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Sample records for anti-apoptotic cell natural

  1. Anti-apoptotic signature in thymic squamous cell carcinomas - functional relevance of anti-apoptotic BIRC3 expression in the thymic carcinoma cell line 1889c

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    Bei eHuang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of thymomas and thymic carcinomas (TCs is poorly understood and results of adjuvant therapy are unsatisfactory in case of metastatic disease and tumor recurrence. For these clinical settings, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Recently, limited sequencing efforts revealed that a broad spectrum of genes that play key roles in various common cancers are rarely affected in thymomas and thymic carcinomas, suggesting that other oncogenic principles might be important. This made us re-analyze historic expression data obtained in a spectrum of thymomas and thymic squamous cell carcinomas (TSCC with a custom made cDNA microarray. By cluster analysis, different anti-apoptotic signatures were detected in type B3 thymoma and TSCC, including overexpression of BIRC3 in TSCCs. This was confirmed by qRT-PCR in the original and an independent validation set of tumors. In contrast to several other cancer cell lines, the BIRC3-positive TSCC cell line, 1889c showed spontaneous apoptosis after BIRC3 knock-down. Targeting apoptosis genes is worth testing as therapeutic principle in TSCC.

  2. Evaluation of anti-apoptotic activity of different dietary antioxidants in renal cell carcinoma against hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garg Neeraj K; Mangal Sharad; Sahu Tejram; Mehta Abhinav; Vyas Suresh P; Tyagi Rajeev K

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti-apoptotic and radical scavenging activities of dietary phenolics, namely ascorbic acid, -tocopherol acetate, citric acid, salicylic acid, and estimate H2O2-induced apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma cells. Methods: The intracellular antioxidant potency of antioxidants was investigated. H2O2-induced apoptosis in RCC-26 was assayed with the following parameters: cell viability (% apoptosis), nucleosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, bcl-2 levels and flow cytometery analysis (ROS production evaluation). Results: The anticancer properties of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, - tocopherol acetate, citric acid, salicylic acid with perdurable responses were investigated. It was observed that these antioxidants had protective effect (anti-apoptotic activity) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in renal cell carcinoma (RCC-26) cell line. Conclusions: This study reveals and proves the anticancer properties. However, in cancer cell lines anti-apoptotic activity can indirectly reflect the cancer promoter activity through radicals scavenging, and significantly protect nucleus and bcl-2.

  3. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  4. Nitric oxide induces cell death by regulating anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members.

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    Colleen M Snyder

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway to induce cell death. However, the mechanism by which this pathway is activated in cells exposed to NO is not known. Here we report that BAX and BAK are activated by NO and that cytochrome c is released from the mitochondria. Cells deficient in Bax and Bak or Caspase-9 are completely protected from NO-induced cell death. The individual loss of the BH3-only proteins, Bim, Bid, Puma, Bad or Noxa, or Bid knockdown in Bim(-/-/Puma(-/- MEFs, does not prevent NO-induced cell death. Our data show that the anti-apoptotic protein MCL-1 undergoes ASK1-JNK1 mediated degradation upon exposure to NO, and that cells deficient in either Ask1 or Jnk1 are protected against NO-induced cell death. NO can inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain resulting in an increase in superoxide generation and peroxynitrite formation. However, scavengers of ROS or peroxynitrite do not prevent NO-induced cell death. Collectively, these data indicate that NO degrades MCL-1 through the ASK1-JNK1 axis to induce BAX/BAK-dependent cell death.

  5. Evaluation of anti-apoptotic activity of different dietary antioxidants in renal cell carcinoma against hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garg; Neeraj; K; Mangal; Sharad; Sahu; Tejram; Mehta; Abhinav; Vyas; Suresh; P; Tyagi; Rajeev; K

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the anti-apoptotic and radical scavenging activities of dietary phenolics, namely ascorbic acid,a-tocopherol acetate,citric acid,salicylic acid,and estimate H2O2induced apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma cells.Methods:The intracellular antioxidant potency of antioxidants was investigated.H2O-2-induced apoptosis in RCC-26 was assayed with the following parameters:cell viability(%apoptosis),nucleosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, bcl-2 levels and flow cytometery analysis(ROS production evaluation).Results:Ine anticancer properties of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid,a- tocopherol acetate,citric acid,salicylic acid with perdurable responses were investigated.It was observed that these antioxidants had protective effect(anti-apoptotic activity) against hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) in renal cell carcinoma(RCC-26) cell line.Conclusions:This study reveals and proves the anticancer properties.However,in cancer cell lines anti-apoptotic activity can indirectly reflect the cancer promoter activity through radicals scavenging,and significantly protect nucleus and bcl-2.

  6. Anti-apoptotic Effects of PCP4/PEP19 in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines: A Novel Oncotarget

    OpenAIRE

    HAMADA, Taiji; Souda, Masakazu; Yoshimura, Takuya; Sasaguri, Shoko; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Tasaki, Takashi; Yoshioka, Takako; Ohi, Yasuyo; Yamada, Sohsuke; Tsutsui, Masato; Umekita, Yoshihisa; TANIMOTO, Akihide

    2014-01-01

    The PCP4/PEP19 is a calmodulin-binding anti-apoptotic peptide in neural cells but its potential role in human cancer has largely been unknown. We investigated the expression of PCP4/PEP19 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231 cells, and found that estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF-7 and ER-negative SK-BR-3 cells expressed PCP4/PEP19. In the MCF-7 cells, cell proliferation was estrogen-dependent, and PCP4/PEP19 expression was induced by estrogen. In both cell lines...

  7. Neuroglobin in Breast Cancer Cells: Effect of Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress on Protein Level, Localization, and Anti-Apoptotic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchetti, Marco; Cipolletti, Manuela; Leone, Stefano; Naldini, Antonella; Carraro, Fabio; Giordano, Daniela; Verde, Cinzia; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The over-expression of human neuroglobin (NGB), a heme-protein preferentially expressed in the brain, displays anti-apoptotic effects against hypoxic/ischemic and oxidative stresses enhancing neuron survival. As hypoxic and oxidative stress injury frequently occurs in fast proliferating neoplastic tissues, here, the effect of these stressors on the level, localization, and anti-apoptotic function of NGB in wild type and NGB-stable-silenced MCF-7 breast cancer cells has been assessed. The well-known endogenous NGB inducer 17β-estradiol (E2) has been used as positive control. The median pO2 present in tumor microenvironment of breast cancer patients (i.e., 2% O2) does not affect the NGB level in breast cancer cells, whereas hydrogen peroxide and lead(IV) acetate, which increase intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, enhance the NGB levels outside the mitochondria and still activate apoptosis. However, E2-induced NGB up-regulation in mitochondria completely reverse lead(IV) acetate-induced PARP cleavage. These results indicate that the NGB level could represent a marker of oxidative-stress in MCF-7 breast cancer cells; however, the NGB ability to respond to injuring stimuli by preventing apoptosis requires its re-allocation into the mitochondria. As a whole, present data might lead to a new direction in understanding NGB function in cancer opening new avenues for the therapeutic intervention. PMID:27149623

  8. Cytotoxicity of calotropin is through caspase activation and downregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins in K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Chung; Lu, Mei-Chin; Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Tseng, Hsing-I; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Wu, Yang-Chang; Yang, Pei-Yu

    2009-12-01

    Calotropin is one of cardenolides isolated from milkweed used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries. Whereas calotropin possesses cytotoxicity against several cancer cells, the mechanisms of action remain unclear. We set out to evaluate the cytotoxic mechanism of calotropin on human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. Calotropin inhibited the growth of K562 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner by G(2)/M phase arrest. It upregulated the expression of p27 leading to this arrest by downregulating the G2/M regulatory proteins, cyclins A and B, and by upregulating the cdk inhibitor, p27. Furthermore, it downregulated anti-apoptotic signaling (XIAP and survivin) and survival pathways (p-Akt and NFkappaB), leading to caspase-3 activation which resulted in the induction of apoptosis. In all, calotropin exerted its anticancer activity on K562 cells by modulating the pro-survival signaling that leads to induction of apoptosis.

  9. Anti-apoptotic effects of PCP4/PEP19 in human breast cancer cell lines: a novel oncotarget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Taiji; Souda, Masakazu; Yoshimura, Takuya; Sasaguri, Shoko; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Tasaki, Takashi; Yoshioka, Takako; Ohi, Yasuyo; Yamada, Sohsuke; Tsutsui, Masato; Umekita, Yoshihisa; Tanimoto, Akihide

    2014-08-15

    The PCP4/PEP19 is a calmodulin-binding anti-apoptotic peptide in neural cells but its potential role in human cancer has largely been unknown. We investigated the expression of PCP4/PEP19 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231 cells, and found that estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF-7 and ER-negative SK-BR-3 cells expressed PCP4/PEP19. In the MCF-7 cells, cell proliferation was estrogen-dependent, and PCP4/PEP19 expression was induced by estrogen. In both cell lines, PCP4/PEP19 knockdown induced apoptosis and slightly decreased Akt phosphorylation. Knockdown of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 1 (CaMKK1), resulting in decreased phospho-Akt(Thr308), enhanced apoptosis in SK-BR-3 but not in MCF-7 cells. CaMKK2 knockdown moderately decreased phospho-Akt(Thr308) and increased apoptosis in MCF-7 cells but not in SK-BR-3 cells. These data indicated that PCP4/PEP19 regulates apoptosis but exact mechanism is still unknown. PCP4/PEP19 can therefore potentially serve as independent oncotarget for therapy of PCP4/PEP19-positive breast cancers irrespective of ER expression.

  10. Tuberin and PRAS40 are anti-apoptotic gatekeepers during early human amniotic fluid stem-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Christiane; Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Mikula, Mario; Kramer, Nina; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2012-03-01

    Embryoid bodies (EBs) are three-dimensional multicellular aggregates allowing the in vitro investigation of stem-cell differentiation processes mimicking early embryogenesis. Human amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells harbor high proliferation potential, do not raise the ethical issues of embryonic stem cells, have a lower risk for tumor development, do not need exogenic induction of pluripotency and are chromosomal stable. Starting from a single human AFS cell, EBs can be formed accompanied by the differentiation into cells of all three embryonic germ layers. Here, we report that siRNA-mediated knockdown of the endogenous tuberous sclerosis complex-2 (TSC2) gene product tuberin or of proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa (PRAS40), the two major negative regulators of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), leads to massive apoptotic cell death during EB development of human AFS cells without affecting the endodermal, mesodermal and ectodermal cell differentiation spectrum. Co-knockdown of endogenous mTOR demonstrated these effects to be mTOR-dependent. Our findings prove this enzyme cascade to be an essential anti-apoptotic gatekeeper of stem-cell differentiation during EB formation. These data allow new insights into the regulation of early stem-cell maintenance and differentiation and identify a new role of the tumor suppressor tuberin and the oncogenic protein PRAS40 with the relevance for a more detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of diseases associated with altered activities of these gene products.

  11. Metformin combined with sodium dichloroacetate promotes B leukemic cell death by suppressing anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltan, Rebecca; Rimondi, Erika; Melloni, Elisabetta; Gilli, Paola; Bertolasi, Valerio; Casciano, Fabio; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Zauli, Giorgio; Secchiero, Paola

    2016-04-05

    Metformin and the mitochondrial targeting dichloroacetate (DCA) have recently received attention due to their ability to inhibit anaerobic glycolysis, which renders most cancer cells resistant to apoptosis induction. We observed that Metformin alone exhibited a dose-dependent anti-leukemic activity in both B leukemic cell lines and primary B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients' cells and its anti-leukemic activity was enhanced when used in combination with DCA. In order to overcome the problems of poor bioavailability and cellular uptake, which limit DCA efficacy, we have designed and synthetized cocrystals consisting of Metformin and DCA (Met-DCA) at different stoichiometric ratios. Of note, the MetH(2)(++)•2DCA(-) cocrystal exhibited enhanced in vitro anti-leukemic activity, with respect to the treatment with the mix consisting of Metformin plus DCA. In particular, the treatment with the cocrystal MetH(2)(++)•2DCA(-) induced a synergistic apoptotic cell death coupled to a marked down-modulation of the anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein. Taken together, our data emphasize that innovative compounds based on Metformin-DCA combination merit to be further evaluated as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of B-CLL.

  12. Anti-apoptotic BFL-1 is the major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

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    Maria Ekoff

    Full Text Available Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions, where aggregation of FcεRI leads to the release of mast cell mediators causing allergic symptoms. The activation also induces a survival program in the cells, i.e., activation-induced mast cell survival. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the activation-induced survival is mediated. Cord blood-derived mast cells and the mast cell line LAD-2 were activated through FcεRI crosslinking, with or without addition of chemicals that inhibit the activity or expression of selected Bcl-2 family members (ABT-737; roscovitine. Cell viability was assessed using staining and flow cytometry. The expression and function of Bcl-2 family members BFL-1 and MCL-1 were investigated using real-time quantitative PCR and siRNA treatment. The mast cell expression of Bfl-1 was investigated in skin biopsies. FcεRI crosslinking promotes activation-induced survival of human mast cells and this is associated with an upregulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1. ABT-737 alone or in combination with roscovitine decreases viability of human mast cells although activation-induced survival is sustained, indicating a minor role for Bcl-X(L, Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Mcl-1. Reducing BFL-1 but not MCL-1 levels by siRNA inhibited activation-induced mast cell survival. We also demonstrate that mast cell expression of Bfl-1 is elevated in birch-pollen-provocated skin and in lesions of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Taken together, our results highlight Bfl-1 as a major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

  13. Cytoplasmic and nuclear anti-apoptotic roles of αB-crystallin in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

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    Woo Jin Jeong

    Full Text Available In addition to its well-characterized role in the lens, αB-crystallin performs other functions. Methylglyoxal (MGO can alter the function of the basement membrane of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. Thus, if MGO is not efficiently detoxified, it can induce adverse reactions in RPE cells. In this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptotic activity of αB-crystallin in the human retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE-19 following MGO treatment using various assays, including nuclear staining, flow cytometry, DNA electrophoresis, pulse field gel electrophoresis, western blot analysis, confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation assays. To directly assess the role of phosphorylation of αB-crystallin, we used site-directed mutagenesis to convert relevant serine residues to alanine residues. Using these techniques, we demonstrated that MGO induces apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. Silencing αB-crystallin sensitized ARPE-19 cells to MGO-induced apoptosis, indicating that αB-crystallin protects ARPE-19 cells from MGO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that αB-crystallin interacts with the caspase subtypes, caspase-2L, -2S, -3, -4, -7, -8, -9 and -12 in untreated control ARPE-19 cells and that MGO treatment caused the dissociation of these caspase subtypes from αB-crystallin; transfection of S19A, S45A or S59A mutants caused the depletion of αB-crystallin from the nuclei of untreated control RPE cells leading to the release of caspase subtypes. Additionally, transfection of these mutants enhanced MGO-induced apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells, indicating that phosphorylation of nuclear αB-crystallin on serine residues 19, 45 and 59 plays a pivotal role in preventing apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that αB-crystallin prevents caspase activation by physically interacting with caspase subtypes in the cytoplasm and nucleus, thereby protecting RPE cells from MGO-induced apoptosis.

  14. The anti-apoptotic factor Che-1/AATF links transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and DNA damage response

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    Fanciulli Maurizio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Che-1 is a RNA polymerase II binding protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of E2F target genes and in cell proliferation. Recently, it has been shown that Che-1 accumulates in cells responding to genotoxic agents such as Doxorubicin and ionizing radiation. The DNA damage-activated checkpoint kinases ATM and Chk2 interact with and phosphorylate Che-1, enhancing its accumulation and stability, and promoting Che-1-mediated transcription of p53-responsive genes and of p53 itself, as evidenced by microarray analysis. This transcriptional response is suppressed by expression of a Che-1 mutant lacking ATM and Chk2 phosphorylation amino acid residues, or by depletion of Che-1 by RNA silencing. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis has shown that Che-1 is released from E2F target genes and recruited to the p21 and p53 promoters after DNA damage. Che-1 contributes to the maintenance of the G2/M checkpoint in response to genotoxic stress. These findings identify a new mechanism by which the checkpoint kinases regulate, via the novel effector Che-1, the p53 pathway. Lastly, increasing evidence suggests that Che-1 may be involved in apoptotic signaling in neural tissues. In cortical neurons, Che-1 exhibits anti-apoptotic activity, protecting cells from neuronal damage induced by amyloid β-peptide. In cerebellar granule neurons, Che-1 interacts with Tau in the cytoplasmic compartment and this interaction is modulated during neuronal apoptosis. Finally, Che-1 directly interacts with the neuronal cell-death inducer "NRAGE" which downregulates endogenous Che-1 by targeting it for proteasome-dependent degradation. These findings identify Che-1 as a novel cytoprotective factor against apoptotic insults and suggest that Che-1 may represent a potential target for therapeutic application.

  15. Investigating The Anti-apoptotic Effects of Shigella Flexneri Infection In Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-13

    6, 79 Mycoplasma fermentans U937 Inhibits TNF-α-induced apoptosis 32, 33 Brucella suis THP-1 Upregulates pro-survival genes 37 Escherichia coli K1...451-460. 37. Gross, A., A. Terraza, S. Ouahrani-Bettache, J. P. Liautard, and J. Dornand. 2000. In vitro Brucella suis infection prevents the...temperature in the dark. For the activated caspase-3 staining, monolayers were blocked with 10% natural goat serum (NGS) and 0.1% saponin in 1X

  16. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

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    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins.

  17. Chronic NMDA administration to rats increases brain pro-apoptotic factors while decreasing anti-Apoptotic factors and causes cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport Stanley I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA administration to rats is reported to increase arachidonic acid signaling and upregulate neuroinflammatory markers in rat brain. These changes may damage brain cells. In this study, we determined if chronic NMDA administration (25 mg/kg i.p., 21 days to rats would alter expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic factors in frontal cortex, compared with vehicle control. Results Using real time RT-PCR and Western blotting, chronic NMDA administration was shown to decrease mRNA and protein levels of anti-apoptotic markers Bcl-2 and BDNF, and of their transcription factor phospho-CREB in the cortex. Expression of pro-apoptotic Bax, Bad, and 14-3-3ζ was increased, as well as Fluoro-Jade B (FJB staining, a marker of neuronal loss. Conclusion This alteration in the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors by chronic NMDA receptor activation in this animal model may contribute to neuronal loss, and further suggests that the model can be used to examine multiple processes involved in excitotoxicity.

  18. Anti-apoptotic effect of morphine-induced delayed preconditioning on pulmonary artery endothelial cells with anoxia/reoxygenation injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Weng-ang; ZHOU Hua-cheng; CUI Xiao-guang; LI Wen-zhi; GUO Yue-ping; ZHANG Bing; LIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    Background Opioid preconditioning (PC) reduces anoxiaJreoxygenation (NR) injury to various cells. However, it remains unclear whether opioid-induced delayed PC would show anti-apoptotic effects on pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) suffering from A/R injury. The present study was conducted to elucidate this issue and to investigate the potential mechanism of opioid-induced delayed PC.Methods Cultured porcine PAECs underwent 16-hour anoxia followed by 1-hour reoxygenation 24 hours after pretreatment with saline (NaCI; 0.9%) or morphine (1 μmol/L). To determine the underlying mechanism, a non-selective KATP channel inhibitor glibenclamide (Glib; 10 μmol/L), a nitric oxide (NO) synthase blocker NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 μmol/L), and an opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (Nal; 10 pmol/L) were given 30 minutes before the A/R load. The percentage of apoptotic cells was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, eNOS mRNA level was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). NO content of PAECs supernatants was measured with the Griess reagent.Results Compared to the A/R PAECs, morphine-induced delayed PC significantly reduced PAECs apoptosis ((18.1±1.9)% vs (5.5±0.3)%; P <0.05), increased NO release ((11.4±1.3) μmol/L vs (20.5±2.1) μmol/L, P <0.05), and up-regulated eNOS gene expression nearly 9 times (P<0.05). The anti-apoptosis effect of morphine was abolished by pretreatment with Glib, L-NAME and Nal, but the three agent-selves did not aggravate the A/R injury. Furthermore, L-NAME and Nal offset the enhanced release of NO caused by pretreatment with morphine.Conclusions Morphine-induced delayed PC prevents A/R injury of PAECs. This effect may be mediated by activation of KATP channel via opioid receptor and NO signaling pathways.

  19. Membrane microdomain-associated uroplakin IIIa contributes to Src-dependent mechanisms of anti-apoptotic proliferation in human bladder carcinoma cells

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    Shigeru Kihira

    2012-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of p145met/β-subunit of hepatocyte growth factor receptor by epidermal growth factor receptor and Src contributes to the anti-apoptotic growth of human bladder carcinoma cell 5637 under serum-starved conditions. Here, we show that some other cell lines of human bladder carcinoma, but not other types of human cancer cells, also exhibit Src-dependent, anti-apoptotic proliferation under serum-starved conditions, and that low-density, detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains (MD serve as a structural platform for signaling events involving p145met, EGFR, and Src. As an MD-associated molecule that may contribute to bladder carcinoma-specific cellular function, we identified uroplakin IIIa (UPIIIa, an urothelium-specific protein. Results obtained so far revealed: 1 UPIIIa undergoes partial proteolysis in serum-starved cells; 2 a specific antibody to the extracellular domain of UPIIIa inhibits the proteolysis of UPIIIa and the activation of Src, and promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells; and 3 knockdown of UPIIIa by short interfering RNA also promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells. GM6001, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP, inhibits the proteolysis of UPIIIa and promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells. Furthermore, serum starvation promotes expression and secretion of the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor in a manner that depends on the functions of MMP, Src, and UPIIIa. These results highlight a hitherto unknown signaling network involving a subset of MD-associated molecules in the anti-apoptotic mechanisms of human bladder carcinoma cells.

  20. Evidence for involvement of c-Src in the anti-apoptotic action of nitric oxide in serum-deprived RINm5F cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedo, J R; Ramírez, R; Cahuana, G M; Rincón, P; Sobrino, F; Bedoya, F J

    2001-11-01

    The mechanism by which nitric oxide (NO) protects from apoptosis is a matter of debate. We have shown previously that phosphorylation of tyrosine residues participates in the protection from apoptosis in insulin-producing RINm5F cells (Inorg. Chem. Commun. 3 (2000) 32). Since NO has been reported to activate the tyrosine kinase c-Src and this kinase is involved in the activation of protein kinase G (PKG) in some cell systems, we aimed at studying the contribution of c-Src and PKG systems in anti-apoptotic actions of NO in serum-deprived RINm5F cells. Here we report that exposure of serum-deprived cells to 10 microM DETA/NO results in protection from degradation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, together with a reduction of cytochrome c release from mitochondria and caspase-3 inhibition. Studies with the inhibitors ODQ and KT-5823 revealed that these actions are dependent on both activation of guanylate cyclase and PKG. DETA/NO was also able to induce autophosphorylation and activation c-Src protein both in vivo and in vitro and active c-Src was able to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Bcl-2 in vitro. The c-Src kinase inhibitor PP1 abrogated the actions of DETA/NO on cGMP formation, PKG activation, caspase activation, cytochrome c release from mitochondria, and Bcl-2 phosphorylation and degradation in serum-deprived cells. We thus propose that activation of c-Src is an early step in the chain of events that signal cGMP-dependent anti-apoptotic actions of NO in mitocohondria.

  1. Anti-apoptotic mechanism of Bacoside rich extract against reactive nitrogen species induced activation of iNOS/Bax/caspase 3 mediated apoptosis in L132 cell line.

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    Anand, T; Pandareesh, M D; Bhat, Pratiksha V; Venkataramana, M

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a highly reactive free radical gas that reacts with a wide range of bio-molecules to produce reactive nitrogen species and exerts nitrative stress. Bacopa monniera is a traditional folk and ayurvedic medicine known to alleviate a variety of disorders. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the protective propensity of Bacopa monniera extract (BME) through its oxido-nitrosative and anti-apoptotic mechanism to attenuate sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced apoptosis in a human embryonic lung epithelial cell line (L132). Our results elucidate that pre-treatment of L132 cells with BME ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by SNP as evidenced by MTT and LDH leakage assays. BME pre-treatment inhibited NO generation by down-regulating inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. BME exhibited potent antioxidant activity by up-regulating the antioxidant enzymes. SNP-induced damage to cellular, nuclear and mitochondrial integrity was also restored by BME, which was confirmed by ROS estimation, comet assay and mitochondrial membrane potential assays respectively. BME pre-treatment efficiently attenuated the SNP-induced apoptotic biomarkers such as Bax, cytochrome-c and caspase-3, which orchestrate the proteolytic damage of the cell. By considering all these findings, we report that BME protects L132 cells against SNP-induced toxicity via its free radical scavenging and anti-apoptotic mechanism.

  2. Hydroalcoholic extract of cyperus rotundus ameliorates H2O2-induced human neuronal cell damage via its anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic machinery.

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    Kumar, K Hemanth; Khanum, Farhath

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), a major reactive oxygen species produced during oxidative stress, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative conditions. Cyperus rotundus is a traditional medicinal herb that has recently found applications in food and confectionary industries. In the current study, the neuroprotective effects of Cyperus rotundus rhizome extract (CRE) through its antioxidant and anti-apoptotic machinery to attenuate H(2)O(2)-induced cell damage on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells have been explored. The results obtained demonstrate that pretreatment of cells with CRE for 2 h before administration of H(2)O(2) for 24 h ameliorates the cytotoxicity induced by H(2)O(2) as evidenced by MTT and LDH assays. CRE exhibited potent antioxidant activity by regulating the enzymes/proteins levels such as SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, HSP-70, Caspase-3, and Bcl-2. The pretreatment restored H(2)O(2)-induced cellular, nuclear, and mitochondrial morphologies as well as increased the expression of Brain derived nerve growth factor (BDNF). The anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic potentials of the plant extract may account for its high content of phenolics, flavonoids, and other active principles. Taken together, our findings suggest that CRE might be developed as an agent for neurodegeneration prevention or therapy.

  3. A novel BH3 mimetic efficiently induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through direct binding to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, including phosphorylated Mcl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubo; Xie, Mingzhou; Song, Ting; Sheng, Hongkun; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zhichao

    2015-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family modulates sensitivity to chemotherapy in many cancers, including melanoma, in which the RAS/BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway is constitutively activated. Mcl-1, a major anti-apoptotic protein in the Bcl-2 family, is extensively expressed in melanoma and contributes to melanoma's well-documented chemoresistance. Here, we provide the first evidence that Mcl-1 phosphorylation at T163 by ERK1/2 and JNK is associated with the resistance of melanoma cell lines to the existing BH3 mimetics gossypol, S1 and ABT-737, and a novel anti-apoptotic mechanism of phosphorylated Mcl-1 (pMcl-1) is revealed. pMcl-1 antagonized the known BH3 mimetics by sequestering pro-apoptotic proteins that were released from Bcl-2/Mcl-1. Furthermore, an anthraquinone BH3 mimetic, compound 6, was identified to be the first small molecule to that induces endogenous apoptosis in melanoma cells by directly binding Bcl-2, Mcl-1, and pMcl-1 and disrupting the heterodimers of these proteins. Although compound 6 induced upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa, its apoptotic induction was independent of Noxa. These data reveal the promising therapeutic potential of targeting pMcl-1 to treat melanoma. Compound 6 is therefore a potent drug that targets pMcl-1 in melanoma.

  4. Exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field raises the levels of the anti-apoptotic protein BAG3 in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Anna; Zeppa, Rosario; Pasquino, Nicola; Arra, Claudio; Ammirante, Massimo; Festa, Michelina; Barbieri, Antonio; Giudice, Aldo; Pascale, Maria; Turco, Maria Caterina; Rosati, Alessandra

    2011-11-01

    The expression of the anti-apoptotic protein BAG3 is induced in several cell types by exposure to high temperature, oxidants, and other stressful agents. We investigated whether exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields raised BAG3 levels in the human melanoma cell line M14, in vitro and in orthotopic xenografts. Exposure of cultured cells or xenografts for 6 h or 4 weeks, respectively, produced a significant (P < 0.01) increase in BAG3 protein amounts. Interestingly, at the same times, we could not detect any significant variation in the levels of HSP70/72 protein or cell apoptosis. These results confirm the stressful effect of exposure to ELF in human cells, by identifying BAG3 protein as a marker of ELF-induced stress. Furthermore, they suggest that BAG3 induction by ELF may contribute to melanoma cell survival and/or resistance to therapy.

  5. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Lizarte Neto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA. We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21 and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8 genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3 and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP. KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  6. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizarte, F.S. Neto; Tirapelli, D.P.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, S.R. [Universidade de Franca, Núcleo de Pesquisa em Ciências e Tecnologia, Franca, SP (Brazil); Tirapelli, C.R. [Universidade de São Paulo, Laboratório de Farmacologia, Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, F.M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Novais, P.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Peria, F.M.; Oliveira, H.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Carlotti, C.G. Junior; Tirapelli, L.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-01-11

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  7. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarte Neto, F S; Tirapelli, D P C; Ambrosio, S R; Tirapelli, C R; Oliveira, F M; Novais, P C; Peria, F M; Oliveira, H F; Carlotti Junior, C G; Tirapelli, L F

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  8. Mitogenic and Anti-apoptotic Effects of Insulin in En-dometrial Cancer Cells Are Phosphatidylinositol 3-ki-nase/Akt Dependent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaofang HUA; Fengxia XUE; Jing ZHAO

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the world. Although the insulin-resistant state or hyperinsulinemia was recently suggested as a potent risk factor for endometrial carcinogenesis and progression, there is only limited supporting evidence and the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we explored the roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-k/nase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway in the response of a human endometrial cancer cell line, Ishikawa3-H-12 cells, to insulin.Methods The Ishikawa 3-H-12 cells were serum-starved and then stimulated by insulin at various concentrations and for different time periods. To identify the insnlin-mediated signal pathway in the cells, LY294002, a selective inhibitor of PI3K, was used. The proliferation and the apoptotic rates were determined with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometric assays, respectively.Results The insulin receptor positive Ishikawa 3-H-12 cells had enhanced proliferation upon insulin stimulation in a rinse-and time-dependent manner. The growth promoting effect of insulin was blocked when the cells were pre-incubated with LY294002 for 60 rains.Insulin was able to protect the cells from serum-starvation-induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner, while the anti-apoptotic effects of insulin was reversed by adding LY294002. Treatment with insulin at 1 μM for 15 rain resulted in an increased level of activated Akt The insulin-induced Akt activation was inhibited by LY294002 in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusion Insulin activates PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and is a mitogenic and anti-apoptotic agent for Ishikewa 3-H-12 endometrial cancer cells.

  9. The CORM ALF-186 Mediates Anti-Apoptotic Signaling via an Activation of the p38 MAPK after Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Felix; Kaufmann, Kai B.; Meske, Alexander; Lagrèze, Wolf A.; Augustynik, Michael; Buerkle, Hartmut; Ramao, Carlos C.; Biermann, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Ischemia and reperfusion injury may induce apoptosis and lead to sustained tissue damage and loss of function, especially in neuronal organs. While carbon monoxide is known to exert protective effects after various harmful events, the mechanism of carbon monoxide releasing molecules in neuronal tissue has not been investigated yet. We hypothesize that the carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CORM) ALF-186, administered after neuronal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), counteracts retinal apoptosis and its involved signaling pathways and consecutively reduces neuronal tissue damage. Methods IRI was performed in rat´s retinae for 1 hour. The water-soluble CORM ALF-186 (10 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via a tail vein after reperfusion. After 24 and 48 hours, retinal tissue was harvested to analyze mRNA and protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, ERK1/2, p38 and JNK. Densities of fluorogold pre-labeled retinal ganglion cells (RGC) were analyzed 7 days after IRI. Immunohistochemistry was performed on retinal cross sections. Results ALF-186 significantly reduced IRI mediated loss of RGC. ALF-186 treatment differentially affected mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) phosphorylation: ALF-186 activated p38 and suppressed ERK1/2 phosphorylation, while JNK remained unchanged. Furthermore, ALF-186 treatment affected mitochondrial apoptosis, decreasing pro-apoptotic Bax and Caspase-3-cleavage, but increasing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Inhibition of p38-MAPK using SB203580 reduced ALF-186 mediated anti-apoptotic effects. Conclusion In this study, ALF-186 mediated substantial neuroprotection, affecting intracellular apoptotic signaling, mainly via MAPK p38. CORMs may thus represent a promising therapeutic alternative treating neuronal IRI. PMID:27764224

  10. CD27-triggering on primary plasma cell leukaemia cells has anti-apoptotic effects involving mitogen activated protein kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Vellenga, E; Abdulahad, WH; Hovenga, S; Bos, NA

    2004-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukaemia (PCL) is a rare plasma cell malignancy, which is related to multiple myeloma (MM) and is characterized by a poor prognosis. In a previous study we demonstrated that PCL plasma cells display a high expression of CD27, in contrast to MM plasma cells. The present study was

  11. Fetal Kidney Cells Can Ameliorate Ischemic Acute Renal Failure in Rats through Their Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Apoptotic and Anti-Oxidative Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashwani Kumar; Jadhav, Sachin H; Tripathy, Naresh Kumar; Nityanand, Soniya

    2015-01-01

    Fetal kidney cells may contain multiple populations of kidney stem cells and thus appear to be a suitable cellular therapy for the treatment of acute renal failure (ARF) but their biological characteristics and therapeutic potential have not been adequately explored. We have culture expanded fetal kidney cells derived from rat fetal kidneys, characterized them and evaluated their therapeutic effect in an ischemia reperfusion (IR) induced rat model of ARF. The fetal kidney cells grew in culture as adherent spindle shaped/polygonal cells and expressed CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD24 and CD133 markers. Administration of PKH26 labeled fetal kidney cells in ARF rats resulted in a significant decrease in the levels of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and decreased tubular necrosis in the kidney tissues (pkidney cells were observed to engraft around injured tubular cells, and there was increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of tubular cells in the kidneys (pkidney tissues of ARF rats treated with fetal kidney cells had a higher gene expression of renotropic growth factors (VEGF-A, IGF-1, BMP-7 and bFGF) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL10); up regulation of anti-oxidative markers (HO-1 and NQO-1); and a lower Bax/Bcl2 ratio as compared to saline treated rats (pkidney cells express mesenchymal and renal progenitor markers, and ameliorate ischemic ARF predominantly by their anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  12. Adaptation of HepG2 cells to silver nanoparticles-induced stress is based on the pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic changes in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzóska, Kamil; Męczyńska-Wielgosz, Sylwia; Stępkowski, Tomasz M; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials due to their antibacterial properties. Owing to the recent boost in the usage of AgNPs-containing products, human exposure to AgNPs is increasing, highlighting the need for careful evaluation of AgNPs toxicity in humans. We used two cellular models, hepatic HepG2 and epithelial A549 cell lines, to study the mechanism of AgNPs-induced toxicity at the cellular level. These two cell lines differ significantly in their response to AgNPs treatment. In the case of A549 cells, a minor decrease in viability and increase in the extent of DNA breakage were observed. A markedly different response to AgNPs was observed in HepG2 cells. In short term, a massive induction of DNA breakage was observed, suggesting that the basal activity of antioxidant defence in these cells was not sufficient to effectively protect them from the nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress. After prolonged exposure, the extent of DNA breakage decreased to the level observed in the control cells proving that a successful adaptation to the new conditions had taken place. The cells that were unable to adapt must have died, as revealed by the Neutral Red assay that indicated less than half viable cells after 24-h treatment with 100 µg/ml of 20nm AgNPs. The gene expression analysis revealed that the observed adaptation was underlain by a pro-proliferative, anti-apoptotic signal leading to up-regulation of the genes promoting proliferation and inflammatory response (EGR1, FOS, JUN, HK2, IL4, MMP10, VEGFA, WISP1, CEBPB, IL8, SELPLG), genes coding the anti-apoptotic proteins (BCL2A1, CCL2) and factors involved in the response to stress (HSPB1, GADD45A). Such a selection of highly resistant population of cells should be taken into account in the case of medical applications of nanoparticles since the sustained proliferative signalling and resistance to cell death are hallmarks of cancer, acquired by the cells in the process of

  13. Examination of a Viral Infection Mimetic Model in Human iPS Cell-Derived Insulin-Producing Cells and the Anti-Apoptotic Effect of GLP-1 Analogue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megu Yamaguchi Baden

    Full Text Available Viral infection is associated with pancreatic beta cell destruction in fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to investigate the acceleration and protective mechanisms of beta cell destruction by establishing a model of viral infection in pancreatic beta cells.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid was transfected into MIN6 cells and insulin-producing cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells via small molecule applications. Gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining. The anti-apoptotic effect of Exendin-4 was also evaluated.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid transfection led to elevated expression of the genes encoding IFNα, IFNβ, CXCL10, Fas, viral receptors, and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors in MIN6 cells. Exendin-4 treatment suppressed the elevated gene expression levels and reduced polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid-induced apoptosis both in MIN6 cells and in insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor, protein kinase A, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors counteracted the anti-apoptotic effect of Exendin-4.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid transfection can mimic viral infection, and Exendin-4 exerted an anti-apoptotic effect both in MIN6 and insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

  14. c-Myc dependent expression of pro-apoptotic Bim renders HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells dependent on anti-apoptotic Mcl-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jézéquel Pascal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-apoptotic signals induced downstream of HER2 are known to contribute to the resistance to current treatments of breast cancer cells that overexpress this member of the EGFR family. Whether or not some of these signals are also involved in tumor maintenance by counteracting constitutive death signals is much less understood. To address this, we investigated what role anti- and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, key regulators of cancer cell survival, might play in the viability of HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells. Methods We used cell lines as an in vitro model of HER2-overexpressing cells in order to evaluate how anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, and pro-apoptotic Puma and Bim impact on their survival, and to investigate how the constitutive expression of these proteins is regulated. Expression of the proteins of interest was confirmed using lysates from HER2-overexpressing tumors and through analysis of publicly available RNA expression data. Results We show that the depletion of Mcl-1 is sufficient to induce apoptosis in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. This Mcl-1 dependence is due to Bim expression and it directly results from oncogenic signaling, as depletion of the oncoprotein c-Myc, which occupies regions of the Bim promoter as evaluated in ChIP assays, decreases Bim levels and mitigates Mcl-1 dependence. Consistently, a reduction of c-Myc expression by inhibition of mTORC1 activity abrogates occupancy of the Bim promoter by c-Myc, decreases Bim expression and promotes tolerance to Mcl-1 depletion. Western blot analysis confirms that naïve HER2-overexpressing tumors constitutively express detectable levels of Mcl-1 and Bim, while expression data hint on enrichment for Mcl-1 transcripts in these tumors. Conclusions This work establishes that, in HER2-overexpressing tumors, it is necessary, and maybe sufficient, to therapeutically impact on the Mcl-1/Bim balance for efficient induction of

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus Increases the Anti-apoptotic Micro RNA-21 and Decreases the Pro-inflammatory Micro RNA-155 in the LPS-Treated Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Mehdi; Hodjati, Hossein; Sajedi Khanian, Mahdi; Doroudchi, Mehrnoosh

    2016-06-01

    Given the anti-inflammatory and protective role of probiotics in atherosclerosis and the regulatory role of micro RNA (miRNA) in endothelial cell (dys) functions, this study aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus (La) on cellular death and the expression of miRNA-21, 92a, 155, and 663 in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (Ec-LPS). LPS-treated and untreated HUVECs were cultured in the presence of different La conditions such as La-conditioned media (LaCM), La water extract (LaWE), La culture-filtered (LaFS) and unfiltered supernatants (LaUFS). After 24 h, apoptosis, necrosis and the levels of the mentioned miRNAs were measured using flow cytometry and real-time PCR methods, respectively. LaCM decreased apoptosis, necrosis and inflammatory miR-155 and conversely increased anti-apoptotic miR-21 in Ec-LPS-treated HUVECs. Association analysis revealed negative correlations between necrosis and the levels of miR-21, miR-92a, and miR-155. The beneficial effects of L. acidophilus on the ECs death and expression of atherosclerosis related miRNAs in these cells imply a new aspect of its regulation in cardiovascular diseases rather than previously described ones and suggest this probiotic bacterium as a candidate in the preventative therapy of atherosclerosis.

  16. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Shasha [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Wang, Shuang [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Biopharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150081 (China); Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Zhu, Daling, E-mail: dalingz@yahoo.com [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Biopharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway.

  17. Human Noxin is an anti-apoptotic protein in response to DNA damage of A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyoung-Jae; Im, Joo-Young; Yun, Chae-Ok; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Young Joo; Lee, Jung-Sun; Jung, Young-Jin; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Song, Kyung Bin; Kim, Young-Ho; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Jung, Kyeong Eun; Kim, Moon-Hee; Won, Misun

    2014-06-01

    Human Noxin (hNoxin, C11Orf82), a homolog of mouse noxin, is highly expressed in colorectal and lung cancer tissues. hNoxin contains a DNA-binding C-domain in RPA1, which mediates DNA metabolic processes, such as DNA replication and DNA repair. Expression of hNoxin is associated with S phase in cancer cells and in normal cells. Expression of hNoxin was induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Knockdown of hNoxin caused growth inhibition of colorectal and lung cancer cells. The comet assay and western blot analysis revealed that hNoxin knockdown induced apoptosis through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/p53 in non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells. Furthermore, simultaneous hNoxin knockdown and treatment with DNA-damaging agents, such as camptothecin (CPT) and UV irradiation, enhanced apoptosis, whereas Trichostatin A (TSA) did not. However, transient overexpression of hNoxin rescued cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis but did not block apoptosis in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that hNoxin may be associated with inhibition of apoptosis in response to DNA damage. An adenovirus expressing a short hairpin RNA against hNoxin transcripts significantly suppressed the growth of A549 tumor xenografts, indicating that hNoxin knockdown has in vivo anti-tumor efficacy. Thus, hNoxin is a DNA damage-induced anti-apoptotic protein and potential therapeutic target in cancer.

  18. The molecular cell death machinery in the simple cnidarian Hydra includes an expanded caspase family and pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasi, Margherita; Pauly, Barbara; Schmidt, Nikola; Cikala, Mihai; Stiening, Beate; Käsbauer, Tina; Zenner, Gerhardt; Popp, Tanja; Wagner, Anita; Knapp, Regina T; Huber, Andreas H; Grunert, Michaela; Söding, Johannes; David, Charles N; Böttger, Angelika

    2010-07-01

    The fresh water polyp Hydra belongs to the phylum Cnidaria, which diverged from the metazoan lineage before the appearance of bilaterians. In order to understand the evolution of apoptosis in metazoans, we have begun to elucidate the molecular cell death machinery in this model organism. Based on ESTs and the whole Hydra genome assembly, we have identified 15 caspases. We show that one is activated during apoptosis, four have characteristics of initiator caspases with N-terminal DED, CARD or DD domain and two undergo autoprocessing in vitro. In addition, we describe seven Bcl-2-like and two Bak-like proteins. For most of the Bcl-2 family proteins, we have observed mitochondrial localization. When expressed in mammalian cells, HyBak-like 1 and 2 strongly induced apoptosis. Six of the Bcl-2 family members inhibited apoptosis induced by camptothecin in mammalian cells with HyBcl-2-like 4 showing an especially strong protective effect. This protein also interacted with HyBak-like 1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Mutation of the conserved leucine in its BH3 domain abolished both the interaction with HyBak-like 1 and the anti-apoptotic effect. Moreover, we describe novel Hydra BH-3-only proteins. One of these interacted with Bcl-2-like 4 and induced apoptosis in mammalian cells. Our data indicate that the evolution of a complex network for cell death regulation arose at the earliest and simplest level of multicellular organization, where it exhibited a substantially higher level of complexity than in the protostome model organisms Caenorhabditis and Drosophila.

  19. CREB mediates the insulinotropic and anti-apoptotic effects of GLP-1 signaling in adult mouse β-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soona Shin

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: In sum, our studies using conditional gene deletion put into question current notions about the importance of CREB in regulating β-cell function and mass. However, we reveal an important role for CREB in the β-cell response to GLP-1 receptor signaling, further validating CREB as a therapeutic target for diabetes.

  20. RAC1b overexpression stimulates proliferation and NF-kB-mediated anti-apoptotic signaling in thyroid cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Márcia; Matos, Paulo; Pereira, Teresa; Cabrera, Rafael; Cardoso, Bruno A.; Bugalho, Maria João

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor-associated RAC1b has been recently highlighted as one of the most promising targets for therapeutic intervention in colon, breast, lung and pancreatic cancer. RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 and has been recently shown to be overexpressed in a subset of papillary thyroid carcinomas associated with unfavorable outcome. Using the K1 PTC derived cell line as an in vitro model, we observed that both RAC1 and RAC1b were able to induce a significant increase on NF-kB and cyclin D1 reporter activity. A clear p65 nuclear localization was found in cells transfected with RAC1b-WT, confirming NF-kB canonical pathway activation. Consistently, we observed a RAC1b-mediated decrease in IκBα (NF-kB inhibitor) protein levels. Moreover, we show that RAC1b overexpression stimulates G1/S progression and protects thyroid cells against induced apoptosis, the latter through a process involving the NF-kB pathway. Present data support previous findings suggesting an important role for RAC1b in the development of follicular cell-derived thyroid malignancies and point out NF-kB activation as one of the molecular mechanisms associated with the pro-tumorigenic advantage of RAC1b overexpression in thyroid carcinomas. PMID:28234980

  1. Anti-apoptotic effect of caspase inhibitors on H₂O₂-treated HeLa cells through early suppression of its oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in cervical cancer cells may be of toxicological interest. In the present study, the effects of exogenous H2O2 on cell growth and death in HeLa cervical cancer cells were investigated, and the anti-apoptotic effects of various caspase (pan-caspase, caspase-3, -8 or -9) inhibitors on H2O2-treated HeLa cells were also evaluated with regard to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) levels. Based on MTT assays, H2O2 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC50 value of ~75 µM at 24 h. H2O2 increased the number of dead cells and Annexin V-FITC-positive cells in the HeLa cells, which was accompanied by the activation of caspase-3 and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm). However, relatively higher doses of H2O2 induced necrosis in HeLa cells. Caspase inhibitors significantly prevented H2O2-induced HeLa cell death. H2O2 increased ROS including O2•- at 24 h and increased the activity of catalase in HeLa cells. H2O2 also increased the ROS level at 1 h, and several caspase inhibitors attenuated the increased level at 1 h but not at 6, 12 and 24 h. H2O2 decreased the GSH level in HeLa cells at 1 h, and several caspase inhibitors attenuated the decreased level of GSH at this time. H2O2 induced GSH depletion at 24 h. In conclusion, H2O2 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells via apoptosis and/or necrosis, which was accompanied by intracellular increases in ROS levels and GSH depletion. Caspase inhibitors are suggested to suppress H2O2-induced oxidative stress to rescue HeLa cells at the early time point of 1 h.

  2. Follicle-stimulating hormone potentiates the steroidogenic activity of chorionic gonadotropin and the anti-apoptotic activity of luteinizing hormone in human granulosa-lutein cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarini, Livio; Riccetti, Laura; De Pascali, Francesco; Nicoli, Alessia; Tagliavini, Simonetta; Trenti, Tommaso; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Simoni, Manuela

    2016-02-15

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and choriogonadotropin (hCG) are glycoprotein hormones regulating ovarian function and pregnancy, respectively. Since these molecules act on the same receptor (LHCGR), they were traditionally assumed as equivalent in assisted reproduction techniques (ART), although differences between LH and hCG were demonstrated at molecular and physiological level. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that co-treatment with a follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) dose in the ART therapeutic range potentiates different LH- and hCG-dependent responses in vitro, measured in terms of cAMP, phospho-CREB, -ERK1/2 and -AKT activation, gene expression, progesterone and estradiol production in human granulosa-lutein cells (hGLC). We show that in the presence of FSH, hCG biopotency is about 5-fold increased, in the presence of FSH, in terms of cAMP activation. Accordingly, CREB phosphorylation and steroid production is increased under hCG and FSH co-treatment. LH effects, evaluated as steroidogenic cAMP/PKA pathway activation, do not change in the presence of FSH, which, however, increases LH-dependent ERK1/2 and AKT, but not CREB phosphorylation, resulting in anti-apoptotic effects. The different modulatory activity of FSH on LH and hCG action in vitro corresponds to their different physiological functions, reflecting proliferative effects exerted by LH during the follicular phase and before trophoblast development, and the high steroidogenic potential of hCG requested to sustain pregnancy from the luteal phase onwards.

  3. Anti-apoptotic signaling as a cytoprotective mechanism in mammalian hibernation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N. Rouble

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of normal cell turnover, apoptosis is a natural phenomenon involved in making essential life and death decisions. Apoptotic pathways balance signals which promote cell death (pro-apoptotic pathways or counteract these signals (anti-apoptotic pathways. We proposed that changes in anti-apoptotic proteins would occur during mammalian hibernation to aid cell preservation during prolonged torpor under cellular conditions that are highly injurious to most mammals (e.g. low body temperatures, ischemia. Immunoblotting was used to analyze the expression of proteins associated with pro-survival in six tissues of thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. The brain showed a concerted response to torpor with significant increases in the levels of all anti-apoptotic targets analyzed (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, BI-1, Mcl-1, cIAP1/2, xIAP as well as enhanced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at S70 and T56. Heart responded similarly with most anti-apoptotic proteins elevated significantly during torpor except for Bcl-xL and xIAP that decreased and Mcl-1 that was unaltered. In liver, BI-1 increased whereas cIAP1/2 decreased. In kidney, there was an increase in BI-1, cIAP and xIAP but decreases in Bcl-xL and p-Bcl-2(T56 content. In brown adipose tissue, protein levels of BI-1, cIAP1/2, and xIAP decreased significantly during torpor (compared with euthermia whereas Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 were unaltered; however, Bcl-2 showed enhanced phosphorylation at Thr56 but not at Ser70. In skeletal muscle, only xIAP levels changed significantly during torpor (an increase. The data show that anti-apoptotic pathways have organ-specific responses in hibernators with a prominent potential role in heart and brain where coordinated enhancement of anti-apoptotic proteins occurred in response to torpor.

  4. Human bronchial epithelial cells exposed in vitro to diesel exhaust particles exhibit alterations in cell rheology and cytotoxicity associated with decrease in antioxidant defenses and imbalance in pro- and anti-apoptotic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriani, Robson; de Souza, Claudia Emanuele Carvalho; Krempel, Paloma Gava; Frias, Daniela Perroni; Matsuda, Monique; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Ferreira, Márcia Zotti Justo; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Negri, Elnara Marcia; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Mauad, Thais; Macchione, Mariangela

    2016-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) from diesel engines produce adverse alterations in cells of the airways by activating intracellular signaling pathways and apoptotic gene overexpression, and also by influencing metabolism and cytoskeleton changes. This study used human bronchial epithelium cells (BEAS-2B) in culture and evaluates their exposure to DEPs (15ug/mL for 1 and 2 h) in order to determine changes to cell rheology (viscoelasticity) and gene expression of the enzymes involved in oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. BEAS-2B cells exposed to DEPs were found to have a significant loss in stiffness, membrane stability, and mitochondrial activity. The genes involved in apoptosis [B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2 and caspase-3)] presented inversely proportional expressions (p = 0.05, p = 0.01, respectively), low expression of the genes involved in antioxidant responses [SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1); SOD2 (superoxide dismutase 2), and GPx (glutathione peroxidase) (p = 0.01)], along with an increase in cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1) (p = 0.01). These results suggest that alterations in cell rheology and cytotoxicity could be associated with oxidative stress and imbalance between pro- and anti-apoptotic genes.

  5. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Mcl-2) are pivotal regulators of apoptotic cell death. They are all highly overexpressed in cancers of different origin in which they enhance the survival of the cancer cells. Consequently, they represent prime candidates for anti-ca...

  6. Anti-apoptotic signaling and failure of apoptosis in the ischemic rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Lassmann, Hans; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2007-01-01

    Several anti-apoptotic proteins are induced in CA1 neurons after transient forebrain ischemia (TFI), but fail to protect the majority of these cells from demise. Correlating cell death morphologies (apoptosis-like and necrosis-like death) with immunohistochemistry (IHC), we investigated whether a...

  7. Turmeric toxicity in A431 epidermoid cancer cells associates with autophagy degradation of anti-apoptotic and anti-autophagic p53 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongrakard, Visa; Titone, Rossella; Follo, Carlo; Morani, Federica; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Tencomnao, Tewin; Isidoro, Ciro

    2014-12-01

    The keratinocyte-derived A431 Squamous Cell Carcinoma cells express the p53R273H mutant, which has been reported to inhibit apoptosis and autophagy. Here, we show that the crude extract of turmeric (Curcuma longa), similarly to its bioactive component Curcumin, could induce both apoptosis and autophagy in A431 cells, and these effects were concomitant with degradation of p53. Turmeric and curcumin also stimulated the activity of mTOR, which notoriously promotes cell growth and acts negatively on basal autophagy. Rapamycin-mediated inhibition of mTOR synergized with turmeric and curcumin in causing p53 degradation, increased the production of autophagosomes and exacerbated cell toxicity leading to cell necrosis. Small-interference mediated silencing of the autophagy proteins BECLIN 1 or ATG7 abrogated the induction of autophagy and largely rescued p53 stability in Turmeric-treated or Curcumin-treated cells, indicating that macroautophagy was mainly responsible for mutant p53 degradation. These data uncover a novel mechanism of turmeric and curcumin toxicity in chemoresistant cancer cells bearing mutant p53.

