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Sample records for anti-a murine monoclonal

  1. Heterohybridoma for the production of non murine monoclonal antibodies

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    Kh.Victoria Chanu and M. Ayub Ali

    Full Text Available Hybridoma technology described by kohler and Milstein produce only mouse immunoglobulins. Such immunoglobulins have limited use due to its negative side effects such as the recipient’s immune response. The production of a non murine monoclonal antibody to combat the problems of murine monoclonal antibody is again difficult due to the lack of a suitable myeloma cell line. Heterohybridoma formed by the fusion of lymphocyte of one species with the myeloma cell of a different species is the solution, which can be used for the production of non murine monoclonal antibodies. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(8.000: 390-392

  2. Purification of Murine Monoclonal IgM Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the purification of a monoclonal IgM antibody against human tumor associated antigen Lewis-Y by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to identify purified IgM antibody.In flow cytometry analysis, the purified IgM antibody recognizes human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 which expresses Lewis-Y antigen.This work presents a new way for the purification of murine monoclonal IgM antibody.

  3. Immunotherapy of hepatoma with a monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Hong Tan; Feng-Ying Huang; Hua Wang; Yong-Hao Huang; Ying-Ying Lin; Yue-Nan Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the capability of a monoclonal antibody(mAb) against murine endoglin to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and suppression of hepatoma growth in murine models.METHODS: A monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin was purified by affinity chromatography and passively transfused through tail veins in two murine hepatoma models. Tumor volume and survival time were observed at three-day intervals for 48 d. Microvessels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry against CD31, and angiogenesis in vivo was determined by alginate encapsulated assay. In addition, tumor cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Passive immunotherapy with anti-endoglin mAb could effectively suppress tumor growth, and prolonged the survival time of hepatoma-bearing mice.Angiogenesis was apparently inhibited within the tumor tissues, and the vascularization of alginate beads was also reduced in the mice passively transfused with antiendoglin mAb. In addition, increased apoptotic cells were observed within the tumor tissues from the mice passively transfused with anti-endoglin mAb.CONCLUSION: Passive immunotherapy with antiendoglin mAb effectively inhibits tumor growth via inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and increasing tumor cell apoptosis, which may be highly correlated with the blockage of endoglin-related signal pathway induced by anti-endoglin mAb.

  4. Production and Characterization of a Murine Monoclonal Antibody Against Human Ferritin

    OpenAIRE

    Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Yeganeh, Omid; Ghods, Roya; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ardekani, Reza Bahjati; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Haghighat-Noutash, Farzaneh; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    Background Ferritin is an iron storage protein, which plays a key role in iron metabolism. Measurement of ferritin level in serum is one of the most useful indicators of iron status and also a sensitive measurement of iron deficiency. Monoclonal antibodies may be useful as a tool in various aspects of ferritin investigations. In this paper, the production of a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human ferritin was reported. Methods Balb/c mice were immunized with purified human ferritin ...

  5. Monoclonal antibody to murine PECAM-1 (CD31) blocks acute inflammation in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    A murine model of peritonitis was used to test the role of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31) in acute inflammation. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for murine PECAM-1 injected intravenously 4 h before the intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate broth blocked leukocyte emigration into the peritoneal cavity for up to 48 h. This block was particularly evident for neutrophils. Control mAb, including one that bound to murine CD18 without blocking its function, f...

  6. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren;

    2005-01-01

    In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  7. Development of murine monoclonal antibodies for the immunohistochemical diagnosis of systemic bovine aspergillosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbaek, B.; Lind, Peter;

    1996-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against water-soluble somatic antigens (WSSA) and the wall fraction (WF) from Aspergillus fumigatus were produced by fusion of splenocytes from immunized BALB/c mice with mouse myeloma X63-Ag 8.653 cells. The supernatants of in vitro cultured hybridomas were...... techniques using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from experimentally infected mice. Because of a high immunohistochemical reactivity with homologous fungi, 4 MAbs raised against A. fumigatus WSSA and WF were selected for a further evaluation of cross-reactivity (diagnostic specificity......) in immunohistochemical and immunoblotting assays. In immunohistochemical assays, all MAbs raised against WSSA cross-reacted heavily with a number of other fungal species. All 4 MAbs (MAb-WF-AF-1-4) raised against the WF reacted strongly with hyphae of Aspergillus spp.; hyphae of Scedosporium apiospermum were also...

  8. In vivo tumor localization using tumor-specific monkey xenoantibody, alloantibody, and murine monoclonal xenoantibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific in vivo localization of antibodies reactive with human melanoma cell membrane tumor associated antigens (TAA) has been attempted using congenitally athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous human melanoma tumor xenografts as the experimental model. IgG fractions were prepared from each of several immune and control sera. Antimelanoma antibody sources included human alloantibody obtained from melanoma patients immunized against allogeneic melanoma cells, a monkey antiserum raised by immunization against a single human melanoma cell line, and a murine monoclonal antimelanoma antibody-secreting hybridoma cell line. Localization of these radiolabeled antibodies and of control IgG preparations to tumor tissue was determined by whole body scintigraphy and by differential tissue counting. Compared with the different control IgG preparations, each of the antimelanoma IgG preparations exhibited significant specific accumulation within the melanoma tissue. However, variation existed in the ability of each antimelanoma IgG to tumor preparation to localize despite attempts to control model parameters such as tumor source, in vivo passage number and mass. This variation appears to reflect basic biologic differences between tumors in different animals and possibly differences in the antigen-binding capacities of each IgG preparation following radioiodination. This technique for tumor localization is very promising and has obvious potential for clinical application

  9. Studies of a murine monoclonal antibody directed against DARC: reappraisal of its specificity.

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    Dorota Smolarek

    Full Text Available Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC plays multiple roles in human health as a blood group antigen, a receptor for chemokines and the only known receptor for Plasmodium vivax merozoites. It is the target of the murine anti-Fy6 monoclonal antibody 2C3 which binds to the first extracellular domain (ECD1, but exact nature of the recognized epitope was a subject of contradictory reports. Here, using a set of complex experiments which include expression of DARC with amino acid substitutions within the Fy6 epitope in E. coli and K562 cells, ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR and flow cytometry, we have resolved discrepancies between previously published reports and show that the basic epitope recognized by 2C3 antibody is 22FEDVW26, with 22F and 26W being the most important residues. In addition, we demonstrated that 30Y plays an auxiliary role in binding, particularly when the residue is sulfated. The STD-NMR studies performed using 2C3-derived Fab and synthetic peptide corroborated most of these results, and together with the molecular modelling suggested that 25V is not involved in direct interactions with the antibody, but determines folding of the epitope backbone.

  10. Cytotoxic murine monoclonal antibody LAM8 with specificity for human small cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, R A; O'Hara, C J; Mabry, M; Waibel, R; Sabbath, K; Speak, J A; Bernal, S D

    1986-04-01

    The reactivity of the murine immunoglobulin monoclonal antibody LAM8 directed against a membrane antigen of human small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung was investigated on human cell lines and tissues. Indirect immunofluorescence staining, radioimmunoassays, and cytotoxicity assays showed LAM8 antibody to selectively react with SCC but not with non-SCC lung cancer cell lines and extrapulmonary tumor cell lines. Unlike other SCC antibodies, including those we have previously described, highly preferential reactivity with SCC tissues was also demonstrated by immunoperoxidase staining of deparaffinized formalin-fixed tissue sections. Membrane and cytoplasmic staining was seen in of 9 of 12 SCC tissues. No significant staining was seen in non-SCC lung cancer and a wide range of other tumors, including mesothelioma and bronchial carcinoids. Significant LAM8 reactivity was also absent in normal tissues of all major organs. Few tumors and epithelial tissues, including bronchial epithelium had rare LAM8 positive cells which were always less than 2% of the entire cell population. In vitro treatment with antibody and human complement was highly cytotoxic to SCC cells, but had not effect on bone marrow progenitor cells. Immunoblotting of membrane extracts separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels showed the LAM8 antigen to have a band of an approximate molecular weight of 135,000 and a cluster of bands with approximate molecular weights of 90,000. This reactivity was lost after incubation of the extracts with periodate. LAM8 antibody shows a highly preferential reactivity with SCC cell lines and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded SCC tissues and is selectively cytotoxic to cells expressing LAM8 antigen.

  11. Evaluation of hollow fiber and mini perm bioreactors as an alternative to murine ascites for small scale monoclonal antibody production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to compare monoclonal antibody production in hollow fiber, mini perm bioreactor systems and murine ascites to determine the feasibility of the bioreactor system as a potential alternative to the use of mice. One hybridoma cell line was grown in hollow fiber, mini perm bioreactor systems and in groups of 5 mice. Mice were primed with 0.5 ml pristane intraperitoneally 14 days prior to inoculation of 1x107 hybridoma cells. Each mouse was tapped a maximum of three times for collection of ascites. Bioreactors were harvested three times weekly for 30 days and were monitored by cell counts, cell viability and media consumption. Time and materials logs were maintained. The total quantity of monoclonal antibody produced in 5 mice versus the total production for the two different bioreactors (hollow fiber and mini perm) in 30 days was as follows: cell line 2AC10E6C7 produce 158 mg vs.97.5 mg, vs 21.54 mg respectively. Mean monoclonal antibody concentration ranged from 4.07 to 8.37 mg/ml in murine ascites, from 0.71 to 3.8 mg/ml in hollow fiber bioreactor system, and from 0.035 to 1.06 in mini perm. Although time and material costs were generally greater for the bioreactors, these results suggest that hollow fiber and mini perm bioreactor systems merit further investigations as potentially viable in vitro alternatives to the use of mice for small scale (<1mg) monoclonal antibody production.(Author)

  12. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovar...

  13. In vitro and in vivo behavior of radiolabeled chimeric anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody: Comparison with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutant version of the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFRvIII has been found on gliomas and other tumors, but not on normal tissues. Radioiodinated murine (mu) L8A4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) specifically targets EGFRvIII xenografts in vivo when labeled using N-succinimidyl 5-iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate (SIPC). A chimeric (ch) MAb consisting of the variable region of muL8A4 and the constant domains of human IgG2 has been developed that has an affinity and radioiodinated immunoreactive fraction comparable to muL8A4. In vitro, both MAbs were internalized and processed by EGFRvIII expressing cell lines (U87MGΔEGFR or NR6M) at similar rates (maximum intracellular retention, 35-40%). In paired-label tissue distribution studies in athymic mice bearing U87MGΔEGFR tumor xenografts, the ch:mu L8A4 uptake ratio in normal tissues rose to greater than 2:1, whereas in tumor, the ratio remained 1:1 throughout the experiment. These results indicate that chL8A4 exhibits similar binding and internalization properties as its murine parent, but suggest different intracellular processing and/or deposition of catabolites in normal tissues for chL8A4

  14. Polymerase chain reaction facilitates the cloning, CDR-grafting, and rapid expression of a murine monoclonal antibody directed against the CD18 component of leukocyte integrins.

    OpenAIRE

    Daugherty, B L; DeMartino, J A; Law, M F; Kawka, D W; Singer, I I; Mark, G E

    1991-01-01

    Two novel approaches of recombinant PCR technology were employed to graft the complementarity determining regions from a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) onto human antibody frameworks. One approach relied on the availability of cloned human variable region templates, whereas the other strategy was dependent only on human variable region protein sequence data. The transient expression of recombinant humanized antibody was driven by the adenovirus major late promoter and was detected 48 hrs po...

  15. Generation of a murine monoclonal antibody to capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella Typhi

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    Fátima Reyes-López

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The conventional hybridoma technology has enabled the development of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs against many antigens. Mabs have several applications in the field of basic research, diagnosis, immunotherapy and vaccine manufacturing processes. Mabs-producing hybridomas against the capsular polysaccharide from Salmonella Typhi were obtained, after intraperitoneal immunization of BALB/c mice with 10 µg of capsular polysaccharide Vi conjugated to diphtheria toxoid, and subsequent fusion of lymphocytes isolated of the spleen and myeloma cells SP2/O. A Mab was selected, partially characterized, and named as 4G3E11. The isotype of this Mab was IgG1. It was proved by means of a sandwich ELISA that the 4G3E11 Mab reacts with different concentrations of polysaccharide in samples of the vax-TyVi® vaccine. The Mab obtained in this research could be useful as reagent for the detection and quantitation of polysaccharide Vi in typhoid vaccines.

  16. Immunoradiometric assay for the detection of circulating antibodies to murine monoclonal antibodies in humans (HAMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing clinical use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) has focussed attention on the importance of the generation of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA). HAMA can not only be life threatening but can also be associated with reduced image quality and accelerated MAb clearance in vivo as well as interfere with in vitro MAb based assays. The development of a two step immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for detecting circulating HAMA is reported. Preliminary results have been generated with specific MAb coated polystyrene wells. The appropriately diluted serum sample is first incubated with the MAb coated wells followed by a wash step and a second incubation with 125I labeled goat anti-human IgG. After a final wash, the wells are assayed for 125I and the results expressed as percent of the input bound. The prototype assay is compared with an existing commercially available ELISA kit using patient sera obtained at various time periods up to 7 months after IV MAb injection for radioimmunoscintigraphy. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  17. Localization of radiolabeled anti-DNA monoclonal antibodies in murine systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

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    Wahl, R.; Hahn, B.; Ebling, F.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of SLE can be extremely difficult. This multi-system disease is characterized by the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA antibody (Ab) complexes in many tissues, producing glomerulonephritis and systemic vasculitis. This study evaluates an IGG monoclonal (Mo) Ab directe3d against DNA (MrSSl) for potential radioimmunodiagnosis of SLE. Six 15 wk. old F-1 female hybrids of NZB+NZW mice (an animal SLE model that develops vasculitis and nephritis) were injected with 50 ..mu..Cl of I-131 MrSSl and 15 ..mu..Cl of I-125 isotype-matched control mouse myeloma (LPC-1) (non-reactive with DNA). Imaging and tissue distribution were studied. Two animals were also imaged using I-131 LPC Ab. Images at 2 and 9 days showed no clear differences in scan patterns using MrSSl or LPC-1 Ab. Tissue distribution studies at six days, however, showed a significantly higher accumulation of MrSSl in the kidneys vs. control Ab (2.7% vs. 1.8% of injected dose) (p < .04). Similarly, higher levels of MrSS were also seen in the spleen, liver and lungs (p < .03). Blood levels tended to be higher with the specific antibody as well. These differences were not apparent at 3 days post injection. The increased concentration of MrSSl present at 9 days in several organs may be secondary to MrSSl binding to DNA containing immune complexes present in diseased tissues. Blocked clearance by immune complexes or DNA, or differences in electrical charges of the antibodies could be contributing to the higher MrSSl levels seen. Images did not suggest deiodination as responsible. Further studies are necessary to determine if the amount of MrSSl retained by diseased animals is indicative of SLE disease activity.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

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    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  19. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sture Lindegren

    Full Text Available The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics.

  20. COMPARISON OF FOUR METHODS TO GENERATE IMMUNOREACTIVE FRAGMENTS OF A MURINE MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY OC859 AGAINST HUMAN OVARIAN EPITHELIAL CANCER ANTIGEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹颖; 卞美璐; 杨子义; 连利娟; 刘文淑; 许秀英

    1995-01-01

    In the present study,four different proteases (pepsin,papain,bromelain and ficin) were screened with a murine monoclonal antibody OC859,in order to verify whether different digestion procedures could improve yield and stability of the F(ab')2 or Fab fragments.The yields of F(ab')2 or Fab fragments from digestion with pepsin,papain,bromelain and ficin were respectively 20.3+/-2.0%,50.5%+/-5.0%,74.4+/-2.7% and 82.8+/-10.2% of the theoretical maximum.Immunoreactivity in a noncompetitive solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) of the fragments generated by the four proteases were respectively 10+/-5%,36+/-5%,60+/-6% and 75+/-6% of the intact OC859 IgG.These results suggested that the fragmentation of OC859 with ficin gave a higher yield of superior immunoreactive fragments.

  1. A humanised murine monoclonal antibody protects mice from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Everglades virus and Mucambo virus when administered up to 48 h after airborne challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently there are no licensed antiviral treatments for the Alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades virus and Mucambo virus. We previously developed a humanised version of the mouse monoclonal antibody 1A3B-7 (Hu1A3B-7) which exhibited a wide range of reactivity in vitro and was able to protect mice from infection with VEEV. Continued work with the humanised antibody has now demonstrated that it has the potential to be a new human therapeutic. Hu1A3B-7 successfully protected mice from infection with multiple Alphaviruses. The effectiveness of the humanisation process was determined by assessing proliferation responses in human T-cells to peptides derived from the murine and humanised versions of the VH and VL domains. This analysis showed that the number of human T-cell epitopes within the humanised antibody had been substantially reduced, indicating that Hu1A3B-7 may have reduced immunogenicity in vivo.

  2. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody T1h and variant anti-CD6 murine 10D12 in healthy animals and in experimental arthritis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic of two radio labeled monoclonal antibodies was performed with the help of imaging techniques. Isotopic labeling was carried out by means of standardized methods. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was performed using the population approach and sparse data design. Introduction: Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is an efficient option for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Th1 is a MAb anti human CD6 developed for the treatment of autoimmune disease and 10D12 is its counterpart anti murine CD6 developed as a pharmacological tool to get deep into the response mechanisms in animals models of rheumatoid arthritis.To investigate the behavior of both antibodies in the assay system, molecules were labeled with 125I to evaluate pharmacokinetic in healthy animals and with 99mTc to evaluate the antibody uptake in inflamed area of induced arthritis. Materials and methods: Antibodies were supplied by the Center of Molecular immunology. Iodination was performed by the iodogen method and technetium labeling was carried out directly by Schwarz method. Female C57BL6 from CENPALAB were used for experiments. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic was performed by a sparse data design using the population approach. Uptake in region of inflammation was quantified by gammagraphy at the same time points of blood sampling. A compartmental model was build to quantify uptake kinetic. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed using MONOLIX software version 4.2. Results: Minor pharmacokinetic differences were found between monoclonal antibodies labeled with 125I and 99mTc. As a humanized antibody, T1h shows a faster clearance than 10D12 and a biodistribution pattern reflecting preference for excretion mechanisms. The arthritis accumulation was not consistent with a targeted mediated uptake. On the other hand, radio labeled 10D12 shows an accumulation profile in arthritis with two peaks of maximum concentration representing an initial transit to

  3. Development and characterization of murine monoclonal antibody specific for the P1.4 PorA proteins from strain B:4:P1.(7b.4. of Neisseria meningitidis

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    María Elena Pérez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis isolates are conventionally classified by serosubtyping that characterizes the reactivities of the PorA outer membrane protein variable-region epitopes with monoclonal antibodies. Porins are outer membrane proteins (OMPs of N. meningitidis serogroup B and have attracted study principally for two reasons: their use in the classification of meningococcal isolates into serotype and subtype and as potential components of vaccines against this important pathogen. New murine hybridomas, secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against PorA serotype P1.4 of N. meningitidis serogroup B, were generated using conventional hybridoma procedures. The monoclonal antibodies obtained were characterized by Western blot and whole cell ELISA, using reference strains from different N. meningitidis serotypes and subtypes. All monoclonal antibodies belong to isotype IgG1. Others hybridomas producing MAbs against PorB and FrpB were also obtained.

  4. Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Detection and Quantification Using a Murine Monoclonal Antibody-Based Direct Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changqi; Chhabra, Guneet S; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2015-10-21

    A commercially available direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (BioFront Technologies, Tallahassee, FL, USA) using murine anti-pistachio monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as capture and detection antibodies was evaluated. The assay was sensitive (limit of detection = 0.09 ± 0.02 ppm full fat pistachio, linear detection range = 0.5-36 ppm, 50% maximum signal concentration = 7.9 ± 0.7 ppm), reproducible (intra- and inter-assay variability pistachio seeds subjected to autoclaving (121 °C, 15 psi, 15, 30 min), blanching (100 °C, 5, 10 min), frying (191 °C, 1 min), microwaving (500, 1000 W, 3 min), and dry roasting (140 °C, 30 min; 168 °C, 12 min). No cross-reactivity was observed in 156 food matrices, each tested at 100,000 ppm, suggesting the ELISA to be pistachio specific. The pistachio recovery ranges for spiked (10 ppm) and incurred (10-50000 ppm) food matrices were 93.1-125.6% and 35.7-112.2%, respectively. The assay did not register any false-positive or -negative results among the tested commercial and laboratory prepared samples.

  5. A humanised murine monoclonal antibody protects mice from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Everglades virus and Mucambo virus when administered up to 48 h after airborne challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Lyn M., E-mail: lmobrien@dstl.gov.uk; Goodchild, Sarah A.; Phillpotts, Robert J.; Perkins, Stuart D.

    2012-05-10

    Currently there are no licensed antiviral treatments for the Alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades virus and Mucambo virus. We previously developed a humanised version of the mouse monoclonal antibody 1A3B-7 (Hu1A3B-7) which exhibited a wide range of reactivity in vitro and was able to protect mice from infection with VEEV. Continued work with the humanised antibody has now demonstrated that it has the potential to be a new human therapeutic. Hu1A3B-7 successfully protected mice from infection with multiple Alphaviruses. The effectiveness of the humanisation process was determined by assessing proliferation responses in human T-cells to peptides derived from the murine and humanised versions of the V{sub H} and V{sub L} domains. This analysis showed that the number of human T-cell epitopes within the humanised antibody had been substantially reduced, indicating that Hu1A3B-7 may have reduced immunogenicity in vivo.

  6. Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Detection and Quantification Using a Murine Monoclonal Antibody-Based Direct Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changqi; Chhabra, Guneet S; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2015-10-21

    A commercially available direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (BioFront Technologies, Tallahassee, FL, USA) using murine anti-pistachio monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as capture and detection antibodies was evaluated. The assay was sensitive (limit of detection = 0.09 ± 0.02 ppm full fat pistachio, linear detection range = 0.5-36 ppm, 50% maximum signal concentration = 7.9 ± 0.7 ppm), reproducible (intra- and inter-assay variability < 24% CV), and rapid (post-extraction testing time ∼ 1.5 h). The target antigen was stable and detectable in whole pistachio seeds subjected to autoclaving (121 °C, 15 psi, 15, 30 min), blanching (100 °C, 5, 10 min), frying (191 °C, 1 min), microwaving (500, 1000 W, 3 min), and dry roasting (140 °C, 30 min; 168 °C, 12 min). No cross-reactivity was observed in 156 food matrices, each tested at 100,000 ppm, suggesting the ELISA to be pistachio specific. The pistachio recovery ranges for spiked (10 ppm) and incurred (10-50000 ppm) food matrices were 93.1-125.6% and 35.7-112.2%, respectively. The assay did not register any false-positive or -negative results among the tested commercial and laboratory prepared samples. PMID:26416205

  7. Discrimination of different forms of the murine urokinase plasminogen activator receptor on the cell surface using monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, M.G.; Pass, J.; Illemann, M.;

    2008-01-01

    of saturation with the amino-terminal fragment of uPA, ATF. However, the signal intensity obtained using another uPAR domain I specific mAb, mR1, was significantly reduced upon ATF saturation. Furthermore, when adding ATF, mR4 selectively stained the cleaved receptor. Applying these newly generated mAbs, we...... and pathological extracellular tissue remodelling processes. uPA can also cleave uPAR, resulting in liberation of the amino-terminal domain I, which encompasses binding sites for both uPA and the adhesion molecule, vitronectin. In order to localise the different uPAR forms on the plasma membrane of murine monocyte...

  8. The role of antigen specificity in the binding of murine monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies to microparticles from apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Marion, Tony N; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and markers of underlying immune system disturbances. These antibodies bind to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, mediating pathogenesis by forming immune complexes. As shown recently, DNA in blood exists in both free and particulate forms, with DNA representing an important component of microparticles. Microparticles are membrane-bound vesicles containing nuclear molecules, released by membrane blebbing during cell death and activation. A panel of monoclonal NZB/NZW F1 anti-DNA antibodies was tested for binding to microparticles generated from apoptotic THP-1 and Jurkat cells. These studies showed that only certain anti-DNA antibodies in the panel, specific for double-stranded DNA, bound to microparticles. Binding to particles was reduced by soluble DNA or DNase treatment. Together, these results indicate that particle binding is a feature of only certain anti-DNA antibodies, reflecting immunochemical properties of the antibodies and the nature of the exposed DNA antigens.

  9. A Novel Murine Anti-Lactoferrin Monoclonal Antibody Activates Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes through Membrane-Bound Lactoferrin and TLR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Min Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble lactoferrin (LTF is a versatile molecule that not only regulates the iron homeostasis, but also harbors direct microbicidal and immunomodulating abilities in mammalian body fluids. In contrast, little is known about the function of membrane-bound LTF (mbLTF, although its expression on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (huPMNs has been reported for decades. Given that LTF/anti-LTF antibodies represent a potential diagnostic/prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in patients with immune disorders, we wished, in the present study, to generate a novel human LTF- (huLTF- specific mAb suitable for detailed analyses on the expression and function of mbLTF as well as for deciphering the underlying mechanisms. By using the traditional hybridoma cell fusion technology, we obtained a murine IgG1 (kappa mAb, M-860, against huLTF. M-860 recognizes a conformational epitope of huLTF as it binds to natural, but not denatured, huLTF in ELISA. Moreover, M-860 detects mbLTF by FACS and captures endogenous huLTF in total cell lysates of huPMNs. Functionally, M-860 induces the activation of huPMNs partially through TLR4 but independently of phagocytosis. M-860 is thus a powerful tool to analyze the expression and function of human mbLTF, which will further our understanding of the roles of LTF in health and disease.

  10. A single dose of neuron-binding human monoclonal antibody improves spontaneous activity in a murine model of demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Denic

    Full Text Available Our laboratory demonstrated that a natural human serum antibody, sHIgM12, binds to neurons in vitro and promotes neurite outgrowth. We generated a recombinant form, rHIgM12, with identical properties. Intracerebral infection with Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV of susceptible mouse strains results in chronic demyelinating disease with progressive axonal loss and neurologic dysfunction similar to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. To study the effects of rHIgM12 on the motor function of TMEV-infected mice, we monitored spontaneous nocturnal activity over many weeks. Nocturnal behavior is a sensitive measure of rodent neurologic function because maximal activity changes are expected to occur during the normally active night time monitoring period. Mice were placed in activity boxes eight days prior to treatment to collect baseline spontaneous activity. After treatment, activity in each group was continuously recorded over 8 weeks. We chose a long 8-week monitoring period for two reasons: (1 we previously demonstrated that IgM induced remyelination is present by 5 weeks post treatment, and (2 TMEV-induced demyelinating disease in this strain progresses very slowly. Due to the long observation periods and large data sets, differences among treatment groups may be difficult to appreciate studying the original unfiltered recordings. To clearly delineate changes in the highly fluctuating original data we applied three different methods: (1 binning, (2 application of Gaussian low-pass filters (GF and (3 polynomial fitting. Using each of the three methods we showed that compared to control IgM and saline, early treatment with rHIgM12 induced improvement in both horizontal and vertical motor function, whereas later treatment improved only horizontal activity. rHIgM12 did not alter activity of normal, uninfected mice. This study supports the hypothesis that treatment with a neuron-binding IgM not only protects neurons in vitro, but

  11. Characterization of the tumor marker muc16 (ca125 expressed by murine ovarian tumor cell lines and identification of a panel of cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies

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    Goodell Cara AR

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives The ovarian tumor marker CA125 is expressed on human MUC16, a cell surface bound mucin that is also shed by proteolytic cleavage. Human MUC16 is overexpressed by ovarian cancer cells. MUC16 facilitates the binding of ovarian tumor cells to mesothelial cells lining the peritoneal cavity. Additionally, MUC16 also is a potent inhibitor of natural killer cell mediated anti-tumor cytotoxic responses. Extensive studies using human as well as murine ovarian tumor cell models are required to clearly define the function of MUC16 in the progression of ovarian tumors. The major objective of this study was to determine if the murine ovarian tumor cells, MOVCAR, express Muc16 and to characterize antibodies that recognize this mucin. Methods RT-PCR analysis was used for detecting the Muc16 message and size exclusion column chromatography for isolating Muc16 produced by MOVCAR cells. Soluble and cell-associated murine Muc16 were analyzed, respectively, by Western blotting and flow cytometry assays using a new panel of antibodies. The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides on murine Muc16 was determined by ConA chromatography. Results We demonstrate that murine Muc16 is expressed by mouse ovarian cancer cells as an ~250 kDa glycoprotein that carries both O-linked and N-linked oligosaccharides. In contrast to human MUC16, the murine ortholog is primarily released from the cells and cannot be detected on the cell surface. Since the released murine Muc16 is not detected by conventional anti-CA125 assays, we have for the first time identified a panel of anti-human MUC16 antibodies that also recognizes the murine counterpart. Conclusion The antibodies identified in this study can be used in future purification of murine Muc16 and exhaustive study of its properties. Furthermore, the initial identification and characterization of murine Muc16 is a vital preliminary step in the development of effective murine models of human ovarian cancer. These

  12. Systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated tumoricidal effects by intratumoral treatment of oncolytic herpes simplex virus with the agonistic monoclonal antibody for murine glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor.

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    Mikiya Ishihara

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy combined with immunomodulators is a novel noninvasive strategy for cancer treatment. In this study, we examined the tumoricidal effects of oncolytic HF10, a naturally occurring mutant of herpes simplex virus type-1, combined with an agonistic DTA-1 monoclonal antibody specific for the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor. Two murine tumor models were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacies of HF10 virotherapy combined with DTA-1. The kinetics and immunological mechanisms of DTA-1 in HF10 infection were examined using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Intratumoral administration of HF10 in combination with DTA-1 at a low dose resulted in a more vigorous attenuation of growth of the untreated contralateral as well as the treated tumors than treatment with either HF10 or DTA-1 alone. An accumulation of CD8(+ T cells, including tumor- and herpes simplex virus type-1-specific populations, and a decrease in the number of CD4(+ Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells were seen in both HF10- and DTA-1-treated tumors. Studies using Fc-digested DTA-1 and Fcγ receptor knockout mice demonstrated the direct participation of DTA-1 in regulatory T cell depletion by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity primarily via macrophages. These results indicated the potential therapeutic efficacy of a glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-specific monoclonal antibody in oncolytic virotherapy at local tumor sites.

  13. Interference in a CA 125 assay by human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) in patients imaged with the murine monoclonal antibody OC 125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearance of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) in the sera of patients after injection of MAb OC 125 was evaluated in 11 adenocarcinoma patients (10 ovarian and 1 fallopian tube) who received 1 mg of 131I labeled OC 125 F(ab')2 for immunoscintigraphy. HAMA levels were determined using a two step immunoradiometric assay (Biomira) employing OC 125 (F(ab')2 coated wells and 125I labeled goat anti-human IgG. CA 125 levels were also assessed and were measured using the ELSA CA 125 assay (ID-CIS, Dreieich, West Germany). In four of these 11 patients, a second injection of OC 125 was performed due to suspicion of recurrent disease. Thereafter a significant rise in HAMA levels corresponded with a sudden increase in CA 125 serum levels was recorded. In addition, it is mentioned that other serum assays (FSH, LH) performed at the same time, using kits based on murine MAb, demonstrated a similar effect. It was concluded that these increases were caused by interference of HAMA with the murine MAb. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  14. Selective cytotoxicity of murine monoclonal antibody LAM2 against human small-cell carcinoma in the presence of human complement: possible use for in vitro elimination of tumor cells from bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, R A; Mabry, M; Sabbath, K; Speak, J A; Bernal, S D

    1985-05-15

    LAM2 is a murine IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb) which binds strongly to the cell membrane of human lung small-cell carcinoma (SCC) and squamous-cell carcinoma but not to normal bone-marrow cells. The cytotoxicity of this antibody in the presence of human complement was investigated in vitro by chromium release and clonogenic assays. The optimal treatment conditions included incubation with antibody for 30 min at 37 degrees C followed by 3 additions of human complement 30 min apart. Cell lysis ranged from 94 to 98% in 4 SCC cell lines at antibody dilutions of 1:100: a lower level of lysis (60%) occurred in a lung squamous-cell carcinoma cell line. The cytotoxic effect was strictly complement-dependent. No cytotoxic effect was seen with other human cell lines including lung adenocarcinoma, lung large-cell carcinoma, myeloid leukemia, and lymphoblastic leukemia. No lysis was seen with nucleated marrow cells from healthy volunteers. Normal marrow cells in excess did not inhibit SCC cell lysis. Incubation with antibody and complement resulted in a 100-fold reduction of colony formation of SCC cells, but did not reduce the number of colonies of marrow-cell precursors, including CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, and CFU-C. The selective cytotoxicity of LAM2 antibody to SCC, but not to normal bone-marrow cells, suggests that this antibody may be useful for the in vitro elimination of SCC cells from the bone marrow.

  15. Production and characterization of a murine monoclonal IgM antibody to human C1q receptor (C1qR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybridoma cell line that produces a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to cell surface C1q receptor (C1qr) has been produced by fusion of the P3 x 63-Ag8.653 mouse myeloma cell line with the spleen cells of a CD-1 mouse that had been hyperimmunized with viable Raji cell suspensions (5 x 107 cells/inoculum). This MAb, designated II1/D1, is an IgM antibody with lambda-light chain specificity. Radiolabeled or unlabeled, highly purified II1/D1 was used to determine that: a) this antibody competes for C1q binding sites on C1qR-bearing cells; b) the molecule recognized by this MAb is the C1qR; and c) cells that are known to bind C1q also bind II1/D1 in a specific manner. Western blot analysis of solubilized Raji, or U937 cell membranes, showed that the 125I-MAb detected a major protein band of approximately 85000 m.w. in its unreduced state, indicating that the C1qR is similar, if not identical, in both types of cells. Analyses of 125I-II/D1 binding experiments revealed that the antibody bound to Raji cells or u937 cells in a specific manner. Uptake of the antibody was saturable, with equilibrium virtually attained within 35 min. Scatchard analysis of the binding data using the intact MAb suggests that the affinity constant K/sub D/ is 2.9 x 10-10 M, and at apparent saturation, 24.6 ng of the antibody were bound per 2 x 106 cells, giving an estimated 7.8 x 103 antibody molecules bound per cell. That the II1/D1 antibody is specifically directed to the C1q was further evidenced by an ELISA in which the ability of C1qR-bearing cells to bind the MAb was abrogated by c-C1q in a specific dose-dependent manner

  16. In vitro characterization of an iodine-125 labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor murine monoclonal antibody (MAB-425) in human high grade glioma cells: Binding, uptake, transport and localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine intracellular accumulation and possible nuclear translocation of 125I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 425 in human high grade glioma cells following internalization of this antibody, a prerequisite for the induction of radiotoxic effects. Four human high grade glioma cell lines known to express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and a colorectal carcinoma cell line with negligible EGF-R expression were incubated for various time periods with a saturating concentration of 125I-MAb 425. No measurable intranuclear uptake of radioactivity was detected within an incubation period of less than 6 hr. After an incubation of 24-28 hr, only 0.5-2% of the internalized radioactivity was detected in the nuclear fraction. It may be possible to inhibit 125I-MAb 425 degradation with the addition of chloroquine. Overall, the data indicate that the major portion of the 125I-MAb 425 is degraded following internalization. Inhibition of lysosomal activity results in a significant increase in intracellular, but more importantly, intranuclear accumulation of 125I-MAb 425. Since radioactivity is released from the glioma cells following 125I-MAb 425 internalization, discontinuous gel electrophoresis was performed to determine the nature of the released cell products. The cell supernatants were examined at 0, 24 and 48 hr post incubation to determine the nature of any cell-associated radioactivity released from the cell surface or interior. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 167 kDa was detected in all cell supernatants. Parallel electrophoretic gels were processed for autoradiographic studies in order to indicate corresponding radioactive components. In addition, immunostaining by Western blot with peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse antibody was performed to confirm the antibody nature of the protein bands

  17. In vitro characterization of an iodine-125 labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor murine monoclonal antibody (MAB-425) in human high grade glioma cells: Binding, uptake, transport and localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrich, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine intracellular accumulation and possible nuclear translocation of [sup 125]I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 425 in human high grade glioma cells following internalization of this antibody, a prerequisite for the induction of radiotoxic effects. Four human high grade glioma cell lines known to express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and a colorectal carcinoma cell line with negligible EGF-R expression were incubated for various time periods with a saturating concentration of [sup 125]I-MAb 425. No measurable intranuclear uptake of radioactivity was detected within an incubation period of less than 6 hr. After an incubation of 24-28 hr, only 0.5-2% of the internalized radioactivity was detected in the nuclear fraction. It may be possible to inhibit [sup 125]I-MAb 425 degradation with the addition of chloroquine. Overall, the data indicate that the major portion of the [sup 125]I-MAb 425 is degraded following internalization. Inhibition of lysosomal activity results in a significant increase in intracellular, but more importantly, intranuclear accumulation of [sup 125]I-MAb 425. Since radioactivity is released from the glioma cells following [sup 125]I-MAb 425 internalization, discontinuous gel electrophoresis was performed to determine the nature of the released cell products. The cell supernatants were examined at 0, 24 and 48 hr post incubation to determine the nature of any cell-associated radioactivity released from the cell surface or interior. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 167 kDa was detected in all cell supernatants. Parallel electrophoretic gels were processed for autoradiographic studies in order to indicate corresponding radioactive components. In addition, immunostaining by Western blot with peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse antibody was performed to confirm the antibody nature of the protein bands.

