons, Mark J; Dillmon, Melissa S; Frank, Elizabeth S; Gandhi, Sonal; Gupta, Rasna; Mates, Mihaela; Moy, Beverly; Vandenberg, Ted; Van Poznak, Catherine H

    2017-06-20

    Purpose To make recommendations regarding the use of bisphosphonates and other bone-modifying agents as adjuvant therapy for patients with breast cancer. Methods Cancer Care Ontario and ASCO convened a Working Group and Expert Panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. Results Adjuvant bisphosphonates were found to reduce bone recurrence and improve survival in postmenopausal patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer. In this guideline, postmenopausal includes patients with natural menopause or that induced by ovarian suppression or ablation. Absolute benefit is greater in patients who are at higher risk of recurrence, and almost all trials were conducted in patients who also received systemic therapy. Most studies evaluated zoledronic acid or clodronate, and data are extremely limited for other bisphosphonates. While denosumab was found to reduce fractures, long-term survival data are still required. Recommendations It is recommended that, if available, zoledronic acid (4 mg intravenously every 6 months) or clodronate (1,600 mg/d orally) be considered as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal patients with breast cancer who are deemed candidates for adjuvant systemic therapy. Further research comparing different bone-modifying agents, doses, dosing intervals, and durations is required. Risk factors for osteonecrosis of the jaw and renal impairment should be assessed, and any pending dental or oral health problems should be dealt with prior to starting treatment. Data for adjuvant denosumab look promising but are currently insufficient to make any recommendation. Use of these agents to reduce fragility fractures in patients with low bone mineral density is beyond the scope of the guideline. Recommendations are not meant to restrict such use of bone-modifying agents in these situations. Additional information at www.asco.org/breast-cancer-adjuvant-bisphosphonates-guideline , www.asco.org/guidelineswiki , https://www.cancercareontario.ca/guidelines-advice/types-of-cancer/breast .

  15. Sensitivity of docetaxel-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells to microtubule-destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and colchicine-site binding agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Wang

    Full Text Available One of the main reasons for disease recurrence in the curative breast cancer treatment setting is the development of drug resistance. Microtubule targeted agents (MTAs are among the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of breaset cancer and therefore overcoming taxane resistance is of primary clinical importance. Our group has previously demonstrated that the microtubule dynamics of docetaxel-resistant MCF-7TXT cells are insensitivity to docetaxel due to the distinct expression profiles of β-tubulin isotypes in addition to the high expression of p-glycoprotein (ABCB1. In the present investigation we examined whether taxane-resistant breast cancer cells are more sensitive to microtubule destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and colchicine-site binding agents (CSBAs than the non-resistant cells.Two isogenic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were selected for resistance to docetaxel (MCF-7TXT and the wild type parental cell line (MCF-7CC to examine if taxane-resistant breast cancer cells are sensitive to microtubule-destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and CSBAs. Cytotoxicity assays, immunoblotting, indirect immunofluorescence and live imaging were used to study drug resistance, apoptosis, mitotic arrest, microtubule formation, and microtubule dynamics.MCF-7TXT cells were demonstrated to be cross resistant to vinca alkaloids, but were more sensitive to treatment with colchicine compared to parental non-resistant MCF-7CC cells. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that the IC50 of MCF-7TXT cell to vinorelbine and vinblastine was more than 6 and 3 times higher, respectively, than that of MCF-7CC cells. By contrast, the IC50 of MCF-7TXT cell for colchincine was 4 times lower than that of MCF-7CC cells. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that all MTAs induced the disorganization of microtubules and the chromatin morphology and interestingly each with a unique pattern. In terms of microtubule and chromain morphology, MCF-7TXT cells were

  16. Prolactin Receptor-Mediated Internalization of Imaging Agents Detects Epithelial Ovarian Cancer with Enhanced Sensitivity and Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Karthik M; Zhang, Yilin; Mitra, Anirban K; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Gwin, Katja; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Roman, Brian B; Lengyel, Ernst; Piccirilli, Joseph A

    2017-04-01

    Poor prognosis of ovarian cancer, the deadliest of the gynecologic malignancies, reflects major limitations associated with detection and diagnosis. Current methods lack high sensitivity to detect small tumors and high specificity to distinguish malignant from benign tissue, both impeding diagnosis of early and metastatic cancer stages and leading to costly and invasive surgeries. Tissue microarray analysis revealed that >98% of ovarian cancers express the prolactin receptor (PRLR), forming the basis of a new molecular imaging strategy. We fused human placental lactogen (hPL), a specific and tight binding PRLR ligand, to magnetic resonance imaging (gadolinium) and near-infrared fluorescence imaging agents. Both in tissue culture and in mouse models, these imaging bioconjugates underwent selective internalization into ovarian cancer cells via PRLR-mediated endocytosis. Compared with current clinical MRI techniques, this targeted approach yielded both enhanced signal-to-noise ratio from accumulation of signal via selective internalization and improved specificity conferred by PRLR upregulation in malignant ovarian cancer. These features endow PRLR-targeted imaging with the potential to transform ovarian cancer detection. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1684-96. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Combination chemotherapy versus single-agent therapy as first- and second-line treatment in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensuu, H; Holli, K; Heikkinen, M

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report results of a randomized prospective study that compared single agents of low toxicity given both as the first-line and second-line chemotherapy with combination chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer with distant metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients in the single-agent arm...... three times per week (CEF) followed by M 8 mg/m2 plus vinblastine (V) 6 mg/m2 every 4 weeks. Exclusion criteria included age greater than 70 years, World Health Organization (WHO) performance status greater than 2, prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease, and presence of liver metastases in patients...

  18. Antibody-conjugated gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles as multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S Day

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Emily S Day, Lissett R Bickford, John H Slater, Nicholas S Riggall, Rebekah A Drezek, Jennifer L WestDepartment of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: The goal of this study was to develop near-infrared (NIR resonant gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles (GGS-NPs as dual contrast and therapeutic agents for cancer management via multiphoton microscopy followed by higher intensity photoablation. We demonstrate that GGS-NPs exposed to a pulsed, NIR laser exhibit two-photon induced photoluminescence that can be utilized to visualize cancerous cells in vitro. When conjugated with anti-HER2 antibodies, these nanoparticles specifically bind SK-BR-3 breast carcinoma cells that overexpress the HER2 receptor, enabling the cells to be imaged via multiphoton microscopy with an incident laser power of 1 mW. Higher excitation power (50 mW could be employed to induce thermal damage to the cancerous cells, producing extensive membrane blebbing within seconds leading to cell death. GGS-NPs are ideal multifunctional agents for cancer management because they offer the ability to pinpoint precise treatment sites and perform subsequent thermal ablation in a single setting.Keywords: cancer, nanomedicine, multiphoton microscopy, photoluminescence, photothermal therapy, theranostics

  19. Chemotherapy, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors in human milk: how should we counsel cancer patients about breastfeeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistilli, Barbara; Bellettini, Giulia; Giovannetti, Elisa; Codacci-Pisanelli, Giovanni; Azim, Hatem A; Benedetti, Giovanni; Sarno, Maria Anna; Peccatori, Fedro A

    2013-05-01

    An increasing number of women are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy and lactation. Women are usually advised to interrupt breastfeeding during systemic anticancer treatment for fear of serious adverse effects to the nursed infant. However, the issue is poorly addressed in the literature and very few studies have evaluated the safety of breastfeeding during or after cytotoxic drugs or target agents administration. In this review we will analyze the available evidence that addresses the issue of anticancer drugs, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors excretion in human milk. This could serve as a unique resource that may aid physicians in the management of breastfeeding cancer patients interested in maintaining lactation during treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectroscopic Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer using a B7-H3-targeted ICG Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Jensen, Kristen; Machtaler, Steven; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer imaging methods lack diagnostic accuracy, in particular for patients with dense breast tissue, and improved techniques are critically needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antibody-indocyanine green (ICG) conjugates, which undergo dynamic absorption spectrum shifts after cellular endocytosis and degradation, and spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging to differentiate normal breast tissue from breast cancer by imaging B7-H3, a novel breast cancer associated molecular target. Methods: Quantitative immunohistochemical staining of endothelial and epithelial B7-H3 expression was assessed in 279 human breast tissue samples, including normal (n=53), benign lesions (11 subtypes, n=129), and breast cancers (4 subtypes, n=97). After absorption spectra of intracellular and degraded B7-H3-ICG and Isotype control-ICG (Iso-ICG) were characterized, sPA imaging in a transgenic murine breast cancer model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTVPyMT)634Mul) was performed and compared to imaging of control conditions [B7-H3-ICG in tumor negative animals (n=60), Iso-ICG (n=30), blocking B7-H3+B7-H3-ICG (n=20), and free ICG (n=20)] and validated with ex vivo histological analysis. Results: Immunostaining showed differential B7-H3 expression on both the endothelium and tumor epithelium in human breast cancer with an area under the ROC curve of 0.93 to differentiate breast cancer vs non-cancer. Combined in vitro/in vivo imaging showed that sPA allowed specific B7-H3-ICG detection down to the 13 nM concentration and differentiation from Iso-ICG. sPA molecular imaging of B7-H3-ICG showed a 3.01-fold (Pbreast cancer. Leveraging antibody-ICG contrast agents and their dynamic optical absorption spectra allows for highly specific sPA imaging of breast cancer.

  1. Thiol-reducing agents prevent sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Choi, Boyun; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inhibitory potential of sulforaphane against cancer has been suggested for different types of cancer, including ovarian cancer. We examined whether this effect is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules related to cell survival and proliferation, in ovarian cancer cells. Sulforaphane at a concentration of 10 μM effectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that act...

  2. Glucose-installed, SPIO-loaded PEG- b-PCL micelles as MR contrast agents to target prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerasilp, Man; Sunintaboon, Panya; Sungkarat, Witaya; Nasongkla, Norased

    2017-11-01

    Polymeric micelles of poly(ethylene glycol)- block-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) bearing glucose analog encapsulated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Glu-SPIO micelles) were synthesized as an MRI contrast agent to target cancer cells based on high-glucose metabolism. Compared to SPIO micelles (non-targeting SPIO micelles), Glu-SPIO micelles demonstrated higher toxicity to human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3) at high concentration. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the amount of iron in cells. It was found that the iron in cancer cells treated by Glu-SPIO micelles were 27-fold higher than cancer cells treated by SPIO micelles at the iron concentration of 25 ppm and fivefold at the iron concentration of 100 ppm. To implement Glu-SPIO micelles as a MR contrast agent, the 3-T clinical MRI was applied to determine transverse relaxivities ( r 2*) and relaxation rate (1/ T 2*) values. In vitro MRI showed different MRI signal from cancer cells after cellular uptake of SPIO micelles and Glu-SPIO micelles. Glu-SPIO micelles was highly sensitive with the r 2* in agarose gel at 155 mM-1 s-1. Moreover, the higher 1/ T 2* value was found for cancer cells treated with Glu-SPIO micelles. These results supported that glucose ligand increased the cellular uptake of micelles by PC-3 cells with over-expressing glucose transporter on the cell membrane. Thus, glucose can be used as a small molecule ligand for targeting prostate cancer cells overexpressing glucose transporter.

  3. A novel endocrine-disrupting agent in corn with mitogenic activity in human breast and prostatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaverich, Barry; Mani, Shaila; Alejandro, Mary Ann; Mitchell, Andrea; Markaverich, David; Brown, Trellis; Velez-Trippe, Claudia; Murchison, Chris; O'Malley, Bert; Faith, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Housing adult rats on ground corncob bedding impedes male and female mating behavior and causes acyclicity in females. The suppressive effects on ovarian cyclicity are mimicked by a mitogenic agent purified from the ground corncob bedding material (corn mitogen; CM), which stimulates the proliferation of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (MCF-7 cells) and ER-negative (MDA-MD-231 cells) breast cancer cells. Purified CM does not compete for [(3)H]estradiol binding to ER or nuclear type II sites, and its effects on MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation are not blocked by the antiestrogen ICI-182,780. These results suggest that the active component is unlikely to be a phytoestrogen, bioflavonoid, mycotoxin, or other known endocrine-disrupting agent that modifies cell growth via ER or type II [(3)H]estradiol binding sites. CM also stimulates the proliferation of PC-3 human prostatic cancer cells in vitro, and the growth rate of PC-3 cell xenografts is accelerated in nude male mice housed on ground corncob as opposed to pure cellulose bedding. Consequently, this endocrine-disrupting agent in ground corncob bedding may influence behavioral and physiologic reproductive response profiles and malignant cell proliferation in experimental animals. Fresh corn (kernels and cob) or corn tortillas also contain CM, indicating that human exposure is likely; consequently, CM and/or related mitogens in corn products may influence human health and development. PMID:11836146

  4. Strategy and planning for chemopreventive drug development: clinical development plans. Chemoprevention Branch and Agent Development Committee. National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloff, G J; Crowell, J A; Boone, C W; Steele, V E; Lubet, R A; Greenwald, P; Alberts, D S; Covey, J M; Doody, L A; Knapp, G G

    1994-01-01

    At the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, the Chemoprevention Branch and Agent Development Committee develop strategies for efficiently identifying, procuring, and advancing the most promising drugs into clinical trials. Scientific expertise is applied at each phase of development to critically review the testing methods and results, and to establish and apply criteria for evaluating the agents for further development. The Clinical Development Plan, prepared by the Chemoprevention Branch and the Agent Development Committee, is a summary of the status of the agent regarding evidence for safety and chemopreventive efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. It also contains the strategy for further development of the drug that addresses pharmacodynamics, drug effect measurements, intermediate biomarkers for monitoring efficacy, toxicity, supply and formulation, regulatory approval, and proposed clinical trials. Sixteen Clinical Development Plans are presented here: N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), aspirin, calcium, beta-carotene, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), DHEA analog 8354, 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acid, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR), ibuprofen, oltipraz, piroxicam, Proscar, sulindac, tamoxifen, vitamin D3 and analogs, and vitamin E. The objective of publishing these plans is to stimulate interest and thinking among the scientific community on the prospects for developing chemopreventive drugs.

  5. In Vivo 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Biologically Specific Contrast Agent for Prostate Cancer: A Nude Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Brian Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized in vivo a functional superparamagnetic iron-oxide magnetic resonance contrast agent that shortens the T2 relaxation time in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of prostate cancer xenografts. The agent was developed by conjugating Molday ION™ carboxyl-6 (MIC6, with a deimmunized mouse monoclonal antibody (muJ591 targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA. This functional contrast agent could be used as a noninvasive method to detect prostate cancer cells that are PSMA positive and more readily differentiate them from surrounding tissues for treatment. The functional contrast agent was injected intravenously into mice and its effect was compared to both MIC6 (without conjugated antibody and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS injection controls. MR imaging was performed on a clinical 3T MRI scanner using a multiecho spin echo (MESE sequence to obtain T2 relaxation time values. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was used to confirm an increase in elemental iron in injected mice tumours relative to controls. Histological examination of H&E stained tissues showed normal morphology of the tissues collected.

  6. Personalizing cancer treatment in the age of global genomic analyses: PALB2 gene mutations and the response to DNA damaging agents in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Maria C; Rajeshkumar, N V; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Jones, Siân; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H; Eshleman, James R; Klein, Alison; Laheru, Daniel; Donehower, Ross; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis and drug resistance are the major causes of mortality in patients with pancreatic cancer. Once developed, the progression of pancreatic cancer metastasis is virtually unstoppable with current therapies. Here, we report the remarkable clinical outcome of a patient with advanced, gemcitabine-resistant, pancreatic cancer who was later treated with DNA damaging agents, on the basis of the observation of significant activity of this class of drugs against a personalized xenograft generated from the patient's surgically resected tumor. Mitomycin C treatment, selected on the basis of its robust preclinical activity in a personalized xenograft generated from the patient's tumor, resulted in long-lasting (36+ months) tumor response. Global genomic sequencing revealed biallelic inactivation of the gene encoding PalB2 protein in this patient's cancer; the mutation is predicted to disrupt BRCA1 and BRCA2 interactions critical to DNA double-strand break repair. This work suggests that inactivation of the PALB2 gene is a determinant of response to DNA damage in pancreatic cancer and a new target for personalizing cancer treatment. Integrating personalized xenografts with unbiased exomic sequencing led to customized therapy, tailored to the genetic environment of the patient's tumor, and identification of a new biomarker of drug response in a lethal cancer. ©2010 AACR.

  7. Biocompatible Chitosan Oligosaccharide Modified Gold Nanorods as Highly Effective Photothermal Agents for Ablation of Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchanathan Manivasagan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal therapy (PTT using biocompatible nanomaterials have recently attracted much attention as a novel candidate technique for cancer therapy. In this work we report the performance of newly synthesized multidentate chitosan oligosaccharide modified gold nanorods (AuNRs-LA-COS as novel agents for PTT of cancer cells due to their excellent biocompatibility, photothermal stability, and high absorption in the near-infrared (NIR region. The AuNRs-LA-COS exhibit a strong NIR absorption peak at 838 nm with a mean length of 26 ± 3.1 nm and diameter of 6.8 ± 1.7 nm, respectively. The temperature of AuNRs-LA-COS rapidly reached 52.6 °C for 5 min of NIR laser irradiation at 2 W/cm2. The AuNRs-LA-COS had very low cytotoxicity and exhibited high efficiency for the ablation of breast cancer cells in vitro. The tumor-bearing mice were completely ablated without tumor recurrence after photothermal treatment with AuNRs-LA-COS (25 µg/mL under laser irradiation. In summary, this study demonstrated that AuNRs-LA-COS with laser irradiation as novel agents pave an alternative way for breast cancer therapy and hold great promise for clinical trials in the near future.

  8. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thai Q; Ishak Gabra, Mari B; Lowman, Xazmin H; Yang, Ying; Reid, Michael A; Pan, Min; O'Connor, Timothy R; Kong, Mei

    2017-11-01

    Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH) enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  9. Cumulative alkylating agent exposure and semen parameters in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel M; Liu, Wei; Kutteh, William H; Ke, Raymond W; Shelton, Kyla C; Sklar, Charles A; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Pui, Ching-Hon; Klosky, James L; Spunt, Sheri L; Metzger, Monika L; Srivastava, DeoKumar; Ness, Kirsten K; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Few data define the dose-specific relation between alkylating agent exposure and semen variables in adult survivors of childhood cancer. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that increased exposure to alkylating agents would be associated with decreased sperm concentration in a cohort of adult male survivors of childhood cancer who were not exposed to radiation therapy for their childhood cancer. Methods We did semen analysis on 214 adult male survivors of childhood cancer (median age 7·7 years [range 0·01–20·3] at diagnosis, 29·0 years [18·4–56·1] at assessment, and a median of 21·0 years [10·5–41·6] since diagnosis) who had received alkylating agent chemotherapy but no radiation therapy. Alkylating agent exposure was estimated using the cyclophosphamide equivalent dose (CED). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for oligospermia (sperm concentration >0 and fertility preservation services. PMID:25239573

  10. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Deborah P; Epstein, Joel B; Elad, Sharon; Allemano, Justin; Bossi, Paolo; van de Wetering, Marianne D; Rao, Nikhil G; Potting, Carin; Cheng, Karis K; Freidank, Annette; Brennan, Michael T; Bowen, Joanne; Dennis, Kristopher; Lalla, Rajesh V

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. A systematic review of the available literature was conducted. The body of evidence for the use of each agent, in each setting, was assigned a level of evidence. Based on the evidence level, one of the following three guideline determinations was possible: recommendation, suggestion, or no guideline possible. A recommendation was developed in favor of patient-controlled analgesia with morphine in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients. Suggestions were developed in favor of transdermal fentanyl in standard dose chemotherapy and HSCT patients and morphine mouth rinse and doxepin rinse in head and neck radiation therapy (H&N RT) patients. Recommendations were developed against the use of topical antimicrobial agents for the prevention of mucositis. These included recommendations against the use of iseganan for mucositis prevention in HSCT and H&N RT and against the use of antimicrobial lozenges (polymyxin-tobramycin-amphotericin B lozenges/paste and bacitracin-clotrimazole-gentamicin lozenges) for mucositis prevention in H&N RT. Recommendations were developed against the use of the mucosal coating agent sucralfate for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced or radiation-induced OM. No guidelines were possible for any other agent due to insufficient and/or conflicting evidence. Additional well-designed research is needed on prevention and management approaches for OM.

  11. Antimicrobial efficacy of oral topical agents on microorganisms associated with radiated head and neck cancer patients: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S; Tarrand, Jeffery J; Roberts, Dianna B; Rolston, Kenneth V; Chambers, Mark S

    2011-04-01

    A variety of oral topical agents have been used for prevention and management of radiotherapy-induced adverse effects. The antimicrobial nature of some of the commonly used agents is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial efficacies of various oral topical agents on common microorganisms associated with radiated head and neck cancer patients. Seven commonly used topical oral agents-0.12% chlorhexidine with alcohol, 0.12% chlorhexidine without alcohol, baking soda-salt rinse, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel, 0.63% stannous fluoride rinse, calcium phosphate mouthrinse, and acemannan hydrogel (aloe vera) rinse-were evaluated in vitro for their antimicrobial efficacies against four common microorganisms. A combination of baking soda-salt rinse and 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was evaluated as the eighth agent. The microorganisms used were Staphylococcus aureus, group B Streptococcus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans. An ELISA reader was used to measure the turbidity of microbial culture wells and optical density (OD) values for each of the 960 wells recorded. Mean OD values were rank ordered based on their turbidity. One-way ANOVA with Tukey HSD post hoc analysis was used to study differences in OD values (P baking soda- salt, calcium phosphate rinse, and the combination of baking soda-salt and stannous fluoride gel. Mean OD values classified for microorganisms from lowest to highest were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, group B Streptococcus, and Candida albicans. A significant difference among the antimicrobial efficacies of topical agents was evident for each of four microorganisms (P < .05). There was also a significant difference among the antimicrobial efficacies of the same topical agent on the four microorganisms tested (P < .05).

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of high dose "ethinylestradiol" in post-menopausal advanced breast cancer patients heavily pre-treated with endocrine agents

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Amit; Robertson, John FR; Cheung, KL

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background High dose estrogens (HDEs) were frequently used as endocrine agents prior to the introduction of tamoxifen which carries fewer side effects. Due to the development of resistance to available endocrine agents in almost all women with metastatic breast cancer, interest has renewed in the use of HDEs as yet another endocrine option that may have activity. We report our experience with one of the HDEs ("ethinylestradiol" 1 mg daily) in advanced breast cancer (locally advanced ...

  13. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial for an organism's favorable response to alkylating agents. Furthermore, an individual's response to alkylating agents can vary considerably from tissue to tissue and from person to person, pointing to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that modulate alkylating agent toxicity. PMID:22237395

  14. Targeted agents for patients with advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer: A protocol for systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Baoshan; Pan, Bei; Ge, Long; Ma, Jichun; Wu, Yiting; Guo, Tiankang

    2018-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a devastating malignant tumor. Although surgical resection may offer a good prognosis and prolong survival, approximately 80% patients with PC are always diagnosed as unresectable tumor. National Comprehensive Cancer Network's (NCCN) recommended gemcitabine-based chemotherapy as efficient treatment. While, according to recent studies, targeted agents might be a better available option for advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer patients. The aim of this systematic review and network meta-analysis will be to examine the differences of different targeted interventions for advanced/metastatic PC patients. We will conduct this systematic review and network meta-analysis using Bayesian method and according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) statement. To identify relevant studies, 6 electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of science, CNKI (Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure), and CBM (Chinese Biological Medical Database) will be searched. The risk of bias in included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) will be assessed using the Cochrane Handbook version 5.1.0. And we will use GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence from network meta-analysis. Data will be analyzed using R 3.4.1 software. To the best of our knowledge, this systematic review and network meta-analysis will firstly use both direct and indirect evidence to compare the differences of different targeted agents and targeted agents plus chemotherapy for advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer patients. This is a protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis, so the ethical approval and patient consent are not required. We will disseminate the results of this review by submitting to a peer-reviewed journal.

  15. Nanoceria: a rare-earth nanoparticle as a novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic agent in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Shailendra; Karakoti, Ajay; Graham, Rondell P; Maguire, Jacie L; Reilly, Christopher M; Seal, Sudipta; Rattan, Ramandeep; Shridhar, Viji

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is the fifth most common cause of death from all cancers among women in United Sates and the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. While most OvCa patients initially respond to surgical debulking and chemotherapy, 75% of patients later succumb to the disease. Thus, there is an urgent need to test novel therapeutic agents to counteract the high mortality rate associated with OvCa. In this context, we have developed and engineered Nanoceria (NCe), nanoparticles of cerium oxide, possessing anti-oxidant properties, to be used as a therapeutic agent in OvCa. We show for the first time that NCe significantly inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A2780 cells, attenuated growth factor (SDF1, HB-EGF, VEGF(165) and HGF) mediated cell migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells, without affecting the cell proliferation. NCe treatment also inhibited VEGF(165) induced proliferation, capillary tube formation, activation of VEGFR2 and MMP2 in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). NCe (0.1 mg/kg body weigh) treatment of A2780 ovarian cancer cells injected intra-peritoneally in nude mice showed significant reduction (p<0.002) in tumor growth accompanied by decreased tumor cell proliferation as evident from reduced tumor size and Ki67 staining. Accumulation of NCe was found in tumors isolated from treated group using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Reduction of the tumor mass was accompanied by attenuation of angiogenesis, as observed by reduced CD31 staining and specific apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. Collectively, these results indicate that cerium oxide based NCe is a novel nanoparticle that can potentially be used as an anti-angiogenic therapeutic agent in ovarian cancer.

  16. Nanoceria: a rare-earth nanoparticle as a novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic agent in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Giri

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer (OvCa is the fifth most common cause of death from all cancers among women in United Sates and the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. While most OvCa patients initially respond to surgical debulking and chemotherapy, 75% of patients later succumb to the disease. Thus, there is an urgent need to test novel therapeutic agents to counteract the high mortality rate associated with OvCa. In this context, we have developed and engineered Nanoceria (NCe, nanoparticles of cerium oxide, possessing anti-oxidant properties, to be used as a therapeutic agent in OvCa. We show for the first time that NCe significantly inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in A2780 cells, attenuated growth factor (SDF1, HB-EGF, VEGF(165 and HGF mediated cell migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells, without affecting the cell proliferation. NCe treatment also inhibited VEGF(165 induced proliferation, capillary tube formation, activation of VEGFR2 and MMP2 in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC. NCe (0.1 mg/kg body weigh treatment of A2780 ovarian cancer cells injected intra-peritoneally in nude mice showed significant reduction (p<0.002 in tumor growth accompanied by decreased tumor cell proliferation as evident from reduced tumor size and Ki67 staining. Accumulation of NCe was found in tumors isolated from treated group using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS. Reduction of the tumor mass was accompanied by attenuation of angiogenesis, as observed by reduced CD31 staining and specific apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. Collectively, these results indicate that cerium oxide based NCe is a novel nanoparticle that can potentially be used as an anti-angiogenic therapeutic agent in ovarian cancer.

  17. Maintenance Therapy in Ovarian Cancer with Targeted Agents Improves PFS and OS: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Qian

    Full Text Available Maintenance therapy with targeted agents for prolonging remission for ovarian cancer patients remains controversial. As a result, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of using maintenance therapy with targeted agents for the treatment of ovarian cancer.From inception to January 2015, we searched for randomized, controlled trials (RCTs using the following databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane Library, Clinicaltrials.gov and EBSCO. Eligible trials included RCTs that evaluated standard chemotherapy which was either followed or not followed by targeted maintenance in patients with ovarian cancer who had been previously receiving adjunctive treatments, such as cytoreductive surgery and standard chemotherapy. The outcome measures included progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and incidence of adverse events.A total of 13 RCTs, which were published between 2006 and 2014, were found to be in accordance with our inclusion criteria. The primary meta-analysis indicated that both PFS and OS were statistically and significantly improved in the targeted maintenance therapy group as compared to the control group (PFS: HR = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.75 to 0.95, p = 0.001; OS: HR = 0.91, 95%CI: 0.84 to 0.98, p = 0.02. When taking safety into consideration, the use of targeted agents was significantly correlated with increased risks of fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and hypertension. However, no significant differences were found in incidence rates of abdominal pain, constipation or joint pain.Our results indicate that targeted maintenance therapy clearly improves the survival of ovarian cancer patients but may also increase the incidence of adverse events. Additional randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter investigations will be required on a larger cohort of patients to verify our findings.

  18. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Radiotherapy has a longstanding and well-defined role in the treatment of resectable rectal cancer to reduce the historically high risk of local recurrence. In more advanced borderline or unresectable cases, where the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is breached or threatened according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), despite optimized local multimodality treatment and the gains achieved by modern high quality total mesorectal excision (TME), at least half the patients fail to achieve sufficient downstaging with current schedules. Many do not achieve an R0 resection. In less locally advanced cases, even if local control is achieved, this confers only a small impact on distant metastases and a significant proportion of patients (30-40%) still subsequently develop metastatic disease. In fact, distant metastases have now become the predominant cause of failure in rectal cancer. Therefore, increasing the intensity and efficacy of chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy by integrating additional cytotoxics and biologically targetted agents seems an appealing strategy to explore-with the aim of enhancing curative resection rates and improving distant control and survival. However, to date, we lack validated biomarkers for these biological agents apart from wild-type KRAS. For cetuximab, the appearance of an acneiform rash is associated with response, but low levels of magnesium appear more controversial. There are no molecular biomarkers for bevacizumab. Although some less invasive clinical markers have been proposed for bevacizumab, such as circulating endothelial cells (CECS), circulating levels of VEGF and the development of overt hypertension, these biomarkers have not been validated and are observed to emerge only after a trial of the agent. We also lack a simple method of ongoing monitoring of 'on target' effects of these biological agents, which could determine and pre-empt the development of resistance, prior to radiological and clinical assessessments or

  19. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Bao, Jin-ku, E-mail: jinkubao@yahoo.com [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  20. Activation of TRPA1 Channel by Antibacterial Agent Triclosan Induces VEGF Secretion in Human Prostate Cancer Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouiche, Sandra; Mariot, Pascal; Warnier, Marine; Vancauwenberghe, Eric; Bidaux, Gabriel; Gosset, Pierre; Mauroy, Brigitte; Bonnal, Jean-Louis; Slomianny, Christian; Delcourt, Philippe; Dewailly, Etienne; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Roudbaraki, Morad

    2017-03-01

    Accruing evidence indicates that exposure to environmental compounds may adversely affect human health and promote carcinogenesis. Triclosan (TCS), an antimicrobial agent widely used as a preservative in personal care products, has been shown to act as an endocrine disruptor in hormone-dependent tissues. Here, we demonstrate a new molecular mechanism by which TCS stimulates the secretion by human prostate cancer stromal cells of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a factor known to promote tumor growth. This mechanism involves an increase in intracellular calcium levels due to the direct activation of a membrane ion channel. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiology techniques, we show for the first time that environmentally relevant concentrations of TCS activate a cation channel of the TRP family, TRPA1 (Transient Receptor Potential Ankirin 1), in primary cultured human prostate cancer stromal cells. The TCS-induced TRPA1 activation increased basal calcium in stromal cells and stimulated the secretion of VEGF and epithelial cells proliferation. Interestingly, immunofluorescence labeling performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate tissues showed an exclusive expression of the TRPA1 channel in prostate cancer stromal cells. Our data demonstrate an impact of the environmental factor TCS on the tumor microenvironment interactions, by activating a tumor stroma-specific TRPA1 ion channel. Cancer Prev Res; 10(3); 177-87. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Agent Indomethacin Reduces Invasion and Alters Metabolism in a Human Breast Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ackerstaff

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Hostile physiological environments such as hypoxia and acidic extracellular pH, which exist in solid tumors, may promote invasion and metastasis through inflammatory responses and formation of eicosanoids. Here, we have investigated the effects of the antiinflammatory agent indomethacin on the invasion and metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-435 in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles (DME-based or Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI-based cell medium, using a magnetic resonance-compatible invasion assay. Indomethacin treatment significantly reduced the invasion of MDA-MB-435 cells independent of the culture and perfusion conditions examined. Significant changes were detected in levels of intracellular choline phospholipid metabolites and in triglyceride (TG concentrations of these cells, depending on indomethacin treatment and basal cell medium used. Additionally, genetic profiling of breast cancer cells, grown and treated with low-dose indomethacin in cell culture using an RPMI-based medium, revealed the upregulation of several genes implicating cyclooxygenaseindependent targets of indomethacin. These data confirm the ability of an anti-inflammatory agent to reduce breast cancer invasion and demonstrate, depending on cell culture and perfusion conditions, that the indomethacin-induced decrease in invasion is associated with changes in choline phospholipid metabolism, TG metabolism, and gene expression.

  2. Obtusifolin suppresses phthalate esters-induced breast cancer bone metastasis by targeting parathyroid hormone-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2014-12-10

    This study is the first to demonstrate that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), produced by human breast cancer cells after exposure to phthalate esters, contributes to bone metastasis by increasing osteoclastogenesis. This is also the first to reveal that obtusifolin reverses phthalate esters-mediated bone resorption. Human breast cancer cells were treated with dibutyl phthalate (DBP), harvested in conditioned medium, and cultured to osteoblasts or osteoclasts. Cultures of osteoblasts with DBP-MDA-MB-231-CM increased the osteoclastogenesis activator RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand) and M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor). PTHrP was secreted in MDA-MB-231 cells. DBP-MDA-MB-231-CM reduced osteoblasts to produce osteoprotegerin, an osteoclastogenesis inhibitor, while DBP mediated PTHrP up-regulation, increasing IL-8 secretion in MDA-MB-231 and contributing to breast cancer-mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Obtusifolin, a major bioactive compound present in Cassia tora L., suppressed phthalate esters-mediated bone resorption. Therefore, obtusifolin may be a novel anti-breast-cancer bone metastasis agent.

  3. First-line single agent treatment with gefitinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yong-Qian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is a malignant carcinoma which has the highest morbidity and mortality in Chinese population. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, displays anti-tumor activity. The present data regarding first-line treatment with single agent gefitinib against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in Chinese population are not sufficient. Purpose To assess the efficacy and toxicity of gefitinib in Chinese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, a study of single agent treatment with gefitinib in Chinese patients was conducted. Methods 45 patients with advanced NSCLC were treated with gefitinib (250 mg daily until the disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Results Among the 45 patients, 15 patients achieved partial response (PR, 17 patients experienced stable disease (SD, and 13 patients developed progression disease (PD. None of the patients achieved complete response (CR. The tumor response rate and disease control rate was 33% and 71.1%, respectively. Symptom remission rate was 72.5%, and median remission time was 8 days. Median overall survival and median progression-free survival was 15.3 months and 6.0 months, respectively. The main induced toxicities by gefitinib were skin rash and diarrhea (53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The minor induced toxicities included dehydration and pruritus of skin (26.7% and 22.2%, respectively. In addition, hepatic toxicity and oral ulceration occurred in few patients (6.7% and 4.4%2, respectively. Conclusions Single agent treatment with gefitinib is effective and well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC.

  4. Secondary metabolites inhibiting ABC transporters and reversing resistance of cancer cells and fungi to cytotoxic and antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eWink

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungal, bacterial and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: 1. Activation of ABC transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, 2. Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidise lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulphate or amino acids, and 3. Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarises the evidence that secondary metabolites of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids ( monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins, steroids (including cardiac glycosides and tetraterpenes but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse MDR, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these secondary metabolites are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion.

  5. Genotoxic anti-cancer agents and their relationship to DNA damage, mitosis, and checkpoint adaptation in proliferating cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Lucy H; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2014-02-25

    When a human cell detects damaged DNA, it initiates the DNA damage response (DDR) that permits it to repair the damage and avoid transmitting it to daughter cells. Despite this response, changes to the genome occur and some cells, such as proliferating cancer cells, are prone to genome instability. The cellular processes that lead to genomic changes after a genotoxic event are not well understood. Our research focuses on the relationship between genotoxic cancer drugs and checkpoint adaptation, which is the process of mitosis with damaged DNA. We examine the types of DNA damage induced by widely used cancer drugs and describe their effects upon proliferating cancer cells. There is evidence that cell death caused by genotoxic cancer drugs in some cases includes exiting a DNA damage cell cycle arrest and entry into mitosis. Furthermore, some cells are able to survive this process at a time when the genome is most susceptible to change or rearrangement. Checkpoint adaptation is poorly characterised in human cells; we predict that increasing our understanding of this pathway may help to understand genomic instability in cancer cells and provide insight into methods to improve the efficacy of current cancer therapies.

  6. Synergistic antitumor activity of oncolytic reovirus and chemotherapeutic agents in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffey Matthew C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reovirus type 3 Dearing strain (ReoT3D has an inherent propensity to preferentially infect and destroy cancer cells. The oncolytic activity of ReoT3D as a single agent has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo against various cancers, including colon, pancreatic, ovarian and breast cancers. Its human safety and potential efficacy are currently being investigated in early clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the in vitro combination effects of ReoT3D and chemotherapeutic agents against human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Results ReoT3D alone exerted significant cytolytic activity in 7 of 9 NSCLC cell lines examined, with the 50% effective dose, defined as the initial virus dose to achieve 50% cell killing after 48 hours of infection, ranging from 1.46 ± 0.12 ~2.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± SD log10 pfu/cell. Chou-Talalay analysis of the combination of ReoT3D with cisplatin, gemcitabine, or vinblastine demonstrated strong synergistic effects on cell killing, but only in cell lines that were sensitive to these compounds. In contrast, the combination of ReoT3D and paclitaxel was invariably synergistic in all cell lines tested, regardless of their levels of sensitivity to either agent. Treatment of NSCLC cell lines with the ReoT3D-paclitaxel combination resulted in increased poly (ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage and caspase activity compared to single therapy, indicating enhanced apoptosis induction in dually treated NSCLC cells. NSCLC cells treated with the ReoT3D-paclitaxel combination showed increased proportions of mitotic and apoptotic cells, and a more pronounced level of caspase-3 activation was demonstrated in mitotically arrested cells. Conclusion These data suggest that the oncolytic activity of ReoT3D can be potentiated by taxanes and other chemotherapeutic agents, and that the ReoT3D-taxane combination most effectively achieves synergy through accelerated apoptosis triggered by prolonged mitotic arrest.

  7. CALCIUM AND VITAMIN-D - POSSIBLE PROTECTIVE AGENTS AGAINST COLORECTAL-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLEIBEUKER, JH; VANDERMEER, R; DEVRIES, EGE

    1995-01-01

    Nutritional factors are important determinants of colorectal cancer risk. Diets high in fat and/or low in fibre are especially recognised to increase risk. Dietary calcium and vitamin D have been suggested to be protective against colorectal cancer. With respect to calcium, its possible effect is

  8. Alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a wave of global protein hyperacetylation: Implications in cancer cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Joo-In; Kwak, Jong-Young; Chung, Jay H.; Yun, Jeanho

    2007-01-01

    Protein acetylation modification has been implicated in many cellular processes but the direct evidence for the involvement of protein acetylation in signal transduction is very limited. In the present study, we found that an alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a robust and reversible hyperacetylation of both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins during the early phase of the cellular response to MMS. Notably, the acetylation level upon MMS treatment was strongly correlated with the susceptibility of cancer cells, and the enhancement of MMS-induced acetylation by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors was shown to increase the cellular susceptibility. These results suggest protein acetylation is important for the cell death signal transduction pathway and indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of cancer is relevant

  9. Effect of capping agents on the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in human normal and cancer skin cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netchareonsirisuk, Ponsawan [Chulalongkorn University, Program in Biotechnology, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Puthong, Songchan [Chulalongkorn University, Antibody Production Research Unit, Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (Thailand); Dubas, Stephan [Chulalongkorn University, Petroleum and Petrochemical College (Thailand); Palaga, Tanapat [Chulalongkorn University, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Komolpis, Kittinan, E-mail: kittinan.k@chula.ac.th [Chulalongkorn University, Antibody Production Research Unit, Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (Thailand)

    2016-11-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are among the most widely used nanomaterials in medical and consumer products. However, safety in the uses of AgNPs is still controversial. The toxicity of AgNPs toward various cell types has been reported to depend on the surface properties of the nanoparticles. In this study, the effect of AgNPs with the average size of 5–15 nm on the viability of the CCD-986SK human normal skin fibroblast cell line and A375 human malignant melanoma cell line was evaluated. Comparative toxicity studies, based on MTT assay, were performed by using either sodium alginate or poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt (PSSMA) as capping agent in the nanoparticle preparation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that AgNO{sub 3} alone was highly toxic to both cell types while both alginate and PSSMA alone were not toxic. AgNPs capped with alginate were selectively toxic to the cancer cell line but not to the normal cell line while AgNPs capped with PSSMA were toxic to both cancer and normal cell lines. Judging from the 50 % inhibition concentration (IC{sub 50}), it was found that the cancer cell line was more sensitive to AgNPs than the normal cell line. Study on the mode of cell death by annexin V and propidium iodide staining revealed that AgNPs induced more apoptotic cell death (84–90 %) than necrosis (8–12 %) in the skin cancer cell line. These results suggest that the toxicity of AgNPs depended on the type of capping agent and the type of cell line.

  10. Diagnostic significance of gas distension technique of the stomach with gas-forming agent on CT scan of stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Tae Jin; Song, Chang June; Choi, Joong Chan; Park, Cheong Hee; Cho, June Sik; Rhee, Byung Chull

    1988-01-01

    CT is a valuable method for preoperative staging of patients with stomach cancers. However, in patients with poor distension of the stomach and scanty fat between the stomach and adjacent organs, CT findings may indicate a false impression of gastric wall thickening and cannot provide the precise extent of stomach cancer. We studied the usefulness of gastric distension by gas-forming agent in 28 cases of pathologically confirmed gastric cancers on CT. Comparative analysis between CT findings and surgical pathologic findings was done in 22 cases who underwent surgery. The results were as follows; 1. Conventional CT failed to define the wall thickening or masses of the stomach, in 14 cases of 23 advanced gastric cancers, while CT with gas distension technique allowed good visualization in all advanced gastric cancers. 2. In 2 cases of 5 early gastric cancers, CT with gas distension technique could detect focal thickening of the gastric wall, even less than 1cm thickness. 3. Among 13 cases with indistinguishable border between stomach and liver on conventional CT, 7 cases were diagnosed as negative invasion on CT with gas distension technique and 5 cases of these were confirmed by surgery. 4. Among 11 cases with indistinguishable border between stomach and pancreas on conventional CT, 3 cases were diagnosed as negative invasion on CT with gas distension technique, all of which were confirmed by surgery. 5. There was no significant difference between conventional CT and CT with gas distension technique of the stomach to diagnose invasion into transverse colon, transverse colon, transverse mesocolon, lymph node metastasis, and various distant metastasis.