  8. Pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of p53 in cisplatin-treated human testicular cancer are cell context-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    di Pietro, Alessandra; Koster, Roelof; Boersma-van Eck, Wytske; Dam, Wendy A.; Mulder, Nanno H.; Gietema, Jourik A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2012-01-01

    In murine testicular cancer (TC) cells wild-type p53 contributes to sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs in a dose-dependent way. In human TC, however, the role of wild-type p53 functionality in chemotherapeutic response remains elusive. We analyzed functionality of wild-type p53 in cisplatin sensitivi

  9. Anti-apoptotic protein BRE/BRCC45 attenuates apoptosis through maintaining the expression of caspase inhibitor XIAP in mouse Lewis lung carcinoma D122 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Yiu-Loon; Ma, Chun-Hung; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhenyu; Yao, Yao; Lin, Frances Ka-Yin; Chan, John Yeuk-Hon; Lee, Kenneth Ka-Ho

    2014-05-01

    Brain and Reproductive Organ Expressed (BRE), or BRCC45, is a death receptor-associated antiapoptotic protein, which is also involved in DNA-damage repair, and K63-specific deubiquitination. BRE overexpression attenuates both death receptor- and stress-induced apoptosis, promotes experimental tumor growth, and is associated with human hepatocellular and esophageal carcinoma. How BRE mediates its antiapoptotic function is unknown. Here we report based on the use of a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cell line D122 that BRE has an essential role in maintaining the cellular protein level of XIAP, which is the most potent endogenous inhibitor of the caspases functioning in both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis. shRNA-mediated exhaustive depletion of BRE sensitized D122 cells to apoptosis induced not only by etopoxide, but also by TNF-α even in the absence of cycloheximide, which blocks the synthesis of antiapoptotic proteins by TNF-α-activated NF-κB pathway. In BRE-depleted cells, protein level of XIAP was downregulated, but not the levels of other antiapoptotic proteins, cIAP-1, 2, and cFLIP, regulated by the same NF-κB pathway. Reconstitution of BRE restored XIAP levels and increased resistance to apoptosis. XIAP mRNA level was also reduced in the BRE-depleted cells, but the level of reduction was less profound than that of the protein level. However, BRE could not delay protein turnover of XIAP. Depletion of BRE also increased tumor cell apoptosis, and decreased both local and metastatic tumor growth. Taken together, these findings indicate that BRE and its XIAP-sustaining mechanism could represent novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  10. Expression of anti -apoptotic and multidrug resistance- associated protein genes in glioma stem cell isolated from primary glioma cells%胶质瘤干细胞抗凋亡和多重耐药基因的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈德勤; 赵洪洋; 靳峰; 赵万巨; 魏宇佳; 张浩; 张军臣; 高超; 郭强; 邵彤

    2010-01-01

    Objective To isolate and culture glioma stem cells from primary glioma cells and detect the expression of anti - apoptotic and multidrug resistance - associated protein (MRP) genes. Methods Glioma stem cells were isolated from human glioma cell by physics technique and nestin, β- tubulin and GFAP expression were examined by Immunofluoresence staining. Expression of livin, livinα, livinβ, survivin, MRPI and MRP3 were assayed by real - time quantitative RT-PCR. Results Glioma stem cells were induced successfully from two glioma specimens from one glioblastoma (No. 912110) and one grade 2 -3 astrocytoma subject (No. 916718). The glioma stem cells which were cultured in NSC medium grew in suspension and presented the features of stem cells: sphere - like shape, self - renewal and ability to differentiate. Nestin immunofluoresence staining of the stem cells presented positive, but the glioma did not show this feature. These cells could conditionally differentiate into tubulin -β~+ and GFAP~+ cells, which provided these cells in culture could produce neurons as well as glial cells. The mRNA expression of cancer stem cells on livin, livinα, survivin, MRP1 was significantly up - regulated than that of glioma primary cells. However, the mRNA expression of MRP3 was down - regulated. Conclusion Primary glioma cell contains cancer stem cells. The expression levels of anti - apeptotic and MRP1 genes are higher than that of glioma primary cells, which show glioma stem cells are the factor to maintain tumor growth and resist apoptosis and to pump the anti - tumor drugs out of cells, and this is what we need further research on.%目的 从人脑胶质瘤组织中分离、培养胶质瘤干细胞,并探讨其生物学特性及其抗凋亡和多重耐药基因的表达差异.方法 人脑胶质瘤组织经过原代细胞培养后,用无血清培养方法获得胶质瘤干细胞球,用10%的胎牛血清培养诱导分化,分化前后分别做nestin、tubulin-β、GFAP免疫细

  11. Synthetic peptide, Ala-Arg-Glu-Gly-Glu-Met, abolishes pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of high glucose in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaozhou; Lyu, Yi; Ning, Junyu; Tang, Xiaozhi; Shen, Xinchun

    2017-02-11

    Apoptosis plays a critical role in normal vascular development and atherosclerosis. However, high glucose has been reported to generate a certain level of ROS that can inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis, with the underlying mechanism remaining unclear. In this study, a synthetic peptide AREGEM (Ala-Arg-Glu-Gly-Glu-Met) exhibited antioxidative effects and was used to investigate its function in VSMCs during hyperglycaemia. MTT assay results demonstrated that AREGEM significantly attenuated high glucose-induced VSMCs proliferation. Flow cytometry displayed that high glucose levels inhibited cell apoptosis, whereas this effect was attenuated by pre-incubation with AREGEM. In addition, the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) fluorescent probe assay further demonstrated that AREGEM reduced intracellular ROS accumulation in VSMCs. Furthermore, this peptide was able to prevent the decrease of caspase-3 activity and the increase of the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein in VSMCs exposed to high glucose. These findings demonstrated that AREGEM is able to abolish the effects of high glucose in VSMCs; therefore, this peptide can be a potential candidate to develop a novel strategy for curing diabetic related diseases.

  12. Long noncoding RNA-mediated anti-apoptotic activity in murine erythroid terminal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-12-15

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are differentially expressed under both normal and pathological conditions, implying that they may play important biological functions. Here we examined the expression of lncRNAs during erythropoiesis and identified an erythroid-specific lncRNA with anti-apoptotic activity. Inhibition of this lncRNA blocks erythroid differentiation and promotes apoptosis. Conversely, ectopic expression of this lncRNA can inhibit apoptosis in mouse erythroid cells. This lncRNA represses expression of Pycard, a proapoptotic gene, explaining in part the inhibition of programmed cell death. These findings reveal a novel layer of regulation of cell differentiation and apoptosis by a lncRNA.

  13. Inhibition of mitochondria responsible for the anti-apoptotic effects of melatonin during ischemia-reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yi-xiang; ZHANG Sheng-hui; WANG Xi-ming; WU Jian-bo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a possible mechanism responsible for anti-apoptotic effects of melatonin and provide theoretical evidences for clinical therapy. Methods: Ischemia-reperfusion mediated neuronal cell injury model was constructed in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) by deprivation of glucose, serum and oxygen in media. After ischemia, melatonin was added to the test groups to reach differential concentration during reperfusion. DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential,mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activity were observed after subjecting cerebellar granule neurons to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Results: The results showed that OGD induced typical cell apoptosis change, DNA ladder and apoptosis-related alterations in mitochondrial functions including depression of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (its maximal protection ratio was 73.26%) and release of cytochrome c (its maximal inhibition ratio was 42.52%) and the subsequent activation of caspase-3 (its maximal protection ratio was 59.32%) in cytoplasm. Melatonin reduced DNA damage and inhibited release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3. Melatonin can strongly prevent the OGD-induced loss of the mitochondria membrane potential. Conclusion: Our findings suggested that the direct inhibition of mitochondrial pathway might essentially contribute to its anti-apoptotic effects in neuronal ischemia-reperfusion.

  14. Effect of ionizing radiation on hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells: Role of apoptosis and potential therapeutic significance of anti-apoptotic treatments; Effet des rayonnements ionisants sur les cellules souches et progeniteurs hematopoietiques : place de l'apoptose et interet therapeutique potentiel des traitements antiapoptotiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouet, M.; Mourcin, F.; Grenier, N.; Mayol, J.F.; Leroux, V. [Unite de Radiohematologie experimentale, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France); Sotto, J.J. [Inst. Albert Bonniot, La Tronche (France); Herodin, F. [Unite de Radiohematologie experimentale, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France)

    2002-07-01

    Bone marrow aplasia observed following ionizing radiation exposure (Total Body Irradiation; gamma dose range: 2-10 Gy) is a result, in particular, of the radiation-induced (RI) apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We have previously shown in a baboon model of mobilized peripheral blood CD34{sup +} cell irradiation in vitro that RI apoptosis in HSPC was an early event, mostly occurring within the first 24 hours, which involves the CD95 Fas pathway. Apoptosis may be significantly reduced with a combination of 4 cytokines (4F): Stem Cell Factor (SCF), FLT-3 Ligand (FL), thrombopoietin (TPO), and interleukin-3 (IL-3), each at 50 ng{center_dot}mL{sup -1} (15% survival versus <3% untreated cells, 24 h post-irradiation at 2.5 Gy). In this study we show that addition of TNF-{alpha}(800 IU/ml) induces an increase in 4F efficacy in terms of cell survival 24 h after incubation (26% survival after 24 h irradiation exposure at 2.5 Gy) and amplification (k) of CD34{sup +} cells after 6 days in a serum free culture medium (SFM) (k{sub CD34{sup +}} = 4.3 and 6.3 respectively for 4F and successive 4F + TNF-{alpha}/4F treatments). In addition, the 4F combination allows culture on pre-established allogenic irradiated stromal cells in vitro at 4 Gy (k{sub CD34{sup +}} = 4.5). Overall this study suggests (i) the potential therapeutic interest for an early administration of anti-apoptotic cytokines with or without hematopoiesis inhibitors (emergency cytokine therapy) and (ii) the feasibility in the accidentally irradiated individual, of autologous cell therapy based on ex vivo expansion in order to perform autograft of residual HSPC collected after the accident. (author)

  15. Significant reduction of fungal disease symptoms in transgenic lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) expressing the anti-apoptotic baculovirus gene p35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanto, Teguh; Barker, Susan J; Wylie, Stephen J; Gilchrist, David G; Cowling, Wallace A

    2009-10-01

    Narrow-leafed lupin (NLL; Lupinus angustifolius) is a recently domesticated but anciently propagated crop with significant value in rotation with cereals in Mediterranean climates. However, several fungal pathogens, traditionally termed necrotrophs, severely affect broad-acre production and there is limited genetic resistance in the NLL germplasm pool. Symptoms of many of these diseases appear as localized areas of dead cells exhibiting markers of programmed cell death. Based on our previous research, we hypothesized that engineered expression of the baculovirus anti-apoptotic p35 gene might reduce symptoms of these diseases. Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of a cultivar highly susceptible to several pathogens, 14 independent NLL lines containing both the p35 and bar genes were obtained (p35-NLL). Integration and expression of the transgenes were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), progeny testing, Southern blot, Northern blot and reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses. Fecundity and nodulation were not altered in these lines. Third or fourth generation p35-NLL lines were challenged with necrotrophic fungal pathogens (anthracnose in stem and leaf, and Pleiochaeta root rot and leaf brown spot) in controlled environment conditions. Several p35-NLL lines had significantly reduced disease symptoms. Interestingly, as with natural resistance, no single line was improved for all three diseases which possibly reflecting spatial variation of p35 expression in planta. These data support an alternative molecular definition for 'necrotrophic disease' in plants and suggest new routes for achieving resistance against a range of pathogens.

  16. Anti-apoptotic treatment in mouse models of age-related hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengchan Han; Oumei Wang; Quanxiang Cai

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL), or presbycusis, is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and top communication deficit of the aged population. Genetic predisposition is one of the major factors in the development of AHL. Generally, AHL is associated with an age-dependent loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons and stria vascularis cells in the inner ear. Although the mechanisms leading to genetic hearing loss are not completely understood, caspase-family proteases function as important signals in the inner ear pathology. It is now accepted that mouse models are the best tools to study the mechanism of genetic hearing loss or AHL. Here, we provide a brief review of recent studies on hearing improvement in mouse models of AHL by anti-apoptotic treatment.

  17. AT-101, a small molecule inhibitor of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, activates the SAPK/JNK pathway and enhances radiation-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooswinkel Rogier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gossypol, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound has been identified as a small molecule inhibitor of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. It induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cell lines and enhances chemotherapy- and radiation-induced cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. Bcl-2 and related proteins are important inhibitors of apoptosis and frequently overexpressed in human tumors. Increased levels of these proteins confer radio- and chemoresistance and may be associated with poor prognosis. Consequently, inhibition of the anti-apoptotic functions of Bcl-2 family members represents a promising strategy to overcome resistance to anticancer therapies. Methods We tested the effect of (--gossypol, also denominated as AT-101, radiation and the combination of both on apoptosis induction in human leukemic cells, Jurkat T and U937. Because activation of the SAPK/JNK pathway is important for apoptosis induction by many different stress stimuli, and Bcl-XL is known to inhibit activation of SAPK/JNK, we also investigated the role of this signaling cascade in AT-101-induced apoptosis using a pharmacologic and genetic approach. Results AT-101 induced apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, with ED50 values of 1.9 and 2.4 μM in Jurkat T and U937 cells, respectively. Isobolographic analysis revealed a synergistic interaction between AT-101 and radiation, which also appeared to be sequence-dependent. Like radiation, AT-101 activated SAPK/JNK which was blocked by the kinase inhibitor SP600125. In cells overexpressing a dominant-negative mutant of c-Jun, AT-101-induced apoptosis was significantly reduced. Conclusion Our data show that AT-101 strongly enhances radiation-induced apoptosis in human leukemic cells and indicate a requirement for the SAPK/JNK pathway in AT-101-induced apoptosis. This type of apoptosis modulation may overcome treatment resistance and lead to the development of new effective combination

  18. Novel anti-apoptotic microRNAs 582-5p and 363 promote human glioblastoma stem cell survival via direct inhibition of caspase 3, caspase 9, and Bim.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiree Hunt Floyd

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor. Tumor initiation and recurrence are likely caused by a sub-population of glioblastoma stem cells, which may derive from mutated neural stem and precursor cells. Since CD133 is a stem cell marker for both normal brain and glioblastoma, and to better understand glioblastoma formation and recurrence, we looked for dys-regulated microRNAs in human CD133+ glioblastoma stem cells as opposed to CD133+ neural stem cells isolated from normal human brain. Using FACS sorting of low-passage cell samples followed by microRNA microarray analysis, we found 43 microRNAs that were dys-regulated in common in three separate CD133+ human glioblastomas compared to CD133+ normal neural stem cells. Among these were several microRNAs not previously associated with cancer. We then verified the microRNAs dys-regulated in glioblastoma using quantitative real time PCR and Taqman analysis of the original samples, as well as human GBM stem cell and established cell lines and many human specimens. We show that two candidate oncogenic microRNAs, miR-363 and miR-582-5p, can positively influence glioblastoma survival, as shown by forced expression of the microRNAs and their inhibitors followed by cell number assay, Caspase 3/7 assay, Annexin V apoptosis/fluorescence activated cell sorting, siRNA rescue of microRNA inhibitor treatment, as well as 3'UTR mutagenesis to show luciferase reporter rescue of the most successful targets. miR-582-5p and miR-363 are shown to directly target Caspase 3, Caspase 9, and Bim.

  19. Targeting Hsp90 with small molecule inhibitors induces the over-expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule, survivin, in human A549, HONE-1 and HT-29 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Kevin W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is a dual functioning protein. It inhibits the apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting caspases, and also promotes cancer cell growth by stabilizing microtubules during mitosis. Since the molecular chaperone Hsp90 binds and stabilizes survivin, it is widely believed that down-regulation of survivin is one of the important therapeutic functions of Hsp90 inhibitors such as the phase III clinically trialed compound 17-AAG. However, Hsp90 interferes with a number of molecules that up-regulate the intracellular level of survivin, raising the question that clinical use of Hsp90 inhibitors may indirectly induce survivin expression and subsequently enhance cancer anti-drug responses. The purpose of this study is to determine whether targeting Hsp90 can alter survivin expression differently in different cancer cell lines and to explore possible mechanisms that cause the alteration in survivin expression. Results Here, we demonstrated that Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, induced the over-expression of survivin in three different human cancer cell lines as shown by Western blotting. Increased survivin mRNA transcripts were observed in 17-AAG and geldanamycin-treated HT-29 and HONE-1 cancer cells. Interestingly, real-time PCR and translation inhibition studies revealed that survivin was over-expressed partially through the up-regulation of protein translation instead of gene transcription in A549 cancer cells. In addition, 17-AAG-treated A549, HONE-1 and HT-29 cells showed reduced proteasomal activity while inhibition of 26S proteasome activity further increased the amount of survivin protein in cells. At the functional level, down-regulation of survivin by siRNA further increased the drug sensitivity to 17-AAG in the tested cancer cell lines. Conclusions We showed for the first time that down-regulation of survivin is not a definite therapeutic function of Hsp90 inhibitors. Instead, targeting Hsp90 with small

  20. ET-46ONCOLYTIC VIRAL THERAPY FOR MALIGNANT GLIOMAS USING MYXOMA VIRUS DELETED FOR ANTI-APOPTOTIC M11L GENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklakova, Alexandra; McKenzie, Brienne; Kenchappa, Rajappa; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Brain Tumour Initiating Cells (BTICs) are stem-like cells hypothesized to mediate recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Myxoma virus (MyxV) is a promising oncolytic virus, which is highly effective in conventional long term resistant glioma cell lines and less effective in BTICs. We hypothesized that one possible factor limiting efficacy in BTICs is that cell death following infection with MyxV is inhibited by virally encoded anti-apoptotic proteins, such as the Bcl-2 structural homologue, M011L. To test this we evaluated and compared the efficacy of wtMYXV versus the viral construct MyxV-M011L-KO (in which the anti-apoptotic protein M11L has been deleted) in BTICs. We found that WT-MyxV does not induce significant level of apoptosis in infected BTICs, but that MyxV-M011L-KO induces dramatically more apoptosisas shown by caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and Cytochrome C release from the mitochondria M11L from the WT-MyxV localized to the mitochondrial membrane and prevented the association of Bax with the mitochondrial membrane. Finally, silencing of Bax using specific siRNAs significantly blocked the induction of apoptosis and cell death that occurs after infection with mutant MyxV-M011L-KO virus. Therefore MyxV-M011L-KO, which is has the anti-apoptotic virally derived gene M11L, dramatically improves the oncolytic efficacy in BTICs and this is dependent on the presence of the pro-apoptotic host protein, Bax. This is the first demonstration, that the MyxV mutant, genetically modified to promote apoptosis in tumor initiating cells, is significantly more efficacious than the wildtype virus. Strategies, such as this one, that promotes apoptosis in tumor initiating cells might be particularly effective.

  1. EPO Mediates Neurotrophic, Neuroprotective, Anti-Oxidant, and Anti-Apoptotic Effects via Downregulation of miR-451 and miR-885-5p in SH-SY5Y Neuron-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alural, Begum; Duran, Gizem Ayna; Tufekci, Kemal Ugur; Allmer, Jens; Onkal, Zeynep; Tunali, Dogan; Genc, Kursad; Genc, Sermin

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a neuroprotective cytokine, which has been applied in several animal models presenting neurological disorders. One of the proposed modes of action resulting in neuroprotection is post-transcriptional gene expression regulation. This directly brings to mind microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. It has not yet been evaluated whether miRNAs participate in the biological effects of EPO or whether it, inversely, modulates specific miRNAs in neuronal cells. In this study, we employed miRNA and mRNA arrays to identify how EPO exerts its biological function. Notably, miR-451 and miR-885-5p are downregulated in EPO-treated SH-SY5Y neuronal-like cells. Accordingly, target prediction and transcriptome analysis of cells treated with EPO revealed an alteration of the expression of genes involved in apoptosis, cell survival, proliferation, and migration. Low expression of miRNAs in SH-SY5Y was correlated with high expression of their target genes, vascular endothelial growth factor A, matrix metallo peptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), erythropoietin receptor, Mini chromosome maintenance complex 5 (MCM5), B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), and Galanin (GAL). Cell viability, apoptosis, proliferation, and migration assays were carried out for functional analysis after transfection with miRNA mimics, which inhibited some biological actions of EPO such as neuroprotection, anti-oxidation, anti-apoptosis, and migratory effects. In this study, we report for the first time that EPO downregulates the expression of miRNAs (miR-451 and miR-885-5p) in SH-SY5Y neuronal-like cells. The correlation between the over-expression of miRNAs and the decrease in EPO-mediated biological effects suggests that miR-451 and miR-885-5p may play a key role in the mediation of biological function.

  2. Inhibition of potentially anti-apoptotic proteins by antisense protein kinase C-alpha (Isis 3521) and antisense bcl-2 (G3139) phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides: relationship to the decreased viability of T24 bladder and PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benimetskaya, L; Miller, P; Benimetsky, S; Maciaszek, A; Guga, P; Beaucage, S L; Wilk, A; Grajkowski, A; Halperin, A L; Stein, C A

    2001-12-01

    Isis 3521 and G3139 are 20- and 18-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, respectively, targeted to the protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha and bcl-2 mRNAs. Treatment of T24 bladder and PC3 prostate carcinoma cells with full-length and 3'-truncation mutants of Isis 3521 causes down-regulation of PKC-alpha protein and mRNA. However, at the level of a 15-mer and shorter, down-regulation of mRNA expression is no longer observed. Further, no diminution in cellular viability, as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, in response to increasing concentrations of paclitaxel, can be observed for these shorter oligomers. These observations not only indicate that PKC-alpha protein expression can be down-regulated by both RNase H-dependent and -independent mechanisms but also that down-regulation of PKC-alpha is insufficient by itself to "chemosensitize" cells. G3139, which down-regulates bcl-2 protein and mRNA expression, also down-regulates PKC-alpha protein and mRNA expression but not that of PKC-betaI, -epsilon, or -zeta. However, the down-regulation of PKC-alpha and bcl-2 are not linked. When the carrier Eufectin 5 is employed, only bcl-2 is down-regulated in both T24 and PC3 cells at 50 nM oligonucleotide concentration. At 100 nM, both bcl-2 and PKC-alpha expression are down-regulated, and only at this concentration can "chemosensitization" to paclitaxel and carboplatin be observed. In contrast, the down-regulation of bcl-2 seems to be linked with that of RelA (p65). However, this too is also not sufficient for chemosensitization, even though it leads to the loss of expression of genes under the putative control of nuclear factor-kappaB and to detachment of the cells from plastic surfaces. These results underscore the complexity of the intracellular requirements for the initiation of chemosensitization to anti-neoplastic agents.

  3. Relationships Between Icariin and Anti-Apoptotic miRNA-21 in Mouse Blastocyst Development In vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ya-ran; WANG Zhan-he; CAO Yong-chun; LU Yan; TIAN Jin-ling; ZhANG Chao; JIA Zi-ye; CHEN Wu; GAO Jian-ming

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of icariin, a flavonoid from the Chinese traditional medicine epimedium, on miRNA-21 of mouse developmental blastocysts in vitro and the development of preimplantation embryos were studied. The possible effective targets of icariin promoting preimplantation embryo development in vitro and anti-apoptosis were determined. The embryos were cultured in modified CZB medium (mCZB) as control group. The experimental group (Ica group) was supplemented with 0.6μg mL-1 icariin. Mouse pronuclear embryos were cultured in vitro until blastocysts. The development rates of preimplantation embryos were observed. The total cell number, apoptotic cell number and the rate of apoptotic cells in blastocysts were analysed by the staining of Hoechst33342 and labeling of TUNEL and detected under a laser confocal scanning microscope. The miRNA-21 expression, the mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic Caspase3, and the target genes of miRNA-21:pro-apoptotic PTEN, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 were detected by real-time RT-PCR. The results showed that percentages of morulaes and blastocysts in Ica group were both extremely higher than control group ((85.14±6.57)%vs. (72.04±11.58)%;(82.50±7.11)%vs. (66.80±11.70)%, respectively, P<0.01). The total cell number of blastocysts had extreme difference between Ica group and control group ((61.40±9.64) vs. (46.23±4.50), P<0.01). The apoptotic cell number and rate of apoptotic cells of blastocysts were both reduced in Ica group ((1.47±0.51) vs. (2.94±0.66);(2.40±0.27)%vs. (6.25±0.62)%, respectively, P<0.01). Compared to control group, addition of icariin into mCZB extremely increased the expression of anti-apoptotic miRNA-21 (P<0.01), down-regulated pro-apoptotic Caspase3 (P<0.05) and PTEN (P<0.01), up-regulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 (P<0.01). In conclusion, icariin could reduce the apoptosis, promote the embryo development in vitro by enhancing miRNA-21 expression to up-regulated anti-apoptotic genes and down-regulated pro

  4. BAG1: the guardian of anti-apoptotic proteins in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveic, Sanja; Pigazzi, Martina; Basso, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1) is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, MCL1, and phospho-ERK1/2, all proteins able to sustain leukemia, without affecting the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. BAG1 down-regulation was also found to increase expression of BAG3, whose similar activity was able to compensate the loss of function of BAG1. BAG1/BAG3 co-silencing caused an enhanced cell predisposition to death in cell lines and also in primary AML cultures, affecting the same proteins. Cell death was CASPASE-3 dependent, was accompanied by PARP cleavage and documented by an increased release of pro-apoptotic molecules Smac/DIABLO and Cytochrome c. BAG1 was found to directly maintain BCL2 and to protect MCL1 from proteasomal degradation by controlling USP9X expression, which appeared to be its novel target. Finally, BAG1 was found able to affect leukemia cell fate by influencing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins crucial for AML maintenance.

  5. BAG1: the guardian of anti-apoptotic proteins in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Aveic

    Full Text Available BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1 is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, MCL1, and phospho-ERK1/2, all proteins able to sustain leukemia, without affecting the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. BAG1 down-regulation was also found to increase expression of BAG3, whose similar activity was able to compensate the loss of function of BAG1. BAG1/BAG3 co-silencing caused an enhanced cell predisposition to death in cell lines and also in primary AML cultures, affecting the same proteins. Cell death was CASPASE-3 dependent, was accompanied by PARP cleavage and documented by an increased release of pro-apoptotic molecules Smac/DIABLO and Cytochrome c. BAG1 was found to directly maintain BCL2 and to protect MCL1 from proteasomal degradation by controlling USP9X expression, which appeared to be its novel target. Finally, BAG1 was found able to affect leukemia cell fate by influencing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins crucial for AML maintenance.

  6. Novel anti-apoptotic mechanism of A20 through targeting ASK1 to suppress TNF-induced JNK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, M; Park, K A; Byun, H S; Sohn, K-C; Kim, Y-R; Jeon, J; Hong, J H; Park, J; Seok, J H; Kim, J M; Yoon, W-H; Jang, I-S; Shen, H M; Liu, Z G; Hur, G M

    2010-12-01

    The zinc-finger protein A20 has crucial physiological functions as a dual inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and apoptosis in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 signaling pathway. Although the molecular basis for the anti-NF-κB function of A20 has been well elucidated, the anti-apoptotic function of A20 is largely unknown. Here, we report a novel mechanism underlying the anti-apoptotic function of A20: A20 blocks TNF-induced apoptosis through suppression of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by targeting apoptosis signal-regulating kinase1 (ASK1). First, the ectopic expression of A20 drastically inhibits TNF-induced JNK activation and apoptosis in multiple cell types including those deficient of NF-κB activation. Unexpectedly, the blunting effect of A20 on TNF-induced JNK activation is not mediated by affecting the TNFR1 signaling complex formation. Instead, A20 interacts with ASK1, an important MAPKK kinase in the JNK signaling cascade. More importantly, overexpression of wild-type A20, but not of mutant A20 (ZnF4; C624A, C627A), promotes degradation of the ASK1 through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Taken together, the results from this study reveal a novel anti-apoptotic mechanism of A20 in TNF signaling pathway: A20 binds to ASK1 and mediates ASK1 degradation, leading to suppression of JNK activation and eventually blockage of apoptosis.

  7. An anti-apoptotic peptide improves survival in lethal total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDunn, Jonathan E; Muenzer, Jared T; Dunne, Benjamin; Zhou, Anthony; Yuan, Kevin; Hoekzema, Andrew; Hilliard, Carolyn; Chang, Katherine C; Davis, Christopher G; McDonough, Jacquelyn; Hunt, Clayton; Grigsby, Perry; Piwnica-Worms, David; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2009-05-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been used to deliver the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL-derived BH4 peptide to prevent injury-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) from the SV40 large T antigen has favorable properties for BH4 domain delivery to lymphocytes compared to sequences based on the HIV-1 TAT sequence. While both TAT-BH4 and NLS-BH4 protected primary human mononuclear cells from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death, TAT-BH4 caused persistent membrane damage and even cell death at the highest concentrations tested (5-10 microM) and correlated with in vivo toxicity as intravenous administration of TAT-BH4 caused rapid death. The NLS-BH4 peptide has significantly attenuated toxicity compared to TAT-BH4 and we established a dosing regimen of NLS-BH4 that conferred a significant survival advantage in a post-exposure treatment model of LD90 total body irradiation.

  8. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay for chemical library screening against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Dayong; Godoi, Paulo; Sergienko, Eduard; Dahl, Russell; Chan, Xochella; Brown, Brock; Rascon, Justin; Hurder, Andrew; Su, Ying; Chung, Thomas D Y; Jin, Chaofang; Diaz, Paul; Reed, John C

    2012-03-01

    Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins occurs commonly in human cancers. Bfl-1 is highly expressed in some types of malignant cells, contributing significantly to tumor cell survival and chemoresistance. Therefore, it would be desirable to have chemical antagonists of Bfl-1. To this end, we devised a fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) using Bfl-1 protein and fluorescein-conjugated Bid BH3 peptide, which was employed for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. Approximately 66 000 compounds were screened for the ability to inhibit BH3 peptide binding to Bfl-1, yielding 14 reproducible hits with ≥50% displacement. After dose-response analysis and confirmation using a secondary assay based on time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), two groups of Bfl-1-specific inhibitors were identified, including chloromaleimide and sulfonylpyrimidine series compounds. FPAs generated for each of the six anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins demonstrated selective binding of both classes of compounds to Bfl-1. Analogs of the sulfonylpyrimidine series were synthesized and compared with the original hit for Bfl-1 binding by both FPAs and TR-FRET assays. The resulting structure-activity relation analysis led to the chemical probe compound CID-2980973 (ML042). Collectively, these findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the HTS assay for discovery of selective chemical inhibitors of Bfl-1.

  9. Combination Anti-Apoptotic Effect of Erythropoietin and Melatonin on Ischemia Reperfusion-Induced Renal Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokofeh Banaei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR contributes to the development of acute renal failure (ARF. Oxygen free radicals are considered to be principal components involved in the pathophysiological tissue alterations observed during renal IR. The purpose of this study was to investigate the combination effect of melatonin (MEL and erythropoietin (EPO, which are a potent antioxidant and anti-apoptotic agents, in IR-induced renal injury in rats. Wistar Albino rats were unilaterally nephrectomized and subjected to 45 min of renal pedicle occlusion followed by 24 h reperfusion. MEL (10 mg/kg, i.p and EPO (5000 U/kg, i.p were administered prior to ischemia. After 24 h reperfusion, following decapitation, blood samples were collected for the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and malondialdehyde (MDA levels. Also, renal samples were taken for histological evaluation and apoptosis assay. Ischemia-reperfusion increased SOD, GPx, MDA levels, and TUNEL positive cells. Histopathological findings of the IR group confirmed that there was renal impairment in the tubular epithelium. Treatment with EPO and MEL decreased SOD, GPx, and MDA levels, histopathological changes, and TUNEL positive cells. These results indicated that the combination of MEL and EPO could not exert more nephroprotective and anti-apoptotic effects than MEL treatment in renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  10. A functional yeast survival screen of tumor-derived cDNA libraries designed to identify anti-apoptotic mammalian oncogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Eißmann

    Full Text Available Yeast cells can be killed upon expression of pro-apoptotic mammalian proteins. We have established a functional yeast survival screen that was used to isolate novel human anti-apoptotic genes overexpressed in treatment-resistant tumors. The screening of three different cDNA libraries prepared from metastatic melanoma, glioblastomas and leukemic blasts allowed for the identification of many yeast cell death-repressing cDNAs, including 28% of genes that are already known to inhibit apoptosis, 35% of genes upregulated in at least one tumor entity and 16% of genes described as both anti-apoptotic in function and upregulated in tumors. These results confirm the great potential of this screening tool to identify novel anti-apoptotic and tumor-relevant molecules. Three of the isolated candidate genes were further analyzed regarding their anti-apoptotic function in cell culture and their potential as a therapeutic target for molecular therapy. PAICS, an enzyme required for de novo purine biosynthesis, the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 and the MAST2 kinase are overexpressed in certain tumor entities and capable of suppressing apoptosis in human cells. Using a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model, we also demonstrated that glioblastoma tumor growth requires MAST2 expression. An additional advantage of the yeast survival screen is its universal applicability. By using various inducible pro-apoptotic killer proteins and screening the appropriate cDNA library prepared from normal or pathologic tissue of interest, the survival screen can be used to identify apoptosis inhibitors in many different systems.

  11. The Anti-Apoptotic Role of Berberine in Preimplantation Embryo In Vitro Development through Regulation of miRNA-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Shi, Ya-Ran; Liu, Xiao-Ran; Cao, Yong-Chun; Zhen, Di; Jia, Zi-Ye; Jiang, Jin-Qi; Tian, Jian-Hui; Gao, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicinal herbs containing berberine have been historically used to prevent miscarriage. Here, we investigated whether the anti-apoptotic effects of berberine on pre-implantation embryonic development are regulated by miRNA-21. Mouse pronuclear embryos were cultured in medium with or without berberine, and some were then microinjected with a miRNA-21 inhibitor. The in vitro developmental rates of 2- and 4-cell embryos and blastocysts, blastocyst cell numbers, apoptotic rates, and apoptotic cell numbers were measured in each group. Furthermore, we examined the transcription levels of miRNA-21 and its target genes (caspase-3, PTEN, and Bcl-2) and their translation levels. Comparisons were made with in vivo-developed and untreated embryos. We found that berberine significantly increased the developmental rates and cell numbers of mouse blastocysts and decreased apoptotic cell rates in vitro. Berberine also significantly increased miRNA-21 and Bcl-2 transcription levels and significantly decreased caspase-3 and PTEN transcription levels. In embryos treated with a miRNA-21 inhibitor, the results followed the opposite trend; PTEN and caspase-3 transcription levels increased significantly, while the transcription level of Bcl-2 decreased significantly. Additionally, berberine treatment significantly increased the Bcl-2 protein level and significantly decreased the caspase-3 and PTEN protein levels in blastocysts, but there were no significant differences observed in the levels of these proteins in 2- and 4-cell embryos. This study revealed that miRNA-21 is important for pre-implantation embryonic development, especially blastocyst development in vitro. Berberine elevates miRNA-21 expression, decreases PTEN and caspase-3 levels, increases Bcl-2 levels, and exerts anti-apoptotic and pro-growth effects.

  12. Increased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the brain is associated with resilience to stress-induced depression-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dygalo, Nikolay N; Kalinina, Tatyana S; Bulygina, Veta V; Shishkina, Galina T

    2012-07-01

    Clinical observations and the results of animal studies have implicated changes in neuronal survival and plasticity in both the etiology of mood disorders, especially stress-induced depression, and anti-depressant drug action. Stress may predispose individuals toward depression through down-regulation of neurogenesis and an increase in apoptosis in the brain. Substantial individual differences in vulnerability to stress are evident in humans and were found in experimental animals. Recent studies revealed an association between the brain anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma like X, long variant (Bcl-xL) expression and individual differences in behavioral vulnerability to stress. The ability to increase Bcl-xL gene expression in the hippocampus in response to stress may be an important factor for determining the resistance to the development of stress-induced depression. Treatment with anti-depressant drugs may change Bcl-xL response properties. In the rat brainstem, expression of this anti-apoptotic gene becomes sensitive to swim stress during the long-term fluoxetine treatment, an effect that appeared concomitantly with the anti-depressant-like action of the drug in the forced swim test, suggesting that Bcl-xL may be a new target for depression therapy. The processes and pathways linking stress stimuli to behavior via intracellular anti-apoptotic protein are discussed here in the context of Bcl-xL functions in the mechanisms of individual differences in behavioral resilience to stress and anti-depressant-induced effects on the behavioral despair.

  13. Anti-apoptotic response during anoxia and recovery in a freeze-tolerant wood frog (Rana sylvatica

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    Victoria E.M. Gerber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The common wood frog, Rana sylvatica, utilizes freeze tolerance as a means of winter survival. Concealed beneath a layer of leaf litter and blanketed by snow, these frogs withstand subzero temperatures by allowing approximately 65–70% of total body water to freeze. Freezing is generally considered to be an ischemic event in which the blood oxygen supply is impeded and may lead to low levels of ATP production and exposure to oxidative stress. Therefore, it is as important to selectively upregulate cytoprotective mechanisms such as the heat shock protein (HSP response and expression of antioxidants as it is to shut down majority of ATP consuming processes in the cell. The objective of this study was to investigate another probable cytoprotective mechanism, anti-apoptosis during oxygen deprivation and recovery in the anoxia tolerant wood frog. In particular, relative protein expression levels of two important apoptotic regulator proteins, Bax and p-p53 (S46, and five anti-apoptotic/pro-survival proteins, Bcl-2, p-Bcl-2 (S70, Bcl-xL, x-IAP, and c-IAP in response to normoxic, 24 Hr anoxic exposure, and 4 Hr recovery stages were assessed in the liver and skeletal muscle using western immunoblotting. The results suggest a tissue-specific regulation of the anti-apoptotic pathway in the wood frog, where both liver and skeletal muscle shows an overall decrease in apoptosis and an increase in cell survival. This type of cytoprotective mechanism could be aimed at preserving the existing cellular components during long-term anoxia and oxygen recovery phases in the wood frog.

  14. Anti-apoptotic effects of aspirin following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liying Qiu; Bin Du; Ying Li; Hongbin Fan; Zhiyong Yang

    2008-01-01

    /kg aspirin decreased MDA content and increased ATP levels. However, 6 mg/kg aspirin did not have the same effect. CONCLUSION: Aspirin reduced the number of apoptotic cells following CIRI. These results suggest that the neuroprotective mechanism of aspirin could be related to elevated Bcl-2 protein levels or decreased Bax protein expression. The increase in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax appears to be a common anti-apoptotic mechanism of aspirin.

  15. Targeting the Anti-Apoptotic Protein c-FLIP for Cancer Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safa, Ahmad R., E-mail: asafa@iupui.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Pollok, Karen E. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Herman B. Wells Center for Pediatric Research, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) is a major resistance factor and critical anti-apoptotic regulator that inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Fas-L, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis as well as chemotherapy-triggered apoptosis in malignant cells. c-FLIP is expressed as long (c-FLIP{sub L}), short (c-FLIP{sub S}), and c-FLIP{sub R} splice variants in human cells. c-FLIP binds to FADD and/or caspase-8 or -10 in a ligand-dependent and-independent fashion, which in turn prevents death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) formation and subsequent activation of the caspase cascade. Moreover, c-FLIP{sub L} and c-FLIP{sub S} are known to have multifunctional roles in various signaling pathways, as well as activating and/or upregulating several cytoprotective signaling molecules. Upregulation of c-FLIP has been found in various tumor types, and its downregulation has been shown to restore apoptosis triggered by cytokines and various chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, c-FLIP is an important target for cancer therapy. For example, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that specifically knockdown the expression of c-FLIP{sub L} in diverse human cancer cell lines augmented TRAIL-induced DISC recruitment and increased the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents, thereby enhancing effector caspase stimulation and apoptosis. Moreover, small molecules causing degradation of c-FLIP as well as decreasing mRNA and protein levels of c-FLIP{sub L} and c-FLIP{sub S} splice variants have been found, and efforts are underway to develop other c-FLIP-targeted cancer therapies. This review focuses on (1) the functional role of c-FLIP splice variants in preventing apoptosis and inducing cytokine and drug resistance; (2) the molecular mechanisms that regulate c-FLIP expression; and (3) strategies to inhibit c-FLIP expression and function.

  16. Thyroid cancer imaging in vivo by targeting the anti-apoptotic molecule galectin-3.

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    Armando Bartolazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of thyroid nodules increases with age, average 4-7% for the U.S.A. adult population, but it is much higher (19-67% when sub-clinical nodules are considered. About 90% of these lesions are benign and a reliable approach to their preoperative characterization is necessary. Unfortunately conventional thyroid scintigraphy does not allow the distinction among benign and malignant thyroid proliferations but it provides only functional information (cold or hot nodules. The expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule galectin-3 is restricted to cancer cells and this feature has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. We show here the possibility to obtain thyroid cancer imaging in vivo by targeting galectin-3. METHODS: The galectin-3 based thyroid immuno-scintigraphy uses as radiotracer a specific (99mTc-radiolabeled mAb. A position-sensitive high-resolution mini-gamma camera was used as imaging capture device. Human galectin-3 positive thyroid cancer xenografts (ARO and galectin-3 knockout tumors were used as targets in different experiments in vivo. 38 mice with tumor mass of about 1 gm were injected in the tail vein with 100 microCi of (99mTc-labeled mAb to galectin-3 (30 microg protein/in 100 microl saline solution. Tumor images were acquired at 1 hr, 3 hrs, 6 hrs, 9 hrs and 24 hrs post injection by using the mini-gamma camera. FINDINGS: Results from different consecutive experiments show an optimal visualization of thyroid cancer xenografts between 6 and 9 hours from injection of the radiotracer. Galectin-3 negative tumors were not detected at all. At 6 hrs post-injection galectin-3 expressing tumors were correctly visualized, while the whole-body activity had essentially cleared. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate the possibility to distinguish preoperatively benign from malignant thyroid nodules by using a specific galectin-3 radio-immunotargeting. In vivo imaging of thyroid cancer may allow a better

  17. The orphan adapter protein SLY1 as a novel anti-apoptotic protein required for thymocyte development

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    Beer-Hammer Sandra

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SH3 containing Lymphocyte Protein (SLY1 is a putative adapter protein exclusively expressed in lymphocytes which is involved in antigen receptor induced activation. We previously have generated SLY1Δ/Δ mice harbouring a partial deletion in the N-terminal region of SLY1 which revealed profound immunological defects in T and B cell functions. Results In this study, T cell development in SLY1-/- and SLY1Δ/Δ mice was analysed ex vivo and upon cultivation with the bone marrow stromal cell line OP9. SLY1-deficient thymocytes were compromised in inducing nutrient receptor expression and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation, indicating a defect in mTOR complex activation. Furthermore, SLY1 was identified as a novel anti-apoptotic protein required for developmental progression of T cell precursors to the CD4+CD8+ double-positive stage by protecting from premature programmed cell death initiation in developing CD4-CD8- double-negative thymocytes. In addition, SLY1 phosphorylation was differentially regulated upon Notch ligand-mediated stimulation and expression of the preTCR. Conclusion Thus, our results suggest a non-redundant role for SLY1 in integrating signals from both receptors in early T cell progenitors in the thymus.

  18. The gastroprotective effect of menthol: involvement of anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Leite Rozza

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of menthol against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg or menthol (50 mg/kg and then treated with ethanol to induce gastric ulcers. After euthanasia, stomach samples were prepared for histological slides and biochemical analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses of the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70 and the apoptotic Bax protein were performed. The neutrophils were manually counted. The activity of the myeloperoxidase (MPO was measured. To determine the level of antioxidant functions, the levels of glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, glutathione reductase (GR and superoxide dismutase (SOD were measured using ELISA. The levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 were assessed using ELISA kits. The menthol treated group presented 92% gastroprotection compared to the vehicle-treated group. An increased immunolabeled area was observed for HSP-70, and a decreased immunolabeled area was observed for the Bax protein in the menthol treated group. Menthol treatment induced a decrease in the activity of MPO and SOD, and the protein levels of GSH, GSH-Px and GR were increased. There was also a decrease in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and an increase in the level of IL-10. In conclusion, oral treatment with menthol displayed a gastroprotective activity through anti-apoptotic, antixidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  19. The gastroprotective effect of menthol: involvement of anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozza, Ariane Leite; Meira de Faria, Felipe; Souza Brito, Alba Regina; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of menthol against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg) or menthol (50 mg/kg) and then treated with ethanol to induce gastric ulcers. After euthanasia, stomach samples were prepared for histological slides and biochemical analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses of the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and the apoptotic Bax protein were performed. The neutrophils were manually counted. The activity of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured. To determine the level of antioxidant functions, the levels of glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured using ELISA. The levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) were assessed using ELISA kits. The menthol treated group presented 92% gastroprotection compared to the vehicle-treated group. An increased immunolabeled area was observed for HSP-70, and a decreased immunolabeled area was observed for the Bax protein in the menthol treated group. Menthol treatment induced a decrease in the activity of MPO and SOD, and the protein levels of GSH, GSH-Px and GR were increased. There was also a decrease in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and an increase in the level of IL-10. In conclusion, oral treatment with menthol displayed a gastroprotective activity through anti-apoptotic, antixidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  20. Piezometric biosensors for anti-apoptotic protein survivin based on buried positive-potential barrier and immobilized monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobiecka, Magdalena; Chalupa, Agata; Dworakowska, Beata

    2016-10-15

    The anti-apoptotic protein survivin (Sur) plays an important role in the regulation of cell division and inducing the chemotherapeutic drug resistance. The Sur protein and its mRNA have recently been studied as cancer biomarkers and potential targets for cancer therapy. In this work, we have focused on the design of immunosensors for the detection of Sur based on buried positive-potential barrier layer structure and anti-survivin antibody. The modification of solid AuQC piezoelectrodes was monitored by recording the resonance frequency shift and electrochemical measurements during each step of the sensor preparation. Our results indicate that the immunosensor with covalently bound monoclonal anti-survivin antibody can detect Sur with the limit of detection, LOD=1.7nM (S/N=3σ). The immunosensor applicability for the analysis of real samples was assessed by testing samples of cell lysate solutions obtained from human astrocytoma (glioblastoma) U-87MG cell line, with the experiments performed using the standard addition method. The good linearity of the calibration curves for PBS and lysate solutions at low Sur concentrations confirm the high specificity of the proposed biosensor and good discrimination against nonspecific interactions with lysate components. The calculations indicate that there is still room to increase the Sur capture capacity for Sur while miniaturizing the sensor. The important advantage of the sensor is that it can be reused by a simple regeneration procedure.

  1. Anti-Apoptotic and Pro-Survival Effect of Alpinate Oxyphyllae Fructus (AOF) in a d-Galactose-Induced Aging Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung-Ming; Chang, Hen-Hong; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Lin, Hung-Jen; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Padma Viswanadha, Vijaya; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Chang, Hsin-Nung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-03-29

    Aging, a natural biological/physiological phenomenon, is accelerated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and identified by a progressive decrease in physiological function. Several studies have shown a positive relationship between aging and chronic heart failure (HF). Cardiac apoptosis was found in age-related diseases. We used a traditional Chinese medicine, Alpinate Oxyphyllae Fructus (AOF), to evaluate its effect on cardiac anti-apoptosis and pro-survival. Male eight-week-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were segregated into five groups: normal control group (NC), d-Galactose-Induced aging group (Aging), and AOF of 50 (AL (AOF low)), 100 (AM (AOF medium)), 150 (AH (AOF high)) mg/kg/day. After eight weeks, hearts were measured by an Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) stain, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-assays and Western blotting. The experimental results show that the cardiomyocyte apoptotic pathway protein expression increased in the d-Galactose-Induced aging groups, with dose-dependent inhibition in the AOF treatment group (AL, AM, and AH). Moreover, the expression of the pro-survival p-Akt (protein kinase B (Akt)), Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2), anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-xL) protein decreased significantly in the d-Galactose-induced aging group, with increased performance in the AOF treatment group with levels of p-IGFIR and p-PI3K (Phosphatidylinositol-3' kinase (PI3K)) to increase by dosage and compensatory performance. On the other hand, the protein of the Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) pathway expression decreased in the aging groups and showed improvement in the AOF treatment group. Our results suggest that AOF strongly works against ROS-induced aging heart problems.

  2. Neuroprotective and Anti-Apoptotic Effects of CSP-1103 in Primary Cortical Neurons Exposed to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrini, Vanessa; Sarnico, Ilenia; Benarese, Marina; Branca, Caterina; Mota, Mariana; Lanzillotta, Annamaria; Bellucci, Arianna; Parrella, Edoardo; Faggi, Lara; Spano, Pierfranco; Imbimbo, Bruno Pietro; Pizzi, Marina

    2017-01-01

    CSP-1103 (formerly CHF5074) has been shown to reverse memory impairment and reduce amyloid plaque as well as inflammatory microglia activation in preclinical models of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, it was found to improve cognition and reduce brain inflammation in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Recent evidence suggests that CSP-1103 acts through a single molecular target, the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (AICD), a transcriptional regulator implicated in inflammation and apoptosis. We here tested the possible anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective activity of CSP-1103 in a cell-based model of post-ischemic injury, wherein the primary mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). When added after OGD, CSP-1103 prevented the apoptosis cascade by reducing cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation and the secondary necrosis. Additionally, CSP-1103 limited earlier activation of p38 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathways. These results demonstrate that CSP-1103 is neuroprotective in a model of post-ischemic brain injury and provide further mechanistic insights as regards its ability to reduce apoptosis and potential production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, these findings suggest a potential use of CSP-1103 for the treatment of brain ischemia. PMID:28106772

  3. Anti-apoptotic effect ofShudipingchan granule in the substantia nigra of rat models of Parkinson’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Ye; Xiao-lei Yuan; Jing He; Jie Zhou; Can-xing Yuan; Xu-ming Yang

    2016-01-01

    Levodopa is the gold-standard treatment for Parkinson’s disease. However, although it alleviates the clinical symptoms, it cannot delay the progressive apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons or prevent motor complications in the long term. In the present study, we investigated the effect ofShudipingchan granule on neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease, established by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine into the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area. We then administered levodopa (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally, twice daily) with or withoutShudipingchan granule (7.5 mL/kg intragastrically, twice daily), for 4 weeks. hTe long-term use of levodopa accel-erated apoptosis of nigral cells and worsened behavioral symptoms by activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and downstream apoptotic factors. However, administration ofShudipingchan granule with levodopa reduced expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Bax, increased tyrosine hydroxylase and Bcl-2, reduced apoptosis in the substantia nigra, and markedly improved dyskinesia. hTese ifndings suggest thatShudipingchan granule suppresses neuronal apoptosis by inhibiting the hyper-phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and downregulating expression of anti-apoptotic genes.Shudipingchan granule, used in combination with levodopa, can effectively reduce the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

  4. Methanolic extract of Origanum vulgare ameliorates type 1 diabetes through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujicic, Milica; Nikolic, Ivana; Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Saksida, Tamara; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Orescanin-Dusic, Zorana; Blagojevic, Dusko; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava; Tzakos, Andreas G; Stojanovic, Ivana

    2015-03-14

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D), an autoimmune inflammatory disorder, develops as a consequence of pancreatic β-cell destruction and results in hyperglycaemia. Since current T1D therapy mainly involves insulin replacement, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum (Greek oregano) leaf extract rich in biophenols for the treatment of T1D. The phytochemical profile of methanolic oregano extract (MOE) and aqueous oregano extract (AOE) was determined by liquid chromatography/electrospray ion-trap tandem MS (LC/DAD/ESI-MSn), while their main compounds were quantified by HPLC with diode array detection. After establishing their potent in vitro antioxidant activity, the extracts were administered to C57BL/6 mice treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin for diabetes induction. While prophylactic AOE therapy had no impact on diabetes induction, MOE reduced diabetes incidence and preserved normal insulin secretion. In addition, MOE scavenged reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, therefore, alleviated the need for the up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes. MOE treatment specifically attenuated the pro-inflammatory response mediated by T helper 17 cells and enhanced anti-inflammatory T helper 2 and T regulatory cells through the impact on specific signalling pathways and transcription factors. Importantly, MOE preserved β-cells from in vitro apoptosis via blockade of caspase 3. Finally, rosmarinic acid, a predominant compound in MOE, exhibited only partial protection from diabetes induction. In conclusion, acting as an antioxidant, immunomodulator and in an anti-apoptotic manner, MOE protected mice from diabetes development. Seemingly, there is more than one compound responsible for the beneficial effect of MOE.

  5. Thymosin beta 4 protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress by targeting anti-oxidative enzymes and anti-apoptotic genes.

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    Chuanyu Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. The mechanism by which Tβ4 modulates cardiac protection under oxidative stress is not known. The purpose of this study is to dissect the cardioprotective mechanism of Tβ4 on H(2O(2 induced cardiac damage. METHODS: Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes with or without Tβ4 pretreatment were exposed to H(2O(2 and expression of antioxidant, apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. ROS levels were estimated by DCF-DA using fluorescent microscopy and fluorimetry. Selected antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic genes were silenced by siRNA transfections in neonatal cardiomyocytes and effect of Tβ4 on H(2O(2-induced cardiac damage was evaluated. RESULTS: Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS levels induced by H(2O(2 in cardiomyocytes. Tβ4 pretreatment also resulted in an increase in the expression of antiapoptotic proteins and reduction of Bax/BCl(2 ratio in the cardiomyocytes. Pretreatment with Tβ4 resulted in stimulating the expression of antioxidant enzymes copper/zinc SOD and catalase in cardiomyocytes at both transcription and translation levels. Tβ4 treatment resulted in the increased expression of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Silencing of Cu/Zn SOD and catalase gene resulted in apoptotic cell death in the cardiomyocytes which was prevented by treatment with Tβ4. CONCLUSION: This is the first report that demonstrates the effect of Tβ4 on cardiomyocytes and its capability to selectively upregulate anti-oxidative enzymes, anti-inflammatory genes, and antiapoptotic enzymes in the neonatal cardiomyocytes thus preventing cell death thereby protecting the myocardium. Tβ4 treatment resulted in decreased oxidative stress and inflammation in the

  6. Dimer-dependent intrinsic/basal activity of the class B G protein-coupled receptor PAC1 promotes cellular anti-apoptotic activity through Wnt/β-catenin pathways that are associated with dimer endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjie Yu

    Full Text Available The high expression of PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-preferring receptor PAC1 is associated with nerve injury and tumors. Our previous report (Yu R, et al. PLoS One 2012; 7: e51811 confirmed the dimerization of PAC1 and found that the M-PAC1 mutation in the N-terminal first Cys/Ala lost the ability to form dimers. In this study, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1 cells overexpressing wild-type PAC1 (PAC1-CHO had significantly higher anti-apoptotic activities against serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis associated with a lower caspase 3 activity and a higher Bcl-2 level in a ligand-independent manner than those of CHO cells overexpressing the mutant M-PAC1 (M-PAC1-CHO. PAC1-CHO had significantly higher β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-myc levels corresponding to the Wnt/β-catenin signal than did M-PAC1-CHO. In addition, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor XAV939 significantly inhibited the anti-apoptotic activities of PAC1-CHO. Top-flash assays demonstrated that PAC1-CHO had a significantly stronger Wnt/β-catenin signal than did M-PAC1-CHO. Acetylcysteine (NAC as an inhibitor of the dimerization of PAC1 inhibited the anti-apoptotic activities that were endowed by PAC1 and decreased the Wnt/β-catenin signal in Top-flash assays. In the PAC1 Tet (tetracycline-on inducible gene expression system by doxycycline (Dox, higher expression levels of PAC1 resulted in higher anti-apoptotic activities that were associated with a stronger Wnt/β-catenin signal. A similar correlation was also found with the down-regulation of PAC1 in the Neuro2a neuroblastoma cell. BiFC combined with fluorescence confocal imaging indicated that during serum-withdrawal-induced apoptosis, PAC1 dimers displayed significant endocytosis. These findings indicate that PAC1 has ligand-independent and dimer-dependent intrinsic/basal activity, conferring cells with anti-apoptotic activities against serum withdrawal, which is involved in the Wnt/β-catenin signal and

  7. The Putative Role of the Non-Gastric H+/K+-ATPase ATP12A (ATP1AL1 as Anti-Apoptotic Ion Transporter: Effect of the H+/K+ ATPase Inhibitor SCH28080 on Butyrate-Stimulated Myelomonocytic HL-60 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jakab

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The ATP12A gene codes for a non-gastric H+/K+ ATPase, which is expressed in a wide variety of tissues. The aim of this study was to test for the molecular and functional expression of the non-gastric H+/K+ ATPase ATP12A/ATP1AL1 in unstimulated and butyrate-stimulated (1 and 10 mM human myelomonocytic HL-60 cells, to unravel its potential role as putative apoptosis-counteracting ion transporter as well as to test for the effect of the H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor SCH28080 in apoptosis. Methods: Real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR was used for amplification and cloning of ATP12A transcripts and to assess transcriptional regulation. BCECF microfluorimetry was used to assess changes of intracellular pH (pHi after acute intracellular acid load (NH4Cl prepulsing. Mean cell volumes (MCV and MCV-recovery after osmotic cell shrinkage (Regulatory Volume Increase, RVI were assessed by Coulter counting. Flow-cytometry was used to measure MCV (Coulter principle, to assess apoptosis (phosphatidylserine exposure to the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, caspase activity, 7AAD staining and differentiation (CD86 expression. Results: We found by RT-PCR, intracellular pH measurements, MCV measurements and flow cytometry that ATP12A is expressed in human myelomonocytic HL-60 cells. Treatment of HL-60 cells with 1 mM butyrate leads to monocyte-directed differentiation whereas higher concentrations (10 mM induce apoptosis as assessed by flow-cytometric determination of CD86 expression, caspase activity, phosphatidylserine exposure on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane and MCV measurements. Transcriptional up-regulation of ATP12A and CD86 is evident in 1 mM butyrate-treated HL-60 cells. The H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor SCH28080 (100 µM diminishes K+-dependent pHi recovery after intracellular acid load and blocks RVI after osmotic cell shrinkage. After seeding, HL-60 cells increase their MCV within the first 24 h in culture, and subsequently

  8. The anti-apoptotic protein BCL2L1/Bcl-xL is neutralized by pro-apoptotic PMAIP1/Noxa in neuroblastoma, thereby determining bortezomib sensitivity independent of prosurvival MCL1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenbuchner, Judith; Ausserlechner, Michael J; Porto, Verena; David, Reinhard; Meister, Bernhard; Bodner, Martin; Villunger, Andreas; Geiger, Kathrin; Obexer, Petra

    2010-03-05

    Neuroblastoma is the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children. Here, we report that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (PS-341, Velcade) activated the pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins PMAIP1/Noxa and BBC3/Puma and induced accumulation of anti-apoptotic MCL1 as well as repression of anti-apoptotic BCL2L1/Bcl-xL. Retroviral expression of Bcl-xL, but not of MCL1, prevented apoptosis by bortezomib. Gene knockdown of Noxa by shRNA technology significantly reduced apoptosis, whereas Puma knockdown did not affect cell death kinetics. Immunoprecipitation revealed that endogenous Noxa associated with both, Bcl-xL and MCL1, suggesting that in neuronal cells Noxa can neutralize Bcl-xL, explaining the pronounced protective effect of Bcl-xL. Tetracycline-regulated Noxa expression did not trigger cell death per se but sensitized to bortezomib treatment in a dose-dependent manner. This implies that the induction of Noxa is necessary but not sufficient for bortezomib-induced apoptosis. We conclude that MCL1 steady-state expression levels do not affect sensitivity to proteasome-inhibitor treatment in neuronal tumor cells, and that both the repression of Bcl-xL and the activation of Noxa are necessary for bortezomib-induced cell death.