  18. Obtenção e caracterização de anticorpo monoclonal murino anti-fator VIII da coagulação sangüínea Attainment and characterization of murine monoclonal anti-factor VIII antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Rossi-Ferreira

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Entre os avanços da engenharia celular e biotecnologia nas últimas décadas, destaca-se a produção de anticorpos monoclonais murinos (AcMm utilizados no aprimoramento diagnóstico nas rotinas laboratoriais. A produção de fator VIII de alta pureza sempre foi o desejo e a preocupação das indústrias de hemoderivados para tratamento de pacientes portadores de hemofilia A, porém este produto inexiste no Brasil, sendo necessária sua obtenção no mercado internacional a custos elevados. O trabalho tem por objetivo a produção de AcMm anti-fator VIII humano (FVIII H através da expansão dos clones e caracterização imunoquímica do anticorpo. Camundongos Balb/c foram imunizados com FVIII H purificado como também proveniente de crioprecipitado e as células esplênicas dos animais foram fusionadas com células mielomatosas murinas segundo o método descrito por Kohler e Milstein para produção de híbridos em cultura. Foram testados 1.983 híbridos dos quais 105 foram submetidos à clonagem. Destes, 39 obtiveram monoclonalidade e 7 destes clones foram caracterizados através de técnicas de immunoblotting. Foram submetidas à purificação por cromatografia três imunoglobulinas de diferentes classes pertencentes aos clones LAMB1-10A1A4, LAMB1-17A1A1 e LAMB1-24A2A1. A imunoglobulina purificada pertencente ao clone LAMB1-10A1A4 foi adsorvida em coluna de imunoafinidade para purificação de concentrado de FVIII proveniente de crioprecipitado plasmático.Among the advances in cellular engineering and biotechnology over the last decades, the production of murine monoclonal antibodies (AcMm, used to improve laboratory diagnoses, stands out. The production of very pure factor VIII has always been a concern of suppliers of blood products to treat patients with hemophilia A and this product is still not produced in Brazil. Hence, it can only be attained on the international market at a high cost. The aim of this work was to produce AcMm anti

  19. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Veterinary Parasitology

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    Gupta A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein in 1975, heralded a new era in antibody research. Mouse hybridomas were the first reliable source of monoclonal antibodies. The generation of monoclonal antibodies from species other than rats and mice, has developed slowly over the last 30 years. The advent of antibody engineering and realization of the advantages of non murine antibodies has increased their relevance recently. However, in the area of veterinary parasitology, monoclonal antibodies are just beginning to fulfill the promises inherent in their great specificity for recognizing and selectively binding to antigens. This review describes the recent advances in the application of monoclonal antibodies for immunodiagnosis / prophylaxis and immunotherapy of parasitic diseases. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 183-188

  20. Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are antibodies having single specificity for a given antigen site (epitope). The development of hybridoma technology and the relative ease by which MAbs can be prepared has revolutionized many aspects of serological applications in diagnosis and differentiation of disease producing agents. The property of monospecificity offers advantages in diagnostic applications over polyclonal sera in that tests can be defined exactly with regard to the antigen detected and the affinity of reaction between the given antigenic site and the monoclonal reagent. In addition, MAbs offer better possibilities for test standardization, because the same reagent can be used in different laboratories. Such an MAb can be supplied by a central laboratory or 'grown' from hybridoma cells, ensuring that the resultant product is identical from laboratory to laboratory and that the part of the test involving the MAb reaction is the same. The methodologies for inoculation regimes, mice, cloning methods, selection of fusion partners, etc., have been validated extensively in developed country laboratories. The decision to establish a MAb production facility must be examined on a strict cost-benefit basis, since it is still expensive to produce a product. There are many MAbs available that should be sought to allow exploitation in developing tests. If a production facility is envisaged, it should produce reagents for national needs, i.e. there should be a clear problem oriented approach whereby exact needs are defined. In the field of veterinary applications, MAbs are the central reagent in many immunoassays based on the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The development of specific tests for diagnosing diseases is dominated by MAbs and has been fuelled by a strong research base, mainly in developed countries allied to developing countries through the study of related diseases. Thus, there are very many assays dependent on MAbs, some of which form the basis of

  1. Monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  2. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  3. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin. PMID:23098305

  4. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents

    OpenAIRE

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-01-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine m...

  5. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 131I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  6. Administration of an anti-interleukin 2 receptor monoclonal antibody prolongs cardiac allograft survival in mice

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Administration of the monoclonal antibody M7/20, which binds to the murine interleukin-2 (IL) receptor, significantly prolongs cardiac allograft survival in two H-2-incompatible strain combinations of inbred mice. The results support the important role of the IL-2 receptor in the mechanism of graft rejection, and suggest its suitability as a target for immunosuppressive therapy.

  7. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of systemic bovine zygomycosis by murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbaek, B.; Lind, Peter;

    1996-01-01

    with homologous antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were subsequently screened for reactivity with homologous fungi in immunohistochemical techniques. All four Mabs raised against the WF of A. arrhizus failed to react on tissues. However, four of the Mabs raised against the WSSA of R. arrhizus (Mab...... for the in situ diagnosis of systemic bovine zygomycosis....

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  9. Apoptosis and the thymic microenvironment in murine lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeoka, Y; Taguchi, N; Shultz, L; Boyd, R L; Naiki, M; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-11-01

    The thymus of New Zealand black (NZB) mice undergoes premature involution. In addition, cultured thymic epithelial cells from NZB mice undergo accelerated preprogrammed degeneration. NZB mice also have distinctive and well-defined abnormalities of thymic architecture involving stromal cells, defined by staining with monoclonal antibodies specific for the thymic microenvironment. We took advantage of these findings, as well as our large panel of monoclonal antibodies which recognize thymic stroma, to study the induction of apoptosis in the thymus of murine lupus and including changes of epithelial architecture. We studied NZB, MRL/lpr, BXSB/Yaa, C3H/gld mice and BALB/c and C57BL/6 as control mice. Apoptosis was studied both at basal levels and following induction with either dexamethasone or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The apoptotic cells were primarily found in the thymic cortex, and the frequency of apoptosis in murine lupus was less than 20% of controls. Moreover, all strains of murine lupus had severe abnormalities of the cortical network. These changes were not accentuated by dexamethasone treatment in cultured thymocytes. However, the thymus in murine lupus was less susceptible to LPS-induced apoptosis than control mice. Finally we note that the number of thymic nurse cells (TNC) was lowest in NZB mice. Our findings demonstrate significant abnormalities in the induction of apoptosis and the formation of TNC-like epithelial cells in SLE mice, and suggest that the abnormalities of the thymic microenvironment have an important role in the pathogenesis of murine lupus.

  10. Monoclonal antibody against a Burkitt lymphoma-associated antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiels, J; Fellous, M.; Tursz, T

    1981-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, referred to as 38.13, was obtained by fusing murine myeloma cells with Lewis rat splenocytes sensitized with Daudi cells (human Burkitt lymphoma containing Epstein--Barr virus genome but lacking HLA-A, -B, and -C and beta 2-microglobulin molecules at the cell surface). 38.13 antibody was demonstrated to be a rat IgM. By complement-dependent microcytotoxicity and indirect immunofluorescence assays, 38.13 antibody was shown to react specifically with cells derived from Bu...

  11. Proteolytically modified human beta 2-microglobulin augments the specific cytotoxic activity in murine mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claësson, M H

    1987-01-01

    (M-beta 2-m) bind to murine lymphocytes expressing H-2 class I antigens; M-beta 2-m, when added at day 0 and 1 of culture in nanomolar concentrations to a one-way murine allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) augments the generation of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes; M-beta 2-m increases...... the endogenous production of interleukin 2 in the MLC culture; monoclonal antibody which reacts with both the native beta 2-m and M-beta 2-m molecule blocks the augmentation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte production induced by M-beta 2-m; murine as well as human MLC responder cells can proteolytically modify native...

  12. Comparative Study of Monoclonal and Recombinant Antibody-Based Immunoassays for Fungicide Analysis in Fruit juices

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Tamarit, Mª José; PLANA ANDANI, EMMA; Manclus Ciscar, Juan José; Montoya Baides, Ángel

    2014-01-01

    [EN] A comparative study of the analytical performance of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), based on monoclonal and recombinant antibodies, for the determination of fungicide residues in fruit juices has been carried out. To this aim, three murine hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against (RS)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl ether (tetraconazole), 2-(4-triazolyl)benzimidazole (thiabendazole), and (RS)-1-(be...

  13. Characterization and expression of the human T cell receptor-T3 complex by monoclonal antibody F101.01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Plesner, T; Pallesen, G;

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) F101.01 reacting with the T cell receptor (TCR)-T3 complex is presented. Immunohistological studies showed that F101.01 specifically stains T-zone lymphocytes in lymph nodes, tonsils, and splenic tissue. Two-colour immunofluorescence and flow cytometry demonstr...

  14. Glycoproteins of coated pits, cell junctions, and the entire cell surface revealed by monoclonal antibodies and immunoelectron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Topographical descriptions of three major plasma membrane glycoproteins of murine 3T3 cells were obtained by immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies. A glycoprotein of Mr 80,000 was distributed throughout the total cell surface. A second of Mr 90,000 was concentrated in coated pits, and a third of Mr 100,000 was localized at cell junctions.

  15. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    A monoclonal antibody to an eosinophil specific determinant is very important in assessing eosinophil function during helminthic infection. Eosinophils induced by Schistosoma mansoni infection in BALB/c mice were used to induce C57B1/6 immunocytes for production of hybridomas secreting eosinophil monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies were shown to react with an eosinophil surface epitope but not with neutrophils or macrophages as determined by ELISA, immunodiffusion, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot assay. Affinity chromatography with eosinophil chemotactic factor-sepharose consistently selected out a { rm M_ R} 67,000 protein from solubilized eosinophil membrane antigens but not from neutrophil and macrophage antigens. In vitro studies showed that the eosinophil-specific monoclonal antibodies abrogated antibody-dependent eosinophil -mediated killing of S. mansoni schistosomula using mouse, rat or human eosinophils. Neutrophil and macrophage killing activities were unaffected. The monoclonal antibodies effected complement-dependent lysis of mouse and rat eosinophils but not of human eosinophils. ECF-treated eosinophils showed enhanced killing of schistosomula which was blocked by the monoclonal antibody. Murine and human eosinophils preincubated with monoclonal antibody exhibited decreased chemotaxis to ECF at optimal chemotactic concentrations. The monoclonal antibody also blocked eosinophil binding to ECF- sepharose beads. In vivo induction of peripheral blood eosinophilia by injection of S. mansoni eggs was suppressed by injections of monoclonal antibodies 2CD13 and 2QD45 in mouse and rat experimental models. Eosinophilia induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin- cyclophosphamide treatment was also suppressed by monoclonal antibody in both murine and rat systems. Pulmonary granulomas in mice given egg injection and monoclonal antibody were smaller and contained fewer eosinophils than those granulomas from mice given eggs only. In immuno-biochemical studies, the

  16. Monoclonal gammopathy associated with visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal gammopathy can accompany diverse conditions and is usually benign. It should be distinguished from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS which can rarely turn malignant. Visceral leishmaniasis has only rarely been associated with monoclonal gammopathy. We describe the case of a 55-year-old male who had monoclonal gammopathy associated with visceral leishmanisais, which reversed with stibogluconate therapy.

  17. Monoclonal anti-human factor VII antibodies. Detection in plasma of a second protein antigenically and genetically related to factor VII.

    OpenAIRE

    Broze, G J; S. Hickman; Miletich, J P

    1985-01-01

    Several murine monoclonal anti-human Factor VII antibodies were produced using hybridoma technology. Two noncompetitive monoclonal antibodies were used to examine by Western blotting the Factor VII cross-reactive material (CRM) in normal human plasma and three commercially available congenitally Factor VII-deficient plasmas, and to construct a facile "sandwich" immunoassay for plasma Factor VII. A second, previously undescribed, form of Factor VII CRM was detected in human plasma, which on We...

  18. Preliminary characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Zimbabwe, with stage-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, T.; Lind, Peter; Mukaratirwa, S.

    2005-01-01

    Cell-culture-derived clones of eight Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Zimbabwe were characterised in IFAT with a panel of five monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Each clone had been established from a single murine brain cyst. The antibodies were bradyzoite-specific (4.3), tachyzoite-specific (4.25, 5...... in the IFAT in a similar way to the Danish reference strain of T. gondii, SSI-119....

  19. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    OpenAIRE

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J.; Roberts, Victoria A.; van Dolleweerd, Craig J.; Ma, Julian K.-C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformed Nicotiana tabacum. Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody...

  20. Detection of complement activation using monoclonal antibodies against C3d

    OpenAIRE

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Kulik, Liudmila; Orth, Heather; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Sargsyan, Siranush A.; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Hannan, Jonathan P.; Kovacs, James M.; Coughlin, Beth; Woodell, Alex S.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Rohrer, Bärbel; Holers, V. Michael

    2013-01-01

    During complement activation the C3 protein is cleaved, and C3 activation fragments are covalently fixed to tissues. Tissue-bound C3 fragments are a durable biomarker of tissue inflammation, and these fragments have been exploited as addressable binding ligands for targeted therapeutics and diagnostic agents. We have generated cross-reactive murine monoclonal antibodies against human and mouse C3d, the final C3 degradation fragment generated during complement activation. We developed 3 monocl...

  1. Occult choriocarcinoma: Detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occult choriocarcinoma, manifested only by an elevated B-hCG level, can be a difficult management problem. The authors evaluated the ability of I-131-labeled 5F9.3, a murine monoclonal antibody reactive with choriocarcinomas but not hCG, to detect foci of choriocarcinoma in five patients referred with elevated B-hCG levels but in whom the location of residual disease was uncertain. I-131 5F9.3, 0.5-1.0 mCi, was injected intravenously in each patient and images with dynamic background subtraction of TcHSA were obtained at later time points. In four patients chest studies were true positive (confirmed surgically in all), the chest CT scans in these patients had been interpreted as not definitely showing active disease. In the fifth patient no abnormal focus of uptake was seen and subsequent B-hCG levels normalized. In two of the patients with chest lesions, foci of abdominal uptake were seen that were not due to tumor. One of these patients had a partial small bowel obstruction; the other appeared to have a false-positive study. I-131 5F9.3 is a promising agent for the detection of occult choriocarcinomas

  2. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. PMID:27330002

  3. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  4. Preparation and Evaluation of Norcantharidin-encapsulated Liposomes Modified with a Novel CD19 Monoclonal Antibody 2E8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晶樱; 汤永民; 钱柏芹; 沈红强

    2010-01-01

    In this study,norcanthridin(NCTD)-encapsulated liposomes were modified with a novel murine anti-human CD19 monoclonal antibody 2E8(2E8-NCTD-liposomes) and the targeting efficiency and specific cytotoxicity of 2E8-NCTD-liposomes to CD19+ leukemia cells were evaluated.BALB/c mice were injected with 2E8 hybridoma cells to obtain 2E8 monoclonal antibody(mAb).NCTD-liposomes were prepared by using film dispersion method.2E8 mAbs were linked to NCTD-liposomes using post-incorporation technology.Flow cytometry show...

  5. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  6. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author)

  7. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  8. Characterization of novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to human neurturin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, J A; Tsai, S P; Moffat, B; Schroeder, K A; Jung, C; Chuntharapai, A; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; de Sauvage, F J; Armanini, M; Phillips, H; Devaux, B

    2000-08-01

    Neurturin (NTN) a structural and functional relative of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, was originally identified based on its ability to support the survival of sympathetic neurons in culture. Similar to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Neurturin has been shown to bind to a high affinity glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked receptor (GFRalpha2) and induce phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret, resulting in the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. A panel of six novel murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human Neurturin has been developed and characterized. Four of the MAbs tested inhibit, to varying degrees, binding of NTN to the GPI-linked GFRalpha2 receptor. Three MAbs cross-react with the murine homolog. These antibodies have been shown to be useful reagents for Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and also for the development of a sensitive, quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human NTN. Novel, specific MAbs with varying epitope specificities and blocking activity will be valuable tools for both the in vitro and in vivo characterization of NTN and its relationship to the GFRalpha2 and Ret receptors. PMID:11001403

  9. Use of monoclonal antibodies for the characterization of novel DNA- binding proteins recognized by human autoimmune sera

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Autoantibodies to a DNA-binding heterodimer consisting of 70,000 and 80,000 dalton subunits were identified in 30-50% of human autoimmune sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and scleroderma. Three murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the heterodimer were produced in BALB/c mice by immunizing with isolated human B cell nuclei. By immunofluorescence, the mAb and autoimmune sera demonstrated both speckled nucleoplasmic stainin...

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Therapies against Anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaochun Chen; Mahtab Moayeri; Robert Purcell

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax is a highly lethal infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. It not only causes natural infection in humans but also poses a great threat as an emerging bioterror agent. The lethality of anthrax is primarily attributed to the two major virulence factors: toxins and capsule. An extensive effort has been made to generate therapeutically useful monoclonal antibodies to each of the virulence components: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and ede...

  11. Development of a novel monoclonal antibody with reactivity to a wide range of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phelps Amanda L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a requirement for antiviral therapies capable of protecting against infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV, as a licensed vaccine is not available for general human use. Monoclonal antibodies are increasingly being developed as therapeutics and are potential treatments for VEEV as they have been shown to be protective in the mouse model of disease. However, to be truly effective, the antibody should recognise multiple strains of VEEV and broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies are rarely and only coincidentally isolated using classical hybridoma technology. Results In this work, methods were developed to reliably derive broadly reactive murine antibodies. A phage library was created that expressed single chain variable fragments (scFv isolated from mice immunised with multiple strains of VEEV. A broadly reactive scFv was identified and incorporated into a murine IgG2a framework. This novel antibody retained the broad reactivity exhibited by the scFv but did not possess virus neutralising activity. However, the antibody was still able to protect mice against VEEV disease induced by strain TrD when administered 24 h prior to challenge. Conclusion A monoclonal antibody possessing reactivity to a wide range of VEEV strains may be of benefit as a generic antiviral therapy. However, humanisation of the murine antibody will be required before it can be tested in humans. Crown Copyright © 2009

  12. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  13. Monoclonal antibodies against DNA-binding tips of DNABII proteins disrupt biofilms in vitro and induce bacterial clearance in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Novotny

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of chronic and recurrent bacterial diseases are attributed to the presence of a recalcitrant biofilm that contributes significantly to pathogenesis. As such, these diseases will require an innovative therapeutic approach. We targeted DNABII proteins, an integral component of extracellular DNA (eDNA which is universally found as part of the pathogenic biofilm matrix to develop a biofilm disrupting therapeutic. We show that a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies directed against specific epitopes of a DNABII protein is highly effective to disrupt diverse biofilms in vitro as well as resolve experimental infection in vivo, in both a chinchilla and murine model. Combining this monoclonal antibody cocktail with a traditional antibiotic to kill bacteria newly released from the biofilm due to the action of the antibody cocktail was highly effective. Our results strongly support these monoclonal antibodies as attractive candidates for lead optimization as a therapeutic for resolution of bacterial biofilm diseases.

  14. Radioimmunoimaging of subacute infective endocarditis using a technetium-99m monoclonal granulocyte-specific antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munz, D.L.; Sandrock, D.; Emrich, D. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin); Morguet, A.J.; Heim, A.; Sold, G.; Figulla, H.R.; Kreuzer, H. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Kardiologie und Pulmonologie)

    1991-12-01

    Immunoscintigraphy with a technetium-99m murine monoclonal IgG{sub 1} antibody directed against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) and carcinoembryonic antigen was performed with 20 patients with suspected subacute infective endocarditis (SIE) and 6 controls with suspected inflammatory/infectious disease elsewhere in the body. Immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography localised SIE in 11 of 15 patients in whom the disease could be confirmed. In 4 patients with validated SIE, the immunoscan was abnormal, and the echocardiogram was normal. In another 4 patients, the result was exactly the opposite. These findings suggest that the combination of immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography improves diagnostic efficacy in patients with suspected SIE. (orig.).

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against antigens displayed on a progressively growing mammary tumor.

    OpenAIRE

    Tax, A; Manson, L A

    1981-01-01

    We have produced lymphocyte hybridomas between mouse myeloma cells and either spleen cells of C3H/f/C57BL/6 mice bearing the Mm5mt/c1 tumor-producing murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV) or spleen cells from Fisher rats inoculated with the same tumor. Two classes of hybridoma-secreted monoclonal antibodies were obtained. In the first class are IVC11, IIIA1, and VE7, each of which precipitated a 52,000-dalton protein from 125I-labeled purified preparations of MMTV and [3H]glucosamine-labeled Mm5m...

  16. Radioimmunoguided surgery using monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential proficiency of radioimmunoguided surgery in the intraoperative detection of tumors was assessed using labeled monoclonal antibody B72.3 in 66 patients with tissue-proved tumor. Monoclonal antibody B72.3 was injected 5 to 42 days preoperatively, and the hand-held gamma-detecting probe was used intraoperatively to detect the presence of tumor. Intraoperative probe counts of less than 20 every 2 seconds, or tumor-to-adjacent normal tissue ratios less than 2:1 were considered negative (system failure). Positive probe counts were detected in 5 of 6 patients with primary colon cancer (83 percent), in 31 of 39 patients with recurrent colon cancer (79 percent), in 4 of 5 patients with gastric cancer (80 percent), in 3 of 8 patients with breast cancer (37.5 percent), and in 4 of 8 patients with ovarian cancer (50 percent) undergoing second-look procedures. Additional patients in each group were scored as borderline positive. Overall, radioimmunoguided surgery using B72.3 identified tumors in 47 patients (71.2 percent), bordered on positive in 6 patients (9.1 percent), and failed to identify tumor in 13 patients (19.7 percent). Improved selection of patients for antigen-positive tumors, the use of higher affinity second-generation antibodies, alternate routes of antibody administration, alternate radionuclides, and more sophisticatedly bioengineered antibodies and antibody combinations should all lead to improvements in radioimmunoguided surgery

  17. Cuban Monoclonal Antibodies for Radioimmunodiagnosis and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancer Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Centre of Molecular Immunology produces monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer diseases. We are mainly focus on two target systems; one is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) because there is a tremendous relationship between the EGF/EGF-R system and several human tumours such as lung, head and neck, ovarian breast and brain cancers; the second one is the ganglioside system, the relevance of certain gangliosides in tumour growth and metastatic dissemination has been well documented, GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside is particularly interesting due to its restrictive expression in normal human tissues. Nimotuzumab (h-R3) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) that was obtained by complementarity-determining regions grafting of a murine mAb (ior egf/r3) to a human framework having remarkable antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects. A Phase I clinical trial was performed to evaluate the toxicity and clinical effect of an intracavitary (intracerebral) administration of a single dose of nimotuzumab (h-R3) labelled with increasing doses of 188Re. All patients bearing astrocytomas grade III/IV should be treated previously with conventional therapies and have an EGF-R overexpression in the tumour, demonstrated by immunohistochemical study. Maximal tolerated dose was 3 mg of the h-R3 labelled with 10 mCi of 188Re. The radioimmunoconjugate showed a high retention in the surgical created resection cavity and the brain adjacent tissues with a mean value of 85.5% of the injected dose one hour post-administration. This radioimmunoconjugate may be relatively safe and a promising therapeutic approach for treating high grade gliomas. GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside is particularly interesting due to its restrictive expression in normal human tissues according to immunohistochemical studies, using either polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. But both immunohistochemical and biochemical methods have strongly suggested its over-expression in human breast and colon

  18. Capto MMC mixed-mode chromatography of murine and rabbit antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Storms, Michael; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Okumura, C J; Kita, Yoshiko

    2016-11-01

    Murine antibodies have weak affinity for Protein-A. Here, we have tested binding of murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) to Protein-A or Protein-A/Protein-G mixture under salting-out conditions. The addition of ammonium sulfate to HEK conditioned medium (CM) expressing murine mAb resulted in complete binding, leading to its elution by low pH or neutral arginine solution. Alternatively, a mixed-mode chromatography using Capto MMC resin was developed as a capture step. Binding of murine mAb occurred at neutral pH. The bound mAb was eluted with a gradient from 0.3 M NaCl to 0.3 M arginine/0.3 M NaCl at pH 7.0. The Capto MMC-purified murine mAb was further purified by hydroxyl apatite chromatography. Similarly, rabbit mAb was processed with some modifications. Binding of rabbit mAb to Capto MMC required a lower pH. Elution of the bound rabbit mAb was achieved by a gradient to 0.3 M NaCl, pH 7.0. PMID:27444249

  19. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL AND POLYCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST RECOMBINANT OUTER MEMBRANE PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Fasihi-Ramandi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many studies related to immunological and molecular methods for diagnosis of Vibrio cholera (V. cholerae. However, most assays dependent on enrichment of culture of bacteria, which need more time and involves the use of costly equipment and reagents. In this study Balb/c mice were immunized with recombinant Outer Membrane Protein (rOMPw of vibrio cholerae and splenocytes of hyper immunized mice were fused with murine myeloma Sp2/0 cells. Positive hybridomas were selected by ELISA using rOMPw as coating antigen. The monoclonal antibodies from ascitic fluids were purified and its reaction with rOMPw was assessed by ELISA. Polyclonal antibodies were also produced by immunization of rabbits with the above mentioned antigen. The rabbit sera was affinity purified using Hi-Trap protein G column. The result showed that monoclonal antibody specific to rOMPw has been successfully generated. The monoclonal antibody reacted with recombinant OMPw in ELISA and immunonoblat method. Rabbit polyclonal antibody was also bound to rOMPw by ELISA. The results of agglutination test with whole bacteria also showed that both mouse monoclonal and rabbit polyclonal antibodies reacted with whole vibrio cholera but not other related bacteria. The purpose of this study was to check out if anti OMPw antibodies could use as diagnostic assay for detection of V. cholerae. Our results demonstrated that anti recombinant OMPw monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are able to diagnose whole bacteria in pure culture using agglutination test but not by home made immunochromatic strip test.

  20. Relationship between hyperthyroidism and monoclonal gammapathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 66-year-old man with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and monoclonal gammapathy associated to it of uncertain significance (MGUS). A possible pathogenic relationship between HPTP and MGUS is analyzed. Interleukin 6 could play a pivotal role.

  1. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  2. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  3. Cloning murine antibody V-genes with non-degenerate primers and conversion to a recombinant antibody format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialon, Magdalena; Schellenberg, Ludmila; Herzog, Nicolas; Kraus, Stefan; Jörißen, Hannah; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph; Nähring, Jörg; Barth, Stefan; Püttmann, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are produced in cultured hybridoma cell lines, but these cells tend to be unstable; it is therefore necessary to rescue the corresponding genetic information. Here we describe an improved method for the amplification of antibody variable gene (V-gene) information from murine hybridoma cells using a panel of specific, non-degenerate primers. This primer set allows sequences to be rescued from all murine V-genes, except the lambda light chain genes, which rarely contribute to murine immune diversity. We tested the primers against a range of antibodies and recovered specific amplification products in all cases. The heavy and light chain variable regions were subsequently joined by a two-step cloning strategy or by splice overlap extension PCR. PMID:25545205

  4. Identification and purification of human erythroid progenitor cells by monoclonal antibody to the transferrin receptor (TU 67).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F; Griffin, J D; Sabbath, K D; Oster, W; Wernet, P; Mertelsmann, R

    1988-04-01

    Anti-TU 67 is a murine monoclonal antibody that recognizes the transferrin receptor. With respect to hematopoietic cells TU 67 is expressed by human multipotent colony-forming cells (CFU-Mix), erythroid progenitor cells (BFU-E and CFU-E) and a fraction of granulocyte/monocyte colony forming cells, but is not expressed by mature hematopoietic cells including erythrocytes, platelets, lymphocytes, and peripheral blood myeloid cells. The TU 67-positive fraction of normal bone marrow, separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) or immune rosettes, contained 87% of the erythroid progenitor cells. Erythroid progenitor cells were enriched up to 50-fold by using a combination of monoclonal antibodies to deplete mature hematopoietic cells, followed by positive selection of BFU-E and CFU-E by TU 67 antibody.

  5. Autoradiography-based, three-dimensional calculation of dose rate for murine, human-tumor xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Fast Fourier Transform method for calculating the three-dimensional dose rate distribution for murine, human-tumour xenografts is outlined. The required input includes evenly-spaced activity slices which span the tumour. Numerical values in these slices are determined by quantitative 125I autoradiography. For the absorbed dose-rate calculation, we assume the activity from both 131I- and 90Y-labeled radiopharmaceuticals would be distributed as is measured with the 125I label. Two example cases are presented: an ovarian-carcinoma xenograft with an IgG 2ak monoclonal antibody and a neuroblastoma xenograft with meta-iobenzylguanidine (MIBG). (Author)

  6. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  7. A Recombinant Humanized Anti-Cocaine Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits the Distribution of Cocaine to the Brain in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Andrew B.; Gooden, Felicia C. T.; Tabet, Michael R.; Ball, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is a humanized version of the chimeric human/murine anti-cocaine mAb 2E2. The recombinant h2E2 protein was produced in vitro from a transfected mammalian cell line and retained high affinity (4 nM Kd) and specificity for cocaine over its inactive metabolites benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester. In rats, pharmacokinetic studies of h2E2 (120 mg/kg i.v.) showed a long terminal elimination half-life of 9.0 days and a low volume of distribution at st...

  8. A Molecular Model for Cocaine Binding by the Immunotherapeutic Human/Mouse Chimeric Monoclonal Antibody 2E2

    OpenAIRE

    Lape, Michael; Paula, Stefan; Ball, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy by cocaine-binding monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of cocaine addiction. The human (γ1 heavy chain)/murine (λ light chain) chimeric mAb 2E2 has excellent affinity and specificity for cocaine and recent animal studies have demonstrated 2E2’s ability in vivo to reduce cocaine levels in the brain as well as alter cocaine self-administration behavior in rats. In this study, we used mAb 2E2 amino acid sequence information to create a...

  9. Production, characterization, and antigen specificity of recombinant 62-71-3, a candidate monoclonal antibody for rabies prophylaxis in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Both, L.; van Dolleweerd, C.; Wright, E.; Banyard, A. C.; Bulmer-Thomas, B.; Selden, D.; Altmann, F.; Fooks, A.R.; Ma, J. K.- C.

    2013-01-01

    Rabies kills many people throughout the developing world every year. The murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 62-71-3 was recently identified for its potential application in rabies postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). The purpose here was to establish a plant-based production system for a chimeric mouse-human version of mAb 62-71-3, to characterize the recombinant antibody and investigate at a molecular level its interaction with rabies virus glycoprotein. Chimeric 62-71-3 was successfully expressed ...

  10. A monoclonal antibody (8H3) that binds to rat T lineage cells and augments in vitro proliferative responses

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, designated 8H3, recognizes a cell surface antigen expressed exclusively on rat T lineage cells. 8H3 antibody immunoprecipitated 180-, 120-, and 90-kD components from rat thymocytes as well as splenic T cells under nonreducing conditions. 8H3 antibody specifically inhibited the binding of thymocytes to fibronectin. Furthermore, binding of rat thymocytes to immobilized synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro-Cys-BSA was inhibited by 8H3 antibody as was Gly-Arg-Gl...

  11. Tumoricidal activation of murine resident peritoneal macrophages on pancreatic carcinoma by interleukin-2 and monoclonal antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Kui Chen; Shi Zhen Yuan; Zhi Yong Zeng; Zhi Qing Huang

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Macrophages play an important role in tumor lysis and growth inhibition. They can be activated to a tumoricidal state by a variety of agents such as IFNr, TNFa or IL2. The killing machanisms of activated macrophages have been extensively investigated[1,2]. Recently, it has been proved that antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the potent arms to lyse tumor cells resistant to cytotoxic macrophages,and that the antitumorous effect of a macrophage activator is significantly augmented by the combined use of mAbs capable of inducing ADCC to tumor cells[3].

  12. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  13. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy. Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is now playing a great role not only in diagnostic application but also in therapy of cancer patients. Under the concept of targeted radiotherapy, a number of radiopharmaceuticals based on radiolabelled biomolecules had been evaluated for treatment of cancer by many investigators. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and some small specific peptides labelled with beta emitting radiometals such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188 or Y-90, are being introduced into clinical trials. The objective of this project is to develop laboratory procedures to label monoclonal antibodies, peptide or other proteins with beta emitting radionuclides to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purpose

  14. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is now playing a great role not only in diagnostic application but also in therapy of cancer patients. Under the concept of targeted radiotherapy, a number of radiopharmaceuticals based on radiolabelled biomolecules had been evaluated for treatment of cancer by many investigators. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and some small specific peptides labelled with beta emitting radiometals such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188 or Y-90, are being introduced into clinical trials. The objective of this project is to develop laboratory procedures to label monoclonal antibodies, peptide or other proteins with beta emitting radionuclides to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purpose

  15. Isolation and characterization of a monoclonal anti-protein kinase CK2 beta-subunit antibody of the IgG class for the direct detection of CK2 beta-subunit in tissue cultures of various mammalian species and human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastainczyk, W; Schmidt-Spaniol, I; Boldyreff, B;

    1995-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-protein kinase CK2 beta antibody was isolated and characterized. The antibody detects 1 pmol of purified recombinant CK2 beta-subunit after analysis on SDS-PAGE. Alternatively undenatured CK2 beta-subunit was detected by an ELISA assay either as recombinant CK2 beta-subun...

  16. Serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 strains using a monoclonal-based polystyrene agglutination test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubreuil, J.D.; Letellier, A.; Stenbæk, Eva;

    1996-01-01

    A polystyrene agglutination test has been developed for serotyping Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5a and 5b strains. Protein A-coated polystyrene microparticles were sensitized with a murine monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope on serotype 5 LPS-O chain as shown by SDS......-PAGE and Western blotting, A total of 205 A. pleuropneumoniae, strains including all 12 serotype reference strains and 13 strains representing 8 common bacterial species associated with swine or related to A, pleuropneumoniae, were tested by mixing 25 mu L of polystyrene reagent with the same volume of a dense...... suspension of bacterial cells grown for 18 h. All A, pleuropneumoniae strains had been previously serotyped using standard procedures, The polystyrene agglutination test was rapid (less than 3 min) and easy to perform. Overall a very good correlation (97.3%) with the standard techniques was found...

  17. Criteria for the use of monoclonal antibodies, legislation and ethical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria governing the in vivo use of monoclonal antibodies in humans are based upon a number of legal requirements with respect to radiation hygiene, pharmaceutical legislation, radiopharmaceutical legislation and regulations with respect to products arising from biotechnology. This in itself has led to a complicated situation which has undoubtedly restricted the development of valuable diagnostic and potential therapeutic agents. From the ethical point of view there are also important considerations, firstly with respect to the methods of producing antibodies, which has resulted in the discontinuation of the raising of antibodies in murine ascites, and secondly in consideration of the ethics of administering labelled antibodies to healthy volunteers and to patients who may not necessarily benefit personally from the procedure. These factors must be evaluated in the light of the EEC document 'Good clinical practice for trials in medicinal products in the European Community from the CPMP working party on Efficacy of Medicinal Products'. (author)

  18. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies as novel treatments for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, C.A.; Larocca, A.; Grillo-Lopez, A.J. [IDEC Pharmaceuticals, 3030 Callan Road, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1999-03-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) offer new options for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, needed because existing therapies have many limitations. The unconjugated, chimeric anti-CD20 antibody, Rituximab (MabThera, Rituxan), has recently been approved in the USA for patients with relapsed or refractory, low-grade or follicular, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and in Europe for therapy of relapsed stage III/IV follicular lymphoma. In the pivotal study of Rituximab, an overall response rate of 50% was achieved with median time to progressionin responders of 13.2 months. Studies are ongoing with the {sup 90}Y-labelled murine anti-CD20 antibody, IDEC-Y2B8. The response rate in a Phase I/II study in low-grade and intermediate-grade patients was 67%. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Chemoradiotherapy of cancer using boronated monoclonal antibodies. Comprehensive progress report, April 1, 1982-October 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research to develop boron neutron capture for radiotherapy applications is summarized. Work is reported in the following areas: (1) chemical and biochemical research with B12H11SH2-; (2) chemical and protein-binding studies with B12H11NCO2- and (CH3)3NB10H8NCO1-; (3) effects of neutron irradiation and capture on phytomitogen stimulated lymphocyte blastogenesis; (4) production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against the murine B16 melanoma; (5) reactor description and determination of flux profile; (6) determination of neutron profile; (7) improvement of the neutron beam by the bismuth scatterer method; and (8) in vitro sensitivity of B16 melanoma cells to thermal neutrons and 10B(n,α) capture. 11 references

  20. A monoclonal antibody reactive with normal and leukemic human myeloid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, J D; Linch, D; Sabbath, K; Larcom, P; Schlossman, S F

    1984-01-01

    Anti-MY9 is an IgG2b murine monoclonal antibody selected for reactivity with immature normal human myeloid cells. The MY9 antigen is expressed by blasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes in the bone marrow, and by monocytes in the peripheral blood. Erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets are MY9 negative. All myeloid colony-forming cells (CFU-GM), a fraction of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and multipotent progenitors (CFU-GEMM) are MY9 positive. This antigen is further expressed by the leukemic cells of a majority of patients with AML and myeloid CML-BC. Leukemic stem cells (leukemic colony-forming cells, L-CFC) from most patients tested were also MY9 positive. In contrast, MY9 was not detected on lymphocytic leukemias. Anti-MY9 may be a valuable reagent for the purification of hematopoietic colony-forming cells and for the diagnosis of myeloid-lineage leukemias.