  11. Centchroman induces redox-dependent apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human endometrial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Hari; Singh, Neetu; Kaushik, Shweta; Sharma, Ramesh; Balapure, Anil K

    2017-04-01

    Centchroman (CC) or Ormeloxifene has been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in various types of cancer cells. This has, however, not been addressed for endometrial cancer cells where its (CC) mechanism of action remains unclear. This study focuses on the basis of antineoplasticity of CC by blocking the targets involved in the cell cycle, survival and apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Ishikawa Human Endometrial Cancer Cells were cultured under estrogen deprived medium, exposed to CC and analyzed for proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we also analyzed oxidative stress induced by CC. Cell viability studies confirmed the IC 50 of CC in Ishikawa cells to be 20 µM after 48 h treatment. CC arrests the cells in G0/G1 phase through cyclin D1 and cyclin E mediated pathways. Phosphatidylserine externalization, nuclear morphology changes, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, and alteration of Bcl-2 family protein expression clearly suggest ongoing apoptosis in the CC treated cells. Activation of caspase 3 & 9, up-regulation of AIF and inhibition of apoptosis by z-VAD-fmk clearly explains the participation of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. Further, the increase of ROS, loss of MMP, inhibition of antioxidant (MnSOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and GST) and inhibition of apoptosis with L-NAC suggests CC induced oxidative stress leading to apoptosis via mitochondria mediated pathway. Therefore, CC could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of Endometrial Cancer adjunct to its utility as a contraceptive and an anti-breast cancer agent.

  12. Modulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression by Chemotherapeutic Agents in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welch, James

    2002-01-01

    ... this protein a potentially powerful tumor promoter. The association between higher EOFR expression and poorer prognosis in breast cancer and the frequency of higher EGFR levels in more aggressive/metastatic breast tumors reinforce this possibility...

  13. Modulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression by Chemotherapeutic Agents in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welch, James

    2001-01-01

    ... this protein a potentially powerful tumor promoter. The association between higher EGFR expression and poorer prognosis in breast cancer and the frequency of higher EGFR levels in more aggressive/metastatic breast tumors reinforce this possibility...

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of andrographolide analogues as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Ranjan; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Siddharth, Sumit; Mohapatra, Purusottam; Das, Dipon; Satapathy, Shakti Ranjan; Das, Supriya; Maiti, Nakul C; Maulik, Prakas R; Kundu, Chanakya Nath; Chowdhury, Chinmay

    2014-10-06

    A new family of andrographolide analogues were synthesized and screened in vitro against kidney (HEK-293) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. The anti-cancer effects of the active analogues (2b, 2c and 4c) were determined by multiple cell based assays such as MTT, immunostaining, FACS, western blotting and transcriptional inhibition of NF-κB activity. Importantly, these compounds were found to possess higher anti-cancer potency than andrographolide and low toxicity to normal (VERO and MCF-10A) cells. Increased level of Bax/Bcl-xL ratio, caspase 3, and sub G1 population, higher expression level of tumor suppressor protein p53 and lower expression level of NF-κB suggested potent apoptotic property of the active analogues. Data revealed that the andrographolide derivative-mediated cell death in cancer cells was p53 dependent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Polymer-Based Materials in Cancer Treatment: From Therapeutic Carrier and Ultrasound Contrast Agent to Theranostic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methachan, Boriphat; Thanapprapasr, Kamolrat

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of theranostics with ultrasound technology is a promising development, as it opens pathways to providing more effective treatments for cancer. Advancements in ultrasound imaging would give a more detailed and accurate image for better diagnosis and treatment planning. Polymeric ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are appealing because they are stable and easily modified for active targeting. In addition, a better therapy could be achieved in conjunction with advancements in UCAs. The active targeting not only makes the precise imaging possible, but also leads to targeted delivery of active components to specific local treatment sites. A polymeric nanocarrier with surface bioconjugation is the key to prolonging the bioavailability of the encapsulated drugs or genes and the capacity to target the specific tumor site. Using ultrasound with other imaging modalities will open more precise and better ways for diagnosis and therapy and bring us a step closer to personalized medicine. This review focuses on polymer-based materials of UCAs, multimodal imaging agents and therapeutic carriers that have been currently explored for their theranostic applications involving ultrasound for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Digital PCR quantification of MGMT methylation refines prediction of clinical benefit from alkylating agents in glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barault, L; Amatu, A; Bleeker, F E; Moutinho, C; Falcomatà, C; Fiano, V; Cassingena, A; Siravegna, G; Milione, M; Cassoni, P; De Braud, F; Rudà, R; Soffietti, R; Venesio, T; Bardelli, A; Wesseling, P; de Witt Hamer, P; Pietrantonio, F; Siena, S; Esteller, M; Sartore-Bianchi, A; Di Nicolantonio, F

    2015-09-01

    O(6)-methyl-guanine-methyl-transferase (MGMT) silencing by promoter methylation may identify cancer patients responding to the alkylating agents dacarbazine or temozolomide. We evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of MGMT methylation testing both in tumor and cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) from plasma samples using an ultra-sensitive two-step digital PCR technique (methyl-BEAMing). Results were compared with two established techniques, methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and Bs-pyrosequencing. Thresholds for MGMT methylated status for each technique were established in a training set of 98 glioblastoma (GBM) patients. The prognostic and the predictive value of MGMT methylated status was validated in a second cohort of 66 GBM patients treated with temozolomide in which methyl-BEAMing displayed a better specificity than the other techniques. Cutoff values of MGMT methylation specific for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) tissue samples were established in a cohort of 60 patients treated with dacarbazine. In mCRC, both quantitative assays methyl-BEAMing and Bs-pyrosequencing outperformed MSP, providing better prediction of treatment response and improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) (P alkylating agents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Novel Listeria Vectors Secreting Gut Flora Altering Agents to Prevent Colon Cancer and Treat Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    84 years of age. The significant age risk for colorectal cancer is extensively validated in the USA and worldwide in industrial countries (reviewed...mitigate age-related colitis and related colon cancer risk. Effects will be tested in both young and aged mice in well-established models of colitis and...wild type versus B7-H1 KO mice (which represent mice treated with recombinant scFv vectors). Epithelial damage was significantly more severe in B7-H1

  18. Benzene-poly-carboxylic acid complex, a novel anti-cancer agent induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Fares

    Full Text Available Some cases of breast cancer are composed of clones of hormonal-independent growing cells, which do not respond to therapy. In the present study, the effect of Benzene-Poly-Carboxylic Acid Complex (BP-C1 on growth of human breast-cancer cells was tested. BP-C1 is a novel anti-cancer complex of benzene-poly-carboxylic acids with a very low concentration of cis-diammineplatinum (II dichloride. Human breast cancer cells, MCF-7 and T47D, were used. Cell viability was detected by XTT assay and apoptosis was detected by Flow Cytometry and by annexin V/FITC/PI assay. Caspases were detected by western blot analysis and gene expression was measured by using the Applied Biosystems® TaqMan® Array Plates. The results showed that exposure of the cells to BP-C1 for 48 h, significantly (P<0.001 reduced cell viability, induced apoptosis and activated caspase 8 and caspace 9. Moreover, gene expression experiments indicated that BP-C1 increased the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (CASP8AP1, TNFRSF21, NFkB2, FADD, BCL10 and CASP8 and lowered the level of mRNA transcripts of inhibitory apoptotic genes (BCL2L11, BCL2L2 and XIAP. These findings may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of human cancer using BP-C1 analog.

  19. Role of Bone-Modifying Agents in Metastatic Breast Cancer: An American Society of Clinical Oncology-Cancer Care Ontario Focused Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poznak, Catherine; Somerfield, Mark R; Barlow, William E; Biermann, J Sybil; Bosserman, Linda D; Clemons, Mark J; Dhesy-Thind, Sukhbinder K; Dillmon, Melissa S; Eisen, Andrea; Frank, Elizabeth S; Jagsi, Reshma; Jimenez, Rachel; Theriault, Richard L; Vandenberg, Theodore A; Yee, Gary C; Moy, Beverly

    2017-12-10

    Purpose To update, in collaboration with Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), key recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline on the role of bone-modifying agents (BMAs) in metastatic breast cancer. This focused update addressed the new data on intervals between dosing and the role of BMAs in control of bone pain. Methods A joint ASCO-CCO Update Committee conducted targeted systematic literature reviews to identify relevant studies. Results The Update Committee reviewed three phase III noninferiority trials of dosing intervals, one systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of de-escalation of BMAs, and two randomized trials of BMAs in control of pain secondary to bone metastases. Recommendations Patients with breast cancer who have evidence of bone metastases should be treated with BMAs. Options include denosumab, 120 mg subcutaneously, every 4 weeks; pamidronate, 90 mg intravenously, every 3 to 4 weeks; or zoledronic acid, 4 mg intravenously every 12 weeks or every 3 to 4 weeks. The analgesic effects of BMAs are modest, and they should not be used alone for bone pain. The Update Committee recommends that the current standard of care for supportive care and pain management-analgesia, adjunct therapies, radiotherapy, surgery, systemic anticancer therapy, and referral to supportive care and pain management-be applied. Evidence is insufficient to support the use of one BMA over another. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  20. Comparative effectiveness analysis of monotherapy with cytotoxic agents in triple-negative metastatic breast cancer in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsaris, George; Gluck, Stefan; Faria, Claudio; Cox, David; Rugo, Hope

    2015-01-01

    There has been considerable progress in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. However, the identification of optimal cytotoxic agents in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (negative for hormone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) remains a therapeutic challenge. We conducted a comparative effectiveness analysis of 4 cytotoxic agents in patients with TNBC. We retrospectively identified patients who received single-agent chemotherapy with eribulin, capecitabine, gemcitabine, or vinorelbine from 19 community oncology clinics across the United States. Data collection included baseline patient and disease characteristics, prior therapies, performance status, duration of current therapy, growth-factor use and other supportive care, and dose-limiting toxicities and associated dose reductions or delays or skipped doses. Time to treatment failure (TTF) was measured from the first cycle of chemotherapy until disease progression, discontinuation due to toxicity, or death. TTF was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards modeling adjusted for clustering on the practice site. To control for selection bias, which is inherent in observational studies, a propensity score-weighted TTF analysis was also conducted. Data from 225 patients were included in the analysis (eribulin, 47 patients; capecitabine, 69; gemcitabine, 56; and vinorelbine, 53). The median age of each group was exception of the gemcitabine group (63 years). The 4 groups were comparable with respect to age, performance status, duration of disease-free survival, presence of comorbidities, and hemoglobin level before the start of chemotherapy. Median lines of therapy of eribulin, capecitabine, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine and were 4th, 2nd, 3rd, and 3rd, respectively. The median durations of treatment were ~2 months with eribulin, capecitabine, and gemcitabine compared with 1.6 months with vinorelbine. Using eribulin as the reference drug, and with

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs as anti-cancer and anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Sayed; Nam, Young-Joo; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, a series of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs were synthesized and then evaluated in terms of their cytotoxic activities against four human cancer cell lines, e.g. lung cancer (A549), ovarian cancer (SK-OV-3), skin cancer (SK-MEL-2), and colon cancer (HCT15), as well as anti-microbial activities against three microbes, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, and Aspergillus niger. The title compounds were synthesized by Knoevenagel condensation reaction of benzyl cyanide or p-nitrobenzyl cyanide with substituted benzaldehydes in good yields. Most of the compounds exhibited significant suppressive activities against the growth of all cancer cell lines. Compound 3c was most active in inhibiting the growth of A549, SK-OV-3, SK-MEL-2, and HCT15 cells lines with IC50 values of 0.57, 0.14, 0.65, and 0.34 mg/mL, respectively, followed by compounds 3f, 3i, and 3h. Compound 3c exhibited 2.4 times greater cytotoxic activity against HCT15 cells, whereas it showed similar potency against SK-OV-3 cells to that of the standard anti-cancer agent doxorubicin. Structure-activity relationship study revealed that electron-donating groups at the para-position of phenyl ring B were more favorable for improved cytotoxic activity, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups was unfavorable compare to unsubstituted acrylonitrile. An optimal electron density on phenyl ring A of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs was crucial for their cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines used in the present study. Qualitative structure-cytotoxic activity relationships were studied using physicochemical parameters; a good correlation between calculated polar surface area (PSA), a lipophobic parameter, and cytotoxic activity was found. Moreover, all compounds showed significant anti-bacterial activities against S. typhi, whereas compound 3k showed potent inhibition against both S. aureus and S. typhi bacterial strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  2. Gender-specific effects of oral hypoglycaemic agents on cancer risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G E C; Wells, B J; Yip, K; Zimmerman, R; Raghavan, D; Kattan, M W; Kashyap, S R

    2014-03-01

    To analyse the association between cancer incidence and oral diabetes therapy (biguanide, sulphonylurea, thiazolidinedione and meglitinide) in men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A retrospective analysis of the electronic health record-based Cleveland Clinic Diabetes Registry (25 613 patients) was cross-indexed with the histology-based tumour registry (48 051 cancer occurrences) over an 8-year period (1998-2006). Multiple imputations were used to account for missing data. Cox regression with propensity scores was used to model time for the development of incident cancer in each of the imputed datasets and the results were pooled. During 51 994 person follow-up years, 892 incident cancer cases were identified; prostate (14.5%) and breast (11.7%) malignancies were most frequent. In women, thiazolidinedione use was associated with a 32% decreased cancer risk compared with sulphonylurea use [hazard ratio (HR) 0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48-0.97, in the adjusted analysis]. Comparison of insulin secretagogues (sulphonylurea and meglitinide) versus insulin sensitizers (biguanide and thiazolidinedione) demonstrated a 21% decreased cancer risk in insulin sensitizers [HR 0.79 (95% CI 0.64-0.98) in the adjusted analysis]. Oral diabetes therapy showed no significant difference in men. Adjustments were made for age, body mass index (BMI), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides, coronary heart disease (CHD), diabetes oral monotherapy, race, gender, haemoglobin A1c, statin use, income, insulin use, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), new diabetes status, prior cancer, prior cerebrovascular accident (stroke or transient ischaemic event), systolic/diastolic blood pressure, tobacco use (ever/never) and the propensity score for receiving a biguanide. Oral insulin sensitizers, particularly thiazolidinedione, are associated with decreased malignancy risk in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Evaluation of respiration of mitochondria in cancer cells exposed to mitochondria-targeted agents.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klučková, Katarína; Dong, L. F.; Bajziková, Martina; Rohlena, Jakub; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1265, 07 Oct 2015 (2015), s. 181-194 ISSN 1940-6029 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Animals * Antineoplastic Agents * drug effects * *pharmacology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Quantitative approach to skin field cancerization using a nanoencapsulated photodynamic therapy agent: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passos SK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Simone K Passos,1,2 Paulo EN de Souza,3 Priscila KP Soares,1,3 Danglades RM Eid,1,2 Fernando L Primo,4 Antonio Cláudio Tedesco,4 Zulmira GM Lacava,1 Paulo C Morais3,51University of Brasília, Institute of Biological Sciences, DF, Brazil; 2Foundation for Teaching and Research on Health Sciences, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 3University of Brasília, Institute of Physics, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Philosophy, Sciences and Letters of Ribeirão Preto, Laboratory of Photobiology and Photomedicine, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Control Science and Engineering, Hua-Zhong University of Science and Technology, Wuham, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: This paper introduces a new nanoformulation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (nano-ALA as well as a novel quantitative approach towards evaluating field cancerization for actinic keratosis and/or skin photodamage. In this pilot study, we evaluated field cancerization using nano-ALA and methyl aminolevulinate (MAL, the latter being commercialized as Metvix®.Methods and results: Photodynamic therapy was used for the treatment of patients with selected skin lesions, whereas the fluorescence of the corresponding photosensitizer was used to evaluate the time evolution of field cancerization in a quantitative way. Field cancerization was quantified using newly developed color image segmentation software. Using photodynamic therapy as the precancer skin treatment and the approach introduced herein for evaluation of fluorescent area, we found that the half-life of field cancerization reduction was 43.3 days and 34.3 days for nano-ALA and MAL, respectively. We also found that nano-ALA targeted about 45% more skin lesion areas than MAL. Further, we found the mean reduction in area of skin field cancerization was about 10% greater for nano-ALA than for MAL.Conclusion: Although preliminary, our findings indicate that the efficacy of nano-ALA in

  5. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  6. Diet Modulation is an Effective Complementary Agent in Preventing and Treating Breast Cancer Lung Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangmin; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Wang, Dezhi; Siegal, Gene P.; Hardy, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    A significant percentage of breast cancer victims will suffer from metastases indicating that new approaches to preventing breast cancer metastasis are thus needed. Dietary stearate and chemotherapy have been shown to reduce breast cancer metastasis. We tested the complementary use of dietary stearate with a taxol-based chemotherapy which work through separate mechanisms to reduce breast cancer metastasis. We therefore carried out a prevention study in which diets were initiated prior to human MDA-MB-435 cancer cells being injected into the host and a treatment study in which diets were combined with paclitaxel (PTX). Using an orthotopic athymic nude mouse model and three diets (corn oil control diet/CO, low fat /LF or stearate/ST) the prevention study demonstrated that the ST diet decreased the incidence of lung metastasis by 50% compared to both the LF and CO diets. The ST diet also reduced the number and size of metastatic lung nodules compared to the LF diet. Results of the treatment study indicated that both the CO and ST diets decreased the number of mice with lung metastasis compared to the LF diet. Both CO and ST also decreased the number of lung metastases per mouse compared to the LF diet however only the ST diet cohort was significant. Histomorphometric analysis of the lung tumor tissue indicated that the ST diet plus PTX decreased angiogenesis compared to the LF diet plus PTX. In conclusion these results support combining diet with chemotherapy in both treatment and prevention settings. PMID:24832758

  7. Where Do Bone-Targeted Agents RANK in Breast Cancer Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger von Moos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cells preferentially metastasise to the skeleton, owing, in part, to the fertile environment provided by bone. Increased bone turnover releases growth factors that promote tumour cell growth. In turn, tumour cells release factors that stimulate further bone turnover, resulting in a vicious cycle of metastasis growth and bone destruction. The RANK-RANK ligand (RANKL pathway plays a key role in this cycle, and inhibition of RANKL using the fully-human monoclonal antibody denosumab, has demonstrated efficacy in delaying skeletal complications associated with bone metastases in three phase 3 trials. Preclinical studies suggest that the RANKL pathway also plays a role in breast cancer tumourigenesis and migration to bone. In a subgroup analysis of the negative Adjuvant Zoledronic Acid to Reduce Recurrence (AZURE trial, the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid showed potential for improving survival in patients who were postmenopausal; however, a prospective study in this patient population is required to validate this observation. Ongoing trials are examining whether adjuvant blockade of the RANKL pathway using denosumab can prevent disease recurrence in patients with high-risk breast cancer. These are building on analogous studies that have shown that denosumab improves bone metastasis-free survival in prostate cancer and suggested that it confers an overall survival benefit in non-small-cell lung cancer.

  8. Preclinical and Clinical Assessment of Cannabinoids as Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Ladin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States with 1.7 million new cases estimated to be diagnosed in 2016. This disease remains a formidable clinical challenge and represents a substantial financial burden to the US health care system. Therefore, research and development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer is of high priority. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have been utilized for their medicinal and therapeutic properties throughout history. Cannabinoid activity is regulated through the endocannabinoid system, which is comprised of cannabinoid receptors, transporters, and enzymes involved in cannabinoid synthesis and breakdown. More recently, cannabinoids have gained special attention for their role in cancer development and reduction. However, many studies investigated these roles using in vitro models which may not adequately mimic tumor growth and metastasis. As such, this article aims to review study results which evaluated effects of cannabinoids from plant, synthetic and endogenous origins on cancer development in preclinical models and to examine the current standing of cannabinoids currently being tested in human cancer patients.

  9. Nursing Implications of Chemotherapy Agents and Their Associated Side Effects in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hronek, Jan W; Reed, Maureen

    2015-12-01

    Survival for patients with advanced (locally advanced unresectable and metastatic disease) pancreatic cancer is very poor; however, several advances in treatment have been made during the past several years. Gemcitabine (Gemzar®)-based regimens, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane®)-based regimens have demonstrated efficacy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Understanding the unique safety profile of each of these regimens is crucial in helping nurses identify symptoms, develop patient education strategies, and ultimately improve outcomes. This article aims to provide background information on and nursing implications of the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer by exploring the mechanism of action and efficacy and safety profiles of standard treatment regimens. Key trials of standard treatment regimens used in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer were examined with respect to efficacy outcomes and the most commonly observed adverse events. Symptom identification and management strategies are discussed from the nursing perspective. The current standard treatment options for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have differences in efficacy and safety profiles. Nurses should educate themselves on these differences, particularly on associated adverse events and their management.

  10. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai Q Tran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  11. Integration of targeted agents in the neo-adjuvant treatment of gastro-esophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, D G; Ilson, D H

    2009-11-01

    Pre- and peri-operative strategies are becoming standard for the management of localized gastro-esophageal cancer. For localized gastric/gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer there are conflicting data that a peri-operative approach with cisplatin-based chemotherapy improves survival, with the benefits seen in esophageal cancer likely less than a 5-10% incremental improvement. Further trends toward improvement in local control and survival, when combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy are given pre-operatively, are suggested by recent phase III trials. In fit patients, a significant survival benefit with pre-operative chemoradiation is seen in those patients who achieve a pathologic complete response. In esophageal/GEJ cancer, definitive chemoradiation is now considered in medically inoperable patients. In squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, surgery after primary chemoradiation is not clearly associated with an improved overall survival, however, local control may be better. In localized gastric/GEJ cancer, the integration of bevacizumab with pre-operative chemotherapy is being explored in large randomized studies, and with chemoradiotherapy in pilot trials. The addition of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor and anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibody treatment to pre-operative chemoradiation continues to be explored. Early results show the integration of targeted therapy is feasible. Metabolic imaging can predict early response to pre-operative chemotherapy and biomarkers may further predict response to pre-operative chemo-targeted therapy. A multimodality approach to localized gastro-esophageal cancer has resulted in better outcomes. For T3 or node-positive disease, surgery alone is no longer considered appropriate and neo-adjuvant therapy is recommended. The future of neo-adjuvant strategies in this disease will involve the individualization of therapy with the integration of molecular signatures, targeted therapy, metabolic imaging

  12. Slug increases sensitivity to tubulin-binding agents via the downregulation of βIII and βIVa-tubulin in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Daisuke; Arao, Tokuzo; Nagai, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Aomatsu, Keiichi; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Matsumoto, Kazuko; De Velasco, Marco A; Kato, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Yoshida, Shuhei; Kimura, Hideharu; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Nishio, Wataru; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Kotani, Yoshikazu; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Kazuto

    2013-04-01

    Transcription factor Slug/SNAI2 (snail homolog 2) plays a key role in the induction of the epithelial mesenchymal transition in cancer cells; however, whether the overexpression of Slug mediates the malignant phenotype and alters drug sensitivity in lung cancer cells remains largely unclear. We investigated Slug focusing on its biological function and involvement in drug sensitivity in lung cancer cells. Stable Slug transfectants showed typical morphological changes compared with control cells. Slug overexpression did not change the cellular proliferations; however, migration activity and anchorage-independent growth activity with an antiapoptotic effect were increased. Interestingly, stable Slug overexpression increased drug sensitivity to tubulin-binding agents including vinorelbine, vincristine, and paclitaxel (5.8- to 8.9-fold increase) in several lung cancer cell lines but did not increase sensitivity to agents other than tubulin-binding agents. Real-time RT-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and western blotting revealed that Slug overexpression downregulated the expression of βIII and βIVa-tubulin, which is considered to be a major factor determining sensitivity to tubulin-binding agents. A luciferase reporter assay confirmed that Slug suppressed the promoter activity of βIVa-tubulin at a transcriptional level. Slug overexpression enhanced tumor growth, whereas Slug overexpression increased drug sensitivity to vinorelbine with the downregulation of βIII and βIV-tubulin in vivo. Immunohistochemistry of Slug with clinical lung cancer samples showed that Slug overexpression tended to be involved in response to tubulin-binding agents. In conclusion, our data indicate that Slug mediates an aggressive phenotype including enhanced migration activity, anoikis suppression, and tumor growth, but increases sensitivity to tubulin-binding agents via the downregulation of βIII and βIVa-tubulin in lung cancer cells.

  13. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial fo...

  14. Pterostilbene, a Potent Analog of Resveratrol, a Therapeutic Agent in Prostate Cancer: Epigenetic Mechanisms of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    mediated pathways.  We performed MTA1 ChIP-Seq analysis of prostate tissues from transgenic mice and identified potential MTA1 target genes that...Yokota, H. Ashihara, M.E. Lean, and A. Crozier. 2002. Plant foods and herbal sources of resveratrol. J. Agric. Food Chem. 50:3337– 3340. Dehm, S.M...2011. Resveratrol derivatives as promising chemopreventive agents with improved potency and selectivity. Mol. Nutr. Food Res. 55:1249- 1265. Li, K

  15. Engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells--metastases suppressor factors as change agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Mann, Anita; Aggarwal, Suruchi; Kumar, Maneesh; Roy, Sumitabho Deb; Pore, Subrata Kumar; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Mahesh Kumar, Jerald; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Building molecular correlates of drug resistance in cancer and exploiting them for therapeutic intervention remains a pressing clinical need. To identify factors that impact drug resistance herein we built a model that couples inherent cell-based response toward drugs with transcriptomes of resistant/sensitive cells. To test this model, we focused on a group of genes called metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that influence aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancers. Interestingly, modeling of 84 000 drug response transcriptome combinations predicted multiple MSGs to be associated with resistance of different cell types and drugs. As a case study, on inducing MSG levels in a drug resistant breast cancer line resistance to anticancer drugs caerulomycin, camptothecin and topotecan decreased by more than 50-60%, in both culture conditions and also in tumors generated in mice, in contrast to control un-induced cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells based on a model that exploits inherent cellular response profiles.

  16. Sulforaphane – a possible agent in prevention and therapy of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Tomczyk

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN is an isothiocyanate that is naturally present in cruciferous vegetables, with high concentration in broccoli. The results of the most recent studies indicate multi-targeted sulforaphane actions which may contribute to prevention and therapy of cancer. Protective properties of sulforaphane have been observed in every stage of carcinogenesis. The mechanism of protection against the initiation of carcinogenesis by SFN includes modulation of phase I and II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as direct blocking of specific binding sites of carcinogens with the DNA molecule. As a result, sulforaphane inhibits DNA adduct formation, thus reducing the risk of mutations. Further sulforaphane activity is targeted at cancer cells and prevents their expansion due to regulation of proliferation and induction of differentiation or apoptosis. In vitro studies using various types of cancer cells have revealed the ability of SFN to arrest the cell cycle, particularly in G2/M, while SFN at higher concentration is shown to activate apoptotic pathways. The possible SFN anticancer effect in the progression stage of carcinogenesis has been proved by only a few studies, which provide evidence for its antiangiogenic and antimetastatic influence. Additionally, SFN exhibits anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects relevant to cancer prevention.Apart from the biological activity of SFN, this review also focuses on its bioavailability and tissue distribution as well as individuals’ genetic predispositions as significant factors influencing the potential efficiency of chemoprevention using this compound.

  17. High-throughput screening identifies novel agents eliciting hypersensitivity in Fanconi pathway-deficient cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gallmeier, E.; Hucl, T.; Brody, J.R.; Dezentje, D.A.; Tahir, K.; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Bachman, K.E.; Kern, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 5 (2007), s. 2169-2177 ISSN 0008-5472 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/2030; GA MZd(CZ) NR8562 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cancer * Fanconi anemia pathway * p53 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 7.672, year: 2007

  18. Gold-coated magnetic nanoparticle as a nanotheranostic agent for magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyvazzadeh, Nazila; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali; Fekrazad, Reza; Amini, Elahe; Ghaznavi, Habib; Kamran Kamrava, S

    2017-09-01

    Because of their great scientific and technological potentials, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been the focus of extensive investigations in biomedicine over the past decade. Additionally, the surface plasmon resonance effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) makes them a good candidate for photothermal therapy applications. The unique properties of both IONPs (magnetic) and AuNPs (surface plasmon resonance) may lead to the development of a multi-modal nanoplatform to be used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and as a nanoheater for photothermal therapy. Herein, core-shell gold-coated IONPs (Au@IONPs) were synthesized and investigated as an MRI contrast agent and as a light-responsive agent for cancer photothermal therapy.The synthesized Au@IONPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential analysis. The transverse relaxivity (r 2 ) of the Au@IONPs was measured using a 3-T clinical MRI scanner. Through a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, the cytotoxicity of the Au@IONs was examined on a KB cell line, derived from the epidermal carcinoma of a human mouth. Moreover, the photothermal effects of Au@IONPs in the presence of a laser beam (λ = 808 nm; 6.3 W/cm 2 ; 5 min) were studied.The results show that the Au@IONPs are spherical with a hydrodynamic size of 33 nm. A transverse relaxivity of 95 mM -1  S -1 was measured for the synthesized Au@IONPs. It is evident from the MTT results that no significant cytotoxicity in KB cells occurs with Au@IONPs. Additionally, no significant cell damage induced by the laser is observed. Following the photothermal treatment using Au@IONPs, approximately 70% cell death is achieved. It is found that cell lethality depended strongly on incubation period and the Au@IONP concentration.The data highlight the potential of Au@IONPs as a dual-function MRI contrast agent and

  19. Subchronic toxicity, immunoregulation and anti-breast tumor effect of Nordamnacantal, an anthraquinone extracted from the stems of Morinda citrifolia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu, Nadiah; Zamberi, Nur Rizi; Yeap, Swee Keong; Nordin, Noraini; Mohamad, Nurul Elyani; Romli, Muhammad Firdaus; Rasol, Nurulfazlina Edayah; Subramani, Tamilselvan; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2018-01-27

    Morinda citrifolia L. that was reported with immunomodulating and cytotoxic effects has been traditionally used to treat multiple illnesses including cancer. An anthraquinone derived from fruits of Morinda citrifolia L., nordamnacanthal, is a promising agent possessing several in vitro biological activities. However, the in vivo anti-tumor effects and the safety profile of nordamnacanthal are yet to be evaluated. In vitro cytotoxicity of nordamnacanthal was tested using MTT, cell cycle and Annexin V/PI assays on human MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Mice were orally fed with nordamnacanthal daily for 28 days for oral subchronic toxicity study. Then, the in vivo anti-tumor effect was evaluated on 4T1 murine cancer cells-challenged mice. Changes of tumor size and immune parameters were evaluated on the untreated and nordamnacanthal treated mice. Nordamnacanthal was found to possess cytotoxic effects on MDA-MB231, MCF-7 and 4T1 cells in vitro. Moreover, based on the cell cycle and Annexin V results, nordamnacanthal managed to induce cell death in both MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 cells. Additionally, no mortality, signs of toxicity and changes of serum liver profile were observed in nordamnacanthal treated mice in the subchronic toxicity study. Furthermore, 50 mg/kg body weight of nordamncanthal successfully delayed the progression of 4T1 tumors in Balb/C mice after 28 days of treatment. Treatment with nordamnacanthal was also able to increase tumor immunity as evidenced by the immunophenotyping of the spleen and YAC-1 cytotoxicity assays. Nordamnacanthal managed to inhibit the growth and induce cell death in MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 cell lines in vitro and cease the tumor progression of 4T1 cells in vivo. Overall, nordamnacanthal holds interesting anti-cancer properties that can be further explored.

  20. Evaluation of a curcumin analog as an anti-cancer agent inducing ER stress-mediated apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Yi; Sun, Yusheng; Ren, Luqing; Huang, Yi; Cai, Yuepiao; Weng, Qiaoyou; Shen, Xueqian; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have highlighted the importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cell death processes. Pharmacological interventions that effectively enhance tumor cell death through activating ER stress have attracted a great deal of attention for anti-cancer therapy. A bio-evaluation on 113 curcumin analogs against four cancer cell lines was performed through MTT assay. Furthermore, real time cell assay and flow cytometer were used to evaluate the apoptotic induction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(5-bromo-2-ethoxyphenyl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one (B82). Western blot, RT-qPCR, and siRNA were then utilized to confirm whether B82-induced apoptosis is mediated through activating ER stress pathway. Finally, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of B82 was evaluated. B82 exhibited strong anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cells. Treatment with B82 significantly induced apoptosis in H460 cells in vitro and inhibited H460 tumor growth in vivo. Further studies demonstrated that the B82-induced apoptosis is mediated by activating ER stress both in vitro and in vivo. A new monocarbonyl analog of curcumin, B82, exhibited anti-tumor effects on H460 cells via an ER stress-mediated mechanism. B82 could be further explored as a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of NSCLC

  1. Nanoparticle delivered vascular disrupting agents (VDAs): use of TNF-alpha conjugated gold nanoparticles for multimodal cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoi, Mithun M; Iltis, Isabelle; Choi, Jeunghwan; Koonce, Nathan A; Metzger, Gregory J; Griffin, Robert J; Bischof, John C

    2013-05-06

    Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy remain the mainstay of current cancer therapy. However, treatment failure persists due to the inability to achieve complete local control of the tumor and curtail metastatic spread. Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) are a class of promising systemic agents that are known to synergistically enhance radiation, chemotherapy or thermal treatments of solid tumors. Unfortunately, there is still an unmet need for VDAs with more favorable safety profiles and fewer side effects. Recent work has demonstrated that conjugating VDAs to other molecules (polyethylene glycol, CNGRCG peptide) or nanoparticles (liposomes, gold) can reduce toxicity of one prominent VDA (tumor necrosis factor alpha, TNF-α). In this report, we show the potential of a gold conjugated TNF-α nanoparticle (NP-TNF) to improve multimodal cancer therapies with VDAs. In a dorsal skin fold and hindlimb murine xenograft model of prostate cancer, we found that NP-TNF disrupts endothelial barrier function and induces a significant increase in vascular permeability within the first 1-2 h followed by a dramatic 80% drop in perfusion 2-6 h after systemic administration. We also demonstrate that the tumor response to the nanoparticle can be verified using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a technique in clinical use. Additionally, multimodal treatment with thermal therapies at the perfusion nadir in the sub- and supraphysiological temperature regimes increases tumor volumetric destruction by over 60% and leads to significant tumor growth delays compared to thermal therapy alone. Lastly, NP-TNF was found to enhance thermal therapy in the absence of neutrophil recruitment, suggesting that immune/inflammatory regulation is not central to its power as part of a multimodal approach. Our data demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle-conjugated VDAs to significantly improve cancer therapy by preconditioning tumor vasculature to a secondary insult in a targeted

  2. On the need to assess cancer risk in populations environmentally and occupationally exposed to virus and chemical agents in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Netto Guilherme

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence exists that exposure to poultry oncogenic viruses may produce elevated cancer mortality in human populations, particularly excesses of cancer of lung and excesses of cancer of lymphopoietic tissues. To date, this potential risk is unknown in populations from the developing countries. This paper suggests the need to assess cancer risk in populations of developing countries with reported environmental exposure to chicken meat products and eggs; the need to assess risk of cancer in populations inoculated with vaccines from infected chicken embryos; and the need to assess risk of cancer in occupational populations highly exposed to poultry oncogenic viruses, and with potential concurrent exposure to chemical agents known or suspected to be carcinogens.

  3. Improvements in progression-free and overall survival due to the use of anti-angiogenic agents in gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Bernd C; Oehler, Martin K

    2015-01-01

    In ovarian cancer (OC), the best established anti-angiogenic drug, bevacizumab, has demonstrated only modest prolonged progression free survival (PFS) and no increased overall survival (OS). The unanswered question is in which clinical situation bevacizumab might benefit ovarian cancer patients most. The cost-benefit analysis in the primary treatment was found not to be favorable but the use in the recurrent OC setting might be more compelling. Multi-targeted anti-angiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as cediranib and pazopanib have shown some therapeutic benefits with improvements of PFS and OS in patients with platinum-sensitive as well as resistant OC, in whom there is a major need for novel therapies. Very promising is also the observed improvement of PFS in recurrent OC in patients when combining cediranib with the PARP inhibitor olaparib without giving additional chemotherapy. The anti-angiogenic agent trebananib has achieved similar results like TKI, but has a favorable toxicity profile which does not overlap with those of VEGF inhibitors. In cervical cancer the addition of bevacizumab to combination chemotherapy in patients with recurrent, persistent or metastatic chemotherapy-naive disease results in a significant increase in OS. Considering the lack of therapeutic options in this difficult clinical setting, the inclusion of bevacizumab most likely will become a new standard for recurrent cervical cancer. In uterine sarcomas as very aggressive malignancies with a substantial need for better therapies the observed improved PFS with sorafenib warrants further investigation. No data showing a convincing improvement of survival in endometrial cancer have been presented yet. In view of the limited PFS and OS benefit observed with anti-angiogenics in gynecologic oncology, increased morbidity due to side effects of this treatment resulting in loss of quality of life and also substantial costs have to be taken into consideration. Thorough case selection

  4. Immunomodulatory Agents with Antivascular Activity in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Focus on TLR9 Agonists, IMiDs and NGR-TNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Corti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard treatments for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, often lead to disappointing results. Unfortunately, also the various immunotherapeutic approaches so far tested have not produced satisfactory results to be widely applied in the clinical practice. However, the recent development of new immunomodulatory agents may open promising therapeutic options. This paper focuses on PF3512676, lenalidomide, and NGR-TNF, that is, drugs belonging to three different classes of immunomodulatory agents, that are also capable to affect tumor blood vessels with different mechanisms, and discusses the potential role of such agents in NSCLC treatment strategy.

  5. Multi-scale agent-based brain cancer modeling and prediction of TKI treatment response: Incorporating EGFR signaling pathway and angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Xiaoqiang; Zhang Le; Tan Hua; Bao Jiguang; Strouthos Costas; Zhou Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway and angiogenesis in brain cancer act as an engine for tumor initiation, expansion and response to therapy. Since the existing literature does not have any models that investigate the impact of both angiogenesis and molecular signaling pathways on treatment, we propose a novel multi-scale, agent-based computational model that includes both angiogenesis and EGFR modules to study the response of brain cancer under ...

  6. A herbal composition (hemohim) as a complementary agent for cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Sung-Kee; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    HemoHIM significantly reduced the damage of liver and kidney by cisplatin. In a preliminary clinical study, 85 patients, diagnosed with breast or uterine cervix cancer, were administered with HemoHIM (6 g/day) for 12 weeks during radiation and/or chemotherapy. Age-matched 209 patients were monitored as control group. In the HemoHIM group, fewer cases of severe leucopenia (<3,000 leukocytes/mm 3 ) were shown compared with the control group, and it was more evident in the breast cancer patients. In conclusion, HemoHIM may be a beneficial supplement during radiotherapy and chemotherapy for enhancing the anti-tumor efficacy and reducing the side effects

  7. Abagovomab: an anti-idiotypic CA-125 targeted immunotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, Rachel N; Berek, Jonathan; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Sabbatini, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death due to gynecologic malignancies. Most patients present with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Although many have a good initial response to surgical debulking and platinum-based chemotherapy, relapse is common, with the eventual development of chemotherapy resistance. Innovative treatments are needed in the remission setting to prolong the disease-free interval or prevent recurrence. Abagovomab is a murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (molecular wieght: 165–175 kDa) that functionally imitates the tumor-associated antigen, CA-125. It has been shown to be well tolerated and to induce a sustained immune response in initial Phase I and II clinical trials. An ongoing, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, Phase III trial (MIMOSA) completed its double-blind period in December 2010 and will compare abagovomab maintenance therapy to placebo, which will definitively determine the efficacy of this immunotherapeutic approach in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:21322756

  8. Chemosensitization of Breast Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents by 3,3’diindolylmethane (DIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    United States (1), suggesting that early diagnosis and prevention of this disease is urgently needed. Currently, breast cancer is treated with surgery ...and induction of apo- ptosis . Thus, understanding the molecular biological properties of 3,3V-diindolylmethane may lead to the clinical development of... considered significant. Results Cell growth inhibition by 3,3V-diindolylmethane treatment. MTT assay showed that the treatment of MDA-MB-231 breast

  9. Genipin-induced inhibition of uncoupling protein-2 sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Mailloux

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 is known to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS production and is employed by drug-resistant cancer cells to mitigate oxidative stress. Using the drug-sensitive HL-60 cells and the drug-resistant MX2 subline as model systems, we show that genipin, a UCP2 inhibitor, sensitizes drug-resistant cells to cytotoxic agents. Increased MX2 cell death was observed upon co-treatment with genipin and different doses of menadione, doxorubicin, and epirubicin. DCFH-DA fluorimetry revealed that the increase in MX2 cell death was accompanied by enhanced cellular ROS levels. The drug-induced increase in ROS was linked to genipin-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial proton leak. State 4 and resting cellular respiratory rates were higher in the MX2 cells in comparison to the HL-60 cells, and the increased respiration was readily suppressed by genipin in the MX2 cells. UCP2 accounted for a remarkable 37% of the resting cellular oxygen consumption indicating that the MX2 cells are functionally reliant on this protein. Higher amounts of UCP2 protein were detected in the MX2 versus the HL-60 mitochondria. The observed effects of genipin were absent in the HL-60 cells pointing to the selectivity of this natural product for drug-resistant cells. The specificity of genipin for UCP2 was confirmed using CHO cells stably expressing UCP2 in which genipin induced an ∼22% decrease in state 4 respiration. These effects were absent in empty vector CHO cells expressing no UCP2. Thus, the chemical inhibition of UCP2 with genipin sensitizes multidrug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of cancer: radiopharmaceutical biochemical markers and therapy with radionuclides and reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerecetto, H.; Coppes Z; Garofalo, E.; Gonzalez, M.; Leon, A.; Raymondo, S.; Rey, A.; Savio, E.