  9. Histone demethylase Jmjd3 regulates osteoblast apoptosis through targeting anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Okamura, Hirohiko; Teramachi, Jumpei; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2016-04-01

    Posttranslational modifications including histone methylation regulate gene transcription through directly affecting the structure of chromatin. Trimethylation of histone H3K27 (H3K27me3) contributes to gene silencing and the histone demethylase Jumonji domain-containing 3 (Jmjd3) specifically removes the methylation of H3K27me3, followed by the activation of gene expression. In the present study, we explored the roles of Jmjd3 in regulating osteoblast apoptosis. Knockdown of Jmjd3 promoted osteoblast apoptosis induced by serum deprivation with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased levels of caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation. B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), an anti-apoptotic protein, was down-regulated by knockdown of Jmjd3 through retaining H3K27me3 on its promoter region. Knockdown of Jmjd3 increased the pro-apoptotic activity of Bim through inhibiting ERK-dependent phosphorylation of Bim. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1), which stimulates ERK phosphorylation, decreased in the Jmjd3-knockdown cells and introduction of PKD1 relieved osteoblast apoptosis in the Jmjd3-knockdown cells through increasing ERK-regulated Bim phosphorylation. These results suggest that Jmjd3 regulates osteoblast apoptosis through targeting Bcl-2 expression and Bim phosphorylation.

  10. Increased ratio of anti-apoptotic to pro-apoptotic Bcl2 gene-family members in lithium-responders one month after treatment initiation

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    Lowthert Lori

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lithium is considered by many as the gold standard medication in the management of bipolar disorder (BD. However, the clinical response to lithium is heterogeneous, and the molecular basis for this difference in response is unknown. In the present study, we sought to determine how the peripheral blood gene expression profiles of patients with bipolar disorder (BD changed over time following intitiation of treatment with lithium, and whether differences in those profiles over time were related to the clinical response. Methods Illumina Sentrix Beadchip (Human-6v2 microarrays containing > 48,000 transcript probes were used to measure levels of expression of gene-expression in peripheral blood from 20 depressed subjects with BD prior to and every two weeks during 8 weeks of open-label treatment with lithium. Changes in gene-expression were compared between treatment responders (defined as a decrease in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale of 50% or more and non-responders. Pathway analysis was conducted using GeneGO Metacore software. Results 127 genes showed a differential response in responders vs. non-responders. Pathway analysis showed that regulation of apoptosis was the most significantly affected pathway among these genes. Closer examination of the time-course of changes among BCL2 related genes showed that in lithium-responders, one month after starting treatment with lithium, several anti-apoptotic genes including Bcl2 and insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2 were up-regulated, while pro-apoptotic genes, including BCL2-antagonist/killer 1 (BAK1 and BCL2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD, were down-regulated. In contrast, in lithium non-responders, BCL2 and IRS2 were down-regulated, while BAK1 and BAD up-regulated at the one-month time-point. Conclusions These results suggest that differential changes in the balance of pro- and anti- apoptotic gene-expression following treatment with lithium may explain some of

  11. Nesfatin-1 protects dopaminergic neurons against MPP+/MPTP-induced neurotoxicity through the C-Raf–ERK1/2-dependent anti-apoptotic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Li; Song, Ning; Du, Xi-Xun; Li, Yong; Xie, Jun-Xia; Jiang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Several brain-gut peptides have been reported to have a close relationship with the central dopaminergic system; one such brain-gut peptide is nesfatin-1. Nesfatin-1 is a satiety peptide that is predominantly secreted by X/A-like endocrine cells in the gastric glands, where ghrelin is also secreted. We previously reported that ghrelin exerted neuroprotective effects on nigral dopaminergic neurons, which implied a role for ghrelin in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we aim to clarify whether nesfatin-1 has similar effects on dopaminergic neurons both in vivo and in vitro. We show that nesfatin-1 attenuates the loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mouse model of PD. In addition, nesfatin-1 antagonized 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridillium ion (MPP+)-induced toxicity by restoring mitochondrial function, inhibiting cytochrome C release and preventing caspase-3 activation in MPP+-treated MES23.5 dopaminergic cells. These neuroprotective effects could be abolished by selective inhibition of C-Raf and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our data suggest that C-Raf-ERK1/2, which is involved in an anti-apoptotic pathway, is responsible for the neuroprotective effects of nesfatin-1 in the context of MPTP-induced toxicity. These results imply that nesfatin-1 might have therapeutic potential for PD. PMID:28106099

  12. Anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects of thalidomide on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia, Guadalupe; Medrano, Juan Ángel Núñez-; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Farfán, Dolores Jiménez; Sotelo, Julio; Sánchez, Aurora; Trejo-Solís, Cristina

    2015-04-15

    Thalidomide has shown protective effects in different models of ischemia/reperfusion damage. To elucidate the mechanisms of such protection, this study assessed the effects of thalidomide on the oxidative stress and inflammatory response induced by ischemia/reperfusion episodes in rats. Rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2hours. All animals were sacrificed after different reperfusion times. Rats were administered either DMSO or thalidomide (20mg/kg (i.p.)) at different times before or during reperfusion: 1) 1h before reperfusion; the infarct area was measured 2h after reperfusion. 2) 10min before reperfusion and 80min after reperfusion; the infarct area was measured 24h after reperfusion; and 3) 10min before reperfusion and 1h, 24h, 48h, and 68h after reperfusion; the infarct area was measured 72h after reperfusion. Thalidomide reduced the infarct area 24h and 72h after MCAO, and decreased the neurological deficit in all groups with respect to controls. Thalidomide also lowered significantly the number of TUNEL-positive cells, levels of Bax, caspase-3, lipoperoxidation, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased the levels of SOD1, Bcl-2 and pAkt. These results show that thalidomide has neuroprotective effects, apparently due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects.

  13. Anti-apoptotic and hepatoprotective effects of gomisin A on fulminant hepatic failure induced by D-galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hwa; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kang, Sam Sik; Bae, Kihwan; Hung, Tran Manh; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2008-02-01

    This study examined the effects of gomisin A, a lignan compound from Schisandra fructus, on D-galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hepatic apoptosis and liver failure. Mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of GalN (700 mg/kg) / LPS (10 microg/kg). Gomisin A (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 1 h before the GalN/LPS injection. The liver injury was assessed biochemically and histologically. GalN/LPS increased the serum aminotransferase levels and lipid peroxidation but decreased the reduced glutathione level. The pretreatment with gomisin A attenuated these changes in a dose-dependent manner. The survival rate of the gomisin A group was significantly higher than that of the control. The mitochondria isolated after the mice had been injected with GalN/LPS were swollen, which was attenuated by the gomisin A pretreatment. The elevation of serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and activation of caspase-3 were observed in the GalN/LPS group, which was attenuated by gomisin A. The gomisin A-pretreated groups showed significantly fewer apoptotic (TUNEL-positive) cells and DNA fragmentation as compared with the GalN/LPS mice. The liver protection afforded by gomisin A is the result of the reduced oxidative stress and its anti-apoptotic activity.

  14. Anti-apoptotic effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in focal cerebral ischemic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yuan; Shiming Zhang; Wanli Dong; Qi Fang

    2011-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury are currently contentious. The present study examined the effects of subcutaneous injection of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (50 μg/kg) over 5 days in a model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion with intraluminal filament occlusion in rats. The results indicated that recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor reduced brain infarct volume following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats, down-regulated the expression of caspase-3 mRNA (a key protease for apoptosis in the cerebral ischemia zone), lowered the rate of neuronal apoptosis in the cerebral ischemia zone, and notably ameliorated neurological function. These results indicate that recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has anti-apoptotic effects on neurons following focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and exerts neuroprotective effects.

  15. Reconstitution of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein into lipid membranes and biophysical evidence for its detergent-driven association with the pro-apoptotic Bax protein.

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    Marcus Wallgren

    Full Text Available The anti-apoptotic B-cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2 protein and its counterpart, the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax, are key players in the regulation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. However, how they interact at the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM and there determine whether the cell will live or be sentenced to death remains unknown. Competing models have been presented that describe how Bcl-2 inhibits the cell-killing activity of Bax, which is common in treatment-resistant tumors where Bcl-2 is overexpressed. Some studies suggest that Bcl-2 binds directly to and sequesters Bax, while others suggest an indirect process whereby Bcl-2 blocks BH3-only proteins and prevents them from activating Bax. Here we present the results of a biophysical study in which we investigated the putative interaction of solubilized full-length human Bcl-2 with Bax and the scope for incorporating the former into a native-like lipid environment. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy was used to detect direct Bcl-2-Bax-interactions in the presence of polyoxyethylene-(23-lauryl-ether (Brij-35 detergent at a level below its critical micelle concentration (CMC. Additional surface plasmon resonance (SPR measurements confirmed this observation and revealed a high affinity between the Bax and Bcl-2 proteins. Upon formation of this protein-protein complex, Bax also prevented the binding of antimycin A2 (a known inhibitory ligand of Bcl-2 to the Bcl-2 protein, as fluorescence spectroscopy experiments showed. In addition, Bcl-2 was able to form mixed micelles with Triton X-100 solubilized neutral phospholipids in the presence of high concentrations of Brij-35 (above its CMC. Following detergent removal, the integral membrane protein was found to have been fully reconstituted into a native-like membrane environment, as confirmed by ultracentrifugation and subsequent SDS-PAGE experiments.

  16. Introduction of the anti-apoptotic baculovirus p35 gene in passion fruit induces herbicide tolerance, reduced bacterial lesions, but does not inhibits passion fruit woodiness disease progress induced by cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, D.S.; Coelho, M.C.F.; Souza, M.T.; Marques, A.; Ribeiro, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of anti-apoptotic genes into plants leads to resistance to environmental stress and broad-spectrum disease resistance. The anti-apoptotic gene (p35) from a baculovirus was introduced into the genome of passion fruit plants by biobalistics. Eleven regenerated plants showed the presen

  17. BAG1: The Guardian of Anti-Apoptotic Proteins in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanja Aveic; Martina Pigazzi; Giuseppe Basso

    2011-01-01

    BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1) is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, M...

  18. SATB1 Mediates Long-Range Chromatin Interactions: A Dual Regulator of Anti-Apoptotic BCL2 and Pro-Apoptotic NOXA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin; Wang, Zongdan; Sun, Luan; Shao, Lipei; Yang, Nan; Yu, Dawei; Zhang, Xin; Han, Xiao; Sun, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1), a global genomic organizer, has been associated with various cancers, which raises the question of how higher-order chromatin structure contributes to carcinogenesis. Disruption of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer. We previously demonstrated that SATB1 mediated specific long-range chromosomal interactions between the mbr enhancer located within 3'-UTR of the BCL2 gene and the promoter to regulate BCL2 expression during early apoptosis. In the present study, we used chromosome conformation capture (3C) assays and molecular analyses to further investigate the function of the SATB1-mediated higher-order chromatin structure in co-regulation of the anti-apoptotic BCL2 gene and the pro-apoptotic NOXA gene located 3.4Mb downstream on Chromosome 18. We demonstrated that the mbr enhancer spatially juxtaposed the promoters of BCL2 and NOXA genes through SATB1-mediated chromatin-loop in Jurkat cells. Decreased SATB1 levels switched the mbr-BCL2 loop to mbr-NOXA loop, and thus changed expression of these two genes. The SATB1-mediated dynamic switch of the chromatin loop structures was essential for the cooperative expression of the BCL2 and NOXA genes in apoptosis. Notably, the role of SATB1 was specific, since inhibition of SATB1 degradation by caspase-6 inhibitor or caspase-6-resistant SATB1 mutant reversed expression of BCL-2 and NOXA in response to apoptotic stimulation. This study reveals the critical role of SATB1-organized higher-order chromatin structure in regulating the dynamic equilibrium of apoptosis-controlling genes with antagonistic functions and suggests that aberrant SATB1 expression might contribute to cancer development by disrupting the co-regulated genes in apoptosis pathways.

  19. Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Engage the Cell Death Program Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    motor neuropathy . Nature Genetics, 24, 188–191. 1645231. Mobley, J. A., Leav, I., Zielie, P., Wotkowitz, C., Evans, J., Lam, 1646Y. W., et al. (2003...46] , the suppression of DNA synthesis [47] , an accumulation of p53 [48] and activation of the mitochondrial cell death pathway [49] . The...also been linked to facilitation of cell death induced by cerulenin. For instance, the anti-apoptotic mitochondrial factor Bax rescues cerulenin

  20. Fragment-based discovery of potent inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic MCL-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Andrew M; Swann, Steven L; Song, Danying; Swinger, Kerren; Park, Chang; Zhang, Haichao; Wendt, Michael D; Kunzer, Aaron R; Souers, Andrew J; Sun, Chaohong

    2014-03-15

    Apoptosis is regulated by the BCL-2 family of proteins, which is comprised of both pro-death and pro-survival members. Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant cells. One way in which cancer cells achieve this evasion is thru overexpression of the pro-survival members of the BCL-2 family. Overexpression of MCL-1, a pro-survival protein, has been shown to be a resistance factor for Navitoclax, a potent inhibitor of BCL-2 and BCL-XL. Here we describe the use of fragment screening methods and structural biology to drive the discovery of novel MCL-1 inhibitors from two distinct structural classes. Specifically, cores derived from a biphenyl sulfonamide and salicylic acid were uncovered in an NMR-based fragment screen and elaborated using high throughput analog synthesis. This culminated in the discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of MCL-1 that may serve as promising leads for medicinal chemistry optimization efforts.

  1. IL-17 attenuates the anti-apoptotic effects of GM-CSF in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon, Stéphane; Saffar, Arash Shoja; Shan, Lianyu; Gounni, Abdelilah Soussi

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is a pleiotropic, pro-inflammatory cytokine that is implicated in chronic inflammatory and degenerative disorders. IL-17 has been demonstrated to link activated T-lymphocyte with the recruitment of neutrophils at sites of inflammation, however whether IL-17 can mediate neutrophil survival and subsequently affect inflammatory responses has not fully been elucidated. In our study, we demonstrate that human peripheral blood and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils express mRNA and cell surface IL-17A receptor. IL-17A does not affect the rate of spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis, however significantly decreased granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mediated survival by antagonizing the signal transduction pathways of p38, Erk1/2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5B. These events were associated with reduced myeloid cell lymphoma-1 (Mcl-1) protein levels, increased translocation and aggregation of Bax to mitochondria, decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential and in an increase in caspase-3/7 activity. These events were independent of increased Fas or soluble Fas ligand expression levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that IL-17 may regulate neutrophil homeostasis and favor the resolution of inflamed tissues by attenuating the delay in neutrophil apoptosis induced by inflammatory cytokines.

  2. Annexin V assay-proven anti-apoptotic effect of ascorbic acid 2-glucoside after cold ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Controversy exists over whether the predominant cell death of hepatocytes is due to apoptosis or necrosis after ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study we investigated the predominant cell death of hepatocytes after cold ischemia/reperfusion injury using the Annexin V-based assay, and evaluated the anti-apoptotic effect of ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AA-2G added to the University of Wisconsin solution (UW solution in rat liver transplantation. The retrieved liver was preserved in 4 UW solution for 24 h, and then transplanted orthotopically to the syngeneic Wistar recipient. The animals were divided into 2 groups, a control group (n=10, in which liver grafts were preserved in UW solution (4, and an AA-2G group (n=10, in which liver grafts were preserved in UW solution (4 with AA-2G (100 ug/ml. The serum AST level 4 h after reperfusion in the control group was significantly suppressed in the AA-2G group, and the bile production of the liver graft in the AA-2G group was well recovered. The mean survival time in the AA-2G group was significantly improved compared with that in the control group. Annexin-V and Propidium iodide staining 4 h after reperfusion showed a significantly higher percentage of viable hepatocytes in the AA-2G group compared with the control group (93.4 +/- 2.0 vs. 80.3 +- 2.1%, P<0.05. In the control group, the main cell death of hepatocytes was apoptosis (early apoptosis: 10.0 +- 4.7%, late apoptosis: 6.4 +/- 1.7%. The addition of AA-2G to the UW solution significantly inhibited both early and late apoptotic cell death 4 h after reperfusion (early apoptosis: 0.98 +/- 0.88%, late apoptosis: 2.2 +/- 1.1%. The expression of caspase 9 in the immunostaining of the liver graft was suppressed in the AA-2G group compared with in the control group. Our study using the Annexin V-based assay provided evidence that the predominant cell death of hepatocytes was apoptosis after 24 h cold ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat liver

  3. CCR9 interactions support ovarian cancer cell survival and resistance to cisplatin-induced apoptosis in a PI3K-dependent and FAK-independent fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Erica L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is more often used to treat ovarian cancer (OvCa, which provides modest survival advantage primarily due to chemo-resistance and up regulated anti-apoptotic machineries in OvCa cells. Therefore, targeting the mechanisms responsible for cisplatin resistance in OvCa cell may improve therapeutic outcomes. We have shown that ovarian cancer cells express CC chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9. Others have also shown that CCL25, the only natural ligand for CCR9, up regulates anti-apoptotic proteins in immature T lymphocytes. Hence, it is plausible that CCR9-mediated cell signals might be involved in OvCa cell survival and inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the potential role and molecular mechanisms of CCR9-mediated inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis in OvCa cells. Methods Cell proliferation, vibrant apoptosis, and TUNEL assays were performed with or without cisplatin treatment in presence or absence of CCL25 to determine the role of the CCR9-CCL25 axis in cisplatin resistance. In situ Fast Activated cell-based ELISA (FACE assays were performed to determine anti-apoptotic signaling molecules responsible for CCL25-CCR9 mediated survival. Results Our results show interactions between CCR9 and CCL25 increased anti-apoptotic signaling cascades in OvCa cells, which rescued cells from cisplatin-induced cell death. Specifically, CCL25-CCR9 interactions mediated Akt, activation as well as GSK-3β and FKHR phosphorylation in a PI3K-dependent and FAK-independent fashion. Conclusions Our results suggest the CCR9-CCL25 axis plays an important role in reducing cisplatin-induced apoptosis of OvCa cells.

  4. IFPA Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: the dynamic role of Bcl-2 family members in trophoblast cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J; Jurisicova, A; Caniggia, I

    2009-03-01

    Bcl-2 family members are important regulators of cell fate in normal organ development and in disease status. Pro- and anti-apoptotic members of this family function through a complex network of homo- and hetero-dimers to determine whether a cell lives or dies. Members of the Bcl-2 family are classically recognized for their role in apoptosis, yet emerging evidence has highlighted their importance in the regulation of cell cycle. Cellular proliferation, differentiation and death accompany early placental development of the trophoblast lineage. We have recently reported on the expression and function of two Bcl-2 family members in normal placental development, namely the pro-apoptotic Mtd/Bok, and its anti-apoptotic partner Mcl-1 and have found that their expression is upregulated by low oxygen, a key mediator of trophoblast cell proliferation in early placentation. Interestingly, we have also reported that the expression of the Mtd/Mcl-1 system is altered in preeclampsia, a placental pathology associated with a status of oxidative stress and typically characterized by an immature proliferative trophoblast phenotype and excessive trophoblast cell death. In this pathology levels of pro-apototic Mtd-L and Mtd-P are increased and anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 is cleaved in to a pro-apoptotic isoform. Disruption in Mtd/Mcl-1 expression seen in preeclampsia may contribute to both the increased apoptosis and hyperproliferative nature of this disorder.

  5. The Protective Properties of the Strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats Mediated by Anti-Apoptotic and Upregulation of Antioxidant Genes Expression Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa S; Al-Yhya, Nouf A; El-Khadragy, Manal F; Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M; Alajmi, Reem A; Hassan, Zeinab K; Hassan, Salwa B; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2016-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) has been extensively used to treat a wide range of ailments in many cultures. The present study was aimed at evaluating the hepatoprotective effect of strawberry juice on experimentally induced liver injury in rats. To this end, rats were introperitoneally injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) with or without strawberry juice supplementation for 12 weeks and the hepatoprotective effect of strawberry was assessed by measuring serum liver enzyme markers, hepatic tissue redox status and apoptotic markers with various techniques including biochemistry, ELISA, quantitative PCR assays and histochemistry. The hepatoprotective effect of the strawberry was evident by preventing CCl4-induced increase in liver enzymes levels. Determination of oxidative balance showed that strawberry treatment significantly blunted CCl4-induced increase in oxidative stress markers and decrease in enzymatic and non-enzymatic molecules in hepatic tissue. Furthermore, strawberry supplementation enhanced the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, and restrained the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 with a marked reduction in collagen areas in hepatic tissue. These findings demonstrated that strawberry (F. ananassa) juice possessed antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-fibrotic properties, probably mediated by the presence of polyphenols and flavonoids compounds.

  6. High-quality NMR structure of human anti-apoptotic protein domain Mcl-1(171-327 for cancer drug design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaohua Liu

    Full Text Available A high-quality NMR solution structure is presented for protein hMcl-1(171-327 which comprises residues 171-327 of the human anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 (hMcl-1. Since this construct contains the three Bcl-2 homology (BH sequence motifs which participate in forming a binding site for inhibitors of hMcl-1, it is deemed to be crucial for structure-based design of novel anti-cancer drugs blocking the Mcl1 related anti-apoptotic pathway. While the coordinates of an NMR solution structure for a corresponding construct of the mouse homologue (mMcl-1 are publicly available, our structure is the first atomic resolution structure reported for the 'apo form' of the human protein. Comparison of the two structures reveals that hMcl-1(171-327 exhibits a somewhat wider ligand/inhibitor binding groove as well as a different charge distribution within the BH3 binding groove. These findings strongly suggest that the availability of the human structure is of critical importance to support future design of cancer drugs.

  7. Resveratrol ameliorates renal damage, increases expression of heme oxygenase-1, and has anti-complement, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects in a murine model of membranous nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chao Wu

    Full Text Available Idiopathic membranous nephropathy (MN is an autoimmune-mediated glomerulonephritis and a common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults. There are limited available treatments for MN. We assessed the efficacy of resveratrol (RSV therapy for treatment of MN in a murine model of this disease.Murine MN was experimentally induced by daily subcutaneous administration of cationic bovine serum albumin, with phosphate-buffered saline used in control mice. MN mice were untreated or given RSV. Disease severity and pathogenesis was assessed by determination of metabolic and histopathology profiles, lymphocyte subsets, immunoglobulin production, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and production of heme oxygenase-1 (HO1.MN mice given RSV had significantly reduced proteinuria and a marked amelioration of glomerular lesions. RSV also significantly attenuated immunofluorescent staining of C3, although there were no changes of serum immunoglobulin levels or immunocomplex deposition in the kidneys. RSV treatment of MN mice also reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, reduced cell apoptosis, and upregulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO1. Inhibition of HO1 with tin protoporphyrin IX partially reversed the renoprotective effects of RSV. The HO1 induced by RSV maybe via Nrf2 signaling.Our results show that RSV increased the expression of HO1 and ameliorated the effects of membranous nephropathy in a mouse model due to its anti-complement, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects. RSV appears to have potential as a treatment for MN.

  8. Anti-apoptotic action of API2-MALT1 fusion protein involved in t(11;18)(q21;q21) MALT lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Y

    2005-01-01

    At least three distinct chromosomal translocations, t(11;18)(q21;q21), t(1;14)(p22;q32) and t(14;18)(q32;q21) involving the API2 (also known as c-IAP2)-MALT1 fusion protein, BCL10, and MALT1, respectively, have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Our findings showed that several variants of the API2-MALT1 fusion protein can occur in patients with t(11;18)(q21;q21), and that API2-MALT1 can potently enfance activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB signaling, which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of MALT lymphomas. We also found that MALT1 is rapidly degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as is the case with API2, but upon the synthesis of fusion, API2-MALT1 becomes stable against this pathway. This stability of API2-MALT1 may thus result in inappropriate nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma. Recent biochemical and genetic studies have clearly shown that BCL10 and MALT1 form a physical and functional complex and are both required for NF-kappaB activation by antigen receptor stimulation in T and B lymphocytes. It has also been shown that CARMA1, a newly discovered member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) families, is critical for antigen receptor-stimulated NF-kappaB activation. It can be assumed that API2-MALT1 can bypass this normal BCL10/MALT1 cellular signaling pathway linked to NF-kappaB activation, thereby inducing antigen receptor-independent proliferation of lymphocytes. Furthermore, BCL10/MALT1- and API2-MALT1-induced NF-kappaB activation may contribute to anti-apoptotic action probably through NF-kappaB-mediated upregulation of apoptotic inhibitor genes. We recently provided direct evidence that API2-MALT1 indeed exerts anti-apoptotic action, in part, through its direct interaction with apoptotic regulators including Smac. Taken together, these findings prompt us to hypothesize that the anti-apoptotic action

  9. Chlorophylls - natural solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jantschi, Lorentz; Balan, Mugur C; Sestras, Radu E

    2011-01-01

    A molecular modeling study was conducted on a series of six natural occurring chlorophylls. Quantum chemistry calculated orbital energies were used to estimate frequency of transitions between occupied molecular orbital and unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels of chlorophyll molecules in vivo conditions in standard (ASTMG173) environmental conditions. Obtained results are in good agreement with energies necessary to fix the Magnesium atom by chlorophyll molecules and with occurrence of chlorophylls in living vegetal organisms.

  10. Natural killer cells in psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, A M

    2012-02-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common immune-mediated disorders. There is evidence that it is mediated by Th1 and, more recently, Th17 cells. The cytokine pattern, particularly the dominance of TNF-alpha, implicates the innate immune system in psoriasis pathogenesis. Of the many components of the innate immune system known to be involved in psoriatic lesions, natural killer and natural killer T cells appear to have a unique role. We review the evidence supporting a role for natural killer cells in psoriasis.

  11. Effect of hrHPV infection on anti-apoptotic gene and pro-apoptotic gene expression in cervical cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Er Tang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of hrHPV infection on anti-apoptotic gene and pro-apoptotic gene expression in cervical cancer tissue.Methods: A total of 56 patients with cervical cancer, 94 cases of patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 48 cases of patients with chronic cervicitis who were treated in our hospital from May 2013 to December 2015 were selected for study and included in malignant group, precancerous lesion group and benign group respectively. hrHPV infection as well as the expression of anti-apoptotic genes and pro-apoptotic genes in cervical tissue were detected.Results:hrHPV infection rate and viral load in cervical tissue of malignant group were significantly higher than those of precancerous lesion group and benign group; P27 and p16 levels in cervical tissue of malignant group were significantly lower than those of precancerous lesion group and benign group, and K-ras, c-myc, Prdx4 and TNFAIP8 levels were significantly higher than those of precancerous lesion group and benign group; the greater the HPV virus load, the lower the p27 and p16 levels and the higher the K-ras, c-myc, Prdx4 and TNFAIP8 levels in cervical tissue.Conclusions:hrHPV infection can result in tumor suppressor genes p27 and p16 expression deletion and increase the expression of proto-oncogene and apoptosis-inhibiting genes, and it is associated with the occurrence and development of cervical cancer.

  12. The Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins Bim and bid are functionally active and restrained by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in healthy liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Takahiro; Hikita, Hayato; Kawaguchi, Tsukasa; Saito, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shigekawa, Minoru; Shimizu, Satoshi; Li, Wei; Miyagi, Takuya; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2013-10-18

    An intrinsic pathway of apoptosis is regulated by the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family proteins. We previously reported that a fine rheostatic balance between the anti- and pro-apoptotic multidomain Bcl-2 family proteins controls hepatocyte apoptosis in the healthy liver. The Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins set this rheostatic balance toward apoptosis upon activation in the diseased liver. However, their involvement in healthy Bcl-2 rheostasis remains unknown. In the present study, we focused on two BH3-only proteins, Bim and Bid, and we clarified the Bcl-2 network that governs hepatocyte life and death in the healthy liver. We generated hepatocyte-specific Bcl-xL- or Mcl-1-knock-out mice, with or without disrupting Bim and/or Bid, and we examined hepatocyte apoptosis under physiological conditions. We also examined the effect of both Bid and Bim disruption on the hepatocyte apoptosis caused by the inhibition of Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Spontaneous hepatocyte apoptosis in Bcl-xL- or Mcl-1-knock-out mice was significantly ameliorated by Bim deletion. The disruption of both Bim and Bid completely prevented hepatocyte apoptosis in Bcl-xL-knock-out mice and weakened massive hepatocyte apoptosis via the additional in vivo knockdown of mcl-1 in these mice. Finally, the hepatocyte apoptosis caused by ABT-737, which is a Bcl-xL/Bcl-2/Bcl-w inhibitor, was completely prevented in Bim/Bid double knock-out mice. The BH3-only proteins Bim and Bid are functionally active but are restrained by the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins under physiological conditions. Hepatocyte integrity is maintained by the dynamic and well orchestrated Bcl-2 network in the healthy liver.

  13. Immunomodulatory properties and anti-apoptotic effects of zinc and melatonin in an experimental model of chronic Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazão, Vânia; Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Azevedo, Angela Palamin; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; de Morais, Fabiana Rossetto; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2015-05-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of melatonin and zinc during chronic experimental Chagas' disease were studied. Early and late apoptosis by Annexin V-propidium iodide staining were evaluated. The expression of CD28, CD80, CD86, CD45RA and CD4(+)T and CD8(+)T cells were also evaluated by flow cytometry analysis. The combination of zinc and melatonin notably reduced the apoptotic ratios of splenic cells in the infected and treated animals when compared to untreated rats, during early and late stages of apoptosis. The percentages of CD8(+)T cells in Zn, Mel or Zn and Mel treated rats were reduced when compared to infected and untreated animals. Higher percentages of CD28 expression in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell populations were observed in control and infected Zn-treated group as compared to untreated ones. Zn, Mel or the combination of both did not induce any statistically significant differences for B cells when comparing to treated control and infected groups. Zinc or Mel-treated animals presented a lower expression of CD86 when compared to untreated counterparts. According to our data, this work strongly suggest that the modulation of the immune system operated by zinc and melatonin administration affected the balance among T cell immune response, apoptosis and expression of co-stimulatory molecules during chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection, inducing important changes in the host's immune response against the parasite. Future experiments in this field should be focused in improving our understanding of the key mechanisms underlying the involvement of melatonin and zinc in the immune response during chronic Chagas' disease.

  14. Anti-apoptotic effects of Sonic hedgehog signalling through oxidative stress reduction in astrocytes co-cultured with excretory-secretory products of larval Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang-Yao; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Wang, Lian-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is an important aetiologic agent of eosinophilic meningitis and meningoencephalitis in humans. Co-culturing astrocytes with soluble antigens of A. cantonensis activated the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling pathway and inhibited the apoptosis of astrocytes via the activation of Bcl-2. This study was conducted to determine the roles of the Shh signalling pathway, apoptosis, and oxidative stress in astrocytes after treatment with excretory-secretory products (ESP) from A. cantonensis fifth-stage larvae. Although astrocyte viability was significantly decreased after ESP treatment, the expression of Shh signalling pathway related proteins (Shh, Ptch-1 and Gli-1) was significantly increased. However, apoptosis in astrocytes was significantly decreased after activation of the Shh signalling pathway. Moreover, superoxide and hydrogen superoxide levels in astrocytes were significantly reduced after the activation of Shh pathway signalling due to increasing levels of the antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase. These findings indicate that the anti-apoptotic effects of the Shh signalling pathway in the astrocytes of mice infected with A. cantonensis are due to reduced levels of oxidative stress caused by the activation of antioxidants. PMID:28169282

  15. Neuroprotective effects of lycopene in spinal cord injury in rats via antioxidative and anti-apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenfeng; Liu, Yanlu; Wang, Rong; Luo, Xiao; Huang, Yifei

    2017-03-06

    Oxidative damage induced-mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis has been widely studied in spinal cord injury (SCI). Lycopene, a polyunsaturated hydrocarbon, has the highest antioxidant capacity compared to the other carotenoids. However, the role of lycopene in SCI is unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the antioxidant effects of lycopene on mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis following T10 contusion SCI in rats. The rats were randomized into 5 groups: the sham group, the SCI group and the SCI pre-treated with lycopene (5, 10, or 20mg/kg) group. The SCI group showed increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) ability, which indicated that SCI could induce oxidative damage. What's more, the SCI group showed decreased mRNA expression of cytochrome b and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔYm), which indicated that SCI could induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Besides, the SCI group showed decreased protein expression of bcl-2 and mitochondrial cytochrome C, increased protein expression of cytosolic cytochrome C, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and bax, and increased TUNEL-positive cell numbers, which indicated that SCI could induce cell apoptosis. Fortunately, the lycopene treatment significantly ameliorated oxidative damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis via the reversion of those parameters described above in the dose of lycopene of 10 and 20mg/kg. In addition, lycopene significantly ameliorated the hind limb motor disturbances in the SCI+lyco10 group and the SCI+lyco20 group compared with the SCI group. These results suggested that lycopene administration could improve total antioxidant status and might have neuroprotective effects on SCI.

  16. Anti-apoptotic effect of San Huang Shel Shin Tang cyclodextrin complex (SHSSTc) on CCl4 -induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hsun; Ting, Wei-Jen; Shen, Chia-Yao; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Lin, Yueh-Min; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Tsai, Yuhsin; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic loading is heavier in liver especially when injured or inflammation. San Huang Shel Shin Tang (SHSST) was an old traditional herbal decoction, which composed with Rheum officinale Baill, Scutellaria baicalnsis Geprgi and Coptis chinensis Franch (1:1:2 in weight), can provide a liver protection effects. We used a beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) drug modification method in reduce of the necessary dose of the SHSST. As the results, the FAS-FADD expressions leaded apoptosis in CCl4 intraperitoneal (IP) injection induced acute liver injury in rats. Silymarin, baicalein, SHSST, and SHSST β-CD complex (SHSSTc) pretreatments protected liver through the decreasing of the expressions of FAS-FADD and downstream caspase-3 and caspase-8. Particularly, SHSSTc (30 mg/kg day) treatment enhanced cell survival pathway activation through the PI3K, Akt and Bad phosphorylation. Compared with SHSST as well as silymarin and baicalein, SHSSTc provided a magnificent liver protection effect, especially in survival pathway activation/TUNEL-apoptotic cell reduction/serum cholesterol level suppression. All these data suggested that β-CD complex modified the SHSST and promoted the bioavailability and liver protection effects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 663-670, 2016.

  17. Lens gene expression analysis reveals downregulation of the anti-apoptotic chaperone alphaA-crystallin during cavefish eye degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Allen G; Byerly, Mardi S; Jeffery, William R

    2007-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of the expression patterns of five genes encoding three different classes of major lens proteins during eye degeneration in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus. This species consists of two forms, an eyed surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and a blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) form. Cavefish form an optic primordium with a lens vesicle and optic cup. In contrast to surface fish, however, the cavefish lens does not differentiate fiber cells and undergoes massive apoptosis. The genes encoding the lens intrinsic membrane proteins MIP and MP19 and the divergent betaB1- and gammaM2-crystallins are expressed during cavefish lens development, although their levels are reduced because of a smaller lens, and the spatial distribution of their transcripts is modified because of the lack of differentiated fiber cells. In contrast, the alphaA-crystallin gene, which encodes a heat shock protein-related chaperone with antiapoptotic activity, is substantially downregulated in the developing cavefish lens. The results suggest that suppression of alphaA-crystallin antiapoptotic activity may be involved in cavefish eye degeneration.

  18. Thymosin beta 4 prevents oxidative stress by targeting antioxidant and anti-apoptotic genes in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a ubiquitous protein with diverse functions relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory responses. The effecter molecules targeted by Tβ4 for cardiac protection remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the molecules targeted by Tβ4 that mediate cardio-protection under oxidative stress. METHODS: Rat neonatal fibroblasts cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 in presence and absence of Tβ4 and expression of antioxidant, apoptotic and pro-fibrotic genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels were estimated by DCF-DA using fluorescent microscopy and fluorimetry. Selected antioxidant and antiapoptotic genes were silenced by siRNA transfections in cardiac fibroblasts and the effect of Tβ4 on H(2O(2-induced profibrotic events was evaluated. RESULTS: Pre-treatment with Tβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS levels induced by H(2O(2 in the cardiac fibroblasts. This was associated with an increased expression of antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase and reduction of Bax/Bcl(2 ratio. Tβ4 treatment reduced the expression of pro-fibrotic genes [connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, collagen type-1 (Col-I and collagen type-3 (Col-III] in the cardiac fibroblasts. Silencing of Cu/Zn-SOD and catalase gene triggered apoptotic cell death in the cardiac fibroblasts, which was prevented by treatment with Tβ4. CONCLUSION: This is the first report that exhibits the targeted molecules modulated by Tβ4 under oxidative stress utilizing the cardiac fibroblasts. Tβ4 treatment prevented the profibrotic gene expression in the in vitro settings. Our findings indicate that Tβ4 selectively targets and upregulates catalase, Cu/Zn-SOD and Bcl(2, thereby, preventing H(2O(2-induced profibrotic changes in the myocardium. Further studies are

  19. Hepatitis E virus ORF2 protein activates the pro-apoptotic gene CHOP and anti-apoptotic heat shock proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijo John

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus (HEV is a non-enveloped plus-strand RNA virus that causes acute hepatitis. The capsid protein open reading frame 2 (ORF2 is known to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress in ORF2 expressing cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we found that HEV ORF2 activates the expression of the pro-apoptotic gene C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP. ORF2 stimulates the CHOP promoter mainly through AARE (amino acid response elements and to a minor extent the ERSE (endoplasmic reticulum stress response elements. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 protein binds and activates the AARE regulatory sites of the CHOP promoter. ORF2 expression also leads to increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α that in turn initiates the translation of ATF4 mRNA. The pro-apoptotic gene CHOP is an important trigger to initiate endoplasmic reticulum stress induced apoptosis. However, the activation of CHOP by ORF2 in this study did not induce apoptosis, nor did BCL2-associated X protein (Bax translocate to mitochondria. Microarray analysis revealed an ORF2 specific increased expression of chaperones Hsp72, Hsp70B', and co-chaperone Hsp40. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP and in silico molecular docking analysis suggests that HEV ORF2 interacts with Hsp72. In addition, Hsp72 shows nuclear accumulation in ORF2 expressing cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide new insight into simultaneously occurring counter-acting effects of HEV ORF2 that may be part of a strategy to prevent host suicide before completion of the viral replication cycle.

  20. Oxidative stress triggered by naturally occurring flavone apigenin results in senescence and chemotherapeutic effect in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kacoli; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies involving phytochemical polyphenolic compounds have suggested flavones often exert pro-oxidative effect in vitro against wide array of cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro pro-oxidative activity of apigenin, a plant based flavone against colorectal cancer cell lines and investigate cumulative effect on long term exposure. In the present study, treatment of colorectal cell lines HT-29 and HCT-15 with apigenin resulted in anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects characterized by biochemical and morphological changes, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential which aided in reversing the impaired apoptotic machinery leading to negative implications in cancer pathogenesis. Apigenin induces rapid free radical species production and the level of oxidative damage was assessed by qualitative and quantitative estimation of biochemical markers of oxidative stress. Increased level of mitochondrial superoxide suggested dose dependent mitochondrial oxidative damage which was generated by disruption in anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic protein balance. Continuous and persistent oxidative stress induced by apigenin at growth suppressive doses over extended treatment time period was observed to induce senescence which is a natural cellular mechanism to attenuate tumor formation. Senescence phenotype inducted by apigenin was attributed to changes in key molecules involved in p16-Rb and p53 independent p21 signaling pathways. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma was inhibited and significant up-regulation of p21 led to simultaneous suppression of cyclins D1 and E which indicated the onset of senescence. Pro-oxidative stress induced premature senescence mediated by apigenin makes this treatment regimen a potential chemopreventive strategy and an in vitro model for aging research.

  1. Oxidative stress triggered by naturally occurring flavone apigenin results in senescence and chemotherapeutic effect in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacoli Banerjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies involving phytochemical polyphenolic compounds have suggested flavones often exert pro-oxidative effect in vitro against wide array of cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro pro-oxidative activity of apigenin, a plant based flavone against colorectal cancer cell lines and investigate cumulative effect on long term exposure. In the present study, treatment of colorectal cell lines HT-29 and HCT-15 with apigenin resulted in anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects characterized by biochemical and morphological changes, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential which aided in reversing the impaired apoptotic machinery leading to negative implications in cancer pathogenesis. Apigenin induces rapid free radical species production and the level of oxidative damage was assessed by qualitative and quantitative estimation of biochemical markers of oxidative stress. Increased level of mitochondrial superoxide suggested dose dependent mitochondrial oxidative damage which was generated by disruption in anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic protein balance. Continuous and persistent oxidative stress induced by apigenin at growth suppressive doses over extended treatment time period was observed to induce senescence which is a natural cellular mechanism to attenuate tumor formation. Senescence phenotype inducted by apigenin was attributed to changes in key molecules involved in p16-Rb and p53 independent p21 signaling pathways. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma was inhibited and significant up-regulation of p21 led to simultaneous suppression of cyclins D1 and E which indicated the onset of senescence. Pro-oxidative stress induced premature senescence mediated by apigenin makes this treatment regimen a potential chemopreventive strategy and an in vitro model for aging research.

  2. New Frontiers in Promoting TRAIL-Mediated Cell Death: Focus on Natural Sensitizers, miRNAs, and Nanotechnological Advancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Ranieri, Girolamo; Fayyaz, Sundas; Marech, Ilaria

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is a multifaceted and genomically complex disease, and rapidly emerging scientific evidence is emphasizing on intra-tumor heterogeneity within subpopulations of tumor cells and rapidly developing resistance against different molecular therapeutics. There is an overwhelmingly increasing list of agents currently being tested for efficacy against cancer. In accordance with the concept that therapeutic agents must have fewer off target effects and considerable efficacy, TRAIL has emerged as one among the most deeply investigated proteins reportedly involved in differential killing of tumor cells. Considerable killing activity of TRAIL against different cancers advocated its entry into clinical trials. However, data obtained through preclinical and cell culture studies are deepening our understanding of wide-ranging mechanisms which induce resistance against TRAIL-based therapeutics. These include downregulation of death receptors, overexpression of oncogenes, inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, imbalance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, and inactivation of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Substantial fraction of information has been added into existing pool of knowledge related to TRAIL biology and recently accumulating evidence is adding new layers to regulation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Certain hints have emerged underscoring miR135a-3p- and miR-143-mediated regulation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and natural agents have shown remarkable efficacy in improving TRAIL-based therapeutics by increasing expression of tumor suppressor miRNAs. In this review, we summarize most recent breakthroughs related to naturopathy and strategies to nanotechnologically deliver TRAIL to the target site in xenografted mice. We also set spotlight on positive and negative regulators of TRAIL-mediated signaling. Comprehensive knowledge of genetics and proteomics of TRAIL-based signaling network obtained from cancer patients of different populations will be helpful in getting

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induces the Early Appearance of Pro-apoptotic and Anti-apoptotic Proteins in Neurons of Five Familial Alzheimer's Disease Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Shen; Xiao-Dong Pan; Jing Zhang; Yu-Qi Zeng; Meng Zhou; Lu-Meng Yang; Bing Ye

    2016-01-01

    Background:Amyloid β (Aβ) deposits and the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) are both well established in the development and progression ofAlzheimer's disease (AD).However,the mechanism and role of Aβ-induced ERS in AD-associated pathological progression remain to be elucidated.Methods:The five familial AD (5 ×FAD) mice and wild-type (WT) mice aged 2,7,and 12 months were used in the present study.Morris water maze test was used to evaluate their cognitive performance.Immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses were used to examine the dynamic changes of pro-apoptotic (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein [CHOP] and cleaved caspase-12) and anti-apoptotic factors (chaperone glucose-regulated protein [GRP] 78 and endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation-associated ubiquitin ligase synovial apoptosis inhibitor 1 [SYVN1]) in the ERS-associated unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway.Results:Compared with age-matched WT mice,5 ×FAD mice showed higher cleaved caspase-3,lower neuron-positive staining at the age of 12 months,but earlier cognitive deficit at the age of 7 months (all P < 0.05).Interestingly,for 2-month-old 5×FAD mice,the related proteins involved in the ERS-associated UPR pathway,including CHOP,cleaved caspase-12,GRP 78,and SYVN1,were significantly increased when compared with those in age-matched WT mice (all P < 0.05).Moreover,ERS occurred mainly in neurons,not in astrocytes.Conclusions:These findings suggest that compared with those of age-matched WT mice,ERS-associated pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptoticproteins are upregulated in 2-month-old 5×FAD mice,consistent with intracellular Aβ aggregation in neurons.

  4. The Anti-Apoptotic and Cardioprotective Effects of Salvianolic Acid A on Rat Cardiomyocytes following Ischemia/Reperfusion by DUSP-Mediated Regulation of the ERK1/2/JNK Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuping; Zhu, Shasha; Liu, Yang; Pan, Defeng; Chen, Xiaohu; Li, Dongye

    2014-01-01

    /R group. SAA exerts an anti-apoptotic role against myocardial IRI by inhibiting DUSP2-mediated JNK dephosphorylation and activating DUSP4/16-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. PMID:25019380

  5. The anti-apoptotic and cardioprotective effects of salvianolic acid a on rat cardiomyocytes following ischemia/reperfusion by DUSP-mediated regulation of the ERK1/2/JNK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongda Xu

    +I/R group. SAA exerts an anti-apoptotic role against myocardial IRI by inhibiting DUSP2-mediated JNK dephosphorylation and activating DUSP4/16-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  6. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda;

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxic...... (1% and 5% oxygen) culture and trypsinization would augment ASC expression of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines and increase the angiogenic potential of ASC-conditioned media....

  7. Anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of (RS)-glucoraphanin bioactivated with myrosinase in murine sub-acute and acute MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuppo, Maria; Iori, Renato; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2013-09-01

    (movement coordination, presence of tremors, nutrition). Overall, our results suggest that bioactive RS-GRA can protect neurons against the neurotoxicity involved in PD via an anti-apoptotic/anti-inflammatory action.

  8. The evolution of natural killer cell receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Kesmir, C.; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that play a crucial role against viral infections and tumors. To be tolerant against healthy tissue and simultaneously attack infected cells, the activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a sophisticated array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitin

  9. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Ma; Xiaojuan Li; Ersheng Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral...

  10. Natural Killer Cells in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil eKarimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of asthma have dramatically increased over the last few decades and there is a clear need to identify new, effective, therapeutic and prophylactic strategies. Despite high numbers of NK cells in the lung and their ability to and generate a variety of immunomodulatory mediators the potential of these cells as therapeutic targets in allergic airway disease has been largely overlooked. The fact that IgE, acting through FcγRIII can activate NK cells resulting in cytokine/chemokine production implies that NK cells may contribute to IgE-mediated allergic responses. Indeed, current evidence suggests that NK cells can promote allergic airway responses during sensitization and ongoing inflammation. In animals models increased NK cells are observed in the lung following antigen challenge, while depletion of NK cells before immunization inhibits allergic airway inflammation. Moreover, in asthmatics NK cell phenotype is altered, and may contribute to promotion of the pro-inflammatory Th2-type environment. Conversely, driving NK cells towards an IFN-γ-secreting phenotype can reduce features of the allergic airway response in animal models. However, we have limited knowledge of the signals that drive the development of distinct subsets and functional phenotypes of NK cells in the lung and thus the role and therapeutic potential of NK cells in the allergic airway remains unclear. Here we review the potentially diverse roles of NK cells in allergic airway disease, identify gaps in current knowledge and discuss the potential of modulating NK cell function as a treatment strategy in asthma

  11. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  12. Discovery of Sanggenon G as a natural cell-permeable small-molecular weight inhibitor of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, Maximilian A; Salcher, Stefan; Rupp, Martina; Hagenbuchner, Judith; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Mortier, Jérémie; Wolber, Gerhard; Rollinger, Judith M; Obexer, Petra; Ausserlechner, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Defects in the regulation of apoptosis are one main cause of cancer development and may result from overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). XIAP is frequently overexpressed in human leukemia and prostate and breast tumors. Inhibition of apoptosis by XIAP is mainly coordinated through direct binding to the initiator caspase-9 via its baculovirus-IAP-repeat-3 (BIR3) domain. XIAP inhibits caspases directly making it to an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. In the search for novel, non-peptidic XIAP inhibitors in this study we focused on the chemical constituents of sāng bái pí (mulberry root bark). Most promising candidates of this plant were tested biochemically in vitro by a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay and in vivo via protein fragment complementation analysis (PCA). We identified the Diels Alder adduct Sanggenon G (SG1) as a novel, small-molecular weight inhibitor of XIAP. As shown by FP and PCA analyses, SG1 binds specifically to the BIR3 domain of XIAP with a binding affinity of 34.26 μM. Treatment of the transgenic leukemia cell line Molt3/XIAP with SG1 enhances caspase-8, -3 and -9 cleavage, displaces caspase-9 from XIAP as determined by immunoprecipitation experiments and sensitizes these cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis. SG1 not only sensitizes the XIAP-overexpressing leukemia cell line Molt3/XIAP to etoposide treatment but also different neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing high XIAP levels. Taken together, Sanggenon G (SG1) is a novel, natural, non-peptidic, small-molecular inhibitor of XIAP that can serve as a starting point to develop a new class of improved XIAP inhibitors.

  13. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  14. Natural killer cells: In health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Arundhati; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2015-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute our bodies' frontline defense system, guarding against tumors and launching attacks against infections. The activities of NK cells are regulated by the interaction of various receptors expressed on their surfaces with cell surface ligands. While the role of NK cells in controlling tumor activity is relatively clear, the fact that they are also linked to various other disease conditions is now being highlighted. Here, we present an overview of the role of NK cells during normal body state as well as under diseased state. We discuss the possible utilization of these powerful cells as immunotherapeutic agents in combating diseases such as asthma, autoimmune diseases, and HIV-AIDS. This review also outlines current challenges in NK cell therapy.

  15. The anti-apoptotic MAP kinase pathway is inhibited in NIH3T3 fibroblasts with increased expression of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein β

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenning, M.; van Tiel, C.M.; Wirtz, K.W.A.; Snoek, G.T.

    2007-01-01

    Mouse NIH3T3 fibroblast cells overexpressing phosphatidylinositol transfer protein ß (PI-TPß, SPIß cells) demonstrate a low rate of proliferation and a high sensitivity towards UV-induced apoptosis when compared with wtNIH3T3 cells. In contrast, SPIßS262A cells overexpressing a mutant PI-TPß that la

  16. The evolution of natural killer cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that play a crucial role against viral infections and tumors. To be tolerant against healthy tissue and simultaneously attack infected cells, the activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a sophisticated array of germline-encoded activating and inhibiting receptors. The best characterized mechanism of NK cell activation is "missing self" detection, i.e., the recognition of virally infected or transformed cells that reduce their MHC expression to evade cytotoxic T cells. To monitor the expression of MHC-I on target cells, NK cells have monomorphic inhibitory receptors which interact with conserved MHC molecules. However, there are other NK cell receptors (NKRs) encoded by gene families showing a remarkable genetic diversity. Thus, NKR haplotypes contain several genes encoding for receptors with activating and inhibiting signaling, and that vary in gene content and allelic polymorphism. But if missing-self detection can be achieved by a monomorphic NKR system why have these polygenic and polymorphic receptors evolved? Here, we review the expansion of NKR receptor families in different mammal species, and we discuss several hypotheses that possibly underlie the diversification of the NK cell receptor complex, including the evolution of viral decoys, peptide sensitivity, and selective MHC-downregulation.

  17. Phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) from Pseudomonas sp. strain PUP6 selectively induced apoptosis in lung (A549) and breast (MDA MB-231) cancer cells by inhibition of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R Kamaraj; Veena, V; Naik, P Ravindra; Lakshmi, Pragna; Krishna, R; Sudharani, S; Sakthivel, N

    2015-06-01

    Phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN), a naturally occurring simple phenazine derivative isolated from Pseudomonas sp. strain PUP6, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity against lung (A549) and breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines in differential and dose-dependent manner compared to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PCN-treated cancer cells showed the induction of apoptosis as evidenced by the release of low level of LDH, morphological characteristics, production of reactive oxygen species, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and induction of caspase-3. At molecular level, PCN instigates apoptosis by mitochondrial intrinsic apoptotic pathway via the overexpression of p53, Bax, cytochrome C release and activation of caspase-3 with the inhibition of oncogenic anti-apoptotic proteins such as PARP and Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Bcl-xL). The in silico docking studies of PCN targeted against the anti-apoptotic members of Bcl-2 family proteins revealed the interaction of PCN with the BH3 domain, which might lead to the induction of apoptosis due to the inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins. Due to its innate inhibition potential of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, PCN may be used as potent anticancer agent against both lung and breast cancer.

  18. Modeling Natural Killer Cell Targeted Immunotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Di Santo, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models have extensively contributed to our understanding of human immunobiology and to uncover the underlying pathological mechanisms occurring in the development of diseases. However, mouse models do not reproduce the genetic and molecular complexity inherent in human disease conditions. Human immune system (HIS) mouse models that are susceptible to human pathogens and can recapitulate human hematopoiesis and tumor immunobiology provide one means to bridge the interspecies gap. Natural killer cells are the founding member of the innate lymphoid cell family. They exert a rapid and strong immune response against tumor and pathogen-infected cells. Their antitumor features have long been exploited for therapeutic purposes in the context of cancer. In this review, we detail the development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains and the models currently used in cancer research. We summarize the latest improvements in adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapies and the development of novel NK cell sources. Finally, we discuss the advantages of HIS mice to study the interactions between human NK cells and human cancers and to develop new therapeutic strategies.

  19. Anti-apoptotic ARC protein confers chemoresistance by controlling leukemia-microenvironment interactions through a NFκB/IL1β signaling network

    KAUST Repository

    Carter, Bing Z.

    2016-04-11

    To better understand how the apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) protein confers drug resistance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the role of ARC in regulating leukemia-mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) interactions. In addition to the previously reported effect on AML apoptosis, we have demonstrated that ARC enhances migration and adhesion of leukemia cells to MSCs both in vitro and in a novel human extramedullary bone/bone marrow mouse model. Mechanistic studies revealed that ARC induces IL1β expression in AML cells and increases CCL2, CCL4, and CXCL12 expression in MSCs, both through ARC-mediated activation of NFκB. Expression of these chemokines in MSCs increased by AML cells in an ARC/IL1β-dependent manner; likewise, IL1β expression was elevated when leukemia cells were co-cultured with MSCs. Further, cells from AML patients expressed the receptors for and migrated toward CCL2, CCL4, and CXCL12. Inhibition of IL1β suppressed AML cell migration and sensitized the cells co-cultured with MSCs to chemotherapy. Our results suggest the existence of a complex ARC-regulated circuit that maintains intimate connection of AML with the tumor microenvironment through NFκB/IL1β-regulated chemokine receptor/ligand axes and reciprocal crosstalk resulting in cytoprotection. The data implicate ARC as a promising drug target to potentially sensitize AML cells to chemotherapy.