  1. Radioimmunodetection with 111In-labeled monoclonal antibody Nd2 in patients with pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes results from an initial clinical evaluation of radioimmunodetection (RAID) in patients with pancreatic cancer using murine monoclonal antibody Nd2, directed against mucins from pancreatic cancer. Nd2 (2 mg) was labeled with 111In (2 mCi) and injected into 19 patients suspected of having pancreatic cancer. Planar scintigrams were taken 3 days post-infusion. As for final diagnoses after surgery, 14 cases were pancreatic cancer, and one case each was chronic pancreatitis, neurilemmoma, islet cell carcinoma, cholangioma, and apparent absence of suspected recurrent lesion of pancreatic cancer. Of 14 patients with pancreatic cancer, RAID was positive in 10 cases (71.4%). Cases other than pancreatic cancer were all negative, so the specificity was 100%. These results demonstrate that RAID using 111In-Nd2 can be useful in differentiating exocrine pancreatic cancer from benign conditions and other types of carcinomas in the pancreatoduodenal regions. (author)

  2. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  3. Generation and applications of monoclonal antibodies for livestock production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Lende, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) have found widespread applications in livestock production. Although the generation of murine MCAs is at present a routine, the production of homologous MCAs, especially important for in vivo applications, is still hampered by the lack of efficient homologous fusion partners for immortalization of antibody producing lymphocytes of livestock species. At present, MCAs are used in immunodiagnostic tests e.g. to monitor livestock reproduction and quality of livestock products. In the future MCAs will also be used in immunosensors for real-time and on-site applications in the same areas. The commercial application of MCAs for the immunomodulation of (pharmacologically induced) physiological processes underlying important (re)production traits is at present limited to the use of anti-PMSG MCAs in PMSG-induced superovulation. However, many potentially interesting applications are under investigation (e.g. immunopotentiation of growth hormone to enhance growth; immunocytolysis of adipocytes to increase lean meat production; immunoneutralization of GnRH for immunocastration; immunoimitation of hormone activity with anti-idiotype antibodies). Attempts to use specific MCAs for the sexing of embryos have been disappointing, mainly because of the relatively low accuracy. In the future, MCAs against membrane proteins which are specific for X- or Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa might be used for bulk separation of livestock sperm. In general, it is expected that engineered (homologous) recombinant MCAs will largely contribute to the development of a new generation of rapid immunodiagnostic tests and effective immunomodulation applications. They will further increase the use of MCAs in livestock production.

  4. The development of a radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for murine IgE antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A purified monoclonal IgE preparation, isolated from the ascitic fluid of mice bearing a hybridoma secreting IgE with specificity to ovalbumin, was used for the production of goat anti-murine IgE (GAME) antiserum, which was then rendered monospecific for the epsilon chain. Another monoclonal hybridoma IgE preparation with specificity for the 2,4-dinitrophenyl group was isolated from ascitic fluid in a relatively pure state by affinity chromatography and used in the form of an immunosorbent to isolate antibodies from the monospecific goat serum. The GAME of antibodies were 125I-labeled and used to develop a radioallergosorbent test (RAST) for the quantitation of murine IgE antibodies specifically adsorbed onto antigen-coupled paper discs. The RAST was specific for antibodies of the IgE class only and was as sensitive as and more accurate than PCA assay. RAST results on sera of mice treated with tolerogenic conjugates indicated a reduction in the affinity and concentration of the IgE antibody populations on suppression of the IgE response. The effect of interference by non-IgE antibody populations on the RAST curves has been discussed. (Auth.)

  5. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN IMMUNOGLOBULIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Majidi

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin E is one of the five classes of immonoglobulins that plays an important role in allergic diseases. Production of monoclonal antibodies by a single clonotype against different epitopes of immunoglobulin E has high priority in development of diagnostic kits.In this study, an attempt was made to produce monoclonal antibodies against human immunoglobulin E. Balb/c mice were immunized with semipurified immunoglobulin E and spleen cells fused with SP2.0 mouse myeloma eel! line in the presence of polyethylene glycol. Supernatant of hybridoma cells was screened for detection of antibody by enzyme linked immonosorbent assay method. Cloning of selective high absorbance wells were done with limiting dilution method. The suitable clone (monoclone was selected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and confirmed by immunoblot. The subclass of the chosen monoclonal antibodies was determined and the clones freezed and kept in liquid nitrogen.During this study three successful fusions were carried out, which resulted in development of 156 clones with high production of anti-IgE. Fourteen clones with the highest titres were selected for cloning. After limiting dilution more than 100 monoclonal antibodies were produced and the suitable (me (GJ0F7, i.e.; the clone which displayed the high absorbance in reaction with purified immunoglobulin E and the lowest cross-reactivity with immunoglobulin M, immunoglobulin G and immoglobulin A was chosen. In immunoblotting, presence of high density band in reaction with immunoglobulin E was confirmed. The suitable mab was shown to be IgG 1 subclass with kappa light chain. It seems that, this mab could be successfully used in diagnostic kits.

  6. Selection of therapeutic H5N1 monoclonal antibodies following IgVH repertoire analysis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sean A; Moore, Margaret; VandenEkart, Emily J; Roque, Richard P; Bowen, Richard A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Wiley, Steven R; Clegg, Christopher H

    2016-07-01

    The rapid rate of influenza virus mutation drives the emergence of new strains that inflict serious seasonal epidemics and less frequent, but more deadly, pandemics. While vaccination provides the best protection against influenza, its utility is often diminished by the unpredictability of new pathogenic strains. Consequently, efforts are underway to identify new antiviral drugs and monoclonal antibodies that can be used to treat recently infected individuals and prevent disease in vulnerable populations. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and the analysis of antibody gene repertoires is a valuable tool for Ab discovery. Here, we describe a technology platform for isolating therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by analyzing the IgVH repertoires of mice immunized with recombinant H5N1 hemagglutinin (rH5). As an initial proof of concept, 35 IgVH genes were selected using a CDRH3 search algorithm and co-expressed in a murine IgG2a expression vector with a panel of germline murine kappa genes. Culture supernatants were then screened for antigen binding. Seventeen of the 35 IgVH MAbs (49%) bound rH5VN1203 in preliminary screens and 8 of 9 purified MAbs inhibited 3 heterosubtypic strains of H5N1 virus when assayed by HI. Two of these MAbs demonstrated prophylactic and therapeutic activity in virus-challenged mice. This is the first example in which an NGS discovery platform has been used to isolate anti-influenza MAbs with relevant therapeutic activity. PMID:27109194

  7. Localization of pulmonary human sarcoma xenografts in athymic nude mice with indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study localization of metastatic tumors with a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody, a pulmonary metastases model was devised in athymic mice. Metastatic pulmonary sarcoma colonies were verified by histological examination. A murine monoclonal antibody (MAb 19-24) directed against a human sarcoma antigen was labeled with indium-111 (111In) by use of the linker 1-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (SCN-Bz-DTPA). MAb P3 was similarly labeled as a negative control. In the group given MAb 19-24, the percent injected dose per gram lung tissue bearing tumor colonies (30.1%, 29.6%, and 27.7% on Days 1, 2, and 3, respectively) was significantly (p less than 0.05) higher than in those receiving MAb P3. Hepatic activities of both 111In-MAb 19-24 and 111In-MAb P3 were low. The lungs with tumor colonies demonstrated clearest images on Day 3. The specific binding of 111In-SCN-Bz-DTPA-labeled MAb 19-24 to pulmonary xenografts without appreciable liver uptake indicates that it may be useful in the clinical localization of pulmonic metastatic lesions

  8. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  9. Identification of murine complement receptor type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Fingeroth, J D; Benedict, M A; Levy, D.N.; Strominger, J L

    1989-01-01

    A rabbit antiserum reactive with the human complement component C3d/Epstein-Barr virus receptor (complement receptor type 2, CR2) immunoprecipitates a Mr 155,000 murine B-cell surface antigen. The apparent molecular weight and cellular distribution of this murine antigen are similar to those of human CR2. Cells expressing the murine protein bind sheep erythrocytes coated with antibody and murine C1-C3d but do not bind Epstein-Barr virus at all. The monospecific antiserum to human CR2 together...

  10. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Swanstrom

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73% failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9% levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV.

  11. Serrumab: a human monoclonal antibody that counters the biochemical and immunological effects of Tityus serrulatus venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Zoccal, Karina Furlan; Roncolato, Eduardo Crosara; Bertolini, Thaís Barboza; Campos, Lucas Benício; Cologna, Camila Takeno; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Barbosa, José Elpidio

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil, the species Tityus serrulatus is responsible for the most severe cases of scorpion envenomation. There is currently a need for new scorpion anti-venoms that are more effective and less harmful. This study attempted to produce human monoclonal antibodies capable of inhibiting the activity of T. serrulatus venom (TsV), using the Griffin.1 library of human single-chain fragment-variable (scFv) phage antibodies. Four rounds of phage antibody selection were performed, and the round with the highest phage antibody titer was chosen for the production of monoclonal phage antibodies and for further analysis. The scFv 2A, designated serrumab, was selected for the production and purification of soluble antibody fragments. In a murine peritoneal macrophage cell line (J774.1), in vitro assays of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-10 were performed. In male BALB/c mice, in vivo assays of plasma urea, creatinine, aspartate transaminase, and glucose were performed, as well as of neutrophil recruitment and leukocyte counts. It was found that serrumab inhibited the TsV-induced increases in the production of IL-6, TNFα, and IL-10 in J774.1 cells. The in vivo inhibition assay showed that serrumab also prevented TsV-induced increases in the plasma levels of urea, creatinine, aspartate transaminase, and glucose, as well as preventing the TsV-induced increase in neutrophil recruitment. The results indicate that the human monoclonal antibody serrumab is a candidate for inclusion in a mixture of specific antibodies to the various toxins present in TsV. Therefore, serrumab shows promise for use in the production of new anti-venom. PMID:22424317

  12. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, J. A.; Plante, J. A.; Plante, K. S.; Young, E. F.; McGowan, E.; Gallichotte, E. N.; Widman, D. G.; Heise, M. T.; de Silva, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV) infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73%) failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9%) levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV. PMID:27435464

  13. Combining phage display with de novo protein sequencing for reverse engineering of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickert, Keith W; Grinberg, Luba; Woods, Robert M; Wilson, Susan; Bowen, Michael A; Baca, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The enormous diversity created by gene recombination and somatic hypermutation makes de novo protein sequencing of monoclonal antibodies a uniquely challenging problem. Modern mass spectrometry-based sequencing will rarely, if ever, provide a single unambiguous sequence for the variable domains. A more likely outcome is computation of an ensemble of highly similar sequences that can satisfy the experimental data. This outcome can result in the need for empirical testing of many candidate sequences, sometimes iteratively, to identity one which can replicate the activity of the parental antibody. Here we describe an improved approach to antibody protein sequencing by using phage display technology to generate a combinatorial library of sequences that satisfy the mass spectrometry data, and selecting for functional candidates that bind antigen. This approach was used to reverse engineer 2 commercially-obtained monoclonal antibodies against murine CD137. Proteomic data enabled us to assign the majority of the variable domain sequences, with the exception of 3-5% of the sequence located within or adjacent to complementarity-determining regions. To efficiently resolve the sequence in these regions, small phage-displayed libraries were generated and subjected to antigen binding selection. Following enrichment of antigen-binding clones, 2 clones were selected for each antibody and recombinantly expressed as antigen-binding fragments (Fabs). In both cases, the reverse-engineered Fabs exhibited identical antigen binding affinity, within error, as Fabs produced from the commercial IgGs. This combination of proteomic and protein engineering techniques provides a useful approach to simplifying the technically challenging process of reverse engineering monoclonal antibodies from protein material.

  14. A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 for tumor radioimmunoimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Miyuki; Hinoda, Yuji; Sasaki, Shigeru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Imai, Kohzoh [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan); Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo

    1996-04-01

    A mouse-human chimeric antibody for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was established by using heavy chain loss mouse mutant hybridoma and human immunoglobulin expression vector. The HA58 hybridoma secreted anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (IgG1,{kappa}). The gene of the mouse variable region of heavy chain was amplified and cloned by the polymerase chain reaction technique directly from the HA58 hybridoma RNA. The variable region of heavy chain was joined with an expression vector which contains human {gamma}1 constant gene. The expression vector was transfected into heavy chain loss mutant cells HA58-7, which produced only murine immunoglobulin light chains. The resultant chimeric MoAb HA58, chHA58, retained full-binding reactivity to ICAM-1 compared with murine HA58 parental antibody. The chimeric MoAb chHA58 showed little antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxic activity against cultured tumor cells. Biodistribution studies with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chHA58 in nude mice bearing human gastric carcinoma JRST cells, demonstrated that the tumor-blood ratio was 1.55 at 18 h after injection, when the tumors were clearly visible in gamma scintigraphy. These data suggest that chHA58 may be of practical use for radioimmunoimaging of a wide variety of tumors. (author).

  15. Studies of monoclonal antibodies IOR-CEA-1 and IOR-EGF/R3 labelled with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Medicine is a speciality that uses radioisotopes for the diagnosis or treatment of diseases and it is considered one of the best tools among the diagnostic modalities for detection of cancer. 99mTc is one of the main isotopes for labelling antibodies and in Nuclear Medicine in general, due to its adequate physical properties, availability and low cost. Labelled monoclonal antibodies have shown promising results for diagnosis and therapy of cancer and their use has brought great experimental and clinical advances in the field of oncology. The main clinical applications of immunoscintigraphy with monoclonal antibodies are staging and evaluation of tumoral reappearance. The antibodies employed in this work were: OIR-CEA-1, a murine monoclonal antibody that acts directly against CEA expressed in several neoplasia in particular those from the gastrointestinal tract (colorectal cancer) and IOR-EGF/R3, a murine monoclonal antibody that binds to the external domain of EGF-R and it has been used in the diagnosis of tumors of epithelial origin. The objectives of this work were the development and optimization of the reduction and purification processes, the radiolabelling techniques and quality control procedures (radiochemical, immunoreactivity and cystein challenge) and imaging studies of monoclonal antibodies OIR-CEA-1 and IOR-EGF/R3, using the simple, fast and efficient method of direct labelling of the antibody with 99mTc. The final results was the definition of the best conditions for the preparation of lyophilized reactive kits of OIR-CEA-1 and IOR- EGF/R3 for an efficient diagnostic application in Nuclear Medicine. The most adequate conditions for the labelling of the antibodies were: 1.0 mg Ab, 29 μL MDP, 3.0 μg Sn2+, 1 mL of 99mTc and 30 min. reaction time. With these conditions the labelling yield was always higher than 95% and the maximum activity of 99mTc was about 2220 MBq (60 mCi). The evidences of the efficiency and quality of the methods here

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies to Plant Growth Regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Joachim; Arnscheidt, Angelika; Klix, Dieter; Weiler, Elmar W.

    1986-01-01

    Four high affinity monoclonal antibodies, which recognize two plant growth regulators from the cytokinin group, namely trans-zeatin riboside and dihydrozeatin riboside and their derivatives are reported. Six hybridomas were produced from three independent fusions of Balb/c spleen cells with P3-NS1-Ag 4-1 (abbreviated NS1) or X63-Ag 8.653 (X63) myeloma cells. The mice had been hyperimmunized with zeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate or dihydrozeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate for 3 months. The hybridomas secrete antibodies of the IgG 1 or IgG 2b subclass and allow the detection of femtomole amounts of the free cytokinins, their ribosides, and ribotides in plant extracts. The use of these monoclonals in radio- and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is also discussed. PMID:16664848

  17. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  18. Enhanced potency of a fucose-free monoclonal antibody being developed as an Ebola virus immunoprotectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Larry; Pettitt, James; Scully, Corinne; Bohorova, Natasha; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Hiatt, Andrew; Ngo, Long; Steinkellner, Herta; Whaley, Kevin J; Olinger, Gene G

    2011-12-20

    No countermeasures currently exist for the prevention or treatment of the severe sequelae of Filovirus (such as Ebola virus; EBOV) infection. To overcome this limitation in our biodefense preparedness, we have designed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which could be used in humans as immunoprotectants for EBOV, starting with a murine mAb (13F6) that recognizes the heavily glycosylated mucin-like domain of the virion-attached glycoprotein (GP). Point mutations were introduced into the variable region of the murine mAb to remove predicted human T-cell epitopes, and the variable regions joined to human constant regions to generate a mAb (h-13F6) appropriate for development for human use. We have evaluated the efficacy of three variants of h-13F6 carrying different glycosylation patterns in a lethal mouse EBOV challenge model. The pattern of glycosylation of the various mAbs was found to correlate to level of protection, with aglycosylated h-13F6 providing the least potent efficacy (ED(50) = 33 μg). A version with typical heterogenous mammalian glycoforms (ED(50) = 11 μg) had similar potency to the original murine mAb. However, h-13F6 carrying complex N-glycosylation lacking core fucose exhibited superior potency (ED(50) = 3 μg). Binding studies using Fcγ receptors revealed enhanced binding of nonfucosylated h-13F6 to mouse and human FcγRIII. Together the results indicate the presence of Fc N-glycans enhances the protective efficacy of h-13F6, and that mAbs manufactured with uniform glycosylation and a higher potency glycoform offer promise as biodefense therapeutics.

  19. Technological progresses in monoclonal antibody production systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, E.; Costa, A R; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become vitally important to modern medicine and are currently one of the major biopharmaceutical products in development. However, the high clinical dose requirements of mAbs demand a greater biomanufacturing capacity, leading to the development of new technologies for their large-scale production, with mammalian cell culture dominating the scenario. Although some companies have tried to meet these demands by creating bioreactors of increased capacity, the op...

  20. The role of adipokines in monoclonal gammopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Luís Alberto Resendes de

    2015-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of monoclonal gammopathies (MG), namely in multiple myeloma (MM), the bone marrow microenvironment displays a critical role. As there is accumulating evidence supporting a link between obesity and MM, it is possible that this association is made through altered adipokines secretion levels. Whereas these hormones are important in several physiologic functions, there are studies showing that they also participate in the carcinogenesis process of some solid tumors. However, a...

  1. Monoclonal antibodies as diagnostics; an appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use.

  2. Murine Typhus and Febrile Illness, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Mark D.; Murdoch, David R.; Rozmajzl, Patrick J.; Basnyat, Buddha; Woods, Christopher W.; Richards, Allen L.; Belbase, Ram Hari; Hammer, David A.; Anderson, Trevor P.; Reller, L. Barth

    2008-01-01

    Murine typhus was diagnosed by PCR in 50 (7%) of 756 adults with febrile illness seeking treatment at Patan Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal. Of patients with murine typhus, 64% were women, 86% were residents of Kathmandu, and 90% were unwell during the winter. No characteristics clearly distinguished typhus patients from those with blood culture–positive enteric fever.

  3. THE CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF THE MURINE SCFV GENE IN E.COLI AGAINST HUMAN CERVICAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Human cervical cancer is one of the most com-mon malignant neoplas m in women with a highdeath rate.It is characterized by a lot of factors andits pathological process is very complicated.In spiteof progress in the diagnosis and therapy of humancervical cancer,ti mely and accurate methods are ur-gently needed[1].Application of murine monoclonal antibodies(McAb)for the study of diagnosis and treat mentsfor human tumors is li mited by a number of fac-tors.Due to the progress in gene engineering andphage displ...

  4. The acquisition of cytokine responsiveness by murine B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism whereby small resting (high buoyant density) murine B cells are induced to express interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R) and to respond to IL-2 was addressed by staining with anti-IL-2R alpha and -IL-2R beta monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and using receptor-specific cDNA probes. Resting B...... staining and mRNA were induced by the combination of LPS plus IL-5. LPS+IL-5-treated B cells responded to IL-2 by Ig secretion. This indicates that B cells regulate their responsiveness to IL-2 similarly to T cells, via the combined level of expression of IL-2R beta and IL-2R alpha. The synergy between IL...... cells expressed undetectable levels of both IL-2R alpha and beta chains on their surface and did not respond to IL-2, even at supra-physiological concentrations. Sepharose-coupled, but not streptavidin-cross-linked, plastic-adsorbed or soluble, anti-mu up-regulated the expression of IL-2R alpha and beta...

  5. Critical evaluation of monoclonal antibody staining in breast carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Parham, D M; Coghill, G; Robertson, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The immunoperoxidase staining of 84 primary invasive breast carcinomas with four monoclonal antibodies (BRST-1, HMFG1, EMA, B72.3) was evaluated by semiquantitative light microscopical examination and quantitative image analysis. Major differences in the staining of the tumours for each of the monoclonal antibodies was observed. Correlation between monoclonal antibody staining and patient age, survival, histological grade, tumour diameter and cellularity was also carried out. This showed a si...

  6. Prevalence of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhera, Rishi K.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant plasma cell disorder that is associated with a lifelong risk of multiple myeloma. We conducted a systematic review of all studies investigating the prevalence and incidence of MGUS in the online database PubMed. The review was conducted from January 6, 2009, through January 15, 2010. The following MeSH search headings were used: monoclonal gammopathy, benign and prevalence; monoclonal gammopathy, benign and incidence;...

  7. Laboratory Persistence and Clinical Progression of Small Monoclonal Abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, David L.; Seningen, Justin L.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Snyder, Melissa R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Katzmann, Jerry A.

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) that presents with no quantifiable M spike on immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) can be termed IFE MGUS. We retrospectively identified patients with IFE MGUS who were monitored with at least 1 subsequent assessment that included an IFE, and evaluated the persistence of the monoclonal protein and the progression of disease. Although the monoclonal proteins persisted in the majority of patients, 16% did not experience this persistence,...

  8. ON THE NOTION OF SYNERGY OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AS DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sela

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available History of developing synergy between monoclonal antibodies, anti-tumor activity of monoclonal antibodies against tyrosine-kinases receptors EGFR/ErbB-1 and HER2/ErbB-2 as well as growth factor VEGF in various combinations are considered in the article. There were proposed hypotheses about potential molecular mechanisms underlay synergy between monoclonal antibodies (for homo- and hetero combinations of antibodies appropriately specific for antigenic determinants on the same or different receptors. Future trends in researches necessary to deeper understanding causes of this phenomenon and perspectives for practical application of monoclonal antibodies acted synergistically as immunotherapeutic drugs for human tumors treatment are reviewed.

  9. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB)

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory ePancari; Hongxia eFan; Sharon eSmith; Amita eJoshi; Robin eHaimbach; Desmond eClark; Yingzhe eLi; Jin eHua; Troy eMcKelvey; Yangsi eOu; James eDrummond; Leslie eCope; Donna eMontgomery; Tessie eMcNeely

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1) with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB) of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17), not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. Th...

  10. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  11. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  12. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Hippurate Hydrolase of Campylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Marina; Gyles, Carlton; Chan, Voon Loong; Odumeru, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant Campylobacter jejuni hippurate hydrolase were tested for binding to lysates from 19 C. jejuni strains, 12 other Campylobacter strains, and 21 non-Campylobacter strains. Several monoclonal antibodies bound to C. jejuni but not to other Campylobacter species and may be useful in a species-specific immunoassay.

  14. Assay for the specificity of monoclonal antibodies in crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, K; Schou, C; Koch, C

    1984-01-01

    A method is described based on crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a complex antigen mixture in agarose gel followed by incubation of the gel with the monoclonal antibody. The bound monoclonal antibody is detected by the use of a secondary enzyme-labelled antibody. Using this technique we have been ...

  15. Polyneuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy, cause and consequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eurelings, Marijke

    2005-01-01

    The relation between monoclonal antibodies and polyneuropathy is best supported for polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) antibodies. These anti-MAG antibodies are reactive against peripheral nerve autoantigen, thereby causing an autoimmune medi

  16. Production of monoclonal antibody with Celline-350 bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies are protein that are highly specific and sensitive in their reaction with specific sites on target molecules that they have become reagents of central importance in the diagnostic and treatment of human diseases. This paper reports the use of CELLine-350 bioreactor to produce continuous supply of serum-free breast cancer monoclonal antibody. Initial volume of 5ml (1.5 x 106 viable cells/ml) is inoculated into the bioreactor and harvesting is done every 5 days to obtain high yield monoclonal antibody. The serum-free supernatant is precipitated with 50% saturated ammonia sulfate and the antibody is purified by protein-G affinity chromatography. The concentration of monoclonal antibody successfully produced by the bioreactor is 0.91mg/ml respectively and it is measured by the Lowry method. This result shows that bioreactor Celline-350 is easy to handle and cost effective for the continuous production of serum free monoclonal antibody. (Author)

  17. Kinetics of expression of interleukin 2 receptors on class I and class II restricted murine T cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) expression has been examined on various class I and class II restricted, influenza specific murine T cell clones. Expression and relative levels of IL-2R were examined by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter analysis utilizing 3 anti-murine IL-2R monoclonal antibodies. Receptor expression was analyzed by scatchard analysis using radiolabeled recombinant human interleukin 2 to access the number of high and low affinity IL-2R per cell as well as the affinity of binding. The clones tested bound all 3 monoclonal antibodies and were inhibited in an IL-2 dependent proliferation assay by the addition of the antibodies to the culture. There was, however, differing degrees of inhibition ranging up to 99%, depending on the clone and the antibody used. IL-2R expression was detectable as early as 4-6 hours after antigenic stimulation of quiescent cells. After maximal levels of receptors were expressed, which was about 24 hours after stimulation, expression of IL-2R decreased with time on all clones examined (both class I and class II restricted). Differing rates of receptor loss is seen however, with some class II restricted clones retaining relatively high levels of receptors

  18. Complementary innate (anti-A-specific) IgM emerging from ontogenic O-GalNAc-transferase depletion: (Innate IgM complementarity residing in ancestral antigen completeness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The murine and the human genome have global properties in common. So the murine anti-A-specific complementary IgM and related human innate isoagglutinin represent developmental, 2-mercaptoethanol-sensitive, complement-binding glycoproteins, which do not arise from any measurable environmentally-induced or auto- immune response. The murine anti-A certainly originates from a cell surface- or cell adhesion molecule, which in the course of germ cell development becomes devoid of O-GalNAc-transferase and is released into the circulation. In human sera the enzyme occurs exclusively in those of blood group A- and AB subjects, while in group O(H) an identically encoded protein lets expect an opposite function and appears in conjunction with a complementary anti-A reactive glycoprotein. Since O-glycosylations rule the carbohydrate metabolism in growth and reproduction processes, we propose that the ancestral histo-(blood)-group A molecule arises in the course of O-GalNAc-glycosylations of glycolipids and protein envelops at progenitor cell surfaces. Germ cell development postulates embryonic stem cell fidelity, which is characterised by persistent production of α-linked O-GalNAc-glycans. They are determined by the A-allele within the human, "complete" histo (blood) group AB(O) structure that in early ontogeny is hypothesised to be synthesised independently from the final phenotype. The structure either passes "completely" through the germline, in transferase-secreting mature tissues becoming the "complete" phenotype AB, or disappears in exhaustive glycotransferase depletion from the differentiating cell surfaces and leaves behind the "incomplete" blood group O-phenotype, which has released a transferase- and O-glycan-depleted, complementary glycoprotein (IgM) into the circulation. The process implies, that in humans the different blood phenotypes evolve from a "complete" AB(O) molecular complex in a distinct enzymatic and/or complement cascade suggesting O

  19. Development of a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich ELISA for Peanut Allergen Ara h 1 in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanlai Xu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We have established a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA based on two monoclonal antibodies (mAb to measure the content of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 in foods. Two mAbs were selected out of 12 murine hybridoma cells secreting Ara h 1-specific antibody. Using mAb 6 as the capture antibody and HRP-labelled mAb 4 as the detection antibody, the limit of detection (LOD the assay was 0.34 ng/mL. Cross-reaction analysis showed that this method was strongly specific and had no cross-reactions with Ara h 2, pea protein or soy protein. Sample analysis showed that this ELISA was a useful tool to monitor peanut allergens in food products by measuring Ara h 1 content.

  20. Fine specificity and cross-reactions of monoclonal antibodies to group B streptococcal capsular polysaccharide type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pincus, Seth H; Moran, Emily; Maresh, Grace;

    2012-01-01

    ) is considered the dominant "protective" immune mediator. Here we study the fine specificity and potential host reactivity of a panel of well-characterized murine monoclonal Abs against the type III CPS by examining the binding of the Abs to intact and neuraminidase-digested GBS, purified CPS, synthetic...... carbohydrate array technology. The anti-CPS(III) mAbs did not react with cells expressing GD3 and GT3, nor did mAbs specific for the host carbohydrates cross-react with GBS, raising questions about the physiological relevance of this cross-reaction. But in the process of these investigations, we...... serendipitously demonstrated cross-reactions of some anti-CPS(III) mAbs with antigens, likely carbohydrates, found on human leukocytes. These studies suggest caution in the development of a maternal vaccine to prevent infection by this important human pathogen....

  1. A cross-reactive monoclonal antibody to nematode haemoglobin enhances protective immune responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie E Nieuwenhuizen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four -HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. CONCLUSION: The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity

  2. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  3. Production and characterization of a peptide-based monoclonal antibody against CD44 variant 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Saeed; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Hadavi, Reza; Mahmoudi, Ahmad R; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Vojgani, Yasaman; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2015-02-01

    The gene that codes for the CD44 family members consists of 20 exons, nine of which encode the standard form of the molecule. The other exons can be inserted in various combinations into the membrane proximal region of the extracellular domain of the protein, giving rise to variant isoforms (CD44v). CD44 variants, especially the CD44v6, have been reported to regulate tumor invasion, progression, and metastasis of carcinomas. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human CD44v6 provides a powerful tool to monitor and trace CD44v6 function in different biological fluids. In this study, a synthetic peptide from CD44v6 was conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and injected into BALB/c mice. Splenocytes from the immunized mice were fused with murine SP2/0 myeloma cells followed by selection of antibody producing hybridoma cells. After screening of hybridoma colonies by ELISA, high affinity antibodies were selected and purified by affinity chromatography. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibodies. Six stable hybridoma cell lines, designated as 1H1, 1H2, 2A12, 2G11, 3H3, and 3H7, were obtained. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry results showed that the new monoclonal antibodies recognized CD44v6 on the cell surface. This novel panel of anti-CD44v6 antibodies has the potential for investigating the role of CD44v6 in cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25723282

  4. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  5. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides (123I, 131I, and 111In) and with another radionuclide,211At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for 111In and 123I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches

  6. Humanization and characterization of an anti-ricin neutralization monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Gang Hu

    Full Text Available Ricin is regarded as a high terrorist risk for the public due to its high toxicity and ease of production. Currently, there is no therapeutic or vaccine available against ricin. D9, a murine monoclonal antibody developed previously in our laboratory, can strongly neutralize ricin and is therefore a good candidate for humanization. Humanization of D9 variable regions was achieved by a complementarity-determining region grafting approach. The humanized D9 (hD9 variable regions were further grafted onto human heavy and light chain constant regions to assemble the complete antibody gene. A foot-and-mouth-disease virus-derived 2A self-processing sequence was introduced between heavy and light chain DNA sequences to cleave the recombinant protein into a functional full-length antibody molecule from a single open reading frame driven by a single promoter in an adenoviral vector. After expression in mammalian cells and purification, the hD9 was demonstrated to have equimolar expression of the full-length antibody heavy and light chains. More importantly, the hD9 exhibited high affinity to ricin with K(D of 1.63 nM, comparable to its parental murine D9 (2.55 nM. In a mouse model, intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of hD9, at a low dose of 5 µg per mouse, 4 hours after the i.p. challenge with 5×LD50 ricin was found to rescue 100% of the mice. In addition, administered 6 hours post-challenge, hD9 could still rescue 50% of the mice. The hD9 has the potential to be used for prophylactic or therapeutic purposes against ricin poisoning.

  7. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  8. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  9. Affinity Maturation of Monoclonal Antibody 1E11 by Targeted Randomization in CDR3 Regions Optimizes Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of HER2-Positive Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bong-Kook; Choi, Soyoung; Cui, Lei Guang; Lee, Young-Ha; Hwang, In-Sik; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Shim, Hyunbo; Lee, Jong-Seo

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HER2 murine monoclonal antibody 1E11 has strong and synergistic anti-tumor activity in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cells when used in combination with trastuzumab. We presently optimized this antibody for human therapeutics. First, the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the murine antibody were grafted onto human germline immunoglobulin variable genes. No difference in affinity and biological activity was observed between chimeric 1E11 (ch1E11) and humanized 1E11 (hz1E11). Next, affinity maturation of hz1E11 was performed by the randomization of CDR-L3 and H3 residues followed by stringent biopanning selection. Milder selection pressure favored the selection of more diverse clones, whereas higher selection stringency resulted in the convergence of the panning output to a smaller number of clones with improved affinity. Clone 1A12 had four amino acid substitutions in CDR-L3, and showed a 10-fold increase in affinity compared to the parental clone and increased potency in an in vitro anti-proliferative activity assay with HER2-overepxressing gastric cancer cells. Clone 1A12 inhibited tumor growth of NCI-N87 xenograft model with similar efficacy to trastuzumab alone, and the combination treatment of 1A12 and trastuzumab completely removed the established tumors. These results suggest that humanized and affinity matured monoclonal antibody 1A12 is a highly optimized molecule for future therapeutic development against HER2-positive tumors.

  10. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of fusariosis with monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbæk, B.; Jungersen, Gregers;

    and the two patients. The Mabs showed no reactivity when tested on tissues containing heterologous fungi. Conclusion: Because prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment is essential to maximize the chance of survival for any patient with fusariosis, the present Mabs are expected to add to a quick......Objectives: Fusariosis is an emerging fungal infection, especially in neutropenic patients. Proper identification of Fusarium spp. is important because the choice of antifungal treatment of fusariosis differs from that of aspergillosis, candidosis or scedosporidiosis (pseudalleceriosis). Cultural...... the somatic antigen. The production of murine Mabs was carried out as previously described for other fungi (Jensen et al., 1993, APMIS, 101, 505-516). The Mabs were isotyped and tested for reactivity in ELISA and immunoblotting (IB) with the homologous antigen. Reactive Mabs were applied on tissue sections...

  11. Monoclonal gammopathy: a diagnosis for to keep in mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How to identify monoclonal gammopathies at risk for progression has been studied for the last year. 40 patients were studied in which a monoclonal band had been detected, in some of the cases de novo. The electrophoresis was performed in the Hydrasys system. Of the total of electrophoresis carried out, the 14% was monoclonal gammopathy. In 36% a diagnostic assumption was not stated. Most frequent diagnosis in the group of patients with a diagnosis was multiple myeloma. Average age of patients was 61.5 years and there were differences among percentages for sex

  12. Monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments for treating solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenbeis AM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea M Eisenbeis, Stefan J GrauDepartment of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: Advances in biotechnology, better understanding of pathophysiological processes, as well as the identification of an increasing number of molecular markers have facilitated the use of monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments in various fields in medicine. In this context, a rapidly growing number of these substances have also emerged in the field of oncology. This review will summarize the currently approved monoclonal antibodies used for the treatment of solid tumors with a focus on their clinical application, biological background, and currently ongoing trials.Keywords: targeted therapy, monoclonal antibodies, cancer, biological therapy

  13. Preparation and Evaluation of Human-Murine Chimeric Antibody against Protective Antigen of Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Hao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop a human/murine chimeric Fab antibody which neutralizes the anthrax toxin, protective antigen (PA. The chimeric Fab was constructed using variable regions of murine anti-PA monoclonal antibody in combination with constant regions of human IgG. The chimeric PA6-Fab was expressed in E. coli. BL21 and evaluated by ELISA and co-immunoprecipitation- mass spectra. The potency of PA6-Fab to neutralize LeTx was examined in J774A.1 cell viability in vitro and in Fisher 344 rats in vivo. The PA6-Fab did not have domain similarity corresponding to the current anti PA mAbs, but specifically bound to anthrax PA at an affinity of 1.76 nM, and was able to neutralize LeTx in vitro and protected 56.9% cells at 20 μg/mL against anthrax LeTx. One hundred μg PA6-Fab could neutralize 300 μg LeTx in vivo. The PA6-Fab has potential as a therapeutic mAb for treatment of anthrax.

  14. Radioimmunoimaging of lung vessels: An approach using indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, S.M.; Martynov, A.V.; Klibanov, A.L.; Slinkin, M.A.; Sakharov, I.Yu.; Malov, A.G.; Sergienko, V.B.; Vedernikov, A.Yu.; Muzykantov, V.R.; Torchilin, V.P. (USSR Cardiology Research Center, Moscow)

    1989-10-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody against human angiotensin-converting enzyme was radiolabeled with {sup 111}In via diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid without substantial loss of antigen-binding capacity. This monoclonal antibody designated 9B9 cross-reacted with rat and monkey angiotensin-converting enzyme. Indium-111-labeled 9B9 selectively accumulated 10-20 times greater in the lung than in blood or other organs following intravenous administration in rats. Kinetics of lung accumulation and blood clearance were studied for {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody and compared to that of {sup 125}I-labeled 9B9 in rat. Highly specific accumulation of {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody in the lung of Macaca Rhesus monkeys after intravenous injection was monitored by gamma-imaging. Images of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody 9B9 biodistribution in monkey lung noticeably differ from the images of biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled albumin microspheres. This difference may provide information concerning the state of the endothelium of lung capillaries, which is different from the blood flow characteristics determined with routine microsphere technique.

  15. Development and characterization of a panel of cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated using H1N1 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chun-yan; Tang, Yi-gui; Qi, Zong-li; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Xiang-rong; Huo, Xue-ping; Li, Yan; Feng, Qing; Zhao, Peng-hua; Wang, Xin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Hai-fang; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Xin-jian

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the antigenic epitopes of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of H1N1 influenza virus, a panel consisting of 84 clones of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated using the HA proteins from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine lysate and the seasonal influenza H1N1(A1) vaccines. Thirty-three (39%) of the 84 mAbs were found to be strain-specific, and 6 (7%) of the 84 mAbs were subtype-specific. Twenty (24%) of the 84 mAbs recognized the common HA epitopes shared by 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal A1 (H1N1), and A3 (H3N2) influenza viruses. Twenty-five of the 84 clones recognized the common HA epitopes shared by the 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal A1 (H1N1) and A3 (H3N2) human influenza viruses, and H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses. We found that of the 16 (19%) clones of the 84 mAbs panel that were cross-reactive with human respiratory pathogens, 15 were made using the HA of the seasonal A1 (H1N1) virus and 1 was made using the HA of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue microarray (TMA) showed that 4 of the 84 mAb clones cross-reacted with human tissue (brain and pancreas). Our results indicated that the influenza virus HA antigenic epitopes not only induce type-, subtype-, and strain-specific monoclonal antibodies against influenza A virus but also cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies against human tissues. Further investigations of these cross-reactive (heterophilic) epitopes may significantly improve our understanding of viral antigenic variation, epidemics, pathophysiologic mechanisms, and adverse effects of influenza vaccines.