    1996-01-01

    The cancer is the Second cause but common of death in many countries like it USES, after the cardiac disease, similar situation in Uruguay. The cancer incidence increasing with the age . I number adult developed the illness. For it, you prove biochemical of laboratory, through their determination in the serum or in the plasma, They are very useful in the patient's care with cancer. It is so the mensuration of resulting substances of the cellular metabolism that they are overturned to the patient's sanguine torrent with a certain neoplasms, it is constituted in markers of the illness, called by it Markers Tumours. Many of these labels are useful in the neoplasmas neodiagnosis and therapy. However, in general, any of the labels of it own can not be used for all neoplasms types and for all patients with kind of disease. The most effective uses in the labels tumour have been, the pursuit of the answers to the treatment and the identification of the early recurrence

  11. Anti-cancer agents in Saudi Arabian herbals revealed by automated high-content imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina

    2017-06-13

    Natural products have been used for medical applications since ancient times. Commonly, natural products are structurally complex chemical compounds that efficiently interact with their biological targets, making them useful drug candidates in cancer therapy. Here, we used cell-based phenotypic profiling and image-based high-content screening to study the mode of action and potential cellular targets of plants historically used in Saudi Arabia\\'s traditional medicine. We compared the cytological profiles of fractions taken from Juniperus phoenicea (Arar), Anastatica hierochuntica (Kaff Maryam), and Citrullus colocynthis (Hanzal) with a set of reference compounds with established modes of action. Cluster analyses of the cytological profiles of the tested compounds suggested that these plants contain possible topoisomerase inhibitors that could be effective in cancer treatment. Using histone H2AX phosphorylation as a marker for DNA damage, we discovered that some of the compounds induced double-strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the active fraction isolated from Juniperus phoenicea revealed possible anti-cancer compounds. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of cell-based phenotypic screening of natural products to reveal their biological activities.

  12. A novel agent enhances the chemotherapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that DT-010, a novel conjugate of danshensu (DSS and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, displays antitumor effects in breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated whether DT-010 enhances the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (Dox in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and exerts concurrent cardioprotective benefit at the same time. Our findings showed that DT-010 was more potent than TMP, DSS or their combination in potentiating Dox-induced toxicity in MCF-7 cells. Co-treatment with DT-010 and Dox increased apoptosis in MCF-7 cells relative to Dox alone. Further study indicated that glycolytic capacity, glycolytic reserve and lactate level of MCF-7 cells were significantly inhibited after DT-010 treatment. DT-010 also increased the expression of the pro-survival protein GRP78, which was inhibited by co-treatment with Dox. Both endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress inhibitor 4-PBA and knockdown of the expression of GRP78 protein potentiated DT-010-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, DT-010 inhibited Dox-induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 myoblasts. In conclusion, DT-010 and Dox confers synergistic anti-tumor effect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells through downregulation of the glycolytic pathway and inhibition of the expression of GRP78. Meanwhile, DT-010 also protects against Dox-induced cardiotoxicity.

  13. Realizing the Potential of Vascular Targeted Therapy: The Rationale for Combining Vascular Disrupting Agents and Anti-Angiogenic Agents to Treat Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemann, D W; Chaplin, D J; Horsman, M R

    2017-01-01

    Vascular targeted therapies (VTTs) are agents that target tumor vasculature and can be classified into two categories: those that inhibit angiogenesis and those that directly interfere with established tumor vasculature. Although both the anti-angiogenic agents (AAs) and the vascular disrupting a...

  14. Antibiofouling polymer-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential magnetic resonance contrast agents for in vivo cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haerim; Lee, Eunhye; Kim, Do Kyung; Jang, Nam Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Jon, Sangyong

    2006-06-07

    We report the fabrication and characterization of antifouling polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as nanoprobes for magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents. Magnetite superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were coated with the protein- or cell-resistant polymer, poly(TMSMA-r-PEGMA), to generate stable, protein-resistant MR probes. Coated magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using two different preparation methods (in situ and stepwise, respectively) were both well dispersed in PBS buffer at a variety of pH conditions (pH 1-10). In addition, dynamic light scattering data revealed that their sizes were not altered even after 24 h of incubation in 10% serum containing cell culture medium, indicative of a lack of protein adsorption on their surfaces. When the antibiofouling polymer-coated SPION were incubated with macrophage cells, uptake was significantly lower in comparison to that of the popular contrast agent, Feridex I.V., suggesting that the polymer-coated SPION can be long-circulated in plasma by escaping from uptake by the reticular endothelial system (RES) such as macrophages. Indeed, when the coated SPION were administered to tumor xenograft mice by intravenous injection, the tumor could be detected in T2-weighted MR images within 1 h as a result of the accumulation of the nanomagnets within the tumor site. Although the poly(TMSMA-r-PEGMA)-coated SPION do not have any targeting ligands on their surface, they are potentially useful for cancer diagnosis in vivo.

  15. A Feasibility Study for Microwave Breast Cancer Detection Using Contrast-Agent-Loaded Bacterial Microbots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new approach to microwave breast tumor sensing and diagnosis based on the use of biocompatible flagellated magnetotactic bacteria (MTB adapted to operate in human microvasculature. It has been verified experimentally by Martel et al. that externally generated magnetic gradients could be applied to guide the MTB along preplanned routes inside the human body, and a nanoload could be attached to these bacterial microbots. Motivated by these useful properties, we suggest loading a nanoscale microwave contrast agent such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs or ferroelectric nanoparticles (FNPs onto the MTB in order to modify the dielectric properties of tissues near the agent-loaded bacteria. Subsequently, we propose a novel differential microwave imaging (DMI technique to track simultaneously multiple swarms of MTB microbots injected into the breast. We also present innovative strategies to detect and localize a breast tissue malignancy and estimate its size via this DMI-trackable bacterial microrobotic system. Finally, we use an anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom as a platform to demonstrate the feasibility of this tumor diagnostic method.

  16. Farmer to Pharmacist: Curcumin as an Anti-invasive and Antimetastatic Agent for the Treatment of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Debasish

    2014-12-01

    A huge number of compounds are widely distributed in nature and many of these possess medicinal/biological/pharmacological activity. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the rhizomes (underground stems) of Curcuma longa Linn (a member of the ginger family, commonly known as turmeric) is a culinary spice and therapeutic used in India for thousands of years to induce color and flavor in food as well as to treat a wide array of diseases. The origin of turmeric as spice and folklore medicine is so old that it is lost in legend. Curcumin has many beneficial pharmacological effects which includes, but are not limited with, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, antiangiogenic, and antidiabetic activities. Most importantly curcumin possesses immense antitumorigenic effect. It prevents tumor invasion and metastasis in a number of animal models, including models of lung, liver, stomach, colon, breast, esophageal cancer etc. Invasion and metastasis are considered as one of the hallmarks in cancer biology. The pertinent recent applications of curcumin as anti-invasive and antimetastatic agent in in vitro and in vivo and ex vivo studies as well as associated molecular mechanisms have been discussed in this review. Curcumin has also demonstrated the ability to improve patient outcomes in clinical trials.

  17. New pyrazolopyrimidine inhibitors of protein kinase d as potent anticancer agents for prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuj Tandon

    Full Text Available The emergence of protein kinase D (PKD as a potential therapeutic target for several diseases including cancer has triggered the search for potent, selective, and cell-permeable small molecule inhibitors. In this study, we describe the identification, in vitro characterization, structure-activity analysis, and biological evaluation of a novel PKD inhibitory scaffold exemplified by 1-naphthyl PP1 (1-NA-PP1. 1-NA-PP1 and IKK-16 were identified as pan-PKD inhibitors in a small-scale targeted kinase inhibitor library assay. Both screening hits inhibited PKD isoforms at about 100 nM and were ATP-competitive inhibitors. Analysis of several related kinases indicated that 1-NA-PP1 was highly selective for PKD as compared to IKK-16. SAR analysis showed that 1-NA-PP1 was considerably more potent and showed distinct substituent effects at the pyrazolopyrimidine core. 1-NA-PP1 was cell-active, and potently blocked prostate cancer cell proliferation by inducing G2/M arrest. It also potently blocked the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells, demonstrating promising anticancer activities on multiple fronts. Overexpression of PKD1 or PKD3 almost completely reversed the growth arrest and the inhibition of tumor cell invasion caused by 1-NA-PP1, indicating that its anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities were mediated through the inhibition of PKD. Interestingly, a 12-fold increase in sensitivity to 1-NA-PP1 could be achieved by engineering a gatekeeper mutation in the active site of PKD1, suggesting that 1-NA-PP1 could be paired with the analog-sensitive PKD1(M659G for dissecting PKD-specific functions and signaling pathways in various biological systems.

  18. A Novel Biomolecule-Mediated Reduction of Graphene Oxide: A Multifunctional Anti-Cancer Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jung Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO is a monolayer of carbon atoms that form a dense honeycomb structure, consisting of hydroxyl and epoxide functional groups on the two accessible sides and carboxylic groups at the edges. In contrast, graphene is a two-dimensional sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb lattice. Graphene has great potential for use in biomedical applications due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this study, we report a facile and environmentally friendly approach for the synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (rGO using uric acid (UA. The synthesized uric acid-reduced graphene oxide (UA-rGO was fully characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD, dynamic light scattering (DLS, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Raman spectroscopy. GO and UA-rGO induced a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and induced cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results from this study suggest that UA-rGO could cause apoptosis in mammalian cells. The toxicity of UA-rGO is significantly higher than GO. Based on our findings, UA-rGO shows cytotoxic effects against human ovarian cancer cells, and its synthesis is environmentally friendly. UA-rGO significantly inhibits cell viability by increasing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, activation of caspase-3, and DNA fragmentation. This is the first report to describe the comprehensive effects of UA-rGO in ovarian cancer cells. We believe that the functional aspects of newly synthesized UA-rGO will provide advances towards various biomedical applications in the near future.

  19. Cabazitaxel-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles as a therapeutic agent against prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Na Qu,1 Robert J Lee,1,2 Yating Sun,1 Guangsheng Cai,1 Junyang Wang,1 Mengqiao Wang,1 Jiahui Lu,1 Qingfan Meng,1 Lirong Teng,1 Di Wang,1 Lesheng Teng1,3 1School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China; 2Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 3State Key Laboratory of Long-acting and Targeting Drug Delivery System, Yantai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cabazitaxel-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles (Cbz-NPs were synthesized to overcome vehicle-related toxicity of current clinical formulation of the drug based on Tween-80 (Cbz-Tween. A salting-out method was used for NP synthesis that avoids the use of chlorinated organic solvent and is simpler compared to the methods based on emulsion-solvent evaporation. Cbz-NPs had a narrow particle size distribution, suitable drug loading content (4.9%, and superior blood biocompatibility based on in vitro hemolysis assay. Blood circulation, tumor uptake, and antitumor activity of Cbz-NPs were assessed in prostatic cancer xenograft-bearing nude mice. Cbz-NPs exhibited prolonged blood circulation and greater accumulation of Cbz in tumors along with reduced toxicity compared to Cbz-Tween. Moreover, hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining of organs revealed consistent results. The levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine in drug-treated mice showed that Cbz-NPs were less toxic than Cbz-Tween to the kidneys. In conclusion, Cbz-NPs provide a promising therapeutic for prostate cancer. Keywords: cabazitaxel, human serum albumin, nanoparticle, drug delivery, toxicity, pros­tate cancer

  20. In vitro assessment of a computer-designed potential anticancer agent in cervical cancer cells

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    Michelle Helen Visagie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computer-based technology is becoming increasingly essential in biological research where drug discovery programs start with the identification of suitable drug targets. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2 is a 17ß-estradiol metabolite that induces apoptosis in various cancer cell lines including cervical cancer, breast cancer and multiple myeloma. Owing to 2ME2's poor in vivo bioavailability, our laboratory in silico-designed and subsequently synthesized a novel 2ME2 analogue, 2-ethyl-3-O-sulphamoyl-estra-1,3,5(10,15-tetraen-17-ol (ESE-15-ol, using receptor- and ligand molecular modeling. In this study, the biological effects of ESE-15-ol (180 nM and its parent molecule, 2ME2 (1 μM, were assessed on morphology and apoptosis induction in cervical cancer cells. RESULTS: Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and polarization-optical transmitted light differential interference contrast (PlasDIC images demonstrated morphological hallmarks of apoptosis including apoptotic bodies, shrunken cells, vacuoles, reduced cell density and cell debris. Flow cytometry analysis showed apoptosis induction by means of annexin V-FITC staining. Cell cycle analysis showed that ESE-15-ol exposure resulted in a statistically significant increase in the G2M phase (72% compared to 2ME2 (19%. Apoptosis induction was more pronounced when cells were exposed to ESE-15-ol compared to 2ME2. Spectrophotometric analysis of caspase 8 activity demonstrated that 2ME2 and ESE-15-ol both induced caspase 8 activation by 2- and 1.7-fold respectively indicating the induction of the apoptosis. However, ESE-15-ol exerted all of the above-mentioned effects at a much lower pharmacological concentration (180 nM compared to 2ME2 (1 μM physiological concentration. CONCLUSION: Computer-based technology is essential in drug discovery and together with in vitro studies for the evaluation of these in silico-designed compounds, drug development can be improved to be

  1. Synthesis and Evaluation of Strychnos Alkaloids as MDR Reversal Agents for Cancer Cell Eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    drugs (e.g., taxol, vincristine, and doxorubicin) out of cancer cells.2 In 1981, Tsuruo demonstrated that verapamil, a calcium -channel blocker...refluxed for overnight. After cooling to rt, the reaction was quenched with aq 1 N HCl (2 mL), stirred for 30 min, and extracted with CHCl3 (3 10 mL). The...incubation, MTT reagent was added to each well, and endpoint data collected by a SpectraMax M2microplate spectrophotometer (Molecular De- vice, CA

  2. Cathepsin B mediates caspase-independent cell death induced by microtubule stabilizing agents in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broker, L.E.; Huisman, C.; Span, SW; Rodriguez, J.A.; Kruyt, F.A.E.; Giaccone, G.

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that the microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs) paclitaxel, epothilone B and discodermolide induce caspase-independent cell death in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Here we present two lines of evidence indicating a central role for the lysosomal protease

  3. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  4. Inhibition of endothelial cell functions by novel potential cancer chemopreventive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertl, Elisabeth; Becker, Hans; Eicher, Theophil; Herhaus, Christian; Kapadia, Govind; Bartsch, Helmut; Gerhaeuser, Clarissa

    2004-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) play a major role in tumor-induced neovascularization and bridge the gap between a microtumor and growth factors such as nutrients and oxygen supply required for expansion. Immortalized human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were utilized to assess anti-endothelial effects of 10 novel potential cancer chemopreventive compounds from various sources that we have investigated previously in a human in vitro anti-angiogenic assay. These include the monoacylphloroglucinol isoaspidinol B, 1,2,5,7-tetrahydroxy-anthraquinone, peracetylated carnosic acid (PCA), isoxanthohumol, 2,2',4'-trimethoxychalcone, 3'-bromo-2,4-dimethoxychalcone as well as four synthetic derivatives of lunularic acid, a bibenzyl found in mosses [Int. J. Cancer Prev. 1 (2004) 47]. EC proliferation was inhibited with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations from 0.3 to 49.6 μM, whereas EC migration was affected by most compounds at sub-micromolar concentrations. PCA and the bibenzyl derivative EC 1004 potently prevented differentiation of HMEC-1 into tubule-like structures. Overall, our data indicate that inhibition of endothelial cell function contributes to various extents to the chemopreventive or anti-angiogenic potential of these lead compounds

  5. Genome-wide transcriptional effects of the anti-cancer agent camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Veloso

    Full Text Available The anti-cancer drug camptothecin inhibits replication and transcription by trapping DNA topoisomerase I (Top1 covalently to DNA in a "cleavable complex". To examine the effects of camptothecin on RNA synthesis genome-wide we used Bru-Seq and show that camptothecin treatment primarily affected transcription elongation. We also observed that camptothecin increased RNA reads past transcription termination sites as well as at enhancer elements. Following removal of camptothecin, transcription spread as a wave from the 5'-end of genes with no recovery of transcription apparent from RNA polymerases stalled in the body of genes. As a result, camptothecin preferentially inhibited the expression of large genes such as proto-oncogenes, and anti-apoptotic genes while smaller ribosomal protein genes, pro-apoptotic genes and p53 target genes showed relative higher expression. Cockayne syndrome group B fibroblasts (CS-B, which are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR, showed an RNA synthesis recovery profile similar to normal fibroblasts suggesting that TCR is not involved in the repair of or RNA synthesis recovery from transcription-blocking Top1 lesions. These findings of the effects of camptothecin on transcription have important implications for its anti-cancer activities and may aid in the design of improved combinatorial treatments involving Top1 poisons.

  6. The relative efficacy and safety of targeted agents used in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with untreated advanced gastric cancer: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuping; Zhang, Huixiang; Wang, Xueyan; Ge, Quanxing; Hu, Junhong

    2017-04-18

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading mortal causes. Targeted therapy is a new type of cancer treatment, which precisely identifies and attacks cancer cells and significantly reduces side effects. In this network meta-analysis, we focused on the efficacy and safety of 12 targeted agents on gastric cancer among a total of 8,405 patients from 24 trials. Hazard ratio (HR) with 95% credible interval (CrI) were calculated for primary outcomes, including overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), while odds ratio (OR) with 95% CrI were calculated for secondary outcomes. Surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) were calculated to illustrate the rank probability of various agents for different outcomes. Compared with other analyzed treatments, ramucirumab is outstanding in survival outcomes. However, higher risk of hematological events should be noted during its application. Lapatinib is also efficacious in progression reduction, while it is always combined with severe gastrointestinal events. Trastuzumab is proposed for its high efficacy in improving survival rate and safety, which is proper for most patients. In conclusion, trastuzumab was recommended as the optimal targeted agent combined with chemotherapy for gastric cancer patients.

  7. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Furocoumarin Derivatives as Possible Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mattarei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Targeting small molecules to appropriate subcellular compartments is a way to increase their selectivity and effectiveness while minimizing side effects. This can be accomplished either by stably incorporating specific “homing” properties into the structure of the active principle, or by attaching to it a targeting moiety via a labile linker, i.e., by producing a “targeting pro-drug.” Mitochondria are a recognized therapeutic target in oncology, and blocking the population of the potassium channel Kv1.3 residing in the inner mitochondrial membrane (mtKv1.3 has been shown to cause apoptosis of cancerous cells expressing it. These concepts have led us to devise novel, mitochondria-targeted, membrane-permeant drug candidates containing the furocoumarin (psoralenic ring system and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP lipophilic cation. The strategy has proven effective in various cancer models, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and glioblastoma, stimulating us to devise further novel molecules to extend and diversify the range of available drugs of this type. New compounds were synthesized and tested in vitro; one of them—a prodrug in which the coumarinic moiety and the TPP group are linked by a bridge comprising a labile carbonate bond system—proved quite effective in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Selective death induction is attributed to inhibition of mtKv1.3. This results in oxidative stress, which is fatal for the already-stressed malignant cells. This compound may thus be a candidate drug for the mtKv1.3-targeting therapeutic approach.

  8. Synthesis and Pharmacophore Modelling of 2,6,9-Trisubstituted Purine Derivatives and Their Potential Role as Apoptosis-Inducing Agents in Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Calderón-Arancibia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine derivatives have been synthesized and investigated for their potential role as antitumor agents. Twelve compounds were obtained by a three step synthetic procedure using microwave irradiation in a pivotal step. All compounds were evaluated in vitro to determine their potential effect on cell toxicity by the MTT method and flow cytometry analysis on four cancer cells lines and Vero cells. Three out of twelve compounds were found to be promising agents compared to a known and effective anticancer drug, etoposide, in three out of four cancer cell lines assayed with considerable selectivity. Preliminary flow cytometry data suggests that compounds mentioned above induce apoptosis on these cells. The main structural requirements for their activity for each cancer cell line were characterized with a preliminary pharmacophore model, which identified aromatic centers, hydrogen acceptor/donor center and a hydrophobic area. These features were consistent with the cytotoxic activity of the assayed compounds.

  9. Characterization and Functionalization of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Use as Potential Agents for Cancer Thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Nora

    This thesis presents experimental studies of iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis, functionalization, and intracellular hyperthermal effects on murine macrophages as a model in vitro system. Colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of particular interest in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH). Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have garnered great interest as economical, biocompatible hyperthermia agents due to their superparamagnetic activity. Here we seek to optimize the synthetic reproducibility and in vitro utilization of IONPs for application in MFH. We compared aqueous synthetic protocols and various protective coating techniques using various analytical techniques and in vitro assays to assess the biocompatibility and feasibility of the various preparations of nanoparticles. Using a co-precipitation of iron salts methodology, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with an average diameter of 6-8nm were synthesized and stabilized with carboxylates. By performing calorimetry measurements in an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) with a frequency of 500 kHz and field strength of 0.008Tesla the superparamagnetic behavior of these particles was confirmed. To further investigate these IONPs in a biological application, citric acid-stabilized particles, in conjunction with heat generated by these IONPs when exposed to an OMF, were assessed to determine their effects on cell viability in a RAW 267.4 murine macrophage model system. Our results show that 91.5-97% of cells that have ingested IONPs die follow exposure to an OMF. Importantly, neither the IONPs (at applicable concentrations) nor the OMF show cytotoxic effects. These particular particles have promising preliminary results as hyperthermic agents in both the current literature and simple, proof-of-concept experiments in our laboratory setting. We present experimental results for the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of iron oxide nanoparticles in MFH. Our results show that while IONPs have

  10. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Ganoderma neo-japonicum Imazeki: a potential cytotoxic agent against breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Raman, Jegadeesh; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd; John, Priscilla A; Vikineswary, Sabaratnam

    2013-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are an important class of nanomaterial for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. AgNPs have been used as antimicrobial and disinfectant agents due their detrimental effect on target cells. The aim of our study was to determine the cytotoxic effects of biologically synthesized AgNPs using hot aqueous extracts of the mycelia of Ganoderma neo-japonicum Imazeki on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Methods We developed a green method for the synthesis of water-soluble AgNPs by treating silver ions with hot aqueous extract of the mycelia of G. neo-japonicum. The formation of AgNPs was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the toxicity of synthesized AgNPs was evaluated using a series of assays: such as cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, reactive oxygen species generation, caspase 3, DNA laddering, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Results The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy results showed a strong resonance centered on the surface of AgNPs at 420 nm. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the synthesized AgNPs were single-crystalline, corresponding with the result of transmission electron microscopy. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with various concentrations of AgNPs (1–10 μg/mL) for 24 hours revealed that AgNPs could inhibit cell viability and induce membrane leakage in a dose-dependent manner. Cells exposed to AgNPs showed increased reactive oxygen species and hydroxyl radical production. Furthermore, the apoptotic effects of AgNPs were confirmed by activation of caspase 3 and DNA nuclear fragmentation. Conclusion The results indicate that AgNPs possess cytotoxic effects with apoptotic features and suggest that the reactive oxygen species generated by

  11. Bacterial biosynthesis and maturation of the didemnin anti-cancer agents

    KAUST Repository

    Xü, Ying

    2012-05-23

    The anti-neoplastic agent didemnin B from the Caribbean tunicate Trididemnum solidum was the first marine drug to be clinically tested in humans. Because of its limited supply and its complex cyclic depsipeptide structure, considerable challenges were encountered during didemnin B\\'s development that continue to limit aplidine (dehydrodidemnin B), which is currently being evaluated in numerous clinical trials. Herein we show that the didemnins are bacterial products produced by the marine α-proteobacteria Tistrella mobilis and Tistrella bauzanensis via a unique post-assembly line maturation process. Complete genome sequence analysis of the 6,513,401 bp T. mobilis strain KA081020-065 with its five circular replicons revealed the putative didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster (did) on the 1,126,962 bp megaplasmid pTM3. The did locus encodes a 13-module hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase enzyme complex organized in a collinear arrangement for the synthesis of the fatty acylglutamine ester derivatives didemnins X and Y rather than didemnin B as first anticipated. Imaging mass spectrometry of T. mobilis bacterial colonies captured the time-dependent extracellular conversion of the didemnin X and Y precursors to didemnin B, in support of an unusual post-synthetase activation mechanism. Significantly, the discovery of the didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster may provide a long-term solution to the supply problem that presently hinders this group of marine natural products and pave the way for the genetic engineering of new didemnin congeners. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Dual-surface modified virus capsids for targeted delivery of photodynamic agents to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Tong, Gary J; Hsiao, Sonny C; Francis, Matthew B

    2010-10-26

    Bacteriophage MS2 was used to construct a targeted, multivalent photodynamic therapy vehicle for the treatment of Jurkat leukemia T cells. The self-assembling spherical virus capsid was modified on the interior surface with up to 180 porphyrins capable of generating cytotoxic singlet oxygen upon illumination. The exterior of the capsid was modified with ∼20 copies of a Jurkat-specific aptamer using an oxidative coupling reaction targeting an unnatural amino acid. The capsids were able to target and selectively kill more than 76% of the Jurkat cells after only 20 min of illumination. Capsids modified with a control DNA strand did not target Jurkat cells, and capsids modified with the aptamer were found to be specific for Jurkat cells over U266 cells (a control B cell line). The doubly modified capsids were also able to kill Jurkat cells selectively even when mixed with erythrocytes, suggesting the possibility of using our system to target blood-borne cancers or other pathogens in the blood supply.

  13. Non-Cytotoxic Quantum Dot–Chitosan Nanogel Biosensing Probe for Potential Cancer Targeting Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Maxwell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot (Qdot biosensors have consistently provided valuable information to researchers about cellular activity due to their unique fluorescent properties. Many of the most popularly used Qdots contain cadmium, posing the risk of toxicity that could negate their attractive optical properties. The design of a non-cytotoxic probe usually involves multiple components and a complex synthesis process. In this paper, the design and synthesis of a non-cytotoxic Qdot-chitosan nanogel composite using straight-forward cyanogen bromide (CNBr coupling is reported. The probe was characterized by spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, microscopy (Fluorescence, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Dynamic Light Scattering. This activatable (“OFF”/“ON” probe contains a core–shell Qdot (CdS:Mn/ZnS capped with dopamine, which acts as a fluorescence quencher and a model drug. Dopamine capped “OFF” Qdots can undergo ligand exchange with intercellular glutathione, which turns the Qdots “ON” to restore fluorescence. These Qdots were then coated with chitosan (natural biocompatible polymer functionalized with folic acid (targeting motif and Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC; fluorescent dye. To demonstrate cancer cell targetability, the interaction of the probe with cells that express different folate receptor levels was analyzed, and the cytotoxicity of the probe was evaluated on these cells and was shown to be nontoxic even at concentrations as high as 100 mg/L.

  14. Air pollution combustion emissions: characterization of causative agents and mechanisms associated with cancer, reproductive, and cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewtas, Joellen

    2007-01-01

    emissions and ambient fine particulate air pollution have been associated with measures of genetic damage. Long-term epidemiologic studies have reported an increased risk of all causes of mortality, cardiopulmonary mortality, and lung cancer mortality associated with increasing exposures to air pollution. Adverse reproductive effects (e.g., risk for low birth weight) have also recently been reported in Eastern Europe and North America. Although there is substantial evidence that PAH or substituted PAH may be causative agents in cancer and reproductive effects, an increasing number of studies investigating cardiopulmonary and cardiovascular effects are investigating these and other potential causative agents from air pollution combustion sources.

  15. Novel nano-sized MR contrast agent mediates strong tumor contrast enhancement in an oncogene-driven breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Olof Eriksson

    Full Text Available The current study was carried out to test the potential of a new nanomaterial (Spago Pix as a macromolecular magnetic MR contrast agent for tumor detection and to verify the presence of nanomaterial in tumor tissue. Spago Pix, synthesized by Spago Nanomedical AB, is a nanomaterial with a globular shape, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 5 nm, and a relaxivity (r1 of approximately 30 (mM Mn-1 s-1 (60 MHz. The material consists of an organophosphosilane hydrogel with strongly chelated manganese (II ions and a covalently attached PEG surface layer. In vivo MRI of the MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model was performed on a 3 T clinical scanner. Tissues were thereafter analyzed for manganese and silicon content using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES. The presence of nanomaterial in tumor and muscle tissue was assessed using an anti-PEG monoclonal antibody. MR imaging of tumor-bearing mice (n = 7 showed a contrast enhancement factor of 1.8 (tumor versus muscle at 30 minutes post-administration. Contrast was retained and further increased 2-4 hours after administration. ICP-AES and immunohistochemistry confirmed selective accumulation of nanomaterial in tumor tissue. A blood pharmacokinetics analysis showed that the concentration of Spago Pix gradually decreased over the first hour, which was in good agreement with the time frame in which the accumulation in tumor occurred. In summary, we demonstrate that Spago Pix selectively enhances MR tumor contrast in a clinically relevant animal model. Based on the generally higher vascular leakiness in malignant compared to benign tissue lesions, Spago Pix has the potential to significantly improve cancer diagnosis and characterization by MRI.

  16. Phospho-Ibuprofen (MDC-917) Is a Novel Agent against Colon Cancer: Efficacy, Metabolism, and Pharmacokinetics in Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Gang; Sun, Yu; Nie, Ting; Mackenzie, Gerardo G.; Huang, Liqun; Kopelovich, Levy; Komninou, Despina

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel chemical modification of conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce their toxicity and enhance their efficacy. Phospho-ibuprofen [(PI) 2-(4-isobutyl-phenyl)-propionic acid-4-(diethoxy-phosphoryloxy)-butyl ester (MDC-917)], a novel derivative of ibuprofen, strongly inhibited the growth of human colon cancer cells in vitro and SW480 human colon cancer xenografts in nude mice. PI was metabolized minimally by cultured cells, but extensively by liver microsomes and mice, undergoing regioselective oxidation to produce 1-OH-PI and carboxyl-PI, which can be hydrolyzed to 1-OH-ibuprofen and carboxyl-ibuprofen, respectively. PI also can be hydrolyzed to release ibuprofen, which can generate 2-OH-ibuprofen, carboxyl-ibuprofen, and ibuprofen glucuronide. After a single oral administration (400 mg/kg) of PI, ibuprofen and ibuprofen glucuronide are the main plasma metabolites of PI; they have, respectively, Cmax of 530 and 215 μM, Tmax of 1 and 2 h, elimination t1/2 of 7.7 and 5.3 h, and area under the concentration-time curve (0–24 h) of 1816 and 832 μM × h. Intact PI was detected in several tissues but not in plasma; at a higher PI dose (1200 mg/kg), PI plasma levels were 12.4 μM. PI generated the same metabolites in mouse plasma as conventional ibuprofen, but with much lower levels, perhaps accounting for the enhanced safety of PI. The antitumor effect of PI was significantly associated with plasma ibuprofen levels (p = 0.016) but not with xenograft ibuprofen levels (p = 0.08), suggesting a complex anticancer effect. These results provide a pharmacological basis to explain, at least in part, the anticancer efficacy and safety of this promising compound and indicate that PI merits further evaluation as an anticancer agent. PMID:21422165

  17. Antifungal agent utilization evaluation in hospitalized neutropenic cancer patients at a large teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazin A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Afsaneh Vazin,1 Mohammad Ali Davarpanah,2 Setareh Ghalesoltani3 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 2HIV Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 3International Branch of Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran Abstract: To evaluate pattern of using of three antifungal drugs: fluconazole, amphotericin B and voriconazole, at the hematology–oncology and bone marrow transplant wards of one large teaching hospital. In a prospective cross-sectional study, we evaluated the appropriateness of using antifungal drugs in patients, using Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines. All the data were recorded daily by a pharmacist in a form designed by a clinical pharmacist and infectious diseases specialist, for antifungals usage, administration, and monitoring. During the study, 116 patients were enrolled. Indications of prescribing amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole were appropriate according to guidelines in 83.4%, 80.6%, and 76.9% respectively. The duration of treatments were appropriate according to guidelines in 75%, 64.5%, and 71.1% respectively. The dose of voriconazole was appropriate according to guidelines in 46.2% of patients. None of the patients received salt loading before administration of amphotericin B. The most considerable problems with the mentioned antifungals were about the indications and duration of treatment. In addition, prehydration for amphotericin B and dosage of voriconazole were not completely compatible with the mentioned guidelines. A suitable combination of controlling the use of antifungals and educational programs could be essential for improving the general process of using antifungal drugs at our hospital. Keywords: utilization evaluation, fluconazole, amphotericin B, voriconazole, neutropenia

  18. Developments Toward Diagnostic Breast Cancer Imaging Using Near-Infrared Optical Measurements and Fluorescent Contrast Agents1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Hawrysz

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of near-infrared (NIR light to interrogate deep tissues has enormous potential for molecular-based imaging when coupled with NIR excitable dyes. More than a decade has now passed since the initial proposals for NIR optical tomography for breast cancer screening using time-dependent measurements of light propagation in the breast. Much accomplishment in the development of optical mammography has been demonstrated, most recently in the application of time-domain, frequency-domain, and continuous-wave measurements that depend on endogenous contrast owing to angiogenesis and increased hemoglobin absorbance for contrast. Although exciting and promising, the necessity of angiogenesis-mediated absorption contrast for diagnostic optical mammography minimizes the potential for using NIR techniques to assess sentinel lymph node staging, metastatic spread, and multifocality of breast disease, among other applications. In this review, we summarize the progress made in the development of optical mammography, and focus on the emerging work underway in the use of diagnostic contrast agents for the molecular-based, diagnostic imaging of breast.

  19. Highly biocompatible TiO2:Gd3+ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-01

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 of size ~25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r1 relaxivity which is ~2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r1 values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd3+ ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml-1. The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a promising candidate for

  20. Dietary agent, benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and collaborates with sulforaphane in the growth suppression of PANC-1 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deangelis Stephanie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT proteins comprise a family of latent transcription factors with diverse functions. STAT3 has well established roles in cell proliferation, growth and survival, and its persistent activation has been detected with high frequency in many human cancers. As constitutive activation of STAT3 appears to be vital for the continued survival of these cancerous cells, it has emerged as an attractive target for chemotherapeutics. We examined whether the inhibitory activities of bioactive compounds from cruciferous vegetables, such as Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC and sulforaphane, extended to STAT3 activation in PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells. BITC and sulforaphane were both capable of inhibiting cell viability and inducing apoptosis in PANC-1. Sulforaphane had minimal effect on the direct inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, however, suggesting its inhibitory activities are most likely STAT3-independent. Conversely, BITC was shown to inhibit the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, but not the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, MAPK and p70S6 kinase. These results suggest that STAT3 may be one of the targets of BITC-mediated inhibition of cell viability in PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, we show that BITC can prevent the induction of STAT3 activation by Interleukin-6 in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, combinations of BITC and sulforaphane inhibited cell viability and STAT3 phosphorylation more dramatically than either agent alone. These findings suggest that the combination of the dietary agents BITC and sulforaphane has potent inhibitory activity in pancreatic cancer cells and that they may have translational potential as chemopreventative or therapeutic agents.

  1. Anti-cancer agents based on 4-(hetero)Ary1-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl Amino derivatives and a method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A.; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-29

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. ##STR00001## In particular, the invention relates N-substituted derivatives of 4-(hetero)aryl-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl amines having the structural Formula (I) and (II), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. Meaning of R1 and R2 in the Formula (I) and (II) are defined in claim 1. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  2. Synthesis of a theranostic agent. Radioiodinated PEGylated PLGA-indocyanine capsules and in vitro determination of their bioaffinity on ovarian, cervical and breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levent Akman; Ahmet Bilgi; Sevki Goksun Gokulu; Mustafa Cosan Terek; Fazilet Zumrut Biber Muftuler; Ayfer Yurt Kilcar; Emin Ilker Medine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current study is to synthesize a theranostic (multi-functional) agent, which is targeted on ovary, cervical and breast cancer types with diagnosis and treatment potential and to determine its bioaffinity by using in vitro methods. In conclusion; the designed compound (IPPP), which has fluorescence capability (from Indocyanine), encapsulated structure (with PEGylated PLGA), included an anticancer drug (Paclitaxel) for targeting and radionuclidic tracer ( 131 I) content for tracing, has bioaffinity and promise for diagnosis and therapy on ovarian, cervical and breast cancer cell lines. (author)

  3. Interleukin 16- (IL-16-) Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Improves Detection of Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Animesh; Yellapa, Aparna; Bahr, Janice M; Adur, Malavika K; Utterback, Chet W; Bitterman, Pincas; Basu, Sanjib; Sharma, Sameer; Abramowicz, Jacques S

    2015-01-01

    Limited resolution of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) scanning is a significant barrier to early detection of ovarian cancer (OVCA). Contrast agents have been suggested to improve the resolution of TVUS scanning. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of interleukin 16 (IL-16) by the tumor epithelium and microvessels increases in association with OVCA development and offers a potential target for early OVCA detection. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of IL-16-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from ovarian tumors in hens, a model of spontaneous OVCA. Contrast agents were developed by conjugating biotinylated anti-IL-16 antibodies with streptavidin coated microbubbles. Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity was determined before and after injection of contrast agents. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were processed for the detection of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. Compared with precontrast, contrast imaging enhanced ultrasound signal intensity significantly in OVCA hens at early (P ultrasound signals in OVCA hens were associated with increased frequencies of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. These results suggest that IL-16-targeted contrast agents improve the visualization of ovarian tumors. The laying hen may be a suitable model to test new imaging agents and develop targeted anti-OVCA therapeutics.

  4. Interleukin 16- (IL-16- Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Improves Detection of Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited resolution of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS scanning is a significant barrier to early detection of ovarian cancer (OVCA. Contrast agents have been suggested to improve the resolution of TVUS scanning. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of interleukin 16 (IL-16 by the tumor epithelium and microvessels increases in association with OVCA development and offers a potential target for early OVCA detection. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of IL-16-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from ovarian tumors in hens, a model of spontaneous OVCA. Contrast agents were developed by conjugating biotinylated anti-IL-16 antibodies with streptavidin coated microbubbles. Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity was determined before and after injection of contrast agents. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were processed for the detection of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. Compared with precontrast, contrast imaging enhanced ultrasound signal intensity significantly in OVCA hens at early (P<0.05 and late stages (P<0.001. Higher intensities of ultrasound signals in OVCA hens were associated with increased frequencies of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. These results suggest that IL-16-targeted contrast agents improve the visualization of ovarian tumors. The laying hen may be a suitable model to test new imaging agents and develop targeted anti-OVCA therapeutics.

  5. Serum antibodies against genitourinary infectious agents in prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia patients: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brabec Marek

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of many human malignancies. Whether prostate cancer (PCa - an important health issue in the aging male population in the Western world - belongs to these conditions has been a matter of research since the 1970 s. Persistent serum antibodies are a proof of present or past infection. The aim of this study was to compare serum antibodies against genitourinary infectious agents between PCa patients and controls with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH. We hypothesized that elevated serum antibody levels or higher seroprevalence in PCa patients would suggest an association of genitourinary infection in patient history and elevated PCa risk. Methods A total of 434 males who had undergone open prostate surgery in a single institution were included in the study: 329 PCa patients and 105 controls with BPH. The subjects' serum samples were analysed by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, complement fixation test and indirect immunofluorescence for the presence of antibodies against common genitourinary infectious agents: human papillomavirus (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31 and 33, herpes simplex virus (HSV 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (CMV, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Treponema pallidum. Antibody seroprevalence and mean serum antibody levels were compared between cases and controls. Tumour grade and stage were correlated with serological findings. Results PCa patients were more likely to harbour antibodies against Ureaplasma urealyticum (odds ratio (OR 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.08-4.28. Men with BPH were more often seropositive for HPV 18 and Chlamydia trachomatis (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.09-0.61 and OR 0.45; 95% CI 0.21-0.99, respectively and had higher mean serum CMV antibody levels than PCa patients (p = 0.0004. Among PCa patients, antibodies against HPV 6 were associated with a higher Gleason score (p = 0.0305. Conclusions

  6. Oral Administration and Detection of a Near-Infrared Molecular Imaging Agent in an Orthotopic Mouse Model for Breast Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Sumit; Verma, Kirti Dhingra; Hu, Yongjun; Khera, Eshita; Priluck, Aaron; Smith, David; Thurber, Greg M

    2018-04-26

    Molecular imaging is advantageous for screening diseases such as breast cancer by providing precise spatial information on disease-associated biomarkers, something neither blood tests nor anatomical imaging can achieve. However, the high cost and risks of ionizing radiation for several molecular imaging modalities have prevented a feasible and scalable approach for screening. Clinical studies have demonstrated the ability to detect breast tumors using nonspecific probes such as indocyanine green, but the lack of molecular information and required intravenous contrast agent does not provide a significant benefit over current noninvasive imaging techniques. Here we demonstrate that negatively charged sulfate groups, commonly used to improve solubility of near-infrared fluorophores, enable sufficient oral absorption and targeting of fluorescent molecular imaging agents for completely noninvasive detection of diseased tissue such as breast cancer. These functional groups improve the pharmacokinetic properties of affinity ligands to achieve targeting efficiencies compatible with clinical imaging devices using safe, nonionizing radiation (near-infrared light). Together, this enables development of a "disease screening pill" capable of oral absorption and systemic availability, target binding, background clearance, and imaging at clinically relevant depths for breast cancer screening. This approach should be adaptable to other molecular targets and diseases for use as a new class of screening agents.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of Bombesin-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging of breast cancer using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, Atefeh; Shayesteh, Saber Farjami; Salouti, Mojtaba; Heidari, Zahra; Rajabi, Ahmad Bitarafan; Boustani, Komail; Nahardani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The targeted delivery of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent may facilitate their accumulation in cancer cells and enhance the sensitivity of MR imaging. In this study, SPIONs coated with dextran (DSPIONs) were conjugated with bombesin (BBN) to produce a targeting contrast agent for detection of breast cancer using MRI. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer analyses indicated the formation of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average size of 6.0 ± 0.5 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the conjugation of the BBN with the DSPIONs. A stability study proved the high optical stability of DSPION–BBN in human blood serum. DSPION–BBN biocompatibility was confirmed by cytotoxicity evaluation. A binding study showed the targeting ability of DSPION–BBN to bind to T47D breast cancer cells overexpressing gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. T 2 -weighted and T 2 *-weighted color map MR images were acquired. The MRI study indicated that the DSPION–BBN possessed good diagnostic ability as a GRP-specific contrast agent, with appropriate signal reduction in T 2 *-weighted color map MR images in mice with breast tumors. (paper)

  8. Synthesis and characterization of Bombesin-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging of breast cancer using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Atefeh; Salouti, Mojtaba; Farjami Shayesteh, Saber; Heidari, Zahra; Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Boustani, Komail; Nahardani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The targeted delivery of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent may facilitate their accumulation in cancer cells and enhance the sensitivity of MR imaging. In this study, SPIONs coated with dextran (DSPIONs) were conjugated with bombesin (BBN) to produce a targeting contrast agent for detection of breast cancer using MRI. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer analyses indicated the formation of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average size of 6.0 ± 0.5 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the conjugation of the BBN with the DSPIONs. A stability study proved the high optical stability of DSPION-BBN in human blood serum. DSPION-BBN biocompatibility was confirmed by cytotoxicity evaluation. A binding study showed the targeting ability of DSPION-BBN to bind to T47D breast cancer cells overexpressing gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. T2-weighted and T2*-weighted color map MR images were acquired. The MRI study indicated that the DSPION-BBN possessed good diagnostic ability as a GRP-specific contrast agent, with appropriate signal reduction in T2*-weighted color map MR images in mice with breast tumors.