  20. Pro-apoptotic effect of rice bran inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) on HT-29 colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafie, Nurul Husna; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd; Ithnin, Hairuszah; Saad, Norazalina; Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar

    2013-12-02

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), or phytic acid is a natural dietary ingredient and has been described as a "natural cancer fighter", being an essential component of nutritional diets. The marked anti-cancer effect of IP6 has resulted in our quest for an understanding of its mechanism of action. In particular, our data provided strong evidence for the induction of apoptotic cell death, which may be attributable to the up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-xl in favor of apoptosis. In addition, the up-regulation of caspase-3 and -8 expression and activation of both caspases may also contribute to the apoptotic cell death of human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells when exposed to IP6. Collectively, this present study has shown that rice bran IP6 induces apoptosis, by regulating the pro- and anti-apoptotic markers; Bax and Bcl-xl and via the activation of caspase molecules (caspase-3 and -8).

  1. Cutaneous natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radonich, Michael A; Lazova, Rossitza; Bolognia, Jean

    2002-03-01

    Lymphomas are classified as either Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's. The 2 subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that can present primarily in the skin are cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous B-cell lymphoma, both of which tend to be low-grade malignant neoplasms. Recently another distinct subtype of lymphoma was discovered, the natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, which can involve the skin in a primary or secondary fashion. The NK/T-cell subtype of lymphoma is characterized by the expression of the NK-cell antigen CD56. These CD56(+) lymphomas are further subdivided into nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas that commonly present as midfacial destructive disease and non-nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas that often arise in extranodal locations, including the skin. We report a case of aggressive NK-cell leukemia/lymphoma with numerous secondary cutaneous lesions and review the clinical and histopathologic spectrum of non-nasal CD56(+) lymphomas, with an emphasis on the dermatologic findings.

  2. Evolutionary vignettes of natural killer cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, Jennifer G; Beck, Stephan

    2007-10-01

    The discovery of novel immune receptors has led to a recent renaissance of research into the innate immune system, following decades of intense research of the adaptive immune system. Of particular interest has been the discovery of the natural killer (NK) cell receptors which, depending on type, interact with classical or non-classical MHC class I antigens of the adaptive immune system, thus functioning at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review recent progress with respect to two such families of NK receptors, the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and the killer cell lectin-like receptors (KLRs), and attempt to trace their evolution across vertebrates.

  3. Expression of animal anti-apoptotic gene Ced-9 enhances tolerance during Glycine max L.-Bradyrhizobium japonicum interaction under saline stress but reduces nodule formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Robert

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which the expression of animal cell death suppressors in economically important plants conferred enhanced stress tolerance are not fully understood. In the present work, the effect of expression of animal antiapoptotic gene Ced-9 in soybean hairy roots was evaluated under root hairs and hairy roots death-inducing stress conditions given by i Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation in presence of 50 mM NaCl, and ii severe salt stress (150 mM NaCl, for 30 min and 3 h, respectively. We have determined that root hairs death induced by inoculation in presence of 50 mM NaCl showed characteristics of ordered process, with increased ROS generation, MDA and ATP levels, whereas the cell death induced by 150 mM NaCl treatment showed non-ordered or necrotic-like characteristics. The expression of Ced-9 inhibited or at least delayed root hairs death under these treatments. Hairy roots expressing Ced-9 had better homeostasis maintenance, preventing potassium release; increasing the ATP levels and controlling the oxidative damage avoiding the increase of reactive oxygen species production. Even when our results demonstrate a positive effect of animal cell death suppressors in plant cell ionic and redox homeostasis under cell death-inducing conditions, its expression, contrary to expectations, drastically inhibited nodule formation even under control conditions.

  4. Expression of baculovirus anti-apoptotic genes p35 and op-iap in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. enhances tolerance to verticillium wilt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Tian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Programmed cell death plays an important role in mediating plant adaptive responses to the environment such as the invasion of pathogens. Verticillium wilt, caused by the necrotrophic pathogen Verticillium dahliae, is a serious vascular disease responsible for great economic losses to cotton, but the molecular mechanisms of verticillium disease and effective, safe methods of resistance to verticillium wilt remain unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we introduced baculovirus apoptosis inhibitor genes p35 and op-iap into the genome of cotton via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and analyzed the response of transgenic plants to verticillium wilt. Results showed that p35 and op-iap constructs were stably integrated into the cotton genome, expressed in the transgenic lines, and inherited through the T(3 generation. The transgenic lines had significantly increased tolerance to verticillium wilt throughout the developmental stages. The disease index of T(1-T(3 generation was lower than 19, significantly (P<0.05 better than the negative control line z99668. After treatment with 250 mg/L VD-toxins for 36 hours, DNA from negative control leaves was fragmented, whereas fragmentation in the transgenic leaf DNA did not occur. The percentage of cell death in transgenic lines increased by 7.11% after 60 mg/L VD-toxin treatment, which was less than that of the negative control lines's 21.27%. This indicates that p35 and op-iap gene expression partially protects cells from VD-toxin induced programmed cell death (PCD. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Verticillium dahliae can trigger plant cells to die through induction of a PCD mechanism involved in pathogenesis. This paper provides a potential strategy for engineering broad-spectrum necrotrophic disease resistance in plants.

  5. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and skin regenerative properties of an Aloe vera-based extract of Nerium oleander leaves (NAE-8®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson KF

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen F Benson,1 Robert A Newman,2,3 Gitte S Jensen1 1NIS Labs, Klamath Falls, Oregon, USA; 2University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3Nerium Biotechnology, Inc, San Antonio, TX, USA Objective: The goal for this study was to evaluate the effects of an Aloe vera-based Nerium oleander extract (NAE-8®, compared to an extract of A. vera gel alone (ALOE, and to an aqueous extract of N. oleander (AQ-NOE in bioassays pertaining to dermatologic potential with respect to antioxidant protection, anti-inflammatory effects, and cytokine profiles in vitro. Methods: Cellular antioxidant protection was evaluated in three separate bioassays: The cellular antioxidant protection of erythrocytes (CAP-e assay, protection of cellular viability and prevention of apoptosis, and protection of intracellular reduced glutathione levels, where the last two assays were performed using human primary dermal fibroblasts. Reduction of intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was tested using polymorphonuclear cells in the absence and presence of oxidative stress. Changes to cytokine and chemokine profiles when whole blood cells and human primary dermal fibroblasts were exposed to test products were determined using a 40-plex Luminex array as a method for exploring the potential cross-talk between circulating and skin-resident cells. Results: The NAE-8® provided significantly better antioxidant protection in the CAP-e bioassay than AQ-NOE. NAE-8® and AQ-NOE both protected cellular viability and intracellular reduced glutathione, and reduced the ROS formation significantly when compared to control cells, both under inflamed and neutral culture conditions. ALOE showed minimal effect in these bioassays. In contrast to the NAE-8®, the AQ-NOE showed induction of inflammation in the whole blood cultures, as evidenced by the high induction of CD69 expression and secretion of a number of inflammatory cytokines. The treatment of dermal

  6. Identifying immunogenic CD4+ T-cell epitopes of Myeloid cell leukemia 1 using overlapping 20-mer peptides spanning the whole protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodworth, Joshua S.; Agger, Else Marie; Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) is an anti-apoptotic protein which is overexpressed in various leukemia and other cancers [1]. Mcl-1 has a very short half-life [2], which has been suggested as a molecular mechanism for cells to switch into either the survival or apoptotic pathways in response......) small-molecule inhibitors [6] and (iii) peptide inhibitors [7]. In recent years, therapeutic vaccination with synthetic peptides derived from anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1 has emerged as a promising strategy against hematological cancers. In this study, 34 overlapping 20-mer peptides, spanning...

  7. ANTI-APOPTOTIC EFFECT OF CD95 RECEPTOR IN NA VE CD8+ T-LYMPHOCYTES IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Filatova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute infectious mononucleosis is a widespread viral disease, which most often manifests in childhood. The development of acute infectious mononucleosis is accompanied by the change of the CD4+/CD8+ T-lymphocytes ratio and the increase of the virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes number. One of the T-lymphocytes number regulation mechanisms is the modulation of their progenitor cells apoptosis. The death receptor CD95 takes part in the regulation of T-lymphocytes apoptosis, including naïve T-cells. We studied the effect of CD95 receptor activation on apoptosis of naïve CD4+ and naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes in healthy children and children with acute infectious mononucleosis. In this study children with acute infectious mononucleosis at the age of 9 to 16 years were included. For comparison healthy children of the same age with no clinical and laboratory signs of the disease were used. Naïve CD4+ and naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes were isolated by negative magnetic immunoseparation. The analysis of naïve T-cells apoptosis and the CD95 receptor surface expression density was performed by using the flow cytometry analysis. The analysis of T-cells was performed in three variants: freshly isolated naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes and naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and also cells after 24 hours of the cultivation with anti-CD95 monoclonal antibodies or without them. In healthy children both CD95– and CD95+ naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes underwent apoptosis. In children with acute infectious mononucleosis CD95– naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes lost their susceptibility to apoptosis induction. In healthy children and children with acute infectious mononucleosis CD95– naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes were resistant to apoptosis in contrast to CD95+ naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes. In healthy children CD95 receptor did not induce apoptosis of isolated naïve CD4+ T-lymphocytes and naïve cytotoxic CD8+ T-lymphocytes. In children with acute

  8. Teratogen-induced apoptotic cell death: does the apoptotic machinery act as a protector of embryos exposed to teratogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchinsky, Arkady; Fein, Amos; Toder, Vladimir

    2005-12-01

    Considerable evidence has been collected demonstrating that many teratogens induce apoptotic cell death in embryonic structures that turn out to be malformed in fetuses and newborns. Apoptosis is a genetically regulated process that is realized by the activation of death and pro-survival signaling cascades, and the interplay between these cascades determines whether the cell exposed to apoptotic stimuli dies or survives. Therefore, there is intense interest in understanding how the apoptotic machinery functions in embryos exposed to teratogens. However, the interpretation of the results obtained remains problematic. The main problem is that excessive embryonic cell death, regardless of its nature, if uncompensated for, ultimately leads to maldevelopment or embryonic death. Therefore, we can easily interpret results when the intensity of teratogen-induced cell death and the severity or incidence of teratogen-induced anomalies directly correlate with each other. However, when teratogen-induced cell death is not followed by the formation of anomalies, a usual explanation is that teratogen-induced apoptotic cell death contributes to the renewal of teratogen-targeted cell populations by promoting the removal of injured cells. It is clear that such an explanation leaves vague the role of the anti-apoptotic signaling mechanism (and, hence, the apoptotic machinery as a whole) with respect to protecting the embryo against teratogenic stress. In this review, we summarize the data from studies addressing the function of the apoptotic machinery in embryos exposed to teratogens, and then we discuss approaches to interpreting the results of these studies. We hypothesize that activation of a proapoptotic signaling in teratogen-targeted cell populations is a necessary condition for an anti-apoptotic signaling that counteracts the process of maldevelopment to be activated. If such a scenario is true, we need to modify our approaches to choosing molecular targets for studies

  9. STABLE TRANSFORMATION WITH ANTI-APOPTOTIC GENE OF BACULOVIRUS AND CONSTRUCTION OF ANTI-APOPTOTIC INSECT CELL LINE%杆状病毒凋亡抑制基因的稳定转化及抗凋亡昆虫细胞系的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小峰; 齐义鹏; 朱应; 王业富

    1999-01-01

    构建了新霉素抗性基因为筛选标记的带有凋亡抑制基因p35的重组质粒p35IE1Neo, 转化Sf9细胞后, 经G418筛选得到含有p35IE1Neo的Sf9细胞, 克隆化培养后命名为Sf9-35.PCR检测表明, Sf9-35细胞的染色体DNA上有p35基因的扩增带.经放线菌素D处理后的细胞核酸电泳和TdT介导bio-DUTP缺口末端标记(TUNEL)试剂盒检测, 证实Sf9-35具有抗凋亡特性.

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synaps...

  11. Transmembrane protein 85 from both human (TMEM85) and yeast (YGL231c) inhibit hydrogen peroxide mediated cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Giselle; Khoury, Chamel M; Solar, Aidan J; Yang, Zhao; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2008-07-23

    Anti-apoptotic proteins are involved in modulating the process of apoptosis. Here, we report the identification of the previously uncharacterized transmembrane domain protein 85 (TMEM85) as a novel anti-apoptotic sequence. Using growth and viability assays, we demonstrate that the heterologous expression of human TMEM85 in yeast promotes growth and prevents cell death in response to oxidative stress. Overexpression of the yeast TMEM85 ortholog (YGL231c) also leads to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Analysis of the existing TMEM85 DNA complimentary to mRNAs revealed that the human TMEM85 gene is alternatively spliced to produce multiple transcripts and proteins. Thus TMEM85 is a complex gene that encodes a novel conserved anti-apoptotic protein.

  12. Clinicopathologic features of intestinal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周军

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the clinicopathologic features,diagnosis and differential diagnosis of intestinal natural killer(NK)/T-cell lymphoma.Methods The clinical features,histopathology,immunohistochemical

  13. Regenerative Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Contribution of Muse Cells, a Novel Pluripotent Stem Cell Type that Resides in Mesenchymal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mari Dezawa; Taeko Shigemoto; Fumitaka Ogura; Shohei Wakao; Yasumasa Kuroda

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are easily accessible and safe for regenerative medicine. MSCs exert trophic, immunomodulatory, anti-apoptotic, and tissue regeneration effects in a variety of tissues and organs, but their entity remains an enigma. Because MSCs are generally harvested from mesenchymal tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, or umbilical cord as adherent cells, MSCs comprise crude cell populations and are heterogeneous. The specific cells responsible for each effect have no...

  14. Regulation of Murine Natural Killer Cell Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Huntington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells can derive from the same precursors as B and T cells, however to achieve lineage specificity, several transcription factors need to be activated or annulled. While a few important transcription factors have identified for NK genesis the mechanisms of how this is achieved is far from resolved. Adding to the complexity of this, NK cells are found and potentially develop in diverse locations in vivo and it remains to be addressed if a common NK cell precursor seeds diverse niches and how transcription factors may differentially regulate NK cell commitment in distinct microenvironments. Here we will summarise some recent findings in NK cell commitment and discuss how a NK cell transcriptional network might be organised, while addressing some misconceptions and anomalies along the way.

  15. Role of inositol phospholipid signaling in natural killer cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eGumbleton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are important in the host defense against malignancy and infection. At a cellular level NK cells are activated when signals from activating receptors exceed signaling from inhibitory receptors. At a molecular level NK cells undergo an education process to prevent autoimmunity. Mouse models have shown important roles for inositol phospholipid signaling in lymphocytes. NK cells from mice with deletion in different members of the PI3K signaling pathway have defective development, natural killer cell repertoire expression (NKRR and effector function. Here we review the role of inositol phospholipid signaling in NK cell biology.

  16. Lactobacilli Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. On-going research in our lab aims at describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid...... determined by ELISA. Co-incubation of NK cells and a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain caused increased proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production. The proliferative response was further enhanced in the presence of autologous monocytes, probably because cytokines, secreted by monocytes...... having engulfed bacteria, stimulated the growth of the NK cells. In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various lactobacilli have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent...

  17. A kinase inhibitor screen identifies Mcl-1 and Aurora kinase A as novel treatment targets in antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, S; Pedersen, A M; Thomsen, M B H;

    2015-01-01

    of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Mcl-1 expression was found upregulated in the antiestrogen-resistant cell lines and depletion of Mcl-1 in resistant cells caused decreased viability. JNJ-7706621, a dual Aurora kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, specifically inhibited growth and caused G2 phase...

  18. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  19. Interaction of DNA-lesions induced by sodium fluoride and radiation and its influence in apoptotic induction in cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is an essential trace element but also an environmental contaminant with major sources of exposure being drinking water, food and pesticides. Previous studies showed that sodium fluoride (NaF at 5 mM or more is required to induce apoptosis and chromosome aberrations and proposed that DNA damage and apoptosis play an important role in toxicity of excessive fluoride. The aim of this study is directed to understand the nature of DNA-lesions induced by NaF by allowing its interaction with radiation induced DNA-lesions. NaF 5 mM was used after observing inability to induce DNA damages and apoptosis by single exposure with 50 μM or 1 mM NaF. Co-exposure to NaF and radiation significantly increased the frequency of aberrant metaphases and exchange aberrations in human lymphocytes and arrested the cells in G1 stage instead of apoptotic death. Flow cytometric analysis, DNA fragmentation and PARP-cleavage analysis clearly indicated that 5 mM NaF together with radiation (1 Gy induced apoptosis in both U87 and K562 cells due to down regulation of expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, like Bcl2 in U87 and inhibitors of apoptotic proteins like survivin and cIAP in K562 cells. This study herein suggested that single exposure with extremely low concentration of NaF unable to induce DNA lesions whereas higher concentration induced DNA lesions interact with the radiation-induced DNA lesions. Both are probably repaired rapidly thus showed increased interactive effect. Coexposure to NaF and radiation induces more apoptosis in cancer cell lines which could be due to increased exchange aberrations through lesions interaction and downregulating anti-apoptotic genes.

  20. Depressed natural killer cell activity in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B K; Theander, T G

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity against K562 target cells was measured in patients within 24 h of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and regularly thereafter for 6 weeks. NK cell activity was suppressed on days 1, 3, and 7 (P less than 0.01), day 14 (P less than 0.05) and at 6 weeks (P = 0...

  1. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, D.; Spanholtz, J.; Osl, M.; Tordoir, M.; Lipnik, K.; Bilban, M.; Schlechta, B.; Dolstra, H.; Hofer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT

  2. Uterine Natural Killer Cells: Their Choices, Their Missions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhong Zhang; B Anne Croy; Zhigang Tian

    2005-01-01

    Uterine natural killer (uNK) cells, sharing many characters with peripheral blood natural killer (pNK) cells, are a major uterine lymphocyte population at early gestational stages during normal pregnancy in placental mammals.The functions of uNK cells include cytokine production and cytotoxcity that are regulated by signals through activating and inhibitory receptors. UNK cells differ from pNK cells however and contribute to the structural changes that accompany the differentiation of the maternal-fetal interface. Immunological mechanisms must provide a balanced environment for uNK cell proliferation, differentiation and activation through intricate signaling pathways. An improved knowledge of mechanisms regulating uNK cells development and the cytokine network at the maternal-fetal interface of mice and humans might be useful to harness the power of these cells for maintenance of pregnancy. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):123-129.

  3. Neuromodulation of Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    between the pineal gland As we have seen, NK cell function is ex- and the mitotic activity of some tissues. Arch Sci Biol tremely sensitive to many...34 New York: Alan R. Liss. Inc,. pp 151 - plasis. BriJ Med psychol 43:313-331. 160. Das Gupta TIC. Terz J (1967): Infuence of pineal gland Hochman PS...1968; Baron and D Gupta, 1970). responsiveness in patients with cerebral tu- Chemical sympathectomy renders rats highly mors (Brooks et al., 1972

  4. Matrine induction of reactive oxygen species activates p38 leading to caspase-dependent cell apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caihong; Qian, Xiaoqiang; Jia, Rongdi; Wu, Min; Liang, Zhongqin

    2013-11-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is one of the most refractory cancers in the clinic; it is insensitive to chemotherapy and is usually excised. However, screening natural compounds from herbs is also considered a possible method for its therapy. In the present study, we investigated whether matrine, a natural compound isolated from Sophora flavescens Ait. and exerting an inhibitory effect on lung cancer cells, also indicates inhibition on NSCLC cells and elucidated its molecular mechanism. Firstly, it is confirmed that matrine induces apoptosis of human NSCLC cells with anti-apoptotic factors inhibited and dependent on caspase activity. In addition, we found that matrine increases the phosphorylation of p38 but not its total protein, and inhibition of the p38 pathway with SB202190 partially prevents matrine-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, matrine generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which is reversed by pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Additionally, inhibition of cell proliferation and increase of phosphorylation of p38 was also partially reversed by NAC. Collectively, matrine activates p38 pathway leading to a caspase-dependent apoptosis by inducing generation of ROS in NSCLC cells and may be a potential chemical for NSCLC.

  5. Natural killer cell activity during premedication, anaesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, E; Mickley, H; Grunnet, N

    1983-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured against K-562 target cells in a 51Cr release assay in eight patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery. Eight consecutive blood samples were taken from each patient. A significant increase of NK cell...... activity was observed after premedication with diazepam per os. The activity increased further during a combined anaesthesia (thiopentone + N2O + O2 + buprenorphene + pancuronium) and remained increased during surgery. Postoperatively, NK cell activity fell and remained depressed for a period of at least 5...... days. The findings of this study indicate that premedication, anaesthesia and surgery cause a rapid and transient increase in NK cell activity, followed by a decline in activity postoperatively. The transient increase in activity may be explained by mobilization of natural killer cells from extravasal...

  6. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas eCacalano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells, key members of a distinct hempatopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs, are critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally-infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell-cell contact and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of immune surveillance. Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anti-cancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates with poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells which determine the outcome of cancer immunity are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of natural killer cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  7. Natural killer cells: Biology, functions and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Natural Killer cells (NK cells represent the subset of peripheral lymphocytes that play critical role in the innate immune response to virus-infected and tumor transformed cells. Lysis of NK sensitive target cells could be mediated independently of antigen stimulation and without requirement of peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. NK cell activity and functions are controlled by a considerable number of cell surface receptors, which exist in both inhibitory and activating isoforms. There are several groups of NK cell surface receptors: 1 killer immunoglobulin like receptors-KIR, 2 C-type lectin receptors,3natural citotoxicity receptors-NCR and 4 Toll-like receptors-TLR. Functions of NK receptors. Defining the biology of NK cell surface receptors has contributed to the concept of the manner how NK cells selectively recognize and lyse tumor and virally infected cells while sparing normal cells. Further, identification of NK receptor ligands and their expression on the normal and transformed cells has led to the development of clinical approaches to manipulating receptor/ligand interactions that showed clinical benefit. NK cells are the first lymphocyte subset that reconstitute the peripheral blood following allogeneic HSCT and multiple roles for alloreactive donor NK cells have been demonstrated, in diminishing Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD through selective killing recipient dendritic cells, prevention of graft rejection by killing recipient T cells and participation in Graft vs. Leukaemia (GvL effect through destruction of residual host tumor cells. Conclusion. Besides their role in HSCT, NK cell receptors have an important clinical relevance that reflects from the fact that they play a crucial role in the development of some diseases as well as in possibilities of managing all NK receptors through selective expansion and usage of NK cells in cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Radon measurement of natural gas using alpha scintillation cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Michael E; Torres, Miguel A; Haines, Douglas K; Semkow, Thomas M

    2014-12-01

    Due to their sensitivity and ease of use, alpha-scintillation cells are being increasingly utilized for measurements of radon ((222)Rn) in natural gas. Laboratory studies showed an average increase of 7.3% in the measurement efficiency of alpha-scintillation cells when filled with less-dense natural gas rather than regular air. A theoretical calculation comparing the atomic weight and density of air to that of natural gas suggests a 6-7% increase in the detection efficiency when measuring radon in the cells. A correction is also applicable when the sampling location and measurement laboratory are at different elevations. These corrections to the measurement efficiency need to be considered in order to derive accurate concentrations of radon in natural gas.

  9. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) activates Stat3 and protects hematopoietic cells from cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamo, Alberto; Chiarle, Roberto; Piva, Roberto; Howes, Jennifer; Fan, Yan; Chilosi, Marco; Levy, David E; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2002-02-07

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene is characteristically translocated in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALCL) and the juxtaposition of the ALK gene to multiple partners results in its constitutive protein tyrosine kinase activity. We show here that expression of activated ALK induces the constitutive phosphorylation of Stat3 in transfected cells as well as in primary human ALCLs. Furthermore, immunohistochemical studies demonstrate that among distinct human B and T cell lymphomas, activation of Stat3 nuclear translocation is uniquely associated with ALK expression. NPM-ALK also binds and activates Jak3; however, Jak3 is not required for Stat3 activation or for cell transformation in vitro. Moreover, src family kinases are not necessary for NPM-ALK-mediated Stat3 activation or transformation, suggesting that Stat3 may be phosphorylated directly by ALK. To evaluate relevant targets of ALK-activated Stat3, we investigated the regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-x(L) and its role in cell survival in NPM-ALK positive cells. NPM-ALK expression caused enhanced Bcl-x(L) transcription, largely mediated by Stat3. Increased expression of Bcl-x(L) provided sufficient anti-apoptotic signals to protect cells from treatment with specific inhibitors of the Jaks/Stat pathway or the Brc-Abl kinase. These studies support a pathogenic mechanism whereby stimulation of anti-apoptotic signals through activation of Stat3 contributes to the successful outgrowth of ALK positive tumor cells.

  10. Stimulation of Natural Killer T Cells by Glycolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L. Anderson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d protein. The initial discovery of immunostimulatory glycolipids from a marine sponge and the T cells that respond to the compounds has led to extensive research by chemists and immunologists to understand how glycolipids are recognized, possible responses by NKT cells, and the structural features of glycolipids necessary for stimulatory activity. The presence of this cell type in humans and most mammals suggests that it plays critical roles in antigen recognition and the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Both endogenous and exogenous natural antigens for NKT cells have been identified, and it is likely that glycolipid antigens remain to be discovered. Multiple series of structurally varied glycolipids have been synthesized and tested for stimulatory activity. The structural features of glycolipids necessary for NKT cell stimulation are moderately well understood, and designed compounds have proven to be much more potent antigens than their natural counterparts. Nevertheless, control over NKT cell responses by designed glycolipids has not been optimized, and further research will be required to fully reveal the therapeutic potential of this cell type.

  11. Natural Sphingomonas glycolipids vary greatly in their ability to activate natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Yuki; Pei, Bo; Bufali, Simone; Raju, Ravinder; Richardson, Stewart K; Imamura, Masakazu; Fujio, Masakazu; Wu, Douglass; Khurana, Archana; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Wong, Chi-Huey; Howell, Amy R; Seeberger, Peter H; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-07-21

    Mouse natural killer T (NKT) cells expressing an invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognize glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from Sphingomonas bacteria. The synthetic antigens previously tested, however, were designed to closely resemble the potent synthetic agonist alpha-galactosyl ceramide (alphaGalCer), which contains a monosaccharide and a C18:0 sphingosine lipid. Some Sphingomonas bacteria, however, also have oligosaccharide-containing GSLs, and they normally synthesize several GSLs with different sphingosine chains including one with a cyclopropyl ring-containing C21:0 (C21cycl) sphingosine. Here we studied the stimulation of NKT cells with synthetic GSL antigens containing natural tetrasaccharide sugars, or the C21cycl sphingosine. Our results indicate that there is a great degree of variability in the antigenic potency of different natural Sphingomonas glycolipids, with the C21cycl sphingosine having intermediate potency and the oligosaccharide-containing antigens exhibiting limited or no stimulatory capacity.

  12. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae-Hee, E-mail: leedneo@gmail.com [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of VA (United States); Jung, Chang-Hwa [Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong J. [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Park, Daeho, E-mail: daehopark@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  13. Present and future of allogeneic natural killer cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae eLim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the anti-tumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions.

  14. On The Role of Natural Killer Cells in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzam A. Maghazachi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells exert important immunoregulatory functions by releasing several inflammatory molecules, such as IFN-γ and members of chemokines, which include CCL3/MIP-1α and CCL4/MIP-1β. These cells also express heptahelical receptors, which are coupled to heterotrimeric G proteins that guide them into inflamed and injured tissues. NK cells have been shown to recognize and destroy transformed cells and virally-infected cells, but their roles in neurodegenerative diseases have not been examined in detail. In this review, I will summarize the effects of NK cells in two neurodegenerative diseases, namely multiple sclerosis and globoid cell leukodystrophy. It is hoped that the knowledge obtained from these diseases may facilitate building rational protocols for treating these and other neurodegenerative or autoimmune diseases using NK cells and drugs that activate them as therapeutic tools.

  15. Advantages and Applications of CAR-Expressing Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eGlienke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/ on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy.

  16. Melatonin promotes Bax sequestration to mitochondria reducing cell susceptibility to apoptosis via the lipoxygenase metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Radogna, Flavia

    2015-03-01

    Extra-neurological functions of melatonin include control of the immune system and modulation of apoptosis. We previously showed that melatonin inhibits the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in leukocytes via stimulation of high affinity MT1/MT2 receptors, thereby promoting re-localization of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein to mitochondria. Here we show that Bcl-2 sequesters pro-apoptotic Bax into mitochondria in an inactive form after melatonin treatment, thus reducing cell propensity to apoptosis. Bax translocation and the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin are strictly dependent on the presence of Bcl-2, and on the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which we have previously shown to be produced as a consequence of melatonin binding to its low affinity target calmodulin. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin requires the simultaneous, independent interaction with high (MT1/MT2) and low (calmodulin) affinity targets, eliciting two independent signal transduction pathways converging into Bax sequestration and inactivation. MT1/MT2 vs. lipoxygenase pathways are activated by 10-9 vs. 10-5M melatonin, respectively; the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin is achieved at 10-5M, but drops to 10-9M upon addition of exogenous 5-HETE, revealing that lipoxygenase activation is the rate-limiting pathway. Therefore, in areas of inflammation with increased 5-HETE levels, physiological nanomolar concentrations of melatonin may suffice to maintain leukocyte viability.

  17. Mechanism of human natural killer cell activation by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-08-15

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the host response to Haemophilus ducreyi infection is unclear. In pustules obtained from infected human volunteers, there was an enrichment of CD56bright NK cells bearing the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, compared with peripheral blood. To study the mechanism by which H. ducreyi activated NK cells, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected volunteers. H. ducreyi activated NK cells only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. H. ducreyi-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages activated NK cells in a contact- and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent manner, whereas monocyte-derived dendritic cells induced NK activation through soluble IL-12. More lesional NK cells than peripheral blood NK cells produced IFN-gamma in response to IL-12 and IL-18. We conclude that NK cells are recruited to experimental lesions and likely are activated by infected macrophages and dendritic cells. IFN-gamma produced by lesional NK cells may facilitate phagocytosis of H. ducreyi.

  18. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  19. Berberine inhibits growth and induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Wang, Bin; Zhuang, Yun; Shao, Dong; Sun, Kewen; Chen, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic approach using non-toxic natural products may be one of the strategies for the management of the cholangiocarcinoma. Here we report that in vitro treatment of human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells with berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, decreased cell viability and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with an increase in G1 arrest. Our western blot analysis showed that berberine-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was mediated through the increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (Cdki) proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27); a simultaneous decrease in Cdk2 and Cdk4 and cyclins D1, and reduced activity of the Cyclins-Cdk complex. In additional studies, treatment of QBC939 cells with different concentrations (10, 40, 80 μM) of berberine for 48 h resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in apoptosis compared to the non-berberine-treated control, which was associated with an increased expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Together, this study for the first time identified berberine as a chemotherapeutic agent against human cholangiocarcinoma cells QBC939 cells in vitro. Further in vivo studies are required to determine whether berberine could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the management of cholangiocarcinoma.

  20. NCR1 Expression Identifies Canine Natural Killer Cell Subsets with Phenotypic Similarity to Human Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ann Foltz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Canines spontaneously develop many cancers similar to humans - including osteosarcoma, leukemia, and lymphoma - offering the opportunity to study immune therapies in a genetically heterogeneous and immunocompetent environment. However, a lack of antibodies recognizing canine NK cell markers has resulted in suboptimal characterization and unknown purity of NK cell products, hindering the development of canine models of NK cell adoptive immunotherapy. To this end, we generated a novel antibody to canine NCR1 (NKp46, the putative species-wide marker of NK cells, enabling purification of NK cells for further characterization. We demonstrate that CD3-/NKp46+ cells in healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing canines have phenotypic similarity to human CD3-/NKp46+ NK cells, expressing mRNA for CD16 and the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30, NKp44, and NKp80. Functionally, we demonstrate with the calcein release assay that canine CD3-/NKp46+ cells kill canine tumor cell lines without prior sensitization and secrete IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-10, and GM-CSF as measured by Luminex. Like human NK cells, CD3-/NKp46+ cells expand rapidly on feeder cells expressing 4-1BBL and membrane-bound IL-21 (median= 20,283-fold in 21 days. Further, we identify a minor Null population (CD3-/CD21-/CD14-/NKp46- with reduced cytotoxicity against osteosarcoma cells, but similar cytokine secretion as CD3-/NKp46+ cells. Null cells in canines and humans have reduced expression of NKG2D, NKp44, and CD16 compared to NKp46+ NK cells, and can be induced to express NKp46 with further expansion on feeder cells. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized canine NK cells, including an NKp46- subset of canine and human NK cells, using a novel anti-canine NKp46 antibody, and report robust ex vivo expansion of canine NK cells sufficient for adoptive immunotherapy.

  1. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Arya; Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock induced gene expression and other cellular responses help limit the damage caused by stress and thus facilitate cellular recovery. Cellular damage also triggers apoptotic cell death through several pathways. This paper briefly reviews interactions of the major heat shock proteins with components of the apoptotic pathways. Hsp90, which acts as a chaperone for unstable signal transducers to keep them poised for activation, interacts with RIP and Akt and promotes NF-B mediated inhibition of apoptosis; in addition it also blocks some steps in the apoptotic pathways. Hsp70 is mostly anti-apoptotic and acts at several levels like inhibition of translocation of Bax into mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, formation of apoptosome and inhibition of activation of initiator caspases. Hsp70 also modulates JNK, NF-B and Akt signaling pathways in the apoptotic cascade. In contrast, Hsp60 has both anti- and pro-apoptotic roles. Cytosolic Hsp60 prevents translocation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax into mitochondria and thus promotes cell survival but it also promotes maturation of procaspase-3, essential for caspase mediated cell death. Our recent in vivo studies show that RNAi for the Hsp60D in Drosophila melanogaster prevents induced apoptosis. Hsp27 exerts its anti-apoptotic influence by inhibiting cytochrome c and TNF-mediated cell death. crystallin suppresses caspase-8 and cytochrome c mediated activation of caspase-3. Studies in our laboratory also reveal that absence or reduced levels of the developmentally active as well as stress induced non-coding hsr transcripts, which are known to sequester diverse hnRNPs and related nuclear RNA-binding proteins, block induced apoptosis in Drosophila. Modulation of the apoptotic pathways by Hsps reflects their roles as ``weak links” between various ``hubs” in cellular networks. On the other hand, non-coding RNAs, by virtue of their potential to bind with multiple proteins, can act as ``hubs” in

  2. Natural Killer cells as helper cells in Dendritic cell cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Betina Pampena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy has generated highly variable clinical results due to differing methods of vaccine preparation and variation in patient populations, among other lesser factors. Moreover, these clinical responses do not necessarily correspond with the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes. Here we review the participation of natural killer (NK cells as alternative immune components that could cooperate in successful vaccination treatment. NK cells have been described as helper cells in dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, but the role in other kinds of vaccination strategies (whole cells, peptide or DNA- based vaccines is poorly understood. In this article we address the following issues regarding the role of NK cells in cancer vaccines: NK cell anti-tumor action sites, and the loci of NK cell interaction with other immune cells; descriptions of new data on the memory characteristics of NK cells described in infectious diseases; and finally phenotypical and functional changes after vaccination measured by immunomonitoring in preclinical and clinical settings.

  3. Activation of Natural Killer cells during microbial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eHorowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are large granular lymphocytes that express a diverse array of germline encoded inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC Class I and Class I-like molecules, classical co-stimulatory ligands and cytokines. The ability of NK cells to be very rapidly activated by inflammatory cytokines, to secrete effector cytokines and to kill infected or stressed host cells, suggests that they may be among the very early responders during infection. Recent studies have also identified a small number of pathogen-derived ligands that can bind to NK cell surface receptors and directly induce their activation. Here we review recent studies that have begun to elucidate the various pathways by which viral, bacterial and parasite pathogens activate NK cells. We also consider two emerging themes of NK cell-pathogen interactions, namely their contribution to adaptive immune responses and their potential to take on regulatory and immunomodulatory functions.

  4. Induction of ROS Overload by Alantolactone Prompts Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yushuang; Wang, Hongge; Niu, Jiajing; Luo, Manyu; Gou, Yangmei; Miao, Lining; Zou, Zhihua; Cheng, Ying

    2016-04-14

    Cancer cells typically display higher than normal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may promote cancer development and progression but may also render the cancer cells more vulnerable to further ROS insult. Indeed, many of the current anticancer therapeutics kill cancer cells via induction of oxidative stress, though they target both cancer and normal cells. Recently, alantolactone (ATL), a natural sesquiterpene lactone, has been shown to induce apoptosis by increasing ROS levels specifically in cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanisms linking ROS overproduction to apoptosis remain unclear. Here we show that the ATL-induced ROS overload in human SW480 and SW1116 colorectal cancer cells was followed by a prominent accumulation of cellular oxidized guanine (8-oxoG) and immediate increase in the number of DNA strand breaks, indicating that increased ROS resulted in extensive oxidative DNA damage. Consequently, the G₁/S-CDK suppresser CDKN1B (p21) and pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and activated caspase-3 were upregulated, while anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was downregulated, which were followed by cell cycle arrest at G₁ and marked apoptosis in ATL-treated cancer but not non-cancer cells. These results suggest that the ATL-induced ROS overload triggers cell death through induction of massive oxidative DNA damage and subsequent activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway.

  5. Processing of natural temporal stimuli by macaque retinal ganglion cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Rüttiger, L.; Lee, B.B.

    2002-01-01

    This study quantifies the performance of primate retinal ganglion cells in response to natural stimuli. Stimuli were confined to the temporal and chromatic domains and were derived from two contrasting environments, one typically northern European and the other a flower show. The performance of the

  6. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H.S.; Rakhshandehroo, M.; Graaf, van de S.F.J.; Venken, K.; Koppen, A.; Stienstra, R.; Prop, S.; Meerding, J.; Hamers, N.; Besra, G.S.; Boon, den L.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.S.; Elewaut, D.; Prakken, B.; Kersten, A.H.; Boes, M.; Kalkhoven, E.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased i

  7. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, E.E.S.; Schipper, H.S.; Rakhshandehroo, M.; Graaf, S.F.J. van de; Venken, K.; Koppen, A.; Stienstra, R.; Prop, S.; Meerding, J.M.; Hamers, N.; Besra, G.; Boon, L; Elewaut, D.; Prakken, A.B.J.; Kersten, S.; Boes, M.L.; Kalkhoven, E.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased i

  8. In Vivo Imaging of Natural Killer Cell Trafficking in Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Rapisarda, Anna Serafina; Stabile, Helena; Malviya, Gaurav; Manni, Isabella; Bonanno, Elena; Piaggio, Giulia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Signore, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NKs) are important effectors of the innate immune system, with marked antitumor activity. Imaging NK trafficking in vivo may be relevant to following up the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches aiming at increasing tumor-infiltrating NKs (TINKs). The specific aims of present

  9. Salvianolic Acid B (Sal B Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells from Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death by Activating Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein glutathionylation, defined as the formation of protein mixed disulfides (PSSG between cysteine residues and glutathione (GSH, can lead to cell death. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1 is a thiol repair enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of PSSG. Therefore, Grx1 exerts strong anti-apoptotic effects by improving the redox state, especially in times of oxidative stress. However, there is currently no compound that is identified as a Grx1 activator. In this study, we identified and characterized Salvianolic acid B (Sal B, a natural compound, as a Grx1 inducer, which potently protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from oxidative injury. Our results showed that treatment with Sal B protected primary human RPE cells from H2O2-induced cell damage. Interestingly, we found Sal B pretreatment upregulated Grx1 expression in RPE cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, the key transcription factor that regulates the expression of Grx1, was activated in Sal B treated RPE cells. Further investigation showed that knockdown of Grx1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA significantly reduced the protective effects of Sal B. We conclude that Sal B protects RPE cells against H2O2-induced cell injury through Grx1 induction by activating Nrf2 pathway, thus preventing lethal accumulation of PSSG and reversing oxidative damage.

  10. Salvianolic Acid B (Sal B) Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells from Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death by Activating Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaobin; Xavier, Christy; Jann, Jamieson; Wu, Hongli

    2016-11-03

    Protein glutathionylation, defined as the formation of protein mixed disulfides (PSSG) between cysteine residues and glutathione (GSH), can lead to cell death. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) is a thiol repair enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of PSSG. Therefore, Grx1 exerts strong anti-apoptotic effects by improving the redox state, especially in times of oxidative stress. However, there is currently no compound that is identified as a Grx1 activator. In this study, we identified and characterized Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a natural compound, as a Grx1 inducer, which potently protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from oxidative injury. Our results showed that treatment with Sal B protected primary human RPE cells from H₂O₂-induced cell damage. Interestingly, we found Sal B pretreatment upregulated Grx1 expression in RPE cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key transcription factor that regulates the expression of Grx1, was activated in Sal B treated RPE cells. Further investigation showed that knockdown of Grx1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly reduced the protective effects of Sal B. We conclude that Sal B protects RPE cells against H₂O₂-induced cell injury through Grx1 induction by activating Nrf2 pathway, thus preventing lethal accumulation of PSSG and reversing oxidative damage.

  11. Polyfunctionality of natural killer cell in healthy donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupanun WUTTI-IN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Natural killer (NK cells are important guards of the innate immune system, which act by performing as primary effector cells in viral infections. NK cell function is regulated by the engagement of activating and/or inhibitory receptors on individual NK cell surfaces. Subsequent to activation, the release of preformed cytolytic granules or cytokines occurs. Recently, the polyfunctionality of NK cells has been described as a potent NK cell subset that mediates antiviral response in HIV-infected slow progressors. Objectives: To evaluate the polyfunctional NK cells in healthy individuals. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were separated from 41 healthy blood donors by Ficoll-Hypaque gradient centrifugation. Multicolor flow cytometry was used to investigate the expression of function markers (degranulation marker (CD107a, IFN-γ, and TNF-a on NK cells following PMA/Ionomycin or K562 stimulation. Results: The percentage of NK cells expressing CD107a, IFN-γ, or TNF-a in response to PMA/Ionomycin were 17.85, 10.56, and 2.66 %, respectively. The NK cells expressing CD107a, IFN-γ, or TNF-a in response to K562 stimulation were 6.43, 2.09, and 0.57 %, respectively. The capability of NK cells to perform polyfunctions was 6.19 % of the total NK cells following PMA/Ionomycin stimulation, while 1.06 % was observed following K562 stimulation. The trifunctional CD107a+ / IFN-γ+ / TNF-a + NK cell subset was found to be 0.95 and 0.04 % following PMA/Ionomycin and K562 stimulation, respectively. Conclusion: A small fraction of NK cells was capable of performing polyfunctions following stimulation, with less than 1 % being able to perform trifunctions in this study setting.

  12. 褪黑素对巨核细胞凋亡的影响及作用机制研究%Anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin on CHRF-288-11 cells via AKT and ERK pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周敏; 徐酉华; 李晓辉; 李晓静; 徐鸣; 杨默

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨褪黑素(melatonin,Mel)对巨核细胞凋亡的影响及其作用机制.方法 巨核细胞细胞株CHRF-288-11去血清诱导凋亡,加或不加Mel共培养后,流式细胞仪检测凋亡指标:Annexin V/PI、Caslpase-3和JC-1,并与正常组和TPO组比较.同时检测信号通路AKT、ERK1/2,了解其参与保护作用的机制.结果 Mel 200 nmol/L作用72 h后,CHRF细胞Annexin V/PI、Caspase-3和JC-1的表达较对照组有明显下降,分别由42.9%、29.5%,47.7%降至31.7%(P<0.05)、21.8%(P<0.05)和37.2%(P<0.05).其中,JC-1的表达与TPO组(20.7±5.2)%比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),而Annexin V/PI、Caspase-3的表达与TPO组比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).加入Mel后CHRF细胞的磷酸化AKT、ERK1/2水平明显增高,分别由(5.9±0.1)%、(6.1±0.4)%升至(9.5±0.1)%(P<0.05)、(9.3±0.5)%(P<0.05).结论 Mel可抑制巨核细胞凋亡,其保护机制可能通过AKT、ERK信号通路发挥作用.

  13. 黄芪多糖对粒单核系造血细胞的抗凋亡作用%Anti-apoptotic Effect of Astragalus Polysaccharide on Myeloid Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖彬; 徐月; 何涵; 江千里; 李素毅; 舒慧英; 梁恩瑜; 易正山; 叶洁瑜

    2013-01-01

    本研究探讨黄芪多糖(astragalus polysaccharide,ASPS)体外对骨髓粒单核前体细胞的增殖作用和对HL-60细胞株凋亡的影响及其可能的作用机理.观察不同浓度(0,50,100,200 μg/ml)的黄芪多糖和TPO(100 ng/ml)对骨髓集落形成单位CFU-GM和HL-60集落生成的影响.用无胎牛血清(或1%)的改良型RPMI 1640培养液诱导HL-60细胞凋亡,加入或者不加入黄芪多糖共培养72 h后,进行细胞计数并用Annexin V/PI双标记流式细胞术检测凋亡指标Caspase-3和JC-1的表达,并与正常组比较.结果表明,黄芪多糖(100,200 μg/ml)与TPO在体外能明显促进人骨髓细胞集落CFU-GM形成,同时黄芪多糖(50,100 μg/ml)也能促进HL-60细胞集落生成且其最大作用浓度为100 μg/ml,未发现其与TPO具有协同促进增殖的作用.无胎牛血清的RPMI 1640培养液能降低HL-60细胞的增殖,诱导细胞凋亡.HL-60细胞经黄芪多糖作用72 h后,与对照组相比细胞计数明显上升,由19×104个上升到34×104个(P<0.05),caspase-3表达相对于对照组明显下降,分别由10.5%,14.1%降至7.2%(P<0.05),7.8%(P<0.05).结论:黄芪多糖和TPO均能促进骨髓CFU-GM和HL-60细胞集落的生成;在无胎牛血清RPMI 1640培养液诱导细胞凋亡的情况下,黄芪多糖显著减少HL-60细胞的凋亡,保护HL-60细胞.

  14. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Aharon G; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34(+)CD45RA(+) hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field.

  15. Role of Natural Radiosensitizers and Cancer Cell Radioresistance: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Malik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer originates from genetic mutations accumulation. Cancer stem cells have been depicted as tumorigenic cells that can differentiate and self-renew. Cancer stem cells are thought to be resistant to conventional therapy like chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy damage carcinomic DNA cells. Because of the ability of cancer stem cells to self-renew and reproduce malignant tumors, they are the subject of intensive research. In this review, CSCs radioresistant mechanisms which include DNA damage response and natural radiosensitizers have been summed up. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in different physiological processes. ROS scavenging is responsible for regulation of reactive oxygen species generation. A researcher has proved that microRNAs regulate tumor radiation resistance. Ionizing radiation does not kill the cancer cells; rather, IR just slows down the signs and symptoms. Ionizing radiation damages DNA directly/indirectly. IR is given mostly in combination with other chemo/radiotherapies. We briefly described here the behavior of cancer stem cells and radioresistance therapies in cancer treatment. To overcome radioresistance in treatment of cancer, strategies like fractionation modification, treatment in combination, inflammation modification, and overcoming hypoxic tumor have been practiced. Natural radiosensitizers, for example, curcumin, genistein, and quercetin, are more beneficial than synthetic compounds.

  16. Natural killer cell biology: an update and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kerry S; Hasegawa, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a minor subset of normal lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses toward tumor and virus-infected cells. They can mediate spontaneous cytotoxicity toward these abnormal cells and rapidly secrete numerous cytokines and chemokines to promote subsequent adaptive immune responses. Significant progress has been made in the past 2 decades to improve our understanding of NK cell biology. Here we review recent discoveries, including a better comprehension of the "education" of NK cells to achieve functional competence during their maturation and the discovery of "memory" responses by NK cells, suggesting that they might also contribute to adaptive immunity. The improved understanding of NK cell biology has forged greater awareness that these cells play integral early roles in immune responses. In addition, several promising clinical therapies have been used to exploit NK cell functions in treating patients with cancer. As our molecular understanding improves, these and future immunotherapies should continue to provide promising strategies to exploit the unique functions of NK cells to treat cancer, infections, and other pathologic conditions.

  17. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Henk S; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Venken, Koen; Koppen, Arjen; Stienstra, Rinke; Prop, Serge; Meerding, Jenny; Hamers, Nicole; Besra, Gurdyal; Boon, Louis; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Elewaut, Dirk; Prakken, Berent; Kersten, Sander; Boes, Marianne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased iNKT cell numbers and marginal effects of iNKT cell depletion on insulin resistance under high-fat diet conditions. Here, we focused on the role of iNKT cells under normal conditions. We showed that iNKT cell-deficient mice on a low-fat diet, considered a normal diet for mice, displayed a distinctive insulin resistance phenotype without overt adipose tissue inflammation. Insulin resistance was characterized by adipocyte dysfunction, including adipocyte hypertrophy, increased leptin, and decreased adiponectin levels. The lack of liver abnormalities in CD1d-null mice together with the enrichment of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in both mouse and human adipose tissue indicated a specific role for adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells in the development of insulin resistance. Strikingly, iNKT cell function was directly modulated by adipocytes, which acted as lipid antigen-presenting cells in a CD1d-mediated fashion. Based on these findings, we propose that, especially under low-fat diet conditions, adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells maintain healthy adipose tissue through direct interplay with adipocytes and prevent insulin resistance.

  18. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysia M. Birkholz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells, are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  19. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  20. In vitro Natural Killer cell immunotherapy for medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia eFernandez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available How the immune system attacks medulloblastoma (MB tumours effectively is unclear, although natural killer (NK cells play an important role in immune defence against tumour cells. Interactions between receptors on NK cells and ligands expressed by tumour cells are critical for tumour control by immunotherapy. In this study, we analysed tumour samples from 54 MB patients for expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains A (MICA and UL16 binding protein (ULPB-2, which are ligands for the NK group 2 member D activatory receptor (NKG2D. The percentage of MICA and ULBP-2 positive cells was higher than 25% in 68% and 6% of MB patients, respectively. A moderate-high intensity of MICA cytoplasmic staining was observed in 46% MB patients and weak ULBP-2 staining was observed in 8% MB patients. No correlation between MICA/ULBP-2 expression and patient outcome was found. We observed that HTB-186, a medulloblastoma cell line, was moderately resistant to NK cell cytotoxicity in vitro. Blocking MICA/ULBP-2 on HTB-186, and NKG2D receptor on NK cells increased resistance to NK cell lysis in vitro. However, HLA class I blocking on HTB-186 and overnight incubation with IL-15 stimulated NK cells efficiently to kill tumour cells in vitro. We conclude that although NKG2D/MICA-ULBP-2 interactions have a role in NK cell cytotoxicity against MB, high expression of HLA class I can protect MB from NK cell cytotoxicity. Even so, our in vitro data indicate that if NK cells are appropriately stimulated, they may have the potential to target MB in vivo.

  1. Monkeypox virus infection of rhesus macaques induces massive expansion of natural killer cells but suppresses natural killer cell functions.

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    Haifeng Song

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results showed that the absolute number of total NK cells in the blood increased in response to MPXV infection at a magnitude of 23-fold, manifested by increases in CD56+, CD16+, CD16-CD56- double negative, and CD16+CD56+ double positive NK cell subsets. Similarly, the frequency and NK cell numbers in the lymph nodes also largely increased with the total NK cell number increasing 46.1-fold. NK cells both in the blood and lymph nodes massively proliferated in response to MPXV infection as measured by Ki67 expression. Chemokine receptor analysis revealed reduced expression of CXCR3, CCR7, and CCR6 on NK cells at early time points (days 2 and 4 after virus inoculation, followed by an increased expression of CXCR3 and CCR5 at later time points (days 7-8 of infection. In addition, MPXV infection impaired NK cell degranulation and ablated secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our data suggest a dynamic model by which NK cells respond to MPXV infection of rhesus macaques. Upon virus infection, NK cells proliferated robustly, resulting in massive increases in NK cell numbers. However, the migrating capacity of NK cells to tissues at early time points might be reduced, and the functions of cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion were largely compromised. Collectively, the data may explain, at least partially, the pathogenesis of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques.

  2. HAIR CELL-LIKE CELL GENERATION INDUCED BY NATURE CULTURE OF ADULT RAT AUDITORY EPITHELIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hui; Zhu Hongliang; Li Shengli; Yao Xiaobao; Wang Xiaoxia

    2006-01-01

    Objective To establish adult rat auditory epithelial cell culture and try to find precursor cells of auditory hair cells in vitro. Methods With refinement of culture media and techniques, cochlear sensory epithelial cells of adult rat were cultured. Immunocytochemistry and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)labeling were used to detect properties and mitotic status of cultured cells. Results The cultured auditory epithelial cells showed a large, flat epithelial morphotype and expressed F-actin and cytokeratin, a subset of cells generated from auditory epithelium were labeled by calretinin, a specific marker of early hair cell. Conclusion Adult rat auditory epithelium can be induced to generate hair cell-like cells by nature culture, this phenomenon suggests that progenitor cells may exist in rat cochlea and they may give birth to new hair cells. Whether these progenitor cells are tissue specific stem cells is still need more study.

  3. MicroRNA regulation of natural killer cells

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    Ryan eSullivan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are innate immune lymphocytes critical for host defense against viral infection and surveillance against malignant transformation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a family of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. Recent advances have highlighted the importance of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in NK cell development, maturation, and function. This review focuses on several facets of this regulatory mechanism in NK cells: 1 the expressed NK cell miRNA transcriptome; 2 the impact of total miRNA deficiency on NK cells; 3 the role of specific miRNAs regulating NK cell development, survival, and maturation; 4 the intrinsic role of miRNAs regulating NK cell function, including cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity; and 5 the role of NK cell miRNAs in disease. Currently our knowledge of how miRNAs regulate NK cell biology is limited, and thus we also explore key open questions in the field, as well as approaches and techniques to ascertain the role of individual miRNAs as important molecular regulators.

  4. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease.

  5. Natural Compounds from Saffron and Bear Bile Prevent Vision Loss and Retinal Degeneration

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    Laura Fernández-Sánchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available All retinal disorders, regardless of their aetiology, involve the activation of oxidative stress and apoptosis pathways. The administration of neuroprotective factors is crucial in all phases of the pathology, even when vision has been completely lost. The retina is one of the most susceptible tissues to reactive oxygen species damage. On the other hand, proper development and functioning of the retina requires a precise balance between the processes of proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death. The life-or-death decision seems to be the result of a complex balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic signals. It has been recently shown the efficacy of natural products to slow retinal degenerative process through different pathways. In this review, we assess the neuroprotective effect of two compounds used in the ancient pharmacopoeia. On one hand, it has been demonstrated that administration of the saffron constituent safranal to P23H rats, an animal model of retinitis pigmentosa, preserves photoreceptor morphology and number, the capillary network and the visual response. On the other hand, it has been shown that systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, the major component of bear bile, to P23H rats preserves cone and rod structure and function, together with their contact with postsynaptic neurons. The neuroprotective effects of safranal and TUDCA make these compounds potentially useful for therapeutic applications in retinal degenerative diseases.