  16. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-07-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine myeloma cell lines by different transfection reagents. Mouse myeloma cell lines (SP2/0, NS0, NS1, Ag8, and P3U1) were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector using Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec commercial transfection reagents in different combinations. The transfection permissible HEK293-FT cell line was used as a control in transfection procedure. Transfected cells, expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), were analyzed by flow cytometry 48 hrs post transfection. Our results showed transfection efficiency of 71%, 57% and 22% for HEK293-FT, 5.5%, 3.4% and 1% for SP2/0, 55.7%, 21.1% and 9.3% for NS0, 8.2%, 6% and 5.5% for NS1, 22%, 49.2% and 5.5% for Ag8 and 6.3%, 21.5% and 4.6% for P3U1 cell lines after transfection with Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec reagents, respectively. Our data indicate that NS0 and Ag8 are efficiently transfected by Lipofectamine 2000 and jetPEI reagents. Finally, we propose Ag8 and NS0 cell lines as suitable host cells for efficient expression of target genes which can be used for mouse immunization and MAb production. PMID:23408356

  17. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific to Coenzyme A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malanchuk O. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Generation of monoclonal antibodies specific to Coenzyme A. Methods. Hybridoma technique. KLH carrier protein conjugated with CoA was used for immunization. Screening of positive clones was performed with BSA conjugated to CoA. Results. Monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes CoA and CoA derivatives, but not its precursors ATP and cysteine has been generated. Conclusion. In this study, we describe for the first time the production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against CoA. The monoclonal antibody 1F10 was shown to recognize specifically CoA in Western blotting, ELISA and immunoprecipitation. These properties make this antiboby a particularly valuable reagent for elucidating CoA function in health and disease.

  18. [Nephrotoxicity of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, M L; Depierreux, M; Florquin, S; Abramowicz, D; De Pauw, L; Kinnaert, P; Vereerstraeten, P; Goldman, M

    1991-01-01

    The OKT3 monoclonal antibody entails a transient acute nephrotoxicity when used either to prevent or to treat renal allograft rejection. This nephrotoxicity was reproduced experimentally in mice injected with 145-2C11, an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody which shares many properties with OKT3. Both clinical and experimental data suggest that the renal lesions are due to the systemic release of cytokines that occurs prior to the immunosuppression. Pre-treatment with corticosteroids before the injection of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody mitigates both the release of cytokines and the nephrotoxicity, in a dose-dependent manner. Experimental data suggest that very high doses of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg) administered 2 to 3 hours before the monoclonal antibody are necessary to obtain an optimal protection. PMID:1827878

  19. A monoclonal antibody toolkit for C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayla Hadwiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1, a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10, a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1, a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4, which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2, a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5; to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1; to EHD1 (RME-1 a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1, a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1, a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8 that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60 targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1, a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7 of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1 and to the alpha-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2 as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1 and cadherin (HMR-1, both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1, which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413 which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7 which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to

  20. Characterization of human serum spreading factor with monoclonal antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, D W; Silnutzer, J; See, C; Shaffer, M

    1983-01-01

    Serum spreading factor is a glycoprotein isolated from human serum that promotes spreading of a variety of cell types on culture dishes. We developed mouse hybridoma lines secreting monoclonal antibody to serum spreading factor that markedly inhibited the rate of serum spreading factor-promoted spreading of both fibroblastic and epithelial cells in culture. Fibronectin-promoted cell spreading was unaffected by monoclonal antibody to serum spreading factor, and the factor appeared to be distin...

  1. Current research status of radioimmunotherapy monoclonal antibody drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) was one of the most important progresses in the field of cancer therapy over the past 20 years. It has been successfully applied in the treatment of blood system tumors such as NHL. For the utilization of RIT in therapy of solid tumors, however, development of more effective monoclonal antibodies, labeling methods and so on are needed. The current status of radionuclides, monoclonal antibodies and drugs commonly used in the RIT were briefly reviewed. (authors)

  2. Production and characterization of yeast killer toxin monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Polonelli, L; Morace, G

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were obtained after fusion of mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells isolated from mice primed with a crude extract of yeast killer toxin produced by a strain of Hansenula anomala. Hybridomas were selected by specific immunoassay reaction of their fluid with crude yeast killer toxin extract. Among the monoclonal antibodies, which were characterized by the Western blot technique, one (designated KT4) proved to have precipitating properties, thus permitting the neutralizati...

  3. Immunophenotypic studies of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna Robert W; Chen Weina; Wang Huan-You; Olteanu Horatiu; Karandikar Nitin J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a common plasma cell dyscrasia, comprising the most indolent form of monoclonal gammopathy. However, approximately 25% of MGUS cases ultimately progress to plasma cell myeloma (PCM) or related diseases. It is difficult to predict which subset of patients will transform. In this study, we examined the immunophenotypic differences of plasma cells in MGUS and PCM. Methods Bone marrow specimens from 32 MGUS patients ...

  4. Human C-C chemokine receptor 3 monoclonal antibody inhibits pulmonary inflammation in allergic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Wen LI; Hua-qiong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effect of C-C chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) blockade on pulmonary inflammation and mucus production in allergic mice. Methods:We used the synthetic peptide of the CCR3 NH2-terminal as the immunizing antigen and generated murine monoclonal antibody against the human CCR3. In addition,the generated antibody was administered to mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. The inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage,cytokine levels,pulmonary histopathology,and mucus secretion were examined. Results:The Western blotting analysis indicated that the generated antibody bound to CCR3 specifically. The allergic mice treated with the antihuman CCR3 antibody exhibited a significant reduction of pulmonary inflammation accompanied with the alteration of cytokine. Conclusion:The antibody we generated was specific to CCR3. The inhibition of airway inflammation and mucus overproduction by the antibody suggested that the blockade of CCR3 is an appealing therapeutical target for asthma. The present research may provide an experimental basis for the further study of this agent.

  5. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against rat platelet GPIIb/IIIa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies against rat platelets were produced by fusion of spleen cells from mice intravenously immunized with whole rat platelets. All four antibodies immunoprecipitated two major platelet membrane proteins with apparent molecular weights of 130,000 and 82,000 (nonreduced) and of 120,000 and 98,000 (reduced), which were structurally analogous to human glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, i.e. rat GPIIb/IIIa. Two of four antibodies, named P9 and P55, strongly inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation of washed rat platelets and caused approximately 50% inhibition of human fibrinogen binding to ADP-stimulated rat platelets, suggesting that rat GPIIb/IIIa serves as a fibrinogen receptor in ADP-induced aggregation. In contrast, two other antibodies, named P14 and P34, themselves caused aggregation of rat platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the secretion of 14C-serotonin from 14C-serotonin-labeled PRP. These results indicate that rat GPIIb/IIIa plays an important role in platelet aggregation

  6. Study of effects of anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody on systemic Candidiasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongfen Ge; Xingping Chen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of anti-interleukin- 10 monoclonal antibody( anti-IL- 10MAb) on systemic candidiasis. Methods: Control group(only candidiasis injection), and disposal group( candidiasis infection accompanying with anti-IL-10MAb infection) of cyclophosphamide-induced immuno-suppressed murine systemic candidiasis model were set in this study. Colony Forming Units (CFUs) of infected kidneys and spleens were determined using plating dilution method. The histological studies for infected livers, spleens,and kidneys were applied. Levels of interferon gamma(IFN-γ) in spleen tissue homogenare were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: In kidneys, the numbers of CFU of the disposal group were much lower than that of the control group; the numbers of CFU in spleens were similar to the control group. The histopathological scores of the disposal group were much better than that of the control group in kindneys with significant differences( P < 0.01 ). In spleens,the histopathological scores of disposal group were also better than that of control group,but no statistic significant differences were observed ( P > 0.05). And the spleen IFN-γ level of the disposal group was significant higher than that of the control group( P < 0.01). Conclusion: Anti-IL- 10MAb effects on systemic candidiasis was concluded.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against peptidorhamnomannans of Scedosporium apiospermum enhance the pathogenicity of the fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia C L Lopes

    Full Text Available Scedosporium apiospermum is part of the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex. Peptidorhamnomannans (PRMs are cell wall glycopeptides present in some fungi, and their structures have been characterized in S. apiospermum, S. prolificans and Sporothrix schenckii. Prior work shows that PRMs can interact with host cells and that the glycopeptides are antigenic. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, IgG1 to S. apiospermum derived PRM were generated and their effects on S. apiospermum were examined in vitro and in vivo. The mAbs recognized a carbohydrate epitope on PRM. In culture, addition of the PRM mAbs increased S. apiospermum conidia germination and reduced conidial phagocytosis by J774.16 macrophages. In a murine infection model, mice treated with antibodies to PRM died prior to control animals. Thus, PRM is involved in morphogenesis and the binding of this glycopeptide by mAbs enhanced the virulence of the fungus. Further insights into the effects of these glycopeptides on the pathobiology of S. apiospermum may lead to new avenues for preventing and treating scedosporiosis.

  8. A monoclonal antibody against KCNK9 K+ channel extracellular domain inhibits tumour growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han; Luo, Liqun; Lal, Bachchu; Ma, Xinrong; Chen, Lieping; Hann, Christine L.; Fulton, Amy M.; Leahy, Daniel J.; Laterra, John

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels act to maintain cell resting membrane potential—a prerequisite for many biological processes. KCNK9, a member of K2P family, is implicated in cancer, owing to its overexpression in human tumours and its ability to promote neoplastic cell survival and growth. However, KCNK9's underlying contributions to malignancy remain elusive due to the absence of specific modulators. Here we describe the development of monoclonal antibodies against the KCNK9 extracellular domain and their functional effects. We show that one antibody (Y4) with the highest affinity binding induces channel internalization. The addition of Y4 to KCNK9-expressing carcinoma cells reduces cell viability and increases cell death. Systemic administration of Y4 effectively inhibits growth of human lung cancer xenografts and murine breast cancer metastasis in mice. Evidence for Y4-mediated carcinoma cell autonomous and immune-dependent cytotoxicity is presented. Our study reveals that antibody-based KCNK9 targeting is a promising therapeutic strategy in KCNK9-expressing malignancies. PMID:26842342

  9. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  10. Monoclonal antibody-based serological methods for maize chlorotic mottle virus detection in China*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-xiang; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Huan; Qian, Ya-juan; Xie, Yan; Zhou, Xue-ping

    2013-01-01

    Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) infects maize plants and causes significant losses in corn production worldwide. In this study, purified MCMV particles were used as the immunogen to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and polyclonal antibodies (PAbs). Four murine MAbs (4B8, 8C11, 6F4, and 9G1) against MCMV were obtained through the hybridoma technology. The triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA), dot-immunobinding assay (DIBA), and immunocapture reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR) using the MAb 4B8 were then developed for sensitive, specific, and rapid detection of MCMV in fields. MCMV could be detected in infected leaf crude extracts at dilutions of 1:327 680, 1:64 000, and 1:3 276 800 (w/v, g/ml) by TAS-ELISA, DIBA, and IC-RT-PCR, respectively. One hundred and sixty-one maize field samples showing virus-like symptoms and sixty-nine symptomless maize field samples from ten different provinces of China were collected and screened for the presence of MCMV using the established serological methods. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the full length CP genes and Chinese MCMV isolates formed one branch with Thailand isolates. The detection results demonstrated that MCMV is one of most prevalent viruses infecting maize in the Yunnan and Sichuan provinces of China. PMID:23825140

  11. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Nuclear Protein FAM76B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Zheng

    Full Text Available Human FAM76B (hFAM76B is a 39 kDa protein that contains homopolymeric histidine tracts, a targeting signal for nuclear speckles. FAM76B is highly conserved among different species, suggesting that it may play an important physiological role in normal cellular functions. However, a lack of appropriate tools has hampered study of this potentially important protein. To facilitate research into the biological function(s of FAM76B, murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against hFAM76B were generated by using purified, prokaryotically expressed hFAM76B protein. Six strains of MAbs specific for hFAM76B were obtained and characterized. The specificity of MAbs was validated by using FAM76B-/- HEK 293 cell line. Double immunofluorescence followed by laser confocal microscopy confirmed the nuclear speckle localization of hFAM76B, and the specific domains recognized by different MAbs were further elucidated by Western blot. Due to the high conservation of protein sequences between mouse and human FAM76B, MAbs against hFAM76B were shown to react with mouse FAM76B (mFAM76B specifically. Lastly, FAM76B was found to be expressed in the normal tissues of most human organs, though to different extents. The MAbs produced in this study should provide a useful tool for investigating the biological function(s of FAM76B.

  12. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Yunoki, Mikihiro [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kuhara, Motoki [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano 396-0002 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naomasa [Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ohu University, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan); Okuno, Yoshinobu [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa 768-0061 (Japan); Ikuta, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: ikuta@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  13. T10B9 monoclonal antibody: A short-acting nonstimulating monoclonal antibody that spares γδ T-cells and treats and prevents cellular rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Waid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thomas H Waid1, John S Thompson1, Maria Siemionow2, Stephen A Brown1 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 2Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: T10B9.1A-31/MEDI-500 is a nonmitogenic immunoglobulin M kappa murine monoclonal antibody (mAb directed against the alpha-beta (αβ heterodimer of the T-lymphocyte receptor complex. The hybridoma was first produced by fusing spleen cells from BALB/C mice immunized with human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes with SP2/O-Ag14 mutant myeloma cells. The mAb is produced and purified using multistep ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatography protocols. T10B9 has been used successfully to treat acute cellular rejection in renal transplantation and as an immunosuppression induction agent in heart and simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation. Because T10B9 is nonmitogenic and causes minimal cytokine release, both treatment of rejection and induction of immunosuppression were accomplished with significantly fewer and milder untoward effects (cytokine release syndrome than its comparator OKT3. Since T10B9 is directed against the αβ heterodimer of the CD3 epitope, it spares the gamma delta (γδ region. These gamma delta (γδ T cells have a unique role in the immune response controlling many serious human diseases and perhaps facilitating the development of immunologic tolerance. T10B9 has a relatively short duration of action, depleting T cells for only 10 to 14 days, unlike the protracted depletion seen with thymoglobulin and Campath-1H. There is no B-lymphocyte depletion with T10B9 as there is with both of the aforementioned reagents. The lack of prolonged lymphocyte depletion may account for less infection observed with T10B9 treatment.Keywords: T10B9.1A-31, γδ T-cell, monoclonal antibody, Campath-1H, thymoglobulin, OKT3

  14. Technological progresses in monoclonal antibody production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Costa, Ana Rita; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become vitally important to modern medicine and are currently one of the major biopharmaceutical products in development. However, the high clinical dose requirements of mAbs demand a greater biomanufacturing capacity, leading to the development of new technologies for their large-scale production, with mammalian cell culture dominating the scenario. Although some companies have tried to meet these demands by creating bioreactors of increased capacity, the optimization of cell culture productivity in normal bioreactors appears as a better strategy. This review describes the main technological progresses made with this intent, presenting the advantages and limitations of each production system, as well as suggestions for improvements. New and upgraded bioreactors have emerged both for adherent and suspension cell culture, with disposable reactors attracting increased interest in the last years. Furthermore, the strategies and technologies used to control culture parameters are in constant evolution, aiming at the on-line multiparameter monitoring and considering now parameters not seen as relevant for process optimization in the past. All progresses being made have as primary goal the development of highly productive and economic mAb manufacturing processes that will allow the rapid introduction of the product in the biopharmaceutical market at more accessible prices. PMID:20043321

  15. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics. PMID:27342605

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Moroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of monoclonal antibodies (mAb are now under investigation in clinical trials to assess their potential role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. The most frequently used mAb is rituximab, which is directed against CD20, a membrane protein expressed on B lymphocytes. Uncontrolled trials reported an improvement of SLE activity in non-renal patients and other studies even reported an improvement of severe lupus nephritis unresponsive to conventional treatments. However two randomized trials failed to show the superiority of rituximab over conventional treatment in non renal SLE and in lupus nephritis. Preliminary trials reported promising results with epratuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against CD22, and with belimumab, a human mAb that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of BLyS a cytokine of the tumornecrosis-factor (TNF ligand superfamily. Other clinical trials with mAb directed against TNF-alpha, interleukin-10 (Il-10, Il-6, CD154, CD40 ligand, IL-18 or complement component C5 are under way. At present, however, in spite of good results reported by some studies, no firm conclusion on the risk-benefit profile of these mAbs in patients with SLE can be drawn from the available studies.

  17. Licensed monoclonal antibodies and associated challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amjad Hayat; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2015-12-23

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are the leading class of targeted therapeutics and remarkably effective in addressing autoimmune diseases, inflammations, infections, and various types of cancer. Several mAbs approved by US food and drug administration (FDA), are available on the market and a number are pending for approval. Luckily, FDA approved mAbs have played a pivotal role in the treatment and prevention of lethal diseases. However, claiming that licensed mAbs are 100% safe is still debatable, because infections, malignancies, anaphylactoid, and anaphylactic reactions are the more frequently associated adverse events. To evaluate benefit to risk ratio of mAbs, it is important for the clinical research staff or physicians to monitor and follow-up the patients who are receiving mAbs dozes. It is recommended that patients, physicians, biopharmaceutical companies, and researchers should keep in touch to highlight and resolve antibody-based adverse events. In this review we underscore the associated challenges of mAbs, approved by FDA from 2007-2014. PMID:27472864

  18. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs. PMID:24237029

  19. [New immunological weapons for medicine in the 21st Century: biological therapy based on the use of the latest generation monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguillón, Juan C; Contreras, Juan; Dotte, Andrés; Cruzat, Andrea; Catalán, Diego; Salazar, Lorena; Molina, María Carmen; Guerrero, Julia; López, Mercedes; Soto, Lilian; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Cuchacovich, Miguel

    2003-12-01

    The fusion of a murine B cell and a myeloma cell generates a hybridoma that produces monoclonal antibody (mAb). These murine mAb induce the HAMA (human anti-mouse antibodies) response. Murine mAb have been modified by genetic engineering, producing molecules with a higher proportion of human protein. At present, chimeric, humanized and fully human mAb are available. mAb block interactions between target molecules and their ligands or trigger the lyses of mAb-coated tumor cells. Numerous mAb have been developed using the recombinant DNA technology and several are available in the market. Trastuzumab, against HER2/neu, is useful in breast cancer; rituximab, against CD20 in B lymphocytes is useful in lymphoma; alemtuzumah, against CD52 is used in lymphoma and leukemia; daclizumab and basiliximab block the IL-2 receptor interaction and reduce acute rejection in kidney transplantation; abciximab, an antagonist of GPIIb/IIIa platelet receptor, is used in patients undergoing acute coronary syndromes. In autoimmunity diseases, blocking tumor necrosis factor by infliximab and adalimumab has demonstrated excellent results. Thus, infliximab is useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis while adalimumab is the first fully human mAb available for RA. Infliximab and adalimumab reduce signs and symptoms in RA and they also interfere with progression of joint damage. Finally, the direct benefits of antagonist treatment can occur at the expense of a major adverse effect in some other biological function.

  20. Development of syngeneic monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies to mouse monoclonal anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai M

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Anti-idiotype antibodies (Ab2 play an important role in the homeostasis of immune responses and are related to the development and the disease activity of certain autoimmune diseases. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is considered one of the target antigens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune chronic active hepatitis (AIH. We previously developed a mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 8D7 which recognizes rat and human ASGPR. In this study, to help investigate the anti-ASGPR antibody-anti-idiotype antibody network in patients with AIH, we developed a syngeneic mouse monoclonal Ab2 to the 8D7 anti-ASGPR antibody (Ab1. One clone, designated as 3C8, tested positive for specific reactivity to 8D7-Ab1 and did not bind to other irrelevant immunoglobulins. By competitive inhibition assays, the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to liver membrane extracts, i.e., the crude antigen preparation, was inhibited by 3C8-Ab2 in a dose-dependent manner, and the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to 3C8-Ab2 was inhibited by the liver membrane extracts. In the immunohistochemical analysis, 3C8-Ab2 blocked the specific staining of sinusoidal margins of rat hepatocytes by 8D7-Ab1. These results suggest that 3C8 anti-idiotype antibody recognizes the specific idiotypic determinants within the antigen-binding site of 8D7-Ab1.

  1. Diffuse plane xanthomatosis associated with monoclonal gammopathy Xantomatose plana difusa associada a gamopatia monoclonal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristóteles Rosmaninho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse plane normolipemic xanthomatosis (DPNX is a rare, non-inherited disease that is often associated with systemic diseases, mainly malignant hematological (especially multiple myeloma or lymph proliferative disorders. The DPNX can precede the appearance of such conditions by several years, so careful follow-up and periodic laboratory examinations are recommended even for patients that seemed to have no underlying disease. We describe a case associated with monoclonal gammopathy. This case shows that dermatological lesions can be the first manifestation of important hematological diseases and so physicians should be familiarized with this entityA xantomatose plana difusa normolipêmica (XPDN é uma dermatose adquirida rara, muitas vezes associada a doenças sistêmicas, nomeadamente neoplasias hematológicas(sobretudo o mieloma múltiplo ou a processos linfoproliferativos. A XPDN pode preceder o aparecimento dessas doenças em vários anos, sendo por isso recomendada uma vigilância clínica e laboratorial periódica, mesmo para os doentes que aparentemente não apresentam uma doença associada. Descrevemos um caso associado à gamopatia monoclonal. Este caso demonstra a importância das manifestações cutâneas como primeira manifestação de doenças hematológicas importantes e por isso os clínicos devem estar familiarizados com esta entidade

  2. Murine Typhus in Child, Yucatan, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Zavala-Castro, Jorge E.; Zavala-Velázquez, Jorge E.; Uicab, Justo Eduardo Sulú

    2009-01-01

    A case of murine typhus in Yucatan was diagnosed in a child with nonspecific signs and symptoms. The finding of Rickettsia typhi increases the number of Rickettsia species identified in Yucatan and shows that studies are needed to determine the prevalence and incidence of rickettsioses in Mexico.

  3. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in the US

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-21

    Dr. Lucas Blanton discusses the Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston Texas in 2013.  Created: 4/21/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2015.

  4. Structure of the murine Thy-1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Giguere; K-I. Isobe; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have cloned the murine Thy-1.1 (AKR) and Thy-1.2 (Balb/c) genes. The complete exon/intron structure and the nucleotide sequence of the Thy-1.2 gene was determined. The gene contains four exons and three intervening sequences. The complete transcriptional unit gives rise to a tissue an

  5. Role of CD18-dependent and CD18-independent mechanisms in the increased leukocyte adhesiveness and in the variations of circulating white blood cell populations induced by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaert, P; Pradier, O; Bournonville, B; Habrant, C; Goldman, M; Van Geertruyden, N

    1996-01-01

    Anti-CD3 antibodies induce a quick and profound depletion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that is not well understood. We studied the effect of OKT3, a mouse monoclonal antibody against the human CD3 complex, on the in vitro adhesion of human PBMCs to monolayers of fresh and fixed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OKT3 induced an increased adhesiveness of PBMCs. This phenomenon was blocked with anti-CD18 antibodies, indicating the participation of beta 2 integrins. As this increased adhesiveness could explain the lymphopenia by adhesion of PBMCs to endothelial cells and their sequestration in some peripheral vascular beds, we studied the effect of anti-CD18 antibodies in vivo on mice injected with 145/2C11, a hamster monoclonal antibody against murine CD3. Mice treated with 145/2C11 presented with a transient granulocytopenia and a sustained reduction in PBMCs. A monoclonal anti-CD18 antibody prevented the granulocytopenia but had no effect on the drop in PBMCs. Consequently, the in vivo depletion of PBMCs after administration of an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody involves CD18-independent mechanisms, while the transient drop in polymorphonuclear cells appears to be CD18-dependent. PMID:8819275

  6. PREPARATION OF IgA MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO MURINE LACTIC DEHYDROGENASE-C4 (LDH-C4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENGShu-Lin; BENKun-Long; LIANGZhi-Guo

    1989-01-01

    LDH--C4 is a sperm specific lactic dehydrogcnase in mammals and human, and is consid ered as a model molecule for contraceptive vaccine research. Significant contraceptive effects were observed in female mice, rabbits and baboons immunized with purified

  7. Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Effector-Enhanced EphA2 Agonist Monoclonal Antibody Demonstrates Potent Activity against Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Bruckheimer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available EphA2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that has been shown to be overexpressed in a variety of human tumor types. Previous studies demonstrated that agonist monoclonal antibodies targeting EphA2 induced the internalization and degradation of the receptor, thereby abolishing its oncogenic effects. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC activity of EphA2 effector-enhanced agonist monoclonal antibodies was evaluated. With tumor cell lines and healthy human peripheral blood monocytes, the EphA2 antibodies demonstrated ∼80% tumor cell killing. In a dose-dependent manner, natural killer (NK cells were required for the in vitro ADCC activity and became activated as demonstrated by the induction of cell surface expression of CD107a. To assess the role of NK cells on antitumor efficacy in vivo, the EphA2 antibodies were evaluated in xenograft models in severe compromised immunodeficient (SCID mice (which have functional NK cells and monocytes and SCID nonobese diabetic (NOD mice (which largely lack functional NK cells and monocytes. Dosing of EphA2 antibody in the SCID murine tumor model resulted in a 6.2-fold reduction in tumor volume, whereas the SCID/nonobese diabetic model showed a 1.6-fold reduction over the isotype controls. Together, these results demonstrate that the anti-EphA2 monoclonal antibodies may function through at least two mechanisms of action: EphA2 receptor activation and ADCC-mediated activity. These novel EphA2 monoclonal antibodies provide additional means by which host effector mechanisms can be activated for selective destruction of EphA2-expressing tumor cells.

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies to Conformational Epitopes of the Surface Glycoprotein of Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus: Potential Application to Competitive-Inhibition Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Antibodies in Goat Sera

    OpenAIRE

    Özyörük, Fuat; Cheevers, William P.; Hullinger, Gordon A.; McGuire, Travis C.; Hutton, Melinda; Knowles, Donald P

    2001-01-01

    Four immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the gp135 surface envelope glycoprotein (SU) of the 79–63 isolate of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV), referred to as CAEV-63, were characterized and evaluated for their ability to compete with antibody from CAEV-infected goats. Three murine MAbs (MAbs GPB16A, 29A, and 74A) and one caprine MAb (MAb F7-299) were examined. All MAbs reacted in nitrocellulose dot blots with native CAEV-63 SU purified by MAb F7-299 affinity chromato...

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to drosophila cytochrome P-450's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies were prepared by the fusion of SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells from a female BALB/c mouse immunized by cytochrome P-450-A and P-450-B purified from Drosophila Hikone-R (BG) microsomes. P-450-A and P-450-B are electrophoretically distinct subsets of Drosophila P-450. P-450-A is ubiquitous among strains tested, while P-450-B is present in only a few strains displaying unique enzyme activities and increased insecticide resistance. The Oregon-R strain contains only cytochromes P-450-A and is susceptible to insecticides. The authors Hikone-R (BG) strain expresses both cytochromes P-450-A and P-450-B and is insecticide resistant. Antibody producing hybridomas were detected in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) by binding to Hikone-R (BG) or Oregon-R microsomes. Four independent hybridomas were identified as producing monoclonal antibodies that recognized proteins in the P-450 complex by immunoblot experiments. Three monoclonal antibodies recognized P-450-A proteins, while one monoclonal antibody bound predominantly P-450-B. This monoclonal antibody also recognized southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania, Cramer) microsomal proteins

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to drosophila cytochrome P-450's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundseth, S.S.; Kennel, S.J.; Waters, L.C.

    1987-05-01

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies were prepared by the fusion of SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells from a female BALB/c mouse immunized by cytochrome P-450-A and P-450-B purified from Drosophila Hikone-R (BG) microsomes. P-450-A and P-450-B are electrophoretically distinct subsets of Drosophila P-450. P-450-A is ubiquitous among strains tested, while P-450-B is present in only a few strains displaying unique enzyme activities and increased insecticide resistance. The Oregon-R strain contains only cytochromes P-450-A and is susceptible to insecticides. The authors Hikone-R (BG) strain expresses both cytochromes P-450-A and P-450-B and is insecticide resistant. Antibody producing hybridomas were detected in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) by binding to Hikone-R (BG) or Oregon-R microsomes. Four independent hybridomas were identified as producing monoclonal antibodies that recognized proteins in the P-450 complex by immunoblot experiments. Three monoclonal antibodies recognized P-450-A proteins, while one monoclonal antibody bound predominantly P-450-B. This monoclonal antibody also recognized southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania, Cramer) microsomal proteins.

  11. Preparation and Identification of Anti-rabies Virus Monoclonal Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-juan Wang; Xiong Li; Li-hua Wang; Hu Shan; Lei Cao; Peng-cheng Yu; Qing Tang; Guo-dong Liang

    2012-01-01

    To provide a foundation for the development of rapid and specific methods for the diagnosis of rabies virus infection,anti-rabies virus monoclonal antibodies were prepared and rabies virus nucleoprotein and human rabies virus vaccine strain (PV strain) were used as immunogens to immunize 6-8 week old female BALB/c mice.Spleen cells and SP2/0 myeloma cells were fused according to conventional methods:the monoclonal cell strains obtained were selected using the indirect immunofluorescence test; this was followed by preparation of monoclonal antibody ascitic fluid; and finally,systematic identification of subclass,specificity and sensitivity was carried out.Two high potency and specific monoclonal antibodies against rabies virus were obtained and named 3B12 and 4A12,with ascitic fluid titers of 1∶8000 and 1∶10000,respectively.Both belonged to the IgG2a subclass.These strains secrete potent,stable and specific anti-rabies virus monoclonal antibodies,which makes them well suited for the development of rabies diagnosis reagents.

  12. Unusual Manifestations of Monoclonal Gammopathy: I. Ocular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia R. Balderman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential monoclonal gammopathy is usually an asymptomatic condition, the characteristics of which have been defined over approximately 70 years of study. It has a known population-attributable risk of undergoing clonal evolution to a progressive, symptomatic B-cell neoplasm. In a very small fraction of patients, the monoclonal immunoglobulin has biophysical characteristics that can lead to tissue deposition syndrome (e.g. Fanconi renal syndrome or, by chance, have characteristics of an autoantibody that may inactivate critical proteins (e.g. acquired von Willebrand disease. In this report, we describe the very uncommon forms of ocular injury that may accompany essential monoclonal gammopathy, which include crystalline keratopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, hypercupremic keratopathy, and maculopathy. The first three syndromes result from uncommon physicochemical alterations of the monoclonal immunoglobulin that favor crystallization or exaggerated copper binding. The last-mentioned syndrome is of uncertain pathogenesis. These syndromes may result in decreased visual acuity. These ocular findings may lead, also, to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy.

  13. Improved iodine radiolabels for monoclonal antibody therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Rhona; Govindan, Serengulam V; Mattes, M Jules; Chen, Susan; Reed, Linda; Newsome, Guy; McBride, Bill J; Griffiths, Gary L; Hansen, Hans J; Goldenberg, David M

    2003-01-01

    A major disadvantage of (131)iodine (I)-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for radioimmunotherapy has been the rapid diffusion of iodotyrosine from target cells after internalization and catabolism of the radioiodinated MAbs. We recently reported that a radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide, designated immunomedics' residualizing peptide 1 (IMP-R1), was a residualizing iodine label that overcame many of the limitations that had impeded the development of residualizing iodine for clinical use. To determine the factors governing the therapeutic index of the labeled MAb, as well as the factors required for production of radioiodinated MAb in high yield and with high specific activity, variations in the peptide structure of IMP-R1 were evaluated. A series of radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide moieties (IMP-R1 through IMP-R8) that differed in overall hydrophilicity and charge were compared. Radioiodinations of the peptides followed by conjugations to disulfide-reduced RS7 (an anti-epithelial glycoprotein-1 MAb) furnished radioimmunoconjugates in good overall incorporations, with immunoreactivities comparable to that of directly radioiodinated RS7. Specific activities of up to 8 mCi/mg and yields > 80% have been achieved. In vitro processing experiments showed marked increases in radioiodine retention with all of the adducts; radioiodine retention at 45 h was up to 86% greater in cells than with directly iodinated RS7. Each of the (125)I-peptide-RS7 conjugates was compared with (131)I-RS7 (labeled by the chloramine-T method) in paired-label biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing human lung tumor xenografts. All of the residualizing substrates exhibited significantly enhanced retention in tumor in comparison to directly radioiodinated RS7, but the nontarget uptakes differed significantly among the residualizing labels. The best labels were IMP-R4 and IMP-R8, showing superior tumor-to-non-tumor ratios

  14. Radioimmunoimaging of experimental gliomas using radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodistribution and tumour uptake of radiolabelled (131 I) glioma-seeking monoclonal antibodies (14 AC1) and their F(ab')2 fragments were investigated in nude mice having received glioma transplants. Radioimmunoimaging by external scintigraphy at 48 and 96 hours pointed to a superior tumour localisation by the fragments that was clearly related to the dose. Wholebody determinations of the biokinetic behaviour led to the following results: Faster clearance anc more ready elimination from the blood pool for the fragments, preferential uptake in the tumour; intact antibodies; binding in the liver, spleen and lungs. The study confirmed the value of fragments of monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of tumours and pointed to the possibility of using intact monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radioisotopes and cytotoxic drugs within the scope of therapeutic programmes. (TRV)

  15. ELISA Detection of Francisella tularensis using Polyclonaland Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Pohanka

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were produced for the detection of intracellular pathogenand potential warfare agent Francisella tularensis. Antibody titers obtained were 1:640 for polyclonal antibodiesand 1:320 for monoclonal antibodies. Both antibodies were used in the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbentassay (ELISA found to detect F. tularensis whole cells. The limit of detection was 5.4×106 CFU/ml for polyclonalantibodies and 6.9×106 CFU/ml for monoclonal antibodies. The value sample could  be distinguished from anyconcentration of another gram-negative bacterium: Escherichia coli.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.698-702, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1693

  16. Monoclonal gammopathy: The good, the bad and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavey, Siobhan V; Leung, Nelson

    2016-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a condition characterized by the presence of a monoclonal gammopathy (MG) in which the clonal mass has not reached a predefined state in which the condition is considered malignant. It is a precursor to conditions such as multiple myeloma or lymphoma at a rate of ~1%/year. Thus, from a hematologic standpoint, MGUS is a fairly benign condition. However, it is now recognized that organ damage resulting from just the MG without the need MM or lymphoma can occur. One of the most recognized is nephropathy secondary to monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS). Other well-recognized conditions include neuropathies, oculopathies and dermopathies. Some conditions such as autoimmune diseases and coagulopathies are less common and recognized. Finally, systemic involvement of multiple organs is well described in several entities. In all of these conditions, the role of the MG is no longer insignificant. Thus, the term MGUS should be avoided when describing these entities. PMID:26732417

  17. A cocktail of humanized anti-pertussis toxin antibodies limits disease in murine and baboon models of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Annalee W; Wagner, Ellen K; Laber, Joshua R; Goodfield, Laura L; Smallridge, William E; Harvill, Eric T; Papin, James F; Wolf, Roman F; Padlan, Eduardo A; Bristol, Andy; Kaleko, Michael; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread vaccination, pertussis rates are rising in industrialized countries and remain high worldwide. With no specific therapeutics to treat disease, pertussis continues to cause considerable infant morbidity and mortality. The pertussis toxin is a major contributor to disease, responsible for local and systemic effects including leukocytosis and immunosuppression. We humanized two murine monoclonal antibodies that neutralize pertussis toxin and expressed them as human immunoglobulin G1 molecules with no loss of affinity or in vitro neutralization activity. When administered prophylactically to mice as a binary cocktail, antibody treatment completely mitigated the Bordetella pertussis-induced rise in white blood cell counts and decreased bacterial colonization. When administered therapeutically to baboons, antibody-treated, but not untreated control animals, experienced a blunted rise in white blood cell counts and accelerated bacterial clearance rates. These preliminary findings support further investigation into the use of these antibodies to treat human neonatal pertussis in conjunction with antibiotics and supportive care.

  18. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  19. Advances in Murine Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-li Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the microvascular complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which is also associated with a poor life expectancy of diabetic patients. However, the pathogenesis of DN is still unclear. Thus, it is of great use to establish appropriate animal models of DN for doing research on pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. Although a large number of murine models of DN including artificially induced, spontaneous, and genetically engineered (knockout and transgenic animal models have been developed, none of them develops renal changes sufficiently reflecting those seen in humans. Here we review the identified murine models of DN from the aspects of genetic background, type of diabetes, method of induction, gene deficiency, animal age and gender, kidney histopathology, and phenotypic alterations in the hope of enhancing our comprehension of genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms responsible for this disease and providing new clues as to how to choose appropriate animal models of DN.

  20. DNA extraction columns contaminated with murine sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Erlwein

    Full Text Available Sequences of the novel gammaretrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV have been described in human prostate cancer tissue, although the amounts of DNA are low. Furthermore, XMRV sequences and polytropic (p murine leukemia viruses (MLVs have been reported in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. In assessing the prevalence of XMRV in prostate cancer tissue samples we discovered that eluates from naïve DNA purification columns, when subjected to PCR with primers designed to detect genomic mouse DNA contamination, occasionally gave rise to amplification products. Further PCR analysis, using primers to detect XMRV, revealed sequences derived from XMRV and pMLVs from mouse and human DNA and DNA of unspecified origin. Thus, DNA purification columns can present problems when used to detect minute amounts of DNA targets by highly sensitive amplification techniques.