  9. Nitric oxide-releasing sulindac is a novel skin cancer chemopreventive agent for UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Singh, Tripti; Kapur, Puneet; Weng, Zhiping; Arumugam, Aadithya; Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd, Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) which have been synthesized to reduce gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular toxicities of NSAIDs, possess anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activities. Here, we show that NO-sulindac inhibited UVB-induced skin tumorigenesis in SKH-1 hairless mice. Topical application of NO-sulindac reduced tumor incidence, number (p < 0.05) and volume (p < 0.005) as compared to UVB (alone)-irradiated vehicle-treated mice. An increase in TUNEL-positive cells in skin lesions was accompanied by the enhanced Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The expression of pro-apoptotic Bax was increased whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 reduced. However, proliferation was identified as the major target of NO-sulindac in this study. A reduced expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 associated with the dampening of cell cycle progression was observed. The mechanism of this inhibition was related to the reduction in UVB-induced Notch signaling pathway. UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by NO-sulindac as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases Erk1/2, p38 and JNK1/2. In this regard, NO-sulindac also inhibited NFκB by enhancing IκBα as evidenced by the reduced expression of iNOS and COX-2, the direct NFκB transcription target proteins. NO-sulindac significantly diminished the progression of benign lesions to invasive carcinomas by suppressing the tumor aggressiveness and retarding epithelial–mesenchymal transition. A marked decrease in the expression of mesenchymal markers such as Fibronectin, N-cadherin, SNAI, Slug and Twist and an increase in epithelial cell polarity marker E-cadherin were noted in NO-sulindac-treated tumors. Our data suggest that NO-sulindac is a potent inhibitor of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis and acts by targeting proliferation-regulatory pathways. - Highlights: ► NO-sulindac is a potent chemopreventive agent for UVB-induced skin cancer. ► NO

  10. An antitubulin agent BCFMT inhibits proliferation of cancer cells and induces cell death by inhibiting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Rai

    Full Text Available Using cell based screening assay, we identified a novel anti-tubulin agent (Z-5-((5-(4-bromo-3-chlorophenylfuran-2-ylmethylene-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one (BCFMT that inhibited proliferation of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa (IC(50, 7.2 ± 1.8 µM, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 (IC(50, 10.0 ± 0.5 µM, highly metastatic breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 (IC(50, 6.0 ± 1 µM, cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma (A2780-cis (IC(50, 5.8 ± 0.3 µM and multi-drug resistant mouse mammary tumor (EMT6/AR1 (IC(50, 6.5 ± 1 µM cells. Using several complimentary strategies, BCFMT was found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation at G2/M phase of the cell cycle apparently by targeting microtubules. In addition, BCFMT strongly suppressed the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells. At its half maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration (10 µM, BCFMT reduced the rates of growing and shortening phases of microtubules in MCF-7 cells by 37 and 40%, respectively. Further, it increased the time microtubules spent in the pause (neither growing nor shortening detectably state by 135% and reduced the dynamicity (dimer exchange per unit time of microtubules by 70%. In vitro, BCFMT bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 8.3 ± 1.8 µM, inhibited tubulin assembly and suppressed GTPase activity of microtubules. BCFMT competitively inhibited the binding of BODIPY FL-vinblastine to tubulin with an inhibitory concentration (K(i of 5.2 ± 1.5 µM suggesting that it binds to tubulin at the vinblastine site. In cultured cells, BCFMT-treatment depolymerized interphase microtubules, perturbed the spindle organization and accumulated checkpoint proteins (BubR1 and Mad2 at the kinetochores. BCFMT-treated MCF-7 cells showed enhanced nuclear accumulation of p53 and its downstream p21, which consequently activated apoptosis in these cells. The results suggested that BCFMT inhibits proliferation of several types of cancer cells including drug

  11. Antitumor effects of the antiparasitic agent ivermectin via inhibition of Yes-associated protein 1 expression in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambara, Sho; Masuda, Takaaki; Nishio, Miki; Kuramitsu, Shotaro; Tobo, Taro; Ogawa, Yushi; Hu, Qingjiang; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Kuroda, Yousuke; Ito, Shuhei; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Sugimachi, Keishi; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Akira; Mimori, Koshi

    2017-12-08

    Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) acts as an oncogene through dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation, and nuclear accumulation of YAP1 is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer (GC). We previously identified ivermectin, an antiparasitic drug, as a YAP1 inhibitor. Here, we aimed to clarify whether ivermectin had antitumor effects on GC through inhibition of YAP1. First, we evaluated the antiproliferative effects of ivermectin on human GC cells using in vitro proliferation assays and a xenograft mouse model. YAP1-knockdown assays were performed to assess whether the sensitivity to ivermectin depended on YAP1 expression. Next, we explored the mechanism through which ivermectin regulated YAP1 expression or localization by immunoblotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for YAP1 and the downstream gene CTGF . Finally, the clinical significance of YAP1 expression was examined using three independent GC datasets. We found that MKN1 GC cells were most sensitive to ivermectin, whereas MKN7 cells were most resistant. In MKN1 xenografts, ivermectin suppressed tumor growth, and the sensitivity of MKN1 cells to ivermectin was decreased by YAP1 knockdown. Ivermectin inhibited YAP1 nuclear expression and CTGF expression in MKN1 cells but not MKN7 cells. Moreover, ivermectin decreased YAP1 mRNA expression, thereby inhibiting nuclear accumulation of YAP1 in MKN1 cells. In survival analysis, low YAP1 mRNA expression was associated with a better prognosis in three independent GC datasets. In conclusion, we identified ivermectin as a potential antitumor agent and found a promising novel therapeutic strategy for inhibition of GC progression by blocking YAP1 expression.

  12. A Novel Scheme for Optimal Control of a Nonlinear Delay Differential Equations Model to Determine Effective and Optimal Administrating Chemotherapy Agents in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezanpour, H R; Setayeshi, S; Akbari, M E

    2011-01-01

    Determining the optimal and effective scheme for administrating the chemotherapy agents in breast cancer is the main goal of this scientific research. The most important issue here is the amount of drug or radiation administrated in chemotherapy and radiotherapy for increasing patient's survival. This is because in these cases, the therapy not only kills the tumor cells, but also kills some of the healthy tissues and causes serious damages. In this paper we investigate optimal drug scheduling effect for breast cancer model which consist of nonlinear ordinary differential time-delay equations. In this paper, a mathematical model of breast cancer tumors is discussed and then optimal control theory is applied to find out the optimal drug adjustment as an input control of system. Finally we use Sensitivity Approach (SA) to solve the optimal control problem. The goal of this paper is to determine optimal and effective scheme for administering the chemotherapy agent, so that the tumor is eradicated, while the immune systems remains above a suitable level. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of our proposed procedure. In this paper a new scheme is proposed to design a therapy protocol for chemotherapy in Breast Cancer. In contrast to traditional pulse drug delivery, a continuous process is offered and optimized, according to the optimal control theory for time-delay systems.

  13. Wittig Derivatization of Sesquiterpenoid Polygodial Leads to Cytostatic Agents with Activity Against Drug Resistant Cancer Cells and Capable of Pyrrolylation of Primary Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Ramesh; De Carvalho, Annelise; Medellin, Derek C.; Middleton, Kelsey N.; Hague, Frédéric; Volmar, Marie N. M.; Frolova, Liliya V.; Rossato, Mateus F.; De La Chapa, Jorge J.; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F.; Pillai, Akshita; Kälin, Roland E.; Mathieu, Véronique; Rogelj, Snezna; Gonzales, Cara B.; Calixto, João B.; Evidente, Antonio; Gautier, Mathieu; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Glass, Rainer; Burth, Patricia; Pelly, Stephen C.; van Otterlo, Willem A. L.; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Many types of cancer, including glioma, melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among others, are resistant to proapoptotic stimuli and thus poorly responsive to current therapies based on the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The current investigation describes the synthesis and anticancer evaluation of unique C12-Wittig derivatives of polygodial, a terpenenoid dialdehyde isolated from Persicaria hydropiper (L.) Delabre. These compounds were found to undergo an unprecedented pyrrole formation with primary amines in a chemical model system, a reaction that could be relevant in the biological environment and lead to the pyrrolation of lysine residues in the target proteins. The anticancer evaluation of these compounds revealed their promising activity against cancer cells displaying various forms of drug resistance, including resistance to proapoptotic agents. Mechanistic studies indicated that compared to the parent polygodial, which displays fixative general cytotoxic action against human cells, the C12-Wittig derivatives exerted their antiproliferative action mainly through cytostatic effects explaining their activity against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. The possibility for an intriguing covalent modification of proteins through a novel pyrrole formation reaction, as well as useful activities against drug resistant cancer cells, make the described polygodial-derived chemical scaffold an interesting new chemotype warranting thorough investigation. PMID:26360047

  14. A Meta Analysis of Doublets Versus Single-agent Chemotherapy 
for Elderly Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong’an XU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It remains disputed whether doublets are more effective than single-agent chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of doublets and single-agent chemotherapy for elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods Data from all published, randomized trials that compared doublets and single-agent chemotherapy in elderly patients were collected from electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI and the CBMdice. Meta-analysis was completed using software Stata 11.0. Results The results of the meta-analysis, including 12 eligible trials (2,306 patients, showed that the doublets significantly increased the overall response rate (OR=1.80, 95%CI:1.50-2.17, P<0.000,1 and one-year survival rate (OR=1.45, 95%CI: 1.22-1.72, P<0.000,1 compared with single-agent chemotherapy. The results of one-year survival rate in platinum-based doublet chemotherapy arms (OR=1.55, 95%CI: 1.18-2.03, P=0.001 and non platinum-based ones (OR=1.38, 95%CI: 1.10-1.73, P=0.006 were both significantly higher than that of single-agent chemotherapy. However, grade 3/4 anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and neurotoxicity (P<0.05 were significantly associated with doublet chemotherapy. The incidence of toxicity effect in non platinum-based chemotherapy was similar to that of single-agent chemotherapy. Conclusion Compared with single-agent chemotherapy, doublet chemotherapy could increase the overall response rate and one-year survival rate significantly. Therefore, doublet chemotherapy would be more appropriate for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC as the first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, further prospective randomized controlled trials in elderly NSCLC patients is needed to verify the findings in this study.

  15. Phenolic Fractions from Muscadine Grape "Noble" Pomace can Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell MDA-MB-231 Better than those from European Grape "Cabernet Sauvignon" and Induce S-Phase Arrest and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianming; Wei, Zheng; Zhang, Shengyu; Peng, Xichun; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Tons of grape pomace which still contained a rich amount of plant polyphenols, is discarded after winemaking. Plant polyphenols have multi-functional activities for human body. In this study, polyphenols of pomaces from Muscadinia rotundifolia "Noble" and Vitis vinifera "Cabernet Sauvignon" were extracted and fractionated, and then they were analyzed with LC-MS and the inhibitory effects on breast cancer cells were compared. The inhibition on MDA-MB-231 cells of fractions from "Noble" was further evaluated. The results showed that polyphenols from 2 grape pomaces could be separated into 3 fractions, and ellagic acid and/or ellagitannins were only detected in fractions from "Noble" pomace. All 3 fractions from "Noble" pomace inhibited MDA-MB-231 better than MCF-7. But fraction 2 from "Cabernet Sauvignon" inhibited MCF-7 better while fraction 1 and fraction 3 inhibited both 2 cells similarly. Moreover, the fractions from "Noble" pomace rather than "Cabernet Sauvignon" can inhibit MDA-MB-231 better. Finally, fractions from "Noble" pomace can induce S-phase arrest and apoptosis on MDA-MB-231. These findings suggested the extracts from grape pomace especially those from "Noble," are potential to be utilized as health beneficial products or even anti-breast cancer agents. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. The use of innovative gadolinium-based contrast agent for MR-diagnosis of cancer in the experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Zelchan, R.; Grigorev, E.; Frolova, I.; Nam, I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study of the functional suitability and specific activity of the contrast agent gadolinium-based for magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the investigated contrast agent intensively accumulates in organs and anatomical structures of the experimental animals. In the model of tumor lesions in animals, study have shown that investigational contrast agent accumulates in the tumor tissue and retained there in for a long enough time.

  17. The enhanced inhibitory effect of different antitumor agents in self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems on human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Kalantari, Azin; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Róka, Eszter; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Póka, Róbert; Kozma, Bence; Bácskay, Ildikó

    2015-07-21

    The aim of this study was to develop topical self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) containing antitumor agents (bleomycin, cisplatin and ifosfamide) and to investigate their inhibitory potential in SMEDDS on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. The physicochemical properties of cytostatic drug loaded SMEDDS were characterized. The cytotoxicity of main components of SMEDDS was also investigated. Their IC50 values were determined. HeLa cells were treated by different concentrations of cisplatin, bleomycin and ifosfamide alone and in various SMEDDS. The inhibitory effect on cell growth was analyzed by MTT cell viability assay. Inflammation is a driving force that accelerates cancer development. The inhibitory effect of these antitumor agents has also been tested on HeLa cells in the presence of inflammatory mediators (IL-1-β, TNF-α) as an in vitro model of inflamed human cervix. Significant differences in the cytotoxicity of cytostatic drugs alone and in SMEDDS have been found in a concentration-dependent manner. The self-micro emulsifying system may potentiate the effectiveness of bleomycin, cisplatin and ifosfamide topically. The effect of SMEDDS containing antitumor agents was decreased significantly in the presence of inflammatory mediators. According to our experiments, the optimal SMEDDS formulation is 1:1:2:6:2 ratios of Isopropyl myristate, Capryol 90, Kolliphor RH 40, Cremophor RH40, Transcutol HP and Labrasol. It can be concluded that SMEDDS may increase the inhibitory effect of bleomycin, ifosfamide and cisplatin on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Inflammation on HeLa cells hinders the effectiveness of SMEDDS containing antitumor agents. Our results might ensure useful data for development of optimal antitumor formulations.

  18. Efficacy and tolerability of high dose "ethinylestradiol" in post-menopausal advanced breast cancer patients heavily pre-treated with endocrine agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Robertson, John F R; Cheung, K L

    2006-07-11

    High dose estrogens (HDEs) were frequently used as endocrine agents prior to the introduction of tamoxifen which carries fewer side effects. Due to the development of resistance to available endocrine agents in almost all women with metastatic breast cancer, interest has renewed in the use of HDEs as yet another endocrine option that may have activity. We report our experience with one of the HDEs ("ethinylestradiol" 1 mg daily) in advanced breast cancer (locally advanced and metastatic) in post-menopausal women who had progressed on multiple endocrine agents. According to a database of advanced breast cancer patients seen in our Unit since 1998, those who had complete set of information and fulfilled the following criteria were studied: (1) patients in whom further endocrine therapy was deemed appropriate i.e., patients who have had clinical benefit with previous endocrine agents or were not fit or unwilling to receive chemotherapy in the presence of potentially life-threatening visceral metastases; (2) disease was assessable by UICC criteria; (3) were treated with "ethinylestradiol" until they were withdrawn from treatment due to adverse events or disease progression. Twelve patients with a median age of 75.1 years (49.1-85 years) were identified. Majority (N = 8) had bony disease. They had ethinylestradiol as 3rd to 7th line endocrine therapy. One patient (8%) came off treatment early due to hepato-renal syndrome. Clinical benefit (objective response or durable stable disease for > or = 6 months) was seen in 4 patients (33.3%) with a median duration of response of 10+ (7-36) months. The time to treatment failure was 4 (0.5-36) months. Yet unreported, high dose "ethinylestradiol" is another viable therapeutic strategy in heavily pre-treated patients when further endocrine therapy is deemed appropriate. Although it tends to carry more side effects, they may not be comparable to those of other HDEs (such as diethylstilbestrol) or chemotherapy.

  19. Valeriana jatamansi constituent IVHD-valtrate as a novel therapeutic agent to human ovarian cancer: in vitro and in vivo activities and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Chen, Tao; Lin, Sheng; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Peizhan; Ba, Qian; Guo, He; Liu, Yanling; Li, Jingquan; Chu, Ruiai; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Weidong; Wang, Hui

    2013-05-01

    Identification of novel chemotherapeutic agents from traditional medicines and elucidation of the molecular basis of their anticancer effects are critical and urgently needed for modern pharmacotherapy. We previously found that analogs of the compounds present in Valeriana jatamansi, a traditional medicine used to treat mental disorders, possess notable antitumor properties; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully demonstrated. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of IVHD-valtrate, one of the most active Valeriana jatamansi derivatives, against human ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. IVHD-valtrate inhibited the growth and proliferation of the A2780 and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner, while relatively low cytotoxicity to immortalized non-tumorigenic human ovarian surface epithelial cells (IOSE-144) was observed. Treatment with IVHD-valtrate arrested the ovarian cancer cells in the G2/M phase and induced apoptosis, and significantly suppressed the growth of A2780 and OVCAR3 xenograft tumors in a dose-dependent manner. The detailed in vitro and in vivo study on the molecular mechanisms of this compound demonstrated that IVHD-valtrate exposure modulated the expression of numerous molecules involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis regardless of p53 status, leading to increase the level of p53, Rb, p21, p27 and decrease Mdm2, E2F1, Cyclin B1, Cdc25C and Cdc2. It also down-regulated Bcl-2/Bax and Bcl-2/Bad ratio and enhanced the cleavage of PARP and Caspases. Our preclinical results indicated IVHD-valtrate is a potential therapeutic agent for ovarian cancer, providing a basis for development of the compound as a novel chemotherapeutic agent.

  20. Peptide-modified liposomes for selective targeting of bombesin receptors overexpressed by cancer cells: a potential theranostic agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Antonella; Salsano, Giuseppina; Morisco, Anna; Aurilio, Michela; Parisi, Antonio; Maione, Francesco; Cicala, Carla; Tesauro, Diego; Aloj, Luigi; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Morelli, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Drug delivery systems consisting of liposomes displaying a cell surface receptor-targeting peptide are being developed to specifically deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to tumors overexpressing a target receptor. This study addresses novel liposome composition approaches to specifically target tissues overexpressing bombesin (BN) receptors. Methods A new amphiphilic peptide derivative (MonY-BN) containing the BN(7–14) peptide, the DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) chelating agent, a hydrophobic moiety with two C18 alkyl chains, and polyethylene glycol spacers, has been synthesized by solid-phase methods. Liposomes have been generated by co-aggregation of MonY-BN with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC). The structural and biological properties of these new target-selective drug-delivery systems have been characterized. Results Liposomes with a DSPC/MonY-BN (97/3 molar ratio) composition showed a diameter of 145.5 ± 31.5 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.20 ± 0.05. High doxorubicin (Dox) loading was obtained with the remote pH gradient method using citrate as the inner buffer. Specific binding to PC-3 cells of DSPC/MonY-BN liposomes was obtained (2.7% ± 0.3%, at 37°C), compared with peptide-free DSPC liposomes (1.4% ± 0.2% at 37°C). Incubation of cells with DSPC/ MonY-BN/Dox showed significantly lower cell survival compared with DSPC/Dox-treated cells, in the presence of 100 ng/mL and 300 ng/mL drug amounts, in cytotoxicity experiments. Intravenous treatment of PC-3 xenograft-bearing mice with DSPC/MonY-BN/Dox at 10 mg/kg Dox dose produced higher tumour growth inhibition (60%) compared with nonspecific DSPC/ Dox liposomes (36%) relative to control animals. Conclusion The structural and loading properties of DSPC/MonY-BN liposomes along with the observed in-vitro and in-vivo activity are encouraging for further development of this approach for target-specific cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22619538

  1. Identification of cancer specific ligands from one-bead one compound combinatorial libraries to develop theranostics agents against oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Frances Fan

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most prevalent disease worldwide. One-bead one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial technology is a powerful method to identify peptidomimetic ligands against a variety of receptors on cell surfaces. We therefore hypothesized that cancer specific ligands against OSCC might be identified and can be conjugated to optical dyes or nanocarriers to develop theranostic agents against OSCC. Material and methods: Different OSCC cell lines were incubated with OBOC libraries and beads with cell binding were sorted and then screened with normal human cells to identify peptide-beads binding to different OSCC cell lines but not binding to normal human cells. The molecular probes of OSCC were developed by biotinylating the carboxyl end of the ligands. OSCC theranostic agents were developed by decorating LLY13 with NPs and evaluated by using orthotopic bioluminescent oral cancer model. Results: Six OSCC specific ligands were discovered. Initial peptide-histochemistry study indicated that LLY12 and LLY13 were able to specifically detect OSCC cells grown on chamber slides at the concentration of 1 muM. In addition, LLY13 was found to penetrate into the OSCC cells and accumulate in the cytoplasm, and nucleus. After screened with a panel of integrin antibodies, only anti-alpha3 antibody was able to block most of OSCC cells binding to the LLY13 beads. OSCC theranostic agents developed using targeting LLY13 micelles (25+/- 4nm in diameter) were more efficient in binding to HSC-3 cancer cells compared to non-targeting micelles. Ex vivo images demonstrated that xenografts from the mice with targeting micelles appeared to have higher signals than the non-targeting groups. Conclusion: LLY13 has promising in vitro and in vivo targeting activity against OSCC. In addition, LLY13 is also able to penetrate into cancer cells via endocytosis. Initial study indicated that alpha3 integrin might partially be the corresponding receptor involved

  2. Breast cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of Camellia Sinensis (green tea): an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Movahedi, Mino

    2017-02-01

    Camellia sinensis belongs to the plant family of Theaceae, native to East Asia, the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia, but naturalized in many parts of the world. The aim of this study was to overview its anti-breast cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects. This review article is aimed to overview breast cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of Camellia sinensis (green tea). This review article was carried out by searching studies in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and IranMedex databases. The initial search strategy identified around 108 references. In this study, 68 studies were accepted for further screening, and met all our inclusion criteria [in English, full text, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of Camellia sinensis and dated mainly from the year 1999 to 2016. The search terms were Camellia sinensis, chemopreventive, chemotherapeutic properties, pharmacological effects. The result of this study suggested that the catechin available in Camellia sinensis has properties which can prevent and treat breast cancer. It has also been shown to inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells and to block carcinogenesis. It was found that increased Camellia sinensis consumption may lower the risk of breast cancer. Camellia sinensis intake was shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer incidence. In addition, potential breast cancer chemopreventive effect of Camellia sinensis both in vivo and in vitro was highly confirmed. However, the evidence of low effect and no effect was observed. More clinical trial studies are needed to prove its anti-breast cancer activity decisively. Camellia sinensis is broadly utilized as a part of customary medication since antiquated time because of its cost adequacy, and fewer reaction properties. The studies demonstrated anti-breast cancer activity of Camellia sinensis and its component by adjusting cell signaling pathways such as angiogenesis, apoptosis, and transcription factor. Furthermore

  3. Comparison of outcomes in patients treated with multi-agent regiments of cisplatin, adriamycin, and VP-16 versus carboplatin and paclitaxel for advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olawaiye, A B; Godoy, H E; Shahzad, M M K; Rauh-Hain, J A; Lele, S B; Odunsi, K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of two multi-agent chemotherapeutic regiments that were previously used at the Institution for treatment of advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer. A retrospective review of patients with Stage III, IV, and recurrent endometrial cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy at Roswell Park Cancer Institute over a period of 21 years. Two patient groups were defined based on treatment received: cisplatin, adriamycin, and VP-16 with or without megace (PAV-M), or carboplatin and paclitaxel (CT). Forty-two patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer were included in this review based on regimen received. Median duration of follow up was 55 months. Treatment with PAV-M resulted in more dose modifications compared to CT group (42% vs 11%, respectively). There were no significant differences in disease-free survival or overall survival. PAV/PAV-M is active in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. However, toxicity associated with this triplet regimen may limit clinical use.

  4. Heregulin-expressing HER2-positive breast and gastric cancer exhibited heterogeneous susceptibility to the anti-HER2 agents lapatinib, trastuzumab and T-DM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonagase, Yoshikane; Yonesaka, Kimio; Kawakami, Hisato; Watanabe, Satomi; Haratani, Koji; Takahama, Takayuki; Takegawa, Naoki; Ueda, Hiroto; Tanizaki, Junko; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Takeda, Masayuki; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tamura, Takao; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Tsurutani, Junji

    2016-12-20

    Overexpression of heregulin, a HER3 ligand, is one mechanism that confers resistance to the anti-HER2 agents trastuzumab and lapatinib. We investigated the impact of heregulin expression on the efficacy of HER2-targeted therapeutic agents, including trastuzumab, trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) and lapatinib, in vitro and in vivo and evaluated the heregulin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in specimens from patients with HER2-positive breast or gastric cancer. Cell proliferation and apoptosis assays demonstrated that heregulin conferred robust resistance to lapatinib and trastuzumab via HER3-Akt pathway activation followed by survivin overexpression; however, heregulin conferred minimal or no resistance to T-DM1 and paclitaxel. The heregulin mRNA level of one of 10 patients was up-regulated after the acquisition of resistance to trastuzumab-based therapy. SK-BR-3, NCI-N87, BT-474, MDA-MB-453, HCC1954, SNU-216 and 4-1ST cells were pharmacologically treated with recombinant heregulin or transfected with the heregulin gene. We also assessed the expression of heregulin mRNA in HER2-positive breast or gastric cancer samples before and after trastuzumab-based therapy using a RT-PCR-based method. mRNA up-regulation of heregulin was observed in clinical breast cancer specimens during trastuzumab-based treatment, but heregulin overexpression had a limited effect on the sensitivity to T-DM1 in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Vascular Targeting in Pancreatic Cancer: The Novel Tubulin-Binding Agent ZD6126 Reveals Antitumor Activity in Primary and Metastatic Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Kleespies

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available ZD6126 is a novel vascular-targeting agent that acts by disrupting the tubulin cytoskeleton of an immature tumor endothelium, leading to an occlusion of tumor blood vessels and a subsequent tumor necrosis. We wanted to evaluate ZD6126 in primary and metastatic tumor models of human pancreatic cancer. Nude mice were injected orthotopically with L3.6pl pancreatic cancer cells. In single and multiple dosing experiments, mice received ZD6126, gemcitabine, a combination of both agents, or no treatment. For the induction of metastatic disease, additional groups of mice were injected with L3.6pl cells into the spleen. Twenty-four hours after a single-dose treatment, ZD6126 therapy led to an extensive central tumor necrosis, which was not seen after gemcitabine treatment. Multiple dosing of ZD6126 resulted in a significant growth inhibition of primary tumors and a marked reduction of spontaneous liver and lymph node metastases. Experimental metastatic disease could be significantly controlled by a combination of ZD6126 and gemcitabine, as shown by a reduction of the number and size of established liver metastases. As shown by additional in vitro and in vivo experiments, possible mechanisms involve antivascular activities and subsequent antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of ZD6126 on tumor cells, whereas direct activities against tumor cells seem unlikely. These data highlight the antitumor and antimetastatic effects of ZD6126 in human pancreatic cancer and reveal benefits of adding ZD6126 to standard gemcitabine therapy.

  6. AZD1775 induces toxicity through double-stranded DNA breaks independently of chemotherapeutic agents in p53-mutated colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Peter John; Littlejohns, Anna Tiffany; Gaunt, Hannah Jane; Prasad, K Raj; Beech, David John; Burke, Dermot Anthony

    2017-01-01

    AZD1775 is a small molecule WEE1 inhibitor used in combination with DNA-damaging agents to cause premature mitosis and cell death in p53-mutated cancer cells. Here we sought to determine the mechanism of action of AZD1775 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents in light of recent findings that AZD1775 can cause double-stranded DNA (DS-DNA) breaks. AZD1775 significantly improved the cytotoxicity of 5-FU in a p53-mutated colorectal cancer cell line (HT29 cells), decreasing the IC 50 from 9.3 μM to 3.5 μM. Flow cytometry showed a significant increase in the mitotic marker pHH3 (3.4% vs. 56.2%) and DS-DNA break marker γH2AX (5.1% vs. 50.7%) for combination therapy compared with 5-FU alone. Combination therapy also increased the amount of caspase-3 dependent apoptosis compared with 5-FU alone (4% vs. 13%). The addition of exogenous nucleosides to combination therapy significantly rescued the increased DS-DNA breaks and caspase-3 dependent apoptosis almost to the levels of 5-FU monotherapy. In conclusion, AZD1775 enhances 5-FU cytotoxicity through increased DS-DNA breaks, not premature mitosis, in p53-mutated colorectal cancer cells. This finding is important for designers of future clinical trials when considering the optimal timing and duration of AZD1775 treatment.

  7. Câncer e agentes antineoplásicos ciclo-celular específicos e ciclo-celular não específicos que interagem com o DNA: uma introdução Cancer and cell cicle-specific and cell cicle nonspecific anticancer DNA-interactive agents: an introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia de Almeida

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemotherapy agents against cancer may be classified as "cell cycle-specific" or "cell cycle-nonspecific". Nevertheless, several of them have their biological activity related to any kind of action on DNA such as: antimetabolic agents (DNA synthesis inhibition, inherently reactive agents (DNA alkylating electrophilic traps for macromolecular nucleophiles from DNA through inter-strand cross-linking - ISC - alkylation and intercalating agents (drug-DNA interactions inherent to the binding made due to the agent penetration in to the minor groove of the double helix. The earliest and perhaps most extensively studied and most heavily employed clinical anticancer agents in use today are the DNA inter-strand cross-linking agents.

  8. Rational design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of third generation α-noscapine analogues as potent tubulin binding anti-cancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Manchukonda

    Full Text Available Systematic screening based on structural similarity of drugs such as colchicine and podophyllotoxin led to identification of noscapine, a microtubule-targeted agent that attenuates the dynamic instability of microtubules without affecting the total polymer mass of microtubules. We report a new generation of noscapine derivatives as potential tubulin binding anti-cancer agents. Molecular modeling experiments of these derivatives 5a, 6a-j yielded better docking score (-7.252 to -5.402 kCal/mol than the parent compound, noscapine (-5.505 kCal/mol and its existing derivatives (-5.563 to -6.412 kCal/mol. Free energy (ΔG bind calculations based on the linear interaction energy (LIE empirical equation utilizing Surface Generalized Born (SGB continuum solvent model predicted the tubulin-binding affinities for the derivatives 5a, 6a-j (ranging from -4.923 to -6.189 kCal/mol. Compound 6f showed highest binding affinity to tubulin (-6.189 kCal/mol. The experimental evaluation of these compounds corroborated with theoretical studies. N-(3-brormobenzyl noscapine (6f binds tubulin with highest binding affinity (KD, 38 ± 4.0 µM, which is ~ 4.0 times higher than that of the parent compound, noscapine (KD, 144 ± 1.0 µM and is also more potent than that of the first generation clinical candidate EM011, 9-bromonoscapine (KD, 54 ± 9.1 µM. All these compounds exhibited substantial cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 72.9 µM; compound 6f showed prominent anti-cancer efficacy with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 26.9 µM in cancer cells of different tissues of origin. These compounds perturbed DNA synthesis, delayed the cell cycle progression at G2/M phase, and induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Collectively, the study reported here identified potent, third generation noscapinoids as new anti-cancer agents.

  9. A review on the effects of current chemotherapy drugs and natural agents in treating non–small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Ju, Da-Tong; Chang, Chih-Fen; Muralidhar Reddy, P.; Velmurugan, Bharath Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and this makes it an attractive disease to review and possibly improve therapeutic treatment options. Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, targeted treatments, and immunotherapy separate or in combination are commonly used to treat lung cancer. However, these treatment types may cause different side effects, and chemotherapy-based regimens appear to have reached a therapeutic plateau. Hence, effective, better-tolerated treatments are n...

  10. VEGFR2-Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Enhances the Detection of Ovarian Tumors at Early Stage in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Animesh; Yellapa, Aparna; Bahr, Janice M; Machado, Sergio A; Bitterman, Pincas; Basu, Sanjib; Sharma, Sameer; Abramowicz, Jacques S

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated neoangiogenesis (TAN) is an early event in ovarian cancer (OVCA) development. Increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by TAN vessels presents a potential target for early detection by ultrasound imaging. The goal of this study was to examine the suitability of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound contrast agents in detecting spontaneous OVCA in laying hens. Effects of VEGFR2-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from spontaneous ovarian tumors in hens were examined in a cross-sectional study. Enhancement in the intensity of ultrasound imaging was determined before and after injection of VEGFR2-targeted contrast agents. All ultrasound images were digitally stored and analyzed off-line. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were collected and processed for histology and detection of VEGFR2-expressing microvessels. Enhancement in visualization of ovarian morphology was detected by gray-scale imaging following injection of VEGFR2-targeted contrast agents. Compared with pre-contrast, contrast imaging enhanced the intensities of ultrasound imaging significantly (p ultrasound imaging was significantly (p ultrasound imaging in hens with OVCA were positively correlated with increased (p therapeutics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Development of Laulimalide-Based Microtubule-Stabilzing Agents: New Chemistry for the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davidson, Bradley

    2002-01-01

    Through a collaborative research program involving Utah State University and the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, we have discovered that the sponge-derived macrolides laulimalide and isolaulimalide...

  12. Enhancement of the photo-electric effect with pharmacological agents in synchrotron radiation based anti-cancer radiotherapy: a methodological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corde, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Anti-cancer therapy rests on three main principles: 1) anatomic confinement of irradiation; 2) temporal fractioning of treatment; 3) treatment of tissues that are more sensitive to radiation than surrounding healthy tissue. Under those principles hides the goal of radiotherapy: to deposit more of the X-ray energy in the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. This goal is hard to reach since one of the causes of the failures in radiotherapy is the continuing evolution of the tumor. Could synchrotron radiation be more effective as an X-ray source for radiotherapy? The variation of the radiation-matter interaction cross-sections as a function of X-ray energy and atomic number of the medium show that certain energies and certain elements are more suitable to obtain the largest number of interactions and the largest amount of deposited energy. Synchrotron radiation allows to select precisely those energies because of its high spectral intensity. Its spectral characteristics (energy of the photons between 10 and 100 keV) allow to trigger the photoelectric effect with a maximum of probability on heavy elements introduced close to cancerous cells. It has been shown that: 1) synchrotron radiation based tomodensitometry is a quantitative imaging technique, potentially powerful for radiotherapy since it insures in-vivo the measurement of intra-tumoral concentration of contrast agent (I or Gd); 2) in the presence of iodinated contrast agent the lethal effect of X-rays on cell survival is increased and the gain in radio sensitivity depends on X-ray energy; 3) at the cellular scale the lethality of irradiation can be optimised again by transporting heavy atoms (I, Pt) inside the DNA, which is the biological target of the irradiation. This reinforcement of the killing efficiency of low energy X-rays using a physical mechanism aimed at a pharmacological agent is an original concept in anti-cancer radiotherapy. (author) [fr

  13. The thioredoxin system mediates redox-induced cell death in human colon cancer cells: implications for the mechanism of action of anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Rigas, Basil

    2008-10-15

    Anticancer agents act, at least in part, by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). We examined the redox effect on SW480 and HT-29 colon cancer cells of four anticancer compounds, arsenic trioxide, phosphoaspirin, phosphosulindac, and nitric oxide-donating aspirin (NO-ASA). All compounds inhibited the growth of both cell lines (IC(50), 10-90 micromol/L) and induced RONS detected by a general RONS molecular probe. NO-ASA, which induced at least four individual RONS (NO, H(2)O(2), superoxide anion, and peroxynitirte), induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death that was RONS-mediated (cell death paralleled RONS levels and was abrogated by N-acetyl cysteine but not by diphenylene iodonium, which displayed prooxidant activity and enhanced cell death). Nuclear factor-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinases were modulated by RONS. Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1), an oxidoreductase involved in redox regulation, was heavily oxidized in response to RONS and mediated the growth inhibitory effect of the anticancer agents; knocking-down trx-1 expression by small interfering RNA abrogated cell death induced by them. These compounds also inhibited the activity of Trx reductase that reduces oxidized Trx-1, whereas the Trx reductase inhibitor aurothiomalate synergized with NO-ASA in the induction of cell death. Our findings indicate that the Trx system mediates to a large extent redox-induced cell death in response to anticancer agents. This mechanism of action may be shared by more anticancer agents and deserves further assessment as a candidate mechanism for the pharmacologic control of cancer.

  14. Anti-cancer agents based on N-acyl-2, 3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b] quinoline derivatives and a method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. In particular, the invention relates to N-acyl derivatives of 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]quinolines having the structural Formula (I), ##STR00001## stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. The meaning of R1 is independently selected from H; C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl substituents; R2 is selected from C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl; substituted or non-substituted, fused or non-fused to substituted or non-substituted aromatic ring, aryl or heteroaryl groups. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  15. Current Status of Poly(ADP-ribose Polymerase Inhibitors as Novel Therapeutic Agents for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Hiller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive type of breast cancer that is clinically defined as lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors, as well as being ERBB2 (HER-2 negative. Without specific therapeutic targets, TNBC carries a worse prognosis than other types of breast cancer in the absence of therapy. Research has now further differentiated breast cancer into subtypes based on genetic expression patterns. One of these subtypes, basal-like, frequently overlaps with the clinical picture of TNBC. Additionally, both TNBC and basal-like breast cancer link to BRCA mutations. Recent pharmaceutical advances have created a class of drugs, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors, which are showing potential to effectively treat these patients. The aim of this paper is to summarize the basis behind PARP inhibitors and update the current status of their development in clinical trials for the treatment of TNBC.

  16. HER2 signaling pathway activation and response of breast cancer cells to HER2-targeting agents is dependent strongly on the 3D microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigelt, Britta; Lo, Alvin T; Park, Catherine C; Gray, Joe W; Bissell, Mina J

    2009-07-27

    Development of effective and durable breast cancer treatment strategies requires a mechanistic understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on response. Previous work has shown that cellular signaling pathways and cell morphology are dramatically influenced by three-dimensional (3D) cultures as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Here, we compared 2D and 3D culture models to determine the impact of 3D architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) on HER2 signaling and on the response of HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the HER2-targeting agents Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab and Lapatinib. We show that the response of the HER2-amplified AU565, SKBR3 and HCC1569 cells to these anti-HER2 agents was highly dependent on whether the cells were cultured in 2D monolayer or 3D laminin-rich ECM gels. Inhibition of {beta}1 integrin, a major cell-ECM receptor subunit, significantly increased the sensitivity of the HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the humanized monoclonal antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab when grown in a 3D environment. Finally, in the absence of inhibitors, 3D cultures had substantial impact on HER2 downstream signaling and induced a switch between PI3K-AKT- and RAS-MAPKpathway activation in all cell lines studied, including cells lacking HER2 amplification and overexpression. Our data provide direct evidence that breast cancer cells are able to rapidly adapt to different environments and signaling cues by activating alternative pathways that regulate proliferation and cell survival, events that may play a significant role in the acquisition of resistance to targeted therapies.

  17. HER2 signaling pathway activation and response of breast cancer cells to HER2-targeting agents is dependent strongly on the 3D microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Britta; Lo, Alvin T; Park, Catherine C; Gray, Joe W; Bissell, Mina J

    2010-07-01

    Development of effective and durable breast cancer treatment strategies requires a mechanistic understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on response. Previous work has shown that cellular signaling pathways and cell morphology are dramatically influenced by three-dimensional (3D) cultures as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Here, we compared 2D and 3D culture models to determine the impact of 3D architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) on HER2 signaling and on the response of HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the HER2-targeting agents Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab and Lapatinib. We show that the response of the HER2-amplified AU565, SKBR3 and HCC1569 cells to these anti-HER2 agents was highly dependent on whether the cells were cultured in 2D monolayer or 3D laminin-rich ECM gels. Inhibition of beta1 integrin, a major cell-ECM receptor subunit, significantly increased the sensitivity of the HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the humanized monoclonal antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab when grown in a 3D environment. Finally, in the absence of inhibitors, 3D cultures had substantial impact on HER2 downstream signaling and induced a switch between PI3K-AKT- and RAS-MAPK-pathway activation in all cell lines studied, including cells lacking HER2 amplification and overexpression. Our data provide direct evidence that breast cancer cells are able to rapidly adapt to different environments and signaling cues by activating alternative pathways that regulate proliferation and cell survival, events that may play a significant role in the acquisition of resistance to targeted therapies.