  6. Granule-Dependent Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity to Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbomo, Henry; Mody, Christopher H.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells kill or inhibit the growth of a number of fungi including Cryptococcus, Candida, Aspergillus, Rhizopus, and Paracoccidioides. Although many fungi are not dangerous, invasive fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, cause life-threatening disease in individuals with impaired cell-mediated immunity. While there are similarities to cell-mediated killing of tumor cells, there are also important differences. Similar to tumor killing, NK cells directly kill fungi in a receptor-mediated and cytotoxic granule-dependent manner. Unlike tumor cell killing where multiple NK cell-activating receptors cooperate and signal events that mediate cytotoxicity, only the NKp30 receptor has been described to mediate signaling events that trigger the NK cell to mobilize its cytolytic payload to the site of interaction with C. neoformans and Candida albicans, subsequently leading to granule exocytosis and fungal killing. More recently, the NKp46 receptor was reported to bind Candida glabrata adhesins Epa1, 6, and 7 and directly mediate fungal clearance. A number of unanswered questions remain. For example, is only one NK cell-activating receptor sufficient for signaling leading to fungal killing? Are the signaling pathways activated by fungi similar to those activated by tumor cells during NK cell killing? How do the cytolytic granules traffic to the site of interaction with fungi, and how does this process compare with tumor killing? Recent insights into receptor use, intracellular signaling and cytolytic granule trafficking during NK cell-mediated fungal killing will be compared to tumor killing, and the implications for therapeutic approaches will be discussed. PMID:28123389

  7. Natural killer cell immunotherapy: from bench to bedside

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    Anna eDomogala

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of natural Killer (NK cells to target numerous malignancies in vitro has been well documented, however, only limited success has been seen in the clinic. Although NK cells prove non-toxic and safe regardless of the cell numbers injected, there is often little persistence and expansion observed in a patient which is vital for mounting an effective cellular response. NK cells can be isolated directly from peripheral blood (PB, umbilical cord blood (CB or bone marrow (BM, expanded in vitro using cytokines or differentiated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. Drugs that support NK cell function such as lenalidomide and bortezomib have also been studied in the clinic, however, the optimum combination, which can vary amongst different malignancies, is yet to be identified. NK cell proliferation, persistence and function can further be improved by various activation techniques such as priming and cytokine addition though whether stimulation pre or post injection is more favorable is another obstacle to be tackled. Here we review the various methods of obtaining and activating NK cells for use in the clinic whilst considering the ideal product and drug complement for the most successful cellular therapy.

  8. Illuminating the dynamics of signal integration in Natural Killer cells

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    Sophie Victoria Pageon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cell responses are shaped by the integration of signals transduced from multiple activating and inhibitory receptors at their surface. Biochemical and genetic approaches have identified most of the key proteins involved in signal integration but a major challenge remains in understanding how the spatial and temporal dynamics of their interactions lead to NK cells responding appropriately when encountering ligands on target cells. Well over a decade of research using fluorescence microscopy has revealed much about the architecture of the NK cell immune synapse – the structured interface between NK cells and target cells - and how it varies when inhibition or activation is the outcome of signal integration. However, key questions – such as the proximity of individual activating and inhibitory receptors – have remained unanswered because the resolution of optical microscopy has been insufficient, being limited by diffraction. Recent developments in fluorescence microscopy have broken this limit, seeding new opportunities for studying the nanometre-scale organisation of the NK cell immune synapse. Here, we discuss how these new imaging technologies, including super-resolution imaging and other novel light-based methods, can illuminate our understanding of NK cell biology.

  9. Natural Killer Cells: Biology and Clinical Use in Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William H. D. Hallett; William J. Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the ability to mediate both bone marrow rejection and promote engraftment, as well as the ability to elicit potent anti-tumor effects. However the clinical results for these processes are still elusive. Greater understanding of NK cell biology, from activating and inhibitory receptor functions to the role of NK cells in allogeneic transplantation, needs to be appreciated in order to draw out the clinical potential of NK cells. Mechanisms of bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection are known to be dependant on inhibitory receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and on activating receptors that have many potential ligands. The modulation of activating and inhibitory receptors may hold the key to clinical success involving NK cells. Pre-clinical studies in mice have shown that different combinations of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells can reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), promote engraftment, and provide superior graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Recent clinical data have shown that the use of KIR-ligand incompatibility produces tremendous graft-versus-leukemia effect in patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. This review will attempt to be a synthesis of current knowledge concerning NK cells, their involvement in BMT, and their use as an immunotherapy for cancer and other hematologic malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):12-21.

  10. Influence of human cytomegalvirus on the expression of natural-killer group 2-members receptors on the natural killer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾绍庆

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of human cytomegalovirus(CMV)on the expressions of natural-killer group2-members(NKG2),including natural-killer group 2-member A(NKG2A),natural-killer group 2-member C(NKG2C)and natural-killer group 2-member D(NKG2D)receptors on the natural killer(NK)cells.Methods NK cells were isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 20 healthy individuals using

  11. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity assay with time-resolved fluorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建中; 章竹君; 金伯泉; 田方

    1996-01-01

    A new time-resolved fluorimetric method for the measurement of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity has been developed by labelling the target cell K562 with a new synthesized fluorescence marker KLUK. The method has advantages of higher sensitivity, time-saving, good reproducibility and has no radioactivity problems. A satisfactory result is obtained by comparing it with 51Cr release method. It demonstrates that the new marker provides an alternative to currently used radioactive markers for the assessment of in vitro cellular cytotoxicity.

  12. Natural Dyes as Photosensitizers for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

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    Hatem S. El-Ghamri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs were assembled using Zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles as a photoelectrode and natural dyes extracted from eight natural plants as photosensitizers. The structural properties of the synthesized ZnO nanoparticles were studied using XRD, SEM and TEM characterizations. Photovoltaic parameters such as short circuit current density Jsc, open circuit voltage Voc, fill factor FF, and overall conversion efficiency η for the fabricated cells were determined under 100 mW/cm2 illumination. It was found that the DSSC fabricated with the extracted safflower dye as a sensitizer showed the best performance. Also, its performance increased with increasing the sintering temperature of the semiconductor electrode with highest performance at 400 °C. Moreover, it was found that a semiconductor electrode of 7.5 μm thickness yielded the highest response.

  13. Natural dyes as photosensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Sancun; Wu, Jihuai; Huang, Yunfang; Lin, Jianming [Institute of Materials Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362021 (China)

    2006-02-15

    The dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) were assembled by using natural dyes extracted from black rice, capsicum, erythrina variegata flower, rosa xanthina, and kelp as sensitizers. The I{sub SC} from 1.142mA to 0.225mA, the V{sub OC} from 0.551V to 0.412V, the fill factor from 0.52 to 0.63, and P{sub max} from 58{mu}W to 327{mu}W were obtained from the DSC sensitized with natural dye extracts. In the extracts of natural fruit, leaves and flower chosen, the black rice extract performed the best photosensitized effect, which was due to the better interaction between the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin molecule on black rice extract and the surface of TiO{sub 2} porous film. The blue-shift of absorption wavelength of the black rice extract in ethanol solution on TiO{sub 2} film and the blue-shift phenomenon from absorption spectrum to photoaction spectrum of DSC sensitized with black rice extract are discussed in the paper. Because of the simple preparation technique, widely available and low cheap cost natural dye as an alternative sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cell is promising. (author)

  14. Natural Polymer-Cell Bioconstructs for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titorencu, Irina; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Nemecz, Miruna; Jinga, Victor V

    2017-01-01

    The major goal of bone tissue engineering is to develop bioconstructs which substitute the functionality of damaged natural bone structures as much as possible if critical-sized defects occur. Scaffolds that mimic the structure and composition of bone tissue and cells play a pivotal role in bone tissue engineering applications. First, composition, properties and in vivo synthesis of bone tissue are presented for the understanding of bone formation. Second, potential sources of osteoprogenitor cells have been investigated for their capacity to induce bone repair and regeneration. Third, taking into account that the main property to qualify one scaffold as a future bioconstruct for bone tissue engineering is the biocompatibility, the assessments which prove it are reviewed in this paper. Forth, various types of natural polymer- based scaffolds consisting in proteins, polysaccharides, minerals, growth factors etc, are discussed, and interaction between scaffolds and cells which proved bone tissue engineering concept are highlighted. Finally, the future perspectives of natural polymer-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering are considered.

  15. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells

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    Rohtesh S Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cord blood (CB offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. The risk of relapse and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD after cord blood transplantation (CBT are lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen (HLA mismatch. Natural killer (NK cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR-ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategiesfor the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy.

  16. Natural killer cells in intravenous drug abusers with lymphadenopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, G; Introna, M; Zanaboni, F; Peri, G; Carbonari, M; Aiuti, F; Lazzarin, A; Moroni, M; Mantovani, A

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated 25 intravenous drug abusers with the clinical and laboratory features of lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) and 10 AIDS patients for the expression of NK activity. LAS and AIDS patients had low NK cytotoxicity compared to normal donors. The defective NK cytotoxicity was analysed in the eight LAS subjects with most marked depression. NK effectors were identified by morphology (large granular lymphocytes, LGL) and monoclonal antibody-defined surface markers (B73.1, N901, HNK1). LAS patients had normal percentages of LGL and B73.1+ and N901+ cells. with the exception of two subjects with very low frequency of B73.1+ and N901+ cells. The percentage of HNK1+ cells was increased in LAS, probably because of the reactivity of this reagent with a subset of conventional OKT8+ cells, relatively augmented in LAS subjects. Depletion of monocytes did not enhance NK activity consistently. LAS patients had a normal frequency of cells capable of binding K562. In-vitro exposure to interferon beta (natural) or gamma (recombinant) augmented the defective NK activity of LAS subjects. Thus, patients with LAS have defective NK activity that cannot be accounted for by a low frequency of the relevant effector cells or by monocytic suppressors. These observations suggest a functional defect of NK cells at one or more of the post-binding steps required for the completion of killing. PMID:2415279

  17. Curcumin and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Enhance NK Cell-Induced Apoptosis of Pancreatic Cancer Cells but Curcumin Inhibits Interferon-γ Production: Benefits of Omega-3 with Curcumin against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Fiala

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available STAT-3 and STAT-1 signaling have opposite effects in oncogenesis with STAT-3 acting as an oncogene and STAT-1 exerting anti-oncogenic activities through interferon-γ and interferon-α. The cytokine IL-6 promotes oncogenesis by stimulation of NFκB and STAT-3 signaling. Curcuminoids have bi-functional effects by blocking NFκB anti-apoptotic signaling but also blocking anti-oncogenic STAT-1 signaling and interferon-γ production. In our recent study (unpublished work [1] in pancreatic cancer cell cultures, curcuminoids enhanced cancer cell apoptosis both directly and by potentiating natural killer (NK cell cytotoxic function. The cytotoxic effects of curcuminoids were increased by incubation of cancer cells and NK cells in an emulsion with omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants (Smartfish, which enhanced cancer cell apoptosis and protected NK cells against degradation. However, as also shown by others, curcuminoids blocked interferon-γ production by NK cells. The combined use of curcuminoids and omega-3 in cancer immunotherapy will require deeper understanding of their in vivo interactions with the immune system.

  18. A Case of Mature Natural Killer-Cell Neoplasm Manifesting Multiple Choroidal Lesions: Primary Intraocular Natural Killer-Cell Lymphoma

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    Yoshiaki Tagawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Natural killer (NK cell neoplasm is a rare disease that follows an acute course and has a poor prognosis. It usually emerges from the nose and appears in the ocular tissue as a metastasis. Herein, we describe a case of NK-cell neoplasm in which the eye was considered to be the primary organ. Case: A 50-year-old female displayed bilateral anterior chamber cells, vitreous opacity, bullous retinal detachment, and multiple white choroidal mass lesions. Although malignant lymphoma or metastatic tumor was suspected, various systemic examinations failed to detect any positive results. A vitrectomy was performed OS; however, histocytological analyses from the vitreous sample showed no definite evidence of malignancy, and IL-10 concentration was low. Enlarged choroidal masses were fused together. Three weeks after the first visit, the patient suddenly developed an attack of fever, night sweat, and hepatic dysfunction, and 5 days later, she passed away due to multiple organ failure. Immunohistochemisty and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of atypical cells positive for CD3, CD56, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs, resulting in the diagnosis of NK-cell neoplasm. With the characteristic clinical course, we concluded that this neoplasm was a primary intraocular NK-cell lymphoma. Conclusions: This is the first report to describe primary intraocular NK-cell neoplasm. When we encounter atypical choroidal lesions, we should consider the possibility of NK-cell lymphoma, even though it is a rare disease.

  19. A Case of Mature Natural Killer-Cell Neoplasm Manifesting Multiple Choroidal Lesions: Primary Intraocular Natural Killer-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Namba, Kenichi; Ogasawara, Reiki; Kanno, Hiromi; Ishida, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Natural killer (NK) cell neoplasm is a rare disease that follows an acute course and has a poor prognosis. It usually emerges from the nose and appears in the ocular tissue as a metastasis. Herein, we describe a case of NK-cell neoplasm in which the eye was considered to be the primary organ. Case A 50-year-old female displayed bilateral anterior chamber cells, vitreous opacity, bullous retinal detachment, and multiple white choroidal mass lesions. Although malignant lymphoma or metastatic tumor was suspected, various systemic examinations failed to detect any positive results. A vitrectomy was performed OS; however, histocytological analyses from the vitreous sample showed no definite evidence of malignancy, and IL-10 concentration was low. Enlarged choroidal masses were fused together. Three weeks after the first visit, the patient suddenly developed an attack of fever, night sweat, and hepatic dysfunction, and 5 days later, she passed away due to multiple organ failure. Immunohistochemisty and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of atypical cells positive for CD3, CD56, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs, resulting in the diagnosis of NK-cell neoplasm. With the characteristic clinical course, we concluded that this neoplasm was a primary intraocular NK-cell lymphoma. Conclusions This is the first report to describe primary intraocular NK-cell neoplasm. When we encounter atypical choroidal lesions, we should consider the possibility of NK-cell lymphoma, even though it is a rare disease. PMID:26668579

  20. Zerumbone protects INS-1 rat pancreatic beta cells from high glucose-induced apoptosis through generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changyin; Zou, Shibo; Cui, Zhengjun; Guo, Pengfei; Meng, Qingnan; Shi, Xun; Gao, Ya; Yang, Gaoyuan; Han, Zhaofeng

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of zerumbone, a natural sesquiterpene isolated from Zingiber zerumbet Smith, on high glucose-induced cytotoxicity in pancreatic β cells. INS-1 rat pancreatic β cells were treated with 33 mM glucose with or without different concentrations of zerumbone and cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in the action of zerumbone was examined. Notably, zerumbone significantly (P in a concentration-dependent fashion up to 60 μM of zerumbone. Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining analysis showed that zerumbone impaired the apoptotic response of high glucose-treated INS-1 cells, which was coupled with a significant decline in cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9. Pretreatment with the ROS inhibitor N-acetylcysteine abrogated the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK induced by high glucose. Zerumbone significantly (P in high glucose-treated INS-1 cells. Pharmacological activation of p38 and JNK with anisomycin reversed the anti-apoptotic effect of zerumbone. Additionally, simultaneous inhibition of p38 and JNK significantly (P in high glucose-treated INS-1 cells. In conclusion, zerumbone confers protection against high glucose-induced apoptosis of INS-1 pancreatic β cells, largely through interfering with ROS production and p38 and JNK activation. Zerumbone may have potential therapeutic effects against hyperglycemia-induced β cell damage in diabetes.

  1. Plant cell culture strategies for the production of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Villarreal, Marisol; Howat, Susan; Hong, SunMi; Jang, Mi Ok; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Eun-Kyong; Loake, Gary J

    2016-03-01

    Plants have evolved a vast chemical cornucopia to support their sessile lifestyles. Man has exploited this natural resource since Neolithic times and currently plant-derived chemicals are exploited for a myriad of applications. However, plant sources of most high-value natural products (NPs) are not domesticated and therefore their production cannot be undertaken on an agricultural scale. Further, these plant species are often slow growing, their populations limiting, the concentration of the target molecule highly variable and routinely present at extremely low concentrations. Plant cell and organ culture constitutes a sustainable, controllable and environmentally friendly tool for the industrial production of plant NPs. Further, advances in cell line selection, biotransformation, product secretion, cell permeabilisation, extraction and scale-up, among others, are driving increases in plant NP yields. However, there remain significant obstacles to the commercial synthesis of high-value chemicals from these sources. The relatively recent isolation, culturing and characterisation of cambial meristematic cells (CMCs), provides an emerging platform to circumvent many of these potential difficulties. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 149-158].

  2. Natural Pigment-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Hernández-Martínez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC based on natural dyes extracted from five different sources is reported. These are inexpensive, have no nutritional use, and are easy to find in Mexico. The solar cells were assembled using a thin film and a TiO2 mesoporous film on ITO-coated glass; these films were characterized by FTIR. The extracts were characterized using UV–Vis and typical I-V curves were obtained for the cells. The best performance was for Punica Granatum with a solar energy conversion efficiency of 1.86%, with a current density Jsc of 3.341 mA/cm2using an incident irradiation of 100 mW/cm2 at 25 ºC.

  3. Type I Interferons and Natural Killer Cell Regulation in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lena; Aigner, Petra; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are known to mediate antitumor effects against several tumor types and have therefore been commonly used in clinical anticancer treatment. However, how IFN signaling exerts its beneficial effects is only partially understood. The clinically relevant activity of type I IFNs has been mainly attributed to their role in tumor immune surveillance. Different mechanisms have been postulated to explain how type I IFNs stimulate the immune system. On the one hand, they modulate innate immune cell subsets such as natural killer (NK) cells. On the other hand, type I IFNs also influence adaptive immune responses. Here, we review evidence for the impact of type I IFNs on immune surveillance against cancer and highlight the role of NK cells therein.

  4. Natures of Rotating Stall Cell in a Diagonal Flow Fan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. SHIOMI; K. KANEKO; T. SETOGUCHI

    2005-01-01

    In order to clarify the natures of a rotating stall cell, the experimental investigation was carried out in a high specific-speed diagonal flow fan. The pressure field on the casing wall and the velocity fields at the rotor inlet and outlet were measured under rotating stall condition with a fast response pressure transducer and a single slant hot-wire probe, respectively. The data were processed using the "Double Phase-Locked Averaging (DPLA)"technique, which enabled to obtain the unsteady flow field with a rotating stall cell in the relative co-ordinate system fixed to the rotor. As a result, the structure and behavior of the rotating stall cell in a high specific-speed diagonal flow fan were shown.

  5. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T9...

  6. Selection and expansion of natural killer cells for NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Petra S A; Suck, Garnet; Nowakowska, Paulina; Ullrich, Evelyn; Seifried, Erhard; Bader, Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been used in several clinical trials as adaptive immunotherapy. The low numbers of these cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have resulted in various approaches to preferentially expand primary NK cells from PBMC. While some clinical trials have used the addition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) to co-stimulate the expansion of purified NK cells from allogeneic donors, recent studies have shown promising results in achieving in vitro expansion of NK cells to large numbers for adoptive immunotherapy. NK cell expansion requires multiple cell signals for survival, proliferation and activation. Thus, expansion strategies have been focused either to substitute these factors using autologous feeder cells or to use genetically modified allogeneic feeder cells. Recent developments in the clinical use of genetically modified NK cell lines with chimeric antigen receptors, the development of expansion protocols for the clinical use of NK cell from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are challenging improvements for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Transfer of several of these protocols to clinical-grade production of NK cells necessitates adaptation of good manufacturing practice conditions, and the development of freezing conditions to establish NK cell stocks will require some effort and, however, should enhance the therapeutic options of NK cells in clinical medicine.

  7. Recognition of microbial glycolipids by Natural Killer T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Michael Zajonc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the Major Histocompatibility (MHC family (MHC I and II, lipids, glycolipids and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are Type I Natural killer T (iNKT cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi the causative agents of Lyme disease and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR, leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18 and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  8. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  9. [SEX HORMONE INFLUENCE ON PERIPHERAL NATURAL KILLER CELLS COUNT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, P; Konova, E; Blajeva, Sv; Lukanov, Tsv; Angelova, P; Georgieva, V; Totev, V; Komsa-Penkova, R

    2015-01-01

    Proper evaluation of immunological factors connected with pregnancy establishment increased the possibility for exact treatment in high risk gestation cases. Hormonal changes during an ovarian cycle may affect immune response, which is crucial for the embryonic implantation. Peripheral Natural killer (pNK) cells are key components of immune systems and their activities could be regulated by sex hormones. In the present study we investigated the effects of estrogen fluctuation on the number of NK cells in vivo during the early follicular and middle luteal phase of menstrual cycle. In 63 healthy women with at least one full term pregnancy and regular menstrual cycle with duration between 24 and 32 days, blood samples have been collected twice for investigation of CD3/CD16/CD56 positive lymphocytes. The mean pNK count in follicular phase was 11.6% with 4.7% variation. The median was 10.6%. The mean pNK count in luteal phase was 12.1% with 5.1% variation, respectively median for cell number 11.8%. The two-tailed t-test comparison did not find any statistical difference despite the slight elevation of pNK cells count in luteal phase. The insignificant variation in pNK cells count objected the suggestion to evaluate immunological status in women with adverse pregnancy outcome in specific phase of menstrual cycle.

  10. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase by D2 receptor prevents apoptosis in dopaminergic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Venugopalan D; Olanow, C Warren; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2003-07-01

    Whereas dopamine agonists are known to provide symptomatic benefits for Parkinson's disease, recent clinical trials suggest that they might also be neuroprotective. Laboratory studies demonstrate that dopamine agonists can provide neuroprotective effects in a number of model systems, but the role of receptor-mediated signalling in these effects is controversial. We find that dopamine agonists have robust, concentration-dependent anti-apoptotic activity in PC12 cells that stably express human D(2L) receptors from cell death due to H(2)O(2) or trophic withdrawal and that the protective effects are abolished in the presence of D(2)-receptor antagonists. D(2) agonists are also neuroprotective in the nigral dopamine cell line SN4741, which express endogenous D(2) receptors, whereas no anti-apoptotic activity is observed in native PC12 cells, which do not express detectable D(2) receptors. Notably, the agonists studied differ in their relative efficacy to mediate anti-apoptotic effects and in their capacity to stimulate [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP[S]) binding, an indicator of G-protein activation. Studies with inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase indicate that the PI 3-kinase pathway is required for D(2) receptor-mediated cell survival. These studies indicate that certain dopamine agonists can complex with D(2) receptors to preferentially transactivate neuroprotective signalling pathways and to mediate increased cell survival.

  11. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells.

  12. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  13. Amygdalin induces apoptosis through regulation of Bax and Bcl-2 expressions in human DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Shin, Mal-Soon; Yang, Hye-Young; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Young-Sick; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Kim, Jullia; Kim, Khae-Hawn; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common non-skin cancers in men. Amygdalin is one of the nitrilosides, natural cyanide-containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that have been used to treat cancers and relieve pain. In particular, D-amygdalin (D-mandelonitrile-beta-D-gentiobioside) is known to exhibit selective killing effect on cancer cells. Apoptosis, programmed cell death, is an important mechanism in cancer treatment. In the present study, we prepared the aqueous extract of the amygdalin from Armeniacae semen and investigated whether this extract induces apoptotic cell death in human DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. In the present results, DU145 and LNCaP cells treated with amygdalin exhibited several morphological characteristics of apoptosis. Treatment with amygdalin increased expression of Bax, a pro-apoptotic protein, decreased expression of Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein, and increased caspase-3 enzyme activity in DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Here, we have shown that amygdalin induces apoptotic cell death in human DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells by caspase-3 activation through down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax. The present study reveals that amygdalin may offer a valuable option for the treatment of prostate cancers.

  14. Inactivation of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3 is essential for PKB-mediated survival of hematopoietic progenitor cells by kit ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, Maria; Karlsson, Richard; Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation of phosphatidylinos......OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation...... of hematopoietic progenitors. Because forkhead proteins are involved in controlling apoptosis and cell-cycle progression, this may be one important mechanism by which survival of hematopoietic progenitors is mediated....

  15. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on natural killer cell function in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nived, O.; Johansson, I.; Sturfelt, G. (University Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Rheumatology)

    1992-06-01

    In vitro irradiation with long wavelength ultraviolet light (UV-A), in clinically relevant dosages, of a natural killer cell line containing cell preparations from 17 control subjects reduced natural killer cell cytotoxicity with the cell line K562 as target. The spontaneous function of natural killer cells from 12 patients with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlated inversely with the one hour erythrocyte sedimentation rate, but not with glucocorticoid doses. After UV-A exposure, natural killer cells from patients with SLE exert either increased or decreased cytotoxicity, and the direction of change is inversely correlated with the spontaneous natural killer cell function. (Author).

  16. In vitro protective effects of Thymus quinquecostatus Celak extracts on t-BHP-induced cell damage through antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Lee, Seung-Jae; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Ee-Hwa; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byung-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative activities of water and 70% ethanolic extracts from the Thymus quinquecostatus Celak (TQC) for natural antioxidant source. The antioxidant activities were compared with other natural and synthetic antioxidants. The levels of total polyphenols and flavonoids were also determined. The extracts were found to have different levels of antioxidant properties in a few kind of assay. The results showed that higher radical scavenging activity, reducing power and antioxidant capacity in FRAP than those of BHT as a positive control. In addition, the extracts from the TQC leaf and stem showed stronger antioxidant activity than that of vitamin C, α-tocopherol in ferric thiocyanate (FTC) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) methods. Cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effect of water extracts from TQC was also prevented t-BHP-induced toxicity in Chang liver cells. Therefore, these results indicate that TQC extracts have antioxidant properties through its ability to enhance the cell viability, reduction of production of ROS, inhibition of oxidative damage, mitochondria dysfunction and ultimately inhibition of cell apoptosis. Based on the results described above, it is suggested that TQC has the potential to protect liver on t-BHP-induced cell damage and should be considered as a prospective functional food.

  17. Natural killer cells and cancer: regulation by the killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Amanda K; Campbell, Kerry S

    2009-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune effector cells that make up approximately 10-15% of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in humans and are primarily involved in immunosurveillance to eliminate transformed and virally-infected cells. They were originally defined by their ability to spontaneously eliminate rare cells lacking expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I) self molecules, which is commonly referred to as "missing self" recognition. The molecular basis for missing self recognition emerges from the expression of MHC-I-specific inhibitory receptors on the NK cell surface that tolerize NK cells toward normal MHC-I-expressing cells. By lacking inhibitory receptor ligands, tumor cells or virus-infected cells that have down-modulated surface MHC-I expression become susceptible to attack by NK cells. Killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR; CD158) constitute a family of MHC-I binding receptors that plays a major role in regulating the activation thresholds of NK cells and some T cells in humans. Here, we review the multiple levels of KIR diversity that contribute to the generation of a highly varied NK cell repertoire and explain how this diversity can influence susceptibility to a variety of diseases, including cancer. We further describe strategies by which KIR can be manipulated therapeutically to treat cancer, through the exploitation of KIR/MHC-I ligand mismatch to potentiate hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the use of KIR blockade to enhance tumor cell killing.

  18. Contact-dependent Stimulation and Inhibition of Dendritic Cells by Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piccioli, Diego; Sbrana, Silverio; Melandri, Emiliano; Valiante, Nicholas M.

    2002-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) are two distinct cell types of innate immunity. It is known that the in vitro interaction of human NK cells with autologous DCs results in DC lysis. Here we show that contact-dependent interactions between activated human NK cells and immature DCs (iDCs) provides a “control switch” for the immune system. At low NK/DC ratios, this interaction dramatically amplifies DC responses, whereas at high ratios it completely turns off their responses. ...

  19. Hematopoietic and nature killer cell development from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhenya; Knorr, David A; Kaufman, Dan S

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key effectors of the innate immune system, protecting the host from a variety of infections, as well as malignant cells. Recent advances in the field of NK cell biology have led to a better understanding of how NK cells develop. This progress has directly translated to improved outcomes in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants to treat potentially lethal malignancies. However, key differences between mouse and human NK cell development and biology limits the use of rodents to attain a more in depth understanding of NK cell development. Therefore, a readily accessible and genetically tractable cell source to study human NK cell development is warranted. Our lab has pioneered the development of lymphocytes, specifically NK cells, from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This chapter describes a reliable method to generate NK cells from hESCs and iPSCs using murine stromal cell lines. Additionally, we include an updated approach using a spin-embryoid body (spin-EB) differentiation system that allows for human NK cell development completely defined in vitro conditions.

  20. A natural stem cell therapy? How novel findings and biotechnology clarify the ethics of stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, P.

    2006-01-01

    The natural replacement of damaged cells by stem cells occurs actively and often in adult tissues, especially rapidly dividing cells such as blood cells. An exciting case in Boston, however, posits a kind of natural stem cell therapy provided to a mother by her fetus—long after the fetus is born. Because there is a profound lack of medical intervention, this therapy seems natural enough and is unlikely to be morally suspect. Nevertheless, we feel morally uncertain when we consider giving this...

  1. Neuroprotective effects of KR-62980, a new PPARγ agonist, against chemical ischemia-reperfusion in SK-N-SH cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Young; Cho, Hyun Sill; Lee, Su Hee; Ahn, Jin Hee; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2011-02-01

    PPARγ agonists exert neuroprotective effects against various types of brain injuries. In the present study, we investigated the effects of KR-62980, a new PPARγ agonist, and rosiglitazone on the neuronal cell death induced by chemical ischemia-reperfusion in SK-N-SH cells and their underlying molecular mechanisms. Both agonists inhibited chemical ischemia-reperfusion-induced cell death, and the effects were associated with anti-apoptotic action. KR-62980 and rosiglitazone suppressed NO and ROS formation, and N-acetyl-N-acetoxy-4-chlorobenzenesulfonamide, an NO generator, reversed the protective effects of the agonists on cell viability. In the agonist-induced anti-apoptotic process, PTEN expression was suppressed in parallel with increased Akt and ERK phosphorylation, whereas PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor) or wortmannin (a PI-3K inhibitor) abolished the cell survival by KR-62980 and rosiglitazone. All of the effects of KR-62980 and rosiglitazone appeared to be PPARγ-dependent because the effects were reversed by bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPARγ antagonist, or by PPARγ knockdown. Our results demonstrate that two PPARγ agonists, KR-62980 and rosiglitazone, inhibited chemical ischemia-reperfusion-induced neuronal cell death by PPARγ-mediated anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant mechanisms related to PTEN suppression and ERK phosphorylation.

  2. Induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis by Morinda citrifolia (Noni) in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Banerjee, Ayan; Pathak, Suajta; Sharma, Chandresh; Singh, Neeta

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer in women and has a high mortality rate. Cisplatin, an antitumor agent, is generally used for its treatment. However, the administration of cisplatin is associated with side effects and intrinsic resistance. Morinda citrifolia (Noni), a natural plant product, has been shown to have anti-cancer properties. In this study, we used Noni, cisplatin, and the two in combination to study their cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effects in cervical cancer HeLa and SiHa cell lines. We demonstrate here, that Noni/Cisplatin by themselves and their combination were able to induce apoptosis in both these cell lines. Cisplatin showed slightly higher cell killing as compared to Noni and their combination showed additive effects. The observed apoptosis appeared to be mediated particularly through the up-regulation of p53 and pro-apoptotic Bax proteins, as well as down- regulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, Bcl-XL proteins and survivin. Augmentation in the activity of caspase-9 and -3 was also observed, suggesting the involvement of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis for both Noni and Cisplatin in HeLa and SiHa cell lines.

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  4. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Natural_Killer_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Natural_Killer_Cells mm9 TFs and others Blood Natural Killer Cells... SRX338019,SRX338021,SRX338030,SRX338029 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Natural_Killer_Cells.bed ...

  5. Naturally occurring regulatory T cells: markers, mechanisms, and manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmetterer, Klaus G; Neunkirchner, Alina; Pickl, Winfried F

    2012-06-01

    Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(high) forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) are key mediators of immunity, which orchestrate and maintain tolerance to self and foreign antigens. In the recent 1.5 decades, a multitude of studies have aimed to define the phenotype and function of nTregs and to assess their therapeutic potential for modulating immune mediated disorders such as autoimmunity, allergy, and episodes of transplant rejection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of nTregs. We address the exact definition of nTregs by specific markers and combinations thereof, which is a prerequisite for the state-of-the-art isolation of defined nTreg populations. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism by which nTregs mediate immunosuppression and how this knowledge might translate into novel therapeutic modalities. With first clinical studies of nTreg-based therapies being finished, questions concerning the reliable sources of nTregs are becoming more and more eminent. Consequently, approaches allowing conversion of CD4(+) T cells into nTregs by coculture with antigen-presenting cells, cytokines, and/or pharmacological agents are discussed. In addition, genetic engineering approaches for the generation of antigen-specific nTregs are described.

  6. Pro-Apoptotic Effect of Rice Bran Inositol Hexaphosphate (IP6 on HT-29 Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Husna Shafie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6, or phytic acid is a natural dietary ingredient and has been described as a “natural cancer fighter”, being an essential component of nutritional diets. The marked anti-cancer effect of IP6 has resulted in our quest for an understanding of its mechanism of action. In particular, our data provided strong evidence for the induction of apoptotic cell death, which may be attributable to the up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-xl in favor of apoptosis. In addition, the up-regulation of caspase-3 and -8 expression and activation of both caspases may also contribute to the apoptotic cell death of human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells when exposed to IP6. Collectively, this present study has shown that rice bran IP6 induces apoptosis, by regulating the pro- and anti-apoptotic markers; Bax and Bcl-xl and via the activation of caspase molecules (caspase-3 and -8.

  7. Rpr- and hid-driven cell death in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng Da; Adams, Sheila M; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2002-02-01

    The reaper (rpr) and head involution defective (hid) genes mediate programmed cell death (PCD) during Drosophila development. We show that expression of either rpr or hid under control of a rhodopsin promoter induces rapid cell death of adult photoreceptor cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that the dying photoreceptor cells share morphological features with other cells undergoing PCD. The anti-apoptotic baculoviral P35 protein acts downstream of hid activity to suppress the photoreceptor cell death driven by rpr and hid. These results establish that the Drosophila photoreceptors are sensitive to the rpr- and hid-driven cell death pathways.

  8. Arbutin, an intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenger, protects radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Hua; Li, Peng; Zhao, Qing-Li; Piao, Jin-Lan; Jiao, Yu-Fei; Kadowaki, Makoto; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS have the potential to damage cellular macromolecules including DNA, proteins, and lipids and eventually lead to cell death. In this study, we evaluated the potential of arbutin, a drug chosen from a series of traditional herbal medicine by measuring intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenging ability in X-irradiated U937 cells. Arbutin (hydroquinone-β-D-glucopyranoside), a naturally occurring glucoside of hydroquinone, has been traditionally used to treat pigmentary disorders. However, there are no reports describing the effect of arbutin on IR-induced apoptosis. We confirmed that arbutin can protect cells from apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. The combination of arbutin and X-irradiation could reduce intracellular hydroxyl radical production and prevent mitochondrial membrane potential loss. It also could down-regulate the expression of phospho-JNK, phospho-p38 in whole cell lysate and activate Bax in mitochondria. Arbutin also inhibits cytochrome C release from mitochondria to cytosol. To verify the role of JNK in X-irradiation-induced apoptosis, the cells were pretreated with a JNK inhibitor, and found that JNK inhibitor could reduce apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. Taken together, our data indicate that arbutin plays an anti-apoptotic role via decreasing intracellular hydroxyl radical production, inhibition of Bax-mitochondria pathway and activation of the JNK/p38 MAPK pathway.

  9. YAP Inhibition by Resveratrol via Activation of AMPK Enhances the Sensitivity of Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Gemcitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengdong Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol present in most plants, inhibits the growth of numerous cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Aberrant expression of YAP has been reported to activate multiple growth-regulatory pathways and confer anti-apoptotic abilities to many cancer cells. However, the role of resveratrol in YES-activated protein (YAP expression and that of YAP in pancreatic cancer cells’ response to gemcitabine resistance remain elusive. In this study, we found that resveratrol suppressed the proliferation and cloning ability and induced the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. These multiple biological effects might result from the activation of AMP-activation protein kinase (AMPK (Thr172 and, thus, the induction of YAP cytoplasmic retention, Ser127 phosphorylation, and the inhibition of YAP transcriptional activity by resveratrol. YAP silencing by siRNA or resveratrol enhanced the sensitivity of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that resveratrol could increase the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine by inhibiting YAP expression. More importantly, our work reveals that resveratrol is a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and YAP may serve as a promising target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy.

  10. D-pinitol promotes apoptosis in MCF-7 cells via induction of p53 and Bax and inhibition of Bcl-2 and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Nandakumar, Natarajan; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Haribabu, Lingaiah; Nishigaki, Ikuo; Balasubramanian, Maruthaiveeran Periyasamy

    2014-01-01

    Development of drugs from natural products has been undergoing a gradual evoluation. Many plant derived compounds have excellent therapeutic potential against various human ailments. They are important sources especially for anticancer agents. A number of promising new agents are in clinical development based on their selective molecular targets in the field of oncology. D-pinitol is a naturally occurring compound derived from soy which has significant pharmacological activitites. Therefore we selected D-pinitol in order to evaluate apoptotic potential in the MCF-7 cell line. Human breast cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of D-pinitol and cytotoxicity was measured by MTT and LDH assays. The mechanism of apoptosis was studied with reference to expression of p53, Bcl-2, Bax and NF-kB proteins. The results revealed that D-pinitol significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, while upregulating the expression of p53, Bax and down regulating Bcl-2 and NF-kB. Thus the results obtained in this study clearly vindicated that D-pinitol induces apotosis in MCF-7 cells through regulation of proteins of pro- and anti-apoptotic cascades.

  11. Rat natural killer cell, T cell and macrophage functions after intracerebroventricular injection of SNC 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J E; Gomez-Flores, R; Calderon, S N; Rice, K C; Weber, R J

    1998-08-01

    We investigated the effects of (+)-4-[(alpha R)-alpha-((2S, 5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N, N-diethylbenzamide (SNC 80), a nonpeptidic delta-opioid receptor-selective agonist, on rat leukocyte functions. Intracerebroventricular injection of SNC 80 (20 nmol) in Fischer 344N male rats did not affect splenic natural killer cell activity compared with intracerebroventricular saline-injected controls. SNC 80 also had no effect on concanavalin A-, anti-T cell receptor-, interleukin-2- and anti-T cell receptor + interleukin-2-induced splenic and thymic lymphocyte proliferation in most experiments. In some experiments, however, SNC 80 significantly (P SNC 80 did not significantly affect splenic T cell or natural killer cell populations as measured by the expression of T cell receptoralphabeta, and T helper (CD4), T suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8) and natural killer cell surface markers. Finally, SNC 80 did not affect interferon-gamma- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced splenic nitric oxide, and LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by splenic macrophages. These results suggest that SNC 80 could be useful in the treatment of pain without suppressing immune function. However, the potential immunoenhancing properties of SNC 80 may be also valuable in immunocompromised individuals.

  12. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, induces apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting HSF1 activity through blocking its binding to the hsp70 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Ae; Lee, Somyoung; Kim, Da-Eun; Kim, Moonil; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Han, Dong Cho

    2015-06-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a transcription factor for heat shock proteins (HSPs) expression that enhances the survival of cancer cells exposed to various stresses. HSF1 knockout suppresses carcinogen-induced cancer induction in mice. Therefore, HSF1 is a promising therapeutic and chemopreventive target. We performed cell-based screening with a natural compound collection and identified fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, as a HSF1 inhibitor. Fisetin abolished heat shock-induced luciferase activity with an IC50 of 14 μM in HCT-116 cancer cells. The treatment of HCT-116 with fisetin inhibited proliferation with a GI50 of 23 μM. When the cells were exposed to heat shock in the presence of fisetin, the induction of HSF1 target proteins, such as HSP70, HSP27 and BAG3 (Bcl-2-associated athanogene domain 3), were inhibited. HSP70/BAG3 complexes protect cancer cells from apoptosis by stabilizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. The downregulation of HSP70/BAG3 by fisetin significantly reduced the amounts of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 proteins, subsequently inducing apoptotic cell death. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that fisetin inhibited HSF1 activity by blocking the binding of HSF1 to the hsp70 promoter. Intraperitoneal treatment of nude mice with fisetin at 30mg/kg resulted in a 35.7% (P < 0.001) inhibition of tumor growth.

  13. Revving up natural killer cells and cytokine-induced killer cells against hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco ePittari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D, NKG2A/CD94, NKp46 and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols.Cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming.NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies.

  14. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  15. Functional Reconstitution Of Natural Killer Cells In Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ashik eUllah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are the first lymphocyte population to reconstitute following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and are important in mediating immunity against both leukemia and pathogens. Although NK cell numbers generally reconstitute within a month, the acquisition of mature NK cell phenotype and full functional competency can take 6 months or more, and is influenced by graft composition, concurrent pharmacologic immunosuppression, graft-versus-host disease and other clinical factors. In addition, cytomegalovirus infection and reactivation have a dominant effect on NK cell memory imprinting following allogeneic HSCT just as it does in healthy individuals. Our understanding of NK cell education and licensing has evolved in the years since the ‘missing self’ hypothesis for NK-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effect was first put forward. For example, we now know that NK cell ‘re-education’ can occur, and that unlicensed NK cells can be more protective than licensed NK cells in certain settings, thus raising new questions about how best to harness graft-versus-leukemia effect. Here we review current understanding of the functional reconstitution of NK cells and NK cell education following allogeneic HSCT, highlighting a conceptual framework for future research.

  16. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Van Der Steen, Dirk M.; Blokland, Nina J G; van Noesel, Max M.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Boes, Marianne; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20-40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neurobla

  17. Are natural killer cells protecting the metabolically healthy obese patient?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Lydia A

    2012-02-01

    With the emerging obesity pandemic, identifying those who appear to be protected from adverse consequences such as type 2 diabetes and certain malignancies will become important. We propose that the circulating immune system plays a role in the development of these comorbidities. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 52 patients with severe obesity attending a hospital weight-management clinic and 11 lean healthy controls. Patients were classified into metabolically "healthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 42.6 years, mean BMI 46.8 kg\\/m(2)) or "unhealthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 45 years, mean BMI 47.5 kg\\/m(2)) groups, based upon standard cutoff points for blood pressure, lipid profile, and fasting glucose. Circulating lymphoid populations and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Obese patients had significantly less circulating natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) compared to lean controls. There were significantly higher levels of NK cells and CTLs in the healthy obese group compared to the unhealthy obese group (NK: 11.7% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.0001, CD8 13.4% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.04), independent of age and BMI and these NK cells were also less activated in the healthy compared to the unhealthy group (CD69, 4.1% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.03). This is the first time that quantitative differences in the circulating immune system of obese patients with similar BMI but different metabolic profiles have been described. The significantly higher levels of CTLs and NK cells, which express fewer inhibitory molecules, could protect against malignancy, infection, and metabolic disease seen in obesity.

  18. Natural killer cells go inside: Entosis versus cannibalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youcun Qian; Yufang Shi

    2009-01-01

    @@ The cell-in-cell phenomenon is frequently observed in tumor samples, especially in those highly malignant or metastatic tumors. It is believed that through this mechanism, cancer cells could ingest immune cells such as neutrophils and lymphocytes, which otherwise kill tumor cells. Tumor cells could also phagocytose tumor cells-a phenomenon resembles autophagic di-gestion of cellular organelles under star-vation. This cell-eat-cell phenomenon is called cannibalism [1-2].

  19. Innate immune control of EBV-infected B cells by invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Brian K; Tsai, Kevin; Allan, Lenka L; Zheng, Dong Jun; Nie, Johnny C; Biggs, Catherine M; Hasan, Mohammad R; Kozak, Frederick K; van den Elzen, Peter; Priatel, John J; Tan, Rusung

    2013-10-10

    Individuals with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease lack invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and are exquisitely susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. To determine whether iNKT cells recognize or regulate EBV, resting B cells were infected with EBV in the presence or absence of iNKT cells. The depletion of iNKT cells increased both viral titers and the frequency of EBV-infected B cells. However, EBV-infected B cells rapidly lost expression of the iNKT cell receptor ligand CD1d, abrogating iNKT cell recognition. To determine whether induced CD1d expression could restore iNKT recognition in EBV-infected cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) were treated with AM580, a synthetic retinoic acid receptor-α agonist that upregulates CD1d expression via the nuclear protein, lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1). AM580 significantly reduced LEF-1 association at the CD1d promoter region, induced CD1d expression on LCL, and restored iNKT recognition of LCL. CD1d-expressing LCL elicited interferon γ secretion and cytotoxicity by iNKT cells even in the absence of exogenous antigen, suggesting an endogenous iNKT antigen is expressed during EBV infection. These data indicate that iNKT cells may be important for early, innate control of B cell infection by EBV and that downregulation of CD1d may allow EBV to circumvent iNKT cell-mediated immune recognition.

  20. Fractalkine expression induces endothelial progenitor cell lysis by natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyana Todorova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating CD34(+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that CD34(+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34(+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34(+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34(+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34(+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34(+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients.

  1. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M; Blokland, Nina J G; van Noesel, Max M; Molenaar, Jan J; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Boes, Marianne; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20-40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses.

  2. Different BAG-1 isoforms have distinct functions in modulating chemotherapeutic-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyu LIU; Zhuomin WANG; Yun BAI; Min WANG; Ying LI; Sen WEI; Qinghua ZHOU; Jun CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Aim:BAG-1 is a multifunctional anti-apoptotic gene with four isoforms,and different BAG-1 isoforms have different anti-apoptotic functions.In this study,we transfected BAG-1 isoforms into the human breast cancer cell lines Hs578T (ER nega-tive) and MCF-7 (ER positive) to study their effect on apoptosis with or without estrogens.Methods: The constructed recombinant expression vectors carrying individual BAG-1 isoforms was used to transfect human breast cancer cell lines Hs578T (ER negative) and MCF-7 (ER positive).After stable cell lines were made,a variety of apoptosis-inducing agents,including doxorubicin,docetaxel,and 5-FU,was used to treat these cell lines with or without estrogen to test the role of BAG-1.The mechanism by which BAG-1 affected the function of Bcl-2 was exploredby using the cycloheximide chase assay.Results: The BAG-1 p50 and p46 isoforms significantly enhanced the resistance to apoptosis in both cell lines according to flow cytometry analysis.BAG-1 p33 and p29 failed to protect the transfected cells from apoptosis.The cell viability assay showed that only BAG-1 p50,but not p46,p33,or p29,increased estrogen-dependent function in ER-positive cell line MCF-7.Only BAG-1 p50 dramatically increased its anti-apoptotic ability in the presence of estrogen,while estrogen has very little effect on the anti-apoptotic ability of other BAG-1 isoforms.In the detection of the expression of K-ras,Hsp70,cytochrome c,Raf-1,ER-α,and Bcl-2 in MCF-7 cells by Western blot,only Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly increased in MCF-7 cells transfected with BAG-1 p50 and p46,respectively.Furthermore,the cycloheximide chase assay indicated that the degradation of Bcl-2 protein was extended in the BAG-1 p50 and p46 transfected MCF-7 cells.Conclusion: Distinct isoforrns of BAG-1 have different anti-apoptotic functions in breast cancer cells,and that the BAG-1 p50 isoform can potentiate the role of estrogen in ER-positive breast cancer.

  3. Type 1 Innate Lymphoid Cell Biology: Lessons Learnt from Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yuhao; Huntington, Nicholas D; Belz, Gabrielle T; Seillet, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) comprise the natural killer (NK) cells and ILC1s that reside within peripheral tissues. Several different ILC1 subsets have recently been characterized; however, no unique markers have been identified that uniquely define these subsets. Whether ILC1s and NK cells are in fact distinct lineages, or alternately exhibit transitional molecular programs that allow them to adapt to different tissue niches remains an open question. NK cells are the prototypic member of the Group 1 ILCs and have been historically assigned the functions of what now appears to be a multi-subset family that are distributed throughout the body. This raises the question of whether each of these populations mediate distinct functions during infection and tumor immunosurveillance. Here, we review the diversity of the Group 1 ILC subsets in their transcriptional regulation, localization, mobility, and receptor expression, and highlight the challenges in unraveling the individual functions of these different populations of cells.

  4. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells to generate invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Drake J; Liu, Siyuan; Ji, Sunjong; Li, Bo; McLaughlin, Jami; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N; Yang, Lili

    2015-02-03

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a small population of αβ T lymphocytes. They bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems and mediate strong and rapid responses to many diseases, including cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmunity. However, the study of iNKT cell biology and the therapeutic applications of these cells are greatly limited by their small numbers in vivo (∼0.01-1% in mouse and human blood). Here, we report a new method to generate large numbers of iNKT cells in mice through T-cell receptor (TCR) gene engineering of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We showed that iNKT TCR-engineered HSCs could generate a clonal population of iNKT cells. These HSC-engineered iNKT cells displayed the typical iNKT cell phenotype and functionality. They followed a two-stage developmental path, first in thymus and then in the periphery, resembling that of endogenous iNKT cells. When tested in a mouse melanoma lung metastasis model, the HSC-engineered iNKT cells effectively protected mice from tumor metastasis. This method provides a powerful and high-throughput tool to investigate the in vivo development and functionality of clonal iNKT cells in mice. More importantly, this method takes advantage of the self-renewal and longevity of HSCs to generate a long-term supply of engineered iNKT cells, thus opening up a new avenue for iNKT cell-based immunotherapy.

  5. Early Natural Killer Cell Reconstitution Predicts Overall Survival in T Cell-Replete Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minculescu, Lia; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke; Friis, Lone Smidstrup

    2016-01-01

    Early immune reconstitution plays a critical role in clinical outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Natural killer (NK) cells are the first lymphocytes to recover after transplantation and are considered powerful effector cells in HSCT. We aimed to evaluate...... the clinical impact of early NK cell recovery in T cell-replete transplant recipients. Immune reconstitution was studied in 298 adult patients undergoing HSCT for acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome from 2005 to 2013. In multivariate analysis NK cell numbers...... on day 30 (NK30) > 150 cells/µL were independently associated with superior overall survival (hazard ratio, .79; 95% confidence interval, .66 to .95; P = .01). Cumulative incidence analyses showed that patients with NK30 > 150 cells/µL had significantly less transplant-related mortality (TRM), P = .01...

  6. Cytolysis of oligodendrocytes is mediated by killer (K) cells but not by natural killer (NK) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, J; Kim, S U; Kastrukoff, L F

    1991-03-01

    The cytotoxic activity of killer (K) cells against enriched cultures of bovine oligodendrocytes (BOL) was investigated in multiple sclerosis (MS) and controls. Human K cells mediated cytotoxicity to primary cultures of BOL in the presence of anti-BOL antiserum in all study groups, while BOL were resistant to human natural killer (NK) cells. Cytotoxic activity was significantly reduced in MS when compared to age-matched normal controls but not when compared to other neurologic disease (OND) patients. K cell-mediated lysis of BOL could also be induced with anti-galactocerebroside antibody but not with other antibodies including those specific for OL antigens (myelin basic protein, proteolipid apoprotein, and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase). Enrichment of the effector population indicated that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to BOL was mediated by large granular lymphocytes, and the effector population was further characterized by flow cytometry. The effector cells mediating ADCC could be inhibited by protein A of Staphylococcus aureus, and by K562 cells in cold competition assay. These observations indicate that oligodendrocytes are resistant to NK cells but are susceptible to cytolysis mediated by K cells. This may represent a potentially important immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of MS.

  7. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  8. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Montalvillo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity. Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  9. Acquisition of enhanced natural killer cell activity under anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, C M; Lorden, J F; Hiramoto, R N; Ghanta, V K

    1992-01-01

    An increase in natural killer (NK) cell activity can be conditioned with a one trial learning paradigm to demonstrate the interaction between the central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system. In order to demonstrate learning possibilities during 'non-conscious' state, mice were anesthetized with a ketamin/rompun mixture and underwent one trial learning with odor cue as the conditioned stimulus (CS) preceding the unconditioned stimulus (US). The results indicated that mice that were exposed to camphor odor cue under the influence of anesthesia can associate the signal with the poly I:C unconditioned stimulus and were able to recall the conditioned response upon reexposure to the CS. Secondly, the conditioned association made in a conscious state can be recalled by exposure to the same olfactory odor cue in a 'non-conscious' state. The increase in the conditioned change in NK cell activity of both situations was significantly higher than the control group. The results demonstrate that learning can take place and the learned response can be recalled under the reduced awareness caused by anesthesia. The findings we report are unusual and novel in that they demonstrate that the CNS can learn new associations under conditions where the host is apparently unaware of the signals being linked. Anesthesia combined with the long interstimulus interval indicates that certain neuronal pathways in the CNS are receptive to second signals (elicited by the US) even when the second signal is separated by one day. This means the conditioned learning of a physiological response can take place unconsciously at a separate level and under situations where the host is totally unaware of the events which the brain is processing and linking as incoming information.

  10. Evidence for a second messenger function of dUTP during Bax mediated apoptosis of yeast and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Drew; Norman, Grant; Khoury, Chamel; Metcalfe, Naomi; Briard, Jennie; Laporte, Aimee; Sheibani, Sara; Portt, Liam; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2011-02-01

    The identification of novel anti-apoptotic sequences has lead to new insights into the mechanisms involved in regulating different forms of programmed cell death. For example, the anti-apoptotic function of free radical scavenging proteins supports the pro-apoptotic function of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Using yeast as a model of eukaryotic mitochondrial apoptosis, we show that a cDNA corresponding to the mitochondrial variant of the human DUT gene (DUT-M) encoding the deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) enzyme can prevent apoptosis in yeast in response to internal (Bax expression) and to exogenous (H(2)O(2) and cadmium) stresses. Of interest, cell death was not prevented under culture conditions modeling chronological aging, suggesting that DUT-M only protects dividing cells. The anti-apoptotic function of DUT-M was confirmed by demonstrating that an increase in dUTPase protein levels is sufficient to confer increased resistance to H(2)O(2) in cultured C2C12 mouse skeletal myoblasts. Given that the function of dUTPase is to decrease the levels of dUTP, our results strongly support an emerging role for dUTP as a pro-apoptotic second messenger in the same vein as ROS and ceramide.

  11. Fabrication, Optimization and Characterization of Natural Dye Sensitized Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghann, William; Kang, Hyeonggon; Sheikh, Tajbik; Yadav, Sunil; Chavez-Gil, Tulio; Nesbitt, Fred; Uddin, Jamal

    2017-01-01

    The dyes extracted from pomegranate and berry fruits were successfully used in the fabrication of natural dye sensitized solar cells (NDSSC). The morphology, porosity, surface roughness, thickness, absorption and emission characteristics of the pomegranate dye sensitized photo-anode were studied using various analytical techniques including FESEM, EDS, TEM, AFM, FTIR, Raman, Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopy. Pomegranate dye extract has been shown to contain anthocyanin which is an excellent light harvesting pigment needed for the generation of charge carriers for the production of electricity. The solar cell’s photovoltic performance in terms of efficiency, voltage, and current was tested with a standard illumination of air-mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5 G) having an irradiance of 100 mW/cm2. After optimization of the photo-anode and counter electrode, a photoelectric conversion efficiency (η) of 2%, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.39 mV, and a short-circuit current density (Isc) of 12.2 mA/cm2 were obtained. Impedance determination showed a relatively low charge-transfer resistance (17.44 Ω) and a long lifetime, signifying a reduction in recombination losses. The relatively enhanced efficiency is attributable in part to the use of a highly concentrated pomegranate dye, graphite counter electrode and TiCl4 treatment of the photo-anode.