  1. Immunodetection of Murine Lymphotoxins in Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitchenko, Veronika E.; Korobko, Vyacheslav G.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Kuimov, Alexander N.; Turetskaya, Regina L.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2000-10-01

    Lymphotoxins alpha and beta (LTalpha and LTbeta) are members of tumor necrosis factor superfamily. LT heterotrimers exist on the surface of lymphocytes and signal through LTbeta receptor while soluble LTalpha homotrimer can signal through TNF receptors p55 and p75. LT-, as well as TNF-mediated signaling are important for the organogenesis and maintenance of microarchitecture of secondary lymphoid organs in mice and has been implicated in the mechanism of certain inflammatory syndromes in humans. In this study we describe the generation of eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding murine LTalpha and LTbeta genes and a prokaryotic expression construct for murine LTalpha. Using recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors as tools for antisera selection, we produced and characterized several polyclonal antibodies capable of detecting LT proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  2. Radiolabelled peptides and monoclonal antibodies for therapy decision making in inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, G.; Signore, A.; Lagana, B.; Dierckx, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and monoclonal antibodies are an emerging class of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation with clinical implications for several chronic inflammatory disorders for diagnosis, therapy decision making and follow up. In the last decades, a number of novel monoclonal antibo

  3. Production and radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies and its applications in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of the monoclonal antibody production methodology, some immunological concepts which are important for the understanding of what is a Monoclonal Antibody, its radioiodination and acceptance as receptor-specific radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine are reviewed. (author)

  4. Murine models of human wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  5. Eliminating Murine Norovirus by Cross-Fostering

    OpenAIRE

    Buxbaum, Laurence U.; DeRitis, Pierina C.; Chu, Niansheng; Conti, Pierre A.

    2011-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a newly discovered and extremely prevalent pathogen of laboratory mouse colonies. MNV causes severe disease in some immunocompromised mouse strains and can cause persistent infections even in immunocompetent mice. Despite the fact that immunocompetent mice are generally asymptomatic, the possibility that MNV infection might alter immune responses makes its eradication a potentially useful goal for many facilities. Initial attempts by others to use a strategy of testi...

  6. Monoclonal antibodies in animal production; their use in diagnostics and passive immunization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booman, P.

    1989-01-01

    One of the landmarks in immunology was the invention and development of monoclonal antibody-secreting hybridomas by Milstein and his coworkers. The enormous promise of monoclonal antibody technology, which became apparent soon after its discovery, may explain the unusual speed with which monoclonal

  7. The clinical relevance and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Palumbo, Antonio; Johnsen, Hans Erik;

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is one of the most common pre-malignant disorders. IgG and IgA monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma; light-chain monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of light-chain multiple...

  8. Monoclonal antibodies for the control of influenza virus vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractHybridomas producing haemagglutination inhibiting monoclonal antibodies against influenza A/Texas/1/77 H3N2 were developed. One hybridoma producing antibodies reacting with Victoria/3/75, Texas/1/77 Bangkok/1/79 and England/496/80 was selected to determine the potency of influenza virusv

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 is described. The development of a suitable radioimmunoassay for the detection of anti-HSV-2 antibodies, and the selection of an optimal immunisation schedule, is given. Three assay systems are described and their reliability and sensitivity compared. (Auth.)

  10. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against mink leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W.S.; Pedersen, Mikael; Gram-Nielsen, S.;

    1997-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated against mink leukocytes. One antibody reacted with all T lymphocytes, one with all monocytes and one had platelet reactivity. Under reducing conditions, the T lymphocyte reactive antibody immunoprecipitated 18 kDa, 23 kDa, 25 kDa and 32-40 kDa pol...

  11. High throughput production of mouse monoclonal antibodies using antigen microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Federico; Chiarella, P.; Wilhelm, H.;

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomics research underscore the increasing need for high-affinity monoclonal antibodies, which are still generated with lengthy, low-throughput antibody production techniques. Here we present a semi-automated, high-throughput method of hybridoma generation and identification...

  12. A mouse monoclonal antibody against Alexa Fluor 647.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuethrich, Irene; Guillen, Eduardo; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-04-01

    Fluorophores are essential tools in molecular and cell biology. However, their application is mostly confined to the singular exploitation of their fluorescent properties. To enhance the versatility and expand the use of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 (AF647), we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody against it. We demonstrate its use of AF647 for immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and cytofluorimetry.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen;

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine m...

  14. MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO IDENTIFY TOMATO MOSAIC TOBAMOVIRUS (TOMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Keila M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies were obtained against Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV isolated in Brazil. One antibody (8G7G2 isotyped as IgG2b (kappa light chain showed strong specificity and very low cross reaction with the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. It can be used in identification of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV.

  15. Novel electrokinetic approaches to improve purification processes with monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Faude, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This work was focussed on mAb separations using cation exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Methods to accelerate long winded development strategies of purification processes with monoclonal antibodies were developed facilitated by further improvement of understanding the basic adsorption mechanisms of proteins on chromatographic resins. The new experimental electrokinetic methods introduced are zeta potential determination with proteins via laser light scattering and electro-...

  16. The significance of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    Kyle, Robert A.; Kumar, Shaji

    2009-01-01

    Since it is now well established that all patients with multiple myeloma have a preceding monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), identification of potential risk factors for the progression becomes most important. In this perspective article, Drs. Kyle and Kumar highlight the need for a better understanding of the etiology and biology of MGUS. See related paper on page 1714.

  17. Prevention of Progression in Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a common premalignant plasma cell proliferative disorder with a lifelong risk of progression to multiple myeloma. Since myeloma is an incurable malignancy, strategies to delay or prevent progression in high-risk patients are of considerable importance.

  18. Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance Disguised as Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique A Hartley-Brown

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old woman with a medical history of diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension who was otherwise asymptomatic but continued showing elevated neutrophil levels sought a second opinion at our facility. Serum protein immunoelectrophoresis with immunofixation revealed an immunoglobulin A (IgA-κ monoclonal gammopathy concentration of 1305 mg/dL (normal 80-350 mg/dL but relatively normal concentrations of IgG of 840 mg/dL (620-1400 mg/dL and IgM of 36 mg/dL (45-250 mg/dL. Clonal analysis revealed a polyclonal expression pattern in all cell types analyzed. We concluded that our patient’s neutrophilia may have been due to the underlying monoclonal gammopathy. This is the first case in the literature of a patient with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance presenting with neutrophilia, suggestive of chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL.  Patients with CNL have a poor prognosis; therefore, it is important to distinguish diagnostically between CNL and the less severe prognosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

  19. Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance Disguised as Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique A Hartley-Brown

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old woman with a medical history of diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension who was otherwise asymptomatic but continued showing elevated neutrophil levels sought a second opinion at our facility. Serum protein immunoelectrophoresis with immunofixation revealed an immunoglobulin A (IgA-κ monoclonal gammopathy concentration of 1305 mg/dL (normal 80-350 mg/dL but relatively normal concentrations of IgG of 840 mg/dL (620-1400 mg/dL and IgM of 36 mg/dL (45-250 mg/dL. Clonal analysis revealed a polyclonal expression pattern in all cell types analyzed. We concluded that our patient’s neutrophilia may have been due to the underlying monoclonal gammopathy. This is the first case in the literature of a patient with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance presenting with neutrophilia, suggestive of chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL.  Patients with CNL have a poor prognosis; therefore, it is important to distinguish diagnostically between CNL and the less severe prognosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

  20. Characterization of Binding Epitopes of CA125 Monoclonal Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Halim, Adnan;

    2014-01-01

    The most used cancer serum biomarker is the CA125 immunoassay for ovarian cancer that detects the mucin glycoprotein MUC16. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) including OC125 and M11 are used in CA125 assays. However, despite considerable efforts, our knowledge of the molecular characteristics ...

  1. Protection of rabbits and immunodeficient mice against lethal poxvirus infections by human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Crickard

    Full Text Available Smallpox (variola virus is a bioweapon concern. Monkeypox is a growing zoonotic poxvirus threat. These problems have resulted in extensive efforts to develop potential therapeutics that can prevent or treat potentially lethal poxvirus infections in humans. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against smallpox are a conservative approach to this problem, as the licensed human smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus, VACV primarily works on the basis of protective antibody responses against smallpox. Fully human mAbs (hmAbs against vaccinia H3 (H3L and B5 (B5R, targeting both the mature virion (MV and extracellular enveloped virion (EV forms, have been developed as potential therapeutics for use in humans. Post-exposure prophylaxis was assessed in both murine and rabbit animal models. Therapeutic efficacy of the mAbs was assessed in three good laboratory practices (GLP studies examining severe combined immunodeficiency mice (SCID given a lethal VACV infection. Pre-exposure combination hmAb therapy provided significantly better protection against disease and death than either single hmAb or vaccinia immune globulin (VIG. Post-exposure combination mAb therapy provided significant protection against disease and death, and appeared to fully cure the VACV infection in ≥50% of SCID mice. Therapeutic efficacy was then assessed in two rabbit studies examining post-exposure hmAb prophylaxis against rabbitpox (RPXV. In the first study, rabbits were infected with RPVX and then provided hmAbs at 48 hrs post-infection, or 1 hr and 72 hrs post-infection. Rabbits in both groups receiving hmAbs were 100% protected from death. In the second rabbitpox study, 100% of animal treated with combination hmAb therapy and 100% of animals treated with anti-B5 hmAb were protected. These findings suggest that combination hmAb treatment may be effective at controlling smallpox disease in immunocompetent or immunodeficient humans.

  2. Mechanism of quinine-dependent monoclonal antibody binding to platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougie, Daniel W; Peterson, Julie; Rasmussen, Mark; Aster, Richard H

    2015-10-29

    Drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that cause acute thrombocytopenia upon drug exposure are nonreactive in the absence of the drug but bind tightly to a platelet membrane glycoprotein, usually α(IIb)/β3 integrin (GPIIb/IIIa) when the drug is present. How a drug promotes binding of antibody to its target is unknown and is difficult to study with human DDAbs, which are poly-specific and in limited supply. We addressed this question using quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which, in vitro and in vivo, closely mimic antibodies that cause thrombocytopenia in patients sensitive to quinine. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we found that quinine binds with very high affinity (K(D) ≈ 10⁻⁹ mol/L) to these mAbs at a molar ratio of ≈ 2:1 but does not bind detectably to an irrelevant mAb. Also using SPR analysis, GPIIb/IIIa was found to bind monovalently to immobilized mAb with low affinity in the absence of quinine and with fivefold greater affinity (K(D) ≈ 2.2 × 10⁻⁶) when quinine was present. Measurements of quinine-dependent binding of intact mAb and fragment antigen-binding (Fab) fragments to platelets showed that affinity is increased 10 000- to 100 000-fold by bivalent interaction between antibody and its target. Together, the findings indicate that the first step in drug-dependent binding of a DDAb is the interaction of the drug with antibody, rather than with antigen, as has been widely thought, where it induces structural changes that enhance the affinity/specificity of antibody for its target epitope. Bivalent binding may be essential for a DDAb to cause thrombocytopenia.

  3. Specific and nonspecific imaging of localized Fisher immunotype 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if radiolabeled specific antibodies directed against bacterial antigens could be used to detect sites of infection, gamma camera imaging studies were performed in animals infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) directed against Fisher Immunotype 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a nonmicrobial, nonmammalian haptene, p-arsanilic acid, were labeled with 125I by the lodogen-Bead method. Unilateral, deep thigh infections were created by innoculation with 2 X 10(8) Fisher Immunotype 1 P. aeruginosa. Twenty-four hours later, one of the radiolabeled antibodies was injected intravenously at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg (100-150 microCi). Serial gamma imaging was then carried out beginning at 4 hr and at approximately 24-hr intervals thereafter. Beginning as early as 4 hr postinjection, the area of inflammation could be visualized with either the specific or nonspecific Mab, with the images continuing to intensify until 24-48 hr postinjection. At 48 hr, the contrast between lesion and background with the nonspecific Mab began to fade, while the contrast in the specific Mab-generated images continued to intensify until approximately 192 hr postinjection. Clear-cut differentiation between specific and nonspecific Mab-generated images was possible by 72 hr postinjection. We conclude that specific immune imaging of localized infection with Mab's directed against specific microbial antigens is possible and should be clinically useful. In addition, images created by the localization of immunoglobulin non-specifically at the site of inflammation in the first 24-48 hr postinjection may also provide useful information as to the anatomic location of hidden abscesses

  4. Monoclonal antibody-based serological methods for detection of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yajuan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV, a member of the genus Tobamovirus, can be transmitted by seeds and infects many cucurbit species, causing serious yield losses in cucumber and watermelon plants. In this paper, five serological methods including antigen-coated plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA, triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA, Dot-immunobinding assay (DBIA, direct tissue blot immunoassay (DTBIA and immunocapture reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR were described for detection and diagnosis of CGMMV. Results Using the purified CGMMV particles as immunogens, six murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs were produced. Five serological methods were established using the MAb 4H1 and detection sensitivity was compared using purified preparations and infected-plant tissue extracts. The detection sensitivity of ACP-ELISA was 0.16 ng of purified CGMMV, whereas TAS-ELISA was more sensitive than ACP-ELISA with a minimum detection of 0.04 ng of purified CGMMV. The sensitivities of TAS-ELISA and DBIA were similar for detecting CGMMV in infected-plant tissue extracts, and were four times higher than ACP-ELISA. The IC-RT-PCR was the most sensitive method, which could detect as little as 0.1 pg of purified virus. The detection sensitivity of IC-RT-PCR for CGMMV-infected plant tissues was about 400 times higher than that of TAS-ELISA and DBIA. Conclusions The established ACP-ELISA, TAS-ELISA, DBIA and DTBIA are suitable for routine CGMMV detection of large-scale samples in the field survey, while IC-RT-PCR is more sensitive and suitable for acquiring information about the viral genome.

  5. Correspondence: The association between morphea profunda and monoclonal gammopathy: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Justin; Strickland, Nicole; Grewal, Simer; Vandergriff, Travis; Keenan, Thomas; Longley, B Jack; Jacobe, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    It is known that eosinophilic fasciitis can be associated with monoclonal gammopathy. There is clinical similarity between eosinophilic fasciitis and morphea profunda, but it is unclear whether morphea profunda might be associated with monoclonal gammopathy. The temporal quantification of gammopathy in morphea profunda has not been well characterized. We describe four patients with morphea profunda that were associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Three were associated with monoclonal IgG protein and one with IgM. No patients in our series developed myeloma. In conclusion, the association of monoclonal gammopathy is not unique to eosinophilic fasciitis and scleromyxedema. Further studies are necessary to characterize further the relationship between the two conditions. PMID:27136633

  6. Expression of bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoproteins gI and gIII in transfected murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genes encoding two of the major glycoproteins of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), gI and gIII, were cloned into the eucaryotic expression vectors pRSVcat and pSV2neo and transfected into murine LMTK- cells, and cloned cell lines were established. The relative amounts of gI or gIII expressed from the two vectors were similar. Expression of gI was cell associated and localized predominantly in the perinuclear region, but nuclear and plasma membrane staining was also observed. Expression of gI was additionally associated with cell fusion and the formation of polykaryons and giant cells. Expression of gIII was localized predominantly in the nuclear and plasma membranes. Radioimmunoprecipitation in the presence or absence of tunicamycin revealed that the recombinant glycoproteins were proteolytically processed and glycosylated and had molecular weights similar to those of the forms of gI and gIII expressed in BHV-1 infected bovine cells. However, both recombinant glycoproteins were glycosylated to a lesser extent than were the forms found in BHV-1 infected bovine cells. For gI, a deficiency in N-linked glycosylated of the amino-terminal half of the protein was identified; for gIII, a deficiency in O-linked glycosylation was implicated. The reactivity pattern of a panel of gI- and gIII-specific monoclonal antibodies, including six which recognize conformation-dependent epitopes, was found to be unaffected by the glycosylation differences and was identical for transfected of BHV-1-infected murine cells. Use of the transfected cells as targets in immune-mediated cytotoxicity assays demonstrated the functional recognition of recombinant gI and gIII by murine antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes

  7. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  8. Quality by design: impact of formulation variables and their interactions on quality attributes of a lyophilized monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awotwe-Otoo, David; Agarabi, Cyrus; Wu, Geoffrey K; Casey, Elizabeth; Read, Erik; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt A; Khan, Mansoor A; Shah, Rakhi B

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to use QbD approaches to evaluate the effect of several variables and their interactions on quality of a challenging model murine IgG3κ monoclonal antibody (mAb), and then to obtain an optimized formulation with predefined quality target product profile. This antibody was chosen because it has a propensity to precipitate and thus represents a challenge condition for formulation development. Preliminary experiments were conducted to rule out incompatible buffer systems for the mAb product quality. A fractional factorial experimental design was then applied to screen the effects of buffer type, pH and excipients such as sucrose, sodium chloride (NaCl), lactic acid and Polysorbate 20 on glass transition temperature ( [Formula: see text] ), monoclonal antibody concentration (A(280)), presence of aggregation, unfolding transition temperature (T(m)) of the lyophilized product, and particle size of the reconstituted product. A Box-Behnken experimental design was subsequently applied to study the main, interaction, and quadratic effects of these variables on the responses. Pareto ranking analyses showed that the three most important factors affecting the selected responses for this particular antibody were pH, NaCl, and Polysorbate 20. The presence of curvature in the variables' effects on responses indicated interactions. Based on the constraints set on the responses, a design space was identified for this mAb and confirmed with experiments at three different levels of the variables within the design space. The model indicated a combination of high pH (8) and NaCl (50mM) levels, and a low Polysorbate 20 (0.008 mM) level at which an optimal formulation of the mAb could be achieved. Moisture contents and other analytical procedures such as size exclusion chromatography, protein A analysis and SDS-PAGE of the pre-lyophilized and final reconstituted lyophilized products indicated an intact protein structure with minimal aggregation after

  9. Existence of multiple isoforms of HS1-associated protein X-1 in murine and human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Delphine M; Hart, Ian R; Marshall, John F

    2008-06-13

    To date, the literature concerning the HS1 (haematopoietic cell-specific protein 1)-associated protein X-1 (HAX1) protein has reported considerable variation regarding its function in mammalian cells, subcellular localisation and binding partners. We show here that HAX1 comprises a family of proteins. Murine tissues express three mRNA variants, encoded by two genes on chromosomes 2 and 3. The chromosome 2 gene is intronless and would encode a protein 100% identical with that encoded by chromosome 3. In humans, alternative splice variants, encoded by the chromosome 1 gene, produce a family of transcripts composed of up to eight members. Based on the sequences published in GenBank and Ensembl, we designed specific primers and detected by PCR three mRNA species in murine tissues and eight variants in human cells. We screened a panel of 19 human cell lines as well as primary fibroblasts, oral keratinocytes and freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. All human cells studied expressed at least six of the possible HAX1 mRNA variants. In silico analysis of the variants revealed an open reading frame in all of them, suggesting that murine and human tissues can express two and eight HAX1 proteins, respectively. Analysis of human protein lysates by Western blotting with the use of a monoclonal anti-HAX1 antibody revealed multiple bands. These bands were decreased after treatment of cells with a single small interfering RNA duplex targeting a region common to six of the variants, confirming their identity as HAX1 proteins. Comparison of the human variants with the six HAX1 homologues described to date in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the four homologues described in macaque (Macaca mulatta) revealed very high conservation with only one amino acid substitution between human and chimpanzee homologues. Moreover, a number of additional products were amplified and sequenced, which indicated that further human isoforms are likely to exist. These findings are

  10. A monoclonal autoantibody that promotes central nervous system remyelination in a model of multiple sclerosis is a natural autoantibody encoded by germline immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.J.; Rodriguez, M. [Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Antibodies directed against self-Ags are frequently considered detrimental, and have been shown to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune diseases. However, the presence of autoreactive Abs in normal individuals suggests that some autoantibodies could participate in normal physiology. Our previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal autoantibodies SCH94.03 and SCH94.32, generated from the splenocytes of uninfected SJL/J mice injected with normal homogenized spinal cord, promote central nervous system remyelination when passively transferred into syngeneic mice chronically infected with Theiler`s murine encephalomyelitis virus, an established experimental model of multiple sclerosis. In this study we show that these two monoclonal autoantibodies are identical, and have phenotypic characteristics of natural autoantibodies. By using a solid phase assay system, SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 showed reactivity toward several protein Ags and chemical haptens, with prominent reactivity toward spectrin, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl, and fluorescein. Sequence analysis showed that both SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 were encoded by identical germline Ig light chain V{sub K}10/J{sub K}l and heavy chain V23/DFL16.1/J{sub H}2 genes, with no definitive somatic mutations. These results indicate that a natural autoantibody participates in a beneficial physiologic response to central nervous system injury. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Murine erythrocytes contain high levels of lysophospholipase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, J.A.F. op den; Roelofsen, B.; Sanderink, G.; Middelkoop, E.; Hamer, R.

    1984-01-01

    Murine erythrocytes were found to be unique in the high levels of lysophospholipase activity in the cytosol of these cells. The specific activity of the enzyme in the cytosol of the murine cells is 10-times higher than in the cytosol of rabbit erythrocytes and approximately three orders of magnitude

  12. Targeting of influenza epitopes to murine CR1/CR2 using single-chain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, J; Tchorbanov, A; Horváth, A; Baiu, D C; Hazenbos, W; Rajnavölgyi, E; Kurucz, I; Capel, P J; Erdei, A

    1999-05-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies are genetically engineered molecules comprising the variable regions responsible for specific binding. scFv that recognize certain surface molecules on professional antigen presenting cells could therefore be suitable for targeting Ag to these cells. We have produced an scFv that recognizes murine complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/CR2) and genetically fused it with different numbers of influenza hemagglutinin peptides which contain both B and T cell epitopes. The CR1/CR2 specific hybridoma 7G6 was used for RT-PCR to obtain the variable regions, which were then combined to create an scFv fragment. The influenza hemagglutinin intersubunit peptide HA317-41 (IP) was engineered to the N terminus of the scFv in one, two or three copies. The so obtained IP(1-3)7G6scFv still bound the complement receptors; the peptides in the construct were recognized by the peptide specific monoclonal IP2-11-1 on Western blots and ELISAs. The CR1/CR2 positive B lymphomas A20 and 2PK3 presented the peptide to an I-Ed restricted IP specific T cell hybridoma more efficiently when incubated with the IP(1)7G6 constructs as compared to the free peptide. The results suggest that scFv could work as targeting devices in subunit vaccines. PMID:10408376

  13. Targeting of influenza epitopes to murine CR1/CR2 using single-chain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, J; Tchorbanov, A; Horváth, A; Baiu, D C; Hazenbos, W; Rajnavölgyi, E; Kurucz, I; Capel, P J; Erdei, A

    1999-05-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies are genetically engineered molecules comprising the variable regions responsible for specific binding. scFv that recognize certain surface molecules on professional antigen presenting cells could therefore be suitable for targeting Ag to these cells. We have produced an scFv that recognizes murine complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/CR2) and genetically fused it with different numbers of influenza hemagglutinin peptides which contain both B and T cell epitopes. The CR1/CR2 specific hybridoma 7G6 was used for RT-PCR to obtain the variable regions, which were then combined to create an scFv fragment. The influenza hemagglutinin intersubunit peptide HA317-41 (IP) was engineered to the N terminus of the scFv in one, two or three copies. The so obtained IP(1-3)7G6scFv still bound the complement receptors; the peptides in the construct were recognized by the peptide specific monoclonal IP2-11-1 on Western blots and ELISAs. The CR1/CR2 positive B lymphomas A20 and 2PK3 presented the peptide to an I-Ed restricted IP specific T cell hybridoma more efficiently when incubated with the IP(1)7G6 constructs as compared to the free peptide. The results suggest that scFv could work as targeting devices in subunit vaccines.

  14. Requirements for the triggering of lysis by cloned murine cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancki, D.W.; Weiss, A.; Fitch, F.W.

    1986-03-05

    Cloned murine cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) having defined specificity were triggered by the phorbol ester PMA + a calcium ionophore (either A23187 or Ionomycin) to lyse syngeneic or third party target cells efficiently. Neither PMA nor calcium ionophore alone induced efficient lysis. The characteristics of the lytic process induced by these signals are similar to those of antigen specific or lectin facilitated lysis by CTL: lysis is calcium and temperature dependent, and shows directionality and kinetics similar to lysis mediated via the antigen receptor. Helper T lymphocytes were not induced by these agents to lyse target cells efficiently. Activation of L3 CTL clone lysis by PMA + ionophore differed from antigen-mediated activation in specificity and in susceptibility to inhibition by cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of antigen mediated conjugate formation. Anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies inhibited antigen-mediated, lectin-facilitated, or PMA + ionophore induced lysis. Anti-Lyt-2 and anti-receptor antibodies had little if any effect on lysis induced by PMA + ionophore. The triggering of lysis with PMA + ionophore appears to involve intracellular signals similar to those involved in lysis mediated by the antigen receptor.

  15. Splenectomy normalizes hematocrit in murine polycythemia vera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Rung Mo

    Full Text Available Splenic enlargement (splenomegaly develops in numerous disease states, although a specific pathogenic role for the spleen has rarely been described. In polycythemia vera (PV, an activating mutation in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2(V617 induces splenomegaly and an increase in hematocrit. Splenectomy is sparingly performed in patients with PV, however, due to surgical complications. Thus, the role of the spleen in the pathogenesis of human PV remains unknown. We specifically tested the role of the spleen in the pathogenesis of PV by performing either sham (SH or splenectomy (SPL surgeries in a murine model of JAK2(V617F-driven PV. Compared to SH-operated mice, which rapidly develop high hematocrits after JAK2(V617F transplantation, SPL mice completely fail to develop this phenotype. Disease burden (JAK2(V617 is equivalent in the bone marrow of SH and SPL mice, however, and both groups develop fibrosis and osteosclerosis. If SPL is performed after PV is established, hematocrit rapidly declines to normal even though myelofibrosis and osteosclerosis again develop independently in the bone marrow. In contrast, SPL only blunts hematocrit elevation in secondary, erythropoietin-induced polycythemia. We conclude that the spleen is required for an elevated hematocrit in murine, JAK2(V617F-driven PV, and propose that this phenotype of PV may require a specific interaction between mutant cells and the spleen.

  16. Murine Typhus: Clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar Peniche Lara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 14.00 Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE Rickettsia typhi is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against R. typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of Rickettsia typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi.

  17. Benzaldehyde suppresses murine allergic asthma and rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae Young; Park, Chang-Shin; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Heo, Min-Jeong; Kim, Young Hyo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the antiallergic effects of oral benzaldehyde in a murine model of allergic asthma and rhinitis, we divided 20 female BALB/c mice aged 8-10 weeks into nonallergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to normal saline), allergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to ovalbumin), and 200- and 400-mg/kg benzaldehyde (allergic but treated) groups. The number of nose-scratching events in 10 min, levels of total and ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, differential counts of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titers of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in BAL fluid, histopathologic findings of lung and nasal tissues, and expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3), inflammation (COX-2), antioxidation (extracellular SOD, HO-1), and hypoxia (HIF-1α, VEGF) in lung tissue were evaluated. The treated mice had significantly fewer nose-scratching events, less inflammatory cell infiltration in lung and nasal tissues, and lower HIF-1α and VEGF expressions in lung tissue than the allergic group. The number of eosinophils and neutrophils and Th2 cytokine titers in BAL fluid significantly decreased after the treatment (Pbenzaldehyde exerts antiallergic effects in murine allergic asthma and rhinitis, possibly through inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  18. [Renal involvement in benign monoclonal gammopathies: an underdiagnosed condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, R; Poveda, R; Bernís, C; Ara, J; Sunyer, M; Arrizabalaga, P; Grinyó, J M

    2008-01-01

    Renal involvement is observed frequently in association with malignant gammopathies, mainly those related to light chain deposition, although has also been described in non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy. This study reports the clinicopathological findings and outcome in 9 patients with nephropaty secondary to monoclonal immunoglobulin deposit in absence of malignancy. They were three men and six women and they were 59.2+/-12 years old. All patients presented proteinuria and different levels of renal insufficiency (mean creatinin = 315+/-187 micromol/L) at the moment of diagnostic. Two patients required dialysis at the time of renal biopsy. The pathology studies revealed a nodular sclerosing glomerulopathy in four cases, mesangiocapilary glomerulonephritis in three cases, only tubular lesions in one and mesangial lesions in the other one. The treatment applied was: Prednisone alone (two cases), with chemotherapy associated (melfalan in two, clorambucil in one and ciclophosphamide in another one). One patient received plasmapheresis and mycophenolate and another patient undergone a bone marrow authotransplant associated to mycophenolate and prednisone. One of the two patients who required dialysis at the moment of presentation was not treated. After a follow-up of more than 4 years (4.89 +/-DE: 3.69) renal function improved or remained stable in three patients and proteinuria was disappeared in more than 50% of patients. Four patients had a worsening of renal function and they required dialysis during the time of follow-up (in 2,4 years +/- DE: 4,3). In any case malignitation was observed. Chemotherapy stabilized or improved renal function in 3 of nine patients (33%) with non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy. Non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy could go unnoticed. Appearance of abnormalities in renal routine tests deserves more in-depth diagnostic procedures, including renal biopsy. Evolution to end stage renal disease could probably be avoided or reduced in

  19. [Hashimoto's thyroiditis and monoclonal gammapathy (two cases) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussin, P; Fine, J M; Leroux, E; Lebranchu, Y; Lecomte, P; Bertrand, G

    1979-01-01

    The authors describe two cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis with a monoclonal dysproteinemia (IgG lambda in one case and IgG kappa in the other). They show that the antithyroid activity (anti-microsomial in the first case, anti thyroglobulin in the second case) is not carried by the abnormal gammaglobulin. The two diseases, therefore, appear to be separate but can both be considered as the consequence of a particular immunological state. PMID:117737

  20. Guidelines to cell engineering for monoclonal antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, A.; Rodrigues, E; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently used for many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The high demand for these biopharmaceuticals has led to the development of large-scale manufacturing processes, with productivity improvements being mainly achieved by optimization of bioreactor systems. However, more recently, the early steps of production, previous to bioreactor culture, have been presented as alternative areas where productivity enhancements can be achieved. Thus, ...

  1. Production of monoclonal antibodies to human glomerular basement membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mino,Yasuaki

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the technique of somatic cell fusion, we produced monoclonal antibodies to collagenase-digested human glomerular basement membrane (GBM. Fourteen monoclonal antibodies which reacted with normal human kidney in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF studies were produced. An analysis of the binding patterns indicated that the antigens recognized could be divided into six broad groups. Monoclonal antibody B3-H10 (Group 1 reacted with only GBM in a fine granular pattern. A5-B12 and B5-C2 (Group 2 reacted with GBM and peritubular capillary in a linear pattern. B2-A12 (Group 3 reacted with only epithelial cells. Al-C9 and A4-E2 (Group 4 showed a mesangial pattern in glomerulus and a lineal pattern in tubular basement membrane (TBM, Bowman's capsule and peritubular capillary. A1-E1, A1-E11, A2-E6, A3-B6, A4-F8 and B5-H2 (Group 5 recognized determinants common to GBM, TBM, Bowman's capsule and/or peritubular capillary. A3-F1 and B5-E10 (Group 6 reacted with TBM and Bowman's capsule. The staining pattern of B3-H10 (Group 1 was characteristic because it was not linear, but finely granular along the GBM. The staining pattern of B2-A12 (Group 3 was also characteristic because only epithelial cells were stained, and processes of epithelial cells were observed as fine fibrils. To the best of our knowledge, these two types of monoclonal antibodies have not been reported previously.

  2. Monoclonal Antibody Expression and Novel Purification in Nicotiana benthamiana

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, Andrew Dale

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few decades researchers and industrial professionals alike have realized the vast potential of monoclonal antibodies to treat diseases ranging from arthritis, immune and infectious diseases to cancer. There are a number of antibodies on the market that constitute a large portion of the biopharmaceutical niche in the drug industry. Blockbuster drugs (selling greater than $1 billion/year), include antibodies such as Avastin (bevacizumab), Herceptin (trastuzumab), Rituxan (rituxi...

  3. Screening Panels for Monoclonal Gammopathies: Time to Change

    OpenAIRE

    Katzmann, Jerry A.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of quantitative assays for serum free light chains (FLC) has changed the approach to screening for monoclonal gammopathies. Recent guidelines from the International Myeloma Working Group have recommended the use of serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP), immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) and FLC as the screening panel unless primary amyloidosis (AL) is suspected. If screening for AL, then urine IFE should also be performed. We discuss the background for these recommendations...

  4. Sources of DNA for detecting B cell monoclonality using PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    Diss, T. C.; Pan, L.; Peng, H; Wotherspoon, A C; Isaacson, P G

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstration of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements using routinely prepared, unstained, and stained formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue samples. METHODS--Extracts from (a) fresh frozen tissue samples, (b) unstained, and (c) haematoxylin and eosin stained formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded 5 microns tissue sections from 42 cases of low grade B cell lymphoma, all shown to be monoclonal by Southern blot analysi...

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against plant proteins recognise animal intermediate filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, J M; Miller, C C; Cowell, I; Dodson, A; Dowding, A; Downes, M; Duckett, J G; Anderton, B J

    1987-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies were raised against polypeptides present in a high-salt detergent-insoluble fraction from cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of fibroblasts and epithelial cells grown in culture using these plant antibodies revealed staining arrays identical to those obtained with well characterised antibodies to animal intermediate filaments. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Chlamydomonas with these monoclonal antibodies and a monoclonal antibody that recognises all animal intermediate filaments (anti-IFA) gave a diffuse, patchy cytoplasmic staining pattern. Both the plant antibodies and anti-IFA stained interphase onion root tip cells in a diffuse perinuclear pattern. In metaphase through to telophase, the labelling patterns colocalised with those of microtubules. Labelling of the phragmoplast was also detected but not staining of the preprophase band. On Western blots of various animal cell lines and tissues, all the antibodies labelled known intermediate filament proteins. On Western blots of whole Chlamydomonas proteins, all the antibodies labelled a broad band in the 57,000 Mr range, and three antibodies labelled bands around 66,000 and 140,000 Mr but with variable intensities. On Western blots of whole onion root tip proteins, all the antibodies labelled 50,000 Mr (two to three bands) polypeptides and a diffuse band around 60,000 Mr and three of the antibodies also labelled several polypeptides in the 90,000-200,000 Mr range. The consistent labelling of these different bands by several different monoclonal antibodies recognising animal intermediate filaments makes these polypeptides putative plant intermediate filament proteins. PMID:2446785

  6. Axonal neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    GORSON, K.; Ropper, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is typically a predominantly demyelinating process that may have additional features of axonal degeneration. Sixteen patients with MGUS and a pure or predominantly axonal neuropathy are reported and compared with 20 consecutive patients with demyelinating neuropathy and MGUS who were seen during the same period.
METHODS—Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients w...

  7. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance associated with blue finger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Alaa M. Ali; Aibek E. Mirrakhimov

    2013-01-01

    An 86-year-old Caucasian woman with a medical history of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was admitted to the hospital with a chief complaint of sudden onset of bluish discolouration of the fifth left hand digit. On a physical examination, cyanosis of the fifth digit of the left hand was noticed with decreased capillary fill but no ulcers. The patient had no tenderness on palpation. Pulses were palpable over the radial arteries bilaterally. Patients with MGUS may be a...

  8. Prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy in HIV patients in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Genet; Laurent Sutton; Driss Chaoui; Ahmad Al Jijakli; Juliette Gerbe; Virginie Masse; Bouchra Wifaq

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In non-HIV patients, Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) is associated with an increased risk of subsequent development of haematologic malignancies, especially multiple myeloma (MM) and it has been recently demonstrated that MM is always preceded by a MGUS phase. A higher prevalence of MGUS and MM has been observed in HIV patients compared to the general population. Nevertheless, it has been shown that MGUS in the context of HIV can disappear with antiretr...

  9. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ghislain Moussavou; Kisung Ko; Jeong-Hwan Lee; Young-Kug Choo

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the produ...

  10. Production of Bartonella Genus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Zhongxing; La Scola, Bernard; Lepidi, Hubert; Raoult, Didier

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which react with heat-resistant proteins with molecular masses of 32 to 33 kDa of 14 different Bartonella species were produced. These antibodies did not react with antigens of 26 diverse bacterial strains by microimmunofluorescence assay except MAb B3D4, which reacted with Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia trachomatis at low titers. The identification of a common Bartonella antigenic protein will make it possible to later produce a diagnostic antigen by cloning an...

  11. A Novel PET Imaging Using 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody against Mesothelin Commonly Expressed on Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Kobayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesothelin (MSLN is a 40-kDa cell differentiation-associated glycoprotein appearing with carcinogenesis and is highly expressed in many human cancers, including the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas, ovarian cancers, and mesotheliomas, while its expression in normal tissue is limited to mesothelial cells lining the pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum. Clone 11-25 is a murine hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (mAb against human MSLN. In this study, we applied the 11-25 mAb to in vivo imaging to detect MSLN-expressing tumors. In in vitro and ex vivo immunochemical studies, we demonstrated specificity of 11-25 mAb to membranous MSLN expressed on several pancreatic cancer cells. We showed the accumulation of Alexa Fluor 750-labeled 11-25 mAb in MSLN-expressing tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Then, 11-25 mAb was labeled with 64Cu via a chelating agent DOTA and was used in both in vitro cell binding assay and in vivo positron emission tomography (PET imaging in the tumor-bearing mice. We confirmed that 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb highly accumulated in MSLN-expressing tumors as compared to MSLN-negative ones. The 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb is potentially useful as a PET probe capable of being used for wide range of tumors, rather than 18F-FDG that occasionally provides nonspecific accumulation into the inflammatory lesions.

  12. The detection of axillary lymph node metastases from breast cancer by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjandra, J.J. (Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia) Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia)); Sacks, N.P.M.; Thompson, C.H. (Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia)) (and others)

    1989-02-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies that react with human breast cancer (3E1.2 and RCC-1) were labelled with {sup 131}iodine, and the radiolabelled antibody was injected into 40 patients, 36 of whom had breast cancer and the remaining four of whom had fibroadenoma (the normal, contralateral axilla was used as a control). Immunoscintigraphy had an overall sensitivity of 33% (23% with {sup 131}I-3E1.2 and 5% with {sup 131}I-RCC-1) for the detection of lymph node metastases and a specificity of 63% (67% with {sup 131}I-3E1.2 and 60% with {sup 131}I-RCC-1) with problems of non-specific uptake by presumably normal lymph nodes. The results of immunoscintigraphy obtained with {sup 131}I-RCC-1 (IgG) were superior to {sup 131}I-3E1.2 (IgM) although the accuracy of immunoscintigraphy using {sup 131}I-RCC-1 (56%) was not much better than preoperative clinical assessment (50%). However, there were cases when immunoscintigraphy using radiolabelled antibody (IgM or IgG) detected axillary lymph node metastases not suspected by clinical examination. Thus it appears that while immunoscintigraphy may be a useful adjunct to preoperative clinical assessment and is simple and safe, a major improvement in its accuracy is needed before it can replace axillary dissection and histological examination in the accurate staging of axilla in breast cancer. (author).