  18. MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles functionalized with aptamer and radiolabelled with 90Y and 159Gd as a potential therapeutic agent against colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Carolina de Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a malignancy that affects large intestine and rectum, and it is the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract, the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Nowadays, available therapeutic procedures for this type of cancer are limited and ineffective. Conventional radiotherapy is not an often used approach in the treatment of CRC due to the fact that peristaltic movements hamper the targeting of ionizing radiation and this type of treatment is used as adjuvant and palliative to control symptoms. Therefore, surgical intervention is the primary therapeutic choice against this disease. Researches based on the combination of radioisotopes and nanostructured carriers systems have demonstrated significant results in improving the selectivity action as well as reducing the radiation dose into healthy tissues. MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles have unique characteristics such as high surface area and well-defined pore diameters making these nanoparticles an ideal candidate of therapeutic agent carrier. Thus, the objective of this work is to synthesize and characterize MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles conjugated with yttrium-90 and gadolinium-159 and evaluate this system as a potential therapeutic agent. The nanoparticles were synthesized via sol-gel method. The sample was characterized using FTIR, SAXS, PCS, Zeta Potential analysis, Thermal analysis, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The ability to incorporate Y +3 and Gd +3 ion was determined in vitro using different ratios (1:1, 1:3, 1:5 v/v) of YCL 3 and Gd 2 O 3 and silica nanoparticles dispersed in saline, pH 7.4. The non-incorporated Y +3 and Gd +3 ions were removed by ultracentrifugation procedure and the concentration of ions in the supernatant was determined by ICP-AES. Cell viability was assessed by colorimetric MTT

  19. Proapoptotic protein Smac mediates apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells when treated with the anti-tumor agent AT101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenbin; Wang, Fang; Tang, Jingsheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yuan, Zhu; Nie, Chunlai; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-01-02

    Chemoresistance of ovarian cancer has been previously attributed to the expression and activation of Bcl-2 family proteins. BH3-mimetic molecules possessing potential anticancer activity are able to inhibit antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. AT101 (R-(-)-gossypol), a natural BH3-mimetic molecule, has shown anti-tumor activity as a single agent and in combination with standard anticancer therapies in a variety of tumor models. Here, we report the effect of AT101 on apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells and identify the major molecular events that determine sensitivity. AT101 induced cell apoptosis by activating Bax through a conformational change, translocation, and oligomerization. The inhibition of Bax expression only partially prevented caspase-3 cleavage. However, the gene silencing of Bax had no effect on mitochondrial Smac release. Further experiments demonstrated that Smac reduction inhibited caspase-3 activation and attenuated cell apoptosis. More importantly, the inhibition of Smac or overexpression of XIAP attenuated Bax activation in ovarian cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that the Akt-p53 pathway is involved in the regulation of Smac release. Taken together, our data demonstrate the role of Smac and the molecular mechanisms of AT101-induced apoptosis of chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells. Our findings suggest that AT101 not only triggers Bax activation but also induces mitochondrial Smac release. Activated Smac can enhance Bax-mediated cellular apoptosis. Therefore, Smac mediates Bax activation to determine the threshold for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

  20. Proapoptotic Protein Smac Mediates Apoptosis in Cisplatin-resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells When Treated with the Anti-tumor Agent AT101*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenbin; Wang, Fang; Tang, Jingsheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yuan, Zhu; Nie, Chunlai; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-01-01

    Chemoresistance of ovarian cancer has been previously attributed to the expression and activation of Bcl-2 family proteins. BH3-mimetic molecules possessing potential anticancer activity are able to inhibit antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. AT101 (R-(−)-gossypol), a natural BH3-mimetic molecule, has shown anti-tumor activity as a single agent and in combination with standard anticancer therapies in a variety of tumor models. Here, we report the effect of AT101 on apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells and identify the major molecular events that determine sensitivity. AT101 induced cell apoptosis by activating Bax through a conformational change, translocation, and oligomerization. The inhibition of Bax expression only partially prevented caspase-3 cleavage. However, the gene silencing of Bax had no effect on mitochondrial Smac release. Further experiments demonstrated that Smac reduction inhibited caspase-3 activation and attenuated cell apoptosis. More importantly, the inhibition of Smac or overexpression of XIAP attenuated Bax activation in ovarian cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that the Akt-p53 pathway is involved in the regulation of Smac release. Taken together, our data demonstrate the role of Smac and the molecular mechanisms of AT101-induced apoptosis of chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells. Our findings suggest that AT101 not only triggers Bax activation but also induces mitochondrial Smac release. Activated Smac can enhance Bax-mediated cellular apoptosis. Therefore, Smac mediates Bax activation to determine the threshold for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:22052903

  1. Evolution of systemic treatment for hormone-sensitive breast cancer: from sequential use of single agents to the upfront administration of drug combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Imyanitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current standards of treatment of endocrine-dependent cancers (breast cancer (BC, prostate cancer imply sequential use of endocrine therapy and cytotoxic agents: it is believed, that steroid hormone antagonists cease the division of transformed cells and therefore make them resistant to other therapeutic modalities. It is important to recognize that conceptual investigations in this field were carried out dozens of years ago, and often involved relatively non-efficient drugs, imperfect laboratory tests, etc. There are several recent examples of combined use of endocrine therapy and other compounds. The addition of docetaxel (6 cycles to androgen deprivation resulted in significant improvement of overall survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Clinical trial involving the combined use of exemestane and everolimus demonstrated promising results. There are ongoing studies on inhibitors of cycline-dependent kinases. Use of these drugs in the beginning of endocrine therapy may significantly delay resistance to the antagonists of estrogen signaling.

  2. KCN1, a Novel Synthetic Sulfonamide Anticancer Agent: In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Pancreatic Cancer Activities and Preclinical Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, Elizabeth R.; Xu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xu; Nag, Subhasree Ashok; Wu, Xuming; Wang, Ming-Hai; Wang, Hui; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activity and pharmacological properties of 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]-N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide, KCN1. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro activity of KCN1 on cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution of pancreatic cancer cells, using the MTT and BrdUrd assays, and flow cytometry. The in vivo anti-cancer effects of KCN1 were evaluated in two distinct xenograft models of pancreatic cancer. We also developed an HPLC method for the quantitation of the compound, and examined its stability in mouse plasma, plasma protein binding, and degradation by mouse S9 microsomal enzymes. Furthermore, we examined the pharmacokinetics of KCN1 following intravenous or intraperitoneal injection in mice. Results showed that, in a dose-dependent manner, KCN1 inhibited cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, and showed in vivo anticancer efficacy in mice bearing Panc-1 or Mia Paca-2 tumor xenografts. The HPLC method provided linear detection of KCN1 in all of the matrices in the range from 0.1 to 100 µM, and had a lower limit of detection of 0.085 µM in mouse plasma. KCN1 was very stable in mouse plasma, extensively plasma bound, and metabolized by S9 microsomal enzymes. The pharmacokinetic studies indicated that KCN1 could be detected in all of the tissues examined, most for at least 24 h. In conclusion, our preclinical data indicate that KCN1 is a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer, providing a basis for its future development. PMID:23028659

  3. KCN1, a novel synthetic sulfonamide anticancer agent: in vitro and in vivo anti-pancreatic cancer activities and preclinical pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activity and pharmacological properties of 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-ylmethyl]-N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide, KCN1. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro activity of KCN1 on cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution of pancreatic cancer cells, using the MTT and BrdUrd assays, and flow cytometry. The in vivo anti-cancer effects of KCN1 were evaluated in two distinct xenograft models of pancreatic cancer. We also developed an HPLC method for the quantitation of the compound, and examined its stability in mouse plasma, plasma protein binding, and degradation by mouse S9 microsomal enzymes. Furthermore, we examined the pharmacokinetics of KCN1 following intravenous or intraperitoneal injection in mice. Results showed that, in a dose-dependent manner, KCN1 inhibited cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, and showed in vivo anticancer efficacy in mice bearing Panc-1 or Mia Paca-2 tumor xenografts. The HPLC method provided linear detection of KCN1 in all of the matrices in the range from 0.1 to 100 µM, and had a lower limit of detection of 0.085 µM in mouse plasma. KCN1 was very stable in mouse plasma, extensively plasma bound, and metabolized by S9 microsomal enzymes. The pharmacokinetic studies indicated that KCN1 could be detected in all of the tissues examined, most for at least 24 h. In conclusion, our preclinical data indicate that KCN1 is a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer, providing a basis for its future development.

  4. A review on the effects of current chemotherapy drugs and natural agents in treating non–small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Ju, Da-Tong; Chang, Chih-Fen; Muralidhar Reddy, P.; Velmurugan, Bharath Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and this makes it an attractive disease to review and possibly improve therapeutic treatment options. Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, targeted treatments, and immunotherapy separate or in combination are commonly used to treat lung cancer. However, these treatment types may cause different side effects, and chemotherapy-based regimens appear to have reached a therapeutic plateau. Hence, effective, better-tolerated treatments are needed to address and hopefully overcome this conundrum. Recent advances have enabled biologists to better investigate the potential use of natural compounds for the treatment or control of various cancerous diseases. For the past 30 years, natural compounds have been the pillar of chemotherapy. However, only a few compounds have been tested in cancerous patients and only partial evidence is available regarding their clinical effectiveness. Herein, we review the research on using current chemotherapy drugs and natural compounds (Wortmannin and Roscovitine, Cordyceps militaris, Resveratrol, OSU03013, Myricetin, Berberine, Antroquinonol) and the beneficial effects they have on various types of cancers including non-small cell lung cancer. Based on this literature review, we propose the use of these compounds along with chemotherapy drugs in patients with advanced and/or refractory solid tumours. PMID:29130448

  5. A review on the effects of current chemotherapy drugs and natural agents in treating non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Ju, Da-Tong; Chang, Chih-Fen; Muralidhar Reddy, P; Velmurugan, Bharath Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and this makes it an attractive disease to review and possibly improve therapeutic treatment options. Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, targeted treatments, and immunotherapy separate or in combination are commonly used to treat lung cancer. However, these treatment types may cause different side effects, and chemotherapy-based regimens appear to have reached a therapeutic plateau. Hence, effective, better-tolerated treatments are needed to address and hopefully overcome this conundrum. Recent advances have enabled biologists to better investigate the potential use of natural compounds for the treatment or control of various cancerous diseases. For the past 30 years, natural compounds have been the pillar of chemotherapy. However, only a few compounds have been tested in cancerous patients and only partial evidence is available regarding their clinical effectiveness. Herein, we review the research on using current chemotherapy drugs and natural compounds (Wortmannin and Roscovitine, Cordyceps militaris, Resveratrol, OSU03013, Myricetin, Berberine, Antroquinonol) and the beneficial effects they have on various types of cancers including non-small cell lung cancer. Based on this literature review, we propose the use of these compounds along with chemotherapy drugs in patients with advanced and/or refractory solid tumours. © Author(s) 2017. This article is published with open access by China Medical University.

  6. Growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells and efficacy of anti-angiogenic agents in a hydroxyethyl chitosan/glycidyl methacrylate hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hejing; Qian, Junmin; Zhang, Yaping; Xu, Weijun; Xiao, Juxiang; Suo, Aili

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer negatively affects women's health worldwide. The tumour microenvironment plays a critical role in tumour initiation, proliferation, and metastasis. Cancer cells are traditionally grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures as monolayers on a flat solid surface lacking cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These experimental conditions deviate from the clinical situation. Improved experimental systems that can mimic the in vivo situation are required to discover new therapies, particularly for anti-angiogenic agents that mainly target intercellular factors and play an essential role in treating some cancers. Chitosan can be modified to construct three-dimensional (3D) tumour models. Here, we report an in vitro 3D tumour model using a hydroxyethyl chitosan/glycidyl methacrylate (HECS-GMA) hydrogel produced by a series of chitosan modifications. Parameters relating to cell morphology, viability, proliferation, and migration were analysed using breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In a xenograft model, secretion of angiogenesis-related growth factors and the anti-angiogenic efficacy of Endostar and Bevacizumab in cells grown in HECS-GMA hydrogels were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Hydroxyethyl chitosan/glycidyl methacrylate hydrogels had a highly porous microstructure, mechanical properties, swelling ratio, and morphology consistent with a 3D tumour model. Compared with a 2D monolayer culture, breast cancer MCF-7 cells residing in the HECS-GMA hydrogels grew as tumour-like clusters in a 3D formation. In a xenograft model, MCF-7 cells cultured in the HECS-GMA hydrogels had increased secretion of angiogenesis-related growth factors. Recombinant human endostatin (Endostar), but not Bevacizumab (Avastin), was an effective anti-angiogenic agent in HECS-GMA hydrogels. The HECS-GMA hydrogel provided a 3D tumour model that mimicked the in vivo cancer microenvironment and supported the growth of MCF7 cells better than traditional tissue culture plates. The HECS

  7. Therapeutic potential of the anti-diabetic agent metformin in targeting the skin cancer stem cell diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Anand; Powers, Matthew A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-05-01

    Type II diabetes is associated with increased prevalence of cancer including both melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Emerging evidence from epidemiological studies suggest that diabetic patients on metformin have a lower risk of cancer incidence and mortality in a broad range of neoplasms. In both melanoma and SCC, populations of cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to tumor initiation and metastasis. We propose that metformin constitutes a new class of targeted therapy that acts on the skin CSC diaspora. We posit that metformin selectively and simultaneously targets CSCs of the primary tumor as well as in metastatic niches thereby disrupting the dynamic dispersal of circulating CSCs between the primary tumor and metastatic site. This hypothesis suggests a new concept in dermato-oncology that treatment of type II diabetes and prevention of skin cancer are two sides of the same coin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Design, synthesis and molecular modeling studies of novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives as potential anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Vivek; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A series of novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives 4a-x have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for potential anti-cancer activity. The anti-cancer activity of synthesized compounds 4a-x were evaluated against selected human cancer cell line of breast (MCF-7) using sulforhodamine B (SRB) method. Among the synthesized compounds, 4x having 2-cyano phenyl group showed significant cytotoxic activity which is comparable to that of adriamycin as standard anti-cancer drug. The SAR study revealed that the substituted phenyl group on oxadiazole ring attached to thiazolidine-2,4-dione moiety showed significant growth inhibitory activity against MCF-7 cell line. The result of molecular modeling studies showed that compounds 4f, 4o and 4x having similar structural alignment as crystal ligand of protein.

  9. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media.

  10. Enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 targeting of head and neck cancer in combination with radiation therapy or ZD6126 vascular disrupting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alajez Nehad M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the 5th most common cancer worldwide. Locally advanced HNSCC are treated with either radiation or chemo-radiotherapy, but still associated with high mortality rate, underscoring the need to develop novel therapies. Oncolytic viruses have been garnering increasing interest as anti-cancer agents due to their preferential killing of transformed cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 against the human hypopharyngeal FaDu tumour model in vitro and in vivo. Results Our data demonstrated high toxicity of the virus against FaDu cells in vitro, which was associated with induction of apoptosis. In vivo, systemic injection of 1 × 109 pfu had minimal effect on tumour growth; however, when combined with two doses of ionizing radiation (IR; 5 Gy each or a single injection of the vascular disrupting agent (ZD6126, the virus exhibited profound suppression of tumour growth, which translated to a prolonged survival in the treated mice. Concordantly, VSVΔ51 combined with ZD6126 led to a significant increase in viral replication in these tumours. Conclusions Our data suggest that the combinations of VSVΔ51 with either IR or ZD6126 are potentially novel therapeutic opportunities for HNSCC.

  11. Multi-scale agent-based brain cancer modeling and prediction of TKI treatment response: incorporating EGFR signaling pathway and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Le; Tan, Hua; Bao, Jiguang; Strouthos, Costas; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2012-08-30

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway and angiogenesis in brain cancer act as an engine for tumor initiation, expansion and response to therapy. Since the existing literature does not have any models that investigate the impact of both angiogenesis and molecular signaling pathways on treatment, we propose a novel multi-scale, agent-based computational model that includes both angiogenesis and EGFR modules to study the response of brain cancer under tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment. The novel angiogenesis module integrated into the agent-based tumor model is based on a set of reaction-diffusion equations that describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the distributions of micro-environmental factors such as glucose, oxygen, TGFα, VEGF and fibronectin. These molecular species regulate tumor growth during angiogenesis. Each tumor cell is equipped with an EGFR signaling pathway linked to a cell-cycle pathway to determine its phenotype. EGFR TKIs are delivered through the blood vessels of tumor microvasculature and the response to treatment is studied. Our simulations demonstrated that entire tumor growth profile is a collective behaviour of cells regulated by the EGFR signaling pathway and the cell cycle. We also found that angiogenesis has a dual effect under TKI treatment: on one hand, through neo-vasculature TKIs are delivered to decrease tumor invasion; on the other hand, the neo-vasculature can transport glucose and oxygen to tumor cells to maintain their metabolism, which results in an increase of cell survival rate in the late simulation stages.

  12. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang Xu,1,2,* Xiaobo Wu,3,* Chun Hu,1,2 Zhiying Zhang,4 Le Zhang,1,2 Shujing Liang,1,2 Yingchun Xu,5 Fengchun Zhang1,2 1Department of Oncology, Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Suzhou, 2Department of Oncology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Prevention and Cure Center of Breast Disease, Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, 4Graduate School, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, 5Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015 comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR, and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR and pooled risk ratio (RR were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002, PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001, and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001. Notably, subgroup analysis

  13. Anti-tumor agent celecoxib activity towards SP-C1 tongue cancer cells invasion (in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Achmad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasion is a characteristic of the occurrence of cancer and indicates the cancer cells' capability to destroy and degrade the border between the epithet and basal membrane to further spread into the surrounding extra-cellular matrix. The purpose of this research was to find the existence of impediment at the SP-C1 tongue cancer cell using celecoxib chemopreventive medication. The SP-C1 tongue cancer cells were treated in vitro using celecoxib medication as a research subject at the following concentrations 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, 100, 125%; and 0 as control group (only DMEM growth medium treatment. Pure experimental testing was carried out for 24 and 48 hours, with observation and calculation of an average number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells. The data collected were analyzed using the ANOVA test with Newman Keuls paired range test or t-test. Research results indicated that the average number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells invasion after administration of celecoxib medication based on administration concentration and time statistically yielded significant results. The ANOVA test results were statistically significant, that is, average occurrence of the number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells due to the use of celecoxib at certain concentrations compared to that without celecoxib was different. At celecoxib of zero (control concentration was 24.4 with celecoxib concentration starting at 5 up to 125% experienced a decline from its average 11 to become 2.3. The conclusion of the research was that the greater the celecoxib concentration administered, the greater the effect on the impediment of SP-C1 tongue cancer cell invasion.

  14. SU-F-P-29: Impact of Oral Contrast Agent for Assisting in Outlining Small Intestine On Pelvic IMAT Dose in Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Fan, X [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As the advanced intensity modulated arc therapy(IMAT) delivery systems becoming a main role of treatment ways, which places even greater demands on delivering accuracy. The impact of oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) for assisting in outlining the small intestine on pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer was investigated. Methods: Ten cervical cancer patients for postoperative radiotherapy underwent CT scans, and the planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (including the small intestine, rectum, bladder, colon and the left and right femoral head) were contoured. The IMAT plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system for each case, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Then another plan was generated by re-calculating the radiation dose after changing the electron density of the small bowel. The first plan (plan A) was the conventional IMAT plan (with oral contrast agent), and the second one (plan B) specified the electron density of the small bowel (without oral contrast agent). Paired t-test was used to compare the dose distribution between the two plans. Results: The PTV’s D2, D50, D95, V110, conformity index, and homogeneity index of plans A and B were 5610.5 vs. 5611.4 cGy (P=0.175), 5348.5 vs. 5348.0 cGy (P=0.869), 5039 vs. 5042.3 (P=0.518), 6.0% vs. 6.1 %( P=0.886), 0.1269 vs. 0.1271 (P=0.34) and 0.8421 vs. 0.8416 (P=0.598), respectively. The volumes of the small bowel receiving at least 30 Gy (V30) and the minimum dose of 2% volume accepted (D2) for plans A and B were 31.6% vs. 31.9% (P=0.371) and 5067.8 vs. 5085.4 cGy (P=0.377), while rectum V50 of the two plans was 12.4% vs. 12.1% (P=0.489). Conclusion: The oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) filling the small intestine does not lead to a significant increase in the pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer.

  15. Efficacy and tolerability of high dose "ethinylestradiol" in post-menopausal advanced breast cancer patients heavily pre-treated with endocrine agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High dose estrogens (HDEs were frequently used as endocrine agents prior to the introduction of tamoxifen which carries fewer side effects. Due to the development of resistance to available endocrine agents in almost all women with metastatic breast cancer, interest has renewed in the use of HDEs as yet another endocrine option that may have activity. We report our experience with one of the HDEs ("ethinylestradiol" 1 mg daily in advanced breast cancer (locally advanced and metastatic in post-menopausal women who had progressed on multiple endocrine agents. Patients and methods According to a database of advanced breast cancer patients seen in our Unit since 1998, those who had complete set of information and fulfilled the following criteria were studied: (1 patients in whom further endocrine therapy was deemed appropriate i.e., patients who have had clinical benefit with previous endocrine agents or were not fit or unwilling to receive chemotherapy in the presence of potentially life-threatening visceral metastases; (2 disease was assessable by UICC criteria; (3 were treated with "ethinylestradiol" until they were withdrawn from treatment due to adverse events or disease progression. Results Twelve patients with a median age of 75.1 years (49.1 – 85 years were identified. Majority (N = 8 had bony disease. They had ethinylestradiol as 3rd to 7th line endocrine therapy. One patient (8% came off treatment early due to hepato-renal syndrome. Clinical benefit (objective response or durable stable disease for ≥ 6 months was seen in 4 patients (33.3% with a median duration of response of 10+ (7–36 months. The time to treatment failure was 4 (0.5–36 months. Conclusion Yet unreported, high dose "ethinylestradiol" is another viable therapeutic strategy in heavily pre-treated patients when further endocrine therapy is deemed appropriate. Although it tends to carry more side effects, they may not be comparable to those of other

  16. Combined effects of radiation and other agents on the stomach cancer incidence among Mayak Atomic Plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Rovny, S.I.; Sirchikov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gravity of a problem of the combined action of radiation and other factors again was confirmed sessions UNSCEAR in May, 1998. It especially is important at study of cancer diseases in connection with the polyetiology and multistage of them development. The estimation of radiation, medico-biological factors and condition of life in occurrence of a stomach cancer among Mayak personnel was specified by case-cohort research. For a quota 503 men (157 cases of a stomach cancer, 346 men of the healthy personnel) attributive risk of the radiation factors was 8.8%, medico-biological - 57,2% (from them by greatest was influence chronic gastritis with secreting insufficiency - 35.4%), tobacco consumption - 31,6%. At an estimation of risk of a stomach cancer depending on external γ-irradiation best fitting was received at use of square-law model. The excess relative risk was 0,27 Gr -2 (F=44,5; P=0,007). For 239 Pu incorporation was not revealed of distinct connection with stomach cancer incidences. Interaction of the radiation and non-radiation factors also was appreciated. The interaction of gastritis with external γ-irradiation or 239 Pu was multiplicate. The interaction of smoking with γ-irradiation or 239 Pu incorporation was multiplicate also. The distribution histological types of a stomach cancer among the workers of Mayak plant differed in comparison with not working. Among the workers the increase poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was observed. (author)

  17. Combined effects of radiation and other agents on the stomach cancer incidence among Mayak Atomic Plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Branch No 1 of State Research Center of Public Health Ministry of the Russian Federation, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation). Biophysics Inst.; Rovny, S.I.; Sirchikov, V.A.

    2000-05-01

    The gravity of a problem of the combined action of radiation and other factors again was confirmed sessions UNSCEAR in May, 1998. It especially is important at study of cancer diseases in connection with the polyetiology and multistage of them development. The estimation of radiation, medico-biological factors and condition of life in occurrence of a stomach cancer among Mayak personnel was specified by case-cohort research. For a quota 503 men (157 cases of a stomach cancer, 346 men of the healthy personnel) attributive risk of the radiation factors was 8.8%, medico-biological - 57,2% (from them by greatest was influence chronic gastritis with secreting insufficiency - 35.4%), tobacco consumption - 31,6%. At an estimation of risk of a stomach cancer depending on external {gamma}-irradiation best fitting was received at use of square-law model. The excess relative risk was 0,27 Gr{sup -2} (F=44,5; P=0,007). For {sup 239}Pu incorporation was not revealed of distinct connection with stomach cancer incidences. Interaction of the radiation and non-radiation factors also was appreciated. The interaction of gastritis with external {gamma}-irradiation or {sup 239}Pu was multiplicate. The interaction of smoking with {gamma}-irradiation or {sup 239}Pu incorporation was multiplicate also. The distribution histological types of a stomach cancer among the workers of Mayak plant differed in comparison with not working. Among the workers the increase poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was observed. (author)

  18. PDGFB as a vascular normalization agent in an ovarian cancer model treated with a gamma-secretase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Maria C; Sequeira, Gonzalo; Bocchicchio, Sebastian; May, Maria; Abramovich, Dalhia; Parborell, Fernanda; Tesone, Marta; Irusta, Griselda

    2017-12-20

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. In the past 20 years, the canonical types of drugs used to treat ovarian cancer have not been replaced and the survival rates have not changed. These facts show the clear need to find new therapeutic strategies for this illness. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a gamma-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) in combination with the Platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB) on an ovarian cancer xenograft model. To achieve this goal, we analyzed the effect of the administration of DAPT alone and the co-administration of DAPT and recombinant PDGFB on parameters associated with tumor growth and angiogenesis in an orthotopic experimental model of ovarian cancer. We observed that the dose of DAPT used was ineffective to reduce ovarian tumor growth, but showed anticancer activity when co-administered with recombinant PDGFB. The administration of PDGFB alone normalized tumor vasculature by increasing periendothelial coverage and vascular functionality. Interestingly, this effect exerted by PDGFB was also observed in the presence of DAPT. Our findings suggest that PDGFB is able to improve tumor vascularity and allows the anticancer action of DAPT in the tumor. We propose that this therapeutic strategy could be a new tool for ovarian cancer treatment and deserves further studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A Mucin1 C-terminal Subunit-directed Monoclonal Antibody Targets Overexpressed Mucin1 in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guang; Kim, Dongbum; Kim, Jung Nam; Park, Sangkyu; Maharjan, Sony; Koh, Heeju; Moon, Kyungduk; Lee, Younghee; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2018-01-01

    future applications as an anti-breast cancer agent.

  20. Excess of Radiation Burden for Young Testicular Cancer Patients using Automatic Exposure Control and Contrast Agent on Whole-body Computed Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiniviita, Hannele; Kulmala, Jarmo; Pölönen, Tuukka; Määttänen, Heli; Järvinen, Hannu; Salminen, Eeva

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patient dose from whole-body computed tomography (CT) in association with patient size, automatic exposure control (AEC) and intravenous (IV) contrast agent. Sixty-five testicular cancer patients (mean age 28 years) underwent altogether 279 whole-body CT scans from April 2000 to April 2011. The mean number of repeated examinations was 4.3. The GE LightSpeed 16 equipped with AEC and the Siemens Plus 4 CT scanners were used for imaging. Whole-body scans were performed with (216) and without (63) IV contrast. The ImPACT software was used to determine the effective and organ doses. Patient doses were independent (p agent caused significantly higher (13% Plus 4, 35% LightSpeed 16) exposure than non-contrast imaging (p agent and careful set-up of the AEC modulation parameters is recommended to avoid excessive radiation exposure on the whole-body CT imaging of young patients.

  1. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of the Breast Cancer Neovasculature using Engineered Fibronectin Scaffold Ligands: A Novel Class of Targeted Contrast Ultrasound Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Wilson, Katheryne E; Johnson, Sadie M; Chowdhury, Sayan M; Bachawal, Sunitha; Hackel, Benjamin J; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly-targeted microbubbles (MBs) are increasingly being recognized as promising contrast agents for oncological molecular imaging with ultrasound. With the detection and validation of new molecular imaging targets, novel binding ligands are needed that bind to molecular imaging targets with high affinity and specificity. In this study we assessed a novel class of potentially clinically translatable MBs using an engineered 10(th) type III domain of human-fibronectin (MB-FN3VEGFR2) scaffold-ligand to image VEGFR2 on the neovasculature of cancer. The in vitro binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 to a soluble VEGFR2 was assessed by flow-cytometry (FACS) and binding to VEGFR2-expressing cells was assessed by flow-chamber cell attachment studies under flow shear stress conditions. In vivo binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 was tested in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N Tg(MMTV/PyMT634Mul) of breast cancer and control litter mates with normal mammary glands. In vitro FACS and flow-chamber cell attachment studies showed significantly (Pbreast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Ex vivo immunofluorescence-analysis showed significantly (Pbreast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Our results suggest that MBs coupled to FN3-scaffolds can be designed and used for USMI of breast cancer neoangiogenesis. Due to their small size, stability, solubility, the lack of glycosylation and disulfide bonds, FN3-scaffolds can be recombinantly produced with the advantage of generating small, high affinity ligands in a cost efficient way for USMI.

  2. Integrating evolutionary game theory into an agent-based model of ductal carcinoma in situ: Role of gap junctions in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekian, Negin; Habibi, Jafar; Zangooei, Mohammad Hossein; Aghakhani, Hojjat

    2016-11-01

    There are many cells with various phenotypic behaviors in cancer interacting with each other. For example, an apoptotic cell may induce apoptosis in adjacent cells. A living cell can also protect cells from undergoing apoptosis and necrosis. These survival and death signals are propagated through interaction pathways between adjacent cells called gap junctions. The function of these signals depends on the cellular context of the cell receiving them. For instance, a receiver cell experiencing a low level of oxygen may interpret a received survival signal as an apoptosis signal. In this study, we examine the effect of these signals on tumor growth. We make an evolutionary game theory component in order to model the signal propagation through gap junctions. The game payoffs are defined as a function of cellular context. Then, the game theory component is integrated into an agent-based model of tumor growth. After that, the integrated model is applied to ductal carcinoma in situ, a type of early stage breast cancer. Different scenarios are explored to observe the impact of the gap junction communication and parameters of the game theory component on cancer progression. We compare these scenarios by using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test succeeds in proving a significant difference between the tumor growth of the model before and after considering the gap junction communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test also proves that the tumor growth significantly depends on the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis. In this study, the gap junction communication is modeled by using evolutionary game theory to illustrate its role at early stage cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ. This work indicates that the gap junction communication and the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis can notably affect cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy of a non-hypercalcemic vitamin-D2 derived anti-cancer agent (MT19c and inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in an ovarian cancer xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous vitamin-D analogs exhibited poor response rates, high systemic toxicities and hypercalcemia in human trials to treat cancer. We identified the first non-hypercalcemic anti-cancer vitamin D analog MT19c by altering the A-ring of ergocalciferol. This study describes the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action of MT19c in both in vitro and in vivo models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Antitumor efficacy of MT19c was evaluated in ovarian cancer cell (SKOV-3 xenografts in nude mice and a syngenic rat ovarian cancer model. Serum calcium levels of MT19c or calcitriol treated animals were measured. In-silico molecular docking simulation and a cell based VDR reporter assay revealed MT19c-VDR interaction. Genomewide mRNA analysis of MT19c treated tumors identified drug targets which were verified by immunoblotting and microscopy. Quantification of cellular malonyl CoA was carried out by HPLC-MS. A binding study with PPAR-Y receptor was performed. MT19c reduced ovarian cancer growth in xenograft and syngeneic animal models without causing hypercalcemia or acute toxicity. MT19c is a weak vitamin-D receptor (VDR antagonist that disrupted the interaction between VDR and coactivator SRC2-3. Genome-wide mRNA analysis and western blot and microscopy of MT19c treated xenograft tumors showed inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN activity. MT19c reduced cellular levels of malonyl CoA in SKOV-3 cells and inhibited EGFR/phosphoinositol-3kinase (PI-3K activity independently of PPAR-gamma protein. SIGNIFICANCE: Antitumor effects of non-hypercalcemic agent MT19c provide a new approach to the design of vitamin-D based anticancer molecules and a rationale for developing MT19c as a therapeutic agent for malignant ovarian tumors by targeting oncogenic de novo lipogenesis.

  4. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  5. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures

  6. Loss of expression of a new member of the DNAJ protein family confers resistance to chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridhar, V; Bible, K C; Staub, J; Avula, R; Lee, Y K; Kalli, K; Huang, H; Hartmann, L C; Kaufmann, S H; Smith, D I

    2001-05-15

    Differential display-PCR between ovarian tumor cell lines and short-term cultures of normal ovarian epithelial cell brushings was used to isolate a differentially expressed transcript and its corresponding gene. The gene, which mapped to 13q14.1, has partial homology in the DNAJ domain to a number of proteins with a similar domain and was designated as methylation-controlled J protein (MCJ). MCJ has the highest similarity to a functionally undefined protein from Caenorhabditis elegans. MCJ is expressed as a 1.2-kb transcript in several adult tissues, with testis showing the highest level of expression. Expression of MCJ was absent in three of seven ovarian cancer cell lines. Similarly, expression analysis using semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR indicated that 12 of 18 primary ovarian tumors examined had either a complete absence or lower levels of expression of this gene. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment of the OV202 cell line induced MCJ expression in a dose-dependent manner, implicating methylation in this induction. Loss of heterozygosity and methylation-specific PCR analysis revealed that the loss of MCJ expression in primary tumors and cell lines was attributable to deletion of one allele and methylation of the other. To assess the potential functional significance of MCJ down-regulation, the sensitivity of parental (MCJ-nonexpressing) and MCJ-transfected OV167 cells to antineoplastic agents was evaluated. MCJ expression was associated with enhanced sensitivity to paclitaxel, topotecan, and cisplatin, suggesting that MCJ loss may play a role in de novo chemoresistance in ovarian carcinoma. These observations raise the possibility that MCJ loss may: (a) have potential prognostic significance in ovarian cancer; and (b) contribute to the malignant phenotype by conferring resistance to the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents for ovarian cancer.

  7. Chemotherapeutic agents attenuate CXCL12-mediated migration of colon cancer cells by selecting for CXCR4-negative cells and increasing peptidase CD26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, Murray J.; Lowthers, Erica L.; Richard, Cynthia L.; Hajducek, Dagmar M.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Blay, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) may arise due to the persistence of drug-resistant and cancer-initiating cells that survive exposure to chemotherapy. Proteins responsible for this recurrence include the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which is known to enable CRC metastasis, as well as the cancer-initiating cell marker and peptidase CD26, which terminates activity of its chemokine CXCL12. We evaluated the expression and function of CXCR4 and CD26 in colon cancer cell lines and xenografts following treatment with common chemotherapies using radioligand binding, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and enzymatic assays. 5-Fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and SN-38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan), as well as cisplatin, methotrexate and vinblastine, each caused decreases in cell-surface CXCR4 and concomitant increases in CD26 on HT-29, T84, HRT-18, SW480 and SW620 CRC cell lines. Flow cytometry indicated that the decline in CXCR4 was associated with a significant loss of CXCR4+/CD26- cells. Elevations in CD26 were paralleled by increases in both the intrinsic dipeptidyl peptidase activity of CD26 as well as its capacity to bind extracellular adenosine deaminase. Orthotopic HT-29 xenografts treated with standard CRC chemotherapeutics 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, or oxaliplatin showed dramatic increases in CD26 compared to untreated tumors. Consistent with the loss of CXCR4 and gain in CD26, migratory responses to exogenous CXCL12 were eliminated in cells pretreated with cytotoxic agents, although cells retained basal motility. Analysis of cancer-initiating cell CD44 and CD133 subsets revealed drug-dependent responses of CD26/CD44/CD133 populations, suggesting that the benefits of combining standard chemotherapies 5-fluoruracil and oxaliplatin may be derived from their complementary elimination of cell populations. Our results indicate that conventional anticancer agents may act to inhibit chemokine-mediated migration through eradication of CXCR4+ cells and attenuation of

  8. The Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Crosstalk with Estrogen Receptor in Response of Breast Cancer Cells to the Novel Antitumor Agents Benzothiazoles and Aminoflavone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Callero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many estrogen-receptor- (ER- expressing breast cancers become refractory to ER-based therapies. New antitumor drugs like aminoflavone (AF and benzothiazoles (Bzs have been developed and have exquisite antitumor activity in ER+MCF-7 and T47D cells and in a MCF-7 nude mouse model. ER(− breast cancer cells like MDA-MB-231 are less susceptible. We previously found in MCF-7 cells that these drugs activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR via translocation to the nucleus, induction of AhR-specific DNA binding activity, and expression of CYP1A1, whose transcription is controlled by the AhR-ARNT transcription factor. CYP1A1 metabolizes AF and Bz to a species which directly or after further metabolism damages DNA. In contrast an AhR-deficient variant of MCF-7 or cells with predominantly nuclear AhR expression, such as MDA-MB 231, are resistant. Thus, these drugs, unlike other neoplastic agents, require AhR-mediated signaling to cause DNA damage. This is a new treatment strategy for breast cancers with intact AhR signaling.

  9. Modeling protective anti-tumor immunity via preventative cancer vaccines using a hybrid agent-based and delay differential equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter S; Lee, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    A next generation approach to cancer envisions developing preventative vaccinations to stimulate a person's immune cells, particularly cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), to eliminate incipient tumors before clinical detection. The purpose of our study is to quantitatively assess whether such an approach would be feasible, and if so, how many anti-cancer CTLs would have to be primed against tumor antigen to provide significant protection. To understand the relevant dynamics, we develop a two-compartment model of tumor-immune interactions at the tumor site and the draining lymph node. We model interactions at the tumor site using an agent-based model (ABM) and dynamics in the lymph node using a system of delay differential equations (DDEs). We combine the models into a hybrid ABM-DDE system and investigate dynamics over a wide range of parameters, including cell proliferation rates, tumor antigenicity, CTL recruitment times, and initial memory CTL populations. Our results indicate that an anti-cancer memory CTL pool of 3% or less can successfully eradicate a tumor population over a wide range of model parameters, implying that a vaccination approach is feasible. In addition, sensitivity analysis of our model reveals conditions that will result in rapid tumor destruction, oscillation, and polynomial rather than exponential decline in the tumor population due to tumor geometry.

  10. In vitro application of Fe/MgO nanoparticles as magnetically mediated hyperthermia agents for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalkidou, A.; Simeonidis, K.; Angelakeris, M.; Samaras, T.; Martinez-Boubeta, C.; Balcells, Ll.; Papazisis, K.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Kalogirou, O.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we study the heating efficiency of Fe/MgO magnetic core/biocompatible shell nanoparticles and their in vitro application in magnetic hyperthermia on cancer cells. Different human breast cancer cell lines were used to assess the suitability of nanoparticles for in vivo application. The experiments revealed a very good cytotoxicity profile and significant uptake efficiency together with relatively high specific absorption rates and fast thermal response, features that are crucial for adequate thermal efficiency and minimum duration of treatment. - Research Highlights: → Fe/MgO magnetic core/shell nanoparticles and their in vitro application for magnetic hyperthermia. → Very good cytotoxicity profile and significant uptake efficiency in three human breast cancer cell lines. → SAR values and fast thermal response guarantee adequate thermal efficiency and minimum treatment duration.

  11. In vitro application of Fe/MgO nanoparticles as magnetically mediated hyperthermia agents for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalkidou, A. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Theagenio Cancer Hospital, Alexandrou Simeonidi Street 2, 54 007 Thessaloniki (Greece); Simeonidis, K. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Angelakeris, M., E-mail: agelaker@auth.g [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Samaras, T. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Martinez-Boubeta, C. [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Balcells, Ll. [ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Papazisis, K. [Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Theagenio Cancer Hospital, Alexandrou Simeonidi Street 2, 54 007 Thessaloniki (Greece); Dendrinou-Samara, C. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, O. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    In this work we study the heating efficiency of Fe/MgO magnetic core/biocompatible shell nanoparticles and their in vitro application in magnetic hyperthermia on cancer cells. Different human breast cancer cell lines were used to assess the suitability of nanoparticles for in vivo application. The experiments revealed a very good cytotoxicity profile and significant uptake efficiency together with relatively high specific absorption rates and fast thermal response, features that are crucial for adequate thermal efficiency and minimum duration of treatment. - Research highlights: > Fe/MgO magnetic core/shell nanoparticles and their in vitro application for magnetic hyperthermia. > Very good cytotoxicity profile and significant uptake efficiency in three human breast cancer cell lines. > SAR values and fast thermal response guarantee adequate thermal efficiency and minimum treatment duration.

  12. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors as potent novel anti-cancer agents: suppression of hormone-dependent breast cancer by the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor RO 48-8071.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yayun; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Aebi, Johannes D; Mafuvadze, Benford; Cook, Matthew T; Zou, Xiaoqin; Hyder, Salman M

    2014-07-01

    In most human breast cancers, tumor cell proliferation is estrogen dependent. Although hormone-responsive tumors initially respond to anti-estrogen therapies, most of them eventually develop resistance. Our goal was to identify alternative targets that might be regulated to control breast cancer progression. Sulforhodamine B assay was used to measure the viability of cultured human breast cancer cell lines exposed to various inhibitors. Protein expression in whole-cell extracts was determined by Western blotting. BT-474 tumor xenografts in nude mice were used for in vivo studies of tumor progression. RO 48-8071 ([4'-[6-(Allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate]; RO), a small-molecule inhibitor of oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis), potently reduced breast cancer cell viability. In vitro exposure of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human breast cancer cells to pharmacological levels of RO or a dose close to the IC50 for OSC (nM) reduced cell viability. Administration of RO to mice with BT-474 tumor xenografts prevented tumor growth, with no apparent toxicity. RO degraded ERα while concomitantly inducing the anti-proliferative protein ERβ. Two other cholesterol-lowering drugs, Fluvastatin and Simvastatin, were less effective in reducing breast cancer cell viability and were found not to induce ERβ. ERβ inhibition or knockdown prevented RO-dependent loss of cell viability. Importantly, RO had no effect on the viability of normal human mammary cells. RO is a potent inhibitor of hormone-dependent human breast cancer cell proliferation. The anti-tumor properties of RO appear to be in part due to an off-target effect that increases the ratio of ERβ/ERα in breast cancer cells.