  12. Fabrication, Optimization and Characterization of Natural Dye Sensitized Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghann, William; Kang, Hyeonggon; Sheikh, Tajbik; Yadav, Sunil; Chavez-Gil, Tulio; Nesbitt, Fred; Uddin, Jamal

    2017-01-01

    The dyes extracted from pomegranate and berry fruits were successfully used in the fabrication of natural dye sensitized solar cells (NDSSC). The morphology, porosity, surface roughness, thickness, absorption and emission characteristics of the pomegranate dye sensitized photo-anode were studied using various analytical techniques including FESEM, EDS, TEM, AFM, FTIR, Raman, Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopy. Pomegranate dye extract has been shown to contain anthocyanin which is an excellent light harvesting pigment needed for the generation of charge carriers for the production of electricity. The solar cell’s photovoltic performance in terms of efficiency, voltage, and current was tested with a standard illumination of air-mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5 G) having an irradiance of 100 mW/cm2. After optimization of the photo-anode and counter electrode, a photoelectric conversion efficiency (η) of 2%, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.39 mV, and a short-circuit current density (Isc) of 12.2 mA/cm2 were obtained. Impedance determination showed a relatively low charge-transfer resistance (17.44 Ω) and a long lifetime, signifying a reduction in recombination losses. The relatively enhanced efficiency is attributable in part to the use of a highly concentrated pomegranate dye, graphite counter electrode and TiCl4 treatment of the photo-anode. PMID:28128369

  13. Tissue Protecting Antidotes From Anti-Apoptotic Factors of Mycoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-12

    yeast, spirochetes and fungi . It was previously demonstrated that the diacyl-Lpp MALP2 from M. fermentas (as well from another Mycoplasma ssp...effects of anticancer therapy. Iin 1999 he defined p53 as a major determinant of cancer treatment side effects and suggested this protein as a target for

  14. Invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Elena; De Biasi, Sara; Simone, Anna Maria; Ferraro, Diana; Sola, Patrizia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, and in several countries is a leading cause of permanent neurological disability in young adults, particularly women. MS is considered an autoimmune disease, caused by an aberrant immune response to environmental triggers in genetically susceptible subjects. However, the contribution of the innate or of the adaptive immune system to the development and progression of the disease has not yet been fully elucidated. Innate-like T lymphocytes are unconventional T cells that bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, because they use a T cell receptor to sense external ligands, but behave like innate cells when they rapidly respond to stimuli. These cells could play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS. Here, we focus on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, and we review the current knowledge on their biology and possible involvement in MS. Although several studies have evaluated the frequency and functions of iNKT and MAIT cells both in MS patients and in experimental mouse models, contradictory observations have been reported, and it is not clear whether they exert a protective or a pro-inflammatory and harmful role. A better understanding of how immune cells are involved in MS, and of their interactions could be of great interest for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  15. Apigenin prevents TNF-α induced apoptosis of primary rat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, M-S; Zhu, B-J; Luo, D-W

    2014-11-25

    TNF-α has recently been identified to be a mediator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, while glial cells are relatively protected against this death stimulus. Exposure of RGCs to TNF-α is thought to contribute to RGC apoptosis. Apigenin is a flavone with powerful anti-inflammatory properties that exists naturally in various plants and Chinese medicine. In our study, MTT assays showed that apigenin significantly inhibited the decrease of RGC viability induced by TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with apigenin prevented TNF-α-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as shown by flow cytometry. The production of ATP and the total oxygen uptake were also promoted after apigenin administration. TNF-α stimulation led to a significant reduction of bcl-2 and enhancement of bax, which was reversed by apigenin treatment. Apigenin treatment also alleviated the increased caspase-3 activity induced by TNF-α. Moreover, luciferase reporter assay indicated that apigenin dose-dependently decreased NF-κB activation induced by TNF-α, but had no significant effect on activation of AP-1. Collectively, these data demonstrated that apigenin alleviated TNF-α-induced apoptosis through inhibition of caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB. Therefore, apigenin may be developed as an anti-apoptotic drug to treat retinopathy.

  16. Natural taurine promotes apoptosis of human hepatic stellate cells in proteomics analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Xin; Liang, Jian; LIN, ZHI-XIU; Wu, Fa-Sheng; Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhang, Zhi-Wei

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the differential expression of proteins between natural taurine treated hepatic stellate cells and controls, and investigate the underlying regulatory mechanism of natural taurine in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis.

  17. Down-regulation of wt1 expression in leukemia cell lines as part of apoptotic effect in arsenic treatment using two compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glienke, Wolfgang; Chow, Kai U; Bauer, Nina; Bergmann, Lothar

    2006-08-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) induces remission in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). To better understand molecular mechanisms of arsenic actions, this study investigated the effect of two different arsenic compounds on gene expression of apoptosis and cellular proliferation related genes. The Wilms' tumor gene (wt1) is up-regulated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and a variety of leukemia cell lines. The expression of wt1 in these cells is proposed to have an anti-apoptotic effect. HL-60 and K562 were treated with arsenic trioxide (As2O3) and sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) at concentrations between 0 - 10 microM for up to 48 h. The induction of apoptosis was accompanied by down-regulation of hTERT and wt1 mRNA and protein expression but up-regulation of par-4. Low concentrations of 0.1 microM arsenic induced expression of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 gene in both cell lines HL-60 and K562. There were no major differences encountered between compounds. After arsenic treatment of the leukemia cell lines HL-60 and K562 the up-regulation of par-4 may contribute to the induction of apoptosis rather than down-regulation of bcl-2. The therapeutic effect of arsenic is the induction of apoptosis by modulating the gene expression profile of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes including the wt1 gene.

  18. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a promising treatment for natural killer-cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Naoko; Kami, Masahiro; Kishi, Yukiko; Kim, Sung-Won; Takeuchi, Masami; Matsue, Kosei; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Hirokawa, Makoto; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Matsumura, Tomoko; Kusumi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Noriyuki; Nagafuji, Koji; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Takeuchi, Kengo; Oshimi, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    The efficacy of allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for natural killer (NK)-cell neoplasms is unknown. We investigated the results of allo-HSCT for NK-cell neoplasms between 1990 and 2003 through questionnaires. After reclassification by a haematopathologist, of 345 patients who underwent allo-HSCT for malignant lymphoma, 28 had NK-cell neoplasms (World Health Organization classification): extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (n=22), blastic NK-cell lymphoma (n=3), and aggressive NK-cell leukaemia (n=3). Twelve were chemosensitive and 16 chemorefractory. Twenty-two had matched-related donors. Stem-cell source was bone marrow in eight and mobilised peripheral blood in 20. Conditioning regimens were myeloablative (n=23) and non-myeloablative (n=5). Grade 2-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD developed in 12 and 8 respectively. Eight died of disease progression, three of infection, two of acute GVHD, one of veno-occlusive disease, one of interstitial pneumonitis, and one of thrombotic microangiopathy. Two-year progression-free and overall survivals were 34% and 40% respectively (median follow-up, 34 months). All patients who did not relapse/progress within 10 months achieved progression-free survival (PFS) during the follow-up. In multivariate analysis, stem cell source (BM versus peripheral blood; relative risk 3.03), age (>or=40 years vs. <40 years; relative risk 2.85), and diagnoses (extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma versus others; relative risk 3.94) significantly affected PFS. Allo-HSCT is a promising treatment for NK-cell neoplasms.

  19. Hypothermia enhances bcl-2 expression and protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slikker, W; Desai, V G; Duhart, H; Feuers, R; Imam, S Z

    2001-08-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major causes of cellular injury. Various reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species such as superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide are involved in the manifestations of different types of organ toxicity and the resultant syndromes, symptoms, or diseases. Hypothermic conditions have been reported to reduce the oxidative stress in various in vitro and in vivo studies. In the present study, we sought to determine the effect of lowered temperatures on oxidative stress-induced cell death in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We also investigated the oxidative stress-induced alterations in the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2, in CHO cells at lowered temperatures. CHO cells were incubated at four different temperatures of 30, 32, 35, and 37 degrees C (control temperature) from 1 to 4 d. In another set, the cells were incubated with 100 microM hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) for 30 min before harvesting at different time points. The cells were harvested at 1, 2, 3, and 4 d. Cell survival was significantly higher at 30 degrees C as compared to 37 degrees C over 4 d of incubation. In cells incubated with H(2)O(2), significantly higher cell viability was observed at lower temperatures as compared to the cells incubated at 37 degrees C. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) also increased significantly at lower temperatures. Lowered temperature also provided a significant increase in the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2 after 4 d of incubation. These data suggest that hypothermic conditions lowers the risk of oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and programmed cell death by increasing the activity of GSH-Px and by the induction in the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2.

  20. In vitro enhancement of extracellular matrix formation as natural bioscaffold for stem cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroeni, Aroem; Shalihah, Qonitha; Meilany, Sofy

    2017-02-01

    Growing cells in plastic with liquid media for in vitro study is very common but far from physiological. The use of scaffold materials is more biocompatible. Extracellular matrix provides tissue integrity which acts as a native scaffold for cell attachment and interaction, as well as it serves as a reservoir for growth factors. For this reason, we have developed natural scaffold from mice fibroblast to form a natural scaffold for stem cell culture. Fibroblasts were cultured under crowded condition and lysed to form natural scaffold. The natural scaffold formation was observed using immunofluorescence which then will be used and tested for stem cell propagation and differentiation.

  1. Natural Killer Cell Differentiation From Hematopoietic Stem Cells: A Comparative Analysis of Heparin and Stromal Cell Supported Methods

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells differentiated from hematopietic stem cells (HSCs)may have significant clinical benefits over those from adult donors, including the ability to choose allo-reactive donors and potentially more robust in vivo expansion. Stromal-based methods have been used to study NK differentiation from HSCs. Stroma and cytokines support NK differentiation, but may have considerable regulatory hurdles. Recently, a clinical grade heparin-based method has been reported and could serve...

  2. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  3. Natural killer cells require monocytic Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells to eradicate orthotopically engrafted glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gregory J; Chockley, Peter; Zamler, Daniel; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell immune surveillance. However, the mechanisms used by these cancers to suppress antitumor NK cell activity remain poorly understood. We have recently reported on a novel mechanism of innate immune evasion characterized by the overexpression of the carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-1 by both mouse and rat malignant glioma. Here, we investigate the cytokine profile of galectin-1-deficient GL26 cells and describe the process by which these tumors are targeted by the early innate immune system in RAG1(-/-) and C57BL/6J mice. Our data reveal that galectin-1 knockdown in GL26 cells heightens their inflammatory status leading to the rapid recruitment of Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells and NK1.1(+) NK cells into the brain tumor microenvironment, culminating in tumor clearance. We show that immunodepletion of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells in RAG1(-/-) mice permits the growth of galectin-1-deficient glioma despite the presence of NK cells, thus demonstrating an essential role for myeloid cells in the clearance of galectin-1-deficient glioma. Further characterization of tumor-infiltrating Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) cells reveals that these cells also express CCR2 and Ly-6C, markers consistent with inflammatory monocytes. Our results demonstrate that Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells, often referred to as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), are required for antitumor NK cell activity against galectin-1-deficient GL26 glioma. We conclude that glioma-derived galectin-1 represents an important factor in dictating the phenotypic behavior of monocytic Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells. Galectin-1 suppression may be a valuable treatment approach for clinical glioma by promoting their innate immune-mediated recognition and clearance through the concerted effort of innate myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages.

  4. Lactobacilli Modulate Natural Killer Cell Responses In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent or independent way. Hence, the encounter of NK cells with lactic acid bacteria will affect NK cell activation. Such activation of NK cells may potentially skew an on-going or subsequent immune response towards a Th1 response........ The IFN-gamma concentration was measured by ELISA. Incubation of NK cells with a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain increased the proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production, both to levels comparable to PHA stimulation. The proliferative response was further enhanced with autologous...

  5. Effects of Geldanamycin on Expression of Bcl-2 in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Du; Ruoran Mi; Quanxin Qu; Ye Qu; Tianfu Yue

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Geldanamycin, a natural product of Streptomyces geldanus, binds the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a cell chaperone protein that interacts with Bcl-2. In this study, we investigated whether geldanamycin (GA) inhibits proliferation of HeLa cells through induction of apoptosis by decreasing the level of Bcl-2expression.METHODS HeLa cells, a human cervical cell line, were cultured in vitro and treated with different concentrations of GA (0, 0.02, 0.2,2, 10 μmol/L) for 24 h. Or were treated for different lengths of time at a GA concentration of 10 μmol/L. Proliferation of the cells was analyzed by an MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was determined by staining the cells with annexin V. In addition, cellular mRNA levels for Bcl-2 and Hsp90 were determined by the semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the levels of Bcl-2 and Hsp90 protein expression were determined by Western blots.RESULTS Treatment of cells with GA was found to inhibit HeLa cell proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The inhibition was a result of increased cellular apoptotic levels. Further analyses showed that while the mRNA and protein expression levels of Hsp90 were-not affected, GA treatment significantly reduced the level of Bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner that correlated with the observed inhibition of cell proliferation.CONCLUSION GA can inhibit proliferation and increase apoptosis of HeLa cells by decreasing the transcription and expression of an anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2, probably through interaction and functional inhibition of Hsp90.

  6. Human leukocyte antigen E contributes to protect tumor cells from lysis by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-09-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Lo Monaco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3 of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D. Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Elisa Lo; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-01-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network. PMID:21969815

  9. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    . In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. Conclusion: In this study we have demonstrated that various strains of gut flora-derived lactic acid bacteria have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent...... antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...... at describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon...

  10. Bioactive interruptins A and B from Cyclosorus terminans: antibacterial, anticancer, stem cell proliferation and ROS scavenging activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sireewan Kaewsuwan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The fern Cyclosorus terminans has long been consumed as a vegetable in northern Thailand. Nevertheless there has been no definitive investigation on its biological properties. Here we have isolated three coumarin derivatives, interruptins A, B and C from C. terminans. Interruptin A exhibited antibacterial activity against four Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, S. epidermidis and Bacillus subtilis with MIC values as low as 2 mg/ml. Interruptins A and B inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast and HT-29 human colon cancer cells with IC50 values as low as 0.13 ng/ml yet stimulated proliferation of normal ASC stem cells with no signs of toxicity. Moreover, both interruptins A and B showed a powerful capacity for scavenging intracellular ROS and performed an anti-apoptotic effect against extracellular oxidative damage by H2O2 . As a result, it is suggested that this lower plant could find a use in natural diets for treatment of infection with a special reference to MRSA, controlling breast and colon cancers, and reducing oxidative stress induced by ROS.

  11. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, Jamie L; Ries, Moritz; Guha, Natasha; Connole, Michelle; Colantonio, Arnaud D; Wiertz, EJ; Wilson, Nancy A; Kaur, Amitinder; Evans, David T

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands on target cells. We previously reporte

  12. Comparative cytotoxicity of dolomite nanoparticles in human larynx HEp2 and liver HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Ahmad, Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Khan, Shams T; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A

    2015-06-01

    Dolomite is a natural mineral of great industrial and commercial importance. With the advent of nanotechnology, natural minerals including dolomite in the form of nanoparticles (NPs) are being utilized in various applications to improve the quality of products. However, safety or toxicity information of dolomite NPs is largely lacking. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of dolomite NPs in two widely used in vitro cell culture models: human airway epithelial (HEp2) and human liver (HepG2) cells. Concentration-dependent decreased cell viability and damaged cell membrane integrity revealed the cytotoxicity of dolomite NPs. We further observed that dolomite NPs induce oxidative stress in a concentration-dependent manner, as indicated by depletion of glutathione and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation. Quantitative real-time PCR data demonstrated that the mRNA level of tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic genes (bax, CASP3 and CASP9) were up-regulated whereas the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated in HEp2 and HepG2 cells exposed to dolomite NPs. Moreover, the activity of apoptotic enzymes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) was also higher in both kinds of cells treated with dolomite NPs. It is also worth mentioning that HEp2 cells seem to be marginally more susceptible to dolomite NPs exposure than HepG2 cells. Cytotoxicity induced by dolomite NPs was efficiently prevented by N-acetyl cysteine treatment, which suggests that oxidative stress is primarily responsible for the cytotoxicity of dolomite NPs in both HEp2 and HepG2 cells. Toxicity mechanisms of dolomite NPs warrant further investigations at the in vivo level.

  13. Interferon-γ Expression in Natural Killer Cells and Natural Killer T Cells Is Suppressed in Early Pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongyun Shi; Bin Ling; Ying Zhou; Ting Gao; Dingqing Feng; Min Xiao; Lin Feng

    2007-01-01

    Recent study has suggested that innate immune system might play an important role in pregnancy progression. In this study, to investigate whether NK cells and NKT cells, instead of T cells, are the dominant populations of peripheral blood in early pregnancy, flow cytometry was used to detect the percentage and intracellular cytokine expressions of T cells, NK cells, NKT cells in peripheral blood of non-pregnant women and early pregnant women.In our result, the percentages of NK cells and NKT cells were significantly increased in pregnancy compared to non-pregnancy. However, the percentage of T cells was not changed. We did not detect the Th2-dominance of total lymphocytes or T cells in peripheral blood of early pregnant women and there were also no significant changes of type 1 and type 2 cytokines in T cells, but IFN-γ production in both NK and NKT cells was decreased in early pregnancy. These results suggest that the innate immune system including NK cells and NKT cells should play a pivotal role in pregnancy progression. Type 1/type 2 shift mechanisms in innate immune system during the human early pregnancy should be paid more attention.

  14. Stem cell-derived hepatocytes for functional liver replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eChrist

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternate cell source to substitute for primary hepatocytes in hepatocyte transplantation because of their multiple differentiation potential and nearly unlimited availability. They may differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and maintain specific hepatocyte functions also after transplantation into the regenerating livers of mice or rats both under injury and non-injury conditions. Depending on the underlying liver disease their mode of action is either to replace the diseased liver tissue or to support liver regeneration through their anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic as well as their pro-proliferative action.

  15. Dietary gluten increases natural killer cell cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jesper; Dall, Morten; Antvorskov, Julie Christine; Weile, Christian; Engkilde, Kåre; Josefsen, Knud; Buschard, Karsten

    2014-10-01

    Dietary gluten influences the development of type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and biobreeding rats, and has been shown to influence a wide range of immunological factors in the pancreas and gut. In the present study, the effects of gluten on NK cells were studied in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that gliadin increased direct cytotoxicity and IFN-γ secretion from murine splenocytes and NK cells toward the pancreatic beta-cell line MIN6 cells. Additionally, stimulation of MIN6 cells led to a significantly increased proportion of degranulating C57BL/6 CD107a(+) NK cells. Stimulation of C57BL/6 pancreatic islets with gliadin significantly increased secretion of IL-6 more than ninefold. In vivo, the gluten-containing diet led to a higher expression of NKG2D and CD71 on NKp46(+) cells in all lymphoid organs in BALB/c and NOD mice compared with the gluten-free diet. Collectively, our data suggest that dietary gluten increases murine NK-cell activity against pancreatic beta cells. This mechanism may contribute to development of type 1 diabetes and explain the higher disease incidence associated with gluten intake in NOD mice.

  16. Natural killer cells after altaïr mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinova, I. V.; Rykova, M.; Meshkov, D.; Peres, C.; Husson, D.; Schmitt, D. A.

    Reduced in vitro NK cytotoxic activity have routinely been observed after both prolonged and short-term space flights. This study investigated the effects of space flight on NK cell functions, NK cell counts and the production of IL-2 and TNF by lymphocytes of French-Russian crew members. In the French cosmonaut, after 21 days space flight, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells, the capacity the NK cells to bind and lyse the individual target cells and the percentage of NK cells were decreased. In this cosmonaut a twofold reduction TNF production in cultures of lymphocytes stimulated with PMA and with the mixture of PHA and PMA was observed on the first day after landing. However, the activity of the production of TNF in 48-hour PHA-cultures of lymphocytes was unchanged and the biological activity of IL-2 was not reduced. The immunological examination did not detecte any substantial deviations from the norm in both russian cosmonauts after 197 days space flight. Various explanations for decreased cytotoxicity in cosmonauts after space flight can be proposed, and these include the defective function of NK cells and reduced numbers of circulating effector cells.

  17. Natural Killer Cell Differentiation From Hematopoietic Stem Cells: A Comparative Analysis of Heparin and Stromal Cell Supported Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezell, Steven A.; Ahn, Yong-Oon; Spanholtz, Jan; Wang, Hongbo; Weeres, Matthew; Jackson, Scott; Cooley, Sarah; Dolstra, Harry; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells differentiated from hematopietic stem cells (HSCs)may have significant clinical benefits over those from adult donors, including the ability to choose allo-reactive donors and potentially more robust in vivo expansion. Stromal-based methods have been used to study NK differentiation from HSCs. Stroma and cytokines support NK differentiation, but may have considerable regulatory hurdles. Recently, a clinical grade heparin-based method has been reported and could serve as an alternative. How these two compare in NK generating efficiency or functionis unknown. We show that compared to heparin-based cultures, stromasignificantly increases the yield of HSC-derived NK cells by differentiating less committed progenitors into the NK lineage. NK cells generated by both approaches were similar for most NK activating or inhibitor receptors. While both approaches resulted in a phenotype consistent with CD56brightstage IV NK cells, heparin-based cultures favored the development of CD56+CD16+ cells, while stromaproducedmore KIR-expressing NK cells, both markers of terminal maturation. At day 21, stromal-based cultures showed significantly more IL-22 production and both methods yielded similar amounts of IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity (day 35). Thus, heparin-based cultures are an effective replacement for stroma and may facilitate clinical trials testing HSC-derived NK cells. PMID:22155502

  18. Interplay between carbohydrate and lipid in recognition of glycolipid antigens by natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Bo; Vela, Jose Luis; Zajonc, Dirk; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2012-04-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a T cell subpopulation that were named originally based on coexpression of receptors found on natural killer (NK) cells, cells of the innate immune system, and by T lymphocytes. The maturation and activation of NKT cells requires presentation of glycolipid antigens by CD1d, a cell surface protein distantly related to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded antigen presenting molecules. This specificity distinguishes NKT cells from most CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that recognize peptides presented by MHC class I and class II molecules. The rapid secretion of a large amount of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines by activated NKT cells endows them with the ability to play a vital role in the host immune defense against various microbial infections. In this review, we summarize progress on identifying the sources of microbe-derived glycolipid antigens recognized by NKT cells and the biochemical basis for their recognition.

  19. Natural sequence variants of yeast environmental sensors confer cell-to-cell expression variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrmann, Steffen; Bottin-Duplus, Hélène; Leonidou, Andri; Mollereau, Esther; Barthelaix, Audrey; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M; Yvert, Gaël

    2013-10-08

    Living systems may have evolved probabilistic bet hedging strategies that generate cell-to-cell phenotypic diversity in anticipation of environmental catastrophes, as opposed to adaptation via a deterministic response to environmental changes. Evolution of bet hedging assumes that genotypes segregating in natural populations modulate the level of intraclonal diversity, which so far has largely remained hypothetical. Using a fluorescent P(met17)-GFP reporter, we mapped four genetic loci conferring to a wild yeast strain an elevated cell-to-cell variability in the expression of MET17, a gene regulated by the methionine pathway. A frameshift mutation in the Erc1p transmembrane transporter, probably resulting from a release of laboratory strains from negative selection, reduced P(met17)-GFP expression variability. At a second locus, cis-regulatory polymorphisms increased mean expression of the Mup1p methionine permease, causing increased expression variability in trans. These results demonstrate that an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) can simultaneously have a deterministic effect in cis and a probabilistic effect in trans. Our observations indicate that the evolution of transmembrane transporter genes can tune intraclonal variation and may therefore be implicated in both reactive and anticipatory strategies of adaptation.

  20. Immunologic targeting of FOXP3 in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Nair

    Full Text Available The forkhead transcription factor FOXP3 is necessary for induction of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs and their immunosuppressive function. We have previously demonstrated that targeting Tregs by vaccination of mice with murine FOXP3 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells (DCs elicits FOXP3-specific T cell responses and enhances tumor immunity. It is clear that FOXP3 expression is not restricted to T-cell lineage and herein, using RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and western immunoblot we demonstrate for the first time that FOXP3 is expressed in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC cells, SUM149 (triple negative, ErbB1-activated and SUM190 (ErbB2-overexpressing. Importantly, FOXP3-specific T cells generated in vitro using human FOXP3 RNA-transfected DCs as stimulators efficiently lyse SUM149 cells. Interestingly, an isogenic model (rSUM149 derived from SUM149 with an enhanced anti-apoptotic phenotype was resistant to FOXP3-specific T cell mediated lysis. The MHC class I cellular processing mechanism was intact in both cell lines at the protein and transcription levels suggesting that the resistance to cytolysis by rSUM149 cells was not related to MHC class I expression or to the MHC class I antigen processing machinery in these cells. Our data suggest that FOXP3 may be an effective tumor target in IBC cells however increased anti-apoptotic signaling can lead to immune evasion.

  1. Identification of Anti-tumor Cells Carrying Natural Killer (NK Cell Antigens in Patients With Hematological Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Krzywinska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46, natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA+RO+ phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA+RO− phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA+RO+ cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias.

  2. A dye sensitized solar cell using natural counter electrode and natural dye derived from mangosteen peel waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiaugree, Wasan; Lowpa, Seksan; Towannang, Madsakorn; Rutphonsan, Phikun; Tangtrakarn, Apishok; Pimanpang, Samuk; Maiaugree, Prapen; Ratchapolthavisin, Nattawat; Sang-Aroon, Wichien; Jarernboon, Wirat; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2015-10-01

    Mangosteen peel is an inedible portion of a fruit. We are interested in using these residues as components of a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Carbonized mangosteen peel was used with mangosteen peel dye as a natural counter electrode and a natural photosensitizer, respectively. A distinctive mesoporous honeycomb-like carbon structure with a rough nanoscale surface was found in carbonized mangosteen peels. The efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell using carbonized mangosteen peel was compared to that of DSSCs with Pt and PEDOT-PSS counter electrodes. The highest solar conversion efficiency (2.63%) was obtained when using carbonized mangosteen peel and an organic disulfide/thiolate (T2/T-) electrolyte.

  3. Cell-autonomous requirement for TCF1 and LEF1 in the development of Natural Killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Zhu, Wandi S; Steinke, Farrah C; Xue, Hai-Hui; Sen, Jyoti Misra

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells develop from common CD4(+) CD8(+) thymocyte precursors. Transcriptional programs that regulate the development of NKT cells in the thymus development remain to be fully delineated. Here, we demonstrate a cell-intrinsic requirement for transcription factors TCF1 and LEF1 for the development of all subsets of NKT cells. Conditional deletion of TCF1 alone results in a substantial reduction in NKT cells. The remaining NKT cells are eliminated when TCF1 and LEF1 are both deleted. These data reveal an essential role for TCF1 and LEF1 in development of NKT cells.

  4. The requirements for natural Th17 cell development are distinct from those of conventional Th17 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jiyeon S.; Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A.; Jordan, Martha S.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a critical role in the adaptive immune response against extracellular pathogens. Most studies to date have focused on understanding the differentiation of Th17 cells from naive CD4+ T cells in peripheral effector sites. However, Th17 cells are present in the thymus. In this study, we demonstrate that a population of Th17 cells, natural Th17 cells (nTh17 cells), which acquire effector function during development in the thymus before peripheral antigen exposur...

  5. Poncirin Induces Apoptosis in AGS Human Gastric Cancer Cells through Extrinsic Apoptotic Pathway by up-Regulation of Fas Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saralamma, Venu Venkatarame Gowda; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Lee, Ho Jeong; Yumnam, Silvia; Raha, Suchismita; Heo, Jeong Doo; Lee, Sang Joon; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Gon Sup

    2015-09-18

    Poncirin, a natural bitter flavanone glycoside abundantly present in many species of citrus fruits, has various biological benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The anti-cancer mechanism of Poncirin remains elusive to date. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of Poncirin in AGS human gastric cancer cells (gastric adenocarcinoma). The results revealed that Poncirin could inhibit the proliferation of AGS cells in a dose-dependent manner. It was observed Poncirin induced accumulation of sub-G1 DNA content, apoptotic cell population, apoptotic bodies, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependent manner in AGS cells. The expression of Fas Ligand (FasL) protein was up-regulated dose dependently in Poncirin-treated AGS cells Moreover, Poncirin in AGS cells induced activation of Caspase-8 and -3, and subsequent cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Inhibitor studies' results confirm that the induction of caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in Poncirin-treated AGS cells was led by the Fas death receptor. Interestingly, Poncirin did not show any effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and Bak) and anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-xL) in AGS-treated cells followed by no activation in the mitochondrial apoptotic protein caspase-9. This result suggests that the mitochondrial-mediated pathway is not involved in Poncirin-induced cell death in gastric cancer. These findings suggest that Poncirin has a potential anti-cancer effect via extrinsic pathway-mediated apoptosis, possibly making it a strong therapeutic agent for human gastric cancer.

  6. Poncirin Induces Apoptosis in AGS Human Gastric Cancer Cells through Extrinsic Apoptotic Pathway by up-Regulation of Fas Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venu Venkatarame Gowda Saralamma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Poncirin, a natural bitter flavanone glycoside abundantly present in many species of citrus fruits, has various biological benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The anti-cancer mechanism of Poncirin remains elusive to date. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of Poncirin in AGS human gastric cancer cells (gastric adenocarcinoma. The results revealed that Poncirin could inhibit the proliferation of AGS cells in a dose-dependent manner. It was observed Poncirin induced accumulation of sub-G1 DNA content, apoptotic cell population, apoptotic bodies, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependent manner in AGS cells. The expression of Fas Ligand (FasL protein was up-regulated dose dependently in Poncirin-treated AGS cells Moreover, Poncirin in AGS cells induced activation of Caspase-8 and -3, and subsequent cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Inhibitor studies’ results confirm that the induction of caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in Poncirin-treated AGS cells was led by the Fas death receptor. Interestingly, Poncirin did not show any effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and Bak and anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-xL in AGS-treated cells followed by no activation in the mitochondrial apoptotic protein caspase-9. This result suggests that the mitochondrial-mediated pathway is not involved in Poncirin-induced cell death in gastric cancer. These findings suggest that Poncirin has a potential anti-cancer effect via extrinsic pathway-mediated apoptosis, possibly making it a strong therapeutic agent for human gastric cancer.

  7. Curcumin, the main active constituent of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), induces apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells by modulating the abundance of apoptosis-related growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ya-Jun; Kuchta, Kenny; Lv, Xia; Lin, Yu; Ye, Guo-Rong; Liu, Xu-You; Song, Hui-Dong; Wang, Le-Xin; Kobayashi, Yuta; Shu, Jian-Chang

    2015-11-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of curcumin against hepatic fibrosis, cultured rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC) (HSC-T6) were incubated with curcumin for 24 h, after which apoptosis was measured by flow-cytometry. The protein levels of the pro-apoptotic factors Fas and p53b as well as of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 were monitored by immunocytochemical ABC staining after incubation with curcumin for 24 h. In the case of 20 μM curcumin, not only was the respective apoptosis index increased, but also the abundance of the pro-apoptotic factors Fas and p53 were amplified, whereas that of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 decreased. All these effects were highly reproducible (P<0.05). Consequently, curcumin has an up-regulating effect on pro-apoptotic factors like Fas and p53 as well as a down-regulating effect of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2, thus inducing apoptosis in HSC.

  8. Defining the nature of human pluripotent stem cell progeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michaela Patterson; David N Chan; Iris Ha; Dana Case; Yongyan Cui; Ben Van Handel; Hanna KA Mikkola; William E Lowry

    2012-01-01

    While it is clear that human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can differentiate to generate a panoply of various cell types,it is unknown how closely in vitro development mirrors that which occurs in vivo.To determine whether human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) make equivalent progeny,and whether either makes cells that are analogous to tissue-derived cells,we performed comprehensive transcriptome profiling of purified PSC derivatives and their tissue-derived counterparts.Expression profiling demonstrated that hESCs and hiPSCs make nearly identical progeny for the neural,hepatic,and mesenchymal lineages,and an absence of re-expression from exogenous reprogramming factors in hiPSC progeny.However,when compared to a tissuederived counterpart,the progeny of both hESCs and hiPSCs maintained expression of a subset of genes normally associated with early mammalian development,regardless of the type of cell generated.While pluripotent genes (OCT4,SOX2,REX1,and NANOG) appeared to be silenced immediately upon differentiation from hPSCs,genes normally unique to early embryos (LIN28A,LIN28B,DPPA4,and others) were not fully silenced in hPSC derivatives.These data and evidence from expression patterns in early human fetal tissue (3-16 weeks of development) suggest that the differentiated progeny of hPSCs are reflective of very early human development (< 6 weeks).These findings provide support for the idea that hPSCs can serve as useful in vitro models of early human development,but also raise important issues for disease modeling and the clinical application of hPSC derivatives.

  9. Effects of granulosa cells on steroidogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis of stromal cells and theca cells derived from the goat ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Mingning; Quan, Fusheng; Han, Chengquan; Wu, Bin; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhongcai; Su, Feng; Zhang, Yong

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of granulosa cells from small antral follicles on steroidogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis of goat ovarian stromal and theca cells in vitro. Using Transwell co-culture system, we evaluated androgen production, LH responsiveness, cell proliferation and apoptosis and some molecular expression regarding steroidogenic enzyme and apoptosis-related genes in stromal and theca cells. The results indicated that the co-culture with granulosa cells increased steroidogenesis, LH responsiveness and bcl-2 gene expression as well as decreased apoptotic bax and bad expressions in stromal and theca cells. Thus, granulosa cells had a capacity of promoting steroidogenesis in stromal cell and LH responsiveness in cortical stromal cells, maintaining steroidogenesis in theca cells, inhibiting apoptosis of cortical stromal cells and improving anti-apoptotic abilities of stromal and theca cells.

  10. Liquid Fluoride Salt Experimentation Using a Small Natural Circulation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Williams, David F [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Caja, Joseph [Electrochemical Systems, Inc.; Caja, Mario [ORNL; Jordan, John [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Salinas, Roberto [Texas A& M University, Kingsville

    2014-04-01

    A small molten fluoride salt experiment has been constructed and tested to develop experimental techniques for application in liquid fluoride salt systems. There were five major objectives in developing this test apparatus: Allow visual observation of the salt during testing (how can lighting be introduced, how can pictures be taken, what can be seen) Determine if IR photography can be used to examine components submerged in the salt Determine if the experimental configuration provides salt velocity sufficient for collection of corrosion data for future experimentation Determine if a laser Doppler velocimeter can be used to quantify salt velocities. Acquire natural circulation heat transfer data in fluoride salt at temperatures up to 700oC All of these objectives were successfully achieved during testing with the exception of the fourth: acquiring velocity data using the laser Doppler velocimeter. This paper describes the experiment and experimental techniques used, and presents data taken during natural circulation testing.

  11. Cell death in mammalian cell culture: molecular mechanisms and cell line engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, Britta; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2010-07-01

    Cell death is a fundamentally important problem in cell lines used by the biopharmaceutical industry. Environmental stress, which can result from nutrient depletion, by-product accumulation and chemical agents, activates through signalling cascades regulators that promote death. The best known key regulators of death process are the Bcl-2 family proteins which constitute a critical intracellular checkpoint of apoptosis cell death within a common death pathway. Engineering of several members of the anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 family genes in several cell types has extended the knowledge of their molecular function and interaction with other proteins, and their regulation of cell death. In this review, we describe the various modes of cell death and their death pathways at molecular and organelle level and discuss the relevance of the growing knowledge of anti-apoptotic engineering strategies to inhibit cell death and increase productivity in mammalian cell culture.

  12. Advancement in bioprocess technology: parallels between microbial natural products and cell culture biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A; Khetan, Anurag; Malmberg, Li-Hong; Zhou, Weichang; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2017-02-09

    The emergence of natural products and industrial microbiology nearly eight decades ago propelled an era of bioprocess innovation. Half a century later, recombinant protein technology spurred the tremendous growth of biologics and added mammalian cells to the forefront of industrial producing cells in terms of the value of products generated. This review highlights the process technology of natural products and protein biologics. Despite the separation in time, there is a remarkable similarity in their progression. As the new generation of therapeutics for gene and cell therapy emerges, its process technology development can take inspiration from that of natural products and biologics.

  13. Severe cutaneous human papilloma virus infection associated with Natural Killer cell deficiency following stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamili, Qurat-ul-Ain; Seeborg, Filiz O; Saxena, Kapil; Nicholas, Sarah K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Angelo, Laura S; Mace, Emily M; Forbes, Lisa R; Martinez, Caridad; Wright, Teresa S; Orange, Jordan S.; Hanson, Imelda Celine

    2016-01-01

    Capsule Summary The authors identify Natural Killer cell deficiency in post-transplant severe combined immunodeficiency patients who developed severe human papilloma virus infections as a long term complication. PMID:25159470

  14. Apoptosis of HL-60 human leukemia cells induced by Asiatic acid through modulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 family proteins and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuling; Lv, Tingting; Chen, Yan; Wen, Lu; Zhang, Junli; Jiang, Xudong; Liu, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The toxicities of conventional chemotherapeutic agents to normal cells restrict their dosage and clinical efficacy in acute leukemia; therefore, it is important to develop novel chemotherapeutics, including natural products, which selectively target cancer-specific pathways. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the chemopreventive agent asiatic acid (AA) on the proliferation and apoptotic rate of the leukemia cell line HL-60 and investigated the mechanisms underlying its anti-tumor activity. The effect of AA on the proliferation of HL-60 cells was evaluated using the MTT assay. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis as well as Hoechst 33258 staining were used to analyze the apoptotic rate of the cells. Furthermore, changes of survivin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 expressions were detected by western blot analysis. AA blocked the growth of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50-value of AA on HL-60 cells was 46.67 ± 5.08 µmol/l for 24 h. AA induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited in the presence of Z-DEVD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase. The anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and survivin were downregulated by AA in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrently, AA inhibited ERK and p38 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, while JNK phosphorylation was not affected. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the p38 and ERK pathways, as well as modulation of Bcl-2 family and survivin proteins were key regulators of apoptosis induced in HL-60 cells in response to AA.

  15. Natural Killer cell recognition of melanoma: new clues for a more effective immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel eTarazona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells participate in the early immune response against melanoma and also contribute to the development of an adequate adaptive immune response by their crosstalk with dendritic cells and cytokine secretion. Melanoma resistance to conventional therapies together with its high immunogenicity justifies the development of novel therapies aimed to stimulate effective immune responses against melanoma. However, melanoma cells frequently escape to CD8 T cell recognition by the down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In this scenario, Natural killer cells emerge as potential candidates for melanoma immunotherapy due to their capacity to recognize and destroy melanoma cells expressing low levels of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In addition, the possibility to combine immune checkpoint blockade with other NK cell potentiating strategies (e.g. cytokine induction of activating receptors has opened new perspectives in the potential use of adoptive NK cell-based immunotherapy in melanoma.

  16. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay.

  17. Shedding Light on the Nature of Seminal Round Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianpiero D Palermo

    Full Text Available In this investigation we assess the incidence of round cells (RCs in semen samples in our infertile patient population and their significance on intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycle outcomes. We also evaluate the usefulness of RCs as indicators of bacterial infection and highlight the origin of this cell-type, as well as its role in the human ejaculate.In a prospective fashion, a total of 4,810 ejaculated samples were included in the study during a period of 24 months. RCs were characterized for white blood cell (WBC components versus exfoliated germ cells by testing for multiple markers of ploidy as well as protamine assays. Cases displaying ≥ 2 x 106/ml RCs were screened for bacteria. Raw specimens containing RC were processed by peroxidase and other leukocyte assays, specific stains for protamines were used to identify spermiogenic stage, aneuploidy (FISH assessment was carried out, and the presence of various Sertoli-cell cytoplasmic remnants was analyzed to identify and characterize immature germ cells. The effect of RC on clinical outcome was assessed in specimens used for ICSI.The average age of the men involved was 39.2 ± 7 years. Semen samples had a mean concentration of 40.7 ± 31 x 106/ml, motility of 42.6 ± 35%, and morphology of 2.3 ± 2%. RCs were identified in 261 specimens, representing a proportion of 5.4%. Men with RCs had comparable age but lower sperm concentration and morphology than the control group (P<0.001. The aneuploidy rate of 4.3% in RCs group was remarkably higher than the control group (2.3%; P<0.001. Sperm aneuploidy rate positively correlated with the number of RCs (P<0.001. Of 44 men, 17 of them in 18 cycles had up to 1.9 x 106/ml RCs without affecting fertilization and clinical pregnancy rates when compared to controls (n = 365 cycles. In 27 men undergoing 33 ICSI cycles with ≥ 2 x 106/ml RCs, the fertilization rate trended lower and the miscarriage rate was significantly increased (P = 0

  18. Current perspectives on natural killer cell education and tolerance: emerging roles for inhibitory receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available L Michael Thomas Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA Abstract: Natural killer (NK cells are regulated through the coordinated functions of activating and inhibitory receptors. These receptors can act during the initial engagement of an NK cell with a target cell, or in subsequent NK cell engagements to maintain tolerance. Notably, each individual possesses a sizable minority-population of NK cells that are devoid of inhibitory receptors that recognize the surrounding MHC class I (ie, self-MHC. Since these NK cells cannot perform conventional inhibition, they are rendered less responsive through the process of NK cell education (also known as licensing in order to reduce the likelihood of auto-reactivity. This review will delineate current views on NK cell education, clarify various misconceptions about NK cell education, and, lastly, discuss the relevance of NK cell education in anti-cancer therapies. Keywords: natural killer cell education, natural killer cell inhibitory receptors, immunotherapy, cancer

  19. A Subpopulation of the K562 Cells Are Killed by Curcumin Treatment after G2/M Arrest and Mitotic Catastrophe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Castillo, Macario; Bonilla-Moreno, Raul; Aleman-Lazarini, Leticia; Meraz-Rios, Marco Antonio; Orozco, Lorena; Cedillo-Barron, Leticia; Cordova, Emilio J.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is extensively investigated as a good chemo-preventive agent in the development of many cancers and particularly in leukemia, including treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and it has been proposed as an adjuvant for leukemia therapies. Human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562), were treated with 20 μM of curcumin, and we found that a subpopulation of these cells were arrested and accumulate in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Characterization of this cell subpopulation showed that the arrested cells presented nuclear morphology changes resembling those described for mitotic catastrophe. Mitotic cells displayed abnormal chromatin organization, collapse of the mitotic spindle and abnormal chromosome segregation. Then, these cells died in an apoptosis dependent manner and showed diminution in the protein levels of BCL-2 and XIAP. Moreover, our results shown that a transient activation of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) occurred early in these cells, but decreased after 6 h of the treatment, explaining in part the diminution of the anti-apoptotic proteins. Additionally, P73 was translocated to the cell nuclei, because the expression of the C/EBPα, a cognate repressor of the P73 gene, was decreased, suggesting that apoptosis is trigger by elevation of P73 protein levels acting in concert with the diminution of the two anti-apoptotic molecules. In summary, curcumin treatment might produce a P73-dependent apoptotic cell death in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells (K562), which was triggered by mitotic catastrophe, due to sustained BAX and survivin expression and impairment of the anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and XIAP. PMID:27832139

  20. Prediction of cancer cell sensitivity to natural products based on genomic and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Yue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural products play a significant role in cancer chemotherapy. They are likely to provide many lead structures, which can be used as templates for the construction of novel drugs with enhanced antitumor activity. Traditional research approaches studied structure-activity relationship of natural products and obtained key structural properties, such as chemical bond or group, with the purpose of ascertaining their effect on a single cell line or a single tissue type. Here, for the first time, we develop a machine learning method to comprehensively predict natural products responses against a panel of cancer cell lines based on both the gene expression and the chemical properties of natural products. The results on two datasets, training set and independent test set, show that this proposed method yields significantly better prediction accuracy. In addition, we also demonstrate the predictive power of our proposed method by modeling the cancer cell sensitivity to two natural products, Curcumin and Resveratrol, which indicate that our method can effectively predict the response of cancer cell lines to these two natural products. Taken together, the method will facilitate the identification of natural products as cancer therapies and the development of precision medicine by linking the features of patient genomes to natural product sensitivity.

  1. Prediction of cancer cell sensitivity to natural products based on genomic and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zhenyu; Zhang, Wenna; Lu, Yongming; Yang, Qiaoyue; Ding, Qiuying; Xia, Junfeng; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Natural products play a significant role in cancer chemotherapy. They are likely to provide many lead structures, which can be used as templates for the construction of novel drugs with enhanced antitumor activity. Traditional research approaches studied structure-activity relationship of natural products and obtained key structural properties, such as chemical bond or group, with the purpose of ascertaining their effect on a single cell line or a single tissue type. Here, for the first time, we develop a machine learning method to comprehensively predict natural products responses against a panel of cancer cell lines based on both the gene expression and the chemical properties of natural products. The results on two datasets, training set and independent test set, show that this proposed method yields significantly better prediction accuracy. In addition, we also demonstrate the predictive power of our proposed method by modeling the cancer cell sensitivity to two natural products, Curcumin and Resveratrol, which indicate that our method can effectively predict the response of cancer cell lines to these two natural products. Taken together, the method will facilitate the identification of natural products as cancer therapies and the development of precision medicine by linking the features of patient genomes to natural product sensitivity.

  2. [Influence of human gastrointestinal tract bacterial pathogens on host cell apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronowska, Weronika; Godlewska, Renata; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    Several pathogenic bacteria are able to trigger apoptosis in the host cell, but the mechanisms by which it occurs differ, and the resulting pathology can take different courses. Induction and/or blockage of programmed cell death upon infection is a result of complex interaction of bacterial proteins with cellular proteins involved in signal transduction and apoptosis. In this review we focus on pro/anti-apoptotic activities exhibited by two enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica, Yersinia spp. and gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We present current knowledge on how interaction between mammalian and bacterial cell relates to the molecular pathways of apoptosis, and what is the role of apoptosis in pathogenesis.

  3. Model for Osteosarcoma-9 as a potent factor in cell survival and resistance to apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourvouhaki, Ekaterini; Carvalho, Carla; Aguiar, Paulo

    2007-07-01

    In this paper we use a simple model to explore the function of the gene Osteosarcoma-9 (OS-9). We are particularly interested in understanding the role of this gene as a potent anti-apoptotic factor. The theoretical description is constrained by experimental data from induction of apoptosis in cells where OS-9 is overexpressed. The data available suggest that OS-9 promotes cell viability and confers resistance to apoptosis, potentially implicating OS-9 in the survival of cancer cells. Three different apoptosis-inducing mechanisms were tested and are modeled here. A more complex and realistic model is also discussed.

  4. Interaction of natural killer cells with neutrophils exerts a significant antitumor immunity in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Ryosuke; Narumi, Kenta; Hashimoto, Hisayoshi; Miyakawa, Reina; Okusaka, Takuji; Aoki, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can induce a strong antitumor immunity by homeostatic proliferation (HP) of T cells and suppression of regulatory T cells following preconditioning-induced lymphopenia. However, the role of innate immunity including natural killer (NK) cells is still not understood. Here, first, we examined whether NK cells exert an antitumor effect after syngeneic HSCT in a murine colon cancer model. Flow cytometry showed that NK cells as well as T cells rapidly proliferated after HSCT, and the frequency of mature NK cells was increased in tumor during HP. Furthermore, NK cells undergoing HP were highly activated, which contributed to substantial tumor suppression. Then, we found that a large number of neutrophils accumulated in tumor early after syngeneic HSCT. It was recently reported that neutrophil-derived mediators modulate NK cell effector functions, and so we examined whether the neutrophils infiltrated in tumor are associated with NK cell-mediated antitumor effect. The depletion of neutrophils significantly impaired an activation of NK cells in tumor and increased the fraction of proliferative NK cells accompanied by a decrease in NK cell survival. The results suggested that neutrophils in tumor prevent NK cells from activation-induced cell death during HP, thus leading to a significant antitumor effect by NK cells. This study revealed a novel aspect of antitumor immunity induced by HSCT and may contribute to the development of an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer using HSCT.

  5. Gene expression and pathway analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells treated with cadmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartularo, Laura; Laulicht, Freda; Sun, Hong; Kluz, Thomas; Freedman, Jonathan H.; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal naturally occurring in the earth’s crust. A common route of human exposure is via diet and cadmium accumulates in the liver. The effects of Cd exposure on gene expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells were examined in this study. HepG2 cells were acutely-treated with 0.1, 0.5, or 1.0 μM Cd for 24 hours; or chronically-treated with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 μM Cd for three weeks and gene expression analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Acute and chronic exposures significantly altered the expression of 333 and 181 genes, respectively. The genes most upregulated by acute exposure included several metallothioneins. Downregulated genes included the monooxygenase CYP3A7, involved in drug and lipid metabolism. In contrast, CYP3A7 was upregulated by chronic Cd exposure, as was DNAJB9, an anti-apoptotic J protein. Genes downregulated following chronic exposure included the transcriptional regulator early growth response protein 1. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that the top networks altered by acute exposure were lipid metabolism, small molecule biosynthesis, and cell morphology, organization, and development; while top networks altered by chronic exposure were organ morphology, cell cycle, cell signaling, and renal and urological diseases/cancer. Many of the dysregulated genes play important roles in cellular growth, proliferation, and apoptosis, and may be involved in carcinogenesis. In addition to gene expression changes, HepG2 cells treated with cadmium for 24 hours indicated a reduction in global levels of histone methylation and acetylation that persisted 72 hours post-treatment. PMID:26314618

  6. Propolis from Turkey induces apoptosis through activating caspases in human breast carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda Vatansever, H; Sorkun, Kadriye; Ismet Deliloğlu Gurhan, S; Ozdal-Kurt, Feyzan; Turkoz, Elgin; Gencay, Omur; Salih, Bekir

    2010-11-01

    Propolis is a sticky substance that is collected from plants by honeybees that has anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties with biological and therapeutic effects. The target of this study was to investigate the anti-apoptotic effect of propolis extracts (PE) on the caspase pathway in the human breast cell line MCF-7 in culture. Seven different propolis extracts, numbered PE 1-7, produced in their natural ecological environment, were collected from the Hacettepe University Beytepe Campus area in Ankara, Turkey. Individual extracts at 0.5, 0.25, 0.125 and 0.063mg/ml were incubated with MCF-7 cells during 2 days culture. Cell growth and cytotoxicity were measured colorimetrically by MTT assay. Apoptotic cell death was determined by the TUNEL method (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-biotin nick end-labelling) and caspase activity was investigated by immunocytochemistry using antibodies directed against caspase 6, caspase 8 and caspase 9. The results showed that the PE 5 and 6 extracts at 0.125mg/ml dilution induced apoptosis in association with increased number of TUNEL positive cells. MTT results showed that cultures exposed to the same extracts and at the same dilution experienced better cell growth compared to those cultures exposed to the other extracts. Immunpositivity for all caspases was detected after treatment with all the extracts and at all dilutions, with stronger immunoreactivity for caspase 6 than caspases 8 and 9. Caspase 6 labelling was especially strong in PE 5 and PE 6. We conclude that propolis may have anti-tumour effects by increasing apoptosis through the caspase pathway. Such propolis extracts may be important economically and allow development of a relatively inexpensive cancer treatment.

  7. Natural biased coin encoded in the genome determines cell strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorri, Faezeh; Mahini, Hamid; Sharifi-Zarchi, Ali; Totonchi, Mehdi; Tusserkani, Ruzbeh; Pezeshk, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Decision making at a cellular level determines different fates for isogenic cells. However, it is not yet clear how rational decisions are encoded in the genome, how they are transmitted to their offspring, and whether they evolve and become optimized throughout generations. In this paper, we use a game theoretic approach to explain how rational decisions are made in the presence of cooperators and competitors. Our results suggest the existence of an internal switch that operates as a biased coin. The biased coin is, in fact, a biochemical bistable network of interacting genes that can flip to one of its stable states in response to different environmental stimuli. We present a framework to describe how the positions of attractors in such a gene regulatory network correspond to the behavior of a rational player in a competing environment. We evaluate our model by considering lysis/lysogeny decision making of bacteriophage lambda in E. coli.

  8. Natural biased coin encoded in the genome determines cell strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Dorri

    Full Text Available Decision making at a cellular level determines different fates for isogenic cells. However, it is not yet clear how rational decisions are encoded in the genome, how they are transmitted to their offspring, and whether they evolve and become optimized throughout generations. In this paper, we use a game theoretic approach to explain how rational decisions are made in the presence of cooperators and competitors. Our results suggest the existence of an internal switch that operates as a biased coin. The biased coin is, in fact, a biochemical bistable network of interacting genes that can flip to one of its stable states in response to different environmental stimuli. We present a framework to describe how the positions of attractors in such a gene regulatory network correspond to the behavior of a rational player in a competing environment. We evaluate our model by considering lysis/lysogeny decision making of bacteriophage lambda in E. coli.

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  17. Photoelectrochemical solar cell using extract of Eugenia jambolana Lam as a natural sensitizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Christian G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The extract of Jambolão (java plum, Eugenia jambolana Lam, was used as a natural sensitizer of a wide band-gap semiconductor (TiO2 in photoelectrochemical solar cells. The natural dye, adsorbed onto the semiconductor surface, absorbs visible light and promotes electron transfer across the dye/semiconductor interface. Photogenerated current and voltage as high as 2.3 mA and 711 mV, respectively, were obtained and effective conversion of visible light into electricity was achieved. The use of a natural product as the semiconductor sensitizer enables a faster and simpler production of cheaper and environmentally friendly solar cells.

  18. Animal model of naturally occurring bladder cancer: Characterization of four new canine transitional cell carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Development and further characterization of animal models for human cancers is important for the improvement of cancer detection and therapy. Canine bladder cancer closely resembles human bladder cancer in many aspects. In this study, we isolated and characterized four primary transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) cell lines to be used for future in vitro validation of novel therapeutic agents for bladder cancer. Methods Four K9TCC cell lines were established from naturally-occurring...

  19. Enhanced cytotoxicity of natural killer cells following the acquisition of chimeric antigen receptors through trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Nan Cho

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have the capacity to target tumors and are ideal candidates for immunotherapy. Viral vectors have been used to genetically modify in vitro expanded NK cells to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, which confer cytotoxicity against tumors. However, use of viral transduction methods raises the safety concern of viral integration into the NK cell genome. In this study, we used trogocytosis as a non-viral method to modify NK cells for immunotherapy. A K562 cell line expressing high levels of anti-CD19 CARs was generated as a donor cell to transfer the anti-CD19 CARs onto NK cells via trogocytosis. Anti-CD19 CAR expression was observed in expanded NK cells after these cells were co-cultured for one hour with freeze/thaw-treated donor cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the localization of the anti-CD19 CARs on the NK cell surface. Acquisition of anti-CD19 CARs via trogocytosis enhanced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against the B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL cell lines and primary B-ALL cells derived from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report that describes the increased cytotoxicity of NK cells following the acquisition of CARs via trogocytosis. This novel strategy could be a potential valuable therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell tumors.

  20. Natural bizbenzoquinoline derivatives protect zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells from aminoglycoside toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eKruger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20-30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment.

  1. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R; Verkman, A S; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2012-12-19

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica.

  2. The nature and function of fibroblastoid reticular cells in the hemopoietic stroma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Piersma (Aldert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe experimental work of this thesis, described in the appendix papers, is aimed at characterization of the nature and function of fibroblastic reticular cells in the hemopoietic stroma. A number of experimental models was employed to elucidate different aspects of these cells. In the fi

  3. Hyperforin inhibits Akt1 kinase activity and promotes caspase-mediated apoptosis involving Bad and Noxa activation in human myeloid tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Merhi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The natural phloroglucinol hyperforin HF displays anti-inflammatory and anti-tumoral properties of potential pharmacological interest. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells abnormally proliferate and escape apoptosis. Herein, the effects and mechanisms of purified HF on AML cell dysfunction were investigated in AML cell lines defining distinct AML subfamilies and primary AML cells cultured ex vivo. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: HF inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner the growth of AML cell lines (U937, OCI-AML3, NB4, HL-60 by inducing apoptosis as evidenced by accumulation of sub-G1 population, phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. HF also induced apoptosis in primary AML blasts, whereas normal blood cells were not affected. The apoptotic process in U937 cells was accompanied by downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Noxa, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, activation of procaspases and cleavage of the caspase substrate PARP-1. The general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the caspase-9- and -3-specific inhibitors, but not caspase-8 inhibitor, significantly attenuated apoptosis. HF-mediated apoptosis was associated with dephosphorylation of active Akt1 (at Ser(473 and Akt1 substrate Bad (at Ser(136 which activates Bad pro-apoptotic function. HF supppressed the kinase activity of Akt1, and combined treatment with the allosteric Akt1 inhibitor Akt-I-VIII significantly enhanced apoptosis of U937 cells. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide new evidence that HF's pro-apoptotic effect in AML cells involved inhibition of Akt1 signaling, mitochondria and Bcl-2 members dysfunctions, and activation of procaspases -9/-3. Combined interruption of mitochondrial and Akt1 pathways by HF may have implications for AML treatment.

  4. Alloreactive natural killer cells for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia: from stem cell transplantation to adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana eRuggeri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells express activating and inhibitory receptors which recognize MHC class I alleles, termed Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs. Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched natural killer cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia. Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of natural killer cell infusion in acute myeloid leukemia patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. Aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts of exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of acute myeloid leukemia.