  13. A broadly flavivirus cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibody that recognizes a novel epitope within the fusion loop of E protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Qiang Deng

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are a group of human pathogenic, enveloped RNA viruses that includes dengue (DENV, yellow fever (YFV, West Nile (WNV, and Japanese encephalitis (JEV viruses. Cross-reactive antibodies against Flavivirus have been described, but most of them are generally weakly neutralizing. In this study, a novel monoclonal antibody, designated mAb 2A10G6, was determined to have broad cross-reactivity with DENV 1-4, YFV, WNV, JEV, and TBEV. Phage-display biopanning and structure modeling mapped 2A10G6 to a new epitope within the highly conserved flavivirus fusion loop peptide, the (98DRXW(101 motif. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that 2A10G6 potently neutralizes DENV 1-4, YFV, and WNV and confers protection from lethal challenge with DENV 1-4 and WNV in murine model. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that 2A10G6 blocks infection at a step after viral attachment. These results define a novel broadly flavivirus cross-reactive mAb with highly neutralizing activity that can be further developed as a therapeutic agent against severe flavivirus infections in humans.

  14. Inhibition of Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis by Anti—Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen Monoclonal Antibody JAA-F11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Heimburg

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag is expressed in many carcinomas, including those of the breast, colon, bladder, prostate. TF-Ag is important in adhesion and metastasis and as a potential immunotherapy target. We hypothesized that passive transfer of JAAF11, an anti -TF-Ag monoclonal antibody, may create a survival advantage for patients with TIF-Ag -expressing tumors by cytotoxicity, blocking of tumor cell adhesion, inhibition of metastasis. This was tested using in vitro models of tumor cell growth; cytotoxicity assays; in vitro, ex vivo, in vivo models of cancer metastasis; and, finally, in vivo effects in mice with metastatic breast cancer. Unlike some anti-TF-Ag antibodies, JAA-F11 did not enhance breast carcinoma cell growth. JAA-F11 did not induce the killing of 4T1 tumor cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or apoptotic mechanisms. However, JAA-F11 blocked the stages of metastasis that involve the adhesion of human breast carcinoma cells to human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human bone marrow endothelial cells 60 in in vitro static adhesion models, in a perfused ex vivo model, in murine lung vasculature in an in vivo metastatic deposit formation assay. JAA-F11 significantly extended the median survival time of animals bearing metastatic 4T1 breast tumors and caused a > 50% inhibition of lung metastasis.

  15. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  16. Library of monoclonal antibodies against brush border membrane epithelial antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behar, M.; Katz, A.; Silverman, M.

    1986-03-01

    A purified fraction of proximal tubule brush border membranes (BBM) was prepared from dog kidney and used to immunize mice. The standard technique of hybridoma production was followed as described by Kohler and Milstein. Production of antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence on dog kidney slices and by immunodot against the purified fraction on nitrocellulose. Five hybrids exhibited anti BBM activity. These were cloned twice and yielded stable cell lines producing IgG type monoclonal antibodies against BBM. They were designated A/sub 1/, C/sub 7/, D/sub 3/, D/sub 7/ and H/sub 4/. As a family these five monoclonals have broad tissue specificity, i.e. positive staining of the surface mucosa of intestinal kidney proximal tubules. D/sub 3/ exhibits even broader specificity for epithelium reacting with bile canaliculi and choroid plexus. The authors have verified that at least 4/5 antibodies are directed against BBM protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of solubilized BBM and detected by Coomassie blue staining or autoradiography of lactoperoxidase labelled BBM. Most interestingly all antibodies bind to the surface of LL CPK/sub 1/ cells, a continuous pig kidney cell line of undefined origin but exhibiting many characteristics of proximal tubule cells. The library of monoclonal antibodies obtained provide important probes with which to study membrane biogenesis and polarization in epithelial cells.

  17. [Demonstration of β-1,2 mannan structures expressed on the cell wall of Candida albicans yeast form but not on the hyphal form by using monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Cevahir; Ataoğlu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    . Sandwich ELISA and immunofluorescence (IF) methods have been used to detect the experimental reactions. In our study, highly specific class IgM murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb-2B7) against C.albicans yeast cell wall were obtained from clone 2B7. These antibodies cross-reacted with S.choleraesuis 211 and S.infantis bacteria sharing similar cell wall structure of C.albicans. The existence of mannan β-1,2 bonds on the surface of C.albicans yeast form was confirmed with a commercial monoclonal antibody (mAb-ACMK-1; Matriks Biotek(®), Turkey) specific for those bonds. Besides, mAb-ACMK-1 interacted with C.albicans yeast form and gave intense fluorescence (high positive reaction) in IF method, but no fluorescence (negative) was detected with hyphal form. This data, obtained for the first time with this study, indicates that the mannan β-1,2 bonds are either found infrequently or none in the fungal hyphal wall. Although both monoclonal antibodies recognize the mannan antigen, mAb-2B7 reacted with S.choleraesuis 211, while mAb-ACMK-1 did not, due to the difference of epitope specificity. In conclusion, monoclonal antibodies may facilitate the characterization of antigenic structures of Candida, which will lead for the identification of new determinants that may increase the sensitivity and specificity of commercial tests used for mannan detection in serum.

  18. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  19. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  20. Schistosoma mansoni. Anti-egg monoclonal antibodies protect against cercarial challenge in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to surface membranes of developing schistosomula and/or cercarial tails were generated from mice immunized with living schistosome eggs or soluble egg antigen. These monoclonal antibodies detected at least three different surface epitopes. One surface antigen detected by anti-egg monoclonal antibody EG1C4B1 (E.1) persisted on the surface of developing schistosomula for 96 h posttransformation . The same or a cross-reactive antigen was also detected on the surfa...

  1. Anti-idiotypic immunity in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    Bergenbrant Glas, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies such as multiple myeloma (MM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are lymphoproliferative B cell diseases. B cells/plasma cells produce the monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) which can be detected in plasma and/or urine. Such Ig have unique variable regions of the heavy and light chains and may be regarded as tumour-specific antigens and as such potential targets for immune regulation of the tumour cell clone, by anti-idiotype (I...

  2. Laboratory investigation of monoclonal gammopathy during 10 years of screening in a general hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    V. Malacrida; De Francesco, D.; Banfi, G; Porta, F A; Riches, P G

    1987-01-01

    Protein electrophoresis was carried out on 102,000 samples from the patients of a district general hospital over 10 years, and a monoclonal protein was detected in 730 cases; of these, 114 could be classified as B cell malignancies and 261 as monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS). The various clinical and laboratory features of monoclonal gammopathy were examined with respect to distinguishing the malignant conditions from MGUS at first presentation.

  3. Population-based studies on familiality and prognosis in patients with monoclonal gammopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Kristinsson, Sigurður Yngvi

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies constitute a group of diseases which have in common an overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulins, M-proteins. Clues to their etiology have been found in studies showing familial aggregation of these diseases. We included 2,144 patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström s macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM) and 4,458 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), their 6,177 and 14,621 first-degree relatives respectively,...

  4. Improving food and agricultural production. Thailand. Application on monoclonal antibodies for progesterone measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The duties of the mission were to provide instructions on the maintenance of hybridoma cell lines and their culture and the harvesting of monoclonal antibodies; to assist the counterparts in Thailand to develop work plans for the use of monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassay measurements of progesterone; and to assess the need for and feasibility of establishing a laboratory for producing monoclonal antibodies directed against progesterone. The report contains a summary of the activities performed in fulfillment of these duties

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to coagulation factor IX define a high-frequency polymorphism by immunoassays.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been used to demonstrate a polymorphism of human plasma coagulation factor IX antigen in double antibody solid-phase immunoradiometric assays. This polymorphism is detected in an assay where a monoclonal antibody (A-1) adsorbed to microtiter wells is used to bind factor IX from diluted plasma samples. Plasma samples with the factor IX polymorphism have less than 0.2 U/ml of apparent antigen when tested with the A-1 antibody, while assays with other monoclonal antibo...

  6. Use of commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies for immunofluorescence double staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bzorek, M.; Stamp, I.M.; Frederiksen, L.;

    2008-01-01

    synchronously, and we report here a fast and easy technique for demonstrating more than 1 antigen in 1 slide using immunofluorescence. We have used commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies (Cyclin D1, CD3, CD5, CD23, etc.) paired with mouse monoclonal antibodies (CD7, CD20, CD79a, Pax-5, etc.......) for double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies in combination with mouse monoclonal antibodies proved useful in double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue, and all combinations used yielded excellent results...

  7. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies of Shrimp White Spot Syndrome Virus Envelope Protein VP28

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-gang GU; Jun-fa YUAN; Ge-lin XU; Li-juan LI; Ni LIU; Cong ZHANG; Jian-hong ZHANG; Zheng-li SHI

    2007-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with purified White spot syndrome virus (WSSV).Six monoclonal antibody cell lines were selected by ELISA with VP28 protein expressed in E.coll in vitro neutralization experiments showed that 4 of them could inhibit the virus infection in crayfish.Westernblot suggested that all these monoclonal antibodies were against the conformational structure of VP28.The monoclonal antibody 7B4 was labeled with colloidal gold particles and used to locate the VP28 on virus envelope by immunogold labeling.These monoclonal antibodies could be used to develop immunological diagnosis methods for WSSV infection.

  8. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future.

  9. Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111-hydroxyquinoline labelled platelets, though useful in the detection of thrombus, have not gained widespread use owing to the time and technical skill required for their preparation. A study was therefore conducted evaluating a new method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a 111In labelled monoclonal antibody, P256, directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. When the number of receptors occupied by P256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface platelet function, as assessed by platelet aggregometry, was undisturbed. P256 was radiolabelled with 111In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo - that is, by direct intravenous injection of P256 - in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The 111In kinetics recorded after intravenous P256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P256, three had documented thrombus, tow of whom gave positive results on P256 platelet scintigraphy. The third subject had chromic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative. Imaging thrombus using a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody directed to platelets appears to offer great potential as a simple, non-invasive approach to the diagnosis of thrombosis. 3 refs. (Author)

  10. Monitoring monoclonal antibody delivery in oncology: the example of bevacizumab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Nugue

    Full Text Available Developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies paves the way for new strategies in oncology using targeted therapy which should improve specificity. However, due to a lack of biomarkers, a personalized therapy scheme cannot always be applied with monoclonal antibodies. As a consequence, the efficacy or side effects associated with this type of treatment often appear to be sporadic. Bevacizumab is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. It is used to limit tumor vascularization. No prognosis or response biomarker is associated with this antibody, we therefore assessed whether the administration protocol could be a possible cause of heterogeneous responses (or variable efficacy. To do this, we developed a bevacizumab assay with a broad sensitivity range to measure blood bevacizumab concentrations. We then analyzed bevacizumab concentrations in 17 patients throughout the first quarter of treatment. In line with previously published data, average blood concentrations were 88+/-27 mg/L following the first dose administered, and 213+/-105 mg/L after the last (6(th dose administered. However, the individual values were scattered, with a mean 4-fold difference between the lowest and the highest concentration for each dose administered. We demonstrated that the bevacizumab administration schedule results in a high inter-individual variability in terms of blood concentrations. Comparison of assay data with clinical data indicates that blood concentrations above the median are associated with side effects, whereas values below the median favor inefficacy. In conclusion, bevacizumab-based therapy could benefit from a personalized administration schedule including follow-up and adjustment of circulating bevacizumab concentrations.

  11. Human recombinant erythropoietin promotes differentiation of murine megakaryocytes in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, T.; Koziol, J A; Burstein, S A

    1987-01-01

    To determine if erythropoietin affects megakaryocytopoiesis, we measured acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity, a marker of the murine megakaryocytic lineage, after the addition of human recombinant erythropoietin to serumless murine bone marrow cultures. Erythropoietin increased AchE activity substantially. Moreover, when the hormone was added to serumless cultures of 426 isolated single megakaryocytes derived from megakaryocytic colonies, erythropoietin induced a significant increase in the ...

  12. Dynamic Determination of Oxygenation and Lung Compliance in Murine Pneumonectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gibney, Barry; Lee, Grace S; Houdek, Jan; Lin, Miao; Miele, Lino; Chamoto, Kenji; Konerding, Moritz A; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic surgical procedures in mice have been applied to a wide range of investigations, but little is known about the murine physiologic response to pulmonary surgery. Using continuous arterial oximetry monitoring and the FlexiVent murine ventilator, we investigated the effect of anesthesia and pneumonectomy on mouse oxygen saturation and lung mechanics. Sedation resulted in a dose-dependent decline of oxygen saturation that ranged from 55–82%. Oxygen saturation was restored by mechanical v...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen;

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine m......Ab-producing cell lines were cloned and their cross-reactivities characterised against a panel of airborne fungal spores representing genera commonly found in the same environment as Pst. Two specific mAbs were used to develop a competitive ELISA (Pst mAb4) and a subtractive inhibition ELISA (Pst mAb8). Standard...

  14. Production of recombinant woodchuck IFNalpha and development of monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Berraondo, P.; Crettaz, J. (Julien); Ochoa, L. (Laura); Vales, A. (África); Ruiz, J; Prieto, J.; Martinez-Anso, E. (Eduardo); Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, G

    2009-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is the first line treatment for chronic hepatitis B and C. In order to test new IFNalpha delivery systems and investigate the function of this cytokine in the woodchuck model, the best animal model of chronic hepatitis B, we produced and purified recombinant woodchuck IFNalpha and used it to produce monoclonal antibodies. wIFNalpha5 was cloned in a prokaryotic expression system, expressed as His-tagged protein and then purified. The rwIFNalpha5 protein was found to...

  15. A monoclonal antibody to triplex DNA binds to eucaryotic chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. S.; Burkholder, G D; Latimer, L J; Haug, B L; Braun, R P

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (Jel 318) was produced by immunizing mice with poly[d(TmC)].poly[d(GA)].poly[d(mCT) which forms a stable triplex at neutral pH. Jel 318 did not bind to calf thymus DNA or other non pyrimidine.purine DNAs such as poly[d(TG)].poly[d(CA)]. In addition the antibody did not recognize pyrimidine.purine DNAs containing mA (e.g. poly[d(TC)].poly[d(GmA)]) which cannot form a triplex since the methyl group blocks Hoogsteen base-pairing. The binding of Jel 318 to chromosomes was as...

  16. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Thytoxine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Four hybridoma cell lines (T410D11,T415611, T413A4, T409F6) producing MAbs againstthytoxine(T4) are established by using T4-conjugated bovine serum albumin as an immunogen. These monoclonal antibodies have high affinitiess and specific against T4. The association constants of these MAbs are higher than 108 L/mol. Their cross-reactivities with T3, T2 and rT3 are lower than 0.4%, 0.04% and 0.22%, respectively. The clinical application of the T4 ELISA Kit

  17. Immunosuppression associated with novel chemotherapy agents and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Vicki A

    2014-11-15

    The introduction of novel agents to the therapeutic armamentarium for oncologic, rheumatologic, and neurologic disorders has resulted in major clinical advances. These agents impact immune function, resulting in a discrete spectrum of infectious complications. Purine analogues and alemtuzumab alter cell-mediated immunity, resulting in opportunistic viral/fungal infections. Herpes zoster incidence increases with bortezomib. Hepatitis B reactivation may occur with rituximab. Cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy have occurred following monoclonal antibody therapy. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy is complicated by tuberculosis reactivation and fungal infections. We summarize the impact of these therapies on pathogenesis and spectrum of infection complicating their usage. PMID:25352632

  18. Prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy in HIV patients in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Genet

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In non-HIV patients, Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS is associated with an increased risk of subsequent development of haematologic malignancies, especially multiple myeloma (MM and it has been recently demonstrated that MM is always preceded by a MGUS phase. A higher prevalence of MGUS and MM has been observed in HIV patients compared to the general population. Nevertheless, it has been shown that MGUS in the context of HIV can disappear with antiretroviral therapy (ART. So, measuring MGUS prevalence in HIV patients in the recent period appears of special interest. Materials and Methods: From January to June 2014, in each out-patient seen in our unit, a serum protein electrophoresis was performed. Results: A total of 393 patients were screened. Eight patients with HIV2 and one patient with HIV1+HIV2 infection were excluded. Finally, 383 patients (173 female, 210 male with HIV1 infection were analyzed. Characteristics of patients were as follows: median age 42.2 years (19.1–79.1, hepatitis B virus (HBV and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infection 47 (18.8%, median CD4 610 (2–1758, CD8 793 (113–4010, presence of a past AIDS event for 88 patients (23%. Median time with HIV infection was 11 years (0–30. Three hundred fifty-nine patients (93.7% were on ART for a median duration of 105 months (0–287. For 320 patients (83.6%, viral load was below 50 viral copies/ml. Twelve cases of MGUS (3.1% were observed: IgG Kappa (five cases, IgG Lambda (five cases, biclonal with two IgG Kappa (one case and in one case, three monoclonal immunoglobulins were observed (IgG Kappa×2+IgG Lambda. The monoclonal immunoglobulin's level was low and below 1 g/l in all cases except two (2.1 and 11.6 g/l. No factor was found to be predictive of the presence of MGUS in particular age, CD4, HBV/HCV co-infection, viral load or ART. Conclusions: In the context of modern ART, the prevalence of MGUS remains above those observed in the

  19. Large-scale production of monoclonal antibodies in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, M P; Metzger, L S; Slaber, P L; Nevitt, K L; Boder, G B

    1988-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are being manufactured for clinical trials in suspension culture at the 1300-L scale. Suspension culture offers some advantages relative to high-density mammalian cell culture methods; in particular, the ability to closely monitor the behavior of cells in a homogeneous environment. Computer control and on-line mass spectrography of exit gases provide instantaneous information about the culture metabolic activity. Air sparging and agitation by marine impeller provide aeration sufficient to maintain a constant dissolved oxygen tension at cell concentrations up to 5.0 x 10(6) cells/mL without causing apparent cell damage.

  20. Neutralization and Binding Profile of Monoclonal Antibodies Generated Against Influenza A H1N1 Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembekar, Nachiket; Mallajosyula, Vamsee V Aditya; Malik, Ankita; Saini, Ashok; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) provide scope for the development of better therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Herein, we describe the binding and neutralization profile(s) for a panel of murine MAbs generated against influenza A H1N1 viruses elicited by immunization with pandemic H1 recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA)/whole virus or seasonal H1 rHA. Neutralizing MAbs, MA-2070 and MA-M, were obtained after pandemic A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) virus/rHA immunization(s). Both MAbs reacted specifically with rHA from A/California/07/2009 and A/England/195/2009 in ELISA. MA-2070 bound rHA of A/California/07/2009 with high affinity (KD = 51.36 ± 9.20 nM) and exhibited potent in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.50 μg/mL). MA-2070 bound within the stem domain of HA. MA-M exhibited both hemagglutination inhibition (HI, 1.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 0.66 μg/mL) activity against the pandemic A/California/07/2009 virus and showed higher binding affinity (KD = 9.80 ± 0.67 nM) than MA-2070. MAb, MA-H generated against the seasonal A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 (H1N1) rHA binds within the head domain and bound the seasonal H1N1 (A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 and A/New Caledonia/20/1990) rHAs with high affinity (KD; 0.72-8.23 nM). MA-H showed high HI (2.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.61 μg/mL) activity against the A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 virus. All 3 MAbs failed to react in ELISA with rHA from various strains of H2N2, H3N2, H5N1, H7N9, and influenza virus B, suggesting their specificity for either pandemic or seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. The MAbs reported here may be useful in developing diagnostic assays.

  1. Neutralization and Binding Profile of Monoclonal Antibodies Generated Against Influenza A H1N1 Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembekar, Nachiket; Mallajosyula, Vamsee V Aditya; Malik, Ankita; Saini, Ashok; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) provide scope for the development of better therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Herein, we describe the binding and neutralization profile(s) for a panel of murine MAbs generated against influenza A H1N1 viruses elicited by immunization with pandemic H1 recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA)/whole virus or seasonal H1 rHA. Neutralizing MAbs, MA-2070 and MA-M, were obtained after pandemic A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) virus/rHA immunization(s). Both MAbs reacted specifically with rHA from A/California/07/2009 and A/England/195/2009 in ELISA. MA-2070 bound rHA of A/California/07/2009 with high affinity (KD = 51.36 ± 9.20 nM) and exhibited potent in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.50 μg/mL). MA-2070 bound within the stem domain of HA. MA-M exhibited both hemagglutination inhibition (HI, 1.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 0.66 μg/mL) activity against the pandemic A/California/07/2009 virus and showed higher binding affinity (KD = 9.80 ± 0.67 nM) than MA-2070. MAb, MA-H generated against the seasonal A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 (H1N1) rHA binds within the head domain and bound the seasonal H1N1 (A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 and A/New Caledonia/20/1990) rHAs with high affinity (KD; 0.72-8.23 nM). MA-H showed high HI (2.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.61 μg/mL) activity against the A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 virus. All 3 MAbs failed to react in ELISA with rHA from various strains of H2N2, H3N2, H5N1, H7N9, and influenza virus B, suggesting their specificity for either pandemic or seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. The MAbs reported here may be useful in developing diagnostic assays. PMID:27463230

  2. Research on Growth Behavior of Embryos for Bovine and Murine on Primary Murine Embryos Fibroblast Cell Feeder Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Li-long; XIAO Mei; FENG Xiu-Liang; DOU Zhong-ying; QIU Huai; YANG Qi; LEI An-min; YANG Chun-rong; GAO Zhi-min

    2002-01-01

    The difference in growth behavior between bovine embryos and murine embryos was studied on PMEF(primary murine embryos fibroblast)feeder layer. The results showed as follows: With embryos having attached, bovine embryonic trophoblast formed a transparent membranous structure covering on inner cell mass (ICM), however, murine embryonic trophoblast formed disc structure. Bovine embryos formed four kinds of ICM colonies with different morphology including the mass-like, the net-like, the stream-like and the mixture-like colonies. Compared with Murine ICM, the bovine ICM grew more fast. So, the bovine ICM was passaged at first after a culture of approximately 5 - 6 days in vitro, but murine ICM was passaged at first after an attachment of 3 - 4 days on PMEF feeder layer. The mixture colonies of bovine ICM differentiated very early, while the others differentiated very late. Most ICM-like mass of Bovine grew in a defined spot, but bovine ICMs like stream and ICMs like net proliferated fast and dispersed quickly. We found that the single blastomeres derived from late bovine morula and late murine morula formed sub-blastophere; moreover, the bovine ICM cell would differentiate rapidly if the trophoblast was removed.

  3. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghe; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Longo, Nancy S; Laub, Leo; Lin, Chien-Li; Turk, Ellen; Kang, Byong H; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Connors, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity. PMID:24030440

  4. Fingerprinting of Natural Product by Eastern Blotting Using Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We succeeded in developing the fingerprint of natural product by eastern blotting using monoclonal antibodies. After developing and separating them on a TLC plate, solasodine glycosides are oxidized by NaIO4 and reacted with a protein to give conjugates which are recognized with anti-solamargine monoclonal antibody (MAb. Anti-solamargine MAb having wide cross-reactivity can stain and detect all solasodine glycosides by fingerprint. Different sensitivity between solamargine and solasonine was observed. The detection limit was 1.6 ng of solasonine. The hydrolysed products of solamargine were determined by fingerprint of eastern blotting compared to their Rf values depending on the sugar number. Fingerprint by eastern blotting using anti-ginsenoside Rb1 MAb distinguished the formula containing ginseng prescribed in traditional Chinese medicine. By double-staining of ginsenosides it is possible to suggest that the staining color shows the pharmacological activity, such as the purple bands indicate ginsenosides having stimulation activity, and the blue color indicated compound like ginsenosides possessed the depression affect for the central nervous system (CNS, respectively.

  5. Monoclonal Antibody-Based Therapeutics for Melioidosis and Glanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Yong Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Burkholderia Pseudomallei (BP and B. Mallei (BM were two closely related pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. They were the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively and are recognized by CDC as category B select agents. Significant efforts had been devoted to developing the diagnostic and therapeutic measures against these two pathogens. Monoclonal antibody-based therapeutic was a promising targeted therapy to fight against melioidosis and glanders. Valuable findings have been reported by different groups in their attempt to identify vaccine targets against these two pathogens. Approach: Our group has generated neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies (MAbs against BP and BM and characterized them by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. We present an overview of the MAb-based therapeutic approaches against BP and BM and demonstrate some of our efforts for developing chimeric and fully human MAbs using antibody engineering. Results: Throughout conventional mouse hybridoma technique and antibody engineering (chimerization and in vitro antibody library techniques, we generated 10 chimeric MAbs (3 stable MAbs and 7 transient MAbs and one fully human MAb against BP and BM. In addition, we present the reactive antigen profiles of these MAbs. Our approaches had potentials to accelerate the development of therapeutics for melioidosis and glanders in humans. Conclusion: Our experience and findings presented here will be valuable for choosing the best antigenic targets and ultimately for the production of effective vaccines for these two pathogens.

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  7. Development of Biodegradable Nanocarriers Loaded with a Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gdowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatments utilizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics against intracellular protein-protein interactions in cancer cells have been hampered by several factors, including poor intracellular uptake and rapid lysosomal degradation. Our current work examines the feasibility of encapsulating monoclonal antibodies within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles using a water/oil/water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. This method can be used to prepare protective polymeric nanoparticles for transporting functional antibodies to the cytoplasmic compartment of cancer cells. Nanoparticles were formulated and then characterized using a number of physical and biological parameters. The average nanoparticle size ranged from 221 to 252 nm with a low polydispersity index. Encapsulation efficiency of 16%–22% and antibody loading of 0.3%–1.12% were observed. The antibody molecules were released from the nanoparticles in a sustained manner and upon release maintained functionality. Our studies achieved successful formulation of antibody loaded polymeric nanoparticles, thus indicating that a PLGA-based antibody nanoformulation is a promising intracellular delivery vehicle for a large number of new intracellular antibody targets in cancer cells.

  8. Bothropic antivenom based on monoclonal antibodies, is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauches, Thiago S; Petretski, Jorge H; Arnholdt, Andrea C V; Lasunskaia, Elena B; de Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Kipnis, Thereza L; da Silva, Wilmar D; Kanashiro, Milton M

    2013-09-01

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against three major toxic components of Bothrops atrox venom were produced and tested. The mAbs against phospholipase A2, hemorrhagic metalloprotease, and thrombin-like enzymes were produced in large amounts and purified with caprylic acid followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Purified mAbs were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and their ability to neutralize the respective toxins was tested. Five Swiss mice were injected i.p. with 13.5 mg of pooled mAbs and challenged via s.c. route with venom. Survival rate was recorded for the next 48 h. All mice treated and challenged with venom survived, whereas only one mouse in the control group survived. Bleeding time in mice treated with mAbs was similar to that observed in control mice. Our results show that monoclonal antibodies neutralized the lethal toxicity of Bothrops venom and indicate that there is a reasonable possibility of developing antivenoms based on humanized mAbs to treat victims of venomous animals in the future. PMID:23732123

  9. Detection of grass carp reovirus (GCRV) with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongli, Jing; Lifeng, Zhang; Zhenzhen, Fang; Lipu, Xu; Min, Zhang; Na, Wang; Yulin, Jiang; Xiangmei, Lin

    2014-04-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV) is a pathogen that causes hemorrhagic disease of grass carp. It is the most serious infectious disease of carp and causes serious losses of fingerlings of grass carp and black carp. In this study, a recombinant VP4, one of the viral core proteins, was constructed with a histidine tag and expressed at a high level in E. coli, and the expressed protein was mainly found in the form of inclusion bodies. The expressed VP4 protein was recognized by an anti-His-tag monoclonal antibody and goat anti-GCRV serum. Four monoclonal antibodies (16B7, 39E12, 13C3 and 14D1) against the recombinant VP4 protein were produced. These MAbs did not react with any of the tested viruses or fish cells lines in the ELISA tests except GCRV. In western blotting analysis, a protein band was observed when the recombinant VP4 protein of GCRV was used as an antigen, but a 68-kDa band was observed when natural capsid proteins of GCRV were used as antigens. Furthermore, a sandwich ELISA was developed for detection of GCRV. The detection limit of the test was 105 TCID50 of GCRV per mL. PMID:24122108

  10. CD69 expression on airway eosinophils and airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-ying; SHEN Hua-hao; James J Lee; Nancy A Lee

    2006-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic airway disease with inflammation characterized by physiological changes(airway hyper-responsiveness, AHR) and pathological changes (inflammatory cells infiltration and mucus production). Eosinophils play a key role in the allergic inflammation. But the causative relationship between eosinophils and airway inflammation is hard to prove. One of the reasons is lack of activation marker of murine eosinophils. We investigated the expression of CD69 on murine eosinophils in vitro, the relationship between the expression of CD69 on eosinophils from peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on airway inflammation in asthmatic mice.Methods Eosinophils from peripheral blood of IL-5 transgenic mice (NJ.1638) were purified. Mice were divided into five groups: wild type mice sensitized and challenged with saline (WS group), wild type mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (WO group), IL-5-/- mice sensitized and challenged with saline and transferred with purified eosinophils (ISE group), IL-5-/- mice sensitized and challenged with OVA and transferred with purified eosinophils (IOE group), IL-5-/- mice sensitized and challenged with OVA and transferred with purified eosinophils, pretreated with anti CD4 monoclonal antibody (IOE+antiCD4mAb group).IL-5-/- mice were sensitized with OVA at day 0 and day 14, then challenged with OVA aerosol. On days 24, 25, 26and 27 purified eosinophils were transferred intratracheally to IL-5-/- mice. On day 28, blood and BALF were collected and CD69 expression on eosinophils measured by flowcytometry.Results Purified eosinophils did not express CD69. But eosinophils cultured with PMA+MA, IFN- γ, IL-5 or GM-CSF expressed CD69 strongly. Eosinophils from blood of WO, WS group did not express CD69 at all. The numbers of eosinophils in BALF of WO group, IOE group, ISE group and IOE+antiCD4mAb group were significantly higher than in mice of WS group which did not have eosinophils at all. CD69 expression

  11. Isolation of a high affinity scFv from a monoclonal antibody recognising the oncofoetal antigen 5T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D M; Embleton, M J; Westwater, C; Ryan, M G; Myers, K A; Kingsman, S M; Carroll, M W; Stern, P L

    2000-12-15

    The oncofoetal antigen 5T4 is a 72 kDa glycoprotein expressed at the cell surface. It is defined by a monoclonal antibody, mAb5T4, that recognises a conformational extracellular epitope in the molecule. Overexpression of 5T4 antigen by tumours of several types has been linked with disease progression and poor clinical outcome. Its restricted expression in non-malignant tissue makes 5T4 antigen a suitable target for the development of antibody directed therapies. The use of murine monoclonal antibodies for targeted therapy allows the tumour specific delivery of therapeutic agents. However, their use has several drawbacks, including a strong human anti-mouse immune (HAMA) response and limited tumour penetration due to the size of the molecules. The use of antibody fragments leads to improved targeting, pharmacokinetics and a reduced HAMA. A single chain antibody (scFv) comprising the variable regions of the mAb5T4 heavy and light chains has been expressed in Escherichia coli. The addition of a eukaryotic leader sequence allowed production in mammalian cells. The two 5T4 single chain antibodies, scFv5T4WT19 and LscFv5T4, described the same pattern of 5T4 antigen expression as mAb5T4 in normal human placenta and by FACS. Construction of a 5T4 extracellular domain-IgGFc fusion protein and its expression in COS-7 cells allowed the relative affinities of the antibodies to be compared by ELISA and measured in real time using a biosensor based assay. MAb5T4 has a high affinity, K(D)=1.8x10(-11) M, as did both single chain antibodies, scFv5T4WT19 K(D)=2.3x10(-9) M and LscFv5T4 K(D)=7.9x10(-10) M. The small size of this 5T4 specific scFv should allow construction of fusion proteins with a range of biological response modifiers to be prepared whilst retaining the improved pharmacokinetic properties of scFvs. PMID:11113573

  12. Anti-PrPC monoclonal antibody infusion as a novel treatment for cognitive deficits in an alzheimer's disease model mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strittmatter Stephen M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common of the conformational neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the conversion of a normal biological protein into a β-sheet-rich pathological isoform. In AD the normal soluble Aβ (sAβ forms oligomers and fibrils which assemble into neuritic plaques. The most toxic form of Aβ is thought to be oligomeric. A recent study reveals the cellular prion protein, PrPC, to be a receptor for Aβ oligomers. Aβ oligomers suppress LTP signal in murine hippocampal slices but activity remains when pretreated with the PrP monoclonal anti-PrP antibody, 6D11. We hypothesized that targeting of PrPC to prevent Aβ oligomer-related cognitive deficits is a potentially novel therapeutic approach. APP/PS1 transgenic mice aged 8 months were intraperitoneally (i.p. injected with 1 mg 6D11 for 5 days/week for 2 weeks. Two wild-type control groups were given either the same 6D11 injections or vehicle solution. Additional groups of APP/PS1 transgenic mice were given either i.p. injections of vehicle solution or the same dose of mouse IgG over the same period. The mice were then subjected to cognitive behavioral testing using a radial arm maze, over a period of 10 days. At the conclusion of behavioral testing, animals were sacrificed and brain tissue was analyzed biochemically or immunohistochemically for the levels of amyloid plaques, PrPC, synaptophysin, Aβ40/42 and Aβ oligomers. Results Behavioral testing showed a marked decrease in errors in 6D11 treated APP/PS1 Tg mice compared with the non-6D11 treated Tg groups (p C or Aβ oligomer levels. 6D11 treated APP/PS1 Tg mice had significantly greater synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus molecular layer of the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated APP/PS1 Tg mice (p Conclusions Even short term treatment with monoclonal antibodies such as 6D11 or other compounds which block the binding of Aβ oligomers to PrPC can be used to treat

  13. Reactivity of eleven anti-human leucocyte monoclonal antibodies with lymphocytes from several domestic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Larsen, Else Bang;

    1988-01-01

    Nine commercially available monoclonal antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies from The American Type Culture Collection, raised against various human leucocyte surface antigens, were tested on lymphocytes from cow, sheep, goat, swine, horse, cat, dog, mink, and rabbit as well as man. Four...

  14. Preparation of Europium Induced Conformation—specific anti—calmodulin Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeiGuoLI; ChaoQI; 等

    2002-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technique was employed to detect the conformational difference of CaM induced by metal ions. A trivalent europium ion induced conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody was successfully prepared with europium-saturated calmodulin as antigen.

  15. Inhibition of lipoxygenase activity in lentil protoplasts by monoclonal antibodies introduced into the cells via electroporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Veldink, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The isolation of lentil protoplasts and the transfer of anti-lipoxygenase monoclonal antibodies into plant protoplasts by electroporation is reported. The dependence of the efficiency of monoclonal antibody incorporation on the field strength is shown as well. The transferred immunoglobulins retaine

  16. Preparation of Europium Induced Conformation-specific anti-calmodulin Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technique was employed to detect the conformational difference of CaM induced by metal ions. A trivalent europium ion induced conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody was successfully prepared with europium-saturated calmodulin as antigen.

  17. 76 FR 63317 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... monoclonal antibody m912 (SM-101) as an antibody therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, ovarian... Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers AGENCY: National... the antibody for the treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers, including mesothelioma, lung...

  18. 78 FR 7438 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4'' (HHS Ref. No. E-158-2010/0) to Customized Biosciences, Inc., which is..., rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,...

  19. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  20. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jennifer S; Gritz, Emily C; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Hirschi, Karen K

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  1. Glycosaminoglycan interactions in murine gammaherpesvirus-68 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gillet

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs commonly participate in herpesvirus entry. They are thought to provide a reversible attachment to cells that promotes subsequent receptor binding. Murine gamma-herpesvirus-68 (MHV-68 infection of fibroblasts and epithelial cells is highly GAG-dependent. This is a function of the viral gp150, in that gp150-deficient mutants are much less GAG-dependent than wild-type. Here we show that the major MHV-68 GAG-binding protein is not gp150 but gp70, a product of ORF4. Surprisingly, ORF4-deficient MHV-68 showed normal cell binding and was more sensitive than wild-type to inhibition by soluble heparin rather than less. Thus, the most obvious viral GAG interaction made little direct contribution to infection. Indeed, a large fraction of the virion gp70 had its GAG-binding domain removed by post-translational cleavage. ORF4 may therefore act mainly to absorb soluble GAGs and prevent them from engaging gp150 prematurely. In contrast to gp70, gp150 bound poorly to GAGs, implying that it provides little in the way of adhesion. We hypothesize that it acts instead as a GAG-sensitive switch that selectively activates MHV-68 entry at cell surfaces.

  2. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  3. Forced recombination of psi-modified murine leukaemia virus-based vectors with murine leukaemia-like and VL30 murine endogenous retroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M;

    1999-01-01

    -impaired Akv-MLV-derived vectors, we here examine putative genetic interactions between vector RNAs and copackaged endogenous retroviral RNAs of the murine leukaemia virus (MLV) and VL30 retroelement families. We show (i) that MLV recombination is not blocked by nonhomology within the 5' untranslated region...