  13. Production and evaluation of cytotoxic effects of DT386-BR2 fusion protein as a novel anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a fusion protein consisting of the catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects for targeted eradication of cancer cells. For this purpose, The DT386-BR2 structure was predicted using Modeller 9.14 and the best predicted model was selected based on the minimum DOPE score. A synthetic gene encoding DT386-BR2 was cloned in pET28a expression vector, expressed and purified by affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the expression of the DT386-BR2 fusion protein by revealing a band of about 47kDa after the induction of the expression. Finally, the purified protein was subjected to MTT assay for evaluation of its cyto-lethal effects on cancer and normal cell lines. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction in survival percent of HeLa and MCF-7 cancer cells in comparison to negative control (PBS), while the cytotoxic effect was not significant on the normal cells, i.e. HUVEC and HEK 293. The IC50 of DT386-BR2 for HeLa and MCF-7 was about 0.55 and 2.08μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the production and purification of DT386-BR2 fusion protein was successfully achieved and its cytotoxic effects on the studied cancer cell lines was established. The promising cytotoxic effects of this newly constructed fusion protein made it a suitable candidate for targeted therapy of cancer, and further in vitro and in vivo studies on this fusion protein is underway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The synthesis of a D-glucosamine contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, and its application in cancer molecular imaging with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); Chen Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); Guo Dajing [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010 (China); Huang Zhanwen; Cai Liang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); He Ling [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the synthesis of Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-deoxyglucosamine (Gd-DTPA-DG) which is a D-glucosamine metabolic MR imaging contrast agent. We will also discuss its use in a pilot MRI study using a xenograft mouse model of human adenocarcinoma. Methods: This novel contrast agent was specifically studied because of its ability to 'target' metabolically active tumor tissues. In this study Gd-DTPA-DG is used to investigate how tumor tissues would react to a dose of 0.2 mmol Gd/kg over a 120 min exposure in a xenograft mouse model. These experiments used athymic mice implanted with human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) as demonstrated by dynamic MRI. Alternately, another contrast agent that is not specific for targeting, Gd-DTPA, was used as the control at a similar dose of gadolinium. Efficacy of the targeted contrast agent was assessed by measuring relaxation rate in vitro and signal intensity (SI) in vivo. Statistical differences were calculated using one-way analysis of variance. Results: The synthesized Gd-DTPA-DG was shown to improve the contrast of tumor tissue in this model. Gd-DTPA-DG was also shown to have a similar pharmacokinetic rate but generated a higher relaxation rate in tumor tissues relative to the control contrast Gd-DTPA. In comparison to the pre-contrast imaging, the SI of tumor tissue in the experimental group was shown to be significantly increased at 15 min after injection of Gd-DTPA-DG (p < 0.001). The enhanced signal intensity spread from the edge of the tumor to the center and seemed to strengthen the idea that MRI performance would be useful in different tumor tissues. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that this new chelated contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, can be specifically targeted to accumulation in tumor tissue as compared to normal tissues. This targeted paramagnetic contrast agent has potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI.

  15. Resistant starch: a promising dietary agent for the prevention/treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and bowel cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Janine A; Brown, Ian L

    2013-03-01

    Resistant starch represents a diverse range of indigestible starch-based dietary carbohydrates. Resistant starch has been investigated in the past for its effects on bowel health (pH, epithelial thickness, and apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells); reduction in postprandial glycemia; increased insulin sensitivity; and effects on the gut microbiome. This review highlights advances as resistant starch gains clinical relevance as a potential treatment/preventive tool for diseases such as colorectal cancer (CRC) and diabetes. Recent articles have evaluated the comparative physiological effects of different types of resistant starch and investigated the effects of resistant starch on blood lipids, body weight, and defining resistant starch-induced changes to the micriobiome that may be important in health and disease. The most novel and relevant recent data describe a role for resistant starch in ameliorating inflammation; the use of resistant starch for optimal bowel health and prevention of CRC; and, further, that the systemic effects of resistant starch may be important for the treatment of other forms of cancer, such as breast cancer. This review describes advances in resistant starch research highlighting the gastrointestinal effects that are now being linked to systemic, whole body effects with clinical relevance. These effects have important implications for overall health and the prevention or amelioration of various chronic diseases.

  16. Preclinical imaging and translational animal models of cancer for accelerated clinical implementation of nanotechnologies and macromolecular agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Raquel; Spence, Tara; Huang, Huang; Allen, Christine

    2015-12-10

    The majority of animal models of cancer have performed poorly in terms of predicting clinical performance of new therapeutics, which are most often first evaluated in patients with advanced, metastatic disease. The development and use of metastatic models of cancer may enhance clinical translatability of preclinical studies focused on the development of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems and macromolecular therapeutics, potentially accelerating their clinical implementation. It is recognized that the development and use of such models are not without challenge. Preclinical imaging tools offer a solution by allowing temporal and spatial characterization of metastatic lesions. This paper provides a review of imaging methods applicable for evaluation of novel therapeutics in clinically relevant models of advanced cancer. An overview of currently utilized models of oncology in small animals is followed by image-based development and characterization of visceral metastatic cancer models. Examples of imaging tools employed for metastatic lesion detection, evaluation of anti-tumor and anti-metastatic potential and biodistribution of novel therapies, as well as the co-development and/or use of imageable surrogates of response, are also discussed. While the focus is on development of macromolecular and nanotechnology-based therapeutics, examples with small molecules are included in some cases to illustrate concepts and approaches that can be applied in the assessment of nanotechnologies or macromolecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Liquid Chromatography - Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry : The gold standard for quantitative bioanalysis of anti-cancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vainchtein, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the pharmacologic mechanisms of action, efficacy and toxicity of any anti-cancer drug it is important to know how the compound is transformed in the body: either into active metabolites or inactive and toxic (degradation) products. This information may lead to the success or failure of

  18. Serum Antibodies against Genitourinary Infectious Agents in Prostate Cancer and Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrbáček, J.; Urban, M.; Hamšíková, E.; Tachezy, R.; Eisenbruk, V.; Brabec, Marek; Heráček, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, Art.no. 53 (2011), s. 1-10 ISSN 1471-2407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : serum antibodies * prostate cancer * case-control study * logistic regression, calibration Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.011, year: 2011

  19. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roizin-Towle, L.; Hall, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer dates back to the late 19th century, but the modern era of chemotherapy drugs was ushered in during the 1940's with the development of the polyfunctional alkylating agent. Since then, numerous classes of drugs have evolved and the combined use of antineoplastic agents with other treatment modalities such as radiation or heat, remains a large relatively unexplored area. This approach, combining local hyperthermia with chemotherapy agents affords a measure of targeting and selective toxicity not previously available for drugs. In this paper, the effects of adriamycin, bleomycin and cis-platinum are examined. The adjuvant use of heat may also reverse the resistance of hypoxic cells noted for some chemotherapy agents

  20. Advancing drug therapy for brain tumours: a current review of the pro-inflammatory peptide Substance P and its antagonists as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Kimberley; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of the Substance P (SP)/NK1 receptor system in the development and progression of cancer strongly supports its potential as a therapeutic target in malignancies. Novel strategies for approaching cancer treatment are urgently required particularly with regard to tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), which are notoriously difficult to effectively treat and associated with extremely poor prognosis for many patients. This is due, in part, to the presence of the highly specialised blood-brain barrier, which is known to restrict common treatments such as chemotherapy and hinder early tumour diagnosis. Additionally, tumours of the CNS are difficult to surgically resect completely, often contributing to the resurgence of the disease many years later. Interestingly, despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier, circulating tumour cells are able to gain entry to the brain and form secondary brain tumours; however, the underlying mechanisms of this process remain unclear. Tachykinins, in particular Substance P, have been implicated in early blood-brain barrier disruption via neurogenic inflammation in a number of other CNS pathologies. Recent evidence also suggests that Substance P may play a central role in the development of CNS tumours. It has been well established that a number of tumour cells express Substance P, NK1 receptors and mRNA for the tachykinin NK1 receptor. This increase in the Substance P/NK1 receptor system is known to induce proliferation and migration of tumour cells as well as stimulate angiogenesis, thus contributing to tumour progression. Accordingly, the NK1 receptor antagonist presents a novel target for anti-cancer therapy for which a number of patents have been filed. This review will examine the role of Substance P in the development of CNS tumours and its potential application as an anti-cancer agent.

  1. Retrospective review of hemoglobin and/or hematocrit levels with occurrence of thrombosis in cancer patients treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullmer, Amber C; Miller, Rickey

    2009-09-01

    No data exists that directly compares hemoglobin and hematocrit levels between cancer patients with and without occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). To determine the association of hemoglobin and hematocrit levels with the occurrence of thrombosis in cancer patients treated with ESAs. A retrospective case-control study approved by the Institutional Review Board was conducted on cancer patients billed for epoetin or darbepoetin between 1 July 2002 and 30 June 2007. Cases were defined as patients billed for thrombosis while controls were defined as patients not billed for thrombosis. Sixteen patients had an occurrence of thrombosis (cases) and were matched to 16 patients that did not have an occurrence of thrombosis (controls) based on age, sex, and cancer type. The mean peak hemoglobin levels for cases and controls were 12.6 +/- 1.2 g/dL versus 12.6 +/- 1.4 g/dL (p = 0.9). The mean peak hematocrit levels for cases and controls were 37.3 +/- 3.8% versus 37.9 +/- 4.3% (p = 0.8). For the 16/586 (2.7%) patients with thrombosis, the mean hemoglobin and hematocrit at time of thrombosis were 9.6 +/- 1.0 g/dL and 28.9 +/- 3.1%. A significant identifiable risk factor for thrombosis between the cases and controls was history of thrombosis 31.3% versus 0% (p = 0.04). There was no statistical difference in peak hemoglobin and hematocrit levels between patients with thrombosis and those without thrombosis. Further study is warranted to determine if these levels are true risk factors for thrombosis.

  2. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  3. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Thai Q.; Ishak Gabra, Mari B.; Lowman, Xazmin H.; Yang, Ying; Reid, Michael A.; Pan, Min; O’Connor, Timothy R.; Kong, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH) enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damag...

  4. Clinical evaluation of a self-adhering material as desensitizing agent in xerostomic patients for head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pinna, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Xerostomia is a common clinical symptom that may suffer patients with Head and Neck Cancers during and after radiotherapy. The aim of the present thesis were therefore: 1) to review the current state of knowledge of pathology, clinical complications and radiotherapeutic patient management, 2) to evaluate the aetiology of dentine hypersensitivity in conditions of reduced salivary flow resulting in the radiation exposure, 3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the materials commonly used in the tr...

  5. Development of Novel Technetium-99m-Labeled Steroids as Estrogen-Responsive Breast Cancer Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    bipyridine derivatives with model azides (benzyl azide). Again the reactions go well to give the expected 1,4- disubstituted triazoles . In this case, the...as breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer, and osteoporosis, chemical modulation of the ER- regulated pathways is a critical clinical objective. Recent...20-tetraene-3,17β-diols as ERα-Hormone Binding Domain Ligands: Effect of the Methoxy Group on Receptor Binding and Uterotrophic Growth . J. Med. Chem

  6. Multi-scale agent-based brain cancer modeling and prediction of TKI treatment response: Incorporating EGFR signaling pathway and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiaoqiang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway and angiogenesis in brain cancer act as an engine for tumor initiation, expansion and response to therapy. Since the existing literature does not have any models that investigate the impact of both angiogenesis and molecular signaling pathways on treatment, we propose a novel multi-scale, agent-based computational model that includes both angiogenesis and EGFR modules to study the response of brain cancer under tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs treatment. Results The novel angiogenesis module integrated into the agent-based tumor model is based on a set of reaction–diffusion equations that describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the distributions of micro-environmental factors such as glucose, oxygen, TGFα, VEGF and fibronectin. These molecular species regulate tumor growth during angiogenesis. Each tumor cell is equipped with an EGFR signaling pathway linked to a cell-cycle pathway to determine its phenotype. EGFR TKIs are delivered through the blood vessels of tumor microvasculature and the response to treatment is studied. Conclusions Our simulations demonstrated that entire tumor growth profile is a collective behaviour of cells regulated by the EGFR signaling pathway and the cell cycle. We also found that angiogenesis has a dual effect under TKI treatment: on one hand, through neo-vasculature TKIs are delivered to decrease tumor invasion; on the other hand, the neo-vasculature can transport glucose and oxygen to tumor cells to maintain their metabolism, which results in an increase of cell survival rate in the late simulation stages.

  7. Single-agent pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer: results of an Austrian observational trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pluschnig Ursula

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In advanced breast cancer, multiple sequential lines of treatments are frequently applied. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD has a favourable toxicity profile and can be used in first or higher lines of therapy. PLD has demonstrated response activity even after prior anthracycline exposure. Methods 129 consecutive patients with advanced breast cancer, of whom the majority had been massively pretreated, received PLD as monotherapy within licensed approval, for which efficacy and toxicities were documented. Results In a routine therapy setting, PLD was administered in a slightly reduced dose (median, 40 mg/m2 per cycle. Response rate (complete and partial remission was 26%, and stable disease was observed in 19% of patients. Progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS were 5.8 months and 14.2 months, respectively. There was no difference in terms of response and PFS, no matter if patients had already received anthracycline treatment. Interestingly, PFS proved similar regardless whether PLD was administered as palliative therapy in first, second or third line. Furthermore, PFS and OS were similar in patients with response or stable disease, underscoring the view that disease stabilization is associated with a profound clinical benefit. The most common side effects reported were palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (17%, exanthema (14% and mucositis (12%. Conclusions Efficacy and toxicity data in these "real life" patients permit the conclusion that PLD is a valuable option in the treatment of advanced breast cancer even in heavily pretreated patients.

  8. Loss of Nek11 Prevents G2/M Arrest and Promotes Cell Death in HCT116 Colorectal Cancer Cells Exposed to Therapeutic DNA Damaging Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Sabir

    Full Text Available The Nek11 kinase is a potential mediator of the DNA damage response whose expression is upregulated in early stage colorectal cancers (CRCs. Here, using RNAi-mediated depletion, we examined the role of Nek11 in HCT116 WT and p53-null CRC cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR or the chemotherapeutic drug, irinotecan. We demonstrate that depletion of Nek11 prevents the G2/M arrest induced by these genotoxic agents and promotes p53-dependent apoptosis both in the presence and absence of DNA damage. Interestingly, Nek11 depletion also led to long-term loss of cell viability that was independent of p53 and exacerbated following IR exposure. CRC cells express four splice variants of Nek11 (L/S/C/D. These are predominantly cytoplasmic, but undergo nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mediated through adjacent nuclear import and export signals in the C-terminal non-catalytic domain. In HCT116 cells, Nek11S in particular has an important role in the DNA damage response. These data provide strong evidence that Nek11 contributes to the response of CRC cells to genotoxic agents and is essential for survival either with or without exposure to DNA damage.

  9. Digital PCR assessment of MGMT promoter methylation coupled with reduced protein expression optimises prediction of response to alkylating agents in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Amatu, Alessio; Milione, Massimo; Cassingena, Andrea; Ghezzi, Silvia; Caporale, Marta; Berenato, Rosa; Falcomatà, Chiara; Pellegrinelli, Alessio; Bardelli, Alberto; Nichelatti, Michele; Tosi, Federica; De Braud, Filippo; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Barault, Ludovic; Siena, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) is a repair protein, and its deficiency makes tumours more susceptible to the cytotoxic effect of alkylating agents. Five clinical trials with temozolomide or dacarbazine have been performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with selection based on methyl-specific PCR (MSP) testing with modest results. We hypothesised that mitigated results are consequences of unspecific patient selection and that alternative methodologies for MGMT testing such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) and digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could enhance patient enrolment. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded archival tumour tissue samples from four phase II studies of temozolomide or dacarbazine in MGMT MSP-positive mCRCs were analysed by IHC for MGMT protein expression and by methyl-BEAMing (MB) for percentage of promoter methylation. Pooled data were then retrospectively analysed according to objective response rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). One hundred and five patients were included in the study. Twelve had achieved partial response (PR) (11.4%), 24 stable disease (SD; 22.9%) and 69 progressive disease (PD; 65.7%). Patients with PR/SD had lower IHC scores and higher MB levels than those with PD. MGMT expression by IHC was negatively and MB levels positively associated with PFS (p alkylating agents. Their combination could enhance patient selection in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optical imaging for monitoring tumor oxygenation response after initiation of single-agent bevacizumab followed by cytotoxic chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeto Ueda

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Optical imaging techniques for measuring tissue hemoglobin concentration have been recently accepted as a way to assess tumor vascularity and oxygenation. We investigated the correlation between early optical response to single-agent bevacizumab and treatment outcome. METHODS: Seven patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer were treated with single-agent bevacizumab followed by addition of weekly paclitaxel. Optical imaging of patient's breasts was performed to measure tumor total hemoglobin concentration (tHb and oxygen saturation (stO2 at baseline and on days 1, 3, 6, 8, and 13 after the first infusion of bevacizumab. To assess early metabolic response, 2-deoxy-2-(18F-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO-PET/CT, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed at baseline and after two cycles of the regimen. RESULTS: Seven patients were grouped as responders (n = 4 and nonresponders (n = 3 on the basis of metabolic response measured by FDG-PET/CT. The responders showed remarkable tumor shrinkage and low accumulations of FMISO tracer relative to those of the nonresponders at the completion of two cycles of chemotherapy. Tumors of both groups showed remarkable attenuation of mean tHb as early as day 1 after therapy initiation. The nonresponders had lower baseline stO2 levels compared with adjacent breast tissue stO2 levels along with a pattern of steadily low stO2 levels during the observation window. On the other hand, the responders appeared to sustain high stO2 levels with temporal fluctuation. CONCLUSIONS: Low tumor stO2 level after single-agent bevacizumab treatment was characteristic of the nonresponders. Tumor stO2 level could be a predictor of an additional benefit of bevacizumab over that provided by paclitaxel.

  11. Second-line single-agent chemotherapy in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative metastatic breast cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Fabio; Rea, Daniel; Kroes, Michel A; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    No 'gold standard' exists for single-agent chemotherapy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-negative) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in the second-line. The objective of this systematic review is to identify and appraise overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time to progression (TTP) and Grade ≥3 adverse event evidence for single-agent chemotherapy in this setting. MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched to October 2013, and PubMed October 2013 to November 2014. Electronic database searches were supplemented with hand searching of reference lists and conferences. Eligible randomised controlled trials (RCTs) employed at least one single-agent chemotherapy treatment, enrolled HER2-negative or unselected MBC patients who had progressed following first-line chemotherapy within the metastatic setting, and reported outcomes of interest for the second-line setting. Fifty-three RCTs were included in total, with most containing mixed populations by HER2 status and treatment line. Fourteen studies reported data specifically for second- and later-line treatment within the metastatic setting. Median overall survival (OS) in most trials was 8-13 months. Only one trial reported a significant difference between studied interventions in the second-line metastatic setting: nab-paclitaxel (n=131) conferred a statistically significant OS advantage vs. three-weekly paclitaxel (n=136) (median OS 13.0 vs. 10.7 months, respectively; hazard ratio 0.73, p=0.024) and improved overall safety. One RCT demonstrated significant benefit in this setting in confirmed HER2-negative MBC alongside favourable safety. Treatment line terminology was imprecise. To reliably inform patient treatment decisions, quality-of-life data are needed and precise OS estimation according to underlying patient characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis, Anti-Proliferative Activity Evaluation and 3D-QSAR Study of Naphthoquinone Derivatives as Potential Anti-Colorectal Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Acuña

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a disease with high incidence and mortality, constituting the fourth most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Naphthoquinones are attractive compounds due to their biological and structural properties. In this work, 36 naphthoquinone derivatives were synthesized and their activity evaluated against HT-29 cells. Overall, high to moderate anti-proliferative activity was observed in most members of the series, with 15 compounds classified as active (1.73 < IC50 < 18.11 μM. The naphtho[2,3-b]thiophene-4,9-dione analogs showed potent cytotoxicity, 8-hydroxy-2-(thiophen-2-ylcarbonylnaphtho[2,3-b]thiophene-4,9-dione being the compound with the highest potency and selectivity. Our results suggest that the toxicity is improved in molecules with tricyclic naphtho[2,3-b]furan-4,9-dione and naphtho[2,3-b]thiophene-4,9-dione systems 2-substituted with an electron-withdrawing group. A 3D-QSAR study of comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA was carried out, resulting in the generation of a reliable model (r2 = 0.99 and q2 = 0.625. This model allowed proposing five new compounds with two-fold higher theoretical anti-proliferative activity, which would be worthwhile to synthesize and evaluate. Further investigations will be needed to determine the mechanism involved in the effect of most active compounds which are potential candidates for new anticancer agents.

  14. MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles functionalized with aptamer and radiolabelled with {sup 90}Y and {sup 159}Gd as a potential therapeutic agent against colorectal cancer; Nanoparticulas de silica mesoporosa MCM-41 funcionalizadas com aptamero e radiomarcadas com {sup 90}Y e {sup 159}Gd como um potencial agente terapeutico contra cancer colorretal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Carolina de Aguiar

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a malignancy that affects large intestine and rectum, and it is the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract, the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Nowadays, available therapeutic procedures for this type of cancer are limited and ineffective. Conventional radiotherapy is not an often used approach in the treatment of CRC due to the fact that peristaltic movements hamper the targeting of ionizing radiation and this type of treatment is used as adjuvant and palliative to control symptoms. Therefore, surgical intervention is the primary therapeutic choice against this disease. Researches based on the combination of radioisotopes and nanostructured carriers systems have demonstrated significant results in improving the selectivity action as well as reducing the radiation dose into healthy tissues. MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles have unique characteristics such as high surface area and well-defined pore diameters making these nanoparticles an ideal candidate of therapeutic agent carrier. Thus, the objective of this work is to synthesize and characterize MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles conjugated with yttrium-90 and gadolinium-159 and evaluate this system as a potential therapeutic agent. The nanoparticles were synthesized via sol-gel method. The sample was characterized using FTIR, SAXS, PCS, Zeta Potential analysis, Thermal analysis, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The ability to incorporate Y{sup +3} and Gd{sup +3} ion was determined in vitro using different ratios (1:1, 1:3, 1:5 v/v) of YCL{sub 3} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and silica nanoparticles dispersed in saline, pH 7.4. The non-incorporated Y{sup +3} and Gd{sup +3} ions were removed by ultracentrifugation procedure and the concentration of ions in the supernatant was determined by ICP-AES. Cell viability

  15. The anti-fibrotic agent pirfenidone synergizes with cisplatin in killing tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Boateng, Kingsley; Noyes, David; Antonia, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-fibrotic drugs such as pirfenidone have been developed for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Because activated fibroblasts in inflammatory conditions have similar characteristics as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and CAFs contribute actively to the malignant phenotype, we believe that anti-fibrotic drugs have the potential to be repurposed as anti-cancer drugs. The effects of pirfenidone alone and in combination with cisplatin on human patient-derived CAF cell lines and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. The impact on cell death in vitro as well as tumor growth in a mouse model was determined. Annexin V/PI staining and Western blot analysis were used to characterize cell death. Synergy was assessed with the combination index method using Calcusyn software. Pirfenidone alone induced apoptotic cell death in lung CAFs at a high concentration (1.5 mg/mL). However, co-culture in vitro experiments and co-implantation in vivo experiments showed that the combination of low doses of cisplatin (10 μM) and low doses of pirfenidone (0.5 mg/mL), in both CAFs and tumors, lead to increased cell death and decreased tumor progression, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of cisplatin and pirfenidone in NSCLC cells (A549 and H157 cells) leads to increased apoptosis and synergistic cell death. Our studies reveal for the first time that the combination of cisplatin and pirfenidone is active in preclinical models of NSCLC and therefore may be a new therapeutic approach in this disease. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2162-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  16. Small molecule inhibitor screening identifified HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG as potential therapeutic agent for gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Helga; Valbuena, José R; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Stein, Stefan; Kunkel, Hana; García, Patricia; Bizama, Carolina; Riquelme, Ismael; Espinoza, Jaime A; Kurtz, Stephen E; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Calderon, Juan Francisco; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Grez, Manuel; Pandey, Akhilesh; Leal-Rojas, Pamela; Roa, Juan C

    2017-04-18

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is a lethal cancer with poor prognosis associated with high invasiveness and poor response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. New therapeutic approaches are urgently needed in order to improve survival and response rates of GBC patients. We screened 130 small molecule inhibitors on a panel of seven GBC cell lines and identified the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG as one of the most potent inhibitory drugs across the different lines. We tested the antitumor efficacy of 17-AAG and geldanamycin (GA) in vitro and in a subcutaneous preclinical tumor model NOD-SCID mice. We also evaluated the expression of HSP90 by immunohistochemistry in human GBC tumors.In vitro assays showed that 17-AAG and GA significantly reduced the expression of HSP90 target proteins, including EGFR, AKT, phospho-AKT, Cyclin B1, phospho-ERK and Cyclin D1. These molecular changes were consistent with reduced cell viability and cell migration and promotion of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis observed in our in vitro studies.In vivo, 17-AAG showed efficacy in reducing subcutaneous tumors size, exhibiting a 69.6% reduction in tumor size in the treatment group compared to control mice (p < 0.05).The HSP90 immunohistochemical staining was seen in 182/209 cases of GBC (87%) and it was strongly expressed in 70 cases (33%), moderately in 58 cases (28%), and weakly in 54 cases (26%).Our pre-clinical observations strongly suggest that the inhibition of HSP90 function by HSP90 inhibitors is a promising therapeutic strategy for gallbladder cancer that may benefit from new HSP90 inhibitors currently in development.

  17. Incidence and relative risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with single-agent BRAF inhibitor and dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors in cancer patients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ling; Wang, Yina; Hong, Yun; Ye, Xianghua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Junyan; Zhao, Qiong

    2017-10-10

    BRAF inhibitor and dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of BRAF-mutated melanoma. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC) is an adverse event associated with these drugs. The contribution of BRAF inhibitor and dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors to cuSCC are still unknown. We performed this meta-analysis to determine the overall incidence and relative risk of cuSCC in cancer patients treated with these drugs. A total of 7,442 patients from 24 primary studies were included. The incidences of all-grade and high-grade cuSCC in cancer patients treated with BRAF inhibitor were 12.5% (95% CI: 10.8-14.6%) and 11.6% (95% CI: 9.8-13.8%), and dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors were 3.0% (95% CI: 2.0-4.5%) and 2.8% (95% CI: 1.9-4.0%), respectively. On subgroup analysis and meta-regression, the incidence of cuSCC did not vary with tumor type, study design and specific drug used. The use of single agent BRAF inhibitor significantly increased the risk of developing cuSCC comparing with dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors for all-grade (RR 4.72, 95% CI: 2.42-9.20) and high-grade (RR 4.92, 95% CI: 2.64-9.16) in cancer patients. The databases of PubMed, Embase and abstracts published in ASCO proceedings were searched for relevant studies from January 2000 to June 2017. Summary incidences, relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity of included studies. BRAF inhibitor significantly increases the risk of developing cuSCC compared with dual BRAF/MEK inhibitors in cancer patients. Clinicians should be aware of the risks of cuSCC with the administration of these drugs in cancer patients.

  18. Bioactivity of Turmeric-Derived Curcuminoids and Related Metabolites in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Laura E.; Frye, Jen B.; Gorti, Bhavana; Timmermann, Barbara N.; Funk, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    While the chemotherapeutic effect of curcumin, one of three major curcuminoids derived from turmeric, has been reported, largely unexplored are the effects of complex turmeric extracts more analogous to traditional medicinal preparations, as well as the relative importance of the three curcuminoids and their metabolites as anti-cancer agents. These studies document the pharmacodynamic effects of chemically-complex turmeric extracts relative to curcuminoids on human breast cancer cell growth and tumor cell secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), an important driver of cancer bone metastasis. Finally, relative effects of structurally-related metabolites of curcuminoids were assessed on the same endpoints. We report that 3 curcuminoid-containing turmeric extracts differing with respect to the inclusion of additional naturally occurring chemicals (essential oils and/or polar compounds) were equipotent in inhibiting human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell growth (IC50=10–16μg/mL) and secretion of osteolytic PTHrP (IC50=2–3μg/mL) when concentrations were normalized to curcuminoid content. Moreover, these effects were curcuminoid-specific, as botanically-related gingerol containing extracts had no effect. While curcumin and bis-demethoxycurcumin were equipotent to each other and to the naturally occurring curcuminoid mixture (IC50=58 μM), demethoxycurcumin was without effect on cell growth. However, each of the individual curcuminoids inhibited PTHrP secretion (IC50=22–31μM) to the same degree as the curcuminoid mixture (IC50=16 μM). Degradative curcuminoid metabolites (vanillin and ferulic acid) did not inhibit cell growth or PTHrP, while reduced metabolites (tetrahydrocurcuminoids) had inhibitory effects on cell growth and PTHrP secretion but only at concentrations ≥10-fold higher than the curcuminoids. These studies emphasize the structural and biological importance of curcuminoids in the anti-breast cancer effects of turmeric and contradict

  19. Use of DNA-damaging agents and RNA pooling to assess expression profiles associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status in familial breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan C Walker

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of rare sequence variants of unknown clinical significance have been identified in the breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Laboratory-based methods that can distinguish between carriers of pathogenic mutations and non-carriers are likely to have utility for the classification of these sequence variants. To identify predictors of pathogenic mutation status in familial breast cancer patients, we explored the use of gene expression arrays to assess the effect of two DNA-damaging agents (irradiation and mitomycin C on cellular response in relation to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status. A range of regimes was used to treat 27 lymphoblastoid cell-lines (LCLs derived from affected women in high-risk breast cancer families (nine BRCA1, nine BRCA2, and nine non-BRCA1/2 or BRCAX individuals and nine LCLs from healthy individuals. Using an RNA-pooling strategy, we found that treating LCLs with 1.2 microM mitomycin C and measuring the gene expression profiles 1 hour post-treatment had the greatest potential to discriminate BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX mutation status. A classifier was built using the expression profile of nine QRT-PCR validated genes that were associated with BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX status in RNA pools. These nine genes could distinguish BRCA1 from BRCA2 carriers with 83% accuracy in individual samples, but three-way analysis for BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX had a maximum of 59% prediction accuracy. Our results suggest that, compared to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, non-BRCA1/2 (BRCAX individuals are genetically heterogeneous. This study also demonstrates the effectiveness of RNA pools to compare the expression profiles of cell-lines from BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX cases after treatment with irradiation and mitomycin C as a method to prioritize treatment regimes for detailed downstream expression analysis.

  20. A high-throughput quantitative expression analysis of cancer-related genes in human HepG2 cells in response to limonene, a potential anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafidh, Rand R; Hussein, Saba Z; MalAllah, Mohammed Q; Abdulamir, Ahmed S; Abu Bakar, Fatimah

    2017-11-14

    Citrus bioactive compounds, as active anticancer agent, have been under focus by several studies worldwide. However, the underlying genes responsible for the anticancer potential have not been sufficiently highlighted. The current study investigated the gene expression profile of hepatocellular carcinoma, HepG2, cells after treatment with Limonene. The concentration that killed 50% of HepG2 cells was used to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of limonene anticancer activity. The apoptotic induction was detected by flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscope. Two of pro-apoptotic events, caspase-3 activation and phosphatidylserine translocation were manifested by confocal fluorescence microscopy. High-throughput real-time PCR was used to profile 1023 cancer-related genes in 16 different gene families related to the cancer development. In comparison to untreated cells, limonene increased the percentage of apoptotic cells up to 89.61%, by flow cytometry, and 48.2% by fluorescence microscopy. There was a significant limonene-driven differential gene expression of HepG2 cells in 15 different gene families. Limonene was shown to significantly (>2log) up-regulate and down-regulate 14 and 59 genes, respectively. The affected gene families, from most to least affected, were apoptosis induction, signal transduction, cancer genes augmentation, alteration in kinases expression, inflammation, DNA damage repair, and cell cycle proteins. The current study reveals that limonene could be a promising, cheap, and effective anticancer compound. The broad spectrum of limonene anticancer activity is interesting for anticancer drug development. Further research is needed to confirm the current findings and to examine the anticancer potential of limonene along with underlying mechanisms on different cell lines. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. LUGOL'S IODINE CHROMOENDOSCOPY VERSUS NARROW BAND IMAGE ENHANCED ENDOSCOPY FOR THE DETECTION OF ESOPHAGEAL CANCER IN PATIENTS WITH STENOSIS SECONDARY TO CAUSTIC/CORROSIVE AGENT INGESTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennachi, Caterina Maria Pia Simoni; Moura, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux de; Amorim, Renato Bastos Pimenta; Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Kumbhari, Vivek; Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of corrosion cancer should be suspected in patients with corrosive ingestion if after a latent period of negligible symptoms there is development of dysphagia, or poor response to dilatation, or if respiratory symptoms develop in an otherwise stable patient of esophageal stenosis. Narrow Band Imaging detects superficial squamous cell carcinoma more frequently than white-light imaging, and has significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy compared with white-light. To determinate the clinical applicability of Narrow Band Imaging versus Lugol´s solution chromendoscopy for detection of early esophageal cancer in patients with caustic/corrosive agent stenosis. Thirty-eight patients, aged between 28-84 were enrolled and examined by both Narrow Band Imaging and Lugol´s solution chromendoscopy. A 4.9mm diameter endoscope was used facilitating examination of a stenotic area without dilation. Narrow Band Imaging was performed and any lesion detected was marked for later biopsy. Then, Lugol´s solution chromoendoscopy was performed and biopsies were taken at suspicious areas. Patients who had abnormal findings at the routine, Narrow Band Imaging or Lugol´s solution chromoscopy exam had their stenotic ring biopsied. We detected nine suspicious lesions with Narrow Band Imaging and 14 with Lugol´s solution chromendoscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of the Narrow Band Imaging was 100% and 80.6%, and with Lugol´s chromoscopy 100% and 66.67%, respectively. Five (13%) suspicious lesions were detected both with Narrow Band Imaging and Lugol's chromoscopy, two (40%) of these lesions were confirmed carcinoma on histopathological examination. Narrow Band Imaging is an applicable option to detect and evaluate cancer in patients with caustic /corrosive stenosis compared to the Lugol´s solution chromoscopy.

  2. Surfactant protein-D predicts prognosis of interstitial lung disease induced by anticancer agents in advanced lung cancer: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kota; Kato, Motoyasu; Shukuya, Takehito; Mori, Keita; Sekimoto, Yasuhito; Ihara, Hiroaki; Kanemaru, Ryota; Ko, Ryo; Shibayama, Rina; Tajima, Ken; Koyama, Ryo; Shimada, Naoko; Nagashima, Osamu; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Sasaki, Shinichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-05-02

    Interstitial lung diseases induced by anticancer agents (ILD-AA) are rare adverse effects of anticancer therapy. However, prognostic biomarkers for ILD-AA have not been identified in patients with advanced lung cancer. Our aim was to analyze the association between serum biomarkers sialylated carbohydrate antigen Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), and clinical characteristics in patients diagnosed with ILD-AA. Between April 2011 and March 2016, 1224 advanced lung cancer patients received cytotoxic agents and epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors at Juntendo University Hospital and Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital. Of these patients, those diagnosed with ILD-AA were enrolled in this case control study. ΔKL-6 and ΔSP-D were defined as the difference between the levels at the onset of ILD-AA and their respective levels prior to development of ILD-AA. We evaluated KL-6 and SP-D at the onset of ILD-AA, ΔKL-6 and ΔSP-D, the risk factors for death related to ILD-AA, the chest high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, and survival time in patients diagnosed with ILD-AA. Thirty-six patients diagnosed with ILD-AA were enrolled in this study. Among them, 14 patients died of ILD-AA. ΔSP-D in the patients who died was significantly higher than that in the patients who survived. However, ΔKL-6 did not differ significantly between the two groups. Moreover, ΔSP-D in patients who exhibited diffuse alveolar damage was significantly higher than that in the other patterns on HRCT. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to set the optimal cut off value for ΔSP-D at 398 ng/mL. Survival time for patients with high ΔSP-D (≥ 398 ng/mL) was significantly shorter than that for patients with low ΔSP-D. Multivariate analysis revealed that ΔSP-D was a significant prognostic factor of ILD-AA. This is the first research to evaluate high ΔSP-D (≥ 398 ng/mL) in patients with ILD-AA and to

  3. Safety and efficacy of single-agent bevacizumab-containing therapy in elderly patients with platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer : Subgroup analysis of the randomised phase III AURELIA trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorio, Roberto; Roemer-Becuwe, Célia; Hilpert, Felix; Gibbs, Emma; García, Yolanda; Kaern, Janne; Huizing, Manon; Witteveen, Petronella|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17530808X; Zagouri, Flora; Coeffic, David; Lück, Hans-Joachim; González-Martín, Antonio; Kristensen, Gunnar; Levaché, Charles-Briac; Lee, Chee Khoon; Gebski, Val; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric

    BACKGROUND: The AURELIA trial demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) with bevacizumab added to chemotherapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (PROC). METHODS: Patients with PROC were randomised to receive investigator-selected single-agent chemotherapy alone or with

  4. Development of a new anti-cancer agent for targeted radionuclide therapy: β- radiolabeled RAFT-RGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitprin, A.

    2013-01-01

    β-emitters radiolabeled RAFT-RGD as new agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. The αvβ3 integrin is known to play an important role in tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor proliferation, survival and metastasis. Because of its overexpression on neo-endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origins, αvβ3 integrin is an attractive molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of the rapidly growing and metastatic tumors. A tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK])4 (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets integrin αvβ3 in vitro and in vivo. RAFT-RGD has been used for tumor imaging and drug targeting. This study is the first to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the β-emitters radiolabeled tetrameric RGD peptide RAFT-RGD in a Nude mouse model of αvβ3 -expressing tumors. An injection of 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD in mice with αvβ3 -positive tumors caused a significant growth delay as compared with mice treated with 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RAD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In comparison, an injection of 30 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD had no efficacy for the treatment of αvβ3 -negative tumors. 90 Y-RAFT-RGD and 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent αvβ3 -expressing tumor targeting agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Phaseolus acutifolius Lectin Fractions Exhibit Apoptotic Effects on Colon Cancer: Preclinical Studies Using Dimethilhydrazine or Azoxi-Methane as Cancer Induction Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulisses Moreno-Celis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phaseolus acutifolius (Tepary bean lectins have been studied as cytotoxic molecules on colon cancer cells. The toxicological profile of a Tepary bean lectin fraction (TBLF has shown low toxicity in experimental animals; exhibiting anti-nutritional effects such as a reduction in body weight gain and a decrease in food intake when using a dose of 50 mg/kg on alternate days for six weeks. Taking this information into account, the focus of this work was to evaluate the effect of the TBLF on colon cancer using 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH or azoxy-methane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS as colon cancer inductors. Rats were treated with DMH or AOM/DSS and then administered with TBFL (50 mg/kg for six weeks. TBLF significantly decreased early tumorigenesis triggered by DMH by 70%, but without any evidence of an apoptotic effect. In an independent experiment, AOM/DSS was used to generate aberrant cryptic foci, which decreased by 50% after TBLF treatment. TBLF exhibited antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects related to a decrease of the signal transduction pathway protein Akt in its activated form and an increase of caspase 3 activity, but not to p53 activation. Further studies will deepen our knowledge of specific apoptosis pathways and cellular stress processes such as oxidative damage.

  6. Drug repurposing of novel quinoline acetohydrazide derivatives as potent COX-2 inhibitors and anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Chelli Sai; Manikandan, A.; Sridhar, P.; Sivakumar, A.; Siva Kumar, B.; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara

    2018-02-01

    Novel QuinolineAcetohydrazide (QAh) derivatives (9a-n) were firstly evaluated in silico to determine their anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer efficacy via the mechanisms of COX1 and COX2 inhibition, and NF-ĸB, HDAC and Human Topoisomerase I pathways respectively. In the studied set, the trifluoro substituted QAh derivatives: (E)-N'-(4-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazid and (E)-N'-(3-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazide are determined to be potential leads, indicated from their best docked scores, relative ligand efficiency, and significant structural attributes evaluated by ab initio simulations. The only setback being their partition co-efficient that retrieved a red flag in the evaluation of their Lipinski parameters. The experimental in vitro studies confirmed the significant enhancement as COX-2 inhibitors and appreciable enhancement in MTT assay of breast and skin cancer cell lines. Significantly, trifluoro substituent in the quinoline scaffold can be reasoned to note the excellent binding affinity to all the evaluated drug targets.

  7. Essential oils from Egyptian aromatic plants as antioxidant and novel anticancer agents in human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan, M. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of tumor growth using extracts from aromatic plants are rapidly emerging as important new drug candidates for cancer therapy. The cytotoxicity and in vitro anticancer evaluation of the essential oils from thyme, juniper and clove has been assessed against five different human cancer cell lines (liver HepG2, breast MCF-7, prostate PC3, colon HCT116 and lung A549. A GC/MS analysis revealed that α-pinene, thymol and eugenol are the major components of Egyptian juniper, thyme and clove oils with concentrations of 31.19%, 79.15% and 82.71%, respectively. Strong antioxidant profiles of all the oils are revealed in vitro by DPPH and β-carotene bleaching assays. The results showed that clove oil was similarly potent to the reference drug, doxorubicin in prostate, colon and lung cell lines. Thyme oil was more effective than the doxorubicin in breast and lung cell lines while juniper oil was more effective than the doxorubicin in all the tested cancer cell lines except prostate cancer. In conclusion, the essential oils from Egyptian aromatic plants can be used as good candidates for novel therapeutic strategies for cancer as they possess significant anticancer activity.Los inhibidores de crecimiento de tumores usando extractos de plantas aromáticas están emergiendo con rapidez como nuevos e importantes medicamentos para el tratamiento del cáncer. La citotoxicidad y la acción anticancerígena in vitro de aceites esenciales de tomillo, enebro y clavo han sido evaluadas en cinco líneas celulares de cáncer humano (hígado HepG2, mama MCF-7, próstata PC3, colon HCT116 y pulmón A549. Los análisis de GC/MS mostraron que α-pineno, timol y eugenol son los principales componentes de los aceites egipcios de enebro, tomillo y clavo, con concentraciones de 31,19%, 79,15% y 82,71%, respectivamente. Se demuestra, mediante ensayos in vitro de blanqueo de DPPH y β-caroteno, el enérgico perfil antioxidante de todos los aceites. Los resultados

  8. Preliminary study on the potential of polysaccharide from indigenous Tiger's Milk mushroom (Lignosus rhinocerus) as anti-lung cancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei Hong; Zainal, Zamri; Daud, Fauzi

    2014-09-01

    Tiger's Milk mushroom is a tropical polypore genus that can be found in the tropical part of the world in Australia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Vanuatu. In Malaysia, Lignosus rhinocerus is the most sought after medicinal mushroom by Semai aborigine upon request by local herbalist. This priced mushroom has been used traditionally to treat various diseases such as asthma, breast cancer, cough, fever and food poisoning. Current results indicated polysaccharide from sclerotia of indigenous L. rhinocerus extracted through hot water is able to inhibit up to 45% growth of human lung carcinoma. Inhibition is achieved when concentration of polysaccharide are in the range of 4-8 μg/ml. Present preliminary study suggests beta-glucan-rich polysaccharide from sclerotia of indigenous L. rhinocerus has anti-proliferation activity on human lung carcinoma (A549).