  5. The phenotype and tissue-specific nature of multipotent cells derived from human mature adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wu, Min-Ke; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Sato, Soh; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2014-02-21

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have been considered to be a homogeneous group of multipotent cells, which present to be an alternative source of adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. However, many aspects of the cellular nature about DFAT cells remained unclarified. This study aimed to elucidate the basic characteristics of DFAT cells underlying their functions and differentiation potentials. By modified ceiling culture technique, DFAT cells were converted from human mature adipocytes from the human buccal fat pads. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that those derived cells were a homogeneous population of CD13(+) CD29(+) CD105(+) CD44(+) CD31(-) CD34(-) CD309(-) α-SMA(-) cells. DFAT cells in this study demonstrated tissue-specific differentiation properties with strong adipogenic but much weaker osteogenic capacity. Neither did they express endothelial markers under angiogenic induction.

  6. Decreased natural killer cell activity is associated with atherosclerosis in elderly humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruunsgaard, H.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Schroll, M.;

    2001-01-01

    of elderly humans. It was tested if the potential of natural cytotoxicity in the blood (evaluated as an index including cytotoxicity per NK cell and the number of circulating NK cells) was preserved in 174 81-yearold humans versus 91 young controls and if NK cell mediated immunity was associated with age......-related inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Elderly people had decreased cytotoxicity per NK cell in short-term but not in long-term assays. Ca2+ independent cytotoxicity was unaltered, and NK cells maintained their cytotoxic responses to interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha signals. The decreased...... cytotoxicity per NK cell was not completely counteracted by increased circulating numbers of NK cells in the blood. Elderly people with severe medical disorders had low numbers of circulating NK cells. Furthermore, elderly people with atherosclerosis had low cytotoxicity per NK cell and a high number...

  7. Safrole induces G0/G1 phase arrest via inhibition of cyclin E and provokes apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrion-dependent pathways in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chun-Shu; Huang, An-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lin, Chin-Chung; Chung, Hsiung-Kwang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-05-01

    Safrole, a component of Piper betle inflorescence, is a carcinogen which has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis on human oral cancer HSC-3 cells in vitro and to inhibit HSC-3 cells in xenograft tumor cells in vivo. In our previous study, safrole promoted phagocytosis by macrophages and natural killer cell cytotoxicity in normal BALB/c mice. The cytotoxic effects of safrole on HL-60 cells were investigated by using flow cytometric analysis, comet assay, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, western blotting and confocal laser microscopy. The obtained results indicate that safrole induced a cytotoxic response through reducing the percentage of viable cells and induction of apoptosis in HL-60 cells in a dose-dependent manner. DAPI staining and comet assay also showed that safrole induced apoptosis (chromatin condensation) and DNA damage in HL-60 cells. The flow cytometric assay showed that safrole increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential in HL-60 cells. Safrole enhanced the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein BAX, inhibited those of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL-2 and promoted the levels of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G (Endo G) in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, safrole promoted the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and of activating transcription factor 6α (ATF-6α). Based on these findings, we suggest that safrole-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells is mediated through the ER stress and intrinsic signaling pathways.

  8. The anti-canine distemper virus activities of ex vivo-expanded canine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yun; Shin, Dong-Jun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2015-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in induction of antiviral effects against various viruses of humans and animals. However, few data on NK cell activities during canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are available. Recently, we established a culture system allowing activation and expansion of canine non-B, non-T, large granular NK lymphocytes from PBMCs of normal dogs. In the present study, we explored the ability of such expanded NK cells to inhibit CDV infection in vitro. Cultured CD3-CD5-CD21- NK cells produced large amounts of IFN-γ, exhibited highly upregulated expression of mRNAs encoding NK-cell-associated receptors, and demonstrated strong natural killing activity against canine tumor cells. Although the expanded NK cells were dose-dependently cytotoxic to both normal and CDV-infected Vero cells, CDV infection rendered Vero cells more susceptible to NK cells. Pretreatment with anti-CDV serum from hyperimmunized dogs enhanced the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of NK cells against CDV-infected Vero cells. The culture supernatants of NK cells, added before or after infection, dose-dependently inhibited both CDV replication and development of CDV-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in Vero cells. Anti-IFN-γ antibody neutralized the inhibitory effects of NK cell culture supernatants on CDV replication and CPE induction in Vero cells. Such results emphasize the potential significance of NK cells in controlling CDV infection, and indicate that NK cells may play roles both during CDV infection and in combating such infections, under certain conditions.

  9. Tumor-primed natural killer cells: waiting for the green light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May eSabry

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The functional impairment of natural killer (NK cells has been frequently reported in cancer studies. As one of the central components of host anti-tumor immunity, NK cells exert cellular cytotoxicity against tumor cells, and secrete a cytokine milieu to inhibit tumor progression and enable the recruitment of other immune cells to the tumor site. The unlocking of the full functional potential of NK cells requires successful progression through discrete activation stages that are tightly regulated by a complex array of signalling molecules. Target cell susceptibility to NK cell-mediated killing is dependent on the intensity and specific combination of ligand expression for NK cell receptors. Tumor cells utilize numerous strategies for evading NK cells, including the downregulation of important NK cell-activating ligands. Here, we review key studies on NK cell activation requirements, and argue, based on our findings from NK cell-tumor interactions, that the altered characteristics of tumor-associated NK cells are indicative of unmet signalling requirements for full NK cell activation, rather than NK cell dysfunction in cancer.

  10. The Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxic Function Is Modulated by HIV-1 Accessory Proteins

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    Edward Barker

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells’ major role in the control of viruses is to eliminate established infected cells. The capacity of NK cells to kill virus-infected cells is dependent on the interactions between ligands on the infected cell and receptors on the NK cell surface. Because of the importance of ligand-receptor interactions in modulating the NK cell cytotoxic response, HIV has developed strategies to regulate various NK cell ligands making the infected cell surprisingly refractory to NK cell lysis. This is perplexing because the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces expression of ligands for the NK cell activating receptor, NKG2D. In addition, the accessory protein Nef removes the inhibitory ligands HLA-A and -B. The reason for the ineffective killing by NK cells despite the strong potential to eliminate infected cells is due to HIV-1 Vpu’s ability to down modulate the co-activation ligand, NTB-A, from the cell surface. Down modulation of NTB-A prevents efficient NK cell degranulation. This review will focus on the mechanisms through which the HIV-1 accessory proteins modulate their respective ligands, and its implication for NK cell killing of HIV-infected cells.

  11. Classification of human natural killer cells based on migration behavior and cytotoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherberghen, Bruno; Olofsson, Per E; Forslund, Elin; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali; Pacouret, Simon; Guldevall, Karolin; Enqvist, Monika; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Mehr, Ramit; Önfelt, Björn

    2013-02-21

    Despite intense scrutiny of the molecular interactions between natural killer (NK) and target cells, few studies have been devoted to dissection of the basic functional heterogeneity in individual NK cell behavior. Using a microchip-based, time-lapse imaging approach allowing the entire contact history of each NK cell to be recorded, in the present study, we were able to quantify how the cytotoxic response varied between individual NK cells. Strikingly, approximately half of the NK cells did not kill any target cells at all, whereas a minority of NK cells was responsible for a majority of the target cell deaths. These dynamic cytotoxicity data allowed categorization of NK cells into 5 distinct classes. A small but particularly active subclass of NK cells killed several target cells in a consecutive fashion. These "serial killers" delivered their lytic hits faster and induced faster target cell death than other NK cells. Fast, necrotic target cell death was correlated with the amount of perforin released by the NK cells. Our data are consistent with a model in which a small fraction of NK cells drives tumor elimination and inflammation.

  12. Effect of ranitidine on postoperative suppression of natural killer cell activity and delayed hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Pedersen, B K; Moesgaard, F;

    1989-01-01

    hypersensitivity (DTH) antigens, and blood drawn immediately before and 24 hours after skin incision was analyzed for spontaneous and in vitro stimulated (IL-2, IFN-alpha or indomethacin) natural killer (NK) cell activity and PHA and PPD-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Lymphocyte subsets (helper......-cell activity (p less than 0.02). Postoperative decrease in helper/inducer-T cell numbers was not significantly lessened (p = 0.07), and ranitidine did not influence the levels of suppressor-T cells. PHA and PPD responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were unaltered. The results may suggest potential...

  13. Transcription factors involved in the regulation of natural killer cell development and function: an update

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    Martha Elia Luevano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells belong to the innate immune system and are key effectors in the immune response against cancer and infection. Recent studies have contributed to the knowledge of events controlling NK cell fate. The use of knockout mice has enabled the discovery of key transcription factors (TFs essential for NK cell development and function. Yet, unwrapping the downstream targets of these TFs and their influence on NK cells remains a challenge. In this review we discuss the latest TFs described to be involved in the regulation of NK cell development and maturation.

  14. Photocurrent generation by dye-sensitized solar cells using natural pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz-Mireles, Eddie Nahúm; Rocha-Rangel, Enrique; Caballero-Rico, Frida; Ramírez-de-León, José Alberto; Vázquez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The development of photovoltaic panels has improved the conversion of solar radiation into electrical energy. This paper deals with the electrical and thermal characteristics (voltage, current, and temperature) of photovoltaic solar cells sensitized with natural pigments (dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC) based on a titanium dioxide semiconductor. Several natural pigments (blackberry, beets, eggplant skin, spinach, flame tree flower, papaya leaf, and grass extracts) were evaluated to determine their sensitizing effect on titanium dioxide. The results showed the great potential of natural pigments for use in solar cells. The best results were obtained with the blackberry pigment, reaching a value of 7.1 mA current, open-circuit voltage (Voc ) of 0.72 V in 2 cm(2) , and fill factor (ff) of 0.51 in the DSSC. This performance is well above than that currently offers by actual cells.

  15. Expansion and activation of natural killer cells from PBMC for immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Gang Peng; Li-Jian Liang; Qiang He; Jie-Fu Huang; Ming-De Lu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To induce efficient expansion of natural killer (NK) cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using a culture of anchorage-dependent Wilms tumor cell lines, and to provide a reliable supply for adoptive immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: Culture expansion of NK cells was achieved using PBMCs cultured with Wilms tumor cells. Cytotoxicity was measured using a standard 51Cr release assay and crystal violet staining technique. The proportions of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+,CD16+, and CD56+ cells were determined by flow cytometry.RESULTS: After PBMCs from healthy donors and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were cultured with irradiated HFWT cells for 10-21 d, CD56+ CD16+ cells shared more than 50% of the cell population, and more than 80% of fresh HFWT cells were killed at an effector/target ratio of 2 over 24 h. NK-enriched lymphocyte population from HCC patients killed HCC-1 and 2 cells with sensitivities comparable to fresh TKB-17RGB cells. HCC cells proliferated 196-fold with the irradiated HFWT cells at 18 d. Stimulation by HFWT cells required intimate cell-cell interaction with PBMC. However, neither the soluble factors released from HFWT cells nor the fixed HFWT cells were effective for NK expansion. The lymphocytes expanded with IL-2 killed fresh HFWT target cells more effectively than the lymphocytes expanded with the 4-cytokine cocktail (IL-1 β, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-6). IL-2 was the sole cytokine required for NK expansion.CONCLUSION: Wilms tumor is sensitive to human NK cells and is highly efficient for selective expansion of NK cells from PBMCs.

  16. Protection by polyphenol extract from olive stones against apoptosis produced by oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma cells

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    Ernesto Cortés-Castell

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated the protective activity of an extract from a by-product such as olive stones, through its ability to inhibit H2O2 induced apoptosis in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Material and methods: To such end, 20,000 cells/well were cultivated and differentiation with retinoic acid was initiated. Once the cells were differentiated, apoptosis was induced with and without H2O2 extract. Finally, cDNA extraction was performed, and pro-apoptotic genes Bax and anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2 were analyzed. Quantification of the gene expression was performed using the GAPDH gene marker. Results: Cell viability with the extract is 97.6% (SD 5.7 with 10 mg/l and 62.8% (SD 1.2 to 50 mg/l, using 10 mg/l for the biomarker assay. The retinoic acid differentiated SH-S cell line (10 µM shows a clear apoptosis when treated with H2O2 150 µM, with a Bax/Bcl-2 ratio of 3.75 (SD 0.80 in contrast to the differentiated control cells subjected to H2O2 and with extract, which have the same ratio of 1.02 (SD 0.01-0.03. Conclusion: The olive stone extract shows anti-apoptotic activity in the provoked cell death of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in their normal state, defending them from oxidative stress which produces a significant increase in the apoptotic gene ratio in contrast to anti-apoptotic genes (Bax/Bcl-2.

  17. Therapeutic potential and challenges of Natural killer cells in treatment of solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eGras Navarro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphoid cells that hold tremendous potential for effective immunotherapy for a broad range of cancers. Due to the mode of NK cell killing requiring one–to-one target engagement and site directed release of cytolytic granules, the therapeutic potential of NK cells has been most extensively explored in hematological malignancies. However, their ability to precisely kill antibody coated cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs and genotoxically altered cells, while maintaining tolerance to healthy cells makes them appealing therapeutic effectors for all cancer forms, including metastases. Due to their release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NK cells may potently reverse the anti-inflammatory tumor microenvironment (TME and augment adaptive immune responses by promoting differentiation, activation and/ or recruitment of accessory immune cells to sites of malignancy. Nevertheless, integrated and coordinated mechanisms of subversion of NK cell activity against the tumor and its microenvironment exist. Although our understanding of the receptor ligand interactions that regulate NK cell functionality has evolved remarkably, the diversity of ligands and receptors is complex, as is their mechanistic foundations in regulating NK cell function. In this article, we review the literature and highlight how the TME manipulates the NK cell phenotypes, genotypes and tropism to evade tumor recognition and elimination. We discuss counter strategies that may be adopted to augment the efficacy of NK cell anti-tumor surveillance, the clinical trials that have been undertaken so far in solid malignancies, critically weighing the challenges and opportunities with this approach.

  18. Noxa/Bcl-2 protein interactions contribute to bortezomib resistance in human lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alyson J; Dai, Haiming; Correia, Cristina; Takahashi, Rie; Lee, Sun-Hee; Schmitz, Ingo; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2011-05-20

    Previous studies have suggested that the BH3 domain of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Noxa only interacts with the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and A1 but not Bcl-2. In view of the similarity of the BH3 binding domains of these anti-apoptotic proteins as well as recent evidence that studies of isolated BH3 domains can potentially underestimate the binding between full-length Bcl-2 family members, we examined the interaction of full-length human Noxa with anti-apoptotic human Bcl-2 family members. Surface plasmon resonance using bacterially expressed proteins demonstrated that Noxa binds with mean dissociation constants (K(D)) of 3.4 nm for Mcl-1, 70 nm for Bcl-x(L), and 250 nm for wild type human Bcl-2, demonstrating selectivity but not absolute specificity of Noxa for Mcl-1. Further analysis showed that the Noxa/Bcl-2 interaction reflected binding between the Noxa BH3 domain and the Bcl-2 BH3 binding groove. Analysis of proteins expressed in vivo demonstrated that Noxa and Bcl-2 can be pulled down together from a variety of cells. Moreover, when compared with wild type Bcl-2, certain lymphoma-derived Bcl-2 mutants bound Noxa up to 20-fold more tightly in vitro, pulled down more Noxa from cells, and protected cells against killing by transfected Noxa to a greater extent. When killing by bortezomib (an agent whose cytotoxicity in Jurkat T-cell leukemia cells is dependent on Noxa) was examined, apoptosis was enhanced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-x(L) antagonist ABT-737 or by Bcl-2 down-regulation and diminished by Bcl-2 overexpression. Collectively, these observations not only establish the ability of Noxa and Bcl-2 to interact but also identify Bcl-2 overexpression as a potential mechanism of bortezomib resistance.

  19. [HMGB1 as metabolic weapon in the arsenal of natural killer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdynia, G

    2016-11-01

    The German Nobel Prize winner Otto Warburg discovered the importance of glycolysis in cancer cells in the 1920s. Nearly one century later the inhibition of tumor glycolysis in cancer cells could literally be the Achilles Heel in cancer therapy. Surprisingly, we could show that Natural Killer (NK) cells pursue this strategy. They employ specific metabolic weapons to eliminate cancer cells by targeting tumor glycolysis. In colon cancer cells a specifically modified form of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein released by NK cells induced a previously unknown form of cell death. This new link between the killing of cancer cells and the innate immune system opened up new perspectives for immunotherapy in oncology.

  20. Innate-like functions of natural killer T cell subsets result from highly divergent gene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Isaac; Seumois, Grégory; Chavez, Lukas; Samaniego-Castruita, Daniela; White, Brandie; Chawla, Ashu; Mock, Dennis; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) have stimulatory or inhibitory effects on the immune response that can be attributed in part to the existence of functional subsets of NKT cells. These subsets have been characterized only on the basis of the differential expression of a few transcription factors and cell-surface molecules. Here we have analyzed purified populations of thymic NKT cell subsets at both the transcriptomic level and epigenomic level and by single-cell RNA sequencing. Our data indicated that despite their similar antigen specificity, the functional NKT cell subsets were highly divergent populations with many gene-expression and epigenetic differences. Therefore, the thymus 'imprints' distinct gene programs on subsets of innate-like NKT cells that probably impart differences in proliferative capacity, homing, and effector functions.

  1. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra Oswald-Richter

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+CD25(hi (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells], was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+ T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+ and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+CD4(+CD25(hi T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  2. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Grill, Stacy M; Shariat, Nikki; Leelawong, Mindy; Sundrud, Mark S; Haas, David W; Unutmaz, Derya

    2004-07-01

    A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+)CD25(hi) (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells]), was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+) T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+) and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(hi) T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  3. BLyS inhibition eliminates primary B cells but leaves natural and acquired humoral immunity intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Jean L; Crowley, Jenni E; Tomayko, Mary M; Steinel, Natalie; O'Neill, Patrick J; Quinn, William J; Goenka, Radhika; Miller, Juli P; Cho, Yun Hee; Long, Vatana; Ward, Chris; Migone, Thi-Sau; Shlomchik, Mark J; Cancro, Michael P

    2008-10-07

    We have used an inhibiting antibody to determine whether preimmune versus antigen-experienced B cells differ in their requisites for BLyS, a cytokine that controls differentiation and survival. Whereas in vivo BLyS inhibition profoundly reduced naïve B cell numbers and primary immune responses, it had a markedly smaller effect on memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells, as well as secondary immune responses. There was heterogeneity within the memory pools, because IgM-bearing memory cells were sensitive to BLyS depletion whereas IgG-bearing memory cells were not, although both were more resistant than naïve cells. There was also heterogeneity within B1 pools, as splenic but not peritoneal B1 cells were diminished by anti-BLyS treatment, yet the number of natural antibody-secreting cells remained constant. Together, these findings show that memory B cells and natural antibody-secreting cells are BLyS-independent and suggest that these pools can be separately manipulated.

  4. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschlegel, Anja M; Geissen, Markus; Lenk, Matthias; Riebe, Roland; Angermann, Marlies; Schatzl, Herman; Schaetzl, Hermann; Groschup, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice). We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  5. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja M Oelschlegel

    Full Text Available Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice. We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  6. Livin abrogates apoptosis of SPC-A1 cell by regulating JNKI signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ru; Lin, Ming; Chen, Gang; Xie, Bao-Song; Xu, Neng-Luan; Lin, Li-Fang

    2010-06-01

    Livin, a novel member of inhibitors of apoptosis protein, is highly expressed in tumor tissues. It is a potential target in tumor therapy. Silencing its gene expression has been found to promote tumor cell apoptosis or increase tumor sensitivity to therapies. This paper studied the effect of livin anti-apoptotic activity and examined its molecular mechanisms. In the study, higher levels of cell apoptosis were measured by FACS in the experiment group with livin expression silenced than that in controls (P SPC-A1 by activating JNK1 signaling pathway and inhibiting caspase-3 activation.

  7. Heat Shock Protein translocation induced by membrane fluidization increases tumor-cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Nina C; Ireland, H Elyse; Smith, Carly M; Hoyle, Christine F; Williams, John H H

    2010-10-28

    Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains a challenge due to the frequency of drug resistance amongst patients. Improving the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents while reducing the expression of anti-apoptotic Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) within the cancer cells may facilitate in overcoming this drug resistance. We demonstrate for the first time that sub-lethal doses of chemotherapeutic agents can be combined with membrane fluidizing treatments to produce a significant increase in drug efficacy and apoptosis in vitro. We show that fluidizers result in a transient decrease in intracellular HSPs, resulting in increased tumor-cell sensitivity and a membrane-associated induction of HSP gene expression.

  8. Cell-specific expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in the anterior pituitary of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroba, Ana I; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso M; Frago, Laura M; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2007-01-01

    Cell death is increased in the anterior pituitary of poorly controlled diabetic rats, but anti-apoptotic mechanisms are also activated. We hypothesized that specific cell types are selectively protected against diabetes-induced cell death. To determine when anti-apoptotic mechanisms are activated, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were killed after 1, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of evolution. Anterior pituitaries were processed for western blot analysis to determine changes in the intrinsic cell death pathway and upstream kinases involved in cell protection mechanisms. An increase in cell death was detected by ELISA at 4 weeks of diabetes. TUNEL labelling demonstrated that this corresponded to death of primarily lactotrophs, a few somatotrophs, and no thyrotrophs, corticotrophs or gonadotrophs. Levels of phosphorylated (p) Akt were increased at 1 week of diabetes, while pERK1/2 levels increased at 4 weeks and pJNK at 6 weeks. Activation of caspase 3 decreased and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 protein family increased as early as 1 week after diabetes onset. These changes were coincident with increased IGF-I receptor levels. Levels of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) increased significantly after 6 weeks of diabetes, as did activation of nuclear factor (NF)kappaB. Double immunohistochemistry indicated that XIAP was expressed in less than 1% of lactotrophs and gonadotrophs, approximately 50% of somatotrophs and more than 90% of corticotrophs and thyrotrophs. These results suggest that some cell survival mechanisms are rapidly activated in the anterior pituitary, even before increased cell death can be detected, while others are more delayed. Furthermore, both pituitary cell death and expression of protective mechanisms such as XIAP are cell-type specific.

  9. Natural killer cells from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis have impaired effector functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Heui Kim

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are multicompetent lymphocytes of the innate immune system that play a central role in host defense and immune regulation. Although increasing evidence suggests that innate immunity plays a key role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS, the role of NK cells in CRS has been poorly studied. This study aimed to characterize the peripheral blood NK cells from patients with CRS, and to compare the functions of these cells with those from non-CRS controls. The correlation between NK cell functional activity and prognosis was also assessed. Eighteen CRS patients and 19 healthy non-CRS controls were included. The patients with CRS were classified into two subgroups, namely a treatment-responsive group and recalcitrant group. NK cell degranulation was determined by measuring the cell surface expression of CD107a against 721.221 and K562 cells. Intracytoplasmic cytokine production was determined by flow cytometry. Compared to the controls, the NK cells of CRS group had an impaired ability to degranulate and to produce cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α. The recalcitrant subgroup showed the most severe defects in NK cell effector functions. Moreover, the decreased NK cell functions in patients with CRS were associated with poor prognostic factors such as concomitant asthma and peripheral blood eosinophilia. NK cells, which were originally named for their ability to mediate spontaneous cytotoxicity towards diseased cells including infected cells, may play an important role in regulating the inflammatory process in CRS pathogenesis.

  10. A parametric study of the natural vibration and mode shapes of PEM fuel cell stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A PEM fuel cell stack is laminated with a number of plate-type cells, and the latest model is assembled by compression from both ends of plates.PEM fuel cells are exposed to high magnitude vibrations, shocks, and cyclic loads in many applications. Vibrations during operation show significant impact in the longer run of the fuel cells. Frequencies which are not close to the resonant frequencies or natural frequencies show very little effect on the overall performance. However, if the frequency ranges of operation approaches the resonant frequency range, the probability of component failure increases. It is possible that there will be lateral transition of cells or leakage of fuel gas and coolant water. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effects vibration has on the fuel cell. This work aims to understand the vibration characteristics of a PEM fuel cell stack and to evaluate their seismic resistance under a vibration environment. Natural frequencies and mode shapes of the PEM fuel cell stack are modelling using finite element methods (FEM.A parametric study is conducted to investigate how the natural frequency varies as a function of thickness, Young’s modulus, and density for each component layer. In addition, this work provides insight into how the natural frequencies of the PEM fuel cell stack should be tuned to avoid high amplitude vibrations by modifying the material and geometric properties of individual components. The mode shapes of the PEM fuel cell stack provide insight into the maximum displacement exhibited under vibration conditions that should be considered for transportation and stationary applications.

  11. ALG-2 knockdown in HeLa cells results in G2/M cell cycle phase accumulation and cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Berit Rahbek; la Cour, Peter Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    downregulation induces accumulation of HeLa cells in the G2/M cell cycle phase and increases the amount of early apoptotic and dead cells. Caspase inhibition by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk attenuated the increase in the amount of dead cells following ALG-2 downregulation. Thus, our results indicate...... that ALG-2 has an anti-apoptotic function in HeLa cells by facilitating the passage through checkpoints in the G2/M cell cycle phase.......ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene-2 encoded protein) has been shown to be upregulated in a variety of human tumors questioning its previously assumed pro-apoptotic function. The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the role of ALG-2 in human cancer cells. We show that ALG-2...

  12. Implications of cancer stem cell theory for cancer chemoprevention by natural dietary compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Wicha, Max S; Schwartz, Steven J; Sun, Duxin

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of cancer stem cell theory has profound implications for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Cancer stem cells give rise to the tumor bulk through continuous self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal is of greatest importance for discovery of anticancer drugs targeting cancer stem cells. Naturally occurring dietary compounds have received increasing attention in cancer chemoprevention. The anticancer effects of many dietary components have been reported for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, a number of studies have found that several dietary compounds can directly or indirectly affect cancer stem cell self-renewal pathways. Herein we review the current knowledge of most common natural dietary compounds for their impact on self-renewal pathways and potential effect against cancer stem cells. Three pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog and Notch) are summarized for their functions in self-renewal of cancer stem cells. The dietary compounds, including curcumin, sulforaphane, soy isoflavone, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, lycopene, piperine and vitamin D(3), are discussed for their direct or indirect effect on these self-renewal pathways. Curcumin and piperine have been demonstrated to target breast cancer stem cells. Sulforaphane has been reported to inhibit pancreatic tumor-initiating cells and breast cancer stem cells. These studies provide a basis for preclinical and clinical evaluation of dietary compounds for chemoprevention of cancer stem cells. This may enable us to discover more preventive strategies for cancer management by reducing cancer resistance and recurrence and improving patient survival.

  13. On natural frequencies of non-uniform beams modulated by finite periodic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanlong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Wang, Wei; Wang, Longqi; Peng, Fujun; Li, Bin

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that an infinite periodic beam can support flexural wave band gaps. However, in real applications, the number of the periodic cells is always limited. If a uniform beam is replaced by a non-uniform beam with finite periodicity, the vibration changes are vital by mysterious. This paper employs the transfer matrix method (TMM) to study the natural frequencies of the non-uniform beams with modulation by finite periodic cells. The effects of the amounts, cross section ratios, and arrangement forms of the periodic cells on the natural frequencies are explored. The relationship between the natural frequencies of the non-uniform beams with finite periodicity and the band gap boundaries of the corresponding infinite periodic beam is also investigated. Numerical results and conclusions obtained here are favorable for designing beams with good vibration control ability.

  14. Natural taurine promotes apoptosis of human hepatic stellate cells in proteomics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the differential expression of proteins between natural taurine treated hepatic stellate cells and controls, and investigate the underlying regulatory mechanism of natural taurine in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: A proteomic strategy combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraperform ance liquid chromatographyelectrospray ionizationtandem mass spectrometry (UPLCESIMS/MS) was used to study the differential expression of proteins and Western blotting was used to validate the re...

  15. Apoptotic effects of salinomycin on human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Fuat; Teksen, Fulya

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we studied the apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of salinomycin on human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3) as salinomycin is known as a selectively cancer stem cell killer agent. We used immortal human ovarian epithelial cell line (IHOEC) as control group. Ovarian cancer cells and ovarian epithelial cells were treated by different concentrations of salinomycin such as 0.1, 1, and 40 μM and incubated for 24, 48, and 72 h. Dimethylthiazol (MTT) cell viability assay was performed to determine cell viability and toxicity. On the other hand, the expression levels of some of the apoptosis-related genes, namely anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, apoptotic Bax, and Caspase-3 were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Additionally, Caspase-3 protein level was also determined. As a result, we concluded that incubation of human OVCAR-3 by 0.1 μM concentration of salinomycin for 24 h killed 40 % of the cancer cells by activating apoptosis but had no effect on normal cells. The apoptotic Bax gene expression was upregulated but anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression was downregulated. Active Caspase-3 protein level was increased significantly (p < 0.05).

  16. Overcoming Hypoxic-Resistance of Tumor Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis through Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Jin Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A solid tumor is often exposed to hypoxic or anoxic conditions; thus, tumor cell responses to hypoxia are important for tumor progression as well as tumor therapy. Our previous studies indicated that tumor cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-induced cell apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin inhibits cell proliferation in many cancer types and induces apoptosis in some particular cancer types. Here, we examined the effects of melatonin on hypoxic resistant cells against TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of melatonin in the hypoxic response. Melatonin treatment increased TRAIL-induced A549 cell death under hypoxic conditions, although hypoxia inhibited TRAIL-mediated cell apoptosis. In a mechanistic study, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 proteins, which increase following exposure to hypoxia, were dose-dependently down-regulated by melatonin treatment. Melatonin also blocked the hypoxic responses that reduced pro-apoptotic proteins and increased anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, melatonin treatment reduced TRAIL resistance by regulating the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and Bax translocation. Our results first demonstrated that melatonin treatment induces apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant hypoxic tumor cells by diminishing the anti-apoptotic signals mediated by hypoxia and also suggest that melatonin could be a tumor therapeutic tool by combining with other apoptotic ligands including TRAIL, particularly in solid tumor cells exposed to hypoxia.

  17. Making memory at birth: understanding the differentiation of natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Isaac; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2012-04-01

    Glycolipid reactive natural killer T cells with an invariant TCR α-chain (iNKT cells) are a conserved population of T lymphocytes with a distinct anatomical distribution and functional properties. The differentiation pathway of iNKT cells branches off from mainstream thymocyte differentiation at the double positive stage, and recent work has revealed how signaling events early in the iNKT cell pathway imprint a memory-like behavior on these cells. Additionally, unique molecular interactions governing iNKT cell development and tissue distribution have been uncovered recently, building up our knowledge of the complex network of interactions that form this population. Novel autologous antigens for these cells have been identified, although it has not yet been resolved if there is single endogenous antigen responsible for both positive selection and/or peripheral activation.

  18. Invariant natural killer T cells recognize glycolipids from pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Yuki; Illarionov, Petr; Vela, José Luis; Pei, Bo; Girardi, Enrico; Li, Xiangming; Li, Yali; Imamura, Masakazu; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Okawara, Akiko; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Gómez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Rogers, Paul; Dahesh, Samira; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Khurana, Archana; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Andrew, Peter W; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Nizet, Victor; Besra, Gurdyal S; Tsuji, Moriya; Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-09-04

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) recognize glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. These cells express an evolutionarily conserved, invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR), but the forces that drive TCR conservation have remained uncertain. Here we show that NKT cells recognized diacylglycerol-containing glycolipids from Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia, and group B Streptococcus, which causes neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Furthermore, CD1d-dependent responses by NKT cells were required for activation and host protection. The glycolipid response was dependent on vaccenic acid, which is present in low concentrations in mammalian cells. Our results show how microbial lipids position the sugar for recognition by the invariant TCR and, most notably, extend the range of microbes recognized by this conserved TCR to several clinically important bacteria.

  19. The role of natural killer cells in the early period of infection in murine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Laurenti

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the role of natural killer (NK cells during the early period of Leishmania infection, BALB/c mice were selectively and permanently depleted of NK cells by injection with 90Sr and subsequently infected with Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis (HSJD-1 strain. 90Sr is known to selectively deplete NK cells, leaving an intact T- and B-cell compartment and preserving the ability to produce both interferon alpha and IL-2. This method of depletion has advantages when compared with depletion using anti-NK cell monoclonal antibodies because the effect is permanent and neither activates complement nor provokes massive cell death. In the present study, after one month of treatment with 90Sr, the depletion of NK cells was shown by a more than ten-fold reduction in the cytotoxic activity of these cells: 2 x 106 spleen cells from NK-depleted animals were required to reach the same specific lysis of target cells effected by 0.15 x 106 spleen cells from normal control animals. The histopathology of the skin lesion at 7 days after Leishmania infection showed more parasites in the NK cell-depleted group. This observation further strengthens a direct role of NK cells during the early period of Leishmania infection.

  20. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7) is essential for target cell killing in a natural killer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Coughlin, Jason J; Garofoli, Daniella; Ewen, Catherine; Davidson, Courtney E; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Kane, Kevin P; Lacy, Paige; Logan, Michael R; Befus, A Dean; Bleackley, R Chris; Moqbel, Redwan

    2008-02-15

    Natural killer cells recognize and induce apoptosis in foreign, transformed or virus-infected cells through the release of perforin and granzymes from secretory lysosomes. Clinically, NK-cell mediated killing is a major limitation to successful allo- and xenotransplantation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the fusion of granzyme B-containing secretory lysosomes to the plasma membrane in activated NK cells, prior to target cell killing, are not fully understood. Using the NK cell line YT-Indy as a model, we have investigated the expression of SNAP REceptors (SNAREs), both target (t-) and vesicular (v-) SNAREs, and their function in granzyme B-mediated target cell killing. Our data showed that YT-Indy cells express VAMP-7 and SNAP-23, but not VAMP-2. VAMP-7 was associated with granzyme B-containing lysosomal granules. Using VAMP-7 small interfering RNA (siRNA), we successfully knocked down the expression of VAMP-7 protein in YT-Indy to less than 10% of untreated cells in 24h. VAMP7-deficient YT-Indy cells activated via co-culture with Jurkat cells released <1ng/mL of granzyme B, compared to 1.5-2.5 microg/mL from controls. Using Jurkat cells as targets, we showed a 7-fold reduction in NK cell-mediated killing by VAMP-7 deficient YT-Indy cells. Our results show that VAMP-7 is a crucial component of granzyme B release and target cell killing in the NK cell line YT-Indy. Thus, targeting VAMP-7 expression specifically with siRNA, following transplantation, may be a viable strategy for preventing NK cell-mediated transplant rejection, in vivo.

  1. Natural Products Induce a G Protein-Mediated Calcium Pathway Activating p53 in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Paul R.; Yan, Michael B.; Bhattacharya, Saswati; Polans, Arthur S.; Kenealey, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin are examples of natural products being used as chemotherapeutics but with adverse side effects that limit their therapeutic window. Natural products derived from plants and having low toxicity, such as quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and piceatannol, have been shown to inhibit tumor cell growth both in vitro and in pre-clinical models of cancer, but their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, thus restricting their use as prototypes for developing synthetic analogs with improved anti-cancer properties. We and others have demonstrated that one of the earliest and consistent events upon exposure of tumor cells to these less toxic natural products is a rise in cytoplasmic calcium, activating several pro-apoptotic pathways. We describe here a G protein/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway (InsP3) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that mediates between these less toxic natural products and the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Further, we demonstrate that this elevation of intracellular calcium modulates p53 activity and the subsequent transcription of several pro-apoptotic genes encoding PIG8, CD95, PIDD, TP53INP, RRM2B, Noxa, p21 and PUMA. We conclude from our findings that less toxic natural products likely bind to a G protein coupled receptor that activates a G protein-mediated and calcium-dependent pathway resulting selectively in tumor cell death. PMID:26341291

  2. Natural products induce a G protein-mediated calcium pathway activating p53 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Paul R; Yan, Michael B; Bhattacharya, Saswati; Polans, Arthur S; Kenealey, Jason D

    2015-11-01

    Paclitaxel, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin are examples of natural products being used as chemotherapeutics but with adverse side effects that limit their therapeutic window. Natural products derived from plants and having low toxicity, such as quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and piceatannol, have been shown to inhibit tumor cell growth both in vitro and in pre-clinical models of cancer, but their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, thus restricting their use as prototypes for developing synthetic analogs with improved anti-cancer properties. We and others have demonstrated that one of the earliest and consistent events upon exposure of tumor cells to these less toxic natural products is a rise in cytoplasmic calcium, activating several pro-apoptotic pathways. We describe here a G protein/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway (InsP3) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that mediates between these less toxic natural products and the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Further, we demonstrate that this elevation of intracellular calcium modulates p53 activity and the subsequent transcription of several pro-apoptotic genes encoding PIG8, CD95, PIDD, TP53INP, RRM2B, Noxa, p21 and PUMA. We conclude from our findings that less toxic natural products likely bind to a G protein coupled receptor that activates a G protein-mediated and calcium-dependent pathway resulting selectively in tumor cell death.

  3. Camptothecin and khat (Catha edulis Forsk. induced distinct cell death phenotypes involving modulation of c-FLIPL, Mcl-1, procaspase-8 and mitochondrial function in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossan Kjell O

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An organic extract of the recreational herb khat (Catha edulis Forsk. triggers cell death in various leukemia cell lines in vitro. The chemotherapeutics camptothecin, a plant alkaloid topoisomerase I inhibitor, was tested side-by-side with khat in a panel of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines to elucidate mechanisms of toxicity. Results Khat had a profound effect on MOLM-13 cells inducing mitochondrial damage, chromatin margination and morphological features of autophagy. The effects of khat on mitochondrial ultrastructure in MOLM-13 correlated with strongly impaired routine respiration, an effect neither found in the khat-resistant MV-4-11 cells nor in camptothecin treated cells. Enforced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein provided protection against camptothecin-induced cell death and partly against khat toxicity. Khat-induced cell death in MOLM-13 cells included reduced levels of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein, while both khat and camptothecin induced c-FLIPL cleavage and procaspase-8 activation. Conclusion Khat activated a distinct cell death pathway in sensitive leukemic cells as compared to camptothecin, involving mitochondrial damage and morphological features of autophagy. This suggests that khat should be further explored in the search for novel experimental therapeutics.

  4. Naturally Occurring Self-Reactive CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells: Universal Immune Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nafiseh Pakravan; Agheel Tabar Molla Hassan; Zuhair Muhammad Hassan

    2007-01-01

    Naturally occurring thymus-arisen CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered to play a central role in self-tolerance. Precise signals that promote the development of Treg cells remain elusive, but considerable evidence suggests that costimulatory molecules, cytokines, the nature of the TCR and the niche or the context in which the T cell encounters antigen in the thymus play important roles. Analysis of TCR from Treg cells has demonstrated that a large proportion of this population has a higher avidity to self-antigen in comparison with TCR from CD4+CD25- cells and that peripheral antigen is required for their development, maintenance, or expansion. Treg cells have been shown to undergo expansion in the periphery, likely regulated by the presence of self-antigen. Many studies have shown that the involvement of Treg cells in the tolerance induction is antigen-specific, even with MHC-mismatched,in transplantation/graft versus host disease (GVHD), autoimmunity, cancer, and pregnancy. Theses studies concluded a vital role for self-reactive Treg cells in maintenance of the body integrity. Based on those studies, we hypothesize that self-reactive Treg cells are shared among all healthy individuals and recognize same self-antigens and their TCR encodes for few dominant antigens of each organ which defines the healthy self. These dominant self antigens can be regarded as "universal immune code".

  5. Abnormalities of quantities and functions of natural killer cells in severe aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Li, Zhishang; Sheng, Weiwei; Fu, Rong; Li, Lijuan; Zhang, Tian; Wu, Yuhong; Xing, Limin; Song, Jia; Wang, Huaquan; Shao, Zonghong

    2014-01-01

    Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a rare disease characterized by severe pancytopenia and bone marrow failure. Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or common lymphoid progenitors (CLP). They play a key role in n the innate immunity and adaptive immune. In this study, the quantitative and functional changes of natural killer (NK) cell subsets in peripheral blood of severe aplastic anemia (SAA) patients before and after immunosuppressive therapy (IST) were investigated. Results showed that the percentage of NK cells and its subsets in peripheral blood lymphocytes was decreased in SAA patients. After IST, the percentage of NK cells and their subsets increased dramatically. The median expressions of CD158a, NKG2D and NKp46 on NK cells were higher in SAA patients compared to that in normal controls, and the expressions of perforin in newly diagnosed and recovery SAA patients were higher than that in controls. Therefore, we concluded that the decrease of total NK cells, and CD56(bright), CD56(dim) NK cell subsets and the higher expressions of NKp46 and perforin on NK cells may cause the over-function of T lymphocytes and thus lead to hematopoiesis failure in SAA.

  6. Modulating notochordal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells using natural nucleus pulposus tissue matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxing Liu

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs can differentiate into notochordal cell (NC-like cells when cultured in the presence of natural porcine nucleus pulposus (NP tissue matrix. The method promises massive production of high-quality, functional cells to treat degenerative intervertebral discs (IVDs. Based on our previous work, we further examined the effect of cell-NP matrix contact and culture medium on the differentiation, and further assessed the functional differentiation ability of the generated NC-like. The study showed that direct contact between hiPSCs and NP matrix can promote the differentiation yield, whilst both the contact and non-contact cultures can generate functional NC-like cells. The generated NC-like cells are highly homogenous regarding the expression of notochordal marker genes. A culture medium containing a cocktail of growth factors (FGF, EGF, VEGF and IGF-1 also supported the notochordal differentiation in the presence of NP matrix. The NC-like cells showed excellent functional differentiation ability to generate NP-like tissue which was rich in aggrecan and collagen type II; and particularly, the proteoglycan to collagen content ratio was as high as 12.5-17.5 which represents a phenotype close to NP rather than hyaline cartilage. Collectively, the present study confirmed the effectiveness and flexibility of using natural NP tissue matrix to direct notochordal differentiation of hiPSCs, and the potential of using the generated NC-like cells for treating IVD degeneration.

  7. Life-cycle assessment of diesel, natural gas and hydrogen fuel cell bus transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Jamie; Pryor, Trevor

    The Sustainable Transport Energy Programme (STEP) is an initiative of the Government of Western Australia, to explore hydrogen fuel cell technology as an alternative to the existing diesel and natural gas public transit infrastructure in Perth. This project includes three buses manufactured by DaimlerChrysler with Ballard fuel cell power sources operating in regular service alongside the existing natural gas and diesel bus fleets. The life-cycle assessment (LCA) of the fuel cell bus trial in Perth determines the overall environmental footprint and energy demand by studying all phases of the complete transportation system, including the hydrogen infrastructure, bus manufacturing, operation, and end-of-life disposal. The LCAs of the existing diesel and natural gas transportation systems are developed in parallel. The findings show that the trial is competitive with the diesel and natural gas bus systems in terms of global warming potential and eutrophication. Emissions that contribute to acidification and photochemical ozone are greater for the fuel cell buses. Scenario analysis quantifies the improvements that can be expected in future generations of fuel cell vehicles and shows that a reduction of greater than 50% is achievable in the greenhouse gas, photochemical ozone creation and primary energy demand impact categories.

  8. Visfatin Protects Rat Pancreatic β-cells against IFN-γ-Induced Apoptosis through AMPK and ERK1/2 Signaling Pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Ruo Lan; MEIMei; SU Yun Chao; LI Li; WANG Jin Yu; WU Li Ling

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveInterferon-γ (IFN-γ) plays an important role in apoptosis and was shown to increase the risk of diabetes.Visfatin, an adipokine, has anti-diabetic, anti-tumor, and regulating inflammatory properties. In this study we investigated the effect of visfatin on IFN-γ-induced apoptosis in rat pancreatic β-cells. MethodsThe RINm5F (rat insulinoma cell line) cells exposed to IFN-γ were treated with or without visfatin. The viability and apoptosis of the cells were assessed by using MTT and flow cytometry. The expressionsof mRNA and protein were detected by using real-time PCR and western blot analysis. ResultsThe exposure of RINm5F cells to IFN-γ for 48 h led to increased apoptosis percentage of the cells. Visfatin pretreatment significantly increased the cellviability and reduced the cell apoptosis induced by IFN-γ. IFN-γ-induced increase in expression of p53 mRNA and cytochrome c protein, decrease in mRNA and protein levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were attenuated by visfatin pretreatment. Visfatin alsoincreasedAMPK and ERK1/2phosphorylation and the anti-apoptotic action of visfatin was attenuated by the AMPK and ERK1/2 inhibitor. ConclusionThese results suggested that visfatin protected pancreatic islet cells against IFN-γ-induced apoptosis via mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. The anti-apoptotic action of visfatin is mediated by activation of AMPK and ERK1/2 signaling molecules.

  9. Dendritic cell editing by activated natural killer cells results in a more protective cancer-specific immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Morandi

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, several studies have extensively reported that activated natural killer (NK cells can kill autologous immature dendritic cells (DCs in vitro, whereas they spare fully activated DCs. This led to the proposal that activated NK cells might select a more immunogenic subset of DCs during a protective immune response. However, there is no demonstration that autologous DC killing by NK cells is an event occurring in vivo and, consequently, the functional relevance of this killing remains elusive. Here we report that a significant decrease of CD11c(+ DCs was observed in draining lymph nodes of mice inoculated with MHC-devoid cells as NK cell targets able to induce NK cell activation. This in vivo DC editing by NK cells was perforin-dependent and it was functionally relevant, since residual lymph node DCs displayed an improved capability to induce T cell proliferation. In addition, in a model of anti-cancer vaccination, the administration of MHC-devoid cells together with tumor cells increased the number of tumor-specific CTLs and resulted in a significant increase in survival of mice upon challenge with a lethal dose of tumor cells. Depletion of NK cells or the use of perforin knockout mice strongly decreased the tumor-specific CTL expansion and its protective role against tumor cell challenge. As a whole, our data support the hypothesis that NK cell-mediated DC killing takes place in vivo and is able to promote expansion of cancer-specific CTLs. Our results also indicate that cancer vaccines could be improved by strategies aimed at activating NK cells.

  10. Microencapsulation technology by nature: Cell derived extracellular vesicles with therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, A; Falus, A; Buzás, E

    2013-06-01

    Cell derived extracellular vesicles are submicron structures surrounded by phospholipid bilayer and released by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The sizes of these vesicles roughly fall into the size ranges of microbes, and they represent efficient delivery platforms targeting complex molecular information to professional antigen presenting cells. Critical roles of these naturally formulated units of information have been described in many physiological and pathological processes. Extracellular vesicles are not only potential biomarkers and possible pathogenic factors in numerous diseases, but they are also considered as emerging therapeutic targets and therapeutic vehicles. Strikingly, current drug delivery systems, designed to convey therapeutic proteins and peptides (such as liposomes), show many similarities to extracellular vesicles. Here we review some aspects of therapeutic implementation of natural, cell-derived extracellular vesicles in human diseases. Exploration of molecular and functional details of extracellular vesicle release and action may provide important lessons for the design of future drug delivery systems.

  11. Enhanced performance of natural dye sensitised solar cells fabricated using rutile TIO2 nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akila, Y.; Muthukumarasamy, N.; Agilan, S.; Mallick, Tapas K.; Senthilarasu, S.; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan

    2016-08-01

    Due to the lower cost, natural dye molecules are good alternatives for the ruthenium based sensitizers in the dye-sensitized solar cells. In this article, we have reported the natural sensitizer based dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated using TiO2 nanorods. Rutile phase TiO2 nanorods have been synthesized by template free hydrothermal method which results in TiO2 nanorods in the form of acropora corals. These TiO2 nanorods have been sensitized by flowers of Sesbania grandiflora, leaves of Camellia sinensis and roots of Rubia tinctorum. The maximum conversion efficiency of 1.53% has been obtained for TiO2 nanorods based solar cells sensitized with the leaves of Camellia sinensis. The flowers of Sesbania grandiflora and roots of Rubia tinctorum sensitized TiO2 nanorods based solar cells exhibited an efficiency of 0.65% and 1.28% respectively.

  12. New method for estimating bacterial cell abundances in natural samples by use of sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples, including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert, were heated to a temperature of 500 degrees C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, and the amount of adenine released from the samples was then determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approximately 10(5) to 10(9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation-based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining.

  13. Electrical characterization of dye sensitized nano solar cell using natural pomegranate juice as photosensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adithi, U.; Thomas, Sara; Uma, V.; Pradeep, N.

    2013-02-01

    This paper shows Electrical characterization of Dye Sensitized Solar Cell using natural dye, extracted from the pomegranate as a photo sensitizer and ZnO nanoparticles as semiconductor. The constituents of fabricated dye sensitized solar cell were working electrode, dye, electrolyte and counter electrode. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized and used as semiconductor in working electrode. Carbon soot was used as counter electrode. The resistance of ZnO film on ITO film was found out. There was an increase in the resistance of the film and film changes from conducting to semiconducting. Photovoltaic parameters of the fabricated cell like Short circuit current, open circuit voltage, Fill factor and Efficiency were found out. This paper shows that usage of natural dyes like pomegranate juice as sensitizer enables faster and simpler production of cheaper and environmental friendly solar cell.

  14. Common variable immunodeficiency and inclusion body myositis: a distinct myopathy mediated by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C; Illa, I

    1995-06-01

    Inclusion body myositis developed in two men, 36 and 48 years old with long-standing common variable immunodeficiency. Immunophenotypic analysis of the endomysial cells showed an increased number of natural killer (NK) cells (defined as CD57+, CD56+, CD3-, CD8-, CD68-) accounting for 8.5 to 9.5% of the total cells, compared with a mean of 1% in sporadic inclusion body myositis. The remaining cells were CD8+, macrophages, and CD4+ T cells. NK cells were positive for intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and invaded muscle fibers negative for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. In contrast to ubiquitous endomysial expression of MHC class I antigen in sporadic inclusion body myositis, the MHC class I in common variable immunodeficiency and inclusion body myositis was absent or weakly expressed in only some of the muscle fibers surrounded by CD8+ cells. Enteroviral or retroviral RNA sequences were not amplified. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved strength in 1 patient whose repeated muscle biopsy specimen showed normal NK cells. We conclude that inclusion body myositis can develop in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. Common variable immunodeficiency with inclusion body myositis is an immune myopathy mediated by NK cells in a non-MHC class I-restricted cytotoxicity, and by CD8+ cells in an MHC class I-restricted process. This is the first description of an inflammatory myopathy in which NK cells participate in the myocytotoxic process.

  15. Invariant natural killer T cells: front line fighters in the war against pathogenic microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Catherine M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells constitute a unique subset of innate-like T cells that have been shown to have crucial roles in a variety of immune responses. iNKT cells are characterized by their expression of both NK cell markers and an invariant T cell receptor (TCR) α chain, which recognizes glycolipids presented by the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d. Despite having a limited antigen repertoire, the iNKT cell response can be very complex, and participate in both protective and harmful immune responses. The protective role of these cells against a variety of pathogens has been particularly well documented. Through the use of these pathogen models, our knowledge of the breadth of the iNKT cell response has been expanded. Specific iNKT cell antigens have been isolated from several different bacteria, from which iNKT cells are critical for protection in mouse models. These responses can be generated by direct, CD1d-mediated activation, or indirect, cytokine-mediated activation, or a combination of the two. This can lead to secretion of a variety of different Th1, Th2, or Th17 cytokines, which differentially impact the downstream immune response against these pathogens. This critical role is emphasized by the conservation of these cells between mice and humans, warranting further investigation into how iNKT cells participate in protective immune responses, with the ultimate goal of harnessing their potential for treatment.

  16. Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns Induced Crosstalk between Dendritic Cells, T Helper Cells, and Natural Killer Helper Cells Can Improve Dendritic Cell Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oth, Tammy; Vanderlocht, Joris; Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V

    2016-01-01

    A coordinated cellular interplay is of crucial importance in both host defense against pathogens and malignantly transformed cells. The various interactions of Dendritic Cells (DC), Natural Killer (NK) cells, and T helper (Th) cells can be influenced by a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and will lead to enhanced CD8(+) effector T cell responses. Specific Pattern Recognition Receptor (PRR) triggering during maturation enables DC to enhance Th1 as well as NK helper cell responses. This effect is correlated with the amount of IL-12p70 released by DC. Activated NK cells are able to amplify the proinflammatory cytokine profile of DC via the release of IFN-γ. The knowledge on how PAMP recognition can modulate the DC is of importance for the design and definition of appropriate therapeutic cancer vaccines. In this review we will discuss the potential role of specific PAMP-matured DC in optimizing therapeutic DC-based vaccines, as some of these DC are efficiently activating Th1, NK cells, and cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, to optimize these vaccines, also the inhibitory effects of tumor-derived suppressive factors, for example, on the NK-DC crosstalk, should be taken into account. Finally, the suppressive role of the tumor microenvironment in vaccination efficacy and some proposals to overcome this by using combination therapies will be described.

  17. p53 dependent apoptotic cell death induces embryonic malformation in Carassius auratus under chronic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Banerjee Sawant

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a global phenomenon affecting recruitment as well as the embryonic development of aquatic fauna. The present study depicts hypoxia induced disruption of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death (PCD, leading to embryonic malformation in the goldfish, Carrasius auratus. Constant hypoxia induced the early expression of pro-apoptotic/tumor suppressor p53 and concomitant expression of the cell death molecule, caspase-3, leading to high level of DNA damage and cell death in hypoxic embryos, as compared to normoxic ones. As a result, the former showed delayed 4 and 64 celled stages and a delay in appearance of epiboly stage. Expression of p53 efficiently switched off expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 during the initial 12 hours post fertilization (hpf and caused embryonic cell death. However, after 12 hours, simultaneous downregulation of p53 and Caspase-3 and exponential increase of Bcl-2, caused uncontrolled cell proliferation and prevented essential programmed cell death (PCD, ultimately resulting in significant (p<0.05 embryonic malformation up to 144 hpf. Evidences suggest that uncontrolled cell proliferation after 12 hpf may have been due to downregulation of p53 abundance, which in turn has an influence on upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Therefore, we have been able to show for the first time and propose that hypoxia induced downregulation of p53 beyond 12 hpf, disrupts PCD and leads to failure in normal differentiation, causing malformation in gold fish embryos.