  4. Co-culture: A quick approach for isolation of street rabies virus in murine neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sasikalaveni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory detection of rabies in most cases is based on detection of the antigen by fluorescent antibody test, however, in weak positive cases confirmative laboratory diagnosis depends on widely accepted mouse inoculation test. Cell lines like neuroblastoma have been used to isolate the virus with greater success not only to target for diagnosis, but also for molecular studies that determine the epidemiology of the circulating street rabies strains and in studies that look at the efficiency of the developed monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the different rabies strains. Due to the recent issues in obtaining ethical permission for mouse experimentation, and also the passages required in the cell lines to isolate the virus, we report herewith a co-culture protocol using the murine neuroblastoma (MNA cells, which enable quicker isolation of street rabies virus with minimum passages. Objective: This study is not to have an alternative diagnostic assay, but an approach to produce sufficient amount of rabies virus in minimum passages by a co-culture approach in MNA cells. Materials and Methods: The MNA cells are co-cultured by topping the normal cells with infected cells every 48 h and the infectivity was followed up by performing direct fluorescent-antibody test. Results: The co-culture approach results in 100% infectivity and hence the use of live mouse for experimentation could be avoided. Conclusion: Co-culture method provides an alternative for the situations with limited sample volume and for the quicker isolation of virus which warrants the wild type strains without much modification.

  5. A murine model of coxsackievirus A16 infection for anti-viral evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingwei; Shi, Jinping; Huang, Xulin; Liu, Fei; Cai, Yicun; Lan, Ke; Huang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is one of the main causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which is a common infectious disease in children. CA16 infection may lead to severe nervous system damage and even death in humans. However, study of the pathogenesis of CA16 infection and development of vaccines and anti-viral agents are hindered partly by the lack of an appropriate small animal model. In the present study, we developed and characterized a murine model of CA16 infection. We show that neonatal mice are susceptible to CA16 infection via intraperitoneal inoculation. One-day-old mice infected with 2×10(6)TCID50 of CA16/SZ05 strain consistently exhibited clinical signs, including reduced mobility, and limb weakness and paralysis. About 57% of the mice died within 14days after infection. Significant damage in the brainstem, limb muscles and intestines of the infected mice in the moribund state was observed by histological examination, and the presence of CA16 in neurons of the brainstem was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining with a CA16-specific polyclonal antibody, strongly suggesting the involvement of the central nervous system in CA16 infection. Analysis of virus titers in various organs/tissues collected at 3, 6 and 9days post-infection, showed that skeletal muscle was the major site of virus replication at the early stage of infection, while the virus mainly accumulated in the brain at the late stage. In addition, susceptibility of mice to CA16 infection was found to be age dependent. Moreover, different CA16 strains could exhibit varied virulence in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrated that post-exposure treatment with an anti-CA16 monoclonal antibody fully protected mice against lethal CA16 infection. Collectively, these results indicate the successful development of a CA16 infection mouse model for anti-viral evaluation. PMID:24583030

  6. Isoform-specific upregulation of palladin in human and murine pancreas tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M Goicoechea

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA is a lethal disease with a characteristic pattern of early metastasis, which is driving a search for biomarkers that can be used to detect the cancer at an early stage. Recently, the actin-associated protein palladin was identified as a candidate biomarker when it was shown that palladin is mutated in a rare inherited form of PDA, and overexpressed in many sporadic pancreas tumors and premalignant precursors. In this study, we analyzed the expression of palladin isoforms in murine and human PDA and explored palladin's potential use in diagnosing PDA. We performed immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses on patient samples and tumor-derived cells using an isoform-selective monoclonal antibody and a pan-palladin polyclonal antibody. Immunoblot and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR were used to quantify palladin mRNA levels in human samples. We show that there are two major palladin isoforms expressed in pancreas: 65 and 85-90 kDa. The 65 kDa isoform is expressed in both normal and neoplastic ductal epithelial cells. The 85-90 kDa palladin isoform is highly overexpressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs in both primary and metastatic tumors compared to normal pancreas, in samples obtained from either human patients or genetically engineered mice. In tumor-derived cultured cells, expression of palladin isoforms follows cell-type specific patterns, with the 85-90 kDa isoform in TAFs, and the 65 kDa isoform predominating in normal and neoplastic epithelial cells. These results suggest that upregulation of 85-90 kDa palladin isoform may play a role in the establishment of the TAF phenotype, and thus in the formation of a desmoplastic tumor microenvironment. Thus, palladin may have a potential use in the early diagnosis of PDA and may have much broader significance in understanding metastatic behavior.

  7. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Shinsuke, E-mail: yuasa@a8.keio.jp [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tabata, Hidenori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Kazunori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi [Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function and Dynamics, Advanced Technology Development Group, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukuda, Keiichi [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  8. Murine Typhus: An Important Consideration for the Nonspecific Febrile Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjot Basra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine typhus is a widely distributed flea-borne infection caused by Rickettsia typhi. Symptoms of murine typhus are nonspecific and mimic a variety of other infectious diseases. We herein report a case of murine typhus in an area where the broad use of DDT in the mid-20th century has now made it a rare disease. The patient described presented with headache, fever, and a faint macular rash. Initial laboratory studies revealed a slight transaminase elevation. Further questioning revealed exposure to opossums, prompting the consideration of murine typhus as a diagnosis. Although typhus group antibodies were not present during the patient’s acute illness, empiric therapy with doxycycline was initiated, and the patient defervesced. One month after convalescence, the patient returned to clinic with serum that contained typhus group antibodies with an IgG titer of 1 : 1024. Murine typhus is an important consideration during the workup of a patient with a nonspecific febrile illness. Exposure to reservoir hosts and the flea vector place humans at risk for this disease. Clinician recognition of this entity is required for diagnosis and effective therapy.

  9. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development

  10. Isotype specific immune responses in murine experimental toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuéllar C

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a murine experimental model of toxocariasis has been developed in BALB/c, C57BL/10 and C3H murine strains orally inoculated with 4,000 Toxocara canis embryonated eggs, in order to investigate the isotype-specific immune responses against excretory-secretory antigens from larvae. T. canis specific IgG+M, IgM, IgG, IgA, IgG1, IgG2a and IgG3 were tested by ELISA. The dynamics of the specific immunoglobulins (IgG+IgM production showed a contrasting profile regarding the murine strain. Conversely to the results obtained with the IgM isotype, the IgG antibody class showed similar patterns to those obtained with IgG+IgM antibodies, only in the case of the BALB/c strain, being different and much higher than the obtained with IgG+IgM antibodies, when the C3H murine strain was used. The antibodies IgG+IgM tested in BALB/c and C57BL/10 were both of the IgM and IgG isotypes. Conversely, in the C3H strain only IgG specific antibody levels were detected. The IgG1 subclass responses showed a similar profile in the three murine strains studied, with high values in BALB/c, as in the case of the IgG responses.

  11. Phage Display Approaches for the Isolation of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Dengue Virus Envelope Domain III from Human and Mouse Derived Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash G. Vasudevan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Domain III of the dengue virus envelope protein (EDIII, aa295-395 has an immunoglobulin fold and is the proposed receptor-binding domain of the virus. Previous studies have shown that monoclonal antibodies against EDIII can be neutralizing and have therapeutic potential. Here, cloned Fab-phage libraries of human and mouse origin were screened for DENV specific antibodies. Firstly, bacterially expressed EDIII or whole virus particles were used as bait in biopanning against a large naïve human Fab-phage library ( > 10 billion independent clones. Multiple panning strategies were employed, and in excess of 1000 clones were screened, but all of the antibodies identified bound the envelope in regions outside EDIII suggesting EDIII antibodies are virtually absent from the naïve human repertoire. Next, a chimeric Fab-phage library was constructed from a panel of EDIII specific mouse hybridomas by pooling the VH and VL chain sequences from the hybridomas and cloning these into the pComb3X phagemid vector with human CH and CL encoding sequences. Biopanning against EDIII identified a unique antibody (C9 that cross-reacts with EDIII from DENV1-3 and, in the IgG format, binds and neutralizes DENV2 in cell-based assays. Sequence analysis and saturation mutagenesis of complementary determining regions (CDR in the C9 light chain suggest an antigen recognition model in which the LCDR3 is a key determinant of EDIII specificity, while modifications in LCDR1 and LCDR2 affect DENV serotype cross-reactivity. Overall, this study supports the current prevailing opinion that neutralizing anti-EDIII monoclonal antibodies can be readily generated in murine systems, but in humans the anti-DENV immune response is directed away from domain III.

  12. Evaluation of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Campylobacter fetus in bovine preputial washing and vaginal mucus samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, B W; Devenish, J; Lutze-Wallace, C L; Milnes, D; Robertson, R H; Berlie-Surujballi, G

    2004-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was described and evaluated for use as a presumptive screening test for detection of Campylobacter fetus in bovine preputial washing and vaginal mucus samples. A total of 725 diagnostic samples collected in the field and submitted in Clark's transport enrichment medium (TEM) were analyzed. Cultural isolation of C. fetus was used as the standard for comparison. After incubation of the TEM vials for 4-5 days, fluid was removed for culture and ELISA testing. A sandwich ELISA format was used and the target antigen was C. fetus lipopolysaccharides (LPS). A rabbit anti-C. fetus polyclonal antiserum was used as the capture antibody. Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to C. fetus serotype A and B LPS core and O-polysaccharides and a goat anti-mouse horseradish peroxidase conjugate were used as detection antibodies. ELISA and culture results for the diagnostic samples were in complete agreement. Seven hundred and eight samples were negative by both tests. All 17 culture positive samples were positive by ELISA with a MAb to LPS core. The ELISA with MAbs to LPS O-polysaccharides detected all culture positive samples with the homologous C. fetus serotype. Sixty-six preputial wash samples from three known C. fetus culture positive bulls were also analyzed. Forty-nine of these samples were positive by both ELISA and culture, 16 were positive by ELISA only, and one was negative by both ELISA and culture. The results indicate that this ELISA is useful as a screening test for the detection of C. fetus in diagnostic samples. PMID:15381269

  13. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone.

  14. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for 18 kDa antigen from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Luo, Xuenong; Guo, Aijiang; Zhu, Xueliang; Cai, Xuepeng

    2016-07-01

    The gene encoding a mature 18 kDa glycoprotein of Taenia solium cysticerci (Ts18) was cloned and bacterially expressed with a His-tagged fusion protein. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the recombinant Ts18 antigen were generated in vitro by routine murine hybridoma technique of fusing splenocytes, from BALB/c mice immunized with the vesicular fluid of T. solium cysticerci (TsVF), with mouse myeloma cells (SP2/0). The reactivity and specificity of these MAbs were evaluated by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Three stable hybridoma clones, namely 3B11, 6C5, and 6G4, were screened using His-Ts18-based ELISA, and these showed two IgG1 isotypes and one IgM isotype. All MAbs reacted with His-Ts18 at molecular weight (MW) 12.8 kDa and the native antigen at MW 18 kDa in TsVF and whole larval extracts (WLE). In a dot blotting test, MAbs 6C5 and 6G4 showed no obvious cross-reactivity with heterologous vesicular fluids from other taeniid species, including Taenia saginata (TsaVF), Taenia pisiformis (TpVF), Taenia hydatigena (ThVF), Taenia multiceps (TmVF), and Echinococcus granulosus (EgVF). Immunofluorescent assays showed that MAb 6C5 specifically reacted with the Ts18 expressed from pEGFP-N1-Ts18-transfected HeLa cells. Immunolocalization analysis, using MAb 6C5 as a probe, indicated that Ts18 was present at high concentrations in the region of the larval sucker and spiral canal. The results indicate that the Ts18 protein is an abundantly secreted parasite protein and MAbs against it might provide a step forward for improving the diagnosis of porcine cysticercosis. PMID:26993086

  15. Clearance of a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody following administration of DNA in normal and autoimmune mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, F.S.; Pisetsky, D.S.; Kurlander, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    To study the assembly of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in vivo, we have measured the clearance from blood and organ localization of a murine IgG2a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody, called 6/0, following the infusion of DNA intravenously or intraperitoneally. Intraperitoneal DNA caused a profound acceleration of 6/0 anti-DNA clearance that was dose dependent and demonstrable after the infusion of as little as 1.9 microgram per gram of body weight of single-stranded DNA. The antibody was cleared primarily in the liver without increased deposition in the kidney. Intraperitoneal infusions of DNA also accelerated the clearance of 6/0 in autoimmune MRL-lpr/lpr mice. In contrast, intravenous DNA given in comparable doses caused only a slight increase in 6/0 antibody clearance; this accelerated clearance was seen only at low antigen doses and only during the first 10 min following DNA infusion. Using double-radiolabeling techniques, 6/0 and Cl.18, an IgG2ak myeloma protein without anti-DNA activity, were found to disappear from blood at a comparable rate in both B6D2 mice and MRL-lpr/lpr mice. These results suggest that the DNA-anti-DNA immune complexes can form in vivo but that this process is profoundly affected by the manner in which DNA enters the circulation. In addition, the results suggest that DNA-dependent clearance is not a major pathway for anti-DNA metabolism in normal or at least one strain of autoimmune mice.

  16. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for 18 kDa antigen from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Luo, Xuenong; Guo, Aijiang; Zhu, Xueliang; Cai, Xuepeng

    2016-07-01

    The gene encoding a mature 18 kDa glycoprotein of Taenia solium cysticerci (Ts18) was cloned and bacterially expressed with a His-tagged fusion protein. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the recombinant Ts18 antigen were generated in vitro by routine murine hybridoma technique of fusing splenocytes, from BALB/c mice immunized with the vesicular fluid of T. solium cysticerci (TsVF), with mouse myeloma cells (SP2/0). The reactivity and specificity of these MAbs were evaluated by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Three stable hybridoma clones, namely 3B11, 6C5, and 6G4, were screened using His-Ts18-based ELISA, and these showed two IgG1 isotypes and one IgM isotype. All MAbs reacted with His-Ts18 at molecular weight (MW) 12.8 kDa and the native antigen at MW 18 kDa in TsVF and whole larval extracts (WLE). In a dot blotting test, MAbs 6C5 and 6G4 showed no obvious cross-reactivity with heterologous vesicular fluids from other taeniid species, including Taenia saginata (TsaVF), Taenia pisiformis (TpVF), Taenia hydatigena (ThVF), Taenia multiceps (TmVF), and Echinococcus granulosus (EgVF). Immunofluorescent assays showed that MAb 6C5 specifically reacted with the Ts18 expressed from pEGFP-N1-Ts18-transfected HeLa cells. Immunolocalization analysis, using MAb 6C5 as a probe, indicated that Ts18 was present at high concentrations in the region of the larval sucker and spiral canal. The results indicate that the Ts18 protein is an abundantly secreted parasite protein and MAbs against it might provide a step forward for improving the diagnosis of porcine cysticercosis.

  17. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody inhibits the distribution of cocaine to the brain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Andrew B; Gooden, Felicia C T; Tabet, Michael R; Ball, William J

    2014-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is a humanized version of the chimeric human/murine anti-cocaine mAb 2E2. The recombinant h2E2 protein was produced in vitro from a transfected mammalian cell line and retained high affinity (4 nM Kd) and specificity for cocaine over its inactive metabolites benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester. In rats, pharmacokinetic studies of h2E2 (120 mg/kg i.v.) showed a long terminal elimination half-life of 9.0 days and a low volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss) of 0.3 l/kg. Pretreatment with h2E2 produced a dramatic 8.8-fold increase in the area under the plasma cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) and in brain a concomitant decrease of 68% of cocaine's AUC following an i.v. injection of an equimolar cocaine dose. Sequestration of cocaine in plasma by h2E2, shown via reduction of cocaine's Vdss, indicates potential clinical efficacy. Although the binding of cocaine to h2E2 in plasma should inhibit distribution and metabolism, the elimination of cocaine remained multicompartmental and was still rapidly eliminated from plasma despite the presence of h2E2. BE was the major cocaine metabolite, and brain BE concentrations were sixfold higher than in plasma, indicating that cocaine is normally metabolized in the brain. In the presence of h2E2, brain BE concentrations were decreased and plasma BE was increased, consistent with the observed h2E2-induced changes in cocaine disposition. The inhibition of cocaine distribution to the brain confirms the humanized mAb, h2E2, as a lead candidate for development as an immunotherapy for cocaine abuse. PMID:24733787

  18. A new monoclonal antibody radiopharmaceutical for radioimmunoscintigraphy of breast cancer: direct labeling of antibody and its quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Salouti

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS has found widespread clinical application in tumor diagnosis. The antibody (Ab PR81 is a new murine anti-MUC1 monoclonal antibody (MAb against human breast carcinoma. In this study a very simple, rapid and efficient method for labeling of this MAb with 99mTc, particularly suitable for development of a ‘kit’is described. The reduction of Ab was performed with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME at a molar ratio of 2000:1 (2-ME:MAb and the reduced Ab was labeled with 99mTc via methylene diphosphonate (MDP as a transchelator. The labeling efficiency which was determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC was 94.2%±2.3. Radiocolloides measured by cellulose nitrate electrophoresis were 2.5%±1.7. In vitro stability of the labeled product in human serum which was measured by gel filtration chromatography (FPLC was 70%±5.7 over 24 hr. The integrity of labeled MAb was checked by means of SDS-PAGE and no significant fragmentation was observed. The results of the cell-binding studies showed that both labeled and unlabeled PR81 were able to compete for binding to MCF 7 cells. Biodistribution studies were performed in normal BALB/c mice at 4 and 24 hrs post-injection and no important accumulation was observed in vital organs. These results show that the new radiopharmaceutical may be considered as a promising candidate for imaging of breast cancer.

  19. Characterization of the specificity by immunohistology of a monoclonal antibody to a novel epithelial antigen of ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani-Costantini, R; Agresti, R; Colnaghi, M I; Ménard, S; Andreola, S; Rilke, F

    1985-08-01

    An immunohistological study, using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method, was carried out to define the reactivity profile of a murine monoclonal antibody, MOv2, which recognizes a novel glycoprotidic antigen associated with ovarian epithelial tumors. Among the primary ovarian tumors tested, MOv2 immunostained 93% of mucinous and 75% of serous cystadenomas, 100% of mucinous, 81% of serous and 73% of endometrioid carcinomas. Undifferentiated and clear cell tumors revealed more limited reactivity with the antibody, whereas ovarian sex cord-stromal and germinal tumors were immunonegative. Positive reactions were also documented in omental metastases from primary ovarian carcinomas. No immunoreactivity was detected in normal ovarian epithelium, whereas the cells lining Walthard's nests adjacent to the fallopian tubes and a variety of normal epithelia were consistently immunolabeled. These included the lining epithelia of the gastrointestinal tract, bronchi and endocervix, and the epithelium of salivary, biliary and pancreatic ducts and sweat glands. To a lesser extent, positive reactions were detected in other surface epithelia, such as squamous and transitional epithelia. Among tumors other than ovarian, MOv2 consistently reacted with adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas from different sites, most notably breast, lung and gastrointestinal tract, and with transitional cell carcinomas. In contrast, no staining was demonstrated in non-epithelial malignancies. The antigen defined by MOv2 may be operationally useful as a marker of epithelial lineage in tumor histopathology. Its pattern of immunohistochemical distribution indicates that an antigenic phenotype shared by normal surface epithelia and non-ovarian carcinomas is strongly associated with common epithelial neoplasms of the ovaries.

  20. Structures of A[beta]-Related Peptide−Monoclonal Antibody Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardberg, Anna; Dice, Lezlee; Pridgen, Kathleen; Ko, Jan; Patterson, Paul; Ou, Susan; Wetzel, Ronald; Dealwis, Chris; (Case Western); (CIT); (Tennessee-K)

    2009-06-15

    Passive immunotherapy (PI) is being explored as a potential therapeutic against Alzheimer's disease. The most promising antibodies (Abs) used in PI target the EFRH motif of the A{beta} N-terminus. The monoclonal anti-A{beta} Ab PFA1 recognizes the EFRH epitope of A{beta}. PFA1 has a high affinity for A{beta} fibrils and protofibrils (0.1 nM), as well as good affinity for A{beta} monomers (20 nM). However, PFA1 binds the toxic N-terminally modified pyroglutamate peptide pyro-Glu3-A{beta} with a 77-fold loss in affinity compared to the WT A{beta}(1-8). Furthermore, our earlier work illustrated PFA1's potential for cross-reactivity. The receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2, which plays a role in skeletal and bone formation, possesses the EFRH sequence. PFA1 Fab binds the Ror2(518-525) peptide sequence REEFRHEA with a 3-fold enhancement over WT A{beta}(1-8). In this work, the crystal structures of the hybridoma-derived PFA1 Fab in complex with pyro-Glu3-A{beta} peptide and with a cross-reacting peptide from Ror2 have been determined at resolutions of 1.95 and 2.7 {angstrom}, respectively. As with wild-type A{beta}, these peptides bind to the Fab via a combination of charge- and shape-complementarity, hydrogen-bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. Comparison of the structures of the four peptides A{beta}(1-8), Grip1, pyro-Glu3-A{beta}(3-8), and Ror2 in complex with PFA1 shows that the greatest conformational flexibility occurs at residues 2 to 3 and 8 of the peptide. These structures provide a molecular basis of the specificity tolerance of PFA1 and its ability to recognize A{beta} N-terminal heterogeneity. The structures provide clues to improving mAb specificity and affinity for pyroglutamate A{beta}.

  1. Production of monoclonal antibody against Salmonella typhimurium by hybridoma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research S.typhimurium killed by irradiation was used as antigen was prepared by exposing the bacteria to gamma rays from 60Cobalt source with the dose of 2.5 kGy, Specific lymphocyte cell were obtained by immunizing 3 months old Balb-C mice with the antigen. the immunizations were done by subcutan route with the interval of 2 weeks. The hybridoma cells were made by fussing the specific lymphocyte cells with the myeloma cells. It was found that the animals (immunization + irradiation with a low dose of I Gy ) yielded monoclonal antibody with higher value (5.15 mg/ml) than the control animals (3.25 mg/ml). (author)

  2. Characteristics of Monoclonal Antibody Against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYan-Fei; WangWei; 等

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen strains of monoclonal antibodies(McAbs) against infections bursal disease virus(IBDV) were obtained by using hydridoma technique and their characteristics were studied by double immunodiffusion,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA),virus neutralization test(VNT) and Western-blotting assay (WBA).The result showed that nine of the thirteen McAbs belonged to IgG class and four of them belonged to IgM class.No crossreactions were detected betwween the McAbs and Newscastle disease virus (NDV),infectious bronchitis virus(IBV) and Marek's disease virus(MDV).All of McAbs were positively specific reactive with IBDV and five of them can neutralize viral infectivity.Their recognized epitopes of the neutralizing McAbs were all presented on VP2 of the IBDV.

  3. Characteristics of Monoclonal Antibody Against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen strains of monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were obtained by using hybridoma technique and their characteristics were studied by double immunodiffusion,en- zyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), virus neutralization test (VNT) and Western- blotting assay (WBA). The result showed that nine of the thirteen McAbs belonged to IgG class and four of them belonged to IgM class. No crossreactions were detected betwween the McAbs and Newscastle disease virus (NDV) ,in- fectious bronchitis virus(IBV) and Marek's disease virus(MDV). All of McAbs were positively specific reac- tive with IBDV and five of them can neutralize viral infectivity. Their recognized epitopes of the neutralizing McAbs were all presented on VP2 of the IBDV.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies for human non-small cell lung carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrom, I.; Hellstrom, K.E.; Linsley, P.; Brown, J.P.; Horn, D.

    1987-01-07

    The present invention is concerned with two novel monoclonal antibodies which define carbohydrate antigens associated with human non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) and certain other human carcinomas. The antibodies bind to normal human cells to a much lesser degree than to tumor cells. The antibodies find use in diagnostic methods such as the detection of malignant cells associated with NSCLC and therapeutic methods. The invention also comprises a method for determining the presence of a malignant condition in the lung of a subject. The method involves examining tissue from the subject for the presence of antigens which are Lesup(x) or Lesup(y) antigen or which have the characteristics of Lesup(y) and Lesup(x).

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against the human leukemia cell line K 562.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, V; Hering, S; Jantscheff, P; Micheel, B

    1985-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies raised against K 562, a cell line originally established from a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in terminal blast crisis, were selected according to their distinct reaction pattern. Whereas two antibodies (ZIK-C1-A/C5 and ZIK-C1-A/H5 also designated C and H) recognized antigens, present on K 562 cells and other immature and mature hematopoietic cells (cell lines and normal blood and bone marrow cells), antibody ZIK-C1-A/D9 also designated Y showed an exclusive binding to K 562 cells. The results obtained (here and in the following paper) indicate, that antibody ZIK-C1-A/D9 defines an early differentiation antigen of hematopoiesis or a leukemia-associated antigen.

  6. Novel CD20 monoclonal antibodies for lymphoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cang Shundong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rituximab (RTX, a monoclonal antibody (mAb against CD20, has been widely used for lymphoma therapy. RTX in combination with cyclophosphamide /doxorubicin /vincristine /prednisone (R-CHOP remains the standard frontline regimen for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, suboptimal response and /or resistance to rituximab have remained a challenge in the therapy of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Novel agents are under active clinical trials. This review will summarize the latest development in new mAbs against CD20, which include second-generation mAbs, ofatumumab, veltuzumab (IMMU-106, ocrelizumab (PRO70769, and third-generation mAbs, AME-133v (ocaratuzumab, PRO131921 and GA101 (obinutumumab.

  7. Localization of melanoma with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody fragments and iodoamphetamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liewendahl, K.; Kairento, A.L.; Lindroth, L.; Pyroenen, S.; Franssila, K.; Virkkunen, P.; Asko-Seljavaara, S.; Launes, J.

    1986-10-01

    In two melanoma patients, metastases accumulated both /sup 99m/Tc-labelled monoclonal anti-tumor F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments and N-isopropyl-p-(/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine. Small metastatic deposits were localized only by labelled antibody, for which a higher target-to-nontarget ratio was observed than for radioiodoamphetamine, indicating that immunoscintigraphy may be the more sensitive method. In these two patients positive immunohistochemical staining for the antibody used was observed, whereas in a third patient, with no concentration of labelled antibody, the staining result was negative showing the specificity of the immunoscintigraphy findings. It is possible that the accumulation of radio-iodoamphetamine is due to binding to melanin but this is not certain as tissue samples from one of the two patients with positive scintigrams did not contain stainable melanin.

  8. A monoclonal antibody to pestviruses in bovine and ovine sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to defeat antibodies to pestviruses in bovine and ovine sera. Single sera from 211 cattle and 22 sheep from 7 different farms were tested using ELISA and Serum Neutralisation Test (SNT). 17 Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) directed against P80, gp48 and gp53 were tested for ability to coat ELISA plates and capture the bovine viral diarrhea antigen. 5 mabs(WB 103, WB, 105, WB 112 against P80 kDa protein, WB 210 and WB 214 directed against gp48 and gp 53 kDa protein. Specific antibody to BVDV was detected by rabbit anti-bovine and anti-ovine IgG antisera. The quantitative correlation between two tests was good

  9. Preparation and Characteristic Identification of Monoclonal Antibody Against Sulfamethazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Liangjun; LI Jichang; FU Rui; ZHOU Yanjun; HUO Guicheng

    2006-01-01

    Two artificial antigens were synthesized successfully by diazotizing method, sulfamethazine(SM2)-human serum albumin (HSA) was used for the immunogen, and SM2-ovalbumin(OVA) was used for the coating antigen.The coupled reaction was successful by confirmation of the ultraviolet scanning spectrometer, and the conjugation ratio of SM2 with HSA and OVA was 9:1 and 15:1, respectively. Using cell-fusion and limiting dilution method to reclone 5times to get 3 hybridoma strains, which could stably secret monoclonal antibody (Mab), named CB7, BC4 and BB12. The subtype of BC4 Mab was IgG1 and chain, the molecular weight was 162 ku, the numbers of chromosomal were about 90,the affinity constant was 6.1 × 1012 M-1. No cross reactivity was seen between the Mab and the other 4 sulfonamides, as well as the 2 carries proteins. The Mab antibody had excellent stability.

  10. Iodination of monoclonal antibodies, proteins and peptide using iodogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the iodinating reagent 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3α, 6α-diphenylglycholuril (Iodogen) to label monoclonal antibodies (McAbs). Proteins and peptides was invesrigated with McAbs identified as mouse IgG and IgM, arginine-vasopressin (AVP), glucagon (Glu), human insulin(hI) and albumin(Alb). The labeled products were purified by gel chromatography and their immunoreactivity were detected by RIA or IRMA> Comparison of the Iodogen method with the lactoperoxides and chloramine-T methods showed that the Iodogen method had a number of advantages: 1) technically simpler ; 2) a high labeling efficiency could be obtained; 3) the immunoreactivity of the products was minimally affected; 4) the products were stable for up to 4 months

  11. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were obtained from hybrid myelomas, following fusion of mouse NSI myeloma cells with mouse spleen cells. Ten different antibodies were obtained from 4 separate fusions. Eight antibodies were of the IgG1 subclass. Affinities of antibodies for TSH were in the range 2 x 108-5 x 1010 M-1. Five of the antibodies were specific for TSH and did not react with LH, FSH or hCG. The remaining antibodies reacted with all these hormones and were assumed to recognise their common (α) subunit. The 5 specific antibodies fell into 3 subgroups recognising distinct antigenic determinants, whereas the 5 non-specific antibodies recognised a single determinant or closely related set of sites. It is concluded that these antibodies should be valuable reagents for use in sensitive and specific two-site immunoradiometric assays. (Auth.)

  12. [Continuous perfusion culture hybridoma cells for production of monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Li; Li, Ling; Feng, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2002-05-01

    Hybridoma cells were cultured by continuous perfusion in Fibra-Cel of 5L packed-bed bioreactor for 22 days in low serum or serum-free media. The corresponded amino acids were fed and serum concentration was decreased by analyzing glucose concentration, oxygen uptake rate, secretary antibody amount and amino acids concentration in culture supernatant. Comparing with continuous perfusion culture that amino acids were not fed, antibody amount of production was increased about 2-3 times. The inoculated cell density was 2.5 x 10(5) cells/mL, while the final cell density was 8.79 x 10(8) cells/mL. Antibody production was reached 295 mg/L/d at average level, and the highest level was reached 532 mg/L/d. These results provided a primary mode of enlarge culture for monoclonal antibody industralization. PMID:12192875

  13. Design and manufacture of monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appropriate design and manufacture of monoclonal antibodies is fundamental to their use for radioimmunotherapy. Besides the right selection of antibody specificity and affinity, recombinant antibodies can be designed to simplify manufacture and minimise unwanted side effects. Although many innovative new technologies have been developed in recent years, antibodies are still most commonly produced from mammalian cells and purified by column chromatography. Purification methods have to be designed and validated to remove potential contaminants, especially retroviruses which in principle might be present in mammalian cell lines. Adherence to relevant Good Manufacturing Practice is mandatory in the production of any medicinal product and there are numerous guidelines regarding the manufacture of antibodies. This article outlines some methods used for fermentation, purification and quality control of antibodies intended for radiolabelling

  14. Preparation and Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Vibrio anguillarum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shiyong(陈师勇); Zhang Peijun; Mo Zhaolan; Zhang Zhendong; Zou Yuxia; Xu Yongli

    2004-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against V.anguillarum strain M3 are prepared, and their isotypes are also characterized. Among them, C1C5 is the only Mab which does not crossreact with other eleven non-V.anguillarum strains. The proteinase K digestion test shows that the epitopes recognized by C1C5, C6C3 and C6C32 Mabs contained protein. The periodate oxidation test showed that the epitopes recognized by Mabs except C1C5 are glycosylated. In addition, results of additivity test indicate that the epitopes recognized by C6C3 and C6C32 Mabs are similar, and quite different from those recognized by Mab C1C5.

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  16. Monoclonal antibody-defined human pancreatic cancer-associated antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegel, W H; Kalthoff, H; Arndt, R; Gieseking, J; Greten, H; Klöppel, G; Kreiker, C; Ladak, A; Lampe, V; Ulrich, S

    1985-03-01

    Three pancreatic cancer-associated antigens were characterized by use of monoclonal antibodies in immunobinding studies with various cellular and soluble target antigens, in immunoprecipitation, and in immunoperoxidase staining. C54-0 represents a tumor-associated Mr 122,000 antigen, which appears to be widely distributed on various epithelial tumors and to a lower extent on normal tissue. C1-N3 antigen exhibited a more restricted distribution, reacting with pancreatic and various gastrointestinal tract tumors as well as with chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue. The most specific antigen expression was observed for C1-P83 antigen, found on all exocrine tumors of the pancreas, but not on normal or chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue.

  17. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy with 90Y but not 177Lu is effective treatment in a syngeneic murine leukemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnnie J Orozco

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT for treatment of hematologic malignancies has primarily employed monoclonal antibodies (Ab labeled with 131I or 90Y which have limitations, and alternative radionuclides are needed to facilitate wider adoption of RIT. We therefore compared the relative therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT employing 90Y and 177Lu in a syngeneic, disseminated murine myeloid leukemia (B6SJLF1/J model. Biodistribution studies showed that both 90Y- and 177Lu-anti-murine CD45 Ab conjugates (DOTA-30F11 targeted hematologic tissues, as at 24 hours 48.8 ± 21.2 and 156 ± 14.6% injected dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g of 90Y-DOTA-30F11 and 54.2 ± 9.5 and 199 ± 11.7% ID/g of 177Lu-DOTA-30F11 accumulated in bone marrow (BM and spleen, respectively. However, 90Y-DOTA-30F11 RIT demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit: 60% of mice treated with 300 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 lived over 180 days after therapy, and mice treated with 100 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 had a median survival 66 days. 90Y-anti-CD45 RIT was associated with transient, mild myelotoxicity without hepatic or renal toxicity. Conversely, 177Lu- anti-CD45 RIT yielded no long-term survivors. Thus, 90Y was more effective than 177Lu for anti-CD45 RIT of AML in this murine leukemia model.

  18. Cell line profiling to improve monoclonal antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sohye; Ren, Da; Xiao, Gang; Daris, Kristi; Buck, Lynette; Enyenihi, Atim A; Zubarev, Roman; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Deshpande, Rohini

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cell culture performance is influenced by both intrinsic (genetic) and extrinsic (media and process) factors. In this study, intrinsic capacity of various monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines was compared by exposing them to the same culture condition. Microarray-based transcriptomics and LC-MS/MS shotgun proteomics technologies were utilized to obtain expression landscape of different cell lines. Specific transcripts and proteins correlating with productivity, growth rate and cell size have been identified. The proteomics analysis results showed a strong correlation between the intracellular protein expression levels of the recombinant DHFR and productivity. In contrast, neither the light chain nor the heavy chain of the recombinant monoclonal antibody showed correlation to productivity. Other top ranked proteins which demonstrated positive correlation to productivity included the adaptor protein complex subunits AP3D1and AP2B2, DNA repair protein DDB1 and the ER translocation complex component, SRPR. The subunits of molecular chaperone T-complex protein 1 and the regulator of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism MTHFD2 showed negative correlation to productivity. The transcriptomics analysis has identified the regulators of calcium signaling, Tmem20 and Rcan1, as the top ranked genes displaying positive and negative correlation to productivity, respectively. For the second part of the study, the principal component analysis (PCA) was generated to view the underlying global structure of the expression data. A clear division and expression polarity was observed between the two distinct clusters of cell lines, independent of link to productivity or any other traits examined. The primary component of the PCA generated from either transcriptomics or proteomics data displayed a strong correlation to cell size and doubling time, while none of the main principal components showed correlation to productivity. Our findings suggest

  19. Radioimmunoassay of human growth hormone: characterization of a monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of cell-hybridization techniques by Koehler and Milstein in 1975 to produce monoclonal antibodies (MA) was a definite improvement in methodological tools of radioimmunoassay, quite apart from all other applications of this technique in immunohistochemistry, affinity chromatography, target-directed drug delivery systems etc. MAs would ideally be suited in RIAs, when the specificity is the crucial aspect of the determination. However, for reasons which are not completely understood, assays with MAs very often lack the attribute of being highly sensitive. Despite several reports in the literature on MAs against human growth hormone (HGH), none of these seem sensitive enough to be of use in clinical chemistry, where a too strongly marked specificity may even be unwanted. However, from the scientific point of view, MAs against polypeptide hormones are of great interest. An MA to HGH was developed with a sensitivity limit of 0.2 ng. The titre of the ascites fluid is higher than 1:106 and the specificity against human placental lactogen, human prolactin and rat growth hormone is nearly complete. A critical step of the RIA procedure is the separation of bound and free hormone. A combination of human immunoglobulin (Sandoglobulin) with polyethylene glycol gives optimal results. A Scatchard plot reveals an affinity constant of 4x10-11M-bar and a maximal binding capacity of 2x108cpm/μL. In conclusion, our monoclonal antibody represents an excellent investigational tool for endocrine research and it seems to be the most sensitive and specific MA to HGH described to date. However, for practical clinical applications, there seems to be little advantage of an MA over a conventional polyclonal antiserum. (author)

  20. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against radiation-induced protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtained the 6 monoclonal antibodies against gamma-induced proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans, and these antibodies were designated as Mab-3F, 4B, 4D, 4F, 4G and 12G. Using these antibodies, we investigated the relations between gamma-induced proteins and other stress protein in strain R1, and the induction of proteins were compared among strain R1, resistant mutant (rec1) and radiosensitive mutant (rec30). We found new 6 proteins recognized by these monoclonal antibodies which were induced after gamma-irradiation especially in strain R1 and rec 1, but not induced in strain rec30. We suppose that these proteins participate in repair of DNA damages including double strand breaks caused by gamma-irradiation. One of them was around 46kDa protein band recognized by Mab-12G, and this protein was so induced in a large quantity after irradiation that the protein could detect by gold staining. In addition to this observation, we found some proteins which were induced in R1 and rec 1 by gamma-irradiation and other stress, but not in strain rec30, such as 31kDa protein band recognized by Mab-3F, 4B and 4G, and other 11 proteins which were especially induced in irradiated strain R1. The latter proteins might be reinforcement factor to radioresistance such as GroE and DnaK, or participant in repair of damage by gamma-irradiation in strain R1. (author)

  1. Immunophenotypic studies of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenna Robert W

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS is a common plasma cell dyscrasia, comprising the most indolent form of monoclonal gammopathy. However, approximately 25% of MGUS cases ultimately progress to plasma cell myeloma (PCM or related diseases. It is difficult to predict which subset of patients will transform. In this study, we examined the immunophenotypic differences of plasma cells in MGUS and PCM. Methods Bone marrow specimens from 32 MGUS patients and 32 PCM patients were analyzed by 4-color flow cytometry, using cluster analysis of ungated data, for the expression of several markers, including CD10, CD19, CD20, CD38, CD45, CD56 and surface and intracellular immunoglobulin light chains. Results All MGUS patients had two subpopulations of plasma cells, one with a "normal" phenotype [CD19(+, CD56(-, CD38(bright +] and one with an aberrant phenotype [either CD19(-/CD56(+ or CD19(-/CD56(-]. The normal subpopulation ranged from 4.4 to 86% (mean 27% of total plasma cells. Only 20 of 32 PCM cases showed an identifiable normal subpopulation at significantly lower frequency [range 0–32%, mean 3.3%, p 90% CD19(- plasma cells showed progression of disease, whereas none of the cases with >10% CD19(+ plasma cells evolved to PCM. Conclusion MGUS cases with potential for disease progression appeared to lack CD19 expression on >90% of their plasma cells, displaying an immunophenotypic profile similar to PCM plasma cells. A higher relative proportion of CD19(+ plasma cells in MGUS may be associated with a lower potential for disease progression.