  9. Metal-based phthalocyanines as a potential photosensitizing agent in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduray, Kaminee; Odhav, B.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging medical treatment that uses photosensitizers (drug) which are activated by laser light for the generation of cytotoxic free radicals and singlet oxygen molecules that cause tumor cell death. In the recent years, there has been a focus on using and improving an industrial colorant termed phthalocyanines as a prospective photosensitizer because of its unique properties. This in vitro study investigated the photodynamic effect of indium (InPcCl) and iron (FePcCl) phthalocyanine chlorides on human skin cancer cells (melanoma). Experimentally, 2 x 104 cells/ml were seeded in 24-well tissue culture plates and allowed to attach overnight, after which cells were treated with different concentrations (2 μg/ml - 100 μg/ml) of InPcCl and FePcCl. After 2 h, cells were irradiated with constant light doses of 2.5 J/cm2, 4.5 J/cm2 and 8.5 J/cm2 delivered from a diode laser. Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24 h before cell viability was measured using the MTT Assay. At 24 h after PDT, irradiation with a light dose of 2.5 J/cm2 for each photosensitizing concentration of InPcCl and FePcCl produced a significant decrease in cell viability, but when the treatment light dose was further increased to 4.5 J/cm2 and 8.5 J/cm2 the cell survival was less than 55% for photosensitizing concentrations of InPcCl and FePcCl from 4 μg/ml to 100 μg/ml. This PDT study concludes that low concentrations on InPcCl and FePcCl activated with low level light doses can be used for the effective in vitro killing of melanoma cancer cells.

  10. Does the Addition of Biologic Agents to Chemotherapy in Patients with Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases Result in a Higher Proportion of Patients Undergoing Resection? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogach, Jessica; Levine, Oren; Parpia, Sameer; Valencia, Marlie; Ruo, Leyo; Serrano, Pablo

    2018-03-01

    Surgical resection provides the best opportunity for cure for metastatic colorectal cancer. Whether addition of a biologic agent to chemotherapy improves the rate of conversion from unresectable to resectable disease remains uncertain. We carried out a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis to define the impact of biologic agents on resection. We searched Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, and PubMed for randomized controlled trials published up until April 2017 comparing chemotherapy and biologics (intervention) vs. chemotherapy alone (control) in treatment-naïve patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Study selection, data abstraction, risk of bias, and quality of evidence assessment were performed in duplicate. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled odds ratio (OR) for resection rate and corresponding confidence interval (CI). Nine studies, including a total of 4345 patients, were analyzed. Seven studies assessed epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR)-directed monoclonal antibodies, and two used antiangiogenic agents. The addition of a biologic agent to chemotherapy was associated with higher resection rate (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.07-2.02; resection rate 8.4 vs. 6.1%). Subgroup analysis based on mechanism of action of drugs showed benefit for resection rate only with EGFR-directed agents (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.10-2.64). Heterogeneity among studies was low (I 2  = 34%). The addition of biologic agents to systemic chemotherapy in patients with initially unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer improved resection rate. The optimal biologic agent for this outcome cannot yet be determined.

  11. Development of representative models for the study of gastric cancer and evaluation of potential antitumor agents in primary gastric cancer cells and gastric metastasis in liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Chaves, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer has been the sixth most common malignancy worldwide and the leading cause of death by tumors in Costa Rica, the survival of patients is limited by difficulties in diagnosis and the lack of therapeutic options to improve life expectancy. The study has conducted a number of research models that will allow in the future to better understand the pathology of this tumor and it has evaluated the therapeutic action of naturally occurring in gastric cancer cells. A vivo model of carcinogenesis in stomachs of Wistar rats, has achieved to establish by means of chemical induction with MNNG, in which it has been possible to observe the appearance of tumors in the stratified epithelium flat keratinized starting from week 22 of experiment; while for the 40th week adenomas were observed in the simple cylindrical epithelium. Additionally, the role of Helicobacter pylori was inquired in the development of gastric cancer by inoculation of two strains of bacteria (CagA + and CagA-) in the stomach of Wistar rats, as well as the effect of his administration together with MNNG. However, the results of these models have been limited due to the lack of detection of the bacteria in the stomachs of rats inoculated. In addition, it has established an in vitro model of threedimensional cell culture, which has allowed to reproduce some of the characteristics observed in vivo in the tumors, in this case it was determined that the two gastric cancer cell lines have showed a different behavior, since the cells NCI-N87 from a in metastasis gastric liver were able to form steroids compact whereas AGS cells have been originate from a primary tumor that has formed easily dispersible structures and not compact spheroids. Finally, the effect of natural retinoids ATRA and retinoic acid 13-cis were evaluated, as well as retinamide synthetic retinoid on the viability of the cells AGS and NCI-N87. Cytotoxicity assays using MTT have allowed to observe the reduction of a variation in the

  12. QSAR Modeling on Benzo[c]phenanthridine Analogues as Topoisomerase I Inhibitors and Anti-cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Ngoc-Phuong Huynh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Benzo[c]phenanthridine (BCP derivatives were identified as topoisomerase I (TOP-I targeting agents with pronounced antitumor activity. In this study, hologram-QSAR, 2D-QSAR and 3D-QSAR models were developed for BCPs on topoisomerase I inbibitory activity and cytotoxicity against seven tumor cell lines including RPMI8402, CPT-K5, P388, CPT45, KB3-1, KBV-1and KBH5.0. The hologram, 2D, and 3D-QSAR models were obtained with the square of correlation coefficient R2 = 0.58 − 0.77, the square of the crossvalidation coefficient q2 = 0.41 − 0.60 as well as the external set’s square of predictive correlation coefficient r2 = 0.51 − 0.80. Moreover, the assessment method based on reliability test with confidence level of 95% was used to validate the predictive power of QSAR models and to prevent over-fitting phenomenon of classical QSAR models. Our QSAR model could be applied to design new analogues of BCPs with higher antitumor and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity.

  13. Genome-wide methylation profiling of ovarian cancer patient-derived xenografts treated with the demethylating agent decitabine identifies novel epigenetically regulated genes and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Tomar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC, intrinsic and/or acquired resistance against platinum-containing chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment. A low frequency of somatic mutations but frequent epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation in HGSOC tumors, presents the cancer epigenome as a relevant target for innovative therapy. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs supposedly are good preclinical models for identifying novel drug targets. However, the representativeness of global methylation status of HGSOC PDXs compared to their original tumors has not been evaluated so far. Aims of this study were to explore how representative HGSOC PDXs are of their corresponding patient tumor methylome and to evaluate the effect of epigenetic therapy and cisplatin on putative epigenetically regulated genes and their related pathways in PDXs. Methods Genome-wide analysis of the DNA methylome of HGSOC patients with their corresponding PDXs, from different generations, was performed using Infinium 450 K methylation arrays. Furthermore, we analyzed global methylome changes after treatment of HGSOC PDXs with the FDA approved demethylating agent decitabine and cisplatin. Findings were validated by bisulfite pyrosequencing with subsequent pathway analysis. Publicly available datasets comprising HGSOC patients were used to analyze the prognostic value of the identified genes. Results Only 0.6–1.0 % of all analyzed CpGs (388,696 CpGs changed significantly (p < 0.01 during propagation, showing that HGSOC PDXs were epigenetically stable. Treatment of F3 PDXs with decitabine caused a significant reduction in methylation in 10.6 % of CpG sites in comparison to untreated PDXs (p < 0.01, false discovery rate <10 %. Cisplatin treatment had a marginal effect on the PDX methylome. Pathway analysis of decitabine-treated PDX tumors revealed several putative epigenetically regulated pathways (e.g., the Src family kinase

  14. Heated lipiodol as an embolization agent for transhepatic arterial embolization in VX2 rabbit liver cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Wei; Wan Yi; Liang Zhihui; Duan Yunyou; Liu Xi; Wang Zhimin; Liu Yiyong; Zhu Jia; Liu Xiongtao; Zhang Hongxin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of heated (60 deg. C) lipiodol via hepatic artery administration in a rabbit model of VX2 liver cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups with 10 rabbits assigned to each group. VX2 carcinoma cells were surgically implanted into the left hepatic lobe. The tumors were allowed to grow for 2 weeks, and studies were performed until the diameter of the tumors detected by ultrasonograph reached 2-3 cm. Under anesthesia, trans-catheter hepatic arterial embolization was performed and doxorubicin-lipiodol (37 deg. C) (1 mL), lipiodol (60 deg. C) (1 mL) or control (physiological saline (37 deg. C) (1 mL)) solution was injected into the hepatic arteries of animals in the three groups. One week later, the volume of the tumor was measured by ultrasonograph again. The serum of all rabbits was collected before injection and at 4 and 7 days after injection, and the level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was checked. The survival period of the three groups of rabbits after treatment was also recorded. During the last course of their disease, the rabbits were given analgesics to relieve suffering. Results: The tumor growth rate in the lipiodol (60 deg. C) group (0.92 ± 0.21, tumor volume from 1811 ± 435 to 1670 ± 564 mm 3 ) was significantly lower than that in the control group (3.48 ± 1.17, tumor volume from 1808 ± 756 to 5747 ± 1341 mm 3 ) (P 3 ) (P -1 ) and the doxorubicin-lipiodol (37 deg. C) group (139.7 ± 12.3 U L -1 ) (P > 0.05). However, the serum AST level in the lipiodol (60 deg. C) group was significantly higher at 4 days after injection (P -1 ). Conclusions: Treatment with lipiodol (60 deg. C) resulted in an effect on serum AST levels similar to that caused by treatment with doxorubicin-lipiodol (37 deg. C). Thus, lipiodol (60 deg. C) treatment could greatly prolong the survival period of rabbits with VX2 cancer by inhibiting tumor growth.

  15. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  16. Photosensitizing agents and the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sarah N; Zens, Michael S; Perry, Ann E; Spencer, Steven K; Duell, Eric J; Karagas, Margaret R

    2013-08-01

    It is well-known that UV light exposure and a sun-sensitive phenotype are risk factors for the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In this New Hampshire population-based case-control study, we collected data from 5,072 individuals, including histologically confirmed cases of BCC and SCC, and controls via a personal interview to investigate possible associations between photosensitizing medication use and NMSC. After adjustment for potentially confounding factors (e.g., lifetime number of painful sunburns), we found a modest increase in risk of SCC (odds ratio (OR)=1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.0-1.4) and BCC (OR=1.2, 95% CI=0.9-1.5), in particular early-onset BCC, (≤ 50 years of age) (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.1-2.1) associated with photosensitizing medication use. For SCC the association was strongest among those with tendency to sunburn rather than tan. We also specifically found associations with BCC, and especially early-onset BCC, and photosensitizing antimicrobials. In conclusion, certain commonly prescribed photosensitizing medications may enhance the risk of developing SCC, especially in individuals with a sun-sensitive phenotype, and may increase the risk of developing BCC and incidence of BCC at a younger age.

  17. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Ligands: Potential Pharmacological Agents for Targeting the Angiogenesis Signaling Cascade in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Costas; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) has currently been considered as molecular target for the treatment of human metabolic disorders. Experimental data from in vitro cultures, animal models, and clinical trials have shown that PPAR-γ ligand activation regulates differentiation and induces cell growth arrest and apoptosis in a variety of cancer types. Tumor angiogenesis constitutes a multifaceted process implicated in complex downstream signaling pathways that triggers tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this aspect, accumulating in vitro and in vivo studies have provided extensive evidence that PPAR-γ ligands can function as modulators of the angiogenic signaling cascade. In the current review, the crucial role of PPAR-γ ligands and the underlying mechanisms participating in tumor angiogenesis are summarized. Targeting PPAR-γ may prove to be a potential therapeutic strategy in combined treatments with conventional chemotherapy; however, special attention should be taken as there is also substantial evidence to support that PPAR-γ ligands can enhance angiogenic phenotype in tumoral cells. PMID:18464916

  18. Hypothyroidism in Cancer Patients on Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors with anti-PD1 Agents: Insights on Underlying Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusseini, M; Samantray, J

    2017-04-01

    Background: Immune therapy using monoclonal antibodies against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death 1 receptor (PD-1) for various cancers have been reported to cause thyroid dysfunction. Little is known, however, about the underlying pathogenic mechanisms and the course of hypothyroidism that subsequently develops. In this report, we use the change in thyroglobulin and thyroid antibody levels in patients on immune therapy who develop hypothyroidism to better understand its pathogenesis as well as examine the status of hypothyroidism in the long term. Methods: We report a case series of 10 patients who developed hypothyroidism after initiation of immune therapy (either anti-PD-1 alone or in combination with anti-CTLA-4). Available thyroid antibodies including anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg), anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), and thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) were noted during the initial thyroiditis phase as well as the hypothyroid phase. Persistence or remission of hypothyroidism was noted at 6 months. Summary: During the thyroiditis phase, 50% of the patients had elevated Tg titers, 40% had elevated anti-Tg, and 40% had elevated TSI. All of these titers decreased during the hypothyroid phase. Permanent hypothyroidism was noted in 80% of the cases. Conclusion: Hypothyroidism following initiation of immune therapy has immunologic and non-immunologic mediated mechanisms and is likely to be persistent. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Ligands: Potential Pharmacological Agents for Targeting the Angiogenesis Signaling Cascade in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Giaginis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ has currently been considered as molecular target for the treatment of human metabolic disorders. Experimental data from in vitro cultures, animal models, and clinical trials have shown that PPAR-γ ligand activation regulates differentiation and induces cell growth arrest and apoptosis in a variety of cancer types. Tumor angiogenesis constitutes a multifaceted process implicated in complex downstream signaling pathways that triggers tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this aspect, accumulating in vitro and in vivo studies have provided extensive evidence that PPAR-γ ligands can function as modulators of the angiogenic signaling cascade. In the current review, the crucial role of PPAR-γ ligands and the underlying mechanisms participating in tumor angiogenesis are summarized. Targeting PPAR-γ may prove to be a potential therapeutic strategy in combined treatments with conventional chemotherapy; however, special attention should be taken as there is also substantial evidence to support that PPAR-γ ligands can enhance angiogenic phenotype in tumoral cells.

  20. Novel targeted nuclear imaging agent for gastric cancer diagnosis: glucose-regulated protein 78 binding peptide-guided 111In-labeled polymeric micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng CC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Chia Cheng,1,2,* Chiung-Fang Huang,3,4,* Ai-Sheng Ho,5 Cheng-Liang Peng,6 Chun-Chao Chang,7,8 Fu-Der Mai,1,9 Ling-Yun Chen,10 Tsai-Yueh Luo,2 Jungshan Chang1,11,121Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 2Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, 3School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 4Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 5Division of Gastroenterology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, 6Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Biochemistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 10Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 11Neuroscience Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 12Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Increased expression of cellular membrane bound glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 is considered to be one of the biomarkers for gastric cancers. Therefore, peptides or molecules with specific recognition to GRP78 can act as a guiding probe to direct conjugated imaging agents to localized cancers. Based on this rationale, GRP78-guided polymeric micelles were designed and manufactured for nuclear imaging detection of tumors. Thiolated GRP78 binding peptide (GRP78BP was first labeled with maleimide-terminated poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone and then mixed with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA-linked poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone to form DTPA/GRP78BP-conjugated micelles. The coupling efficiency of micelles with

  1. Blocking heme oxygenase-1 by zinc protoporphyrin reduces tumor hypoxia-mediated VEGF release and inhibits tumor angiogenesis as a potential therapeutic agent against colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Yang, Hao-Jhih; Chang, Chun-Chao; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Chang, Jungshan; Ho, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-28

    Hypoxia in tumor niche is one of important factors to start regeneration of blood vessels, leading to increase survival, proliferation, and invasion in cancer cells. Under hypoxia microenvironment, furthermore, steadily increased hypoxia-inducible factor -1α (HIF-1α) is observed, and can increase vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and promote angiogenesis. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, is potential to inhibit tumor proliferation and progression. However, the mechanism of ZnPP in inhibition of tumor is not completely clear. We hypothesize that ZnPP may modulate HIF-1α through inhibiting HO-1, and then inhibit angiogenesis and tumor progression. This study aimed to dissect the mechanism of ZnPP in tumor suppression. We observed the amount of VEGF was increased in the sera of the colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (n = 34, p ZnPP inhibited the expressions of HIF-1α and VEGF coupled with cell proliferations of HCT-15 cells, suggesting that ZnPP blocked HIF-1α expression, and then inhibited the consequent VEGF production. In the xenograft model, we also observed that the animals exposed to ZnPP displayed much smaller tumor nodules and less degree of angiogenesis with decreased expression of the angiogenesis marker, αvβ3 integrin, compared to that in normal control. This study demonstrated that VEGF level in serum was elevated in the patients with CRC. The HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, possessed the properties of anti-tumor agent by decreasing HIF-1α levels, blocking VEGF production, impairing tumor angiogenesis, and inhibiting tumor growth.

  2. Neoadjuvant Treatment With Single-Agent Cetuximab Followed by 5-FU, Cetuximab, and Pelvic Radiotherapy: A Phase II Study in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, Federica; Chiara, Silvana; Bengala, Carmelo; Antognoni, Paolo; Dealis, Cristina; Zironi, Sandra; Malavasi, Norma; Scolaro, Tindaro; Depenni, Roberta; Jovic, Gordana; Sonaglio, Claudia; Rossi, Aldo; Luppi, Gabriele; Conte, Pier Franco

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery represents the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Cetuximab has proved activity in advanced colorectal cancer, and its incorporation in preoperative treatment may increase tumor downstaging. Methods and Materials: After biopsy and staging, uT3/uT4 N0/+ LARC received single-agent cetuximab in three doses, followed by weekly cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), concomitantly with RT. Sample size was calculated according to Bryant and Day test, a two-stage design with at least 10 pathologic complete remissions observed in 60 patients (pts) able to complete the treatment plan. Results: Forty pts with LARC were entered: male/female = 34/6; median age: 61 (range, 28-77); 12 uT3N0 Ed(30%); 25 uT3N1 (62%); 3 uT4N1 (8%); all Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group = 0. Thirty-five pts completed neoadjuvant treatment; 5 (12%) withdrew therapy after one cetuximab administration: three for hypersensitivity reactions, one for rapid progression, and one for purulent arthritis. They continued 5-FU in continuous infusion in association with RT. Thirty-one pts (77%) presented with acnelike rash; dose reduction/interruption of treatment was necessary in six pts (15%): two for Grade 3 acnelike rash, two for Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity, and two for refusal. Thirty-eight pts were evaluable for pathological response (one patient refused surgery, and one was progressed during neoadjuvant treatment). Pathological staging was: pT0N0 three pts (8%), pT1N0 1 pt (3%); pT2N0 13 pts (34%), and pT3 19 pts (50%) (N0:9, N1:5; N2:5); pT4 2 pts (5%). Conclusions: Preoperative treatment with 5-FU, cetuximab, and pelvic RT is feasible with acceptable toxicities; however, the rate of pathologic responses is disappointingly low

  3. Heated lipiodol as an embolization agent for transhepatic arterial embolization in VX2 rabbit liver cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Wei [Department of Interventional Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No.1 Xinshi Road, Shaanxi Province, Xi' an 710038 (China)], E-mail: zjfurong2008@126.com; Wan Yi [Department of Health Statistics, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Liang Zhihui [Department of Radiology, Bethune International Peace Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province 050082 (China); Duan Yunyou; Liu Xi [Department of Ultrasonography, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 1 Xinshi Road, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang Zhimin; Liu Yiyong; Zhu Jia; Liu Xiongtao [Department of Interventional Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No.1 Xinshi Road, Shaanxi Province, Xi' an 710038 (China); Zhang Hongxin [Department of Interventional Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No.1 Xinshi Road, Shaanxi Province, Xi' an 710038 (China)], E-mail: cawe-001@163.com

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of heated (60 deg. C) lipiodol via hepatic artery administration in a rabbit model of VX2 liver cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups with 10 rabbits assigned to each group. VX2 carcinoma cells were surgically implanted into the left hepatic lobe. The tumors were allowed to grow for 2 weeks, and studies were performed until the diameter of the tumors detected by ultrasonograph reached 2-3 cm. Under anesthesia, trans-catheter hepatic arterial embolization was performed and doxorubicin-lipiodol (37 deg. C) (1 mL), lipiodol (60 deg. C) (1 mL) or control (physiological saline (37 deg. C) (1 mL)) solution was injected into the hepatic arteries of animals in the three groups. One week later, the volume of the tumor was measured by ultrasonograph again. The serum of all rabbits was collected before injection and at 4 and 7 days after injection, and the level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was checked. The survival period of the three groups of rabbits after treatment was also recorded. During the last course of their disease, the rabbits were given analgesics to relieve suffering. Results: The tumor growth rate in the lipiodol (60 deg. C) group (0.92 {+-} 0.21, tumor volume from 1811 {+-} 435 to 1670 {+-} 564 mm{sup 3}) was significantly lower than that in the control group (3.48 {+-} 1.17, tumor volume from 1808 {+-} 756 to 5747 {+-} 1341 mm{sup 3}) (P < 0.05) and in the doxorubicin-lipiodol (37 deg. C) group (1.69 {+-} 0.26, tumor volume from 1881 {+-} 641 to 2428 {+-} 752 mm{sup 3}) (P < 0.05). Consequently, the survival period of the animals in the lipiodol (60 deg. C) group (41.0 {+-} 3.0 days) was significantly greater than that in the doxorubicin-lipiodol (37 deg. C) group (38.0 {+-} 2.5 days) (P < 0.05). On the other hand, there was no statistically significant difference in serum AST levels between the lipiodol (60 deg. C) group (148.2 {+-} 11

  4. Endophytic fungi associated with Taxus fuana (West Himalayan Yew) of Pakistan: potential bio-resources for cancer chemopreventive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nighat; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Park, Eun-Jung; Marler, Laura E; Jadoon, Muniba; Qazi, Muneer Ahmed; Mehboob Mirza, Hira; Khan, Ibrar; Atiq, Naima; Chang, Leng Chee; Ahmed, Safia; Pezzuto, John M

    2016-11-01

    Endophytic fungi, being a prolific source of bioactive secondary metabolites, are of great interest for natural product discovery. Isolation and partial characterization of endophytic fungi inhabiting the leaves and woody parts of Taxus fuana Nan Li & R.R. Mill. (Taxaceae) and evaluation of biological activity. Endophytic fungal isolates were identified by molecular analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of 18S rDNA. Extracts of the endophytic fungi cultured on potato dextrose agar and modified medium were evaluated using cancer chemoprevention bioassays [inhibition of TNF-α-induced NFκB, aromatase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); induction of quinone reductase 1 (QR1)] and growth inhibition with MCF-7 cells. Nine of 15 fungal isolates were identified as belonging to Epicoccum, Mucor, Penicillium, Chaetomium, Paraconiothriym, Plectania or Trichoderma. Five of the 15 extracts inhibited NFκB activity (IC 50 values ranging between 0.18 and 17 μg/mL) and five inhibited iNOS (IC 50 values ranging between 0.32 and 12.9 μg/mL). In the aromatase assay, only two isolates mediated inhibition (IC 50 values 12.2 and 10.5 μg/mL). With QR1 induction, three extracts exhibited significant activity (concentrations to double activity values ranging between 0.20 and 5.5 μg/mL), and five extracts inhibited the growth of MCF-7 cells (IC 50 values ranging from 0.56 to 17.5 μg/mL). Six active cultures were derived from woody parts of the plant material. The endophytic fungi studied are capable of producing pharmacologically active natural compounds. In particular, isolates derived from the wood of Taxus fuana should be prioritized for the isolation and characterization of bioactive constituents.

  5. Thêta-Cream versus Bepanthol lotion in breast cancer patients under radiotherapy. A new prophylactic agent in skin care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röper, Barbara; Kaisig, Danielle; Auer, Florian; Mergen, Ertan; Molls, Michael

    2004-05-01

    In radiotherapy of the breast following breast-conserving surgery, the adverse reaction predominantly found is confined to the skin. After phase II studies, Thêta-Cream, containing CM Glucan, Hydroxyprolisilan C und Matrixyl as active substances, was said to have prophylactic properties of preventing acute radiation side effects in skin tissue. In a prospective randomized study, Thêta-cream was compared with standard skin care using Bepanthol lotion. 20 breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to use Thêta-Cream or Bepanthol lotion during radiotherapy. At 0, 30, and 50 Gy, acute skin toxicity was scored with a modified RTOG scoring system. The patients' content with the skin care and the technical assistants' content with the skin marks were recorded. For single aspects of toxicity and their sums in defined skin areas, no differences in median and range between study groups were found. The maximal toxicity anywhere in the breast averaged in a moderate erythema, mild elevation of skin temperature, no desquamation in both groups. Mild itchiness and sporadic efflorescences were more frequently seen with Thêta-Cream. According to a ranking of anonymized breast photos at 50 Gy by independent investigators, side effects were equal. Patients' content was high with both skin care regimens (1.25 on a scale from 0 to 10). With Thêta-Cream a trend toward worse skin marks was noted. Adverse events exclusively occurred in Thêta-Cream users: suspected allergic reaction once, and the necessity for resimulation twice. In direct comparison with dexpanthenol-containing lotion, no advantage for Thêta-Cream was found. Higher costs and problems with skin marks prevent a general recommendation.

  6. Effectiveness of Fluoride Varnish Application as Cariostatic and Desensitizing Agent in Irradiated Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan P. Dholam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of three-month fluoride varnish application on radiation caries and dental sensitivity and to assess compliance to three-month fluoride varnish application. Materials and Methods. 190 irradiated head and neck cancer patients were randomly selected and reviewed retrospectively. Oral prophylaxis, fluoride varnish application, and treatment of dental caries were done prior to radiation therapy. Patients were followed up at every three months for dental evaluation and fluoride varnish application. Decayed-missing-filling-teeth indices, dental sensitivity, and compliance to fluoride varnish application were noted for fifteen months and analyzed statistically. Results. Significant increase in decayed-missing-filling-teeth index was seen at nine (P=0.028, twelve (P=0.003 and fifteen (P=0.002 months follow-up. However, the rate of increase in decayed-missing-filling-teeth indices was 1.64/month which is less than the rate mentioned in the literature (2.5/month. There was no significant effect of sex (P=0.952 and surgery (P=0.672 on radiation caries, but site of disease (P=0.038 and radiation dose (P=0.015 were found to have statistically significant effect. Dental sensitivity decreased from 39% at 3 months to 25% at 15 months followup. 99% compliance to fluoride varnish application was seen till six months followup which decreased to 46% at fifteen months. Conclusion. Three-month fluoride varnish application is effective in decreasing radiation caries and sensitivity and has good compliance.

  7. The role of iron in the management of chemotherapy-induced anemia in cancer patients receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaskar, Rahul; Wao, Hesborn; Miladinovic, Branko; Kumar, Ambuj; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2016-02-04

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are commonly used to treat chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA). However, about half of patients do not benefit. To evaluate the benefits and harms related to the use of iron as a supplement to ESA and iron alone compared with ESA alone in the management of CIA. We searched for relevant trials from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (issue 1 January 2016), MEDLINE (1950 to February 2016), and www.clinicaltrials.gov without using any language limits. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing 'iron plus ESA' or 'iron alone' versus 'ESA alone' in people with CIA were eligible for inclusion. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included eight RCTs (12 comparisons) comparing ESA plus iron versus ESA alone enrolling 2087 participants. We did not find any trial comparing iron alone versus ESAs alone in people with CIA. None of the included RCTs reported overall survival. There was a beneficial effect of iron supplementation to ESAs compared with ESAs alone on hematopoietic response (risk ratio (RR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09 to 1.26; P types of iron (P = 0.31) and types of ESAs (P = 0.16) for hematopoietic response.The iron supplementation to ESAs might be beneficial as fewer participants treated with iron supplementation required red blood cell (RBC) transfusions compared to the number of participants treated with ESAs alone (RR 0.74 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.92); P = 0.007; 1719 participants; 11 comparisons; moderate-quality evidence). Assuming a baseline risk of 7% to 40% for RBC transfusion without iron supplementation, between 10 and 57 patients should be treated to avoid RBC transfusion in one patient.We found no evidence for a difference in the median time to hematopoietic response with addition of iron to ESAs (hazard ratio (HR) 0.93 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.28); P = 0.65; 1042 participants; seven comparisons; low-quality evidence). In subgroup analyses, RCTs in

  8. Prevention of disease progression in a patient with a gastric cancer-re-recurrence. Outcome after intravenous treatment with the novel antineoplastic agent taurolidine. Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menenakos Charalambos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taurolidine (TRD is a novel agent with multimodal antineoplastic effects. We present the case of a tumor remission after intravenous administration of taurolidine in a patient with gastric cancer re-recurrence. Case presentation A 58 years old male patient suffering from a gastric adenocarcinoma was submitted to partial gastrectomy and partial liver resection (pT2, pN1, pM1L (liver segment 2, N0, V0. 24 months later a local recurrence was diagnosed and the patient was reoperated. Postoperatively the patient underwent a palliative chemotherapy with eloxatin, FU, and leucovorin. A subsequent CT-revealed a liver metastasis and a recurrence adjacent to the hepatic artery. After successful radiofrequency ablation of the liver metastasis the patient was intravenously treated with 2% taurolidine. The patient endured the therapy well and no toxicity was observed. CT-scans revealed a stable disease without a tumor progression or metastatic spread. After 39 cycles the patient was submitted to left nephrectomy due to primary urothelial carcinoma and died 2 days later due to myocardial infarction. Postmortem histology of the esophageal-jejunal anastomosis and liver revealed complete remission of the known metastasized gastric adenocarcinoma. Conclusion The intravenous treatment with 2% taurolidine led to a histological remission of the tumor growth without any toxicity for the patient.

  9. A theranostic approach based on the use of a dual boron/Gd agent to improve the efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the lung cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Diego; Protti, Nicoletta; Toppino, Antonio; Deagostino, Annamaria; Lanzardo, Stefania; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Aime, Silvio

    2015-04-01

    This study aims at developing an innovative theranostic approach for lung tumor and metastases treatment, based on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It relies on to the use of low density lipoproteins (LDL) as carriers able to maximize the selective uptake of boron atoms in tumor cells and, at the same time, to quantify the in vivo boron distribution by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tumor cells uptake was initially assessed by ICP-MS and MRI on four types of tumor (TUBO, B16-F10, MCF-7, A549) and one healthy (N-MUG) cell lines. Lung metastases were generated by intravenous injection of a Her2+ breast cancer cell line (i.e. TUBO) in BALB/c mice and transgenic EML4-ALK mice were used as primary tumor model. After neutron irradiation, tumor growth was followed for 30-40 days by MRI. Tumor masses of boron treated mice increased markedly slowly than the control group. From the clinical editor: In this article, the authors described an improvement to existing boron neutron capture therapy. The dual MRI/BNCT agent, carried by LDLs, was able to maximize the selective uptake of boron in tumor cells, and, at the same time, quantify boron distribution in tumor and in other tissues using MRI. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo experiments showed tumor cell killing after neutron irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Simple synthesis of carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives as new potential PET agents for imaging of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Mingzhang; Wang, Min; Miller, Kathy D.; Zheng, Qi-Huang

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized as new potential PET agents for imaging of DNA repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in cancer. The target tracers, X-[ 11 C]methoxy-2-morpholino-4H-chromen-4-ones (X=8, 7, 6, 5; [ 11 C]4a–d), were prepared from their corresponding precursors, X-hydroxy-2-morpholino-4H-chromen-4-ones (X=8, 7, 6, 5; 5a–d), with [ 11 C]CH 3 OTf through O-[ 11 C]methylation and isolated by a simplified solid-phase extraction (SPE) method using a C-18 Sep-Pak Plus cartridge. The radiochemical yields decay corrected to end of bombardment (EOB), from [ 11 C]CO 2 , were 40–60%. The specific activity at end of synthesis (EOS) was 185–370 GBq/μmol. - Highlights: ► New chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized. ► New carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized. ► Simple solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was employed in radiosynthesis.

  11. Cytotoxic effects of the newly-developed chemotherapeutic agents 17-AAG in combination with oxaliplatin and capecitabine in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Mahshid; Zeynali, Shima; Azarbaijani, Anahita Fathi; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad Hassan; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2017-12-01

    The use of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors like 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-AAG) has been recently introduced as an attractive anticancer therapy. It has been shown that 17-AAG may potentiate the inhibitory effects of some classical anticolorectal cancer (CRC) agents. In this study, two panels of colorectal carcinoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effects of 17-AAG in combination with capecitabine and oxaliplatin as double and triple combination therapies on the proliferation of CRC cell lines. HT-29 and all HCT-116 cell lines were seeded in culture media in the presence of different doses of the mentioned drugs in single, double, and triple combinations. Water-soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1) assay was used to investigate cell proliferation 24 h after treatments. Then, dose-response curves were plotted using WST-1outputs, and IC 50 values were determined. For double and triple combinations respectively 0.5 × IC 50 and 0.25 × IC 50 were used. Data was analyzed with the software CompuSyn. Drug interactions were analyzed using Chou-Talalay method to calculate the combination index (CI).The data revealed that 17-AAG shows a potent synergistic interaction (CI 1) in HT-29 and a synergistic effect (CI AAG with oxaliplatin or capecitabine might be effective against HCT-116 and HT-29 cell lines. However, in triple combinations, positive results were seen only against HCT-116. Further investigation is suggested to confirm the effectiveness of these combinations in clinical trials.

  12. Dual-Energy CT in Patients Treated with Anti-Angiogenic Agents for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: New Method of Monitoring Tumor Response?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Na; Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Ahn, Myung Ju; Park, Keun Chil; Kim, Tae Sung; Yi, Chin A [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Joon Beom [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate tumor responses in patients treated with anti-angiogenic agents for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by assessing intratumoral changes using a dual-energy CT (DECT) (based on Choi's criteria) and to compare it to traditional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Ten NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab underwent DECT. Tumor responses to anti-angiogenic therapy were assessed and compared with the baseline CT results using both RECIST (size changes only) and Choi's criteria (reflecting net tumor enhancement). Kappa statistics was used to evaluate agreements between tumor responses assessed by RECIST and Choi's criteria. The weighted {kappa} value for the comparison of tumor responses between the RECIST and Choi's criteria was 0.72. Of 31 target lesions (21 solid nodules, 8 lymph nodes, and two ground-glass opacity nodules [GGNs]), five lesions (16%) showed discordant responses between RECIST and Choi's criteria. Iodine-enhanced images allowed for a distinction between tumor enhancement and hemorrhagic response (detected in 14% [4 of 29, excluding GGNs] of target lesions on virtual nonenhanced images). DECT may serve as a useful tool for response evaluation after anti-angiogenic treatment in NSCLC patients by providing information on the net enhancement of target lesions without obtaining non-enhanced images.

  13. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Superbugs and Drugs" Home | Contact Us General Background: Antibiotic Agents What is an antibacterial and how are ... with the growth and reproduction of bacteria. While antibiotics and antibacterials both attack bacteria, these terms have ...

  14. Hormones and breast cancer: can we use them in ways that could reduce the risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Mahmud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many hormones promote or inhibit breast cancer in different ways. These effects and the mechanisms involved are reviewed in order to suggest a potentially safer use of hormones. Natural estrogens, administered transdermally, and natural progesterone may be the safest combination of female hormones. Increased intake of cruciferous vegetables could provide additional safety by improving 2-hydoxyestrone and diminishing 16 alphahydroxyestrone. Testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA may directly inhibit breast cancer, but could potentially stimulate it by being aromatized into estrogen in the breast. Modest doses with blood level monitoring appear logical. Melatonin and oxytocin are inhibitory to breast and other cancers. Insulin is a growth factor for breast cancer. Managing insulin resistance before the onset of diabetes could reduce the risk. Tri-iodothyronine (T3 has multiple anti-breast cancer effects. Synthroid may not increase T3 levels adequately. Human growth hormone does not appear to increase risk; but it should not be given for performance enhancement.

  15. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/15s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asfar S Azmi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of novel isatin- incorporated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of novel isatin- incorporated thiadiazole hybrids as potential anti-breast cancer agents. Neeraj Kumar1*, Chandra Shekhar Sharma2, Hemendra Pratap Singh2, Lalit ... form of invasive cancer in women throughout the world and remains the ... pharmacophores may have synergistic effect.

  17. Contrast-enhanced computerized tomography combined with a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent for screening for early-phase non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ninglu; Zhang, Xiaohe; Cao, Yonghui; Jiang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Si; Feng, Yingying; Fan, Yimeng; Lu, Zhitao; Gao, Hongmei

    2017-11-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and patients with NSCLC are frequently diagnosed at an advanced stage. This is primarily due to a lack of advanced and sensitive protocols for the detection of early stage NSCLC. Therefore, methods for the accurate diagnosis of early stage NSCLC are urgently required to improve survival rates. The present study investigated the use of contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CECT) combined with a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent (TNCA) to diagnose early-stage NSCLC in a mice xenograft model. The TNCA used was lenvatinib, a multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1-4, platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase receptor Ret and mast/stem cell growth factor receptor Kit. Xenograft NSCLC mice were established and used to analyze the efficacy of CECT-TNCA compared with CT scanning alone. The TNCA was inhaled with the use of an atomizer. The results demonstrated that CECT-TNCA improved the sensitivity of the diagnosis of early stage NSCLC. In addition, imaging using the TNCA enabled the visualization of nodules in the lung in mice with early stage NSCLC. In addition, lung nodule signal enhancement was increased in CECT-TNCA compared with CT, suggesting a high accurate accumulation of the TNCA in tumor nodules. Mice diagnosed with early stage NSCLC exhibited a higher eradication rate of NSCLC after treatment with cisplatin compared with mice with advanced stage NSCLC. These data indicate that the sensitivity and accuracy of CT imaging for the diagnosis of early stage NSCLC was improved through combination with the liposome-encapsulated TNCA.

  18. Study of Bioreductive Anticancer Agent RH-1-Induced Signals Leading the Wild-Type p53-Bearing Lung Cancer A549 Cells to Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulpinas, Aurimas; Imbrasaitė, Aušra; Krestnikova, Natalija; Šarlauskas, Jonas; Čėnas, Narimantas; Kalvelytė, Audronė Valerija

    2016-01-19

    Aziridinylquinone RH-1 (2,5-diaziridinyl-3-hydroxymethyl-6-methyl-cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione) is a potential anticancer agent. RH-1 action is associated with quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) which reduces this diaziridinylbenzoquinone into DNA-alkylating hydroquinone and is overexpressed in many tumors. Another suggested mechanism of RH-1 toxicity is the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from its redox cycling. In order to improve anticancer action of this and similar antitumor quinones, we investigated the involvement of different signaling molecules in cytotoxicity induced by RH-1 by using wild-type tumor suppressor p53 bearing nonsmall cell lung carcinoma A549 cells as a model. Gradual and prolonged increase of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK, P38, and JNK phosphorylation was observed during 24-h RH-1 treatment. In parallel, activation of DNA damage-sensing ATM kinase, upregulation, and phosphorylation of TP53 (human p53) took place. Inhibition studies revealed that RH-1-induced A549 apoptosis involved the NQO1-ATM-p53 signaling pathway and ROS generation. TP53 participated in ROS- and DNA damage-induced cell death differently. Moreover, MAP kinase JNK was another TP53 activator and death inducer in A549 cells. At the same time, rapid and prolonged activation of AKT kinase during RH-1 treatment was found, and it proved to be antiapoptotic kinase in our model system. Therefore, we identified that different and opposite cell death regulating signaling pathways, which may counteract one another, are induced in cancer cells during chemotherapeutic RH-1 treatment.

  19. Synthesis and stability test of radioimmunoconjugate 177Lu-DOTA-F(ab′2-trastuzumab for theranostic agent of HER2 positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Hermanto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of trastuzumab as intact IgG labeling radionuclide for HER2 positive breast cancer theranostic agent is not ideal because it is slowly eliminated from the blood and normal tissues resulting in low tumor/blood (T/B and tumor/normal tissue (T/NT ratios. To overcome this limitation, we developed the trastuzumab F(ab′2 fragments and radiolabeling of the fragments by β and γ-particle of Lutetium-177. F(ab2 fragments were produced by digestion of trastuzumab IgG (Herceptin with pepsin for 18 h at 37 °C. The F(ab′2 fragment fractionated in PD-10 column, followed by the conjugation with 2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA as a metal chelator and radiolabeling with 177LuCl3. Molecular weight of fragments was calculated by LCMS (Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy and the radiochemical purity was evaluated by ITLC-SG (Instan Thin Layer Chromatography. Our study showed that the purity of F(ab′2 fragment generated by PD-10 fractions was >98% and the molecular weight of F(ab′2 was 98.35 kDa. The average numbers of pSCN-Bn-DOTA chelates per antibody fragment were 5.03 ± 1.5 and the optimum conjugation reactions was performed at molar ratio 20:1 (chelator to antibody. The stability test of the radioimmunoconjugate in the human serum albumin (HSA at 37 °C showed the radiochemical purity was 91.96 ± 0.26% after 96 h storage. This indicated that the radioimmunoconjugate is relatively stable when applied to the human body's physiological condition.