  18. p53 Dependent Apoptotic Cell Death Induces Embryonic Malformation in Carassius auratus under Chronic Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Subrata; Sawant, Bhawesh T.; Chadha, Narinder K.; Pal, Asim K.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a global phenomenon affecting recruitment as well as the embryonic development of aquatic fauna. The present study depicts hypoxia induced disruption of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death (PCD), leading to embryonic malformation in the goldfish, Carrasius auratus. Constant hypoxia induced the early expression of pro-apoptotic/tumor suppressor p53 and concomitant expression of the cell death molecule, caspase-3, leading to high level of DNA damage and cell death in hypoxic embryos, as compared to normoxic ones. As a result, the former showed delayed 4 and 64 celled stages and a delay in appearance of epiboly stage. Expression of p53 efficiently switched off expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 during the initial 12 hours post fertilization (hpf) and caused embryonic cell death. However, after 12 hours, simultaneous downregulation of p53 and Caspase-3 and exponential increase of Bcl-2, caused uncontrolled cell proliferation and prevented essential programmed cell death (PCD), ultimately resulting in significant (p<0.05) embryonic malformation up to 144 hpf. Evidences suggest that uncontrolled cell proliferation after 12 hpf may have been due to downregulation of p53 abundance, which in turn has an influence on upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Therefore, we have been able to show for the first time and propose that hypoxia induced downregulation of p53 beyond 12 hpf, disrupts PCD and leads to failure in normal differentiation, causing malformation in gold fish embryos. PMID:25068954

  19. Large-scale isolation and cytotoxicity of extracellular vesicles derived from activated human natural killer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Ambrose Y.; Wu, Chun-Hua; Li, Jingbo; Sun, Jianping; Fabbri, Muller; Wayne, Alan S.; Seeger, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been the focus of great interest, as they appear to be involved in numerous important cellular processes. They deliver bioactive macromolecules such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, allowing intercellular communication in multicellular organisms. EVs are secreted by all cell types, including immune cells such as natural killer cells (NK), and they may play important roles in the immune system. Currently, a large-scale procedure to obtain functional NK EVs is lacking, limiting their use clinically. In this report, we present a simple, robust, and cost-effective method to isolate a large quantity of NK EVs. After propagating and activating NK cells ex vivo and then incubating them in exosome-free medium for 48 h, EVs were isolated using a polymer precipitation method. The isolated vesicles contain the tetraspanin CD63, an EV marker, and associated proteins (fibronectin), but are devoid of cytochrome C, a cytoplasmic marker. Nanoparticle tracking analysis showed a size distribution between 100 and 200 nm while transmission electron microscopy imaging displayed vesicles with an oval shape and comparable sizes, fulfilling the definition of EV. Importantly, isolated EV fractions were cytotoxic against cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate for the first time that isolated activated NK (aNK) cell EVs contain the cytotoxic proteins perforin, granulysin, and granzymes A and B, incorporated from the aNK cells. Activation of caspase -3, -7 and -9 was detected in cancer cells incubated with aNK EVs, and caspase inhibitors blocked aNK EV-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting that aNK EVs activate caspase pathways in target cells. The ability to isolate functional aNK EVs on a large scale may lead to new clinical applications. Abbreviations: NK: natural killer cells; activated NK (aNK) cells; EVs: extracellular vesicles; ALL: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; aAPC: artificial antigen-presenting cell; TEM: transmission

  20. Underground Adaptation to a Hostile Environment: Acute Myeloid Leukemia vs. Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulphy, Nicolas; Chrétien, Anne-Sophie; Khaznadar, Zena; Fauriat, Cyril; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Caignard, Anne; Chouaib, Salem; Olive, Daniel; Toubert, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies which incidence increases with age. The disease affects the differentiation of hematopoietic stem or precursor cells in the bone marrow and can be related to abnormal cytogenetic and/or specific mutational patterns. AML blasts can be sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell antitumor response. However, NK cells are frequently defective in AML patients leading to tumor escape. NK cell defects affect not only the expression of the activating NK receptors, including the natural cytotoxicity receptors, the NK group 2, member D, and the DNAX accessory molecule-1, but also cytotoxicity and IFN-γ release. Such perturbations in NK cell physiology could be related to the adaptation of the AML to the immune pressure and more generally to patient’s clinical features. Various mechanisms are potentially involved in the inhibition of NK-cell functions in AML, including defects in the normal lymphopoiesis, reduced expression of activating receptors through cell-to-cell contacts, and production of immunosuppressive soluble agents by leukemic blasts. Therefore, the continuous cross-talk between AML and NK cells participates to the leukemia immune escape and eventually to patient’s relapse. Methods to restore or stimulate NK cells seem to be attractive strategies to treat patients once the complete remission is achieved. Moreover, our capacity in stimulating the NK cell functions could lead to the development of preemptive strategies to eliminate leukemia-initiating cells before the emergence of the disease in elderly individuals presenting preleukemic mutations in hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:27014273

  1. Phenotypic studies of natural killer cell subsets in human transporter associated with antigen processing deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Zimmer

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood natural killer (NK cells from patients with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP deficiency are hyporesponsive. The mechanism of this defect is unknown, but the phenotype of TAP-deficient NK cells is almost normal. However, we noticed a high percentage of CD56(bright cells among total NK cells from two patients. We further investigated TAP-deficient NK cells in these patients and compared them to NK cells from two other TAP-deficient patients with no clinical symptoms and to individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases other than TAP deficiency (chronic lung diseases or vasculitis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood were stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies and the phenotype of NK cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, (51Chromium release assays were performed to assess the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In the symptomatic patients, CD56(bright NK cells represented 28% and 45%, respectively, of all NK cells (higher than in healthy donors. The patients also displayed a higher percentage of CD56(dimCD16(- NK cells than controls. Interestingly, this unusual NK cell subtype distribution was not found in the two asymptomatic TAP-deficient cases, but was instead present in several of the other patients. Over-expression of the inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A by TAP-deficient NK cells was confirmed and extended to the inhibitory receptor ILT2 (CD85j. These inhibitory receptors were not involved in regulating the cytotoxicity of TAP-deficient NK cells. We conclude that expansion of the CD56(bright NK cell subtype in peripheral blood is not a hallmark of TAP deficiency, but can be found in other diseases as well. This might reflect a reaction of the immune system to pathologic conditions. It could be interesting to investigate the relative distribution of NK cell subsets in various respiratory and autoimmune diseases.

  2. The application of natural killer (NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayne H Rouce

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are essential components of the innate immune system and play a critical role in host immunity against cancer. Recent progress in our understanding of NK cell immunobiology has paved the way for novel NK cell-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in the field of NK cell immunotherapy, including augmentation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, manipulation of receptor-mediated activation, and adoptive immunotherapy with ex vivo expanded, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR engineered or engager-modified NK cells. In contrast to T lymphocytes, donor NK cells do not attack non-hematopoietic tissues, suggesting that an NK-mediated anti-tumor effect can be achieved in the absence of graft-versus-host disease. Despite reports of clinical efficacy, a number of factors limit the application of NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer such as the failure of infused NK cells to expand and persist in vivo. Therefore efforts to enhance the therapeutic benefit of NK cell-based immunotherapy by developing strategies to manipulate the NK cell product, host factors and tumor targets are the subject of intense research. In the preclinical setting, genetic engineering of NK cells to express CARs to redirect their antitumor specificity has shown significant promise. Given the short lifespan and potent cytolytic function of mature NK cells, they are attractive candidate effector cells to express CARs for adoptive immunotherapies. Another innovative approach to redirect NK cytotoxicity towards tumor cells is to create either bispecific or trispecific antibodies, thus augmenting cytotoxicity against tumor-associated antigens. These are exciting times for the study of NK cells; with recent advances in the field of NK cell biology and translational research, it is likely that NK cell immunotherapy will move to the forefront of cancer immunotherapy over the next

  3. Immune functions in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas): Evaluation of natural killer cell activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Guise, Sylvain De; Ross, Peter; Osterhaus, Albert; Martineau, Daniel; Beland, P; Fournier, Michel

    1997-01-01

    textabstractNatural killer (NK) activity, an important non-specific defense mechanism against viral infections and tumors, was demonstrated in beluga whales using two different methods: 51Cr release and flow cytometry. Using the 51Cr release assay, NK activity in belugas was shown to be higher against K-562 than against YAC-1 cell lines. Moreover, it was enhanced by the addition of human recombinant interleukin-2 with both cell lines. NK activity evaluated by flow cytometry in the peripheral ...

  4. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Scarring Trachoma Indicates Infiltration by Natural Killer and Undefined CD45 Negative Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The phenotype and function of immune cells infiltrating the conjunctiva in scarring trachoma have yet to be fully characterized. We assessed tissue morphology and immunophenotype of cellular infiltrates found in trachomatous scarring compared to control participants.Clinical assessments and conjunctival biopsy samples were obtained from 34 individuals with trachomatous scarring undergoing trichiasis surgery and 33 control subjects undergoing cataract or retinal detachment surgery. Biopsy samples were fixed in buffered formalin and embedded in paraffin wax. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining was performed for assessment of the inflammatory cell infiltrate. Immunohistochemical staining of single markers on individual sections was performed to identify cells expressing CD3 (T-cells, CD4 (helper T-cells, CD8 (suppressor/cytotoxic T-cells and Natural Killer, NK, cells, NCR1 (NK cells, CD20 (B-cells, CD45 (nucleated hematopoietic cells, CD56 (NK and T-cells, CD68 (macrophages/monocytes and CD83 (mature dendritic cells. The degree of scarring was assessed histologically using cross-polarized light to visualize collagen fibres.Scarring, regardless of clinical inflammation, was associated with increased inflammatory cell infiltrates on H&E and CD45 staining. Scarring was also associated with increased CD8+ and CD56+ cells, but not CD3+ cells, suggestive of a NK cell infiltrate. This was supported by the presence of NCR1+ cells. There was some increase in CD20+ cells, but no evidence for increased CD4+, CD68+ or CD83+ cells. Numerous CD45 negative cells were also seen in the population of infiltrating inflammatory cells in scarred conjunctiva. Disorganization of the normal collagen architecture was strongly associated with clinical scarring.These data point to the infiltration of immune cells with a phenotype suggestive of NK cells in conjunctival trachomatous scarring. A large proportion of CD45 negative inflammatory cells were also present. Future work

  5. Methotrexate induces poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent, caspase 3-independent apoptosis in subsets of proliferating CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Albertsen, L; Bendtzen, K;

    2007-01-01

    ) cells play a significant role in most AID. We therefore examined directly, by flow cytometry, the uptake of MTX by the T helper (Th) cells stimulated for 6 days with Candida albicans (CA) or tetanus toxoid (TT), and its consequences with respect to induction of apoptosis. While none of the resting Th...... apoptosis in both undivided and divided Th cells. PHA-induced apoptosis involved activation of caspase-3 and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in addition to PARP cleavage, suggesting that PHA induces apoptosis via different pathways than CA and TT. We suggest that the latter are more representative...

  6. Methotrexate induces poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent, caspase 3-independent apoptosis in subsets of proliferating CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Albertsen, L; Bendtzen, K;

    2007-01-01

    . Exposure of CA-stimulated PBMC to MTX significantly increased their level of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and a similar tendency was observed in TT-stimulated cells. Unlike CA and TT, the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) induced proliferation of both CD4- and CD4+ T cells, and induced...... apoptosis in both undivided and divided Th cells. PHA-induced apoptosis involved activation of caspase-3 and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in addition to PARP cleavage, suggesting that PHA induces apoptosis via different pathways than CA and TT. We suggest that the latter are more representative...

  7. [Music therapy induced alternations in natural killer cell count and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Y; Kubota, N; Inagaki, T; Shinagawa, N

    2001-03-01

    The effects of music therapy on natural killer (NK) cell count and activity (NKCA) were studied in 19 persons. Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovessel disease and Parkinson's disease subjects were assigned to a music therapy. Blood samples were drawn at rest and after completion of music therapy. Music therapy did not change the number of circulating lymphocytes. The percentage of NK cells increased during music therapy, along with an increase in the NK cell activity. The proportion of T cells, CD4 and CD8 did not change significantly during music therapy. One hour after the music therapy session, plasma adrenaline increased but cortisol and noradrenalin did not change. The results indicate that music therapy can significantly increase NK cell count and activity. The change in NK cell and function were independent of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  8. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling: osteoblastic nature, catabolic functions and interactions with osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja; Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Alnaimi, Ragad Walid; Rolighed, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Marcussen, Niels; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts. Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone through electron microscopy and analysis of molecular markers. Periosteoclastic reversal cells show direct contacts with the osteoclasts and with the demineralized resorption debris. These early reversal cells show (1) ¾-collagen fragments typically generated by extracellular collagenases of the MMP family, (2) MMP-13 (collagenase-3) and (3) the endocytic collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180. The prevalence of these markers was lower in the later reversal cells, which are located near the osteoid surfaces and morphologically resemble mature bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that reversal cells colonizing bone surfaces right after resorption are osteoblast-lineage cells, and extends to adult human bone remodeling their role in rendering eroded surfaces osteogenic.

  9. Inhibition of histamine release from human mast cells by natural chymase inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-heng HE; Hua XIE; Xiao-jun ZHANG; Xian-jie WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of natural chymase inhibitors to modulate histamine release from human mast cells.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human lung, tonsil, and skin were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of the natural chymase inhibitors secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and α1-antitrypsin, then histamine release was determined. RESULTS: IgE-dependent histamine release from lung, tonsil, and skin mast cells were inhibited by up to 70 %, 61%, and 62%, respectively following incubation with α1-antitrypsin (5000 nmol/L). SLPI 5000 nmol/L was also able to inhibit anti-IgEdependent histamine released from lung, tonsil and skin mast cells by up to approximately 72%, 67%, and 58%,respectively. While neither α1-antitrypsin nor SLPI by themselves altered histamine release from lung, tonsil and skin mast cells, they were able to inhibit calcium ionophore-induced histamine release from lung and tonsil mast cells. CONCLUSION: Both α1-antitrypsin and SLPI could potently inhibit IgE-dependent and calcium ionophoreinduced histamine release from dispersed human lung, tonsil, and skin mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner, which suggested that they were likely to play a protective role in mast cell associated diseases including allergy.

  10. Endometrial aspiration biopsy: a non-invasive method of obtaining functional lymphoid progenitor cells and mature natural killer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMenamin, Moya

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of endometrial aspiration biopsy (EAB) with the more traditional dilatation and curettage (D&C) for the procurement of lymphoid progenitor cells and uterine natural killer (NK) populations in endometrial tissue. This prospective observational study conducted in a tertiary referral university hospital examined endometrium obtained from 32 women admitted for laparoscopic gynaecological procedures. Each participant had endometrium sampled using both EAB and D&C. Both methods were assessed as a source of uterine NK and lymphoid progenitor cells. Similar proportions of mature CD45+CD56+ NK cells (range 25.4-36.2%) and CD45+CD34+ lymphoid progenitors (range 1.2-2.0%) were found in tissue obtained using both EAB and D&C. These cells were adequate for flow cytometric analysis, magnetic bead separation and culture. Colony formation by the CD34+ population demonstrated maturational potential. Tissues obtained via endometrial biopsy and D&C are equivalent, by analysis of uterine NK and lymphoid progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of endometrial sampling - endometrial aspiration biopsy and traditional dilatation and curettage - for the procurement of haematopoietic stem cells and uterine natural killer (NK) populations in endometrial tissue. Thirty-two women who had gynaecological procedures in a tertiary referral hospital participated in this study and had endometrial tissue collected via both methods. Similar populations of mature NK cells and haematopoietic stem cells were found in tissue obtained using both endometrial aspiration biopsy and dilatation and curettage. Tissue obtained via endometrial aspiration biopsy was adequate for the culture and growth of haematopoietic stem cells. We conclude that tissue obtained via endometrial biopsy and dilatation and curettage is equivalent, by analysis of uterine NK and haematopoietic stem cells using flow cytometry. This has implications for further

  11. Regulation of human natural killer cell migration and proliferation by the exodus subfamily of CC chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, M J; Williams, B T; Christopherson, K; Brahmi, Z; Hromas, R

    2000-01-10

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses to obligate intracellular pathogens. Nevertheless, the regulation of NK cell trafficking and migration to inflammatory sites is poorly understood. Exodus-1/MIP-3alpha/LARC, Exodus-2/6Ckine/SLC, and Exodus-3/MIP-3beta/ELC/CKbeta-11 are CC chemokines that share a unique aspartate-cysteine-cysteine-leucine motif near their amino terminus and preferentially stimulate the migration of T lymphocytes. The effects of Exodus chemokines on human NK cells were examined. Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not induce detectable chemotaxis of resting peripheral blood NK cells. In contrast, Exodus-2 and -3 stimulated migration of polyclonal activated peripheral blood NK cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Exodus-2 and -3 also induced dose-dependent chemotaxis of NKL, an IL-2-dependent human NK cell line. Results of modified checkerboard assays indicate that migration of NKL cells in response to Exodus-2 and -3 represents true chemotaxis and not simply chemokinesis. Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not induce NK cell proliferation in the absence of other stimuli. Nevertheless, Exodus-2 and -3 significantly augmented IL-2-induced proliferation of normal human CD56(dim) NK cells. In contrast, Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not affect the cytolytic activity of resting or activated peripheral blood NK cells. Expression of message for CCR7, a shared receptor for Exodus-2 and -3, was detected in activated polyclonal NK cells and NKL cells but not resting NK cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Exodus-2 and -3 can participate in the recruitment and proliferation of activated NK cells. Exodus-2 and -3 may regulate interactions between T cells and NK cells that are crucial for the generation of optimal immune responses.

  12. A Novel Natural Product, KL-21, Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysun Adan Gökbulut

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aims of this study were to examine the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of KL-21, a novel plant product (produced by Naturin Natural Products, İzmir, Turkey, on 232B4 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL cells and to determine the cytotoxic effects on healthy BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. METHODS: The cytotoxic effect of KL-21 was determined by MTT cell proliferation assay. Changes in caspase-3 enzyme activity were measured using the caspase-3 colorimetric assay. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were determined using the JC-1 dye-based method. Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was performed to measure the apoptotic cell population. Effects of KL-21 on cell cycle profiles of CLL cells were investigated by flow cytometry. RESULTS: We detected time- and concentration-dependent increases in the cytotoxic effect of KL-21 on 232B4 CLL cells. However, we also showed that, especially at higher concentrations, KL-21 was less cytotoxic towards BEAS-2B healthy cells than towards CLL cells. Annexin-V/PI double staining results showed that the apoptotic cell population increased in 232B4 cells. Increasing concentrations of KL-21 increased caspase-3 enzyme activity and induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. KL-21 administration resulted in small increases in the percentage of the cells in the G0/G1 phase while it decreased the S phase cell population up to 1 mg/mL. At the highest concentration, most of the cells accumulated in the G0/G1 phase. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: KL-21 has a growth-inhibitory effect on 232B4 CLL cells. KL-21 causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1.

  13. HAIR CELL-LIKE CELL GENERATION INDUCED BY NATURE CULTURE OF ADULT RAT AUDITORY EPITHELIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Hair cells are the mechanosensory cells thatconvert sound and motion signals into electrical i m-pulses in cochlear and vestibular end organs of innerear.Although mature mammals nor mally do notgenerate new hair cells,recentin vivoandin vitrostudies have demonstrated mitotic activity and i m-mature-looking hair cells in mammalian vestibularepithelia after exposure to ototoxic drugs[1-3],sug-gesting that vestibular hair cell regeneration inmammals may be inducible.However,the possibil-ity of auditory hair ce...

  14. Cystatin F regulates proteinase activity in IL-2-activated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Katarina; Konjar, Spela; Watts, Colin; Turk, Boris; Kopitar-Jerala, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Cystatin F is a unique member of the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, which is synthesized as an inactive dimer and it is activated by N-terminal cleavage in the endolysosomes. It is expressed in the cells of the immune system: myeloid cells and the cells involved in target cell killing: natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Upon activation of the NK cells with interleukin 2 (IL-2), cystatin F was found upregulated and co-localized in cytotoxic granules with cathepsin C (CatC) and CatV. However, cystatin F inhibits the CatC in cells only when its N-terminal part is processed. Although cystatin F could inhibit both CatV and CatC, the IL-2 stimulation of the YT cells resulted in an increased CatV activity, while the CatC activity was unchanged. The incubation of IL-2 activated NK cells with a cysteine proteinase inhibitor E-64d increased the cystatin F dimer formation. Our results suggest that cystatin F not only inhibits CatV, but it is processed by the CatV in order to inhibit the CatC activity in cytotoxic granules. The regulation of the CatC activity in the cytotoxic granules of the NK cells by the cystatin F could be important for the processing and activation of granule-associated serine proteases - granzymes.

  15. The role of invariant natural killer T cells in microbial immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Yuki; Kitano, Naoki; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2013-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are unique lymphocytes with characteristic features, such as expression of an invariant T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) α-chain, recognition of glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d molecules, and ability to rapidly produce large amounts of cytokines, including interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) upon TCR stimulation. Many studies have demonstrated that iNKT cells participate in immune response against diverse microbes, including bacteria, fungi, protozoan parasites, and viruses. Generally, these cells play protective roles in host defense against infections. However, in some contexts they play pathogenic roles, by inducing or augmenting inflammation. Recent reports show that iNKT cells recognize glycolipid antigens from pathogenic bacteria including Streptococcus pneumoniae, and they contribute to host defense against infection. iNKT cell responses to these microbial glycolipid antigens are highly conserved between rodents and humans, suggesting that iNKT cells are evolutionally conserved because their invariant TCR is useful in detecting certain pathogens. Furthermore, glycolipid-mediated iNKT cell activation during immunization has adjuvant activity, enhancing humoral and cell-mediated responses. Therefore, iNKT cell activation is an attractive target for developing new vaccines for infectious diseases.

  16. Renal transplant immunosuppression impairs natural killer cell function in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Morteau

    Full Text Available Despite an increasing awareness of the importance of innate immunity, the roles of natural killer (NK cells in transplant rejection and antiviral and cancer immunity during immunosuppression have not been clearly defined.To address this issue we have developed a quantitative assay of NK cell function that can be used on clinical samples and have studied the influence of immunosuppression on NK cell function. NK cell degranulation and intracellular interferon (IFN-γ production were determined by flow cytometry of peripheral blood samples.Overnight ex vivo treatment of peripheral blood cells from healthy controls with ciclosporin or tacrolimus inhibited NK cell degranulation and IFN-γ production in a dose-dependent manner. A similar impairment of function was seen in NK cells from patients treated in vivo with calcineurin inhibitors. In the early post-transplant period, there was a variable reduction of NK cell counts after treatment with alemtuzumab and basiliximab.The functional inhibition of NK cells in early transplant patients coincides with the period of maximum susceptibility to viral infections. The ability to assay NK cell function in clinical samples allows assessment of the impact of immunosuppression on these effector cells. This information may be helpful in guiding the titration of immunosuppression in the clinical setting.

  17. The Regulatory Effect of Natural Killer Cells: Do "NK-reg Cells" Exist?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Zhang; Jian Zhang; Zhigang Tian

    2006-01-01

    The most important progress in immunology in the last decade is the description of regulatory lymphocytes, among which Treg cells and regulatory NKT cells are much attractive to not only immunologists but also almost all biomedical researchers. Meanwhile, it is noted that NK cells are not only "Killers" but also regulate innate and adaptive immunity, especially in early stage, by secreting cytokines and cell-cell contact. In this review, we are going to briefly summarize the progresses in regulatory lymphocytes including T cells (Treg, Tr1, Th3), NKT cells and NK cells, and then extensively introduce the positive regulatory function of NK cells in both normal immune response and in disease condition (tumor, infection and autoimmunity), and finally, to focus on the most latest progression in the negative regulatory effects of NK cells on normal and pathogenic immune response. In conclusion, we speculate that a "regulatory NK (NK-reg)" cell subset exist and need to explore. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):241-254.

  18. Natural Killer Cells Are Activated by Lactic Acid Bacteria-Matured Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. Human peripheral blood NK cells were...... with lactic acid bacteria will affect NK cell activation. Such activation of NK cells may potentially skew an on-going or subsequent immune response towards a Th1 response....... incubated with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated bacteria or 10 microg/ml phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for four days. Proliferation was assessed by incorporation of radioactive thymidine into NK cell DNA. The IFN-gamma concentration was measured by ELISA. Incubation of NK cells with a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain...

  19. Ultrasonic three-dimensional on-chip cell culture for dynamic studies of tumor immune surveillance by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakou, Athanasia E; Ohlin, Mathias; Önfelt, Björn; Wiklund, Martin

    2015-08-07

    We demonstrate a simple method for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture controlled by ultrasonic standing waves in a multi-well microplate. The method gently arranges cells in a suspension into a single aggregate in each well of the microplate and, by this, nucleates 3D tissue-like cell growth for culture times between two and seven days. The microplate device is compatible with both high-resolution optical microscopy and maintenance in a standard cell incubator. The result is a scaffold- and coating-free method for 3D cell culture that can be used for controlling the cellular architecture, as well as the cellular and molecular composition of the microenvironment in and around the formed cell structures. We demonstrate the parallel production of one hundred synthetic 3D solid tumors comprising up to thousands of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells, we characterize the tumor structure by high-resolution optical microscopy, and we monitor the functional behavior of natural killer (NK) cells migrating, docking and interacting with the tumor model during culture. Our results show that the method can be used for determining the collective ability of a given number of NK cells to defeat a solid tumor having a certain size, shape and composition. The ultrasound-based method itself is generic and can meet any demand from applications where it is advantageous to monitor cell culture from production to analysis of 3D tissue or tumor models using microscopy in one single microplate device.

  20. Berberine, a natural antidiabetes drug, attenuates glucose neurotoxicity and promotes Nrf2-related neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Ya-Yun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Yu-Ting [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Lo, Yi-Ching, E-mail: yichlo@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates production and apoptotic damage induced by high glucose are major causes of neuronal damage in diabetic neuropathy. Berberine (BBR), a natural antidiabetes drug with PI3K-activating activity, holds promise for diabetes because of its dual antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activities. We have previously reported that BBR attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} neurotoxicity via activating the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway. In this study, we further explored the novel protective mechanism of BBR on high glucose-induced apoptotic death and neurite damage of SH-SY5Y cells. Results indicated BBR (0.1–10 nM) significantly attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nucleus condensation, and apoptotic death in high glucose-treated cells. However, AG1024, an inhibitor of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, significantly abolished BBR protection against high glucose-induced neuronal death. BBR also increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased cytochrome c release. High glucose down-regulated IGF-1 receptor and phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β, the effects of which were attenuated by BBR treatment. BBR also activated nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key antioxidative transcription factor, which is accompanied with up-regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, BBR markedly enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF) expression and promoted neurite outgrowth in high glucose-treated cells. To further determine the role of the Nrf2 in BBR neuroprotection, RNA interference directed against Nrf2 was used. Results indicated Nrf2 siRNA abolished BBR-induced HO-1, NGF, neurite outgrowth and ROS decrease. In conclusion, BBR attenuated high glucose-induced neurotoxicity, and we are the first to reveal this novel mechanism of BBR as an Nrf2 activator against glucose neurotoxicity, providing another potential therapeutic use of BBR on the treatment of diabetic complications. - Highlights: • BBR attenuates high glucose-induced ROS

  1. Chemotherapeutic drugs sensitize human renal cell carcinoma cells to ABT-737 by a mechanism involving the Noxa-dependent inactivation of Mcl-1 or A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zantl Niko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human renal cell carcinoma (RCC is very resistant to chemotherapy. ABT-737 is a novel inhibitor of anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family that has shown promise in various preclinical tumour models. Results We here report a strong over-additive pro-apoptotic effect of ABT-737 and etoposide, vinblastine or paclitaxel but not 5-fluorouracil in cell lines from human RCC. ABT-737 showed very little activity as a single agent but killed RCC cells potently when anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 or, unexpectedly, A1 was targeted by RNAi. This potent augmentation required endogenous Noxa protein since RNAi directed against Noxa but not against Bim or Puma reduced apoptosis induction by the combination of ABT-737 and etoposide or vinblastine. At the level of mitochondria, etoposide-treatment had a similar sensitizing activity and allowed for ABT-737-induced release of cytochrome c. Conclusions Chemotherapeutic drugs can overcome protection afforded by Mcl-1 and A1 through endogenous Noxa protein in RCC cells, and the combination of such drugs with ABT-737 may be a promising strategy in RCC. Strikingly, A1 emerged in RCC cell lines as a protein of similar importance as the well-established Mcl-1 in protection against apoptosis in these cells.

  2. Evidence for Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Protection from Metastasis Formation in Uveal Melanoma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, Willem; van der Slik, Arno R.; Verhoeven, Dirk H. J.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Ly, Long V.; Verduijn, Willem; Luyten, Gregorius P. M.; Mulder, Arend; van Hall, Thorbald; Koning, Frits; Jager, Martine J.; van Bergen, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. In uveal melanoma, low human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on primary tumors is associated with a decreased risk of metastasis. Consequently, it has been suggested that natural killer (NK) cells, which detect decreased expression of HLA class I, are involved in the immune contr

  3. Cytotoxic/natural killer cell cutaneous lymphomas. Report of EORTC Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force Workshop.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santucci, M.; Pimpinelli, N; Massi, D; Kadin, ME; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Muller-Hermelink, HK; Paulli, M; Wechsler, J.; Willemze, R.; Audring, H; Bernengo, MG; Cerroni, L.; Chimenti, S.; Chott, A.; Diaz-Perez, J.L.; Dippel, E; Duncan, LM; Feller, AC; Geerts, M.L.; Hallermann, C; Kempf, W; Russell-Jones, R; Sander, C; Berti, E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous lymphomas expressing a cytotoxic or natural killer (NK) cell phenotype represent a group of lymphoproliferative disorders for which there is currently much confusion and little consensus regarding the best nomenclature and classification. METHODS: This study analyzes 48 cases o

  4. Methylene blue-mediated photodynamic therapy enhances apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Jin; Oak, Chul-Ho; Heo, Jeonghoon; Kim, Young-Ho

    2013-08-01

    Combined treatment with a photosensitizer and iodide laser [photodynamic therapy (PDT)] has improved the outcome of various cancers. In this study, we investigated the effects of using the photosensitizer methylene blue (MB) in PDT in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that MB enhances PDT-induced apoptosis in association with downregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increased phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In MB-PDT-treated A549 cells, we observed PARP cleavage, procaspase-3 activation, downregulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, and the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Western blot data showed that phosphorylation of p38 was increased in MB-PDT-treated A549 cells, indicating that several signaling molecules participate in the apoptotic cascade. Our data also showed that apoptotic cell death in MB-PDT-treated cells occurred through a series of steps beginning with the photochemical generation of ROS. Demonstrating the role of ROS, pretreatment of A549 cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) followed by MB-PDT resulted in increased cell viability and reduced proteolytic cleavage of PARP.

  5. Natural compounds' activity against cancer stem-like or fast-cycling melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Sztiller-Sikorska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence supports the concept that melanoma is highly heterogeneous and sustained by a small subpopulation of melanoma stem-like cells. Those cells are considered as responsible for tumor resistance to therapies. Moreover, melanoma cells are characterized by their high phenotypic plasticity. Consequently, both melanoma stem-like cells and their more differentiated progeny must be eradicated to achieve durable cure. By reevaluating compounds in heterogeneous melanoma populations, it might be possible to select compounds with activity not only against fast-cycling cells but also against cancer stem-like cells. Natural compounds were the focus of the present study. METHODS: We analyzed 120 compounds from The Natural Products Set II to identify compounds active against melanoma populations grown in an anchorage-independent manner and enriched with cells exerting self-renewing capacity. Cell viability, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, gene expression, clonogenic survival and label-retention were analyzed. FINDINGS: Several compounds efficiently eradicated cells with clonogenic capacity and nanaomycin A, streptonigrin and toyocamycin were effective at 0.1 µM. Other anti-clonogenic but not highly cytotoxic compounds such as bryostatin 1, siomycin A, illudin M, michellamine B and pentoxifylline markedly reduced the frequency of ABCB5 (ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 5-positive cells. On the contrary, treatment with maytansine and colchicine selected for cells expressing this transporter. Maytansine, streptonigrin, toyocamycin and colchicine, even if highly cytotoxic, left a small subpopulation of slow-dividing cells unaffected. Compounds selected in the present study differentially altered the expression of melanocyte/melanoma specific microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF and proto-oncogene c-MYC. CONCLUSION: Selected anti-clonogenic compounds might be further investigated as potential adjuvants

  6. Adoptive transfer of osteoclast-expanded natural killer cells for immunotherapy targeting cancer stem-like cells in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowska, Anna K; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2016-07-01

    Based on data obtained from oral, pancreatic and lung cancers, glioblastoma, and melanoma, we have established that natural killer (NK) cells target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). CSCs displaying low MHC class I, CD54, and PD-L1 are killed by cytotoxic NK cells and are differentiated by split anergized NK cells through both membrane bound and secreted forms of TNF-α and IFN-γ. NK cells select and differentiate both healthy and transformed stem-like cells, resulting in target cell maturation and shaping of their microenvironment. In our recent studies, we have observed that oral, pancreatic, and melanoma CSCs were capable of forming large tumors in humanized bone marrow, liver, thymus (hu-BLT) mice with fully reconstituted human immune system. In addition, major human immune subsets including NK cells, T cells, B cells, and monocytes were present in the spleen, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and tumor microenvironment. Similar to our previously published in vitro data, CSCs differentiated with split anergized NK cells prior to implantation in mice formed smaller tumors. Intravenous injection of functionally potent osteoclast-expanded NK cells inhibited tumor growth through differentiation of CSCs in humanized mice. In this review, we present current approaches, advances, and existing limitations in studying interactions of the immune system with the tumor, in particular NK cells with CSCs, using in vivo preclinical hu-BLT mouse model. In addition, we discuss the use of osteoclast-expanded NK cells in targeting cancer stem-like tumors in humanized mice-a strategy that provides a much-needed platform to develop effective cancer immunotherapies.

  7. Cell-metal interactions: A comparison of natural uranium to other common metals in renal cells and bone osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, S. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Carriere, M. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thiebault, C. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berger, P. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Khodja, H. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gouget, B. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]. E-mail: barbara.gouget@cea.fr

    2007-07-15

    Uranium acute intoxication has been documented to induce nephrotoxicity. Kidneys are the main target organs after short term exposures to high concentrations of the toxic, while chronic exposures lead to its accumulation in the skeleton. In this paper, chemical toxicity of uranium is investigated for rat osteoblastic bone cells and compared to results previously obtained on renal cells. We show that bone cells are less sensitive to uranium than renal cells. The influence of the chemical form on U cytotoxicity is demonstrated. For both cell types, a comparison of uranium toxicity with other metals or metalloids toxicities (Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Se and Cd) permits classification of Cd, Zn, Se{sup IV} and Cu as the most toxic and Ni, Se{sup VI}, Mn and U as the least toxic. Chemical toxicity of natural uranium proves to be far less than that of cadmium. To try to explain the differences in sensitivities observed between metals and different cell types, cellular accumulations in cell monolayers are quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), function of time or function of dose: lethal doses which simulate acute intoxications and sub-lethal doses which are more realistic with regard to environmentally metals concentrations. In addition to being more resistant, bone cells accumulated much more uranium than did renal cells. Moreover, for both cell models, Mn, U-citrate and U-bicarbonate are strongly accumulated whereas Cu, Zn and Ni are weakly accumulated. On the other hand, a strong difference in Cd behaviour between the two cell types is shown: whereas Cd is very weakly accumulated in bone cells, it is very strongly accumulated in renal cells. Finally, elemental distribution of the toxics is determined on a cellular scale using nuclear microprobe analysis. For both renal and osteoblastic cells, uranium was accumulated in as intracellular precipitates similar to those observed previously by SEM/EDS.

  8. Role of Natural Killer T Cells In Immunogenic Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    28–38. 5. Godfrey, D. I., and M. Kronenberg . 2004. Going both ways: immune regulation via CD1d-dependent NKT cells. J. Clin. Invest. 114: 1379–1388. 6...Hong, D. C. Scherer, I. Serizawa, N. Burdin, M. Kronenberg , Y. Koezuka, and L. Van Kaer. 1999. Cutting edge: activation of NK T cells by CD1d and a...Y. Kinjo, and M. Kronenberg . 2007. The unique role of natural killer T cells in the response to microorganisms. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 5: 405– 417. 45

  9. Menstrual cycle distribution of uterine natural killer cells is altered in heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas Shivhare, Sourima; Bulmer, Judith N; Innes, Barbara A; Hapangama, Dharani K; Lash, Gendie E

    2015-11-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) affects 30% of women of reproductive age and significantly interferes with quality of life. Altered endometrial vascular maturation has been reported in HMB and recurrent miscarriage, the latter associated with increased uterine natural killer (uNK) cell numbers. This study compared endometrial leukocyte populations in controls and women with HMB. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded endometrial biopsies from controls (without endometrial pathology) and HMB were immunostained for CD14 (macrophages), CD56 (uNK cells), CD83 (dendritic cells), FOXP3 (regulatory T cells/Tregs), CD3 and CD8 (T cells). Leukocyte numbers were analysed as a percentage of total stromal cells in five randomly selected fields of view in the stratum functionalis of each sample. In control women across the menstrual cycle, 2-8% of total stromal cells were CD3(+) cells, 2-4% were CD8(+) T cells and 6-8% were CD14(+) macrophages. Compared with controls, CD3(+) cells were reduced during the mid-secretory phase (4%, P<0.01) and increased in the late secretory phase (12%, P=0.01) in HMB. CD83(+) dendritic cells and FOXP3(+) Tregs were scarce throughout the menstrual cycle in both groups. In controls, 2% of stromal cells in proliferative endometrium were CD56(+) uNK cells, increasing to 17% during the late secretory phase. In HMB, CD56(+) uNK cells were increased in the proliferative (5%, P<0.01) and early secretory (4%, P<0.02) phases, but reduced (10%, P<0.01) in the late secretory phase. This study demonstrates dysregulation of uNK cells in HMB, the functional consequence of which may have an impact on endometrial vascular development and/or endometrial preparation for menstruation.

  10. Naturally occurring and stress induced tubular structures from mammalian cells, a survival mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jian

    2007-08-01

    to stress conditions, like dehydration. The disintegrative, mobile, disruptive and ubiquitous nature of straw cells makes this a possible physiological process that may be involved in human health, longevity, and various types of diseases such as cancer.

  11. Nasal lavage natural killer cell function is suppressed in smokers after live attenuated influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Haibo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modified function of immune cells in nasal secretions may play a role in the enhanced susceptibility to respiratory viruses that is seen in smokers. Innate immune cells in nasal secretions have largely been characterized by cellular differentials using morphologic criteria alone, which have successfully identified neutrophils as a significant cell population within nasal lavage fluid (NLF cells. However, flow cytometry may be a superior method to fully characterize NLF immune cells. We therefore characterized immune cells in NLF by flow cytometry, determined the effects of live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV on NLF and peripheral blood immune cells, and compared responses in samples obtained from smokers and nonsmokers. Methods In a prospective observational study, we characterized immune cells in NLF of nonsmokers at baseline using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Nonsmokers and smokers were inoculated with LAIV on day 0 and serial nasal lavages were collected on days 1-4 and day 9 post-LAIV. LAIV-induced changes of NLF cells were characterized using flow cytometry. Cell-free NLF was analyzed for immune mediators by bioassay. Peripheral blood natural killer (NK cells from nonsmokers and smokers at baseline were stimulated in vitro with LAIV followed by flow cytometric and mediator analyses. Results CD45(+CD56(-CD16(+ neutrophils and CD45(+CD56(+ NK cells comprised median 4.62% (range 0.33-14.52 and 23.27% (18.29-33.97, respectively, of non-squamous NLF cells in nonsmokers at baseline. LAIV did not induce changes in total NK cell or neutrophil percentages in either nonsmokers or smokers. Following LAIV inoculation, CD16(+ NK cell percentages and granzyme B levels increased in nonsmokers, and these effects were suppressed in smokers. LAIV inoculation enhanced expression of activating receptor NKG2D and chemokine receptor CXCR3 on peripheral blood NK cells from both nonsmokers and smokers in vitro but did not induce

  12. Berberine inhibits growth, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells by regulating Cdki-Cdk-cyclin cascade, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantena, Sudheer K; Sharma, Som D; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2006-10-01

    Chemotherapeutic approach using non-toxic botanicals may be one of the strategies for the management of the skin cancers. Here we report that in vitro treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, decreased cell viability (3-77%, P berberine-induced G(1) cell cycle arrest was mediated through the increased expression of Cdki proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27), a simultaneous decrease in Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 and cyclins D1, D2 and E and enhanced binding of Cdki-Cdk. In additional studies, treatment of A431 cells with berberine (15-75 microM) for 72 h resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in apoptosis (31-60%, P berberine-treated control (11.7%), which was associated with an increased expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of caspases 9, 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) significantly blocked the berberine-induced apoptosis in A431 cells confirmed that berberine-induced apoptosis is mediated through activation of caspase 3-dependent pathway. Together, this study for the first time identified berberine as a chemotherapeutic agent against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells in vitro, further in vivo studies are required to determine whether berberine could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the management of non-melanoma skin cancers.

  13. Thymus medulla fosters generation of natural Treg cells, invariant γδ T cells, and invariant NKT cells: what we learn from intrathymic migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jennifer E; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2015-03-01

    The organization of the thymus into distinct cortical and medullary regions enables it to control the step-wise migration and development of immature T-cell precursors. Such a process provides access to specialized cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells at defined stages of maturation, ensuring the generation of self-tolerant and MHC-restricted conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) αβ T cells. The migratory cues and stromal cell requirements that regulate the development of conventional αβ T cells have been well studied. However, the thymus also fosters the generation of several immunoregulatory T-cell populations that form key components of both innate and adaptive immune responses. These include Foxp3(+) natural regulatory T cells, invariant γδ T cells, and CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). While less is known about the intrathymic requirements of these nonconventional T cells, recent studies have highlighted the importance of the thymus medulla in their development. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanisms controlling the intrathymic migration of distinct T-cell subsets, and relate this to knowledge of the microenvironmental requirements of these cells.

  14. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue are activated in lean mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Taisuke; Toyoshima, Yujiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues are closely connected with the immune system. It has been suggested that metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes, arteriosclerosis and liver steatosis can be attributed to adipose tissue inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration. To understand a physiological and pathological role of natural killer T (NKT) cells on inflammation in adipose tissue, we characterized a subset of NKT cells in abdominal and subcutaneous adipose tissues in C57BL/6J mice fed normal or high-fat diets. NKT cells comprised a larger portion of lymphocytes in adipose tissues compared with the spleen and peripheral blood, with epididymal adipose tissue having the highest number of NKT cells. Furthermore, some NKT cells in adipose tissues expressed higher levels of CD69 and intracellular interferon-γ, whereas the Vβ repertoires of NKT cells in adipose tissues were similar to other cells. In obese mice fed a high-fat diet, adipose tissue inflammation had little effect on the Vβ repertoire of NKT cells in epididymal adipose tissues. We speculate that the NKT cells in adipose tissues may form an equivalent subset in other tissues and that these subsets are likely to participate in adipose tissue inflammation. Additionally, the high expression level of CD69 and intracellular IFN-γ raises the possibility that NKT cells in adipose tissue may be stimulated by some physiological mechanism.

  15. Invariant natural killer T cells in adipose tissue: novel regulators of immune-mediated metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, M; Kalkhoven, E; Boes, M

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) represents a microenvironment where intersection takes place between immune processes and metabolic pathways. A variety of immune cells have been characterized in AT over the past decades, with the most recent addition of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. As members of the T cell family, iNKT cells represent a subset that exhibits both innate and adaptive characteristics and directs ensuing immune responses. In disease conditions, iNKT cells have established roles that include disorders in the autoimmune spectrum in malignancies and infectious diseases. Recent work supports a role for iNKT cells in the maintenance of AT homeostasis through both immune and metabolic pathways. The deficiency of iNKT cells can result in AT metabolic disruptions and insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent work on iNKT cells in immune regulation, with an emphasis on AT-resident iNKT cells, and identify the potential mechanisms by which adipocytes can mediate iNKT cell activity.

  16. Natural killer T cells in advanced melanoma patients treated with tremelimumab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Javier Ibarrondo

    Full Text Available A significant barrier to effective immune clearance of cancer is loss of antitumor cytotoxic T cell activity. Antibodies to block pro-apoptotic/downmodulatory signals to T cells are currently being tested. Because invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT can regulate the balance of Th1/Th2 cellular immune responses, we characterized the frequencies of circulating iNKT cell subsets in 21 patients with melanoma who received the anti-CTLA4 monoclonal antibody tremelimumab alone and 8 patients who received the antibody in combination with MART-126-35 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (MART-1/DC. Blood T cell phenotypes and functionality were characterized by flow cytometry before and after treatment. iNKT cells exhibited the central memory phenotype and showed polyfunctional cytokine production. In the combination treatment group, high frequencies of pro-inflammatory Th1 iNKT CD8(+ cells correlated with positive clinical responses. These results indicate that iNKT cells play a critical role in regulating effective antitumor T cell activity.

  17. Innate-like recognition of microbes by invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Kinjo, Yuki

    2009-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) express a restricted T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire and they respond rapidly to glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. These glycolipid antigens have hexose sugars in alpha-linkage to two types of lipids that can bind to CD1d. Recent work has shown that the responses of iNKT cells to antigen-bearing microbes can have a profound impact on the development of inflammatory diseases. iNKT cells overcome the limitation of their limited TCR diversity by also responding in a foreign antigen-independent fashion to some infectious agents, similar to NK cells. Recent results demonstrate several mechanisms for the indirect activation of iNKT cells by viruses or TLR ligands, dependent on self-antigen recognition and/or different cytokines produced by antigen presenting cells. The means by which iNKT cells influence other cell types and overall host defense are likewise diverse, illustrating the flexibility and functional diversity of this T lymphocyte sublineage.

  18. Regulation and antimetastatic functions of liver-associated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltrout, R H

    2000-04-01

    The liver is a complex organ composed of hepatic parenchymal cells and a variety of non-parenchymal cells that consist of endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, and several subsets of resident lymphocytes, including natural killer (NK), T, and NK1.1+/CD3+ (NK/T) cells. The regulation of these various lymphoid subpopulations and their relative contributions to antiviral, antitumor and pathogenic inflammatory responses in the liver remain topics of much interest. Studies from our laboratory have shown that various immune stimulants and cytokines can augment liver-associated NK activity at least partially through the mobilization of NK cells from the bone marrow to the liver. The mobilization process can be dependent on the induction of interferon (IFN)-gamma and/or tumor necrosis factor-alpha and on very late activation antigen-4/vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 interaction. The induction of IFN-gamma by cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-12 also rapidly triggers the induction of chemokine genes in parenchymal cells that may contribute to the localization of NK and T cells. Both IL-2 and IL-12 trigger changes in the number and functions of liver-associated leukocyte subsets, and induce antimetastatic effects that are likely mediated through several direct and indirect mechanisms. The overall goal of these studies is to understand the interactions and functions of liver-associated NK1.1+ cells in the context of innate and adaptive immune responses to neoplasia.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa eliminates natural killer cells via phagocytosis-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woong Chung

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA is an opportunistic pathogen that causes the relapse of illness in immunocompromised patients, leading to prolonged hospitalization, increased medical expense, and death. In this report, we show that PA invades natural killer (NK cells and induces phagocytosis-induced cell death (PICD of lymphocytes. In vivo tumor metastasis was augmented by PA infection, with a significant reduction in NK cell number. Adoptive transfer of NK cells mitigated PA-induced metastasis. Internalization of PA into NK cells was observed by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, PA invaded NK cells via phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activation, and the phagocytic event led to caspase 9-dependent apoptosis of NK cells. PA-mediated NK cell apoptosis was dependent on activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. These data suggest that the phagocytosis of PA by NK cells is a critical event that affects the relapse of diseases in immunocompromised patients, such as those with cancer, and provides important insights into the interactions between PA and NK cells.

  20. Dye-sensitized solar cells with natural dyes extracted from achiote seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ortiz, N.M.; Vazquez-Maldonado, I.A.; Azamar-Barrios, J.A.; Oskam, G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CINVESTAV-IPN, Merida, Yuc. 97310 (Mexico); Perez-Espadas, A.R.; Mena-Rejon, G.J. [Laboratorio de Quimica Organica de Investigacion, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Merida, Yuc. 97150 (Mexico)

    2010-01-15

    We have explored the application of natural dyes extracted from the seeds of the achiote shrub (Bixa orellana L.) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The main pigments are bixin and norbixin, which were obtained by separation and purification from the dark-red extract (annatto). The dyes were characterized using {sup 1}H-NMR, FTIR spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Solar cells were prepared using TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanostructured, mesoporous films and the annatto, bixin, and norbixin as sensitizers. The best results were obtained with bixin-sensitized TiO{sub 2} solar cells with efficiencies of up to 0.53%, illustrating the importance of purification of dyes from natural extracts. (author)

  1. A Single Subset of Dendritic Cells Controls the Cytokine Bias of Natural Killer T Cell Responses to Diverse Glycolipid Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O.A.; Saini, Neeraj K.; Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Goldberg, Michael F.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J.; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R.; Jervis, Peter J.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α+ DEC-205+ dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α+ dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:24412610

  2. A single subset of dendritic cells controls the cytokine bias of natural killer T cell responses to diverse glycolipid antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O A; Saini, Neeraj K; Kharkwal, Shalu S; Goldberg, Michael F; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R; Jervis, Peter J; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-16

    Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α(+) DEC-205(+) dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α(+) dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses.

  3. Genetic alterations in systemic nodal and extranodal non-cutaneous lymphomas derived from mature T cells and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Michela; Stathis, Anastasios; Zucca, Emanuele; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Mature (peripheral) T-cell and natural killer (NK)-cell lymphomas comprise a series of rather different neoplasms. Based on morphologic, immunophenotypic, genetic, and clinical data, the World Health Organization classification recognizes more than 20 entities or provisional entities. The variable clinical presentations, the objective recognition and pathological stratification, the difficulties regarding treatment, and the hardly predictable response to therapy indicate that the management of these entities requires novel tools. In contrast to B-cell lymphomas or precursor T-cell neoplasms, few recurrent translocations have been identified so far in T-cell non-Hodgkin's and NK-cell lymphomas. Additionally, some of the entities recognized by the World Health Organization classification are very rare and very scarce molecular data are available for T-cell lymphomas. Here, we have reviewed published reports focusing on the genetic lesions and gene expression profiling underlying systemic nodal and extranodal non-cutaneous mature T-cell and NK-cell lymphomas. We also provide a summary of new agents in clinical development and outline some future directions.

  4. Negative regulation of natural killer cell in tumor tissue and peripheral blood of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anupam; Banerjee, Arunabha; Saikia, Nabajyoti; Phookan, Jyotirmoy; Baruah, Munindra Narayan; Baruah, Shashi

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the key lymphocytes in solid tumors. Its activity is regulated by both germline encoded receptors and cytokine microenvironment. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the activation status of NK cell in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). NK cell activation was assessed in context of NK cell cytotoxicity and transcript expression of NK cell receptors (NKp46 and KIRs) and NK cell associated cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IL-12β, IL-15, IL-18, IL-21, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β). The results revealed possible mechanisms involved in reduced NK cell activation in peripheral circulation: quantitative deficiency of NK cell number and lowered cytotoxicity together with qualitative NK impairments caused by--(1) decreased expression of NK activating receptor NKp46, (2) increased expression of NK suppressive cytokines--IL-10 and TGF-β and (3) induction of FOXP3(+)CTLA4(+) suppressor cells. On the other hand, in the tumor tissue, escape of NK immune surveillance appeared to be modulated by upregulation of TGF-β and IL-10 together with downregulation of NK cell activating cytokines (IL-2, IL-12β, IL-15, IL-18, IL-21 and IFN-γ) and NK receptors (NKp46 and KIRs). In addition, our study supported the earlier contention that TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels may be used as markers of malignant transformation in oral leukoplakia. In conclusion, the study provided an insight into the negative regulation of NK cell in tumor tissue and peripheral blood of OSCC patients, which can be exploited to boost the current NK cell and cytokine based immunotherapy for the treatment of oral cancer.

  5. Wall extensibility: its nature, measurement and relationship to plant cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cells is controlled principally by processes that loosen the wall and enable it to expand irreversibly. The central role of wall relaxation for cell expansion is reviewed. The most common methods for assessing the extension properties of plant cell walls ( wall extensibility') are described, categorized and assessed critically. What emerges are three fundamentally different approaches which test growing cells for their ability (a) to enlarge at different values of turgor, (b) to induce wall relaxation, and (c) to deform elastically or plastically in response to an applied tensile force. Analogous methods with isolated walls are similarly reviewed. The results of these different assays are related to the nature of plant cell growth and pertinent biophysical theory. I argue that the extensibilities' measured by these assays are fundamentally different from one another and that some are more pertinent to growth than others.

  6. Invariant natural killer T cells as sensors and managers of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kaer, Luc; Parekh, Vrajesh V; Wu, Lan

    2013-02-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of innate-like lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens bound by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class-I-related protein CD1d. iNKT cells are activated early during a variety of infections and inflammatory diseases and contribute to the subsequent development of adaptive immune responses. Consequently, iNKT cells play a critical role in the development and resolution of inflammatory diseases and represent attractive targets for the development of immunotherapies. Recent studies have provided important insight into the mechanisms by which iNKT cells become activated in response to diverse inflammatory stimuli. These new findings should be instrumental to promote the immunomodulatory properties of iNKT cells for treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  7. Control of immune ligands by members of a cytomegalovirus gene expansion suppresses natural killer cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Ceri A; Weekes, Michael P; Nobre, Luis V; Ruckova, Eva; Wilkie, Gavin S; Paulo, Joao A; Chang, Chiwen; Suárez, Nicolás M; Davies, James A; Antrobus, Robin; Stanton, Richard J; Aicheler, Rebecca J; Nichols, Hester; Vojtesek, Borek; Trowsdale, John; Davison, Andrew J; Gygi, Steven P

    2017-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 family consists of ten sequentially arranged genes (US12-21) with poorly characterized function. We now identify novel natural killer (NK) cell evasion functions for four members: US12, US14, US18 and US20. Using a systematic multiplexed proteomics approach to quantify ~1300 cell surface and ~7200 whole cell proteins, we demonstrate that the US12 family selectively targets plasma membrane proteins and plays key roles in regulating NK ligands, adhesion molecules and cytokine receptors. US18 and US20 work in concert to suppress cell surface expression of the critical NKp30 ligand B7-H6 thus inhibiting NK cell activation. The US12 family is therefore identified as a major new hub of immune regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22206.001 PMID:28186488

  8. LiFePO 4/gel/natural graphite cells for the BATT program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striebel, K.; Guerfi, A.; Shim, J.; Armand, M.; Gauthier, M.; Zaghib, K.

    LiFePO 4/gel/natural graphite (NG) cells have been prepared and cycled under a fixed protocol for cycle and calendar life determination. Cell compression of 68 kPa was found to represent an optimal balance between cell impedance and the first cycle losses on the individual electrodes with the gel electrolyte. Cells with a Li anode showed capacities of 160 and 78 mAh/g LiFePO 4 for C/25 and 2 C discharge rates, respectively. Rapid capacity and power fade were observed in the LiFePO 4/gel/NG cells during cycling and calendar life studies. Diagnostic evaluations point to the consumption of cycleable Li though a side reaction as the reason for performance fade with minimal degradation of the individual electrodes.

  9. Natural Killer Cells in Human Cancer: From Biological Functions to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella Mariel Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are central components of the innate immunity. In murine models, it has been shown that NK cells can control both local tumor growth and metastasis due to their ability to exert direct cellular cytotoxicity without prior sensitization and to secrete immunostimulatory cytokines like IFN-γ. The latter participates in cancer elimination by inhibiting cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, promoting apoptosis, and stimulating the adaptive immune system, and it is instrumental for enhancing Ag processing and presentation. Nevertheless, NK cells display impaired functionality and capability to infiltrate tumors in cancer patients. Also, NK cells are feasible targets of stimulation to participate in immunotherapeutic approaches like antibody-based strategies and adoptive cell transfer. Thus, multiple attempts currently aim to manipulate NK for utilization in the immunotherapy of cancer.

  10. LiFePO{sub 4}/gel/natural graphite cells for the BATT program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Striebel, K.; Guerfi, A.; Shim, J.; Armand, M.; Gauthier, M.; Zaghib, K.

    2002-10-29

    LiFePO{sub 4}/gel/natural graphite (NG) cells have been prepared and cycled under a fixed protocol for cycle and calendar life determination. Cell compression of 10 psi was found to represent an optimal balance between cell impedance and the first cycle losses on the individual electrodes with the gel electrolyte. Cells with a Li anode showed capacities of 160 and 78 mAh/g-LiFePO{sub 4} for C/25 and 2C discharge rates, respectively. Rapid capacity and power fade were observed in the LiFePO{sub 4}/gel/NG cells during cycling and calendar life studies. Diagnostic evaluations point to the consumption of cycleable Li though a side reaction as the reason for performance fade with minimal degradation of the individual electrodes.

  11. Fetal liver cell transplantation : role and nature of the fetal haemopoietic stem cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractFetal liver cell transplantation deserves intensified interest because, according to previous experimental evidence, it may represent a useful approach to reduce or avoid severe Graft-versus-Host (GvH) reactions following treatment with allogeneic haemopoietic cell grafts. The applicatio

  12. Development of Antiatherosclerotic Drugs on the basis of Natural Products Using Cell Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Orekhov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis including its subclinical form is one of the key medical and social problems. At present, there is no therapy avail