  20. Natural cures for breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munazza Shareef

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, herbs and plants have been used for medicinal purposes and as food as well. This review concerns about different types of plants that retain the immune stimulating and anti-tumor properties. Large variety of active phytochemicals such as carotenoids, flavonoids, ligands, polyphenolics, terpenoids, sulfides, lignans and plant sterols has been identified in different types of herbs. These phytochemicals have different mechanisms of action. They either stimulate the protective enzyme like glutathione transferase or prevent the cell proliferation. This review has centered on the biochemical properties of Allium sativum, Echinacea, Curcuma longa, Arctium lappa, Camellia sinensis, Panax ginseng and Flax seed. Extracts and juices of Withania somnifera, Amoora rohituka, Dysoxylum binectariferum and Vaccinium macrocarpon, respectively also used as anti-breast cancer. The volatile oils and extracts of these herbs and plants inhibit the synthesis of mevalonate that lessen the tumor growth and cholesterol synthesis.

  1. Cruciferous Vegetables and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Inflammation Common Cancer Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cruciferous Vegetables and Cancer Prevention On This Page What are ...

  2. Restoring Lost Anti-HER-2 Th1 Immunity in Breast Cancer: A Crucial Role for Th1 Cytokines in Therapy and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Nadia F; Lee, M Catherine; De La Cruz, Lucy M; Rosemblit, Cinthia; Czerniecki, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    The ErbB/B2 (HER-2/neu) oncogene family plays a critical role in the development and metastatic spread of several tumor types including breast, ovarian and gastric cancer. In breast cancer, HER-2/neu is expressed in early disease development in a large percentage of DCIS lesions and its expression is associated with an increased risk of invasion and recurrence. Targeting HER-2 with antibodies such as trastuzumab or pertuzumab has improved survival, but patients with more extensive disease may develop resistance to therapy. Interestingly, response to HER-2 targeted therapies correlates with presence of immune response genes in the breast. Th1 cell production of the cytokines interferon gamma (IFNγ) and TNFα can enhance MHC class I expression, PD-L1 expression, augment apoptosis and tumor senescence, and enhances growth inhibition of many anti-breast cancer agents, including anti-estrogens and HER-2 targeted therapies. Recently, we have identified that a loss of anti-HER-2 CD4 Th1 in peripheral blood occurs during breast tumorigenesis and is dramatically diminished, even in Stage I breast cancers. The loss of anti-HER-2 Th1 response is specific and not readily reversed by standard therapies. In fact, this loss of anti-HER-2 Th1 response in peripheral blood correlates with lack of complete response to neoadjuvant therapy and diminished disease-free survival. This defect can be restored with HER-2 vaccinations in both DCIS and IBC. Correcting the anti-HER-2 Th1 response may have significant impact in improving response to HER-2 targeted therapies. Development of immune monitoring systems for anti-HER-2 Th1 to identify patients at risk for recurrence could be critical to improving outcomes, since the anti-HER-2 Th1 response can be restored by vaccination. Correction of the cellular immune response against HER-2 may prevent recurrence in high-risk patients with DCIS and IBC at risk of developing new or recurrent breast cancer.

  3. Restoring Lost Anti-HER-2 Th1 Immunity in Breast Cancer: A Crucial Role for Th1 Cytokines in Therapy and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia F Nocera

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ErbB/B2 (HER-2/neu oncogene family plays a critical role in the development and metastatic spread of several tumor types including breast, ovarian and gastric cancer. In breast cancer, HER-2/neu is expressed in early disease development in a large percentage of DCIS lesions and its expression is associated with an increased risk of invasion and recurrence. Targeting HER-2 with antibodies such as trastuzumab or pertuzumab has improved survival, but patients with more extensive disease may develop resistance to therapy. Interestingly, response to HER-2 targeted therapies correlates with presence of immune response genes in the breast. Th1 cell production of the cytokines interferon gamma (IFNγ and TNFα can enhance MHC class I expression, PD1L expression, augment apoptosis and tumor senescence, and enhances growth inhibition of many anti-breast cancer agents, including anti-estrogens and HER-2 targeted therapies. Recently, we have identified that a loss of anti-HER-2 CD4 Th1 in peripheral blood occurs during breast tumorigenesis and is dramatically diminished, even in Stage I breast cancers. The loss of anti-HER-2 Th1 response is specific and not readily reversed by standard therapies. In fact, this loss of anti-HER-2 Th1 response in peripheral blood correlates with lack of complete response to neoadjuvant therapy and diminished disease-free survival. This defect can be restored with HER-2 vaccinations in both DCIS and IBC. Correcting the anti-HER-2 Th1 response may have significant impact in improving response to HER-2 targeted therapies. Development of immune monitoring systems for anti-HER-2 Th1 to identify patients at risk for recurrence could be critical to improving outcomes, since the anti-HER-2 Th1 response can be restored by vaccination. Correction of the cellular immune response against HER-2 may prevent recurrence in high-risk patients with DCIS and IBC at risk of developing new or recurrent breast cancer.

  4. Improved evaluation of antivascular cancer therapy using constrained tracer-kinetic modeling for multi-agent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, Stefanie; Jacobs, Igor; Lok, Jasper; Peters, Johannes; Bussink, Johan; Hoeben, Freek J. M.; Keizer, Henk; Janssen, Henk M.; Nicolay, Klaas; Schabel, Matthias; Strijkers, Gustav

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a promising technique for assessing the response of tumor vasculature to anti-vascular therapies. Multi-agent DCE-MRI employs a combination of low and high molecular weight contrast agents, which potentially improves the accuracy of estimation of tumor

  5. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Ignatiadis

    Full Text Available EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC in combination with paclitaxel.HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2 every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (% reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI estimated Gadolinium (Gd enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated.Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001 for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04.The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment, especially in ER-/HER2

  6. Pre-clinical efficacy and synergistic potential of the MDM2-p53 antagonists, Nutlin-3 and RG7388, as single agents and in combined treatment with cisplatin in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjirband, Maryam; Edmondson, Richard J.; Lunec, John

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related female deaths. Due to serious side effects, relapse and resistance to standard chemotherapy, better and more targeted approaches are required. Mutation of the TP53 gene accounts for 50% of all human cancers. In the remaining malignancies, non-genotoxic activation of wild-type p53 by small molecule inhibition of the MDM2-p53 binding interaction is a promising therapeutic strategy. Proof of concept was established with the cis-imidazoline Nutlin-3, leading to the development of RG7388 and other compounds currently in early phase clinical trials. This preclinical study evaluated the effect of Nutlin-3 and RG7388 as single agents and in combination with cisplatin in a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines. Median-drug-effect analysis showed Nutlin-3 or RG7388 combination with cisplatin was additive to, or synergistic in a p53-dependent manner, resulting in increased p53 activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, associated with increased p21WAF1 protein and/or caspase-3/7 activity compared to cisplatin alone. Although MDM2 inhibition activated the expression of p53-dependent DNA repair genes, the growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects of p53 dominated the response. These data indicate that combination treatment with MDM2 inhibitors and cisplatin has synergistic potential for the treatment of ovarian cancer, dependent on cell genotype. PMID:27223080

  7. Risk of adverse events with the addition of targeted agents to endocrine therapy in patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Samuel; Bruzzone, Marco; Ceppi, Marcello; Maurer, Christian; Ponde, Noam Falbel; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Viglietti, Giulia; Del Mastro, Lucia; Prady, Catherine; de Azambuja, Evandro; Lambertini, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    Combining targeted agents and endocrine therapy (ET) improves outcomes in hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients but increases the risk of adverse events (AEs). This meta-analysis aims to estimate the comparative risk of AEs with ET in addition to targeted agents in this setting. A systematic literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and conference proceedings up to July 17th 2017 was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials investigating ET with or without CDK4/6, mTOR, PI3K inhibitors and anti-HER2 agents. We calculated summary risk estimates (odds ratio, OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each AE within each class of targeted agents for each trial, and pooled analysis using the random and fixed effect models. Sixteen studies (n=8529 patients) were included. The addition of targeted agents to ET was associated with a significant higher risk of grade 3-4 AEs: OR 2.86 (95% CI 2.49-3.27) for CDK4/6 inhibitors, 1.88 (95% CI 1.39-2.53) for mTOR inhibitors, 2.05 (95% CI 1.63-2.58) for PI3K inhibitors, and 2.48 (95% CI 1.09-5.66) for anti-HER2 agents. The highest class-specific risks were neutropenia grade 3-4 for CDK4/6 inhibitors (OR 40.77; 95% CI 19.52-85.19), stomatitis grade 3-4 for mTOR inhibitors (OR 11.92; 95% CI 3.68-38.57), hyperglycemia grade 3-4 for PI3K inhibitors (OR 40.93; 95% CI 10.08-166.22) and diarrhea for anti-HER2 agents (OR 9.93; 95% CI 4.71-20.95). Adding targeted agents to ET is associated with a significant increased risk of AEs. The risk of developing different AEs varies largely according to the type of agent used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  9. Trading Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Wellman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Automated trading in electronic markets is one of the most common and consequential applications of autonomous software agents. Design of effective trading strategies requires thorough understanding of how market mechanisms operate, and appreciation of strategic issues that commonly manifest in trading scenarios. Drawing on research in auction theory and artificial intelligence, this book presents core principles of strategic reasoning that apply to market situations. The author illustrates trading strategy choices through examples of concrete market environments, such as eBay, as well as abst

  10. Spions as nano-theranostics agents

    CERN Document Server

    Zarepour, Atefeh; Khosravi, Arezoo

    2017-01-01

    This Brief introduces SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs), the different synthesis approaches, their applications in the field of diagnostics and treatment and finally as theranostic agents in cancer.

  11. On the need to assess cancer risk in populations environmentally and occupationally exposed to virus and chemical agents in developing countries Sobre a necessidade de avaliação dos riscos de câncer em populações dos países em desenvolvimento expostas ambiental e ocupacionalmente a vírus e agentes químicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Franco Netto

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence exists that exposure to poultry oncogenic viruses may produce elevated cancer mortality in human populations, particularly excesses of cancer of lung and excesses of cancer of lymphopoietic tissues. To date, this potential risk is unknown in populations from the developing countries. This paper suggests the need to assess cancer risk in populations of developing countries with reported environmental exposure to chicken meat products and eggs; the need to assess risk of cancer in populations inoculated with vaccines from infected chicken embryos; and the need to assess risk of cancer in occupational populations highly exposed to poultry oncogenic viruses, and with potential concurrent exposure to chemical agents known or suspected to be carcinogens.Existe evidência de que exposição a vírus oncogênicos de aves possa produzir elevada mortalidade de câncer em populações humanas, havendo particularmente excesso de câncer de pulmão e dos sistemas linfáticos e hemopoiéticos. Até o momento, esse risco potencial é desconhecido em populações dos países em desenvolvimento. Este manuscrito sugere a necessidade de avaliar o risco de câncer em populações dos países em desenvolvimento com sabida exposição a produtos avícolas e ovos; a necessidade de avaliar o risco de câncer em populações que foram inoculadas com vacinas desenvolvidas em embriões de aves contaminadas e a necessidade de avaliar o risco de câncer em populações de trabalhadores com grande exposição a vírus oncogênico de aves, e com potencial exposição simultânea a agentes químicos que são reconhecidos ou suspeitos carcinógenos.

  12. ICAM-1-Targeted, Lcn2 siRNA-Encapsulating Liposomes are Potent Anti-angiogenic Agents for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Yang, Jiang; Jia, Di; Moses, Marsha A; Auguste, Debra T

    2016-01-01

    Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is a promising therapeutic target as well as a potential diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer. It has been previously shown to promote breast cancer progression by inducing the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cells as well as by enhancing angiogenesis. Lcn2 levels in urine and tissue samples of breast cancer patients has also been correlated with breast cancer status and poor patient prognosis. In this study, we have engineered a novel liposomal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system to target triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) via a recently identified molecular target, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). This ICAM-1-targeted, Lcn2 siRNA- encapsulating liposome (ICAM-Lcn2-LP) binds human TNBC MDA-MB-231cells significantly stronger than non-neoplastic MCF-10A cells. Efficient Lcn2 knockdown by ICAM-Lcn2-LPs led to a significant reduction in the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from MDA-MB-231 cells, which, in turn, led to reduced angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Angiogenesis (neovascularization) is a requirement for solid tumor growth and progression, and its inhibition is an important therapeutic strategy for human cancers. Our results indicate that a tumor-specific strategy such as the TNBC-targeted, anti-angiogenic therapeutic approach developed here, may be clinically useful in inhibiting TNBC progression.

  13. Radioprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  14. Utility of a prototype liposomal contrast agent for x-ray imaging of breast cancer: a proof of concept using micro-CT in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, C. T.; Samei, E.; Ghaghada, K.; Saunders, R.; Yuan, H.; Qi, Y.; Hedlund, L. W.; Mukundan, S.

    2008-03-01

    Imaging tumor angiogenesis in small animals is extremely challenging due to the size of the tumor vessels. Consequently, both dedicated small animal imaging systems and specialized intravascular contrast agents are required. The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a liposomal contrast agent for high-resolution micro-CT imaging of breast tumors in small animals. A liposomal blood pool agent encapsulating iodine with a concentration of 65.5 mg/ml was used with a Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy (CIVM) prototype micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system to image the R3230AC mammary carcinoma implanted in rats. The animals were injected with equivalent volume doses (0.02 ml/kg) of contrast agent. Micro-CT with the liposomal blood pool contrast agent ensured a signal difference between the blood and the muscle higher than 450 HU allowing the visualization of the tumors 3D vascular architecture in exquisite detail at 100-micron resolution. The micro-CT data correlated well with the histological examination of tumor tissue. We also studied the ability to detect vascular enhancement with limited angle based reconstruction, i.e. tomosynthesis. Tumor volumes and their regional vascular percentage were estimated. This imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and be the basis for evaluating anti-angiogenic therapies.

  15. Frondoside A from sea cucumber and nymphaeols from Okinawa propolis: Natural anti-cancer agents that selectively inhibit PAK1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Tawata, Shinkichi; Maruta, Hiroshi

    2017-05-30

    A sulfated saponin called "Frondoside A" (FRA) from sea cucumber and ingredients from Okinawa propolis (OP) have been previously shown to suppress the PAK1-dependent growth of A549 lung cancer as well as pancreatic cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism underlying their anti-cancer action still remains to be clarified. In this study, for the first time, we found that both FRA and OP directly inhibit PAK1 in vitro in a selective manner (far more effectively than two other oncogenic kinases, LIMK and AKT). Furthermore, at least two major anti-cancer ingredients of OP, nymphaeols A and C, also directly inhibit PAK1 in vitro in a selective manner. To the best of our knowledge, FRA is the first marine compound that selectively inhibits PAK1. Likewise, these nymphaeols are the first propolis ingredients that selectively inhibit PAK1.

  16. Human murine mammary tumour virus-like agents are genetically distinct from endogenous retroviruses and are not detectable in breast cancer cell lines or biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mant, Christine; Gillett, Cheryl; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Cason, John

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that a human murine mammary tumour virus (MMTV)-like virus (HMLV), which may be an endogenous human retrovirus (HERV), occurs in the human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF-7 and, in 38% of human breast cancer biopsies. As the aetiology of most breast cancers remains unknown, it is important to verify these observations in differing breast cancer populations worldwide. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic relationships between HMLVs, MMTVs, and HERVs, and to investigate the association between HMLVs and breast cancer biopsies from South London, UK. Phylogenetic analyses of the env/pol region indicated that HMLVs are indistinct from MMTVs, and that MMTVS/HMLVs exhibit only low sequence homologies with HERVs. A search of the human genome confirmed that HMLVs are not endogenous. Using MMTV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers described previously, we amplified DNA from all cell lines except MCF-7 and from 7 of 44 (16%) breast cancer biopsies. A restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was designed to distinguish between HMLVs and MMTVs, and upon analyses, PCR amplicons appeared to be HMLVs. To confirm these findings, amplicons from the T47D cell line and from four randomly selected breast cancer patients were sequenced. Of 106 DNA sequences obtained, 103 were homologous with a short arm of human chromosome (Chr) 3 (3p13), two with Chr 4, and one with Chr 8. None of the sequences exhibited significant nucleotide homology with MMTVs, HMLVs, or with HERVs (all <50%). Thus, we conclude that (i) HMLVs are integral members of the MMTV family; (ii) MMTVs/HMLVs are genetically distinct from HERVs; (iii) MMTV/HMLV DNA is not present in human breast cancer cell lines or clinical biopsies in our locality

  17. Immunological effects of hypomethylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Katherine E; Goswami, Meghali; Hourigan, Christopher S; Oetjen, Karolyn A

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic changes resulting from aberrant methylation patterns are a recurrent observation in hematologic malignancies. Hypomethylating agents have a well-established role in the management of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia. In addition to the direct effects of hypomethylating agents on cancer cells, there are several lines of evidence indicating a role for immune-mediated anti-tumor benefits from hypomethylating therapy. Areas covered: We reviewed the clinical and basic science literature for the effects of hypomethylating agents, including the most commonly utilized therapeutics azacitidine and decitabine, on immune cell subsets. We summarized the effects of hypomethylating agents on the frequency and function of natural killer cells, T cells, and dendritic cells. In particular, we highlight the effects of hypomethylating agents on expression of immune checkpoint inhibitors, leukemia-associated antigens, and endogenous retroviral elements. Expert commentary: In vitro and ex vivo studies indicate mixed effects on the function of natural killer, dendritic cells and T cells following treatment with hypomethylating agents. Clinical correlates of immune function have suggested that hypomethylating agents have immunomodulatory functions with the potential to synergize with immune checkpoint therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancy, and has become an active area of clinical research.

  18. Occupational Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... personal habits such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption The presence of certain medical conditions or past medical treatments, including chemotherapy, radiation treatment, or some immune-system suppressing drugs. Exposure to cancer-causing agents in the environment ( ...

  19. Cancer nanotheranostics

    CERN Document Server

    Gopinath, P; Matai, Ishita; Bhushan, Bharat; Malwal, Deepika; Sachdev, Abhay; Dubey, Poornima

    2015-01-01

    This Brief provides a clear insight of the recent advances in the field of cancer theranostics with special emphasis upon nano scale carrier molecules (polymeric, protein and lipid based) and imaging agents (organic and inorganic).

  20. Comparative biodistribution of imaging agents for in vivo molecular profiling of disseminated prostate cancer in mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts: focus on 111In- and 125I-labeled anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal trastuzumab and ABY-025 Affibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, Jennie; Sandström, Mattias; Wester, Kenneth; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) overexpression supports proliferation of androgen-independent prostate cancer (PC). Radionuclide molecular imaging of HER2 expression in disseminated PC would aid in the selection of patients who are likely responders to HER2 targeting therapy. In this study, we evaluated whether ABY-025 Affibody molecule, a small (∼ 7-kDa) HER2-binding scaffold protein, produces superior tumor-to-nontumor ratios compared with those obtained through the use of radiolabeled humanized anti-HER2 antibody, trastuzumab. The influence of 111 In vs. 125 I radiolabel was evaluated for both tracers. Methods: ABY-025 was labeled with 111 In using 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid chelator, site-specifically coupled to the C-terminus via the maleimido derivative. Trastuzumab was labeled with 111 In using a CHX-A″ diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) chelator. An indirect radioiodination with [ 125 I]-N-succinimidyl-para-iodobenzoate was used for both targeting proteins. Biodistribution of all labeled targeting proteins was evaluated in mice bearing DU-145 PC xenografts. Results: The use of residualizing 111 In-label facilitated better tumor uptake and better tumor-to-nontumor ratios for both targeting agents. [ 111 In]-ABY-025 provided tumor uptake of 7.1±0.8% injected dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g) and tumor-to-blood ratio of 47±13 already at 6 h postinjection. The maximum tumor-to-nontumor ratios with [ 111 In]-CHX-DTPA-trastuzumab were achieved at 72 h postinjection, whereas tumor uptake was 11±4% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio was 18±7. The biodistribution data were confirmed with gamma-camera imaging. Conclusions: Radiolabeled ABY-025 Affibody molecule provides higher contrast in imaging of HER2-expressing PC xenografts than radiolabeled trastuzumab. Residualizing radiometal label for ABY-025 provides better contrast in imaging of HER2-expressing PC xenografts than nonresidualizing

  1. Agent Building Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    AgentBuilder is a software component developed under an SBIR contract between Reticular Systems, Inc., and Goddard Space Flight Center. AgentBuilder allows software developers without experience in intelligent agent technologies to easily build software applications using intelligent agents. Agents are components of software that will perform tasks automatically, with no intervention or command from a user. AgentBuilder reduces the time and cost of developing agent systems and provides a simple mechanism for implementing high-performance agent systems.

  2. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  3. Double-blind randomized phase III study comparing a mixture of natural agents versus placebo in the prevention of acute mucositis during chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marucci, Laura; Farneti, Alessia; Di Ridolfi, Paolo; Pinnaro, Paola; Pellini, Raul; Giannarelli, Diana; Vici, Patrizia; Conte, Mario; Landoni, Valeria; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    There is no widely accepted intervention in the prevention of acute mucositis during chemoradiotherapy for head and neck carcinoma. In the present double-blind study, we tested 4 natural agents, propolis, aloe vera, calendula, and chamomile versus placebo. Patients undergoing concomitant chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were given natural agent or matched placebo; grade 3 mucositis on physical examination according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 was the primary endpoint. Various covariates were tested at logistic regression, including the individual amount of mucosa receiving at least 9.5 Gy per week (V9.5w). One hundred seven patients were randomized from January 2011 to July 2014, and 104 were assessable (51%-49% were assigned to the placebo group and 53%-51% were assigned to the natural agent). Overall, 61 patients developed peak grade 3 mucositis with no difference between arms (P = .65). Conversely, V9.5w (P = .007) and primary site (P = .037) were independent predictors. The selected natural agents do not prevent mucositis, whereas the role of V9.5w is confirmed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dual-energy micro-CT functional imaging of primary lung cancer in mice using gold and iodine nanoparticle contrast agents: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Jeffrey R; Clark, Darin P; Moding, Everett J; Ghaghada, Ketan; Kirsch, David G; West, Jennifer L; Badea, Cristian T

    2014-01-01

    To provide additional functional information for tumor characterization, we investigated the use of dual-energy computed tomography for imaging murine lung tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability were quantified using gold and iodine nanoparticles. This approach was compared with a single contrast agent/single-energy CT method. Ex vivo validation studies were performed to demonstrate the accuracy of in vivo contrast agent quantification by CT. Primary lung tumors were generated in LSL-Kras(G12D); p53(FL/FL) mice. Gold nanoparticles were injected, followed by iodine nanoparticles two days later. The gold accumulated in tumors, while the iodine provided intravascular contrast. Three dual-energy CT scans were performed-two for the single contrast agent method and one for the dual contrast agent method. Gold and iodine concentrations in each scan were calculated using a dual-energy decomposition. For each method, the tumor fractional blood volume was calculated based on iodine concentration, and tumor vascular permeability was estimated based on accumulated gold concentration. For validation, the CT-derived measurements were compared with histology and inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy measurements of gold concentrations in tissues. Dual-energy CT enabled in vivo separation of gold and iodine contrast agents and showed uptake of gold nanoparticles in the spleen, liver, and tumors. The tumor fractional blood volume measurements determined from the two imaging methods were in agreement, and a high correlation (R(2) = 0.81) was found between measured fractional blood volume and histology-derived microvascular density. Vascular permeability measurements obtained from the two imaging methods agreed well with ex vivo measurements. Dual-energy CT using two types of nanoparticles is equivalent to the single nanoparticle method, but allows for measurement of fractional blood volume and permeability with a single scan. As confirmed by ex

  5. Competing agents in agent-mediated institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Plaza, Enric; Arcos, Josep Ll.; Noriega, Pablo; Sierra, Carles

    1998-01-01

    Social processes and agent interaction always take place in a specific context. A school of thought in social studies analyses them in the framework of institutions. We present in this paper the notion of agentmediated institutions and show how it is relevant for multi-agent systems (MAS) in general and, more specifically, for MAS that include human agents and software agents involved in socioeconomic interactions. We show how the social interactions of human and software agents taking place ...

  6. A new chemotherapy agent-free theranostic system composed of graphene oxide nano-complex and aptamers for treatment of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni, Amirhossein; Yazdian-Robati, Rezvan; Hashemitabar, Shirin; Ramezani, Mohammad; Ramezani, Pouria; Abnous, Khalil; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-06-30

    The common cancer treatment strategies like chemotherapy and radiotherapy are nonspecific and can trigger severe side effects by damaging normal cells. So, targeted cancer therapies, such as apoptosis induction, have attracted great attention in recent years. In this project, two nano-complexes, MUC1 aptamer-NAS-24 aptamer-Graphene oxide (GO) and MUC1 aptamer-Cytochrome C aptamer-GO, were designed to induce cell programmed death in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells (breast cancer cell lines) and to verify the level of apoptosis in both cell lines. MUC1 aptamer was a molecular recognition probe that led the internalization of two nano-complexes into MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells (MUC1 positive cells) but not into HepG2 cell (liver cancer cell line, MUC1 negative cells). The apoptosis induction relied on binding of NAS-24 aptamer to its target, vimentin, in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 (target cells) with different levels of vimentin content. The function of first nano-complex was confirmed by binding of FAM-labeled cytochrome C aptamer to its target (cytochrome C) which was released from mitochondria, based on the function of the first nano-complex. Fluorometric analysis and gel retardation assay proved the formation of nano-complexes. The results of flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy indicated efficient apoptosis induction just in target cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells) but not in non-target cells (HepG2 cell). The results of MTT assay also confirmed cell death process. Overall, our results proved excellent targeted apoptosis in breast cancer cells by designed nano-complexes which can be applied as an efficient cancer therapy method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... example, in Japan, there are many cases of stomach cancer . But in the United States, this type of ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ...

  8. First report of anti-cancer agent, lapachol producing endophyte, Aspergillus niger of Tabebuia argentea and its in vitro cytotoxicity assays

    OpenAIRE

    Channabasava; Melappa Govindappa

    2014-01-01

    All parts of Tabebuia argentia were used for isolation and identified the lapachol producing endophytes were used for evaluation of in vitro cytotoxicity (antimitotic, antiproliferative, determination of cell viability, DNA fragmentation). Five endophytes (leaf endophytes, Alternaria alternata, Alternaria sp., Aspegerillus niger, Penicillium sp. and the bark endophyte, A. alternata) are able to produce potent anticancer agent lapachol. The 3rd and 4th fractions of endophytic extracts (A. nige...

  9. Comparison of single-agent chemotherapy and targeted therapy to first-line treatment in patients aged 80 years and older with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang QQ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Qianqian Zhang,1 Zhehai Wang,2 Jun Guo,2 Liyan Liu,2 Xiao Han,2 Minmin Li,1 Shu Fang,1 Xiang Bi,1 Ning Tang,1 Yang Liu1 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, 2Department of Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare single-agent chemotherapy with targeted therapy in initial treatment and to explore a better choice of treatment for patients aged 80 years and older with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC.Patients and methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for 136 patients aged 80 years and older who were cytopathologically diagnosed and staged as advanced (stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. The patient population was divided into two treatment groups: 78 patients were allocated to the chemotherapy group (group A, pemetrexed or gemcitabine or docetaxel as a single agent, and 60 patients were allocated to another group and received epidermal growth factor-receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (group B, erlotinib or gefitinib as a single agent. The primary end points were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS, and the secondary end points were response rate, disease-control rate, safety, and quality of life.Results: In group A and group B, respectively, the median PFS was 2 versus 4 months (P=0.013, and the median OS was 8 versus 16 months (P=0.025. The 1- and 2-year survival rates of the two groups were 23.7% (group A, 18 of 76 versus 76.7% (group B, 46 of 60 and 13.2% (group A, ten of 76 versus 10% (group B, six of 60, respectively. The response rate and disease-control rate were 28.9% versus 36.7% (P=0.39 and 57.9% versus 76.7% (P=0.022 in group A and group B, respectively.Conclusion: Elders aged 80 years and over with advanced NSCLC in group B had longer PFS and OS compared with group A. It was well tolerated in group B because of the mild adverse effects. Targeted therapy can be

  10. Efficacy and Safety Assessment of the Addition of Bevacizumab to Adjuvant Therapy Agents in Cancer Patients : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, Fariba; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; de Boer, Anthonius; Liu, Geoffrey; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in the adjuvant cancer therapy setting within different subset of patients. METHODS & DESIGN/ RESULTS: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane and Clinical trials.gov databases were searched for English language studies of randomized controlled trials

  11. Efficacy and safety assessment of the addition of bevacizumab to adjuvant therapy agents in cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, Fariba; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; De Boer, Anthonius; Liu, Geoffrey; Maitland-Van Der Zee, Anke H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in the adjuvant cancer therapy setting within different subset of patients. Methods & Design/Results: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane and Clinical trials.gov databases were searched for English language studies of randomized controlled trials

  12. Single agent- and combination treatment with two targeted suicide gene therapy systems is effective in chemoresistant small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe R; Christensen, Camilla L; Sehested, Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional targeted suicide gene (SG) therapy driven by the insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) promoter makes it possible to target suicide toxin production and cytotoxicity exclusively to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells and tumors. It remains to be determined whether acquired chemoresistance......, as observed in the majority of SCLC patients, desensitizes SCLC cells to INSM1 promoter-driven SG therapy....

  13. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin and Fulvestrant (Falsodex, as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin and fulvestrant (falsodex either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue.Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined.Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P0.05. Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05, and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05 and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1 expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a single agent.We demonstrate that the administration of trastuzumab and fulvestrant in combination results in positive synergistic effects on both, ZR-75-1 and BT-474 cell lines. This combinatorial approach is

  14. Paclitaxel-loaded iron platinum stealth immunomicelles are potent MRI imaging agents that prevent prostate cancer growth in a PSMA-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor RM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Robert M Taylor,1,2 Laurel O Sillerud1,31Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2New Mexico Cancer Nanoscience and Microsystems Training Center, 3UNM Cancer Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USABackground and methods: Problems with the clinical management of prostate cancer include the lack of both specific detection and efficient therapeutic intervention. We report the encapsulation of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs and paclitaxel in a mixture of polyethyleneglycolated, fluorescent, and biotin-functionalized phospholipids to create multifunctional SIPP-PTX micelles (SPMs that were conjugated to an antibody against prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA for the specific targeting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and treatment of human prostate cancer xenografts in mice.Results: SPMs were 45.4 ± 24.9 nm in diameter and composed of 160.7 ± 22.9 µg/mL iron, 247.0 ± 33.4 µg/mL platinum, and 702.6 ± 206.0 µg/mL paclitaxel. Drug release measurements showed that, at 37°C, half of the paclitaxel was released in 30.2 hours in serum and two times faster in saline. Binding assays suggested that PSMA-targeted SPMs specifically bound to C4-2 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and released paclitaxel into the cells. In vitro, paclitaxel was 2.2 and 1.6 times more cytotoxic than SPMs to C4-2 cells at 24 and 48 hours of incubation, respectively. After 72 hours of incubation, paclitaxel and SPMs were equally cytotoxic. SPMs had MRI transverse relaxivities of 389 ± 15.5 Hz/mM iron, and SIPP micelles with and without drug caused MRI contrast enhancement in vivo.Conclusion: Only PSMA-targeted SPMs and paclitaxel significantly prevented growth of C4-2 prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice. Furthermore, mice injected with PSMA-targeted SPMs showed significantly more paclitaxel and platinum in tumors, compared with nontargeted SPM-injected and paclitaxel-injected mice.Keywords: iron platinum, MRI

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new C-12(α/β)-(N-) sulfamoyl-phenylamino-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives as potent anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandanur, Sai Giridhar Sarma; Nanduri, Srinivas; Golakoti, Nageswara Rao

    2017-07-01

    Andrographolide, the major diterpenoidal constituent of Andrographis paniculata (Acanthaceae) and its derivatives have been reported to possess plethora of biological properties including potent anti-cancer activity. In this work, synthesis and in-vitro anti-cancer evaluation of new C-12-substituted aryl amino 14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives (III a-f) are reported. The substitutions include various sulfonamide moieties -SO 2 -NH-R 1 . The new derivatives (III a-e) exhibited improved cytotoxicity (GI 50 , TGI and LC 50 ) compared to andrographolide (I) and the corresponding 3,14,19-O-triacetyl andrographolide (II) when evaluated against 60 NCI cell line panel. Compounds III c and III e are found to be non-toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) cells compared to reference drug THZ-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of morphological changes in breast cancer cells MCF-7 under the action of pro-apoptotic agents with laser modulation interference microscope MIM-340

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebogatikov, V.; Nikitiuk, A.; Konysheva, A.; Ignatyev, P.; Grishko, V.; Naimark, O.

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy is a new method to measure and evaluate the microlevel processes characterized by the high resolution and providing ample opportunities to quantitatively analyze various parameters, including specimens from biological matter. In this study, a laser interference microscope was used to evaluate the state of cancer cells (living and apoptotic). Apoptotic cancer cells were obtained by treatment of MCF-7 cells with the use of betulin-based α-bromomethyl ketone (BMK) derivative. When using the microscope, the main differences in the morphometric parameters of living and apoptotic cells such as height, diameter, perimeter, area and volume were appraised. The criteria that can be used as markers of apoptosis activation were identified.

  17. Blocking heme oxygenase-1 by zinc protoporphyrin reduces tumor hypoxia-mediated VEGF release and inhibits tumor angiogenesis as a potential therapeutic agent against colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chun-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Yang, Hao-Jhih; Chang, Chun-Chao; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Chang, Jungshan; Ho, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoxia in tumor niche is one of important factors to start regeneration of blood vessels, leading to increase survival, proliferation, and invasion in cancer cells. Under hypoxia microenvironment, furthermore, steadily increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) is observed, and can increase vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and promote angiogenesis. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, is potential to inhibit tumor proliferation a...

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor FR901228 enhances the antitumor effect of telomerase-specific replication-selective adenoviral agent OBP-301 in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takanori; Hioki, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Toshiya; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Taki, Masaki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Endo, Yoshikatsu; Urata, Yasuo; Tanaka, Noriaki; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2006-02-01

    Replication-competent oncolytic viruses are being developed for human cancer therapy. We previously reported that an attenuated adenovirus OBP-301 (Telomelysin), in which the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter element drives expression of E1A and E1B genes linked with an internal ribosome entry site, could replicate in and causes selective lysis of human cancer cells. Infection efficiency in target cancer cells is the most important factor that predicts the antitumor effects of OBP-301. The objectives of this study are to examine the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor FR901228 on the level of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression and OBP-301-mediated oncolysis in human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Flow cytometric analysis revealed up-regulated CAR expression in A549 and H460 cells following treatment with 1 ng/ml of FR901228, which was associated with increased infection efficiency as confirmed by replication-deficient beta-galactosidase-expressing adenovirus vector. In contrast, neither CAR expression nor infection efficiency was affected by FR901228 in H1299 cells. To visualize and quantify viral replication in the presence of FR901228, we used OBP-401 (Telomelysin-GFP) that expresses the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter in the E3 region. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that FR901228 increased GFP expression in A549 and H460 cells following OBP-401 infection in a dose-dependent manner, but this effect did not occur in H1299 cells. In addition, OBP-301 and FR901228 demonstrated a synergistic antitumor effect in A549 cells in vitro, as confirmed by isobologram analysis. Our data indicate that FR901228 preferentially increases adenovirus infectivity via up-regulation of CAR expression, leading to a profound oncolytic effect, which may have a significant impact on the outcome of adenovirus-based oncolytic virotherapy.

  19. Cancer nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Hassanzadeh, Parichehr; Fullwood, Isobel; Sothi, Sharmila; Aldulaimi, David

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the engineering of functional systems at the molecular scale which may exert a revolutionary impact on cancer diagnosis and therapy. Nanotechnology is being applied to cancer in two broad areas: i) the development of nanovectors such as nanoparticles which can be loaded with drugs or imaging agents and then targeted to tumours, and ii) high-throughput nanosensor devices for detecting the biological signatures of cancer. Combined, such technologies could lead to earlier diagn...

  20. Synthesis and in vitro cytotoxicity of novel C-12 substituted-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives as potent anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandanur, Sai Giridhar Sarma; Golakoti, Nageswara Rao; Nanduri, Srinivas

    2015-12-15

    Andrographolide, the major labdane diterpenoid from Andrographis paniculata has been reported to be cytotoxic against various cancer cells in vitro. Our research efforts led to the discovery of novel 12-phenyl thio and 12-aryl amino-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives (III q and III r) with potent cytotoxic activity, 12-benzyl amino-14-deoxy-andrographolide analogues showing broad range of cytotoxic activity against most of the cell lines and 12-alkyl amino-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives being selective to few cell lines (PC-3 and HOP-92), when the selected analogues were evaluated against 60 human cancer cell line panel at National Cancer Institute (N.C.I.), USA. The SAR (structure activity relationship) studies demonstrated potent activity for the compounds containing the following functionalities at C-12: substituted aryl amino/phenyl thio>benzylamine>alkyl amine. The significant cytotoxic activity observed for compounds III q and III r suggest that these could serve as templates for further optimization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on N,N-di-tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-2-amino pyridine: A potential bioactive agent for lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Asath, R.; Premkumar, R.; Mathavan, T.; Milton Franklin Benial, A.

    2017-09-01

    Potential energy surface scan was performed and the most stable molecular structure of the N,N-di-tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-2-amino pyridine (DBAP) molecule was predicted. The most stable molecular structure of the molecule was optimized using B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set. Anticancer activity of the DBAP molecule was evaluated by molecular docking analysis. The structural parameters and vibrational wavenumbers were calculated for the optimized molecular structure. The experimental and theoretical wavenumbers were assigned and compared. Ultraviolet-Visible spectrum was simulated and validated experimentally. The molecular electrostatic potential surface was simulated and Fukui function calculations were also carried out to investigate the reactive nature of the DBAP molecule. The natural bond orbital analysis was also performed to probe the intramolecular interactions and confirm the bioactivity of the DBAP molecule. The molecular docking analysis reveals the better inhibitory nature of the DBAP molecule against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein which causes lung cancer. Hence, the present study unveils the structural and bioactive nature of the title molecule. The DBAP molecule was identified as a potential inhibitor against the lung cancer which may be useful in further development of drug designing in the treatment of lung cancer.

  2. Agility: Agent - Ility Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Craig

    2002-01-01

    ...., object and web technologies). The objective of the Agility project is to develop an open agent grid architecture populated with scalable, deployable, industrial strength agent grid components, targeting the theme 'agents for the masses...

  3. Mobile Agent Security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansen, Wayne

    1998-01-01

    Mobile agent technology offers a new computing paradigm in which a program, in the form of a software agent, can suspend its execution on a host computer, transfer itself to another agent-enabled host...

  4. Interacting agents in finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Interacting agents in finance represent a behavioural, agent-based approach in which financial markets are viewed as complex adaptive systems consisting of many boundedly rational agents interacting through simple heterogeneous investment strategies, constantly adapting their behaviour in response

  5. Synthesis and stability test of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab as SPECT-MRI molecular imaging agent for diagnosis of HER-2 positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardiani Rahmania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonivasive diagnosis of cancer can be provided by molecular imaging using hybrid modality to obtain better sensitivity, specificity and depiction localization of the disease. In this study, we developed a new molecular imaging agent, radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab in the form of 147Gd-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab, that can be both target-specific radiopharmaceutical in SPECT as well as targeted contrast agent in MRI for the purpose of diagnosis of HER-2 positive breast cancer. 147Gd radionuclide emits γ-rays that can be used in SPECT modality, but because of technical constraint, 147Gd radionuclide was simulated by its radioisotope, 153Gd. Gd-DOTA complex has also been known as good MRI contrast agent. PAMAM G3.0 is useful to concentrate Gd-DOTA compelexes in large quantities, thus minimizing the number of trastuzumab molecules used. Trastuzumab is human monoclonal antibody that can spesifically interact with HER-2. Synthesis of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab was initiated by conjugating DOTA NHS ester ligand with PAMAM G3.0 dendrimer. The DOTA-PAMAM G3.0 produced was conjugated to trastuzumab molecule and labeled with 153Gd. Characterization DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab immunoconjugate was performed using HPLC system equipped with SEC. The formation of immunoconjugate was indicated by the shorter retention time (6.82 min compared to that of trastuzumab (7.06 min. Radiochemical purity of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab was >99% after purification process by PD-10 desalting column. Radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab compound was stable at room temperature and at 2–8 0C as indicated by its radiochemical purity 97.6 ± 0.5%–99.1 ± 0.5% after 144 h storage.

  6. SW480 colorectal cancer cells that naturally express Lgr5 are more sensitive to the most common chemotherapeutic agents than Lgr5-negative SW480 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planutis, Andrius K; Holcombe, Randall F; Planoutene, Marina V; Planoutis, Kiastoutis S

    2015-10-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is a colorectal cancer (CRC) stem cell marker. The role of Lgr5-expressing stem cells in resistance to chemotherapy is controversial. The notion that Lgr5-expressing cells are more chemotherapy resistant is supported by some data; other data do not support this notion. We hypothesized that Lgr5-expressing cells would be more chemotherapy sensitive, as Lgr5 is usually a marker of dividing cells. We tested this hypothesis by exploiting two natural variants of SW480 CRC cells: the less-differentiated Lgr5-expressing floating fraction and the more-differentiated Lgr5-depleted attached fraction. We estimated chemotherapy sensitivity using an XTT Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. We confirmed that the detected chemotherapy sensitivity differences were Lgr5-driven by overexpressing Lgr5. SW480 CRC cells that naturally express Lgr5 are those that are floating, and they are more sensitive to the chemotherapeutic compounds irinotecan (maximum difference approximately two times, 0.0001exception, Lgr5-overexpressing cells did not show this increase in sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil. Remarkably, Lgr5 reduced the number of floating cells two-fold (instead of increasing it, as one would expect from a stemness-determining factor) and slightly increased the number of attached differentiated cells at a significantly high transfection efficiency for these SW480 cells (∼30%). These results suggest that Lgr5, although purported to be a cancer stem cell marker, is not sufficient to promote floating in these colon cancer cells. In conclusion, CRC cells that naturally express Lgr5 are more sensitive to the most commonly used CRC chemotherapeutic compounds than those that are naturally Lgr5 negative.

  7. Temporal and Geographic Variations in the Receipt of Colony-Stimulating Factors and Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents in a Large Retrospective Cohort of Older Women With Breast Cancer From 2000 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)