  2. A competitive solid-phase radioimmunoassay for translational factors employing monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies produced by the hybridoma techniques were purified by chromatography on DEAE Affi-Gel blue, and covalently coupled to Affi-Gel 10 to purify their antigens. The purified components were used to develop a sensitive competitive radioimmune assay for the quantitative determination of translational factors, as described here with a monoclonal antibody directed against yeast elongation factor 3. Antigen was adsorbed to polyvinyl chloride plastic surfaces and a limiting concentration of monoclonal antibody necessary to bind to the adsorbed antigen was determined. Varying concentrations of purified antigen and of samples containing unknown amounts of antigen were then mixed with the limiting concentration of monoclonal antibody, prior to or at the same time as the reaction of the antibody with the surface-adsorbed antigen. The amount of monoclonal antibody that bound to the surface-adsorbed antigen was determined with a second antibody, radioactive goat anti-mouse antibody. The addition of the free antigen preparations to the monoclonal antibody served to compete for the antibody with the antigen adsorbed to the plastic surfaces. The concentration of antigen in the unknown samples was estimated from the titration curves obtained with varying concentrations of pure antigen. This technique did not require isotopic labeling, modification or derivatization of the monoclonal antibody or its antigen. (Auth.)

  3. Isoforms of murine and human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Hackler, R; Kold, B;

    1998-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) and immunofixation of murine serum amyloid P component (SAP), purified and in serum, showed a distinct and strain-dependent isoform pattern with up to seven bands (pI 5.1-5.7). Neuraminidase treatment caused a shift of the isoforms to more basic pI values, but did...... of isoforms of human SAP required the presence of urea and higher SAP concentrations. TEF and immunofixation of SAP monomers showed five to eight isoforms, ranging from pI 4.7-5.7. IEF of SAP in human serum resulted in a less distinct pattern and more acidic isoforms. As with murine SAP, neuraminidase...

  4. A rapid murine coma and behavior scale for quantitative assessment of murine cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Carroll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field. The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed.

  5. Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Using a High Efficiency Human Hybridoma Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Gabriela; Crowe, James E

    2016-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies against RSV have high potential for use as prophylaxis or therapeutic molecules, and they also can be used to define the structure of protective epitopes for rational vaccine design. In the past, however, isolation of human monoclonal antibodies was difficult and inefficient. Here, we describe contemporary methods for activation and proliferation of primary human memory B cells followed by cytofusion to non-secreting myeloma cells by dielectrophoresis to generate human hybridomas secreting RSV-specific monoclonal antibodies. We also provide experimental methods for screening human B cell lines to obtain RSV-specific lines, especially lines secreting neutralizing antibodies. PMID:27464688

  6. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies specific for products of avian oncogene myb.

    OpenAIRE

    Evan, G. I.; Lewis, G K; Bishop, J M

    1984-01-01

    We isolated a series of monoclonal antibodies which were raised against a bacterially expressed protein, bp37v-myb, and coded for by part of the avian v-myb gene. These monoclonal antibodies recognized a range of antigenic specificities on bp37v-myb, and this was reflected in their differing specificities for the gene products of the v-myb, c-myb, and E26 viral oncogenes. One monoclonal antibody recognized, in addition to the v-myb and c-myb gene products, a conserved nuclear protein found in...

  7. Exchanging murine and human immunoglobulin constant chains affects the kinetics and thermodynamics of antigen binding and chimeric antibody autoreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Torres

    Full Text Available Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V and human (C chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of C(H glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by C(H region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the C(H domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids.

  8. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the murine leukemia virus p30 capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-Tze; Aiyer, Sriram; Villanueva, Rodrigo A; Roth, Monica J

    2013-11-01

    Retroviral vectors derived from the murine leukemia virus (MuLV) are widely used as the starting material in the development of vectors for gene therapy and critical in answering questions relating to viral pathogenesis. The p30 capsid (CA) is the major viral core protein and an internal group antigen in MuLV. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for quantitation of MuLV infectious particles with p30 CA core antigen protein. The ELISA was developed using several goat-polyclonal serum against MuLV p30 generated by the NCI as primary antibody and a rat-monoclonal antibody to CA available from ATCC. The MuLV p30 CA antigen was standardized against recombinant MuLV p30 CA expressed from bacteria. The assay is sensitive, accurate and linear within a defined concentration range of CA. Comparison with different MuLV quantitative methods including reporter gene transfer, reverse transcriptase activity assay, and viral RNA quantitative PCR, showed this ELISA protocol to be highly quantifiable within defined ranges, which can be correlated with infectious viral titer. PMID:23810854

  9. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. ► Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. ► Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. ► Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1+/−K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5–7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm3 shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  10. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccitelli, Richard, E-mail: rich@bioelectromed.com [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Tang, Jean Y. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  11. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  12. Improved detection of Pneumocystis carinii by an immunofluorescence technique using monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Holten-Andersen, W; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1990-01-01

    To assess whether a recently developed indirect immunofluorescent stain using monoclonal antibodies was more sensitive in detecting Pneumocystis carinii than the combination of Giemsa and methenamine silver nitrate stains which has routinely been used in the laboratory, 88 lavage fluid specimens...... and 34 induced sputum specimens were examined. All specimens were stained by five techniques: immunofluorescence using a combination of three monoclonal antibodies (from the National Institutes of Health, USA), immunofluorescence using a single monoclonal antibody (from Dakopatts), Giemsa, methenamine...... silver nitrate and toluidine blue O. Immunofluorescence using the monoclonal antibodies from the NIH was significantly more sensitive than any other single staining method and than the combination of Giemsa and methenamine silver nitrate staining. The study also showed that the cytospin centrifuge...

  13. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed. PMID:27284048

  14. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Justin A; Frederick, Daniel R; Taylor, Justin J; Heffernan, James R; Kotov, Dmitri I; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C; Ruggiero, Jenna L; Rust, Blake J; Landry, Samuel J; Jenkins, Marc K; McLachlan, James B; Fife, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide-MHCII complexes. PMID:27292946

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST BOTH PIG AND RABBIT ZONA PELLUCIDA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OURU-QIANG

    1989-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against both pig and rabbit zona pellucida with a dual immunization protocol employing heat soluble pig zona (HSPZ) and heat soluble rabbit zona (HSRZ), Of the 140 wells screencd, 12 wells were positive to

  16. Immunolocation of antisperm monoclonal antibody 6B10 and corresponding antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高绍荣; 胡国俊; 段崇文; 刘辉; 韩之明; 宋祥芬; 陈大元

    1999-01-01

    An antisperm monoclonal antibody 6B10 was produced by hybridoma technique of the isotype IgG. The monoclonal antibody was purified by means of ammonium sulfate precipitation and protein A-Sepharose Cl-4B affinity chromatography. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to evaluate the purity of the antibody. Evaluation of the sperm acrosomal status was determined by chlortetracycline (CTC) staining. It was found that monoclonal antibody 6B10 can inhibit the sperm acrosome reaction induced by progesterone. The corresponding antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody 6B10 was located on the plasma membrane of the sperm acrosome by indirect immunofluorescent microscopy and immunoelectronmicroscopy. Sperm protein was extracted by 1% Triton X-100. The molecular weight of the antigen is 50 ku, detected by Western blot. The antigen is a key protein in the sperm acrosome reaction and may be the receptor of progesterone on the sperm acrosome. It may either be developed as a candidate contraceptive vaccine

  17. THE MECHANISM OF ANTI-IMPLANTATION EFFECT OF PROGESTERONE MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMin-Yi; HEZhi-Ying; WANGHan-Zheng

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism by which antiprogcsterone monoclonal antibodies block early pregnancy in mice. The mechanism of passive immunization is a complex issue as indicated below:

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF MULTIPLE ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS ON 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' ATTACHMENT PROTEIN BY MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distinct multiple antigenic determinants of the attachment protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been identified by limited proteolytic cleavage using specific monoclonal antibodies. Western blots prepared from the gels containing the cleaved fragments were probed with antiserum ...

  19. Immunoglobulin heavy chain/light chain pairs (HLC, Hevylite™) assays for diagnosing and monitoring monoclonal gammopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraj, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Immunofixation (IFE) is a standard method for detecting monoclonal immunoglobulins and characterizing its isotype. Recently clonality can also be determined by using immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain/light chain immunoassays - HLC, HevyliteTM. HLC separately measures in pairs light chain types of each intact Ig class generating ratios of monoclonal Ig/uninvolved polyclonal Ig concentrations. Studies have shown that HLC and IFE are complementary methods. HLC assays quantify monoclonal proteins and identify monoclonality. It is possible to predict prognosis in multiple myeloma and to monitor response to treatment using HLC ratio. HLC ratio may serve as a parameter for myeloma induced immunoparesis and serve as a new marker for validating remission depth and relapse probabilities.

  20. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against dog immunoglobulin isotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, C; Moreno, A; Millán, Y; Martín de las Mulas, J; Llanes, D

    2002-09-01

    A panel of six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing antigenic determinants on canine immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy or light chains was produced and characterized. All monoclonals recognized the IgG(2) subclass, although only two were subclass-specific (CA3H1 and CA4F1). The CA3B8 mAb was found to be specific for an epitope on canine immunoglobulin G heavy chain, (IgG(1) and IgG(2) subclasses). Two mAbs (CA2E9 and CA5B2) reacted with an epitope on the heavy chain of canine IgG and IgM and another, CA4E7, bound to canine IgA, IgG and IgM isotypes; CA4E7 recognized an epitope on canine immunoglobulin light chain. CA4E7, CA4F1 and CA5B2 recognized an epitope in the Fab region. Three mAbs, CA3B8, CA4E7 and CA5B2, showed much lower reactivity with canine IgG by ELISA when IgG was periodate-treated, suggesting that they recognized a carbohydrate determinant. Cross-reactivity analysis of these mAbs with sera from horse, goat, cow, sheep, pig, cat, rabbit, hamster, rat, mouse and human indicated that two mAbs, CA3B8 and CA5B2, recognized a canine IgG-specific epitope; two others, CA3H1 and CA4E7, recognized an epitope also present in rabbit and sheep immunoglobulin respectively; and the remaining two (CA2E9 and CA4F1) recognized an epitope broadly present on the Igs of the species analyzed. This panel of antibodies will be a useful tool for future canine immunodiagnosis tests. With the exception of CA2E9, all mAbs were able to recognize plasma cells on paraffin-embedded tissues, and will thus be useful for immunohistochemical assays. PMID:12088642

  1. Increased rejection of murine allogeneic bone marrow in presensitized recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanOs, R; deWitte, T; Dillingh, JH; Mauch, PM; Down, JD

    1997-01-01

    The role of presensitizing murine recipients with donor spleen cells prior to T cell-depleted or -repleted H-2 compatible allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was investigated at two different doses of total body irradiation (TBI). Recipients that were presensitized with 2 x 10(7) irradiated

  2. Pharmacodynamics of Doxycycline in a Murine Malaria Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Batty, Kevin T.; Law, Angela S. F.; Stirling, Verity; Moore, Brioni R.

    2007-01-01

    Doxycycline is reported to impair second-generation parasite schizogony. The effects of doxycycline alone and combined with dihydroartemisinin were investigated in a murine malaria model. Doxycycline lowered the rate of parasite growth within 2 days, with maximum effect in 6 days. Addition of dihydroartemisinin led to an additive antimalarial effect.

  3. Turnover of T cells in murine gammaherpesvirus 68-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Doherty, P C

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge of C57BL/6 mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 induces proliferation of T lymphocytes early after infection, as evidenced by incorporation of the DNA precursor bromodeoxyuridine. Using pulse-chase analysis, splenic and peripheral blood activated T lymphocytes were found...

  4. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  5. Studies of monoclonal antibodies IOR-CEA-1 and IOR-EGF/R3 labelled with {sup 99m}Tc; Estudo de marcacao dos anticorpos monoclonais IOR-CEA-1 e IOR-EGF/R3 com {sup 99m}Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Carla Roberta de Barros Rodrigues

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a speciality that uses radioisotopes for the diagnosis or treatment of diseases and it is considered one of the best tools among the diagnostic modalities for detection of cancer. {sup 99m}Tc is one of the main isotopes for labelling antibodies and in Nuclear Medicine in general, due to its adequate physical properties, availability and low cost. Labelled monoclonal antibodies have shown promising results for diagnosis and therapy of cancer and their use has brought great experimental and clinical advances in the field of oncology. The main clinical applications of immunoscintigraphy with monoclonal antibodies are staging and evaluation of tumoral reappearance. The antibodies employed in this work were: OIR-CEA-1, a murine monoclonal antibody that acts directly against CEA expressed in several neoplasia in particular those from the gastrointestinal tract (colorectal cancer) and IOR-EGF/R3, a murine monoclonal antibody that binds to the external domain of EGF-R and it has been used in the diagnosis of tumors of epithelial origin. The objectives of this work were the development and optimization of the reduction and purification processes, the radiolabelling techniques and quality control procedures (radiochemical, immunoreactivity and cystein challenge) and imaging studies of monoclonal antibodies OIR-CEA-1 and IOR-EGF/R3, using the simple, fast and efficient method of direct labelling of the antibody with {sup 99m}Tc. The final results was the definition of the best conditions for the preparation of lyophilized reactive kits of OIR-CEA-1 and IOR- EGF/R3 for an efficient diagnostic application in Nuclear Medicine. The most adequate conditions for the labelling of the antibodies were: 1.0 mg Ab, 29 {mu}L MDP, 3.0 {mu}g Sn{sup 2+}, 1 mL of {sup 99m}Tc and 30 min. reaction time. With these conditions the labelling yield was always higher than 95% and the maximum activity of {sup 99m}Tc was about 2220 MBq (60 mCi). The evidences of the efficiency and

  6. In silico design, construction and cloning of Trastuzumab humanized monoclonal antibody: A possible biosimilar for Herceptin

    OpenAIRE

    Soudabeh Akbarzadeh-Sharbaf; Bagher Yakhchali; Zarrin Minuchehr; Mohammad Ali Shokrgozar; Sirous Zeinali

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a novel hypothesis in that antibodies may have specificity for two distinct antigens that have been named "dual specificity." This hypothesis was evaluated for some defined therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, Bevacizumab, and Cetuximab. In silico design and construction of expression vectors for trastuzumab monoclonal antibody also in this work were performed. Materials and Methods: First, in bioinformatics studies the 3D structur...

  7. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality

    OpenAIRE

    Manassero-Morales, Gioconda; Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorp...

  8. Staining characteristics of six commercially available monoclonal immunofluorescence reagents for direct diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Cles, L D; Bruch, K; Stamm, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using purified elementary bodies of 14 Chlamydia trachomatis serovars in an in vitro assay, we compared the staining characteristics of six commercially available monoclonal antibody reagents used for direct immunofluorescent staining of patient smears. Considerable variation in the degree of brightness, consistency of staining, and specificity of the six reagents was found. Monoclonal antibodies against the major outer membrane proteins of C. trachomatis produced brighter fluorescence, more ...

  9. Development of an antigen microarray for high throughput monoclonal antibody selection

    OpenAIRE

    Staudt, Nicole; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Wright, Gavin J.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are valuable laboratory reagents and are increasingly being exploited as therapeutics to treat a range of diseases. Selecting new monoclonal antibodies that are validated to work in particular applications, despite the availability of several different techniques, can be resource intensive with uncertain outcomes. To address this, we have developed an approach that enables early screening of hybridoma supernatants generated from an animal immunised with up to five differ...

  10. Effect of kinase inhibitors on the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Matera, Eva-Laure; Mathé, Doriane; Evesque, Anne; Valsesia-Wittmann, Sandrine; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Dumontet, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapies of malignancies currently consist of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors. The combination of these novel agents raises the issue of potential antagonisms. We evaluated the potential effect of 4 kinase inhibitors, including the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, and 3 PI3K inhibitors idelalisib, NVP-BEZ235 and LY294002, on the effects of the 3 monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and obinutuzumab (directed against CD20) and trastuzumab...

  11. Characterization and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies developed for typing influenza A and influenza B viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Walls, H H; Harmon, M W; Slagle, J J; Stocksdale, C; Kendal, A P

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that are broadly reactive with influenza A or influenza B viruses were produced as stable reagents for typing influenza viruses. Monoclonal antibodies to influenza A were specific for either matrix protein or nucleoprotein. The antibodies to influenza B were specific for nucleoprotein or hemagglutinin protein. In an enzyme immunoassay procedure, influenza A antibodies detected H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza A virus strains collected between 1934 and 1984. Each of the inf...

  12. Study of Leishmania major-infected macrophages by use of lipophosphoglycan-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Handman, E

    1990-01-01

    Leishmania major infection of macrophages is followed by a time-dependent appearance of lipophosphoglycan (LPG) that can be detected on the surface of infected cells by monoclonal antibodies. The origin of these LPG epitopes is probably the intracellular amastigote. LPG epitopes could be detected on the amastigote and the infected macrophage by a number of monoclonal antibodies directed to several distinct determinants on the phosphoglycan moiety. The macrophage-expressed LPG may be modified ...

  13. Immunohistochemical study of human pulmonary surfactant apoproteins with monoclonal antibodies. Pathologic application for hyaline membrane disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroki, Y.; Dempo, K.; Akino, T

    1986-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies, PC6, PE10, and PE12, were used for immunohistochemical studies of human lungs by immunoperoxidase staining. Monoclonal antibodies PC6 and PE10 against pulmonary surfactant apoproteins stained faint granules in the cytoplasm of some alveolar wall cells in adult lung. These stained cells appeared to be alveolar Type II cells. A fetal lung of 20 weeks' gestation had no any positive staining. However, a few scattered positive cells were observed in a newborn lung of 3...

  14. Specificities of monoclonal antibodies against the activated delta-endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Huber-Lukac, M; Lüthy, P; Braun, D G

    1983-01-01

    Eight hybrid cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies directed against the activated delta-endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis were grown in BALB/c mice. Ascites fluids were collected, and the antibodies were purified by antigen-affinity chromatography. The specificity of each monoclonal antibody for the toxin and protoxin was established by the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All the antibodies consisted of gamma 1 heavy and kappa light chains. They were reac...

  15. Attachment of an anti-MUC1 monoclonal antibody to 5-FU loaded BSA nanoparticles for active targeting of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Mohammadnejad, Javad; Paknejad, Malihe; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2012-01-01

    With PR81 as a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) that was prepared against the human breast cancer, the MUC1 receptor specific targeting is possible. In this study, PR81-conjugated bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles loaded with anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were developed. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) results showed high immunoreactivity of PR81 mAb conjugated to nanoparticles towards MUC1 related peptide or native cancerous MUC1 and almost no cross-reaction to non-specific proteins. In vitro experiments were performed to determine the ability of this new drug delivery system on overcoming MCF-7 breast cancer cells in comparison with four other systems. The results revealed that these cell-type specific drug loaded nanoparticles could achieve more cell death as compared to when the 5-FU was used with no carriers. Stability studies of produced drug delivery system proved high immunoreactivity of conjugated PR81 even after 11 days of storage in room temperature.

  16. Comprehensive evaluation of two HLA-B17 monoclonal antibodies for flow cytometry-based HLA-B57/B58 screening prior to abacavir prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, R; Coates, E; Street, J; Cook, E; Darke, C

    2013-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to the drug abacavir, used to treat HIV/AIDS patients, is associated with possession of HLA-B*57:01. We have carefully assessed two commercially available HLA-B57/B58 murine monoclonal antibodies [0196HA and BIH0243 (One Lambda Inc.)] in a simple flow cytometry-based assay. The evaluation involved tests on 228 reference and random samples covering 91% of all WHO recognized HLA-A, B and C specificities. These involved donors with six different HLA-B*57 alleles and included 19 examples of B*57:01. Both antibodies unambiguously detected B57, but there were small difference in their reactivity against B57-positive non-B*57:01 samples. Importantly, there was no reactivity against B57/B58-negative samples. The possible amino acid motifs involved in the reactivity of these antibodies with B57/B58 were delineated. Thus, HLA-B57/B58, normally present in <10% of patients, can be easily recognized using these two antibodies and further tested by a DNA-based typing method to identify B*57:01.

  17. Generation and characterization of a tetraspanin CD151/integrin α6β1-binding domain competitively binding monoclonal antibody for inhibition of tumor progression in HCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jia-Bin; Huang, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Lu; Kang, Qiang; Liu, Li-Xin; Xie, Nan; Shen, Zao-Zhuo; Hu, Mei-Yu; Cao, Ya; Qiu, Shuang-Jian; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Shi, Guo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that tetraspanin CD151 plays multiple roles in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by forming a functional complex with integrin α6β1. Herein, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that dissociates the CD151/integrin α6β1 complex, and we evaluated its bioactivity in HCCs. A murine mAb, tetraspanin CD151 (IgG1, called CD151 mAb 9B), was successfully generated against the CD151-integrin α6β1 binding site of CD151 extracellular domains. Co-immunoprecipitation using CD151 mAb 9B followed by Western blotting detected a 28 kDa protein. Both immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical staining showed a good reactivity of CD151 mAb 9B in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm of HCC cells, as well as in liver cells. In vitro assays demonstrated that CD151 mAb 9B could inhibit neoangiogenesis and both the mobility and the invasiveness of HCC cells. An in vivo assay showed that CD151 mAb 9B inhibited tumor growth potential and HCC cells metastasis. We successfully produced a CD151 mAb 9B targeting the CD151/integrin α6β1-binding domain, which not only can displayed good reactivity to the CD151 antigen but also prevented tumor progression in HCC. PMID:26756217

  18. Isolation of a high affinity neutralizing monoclonal antibody against 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus that binds at the 'Sa' antigenic site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachiket Shembekar

    Full Text Available Influenza virus evades host immunity through antigenic drift and shift, and continues to circulate in the human population causing periodic outbreaks including the recent 2009 pandemic. A large segment of the population was potentially susceptible to this novel strain of virus. Historically, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been fundamental tools for diagnosis and epitope mapping of influenza viruses and their importance as an alternate treatment option is also being realized. The current study describes isolation of a high affinity (K(D = 2.1±0.4 pM murine MAb, MA2077 that binds specifically to the hemagglutinin (HA surface glycoprotein of the pandemic virus. The antibody neutralized the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in an in vitro microneutralization assay (IC(50 = 0.08 µg/ml. MA2077 also showed hemagglutination inhibition activity (HI titre of 0.50 µg/ml against the pandemic virus. In a competition ELISA, MA2077 competed with the binding site of the human MAb, 2D1 (isolated from a survivor of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic on pandemic H1N1 HA. Epitope mapping studies using yeast cell-surface display of a stable HA1 fragment, wherein 'Sa' and 'Sb' sites were independently mutated, localized the binding site of MA2077 within the 'Sa' antigenic site. These studies will facilitate our understanding of antigen antibody interaction in the context of neutralization of the pandemic influenza virus.

  19. Characterization of N-Linked Glycosylation in a Monoclonal Antibody Produced in NS0 Cells Using Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The N-linked glycosylation in recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAb occurs at Asn297 on the Fc region in the CH2 domain. Glycosylation heterogeneities have been well documented to affect biological activities such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC through their interaction with Fc-receptors. Hence, it is critical to monitor and characterize the N-linked glycosylation profile in a therapeutic protein such as a mAb for product consistency. In one approach, the glycans are first released from the mAb using an enzyme specific digestion, such as Protein N-Glycosidase F (PNGase and subsequently they are labeled using a fluorophore, for example, 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS . Here we have applied this approach and used Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence detection (CE-LIF to analyze a recombinant mAb produced in murine myeloma (NS0 cells. The technique provides short analysis times, efficient separations, and high sensitivity. CE-LIF peak identification was done by a combination of glycan standards and treatment with various exoglycosidases. Furthermore, the APTS-labeled glycans were also analyzed using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC to aid identification of minor peaks by sample collection and off-line mass spectrometry (MS analysis.

  20. Labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for scintigraphy. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realizing the potential of labelled monoclonal antibodies for in vivo diagnosis and therapy and the interest in many developing Member States for acquiring expertise in this field the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research programme in 1991 focusing on 99Tcm labelling of antibodies, their quality control and scintigraphic evaluation. Twelve laboratories from Asia, Latin America, Europe and North America participated in this programme which was concluded in 1996. During this programme the participants investigated the 99Tcm labelling of a murine anti-CEA antibody using the method of chelating 99Tcm with the free sulfhydryl groups generated by reaction with reducing agents such as mercapto ethanol. During the later part of the programme this method was also extended to 99Tcm labelling of hIgG. All the participating laboratories could gain valuable experience in 99Tcm antibody labelling techniques and formulation of kits. Many of them have been use in patients by collaborating nuclear medicine specialists with satisfactory results. This report is a compilation of the detailed results obtained by the participating laboratories and includes a summary and assessment of the achievement of the CRP

  1. Preparation of monoclonal antibody to P53 and its clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqing Wei; Junhua Wu; Jing Liu; Yuxia Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to prepare monoclonal antibody against P53, a kind of tumor suppressor protein,and use the antibody initial y in clinical immunoassay. Methods:Monoclonal antibody was prepared and identified via the classic protocol of monoclonal antibody preparation. Identified monoclonal antibodies were purified by af inity chro-matography. Antibody titer was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The specific binding activity of antibody was detected by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Results:Three strains of monoclonal antibodies named 1P15, 2P37 and 3P40 were obtained and purified by af inity chromatography. The purity of antibodies was higher than 90%. The titers of antibodies were more than 1:6000. Western blot and immunohistochemistry assay showed that the specific antibody can combine with endogenous P53 protein in the tumor celllines and determine the expression of P53 in tumor tis-sue. Conclusion:Three strains of monoclonal antibodies with high af inity to P53 were successful y established, which can be used for detecting the expression of P53 in tumor cells or tissue.

  2. Reactivity of monoclonal antibodies to species-specific antigens of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, H; Kobayashi, S; Nagakura, K; Kaneda, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1991-01-01

    Twenty monoclonal antibodies were produced against trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica strains HK-9 and HM-1: IMSS. When reactivity to various enteric protozoa was examined by an indirect fluorescence antibody test, 15 of the monoclonal antibodies were strongly reactive with E. histolytica trophozoites. Species-specific antigens recognized by these monoclonal antibodies were located on the plasma membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, and cytoskeletal structures of the trophozoites. Two of the remaining five monoclonals reacted strongly with trophozoites of the E. histolytica-like Laredo strain. The determinant antigen was located in the cytoplasm. The three remaining monoclonal antibodies were found to recognize cross-reactive antigens between E. histolytica and E. histolytica-like Laredo, E. hartmanni, E. coli, Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia lamblia, and Trichomonas hominis. These three antibodies were also reactive with T. vaginalis and mammalian cells such as HeLa cells. Thus, the combined use of monoclonal antibodies seems capable of distinguishing E. histolytica and/or E. histolytica-like Laredo from other enteric protozoa. PMID:1724012

  3. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  4. Statistical analysis of data from limiting dilution cloning to assess monoclonality in generating manufacturing cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Jorge; Tsao, Yung-Shyeng

    2016-07-01

    Assurance of monoclonality of recombinant cell lines is a critical issue to gain regulatory approval in biological license application (BLA). Some of the requirements of regulatory agencies are the use of proper documentations and appropriate statistical analysis to demonstrate monoclonality. In some cases, one round may be sufficient to demonstrate monoclonality. In this article, we propose the use of confidence intervals for assessing monoclonality for limiting dilution cloning in the generation of recombinant manufacturing cell lines based on a single round. The use of confidence intervals instead of point estimates allow practitioners to account for the uncertainty present in the data when assessing whether an estimated level of monoclonality is consistent with regulatory requirements. In other cases, one round may not be sufficient and two consecutive rounds are required to assess monoclonality. When two consecutive subclonings are required, we improved the present methodology by reducing the infinite series proposed by Coller and Coller (Hybridoma 1983;2:91-96) to a simpler series. The proposed simpler series provides more accurate and reliable results. It also reduces the level of computation and can be easily implemented in any spreadsheet program like Microsoft Excel. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1061-1068, 2016.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against NS1 protein of Goose parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zheng; Tian, Wei; Yu, Tianfei; Li, Li; Ma, Bo; Wang, Junwei

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against NS1 protein of Goose parvovirus (GPV) were generated. The secreted MAbs were obtained by fusing mouse myeloma cells and spleen cells of BALB/c mice, which were immunized with the plasmid pcDNA3.1-GPV-NS1 and recombinant protein of GPV-NS1. With indirect ELISA, six hybridoma cell lines against GPV-NS1 were screened. The subtypes of the two MAbs were IgG2a; the others were IgM. The light chain was κ. Western blot analysis showed that six MAbs reacted with recombinant protein GPV-NS1. GPV-NS1 was dissected into 15 overlapping epitopes, which were used to react with MAbs in Western blot. Results showed that six MAbs recognized NS1 protein linear B-cell epitopes located at the C-terminus 453-514 aa, 485-542 aa, and 533-598 aa.

  6. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F.; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  7. Gamma radiations an effective way of monoclonal antibodies sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sterilization for radiations of pharmaceutical products is an effective, sure and reliable procedure; that it have been proving technically and grateful for different pharmacopoeia. The Monoclonal Antibodies (Acm) produced in the Center of Molecular Immunology (CIM) are products parenteral for the one which results indispensable that they complete the requirements of established sterility. The radio sterilization result the method more recommend for the sterilization of the Acm deep drying, due to the contained first floor of humidity remnant that minimizes the formation of sub-product that they affect their properties. With the objective of proposing a good dose of irradiation for the sterilization, we were carried out a study of the radius sensibility so much of the product like of the polluting of greater frequency of isolation of the clean area of the CIM. The characterization of the radius sensibility of the different micro- organisms was determined by D10 characteristic of each isolated strains. From the developed studies the Gram-positive rods endospore-forming were the most resistant strains at the deep drying, the radiations and they were of the greater frequency of apparition in the carried out isolations. We could conclude that utilizing a dose of 10 kGy it is possible to eliminate of the pollution more radio resistant, assuring the sterility required in the product, and without inducing effects under desire radiolytic in the same

  8. Analysis of viral clearance unit operations for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesegaes, George; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of viral clearance is a critical step in assuring the safety of biotechnology products. We generated a viral clearance database that contains product information, unit operation process parameters, and viral clearance data from monoclonal antibody and antibody-related regulatory submissions to FDA. Here we present a broad overview of the database and resulting analyses. We report that the diversity of model viruses tested expands as products transition to late-phase. We also present averages and ranges of viral clearance results by Protein A and ion exchange chromatography steps, low pH chemical inactivation, and virus filtration, focusing on retro- and parvoviruses. For most unit operations, an average log reduction value (LRV, a measure of clearance power) for retrovirus of >4 log(10) were measured. Cases where clearance data fell outside of the anticipated range (i.e., outliers) were rationally explained. Lastly, a historical analysis did not find evidence of any improvement trend in viral clearance over time. The data collectively suggest that many unit operations in general can reliably clear viruses.

  9. Removal of drugs from the circulation using immobilized monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brizgys, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity monoclonal antidigoxin antibodies (dig-Ab) were immobilized to a pellicular microbead and characterized in terms of antibody affinity, specificity for other glycosides, and binding capacity. Determination of digoxin binding revealed that the binding capacity decreased to 25% of theoretical capacity. Attempts to improve the binding capacity were ineffective. A guinea pig animal model was developed to determine the efficacy of removing digoxin in vivo from the circulation using an antibody column. Male guinea pigs were hemoperfused with either a dig-Ab or bovine Y-globulin control column 16 h after a single i.v. injection of digoxin. Pre- and postcolumn plasma concentrations were obtained to evaluate the extraction efficiency. Hemoperfusion continued for 3 h at flow rates of 1.0-2.0 mL/min. Bound digoxin was eluted as described earlier and concentrations determined by (/sup 125/I) digoxin RIA. Amounts of digoxin removed represented less than 1% of the total body content. After several studies with the same column, the dig-Ab had lost most of its activity. A freshly prepared dig-Ab column removed approximately 20% of the total body content. Most of the measured constituents of the blood were unaffected by the procedure.

  10. Characterization of Endotrypanum Parasites Using Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Franco Antonia Maria

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Endotrypanum stocks (representing an heterogeneous population of strains have been screened against a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs derived for selected species of Endotrypanum or Leishmania, to see whether this approach could be used to group/differentiate further among these parasites. Using different immunological assay systems, MAbs considered specific for the genus Endotrypanum (E-24, CXXX-3G5-F12 or strain M6159 of E. schaudinni (E-2, CXIV-3C7-F5 reacted variably according to the test used but in the ELISA or immunofluorescence assay both reacted with all the strains tested. Analyses using these MAbs showed antigenic diversity occurring among the Endotrypanum strains, but no qualitative or quantitative reactivity pattern could be consistently related to parasite origin (i.e., host species involved or geographic area of isolation. Western blot analyses of the parasites showed that these MAbs recognized multiple components. Differences existed either in the epitope density or molecular forms associated with the antigenic determinants and therefore allowed the assignment of the strains to specific antigenic groups. Using immunofluorescence or ELISA assay, clone E-24 produced reaction with L. equatorensis (which is a parasite of sloth and rodent, but not with other trypanosomatids examined. Interestingly, the latter parasite and the Endotrypanum strains cross-reacted with a number of MAbs that were produced against members of the L. major-L. tropica complex

  11. Plasmid copy number noise in monoclonal populations of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Ng, Jérôme; Chatenay, Didier; Robert, Jérôme; Poirier, Michael Guy

    2010-01-01

    Plasmids are extra chromosomal DNA that can confer to their hosts’ supplementary characteristics such as antibiotic resistance. Plasmids code for their copy number through their own replication frequency. Even though the biochemical networks underlying the plasmid copy number (PCN) regulation processes have been studied and modeled, no measurement of the heterogeneity in PCN within a whole population has been done. We have developed a fluorescent-based measurement system, which enables determination of the mean and noise in PCN within a monoclonal population of bacteria. Two different fluorescent protein reporters were inserted: one on the chromosome and the other on the plasmid. The fluorescence of these bacteria was measured with a microfluidic flow cytometry device. We show that our measurements are consistent with known plasmid characteristics. We find that the partitioning system lowers the PCN mean and standard deviation. Finally, bacterial populations were allowed to grow without selective pressure. In this case, we were able to determine the plasmid loss rate and growth inhibition effect.

  12. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibody Against Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIE-BO MI; JIN YAN; XIAO-JIE DING; ZHEN-QUAN GUO; MEI-PING ZHAO; WEN-BAO CHANG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To produce specific monoclonal antibody(mAb)against recombinant human erythropoietin(rHuEPO)for development of higmy efficient methods for erythropoietin detection in biological fluids.Methods rHuEPO was covalently coupled with bovine serum albumin(BSA)and the conjugate was used to immunize mice to produce specific mAb against rHuEPO based on hybridoma technology.The obtained F3-mAb was characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA),SDS-PAGE and Western blot.Results The isotype of F3-mAb Was found to be IgM with an affinity constant of 2.1x108 L/mol.The competitive ELISA using the obtained IgM showed a broader linear range and lower detection limit compared with previous work.Conclusions The modification of rHuEPO was proved to be successful in generating required specific mAb with high avidity to rHuEPO.

  13. Novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies protect rodents against lethal filovirus challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb D. Marceau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses are the causative agents of lethal hemorrhagic fever in human and non-human primates (NHP. The family of Filoviridae is composed of three genera, Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus and Cuevavirus. There are currently no approved vaccines or antiviral therapeutics for the treatment of filovirus infections in humans. Passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies targeting the Ebola virus (EBOV glycoprotein (GP has proven effective in protecting mice, guinea pigs and NHP from lethal challenges with EBOV. In this study, we generated two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs, termed S9 and M4 that recognize the GP of EBOV or multiple strains of Marburg virus (MARV, respectively. We characterized the putative binding site of S9 as a linear epitope on the glycan cap of the GP1 subunit of the EBOV-GP. The M4 antibody recognizes an unknown conformational epitope on MARV-GP. Additionally, we demonstrated the post-exposure protection potential of these antibodies in both the mouse and guinea pig models of filovirus infection. These data indicate that MAbs S9 and M4 would be good candidates for inclusion in an antibody cocktail for the treatment of filovirus infections.

  14. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail. PMID:27048742

  15. Radioiodination of monoclonal antibody intact anti-CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to examine a convenient system that can be used to iodinate monoclonal antibodies which is rapid, simple, efficient and reproducible, and which can be accomplished in radiopharmaceutical laboratories. It is important to remember that antibodies are sensitive biochemicals, subject to losses of the activity that is essential to their mode of action, namely the ability to bind specific antigen. The advent of solid phase iodination agents has greatly expanded the range of gentle iodination techniques available for iodinating sensitive biological materials. The agent most widely used is the Iodogen (1,3,4,6 tetrachloro-3a-6a diphenylglycoluril) method. Anti-CEA 4C sub(11) IgG sub(2a,k) (prepared in the Ludwig Institute-Sao Paulo-Brazil ) is used as model to evaluate the Iodogen methodology. The miniature chromatographic system, also rapid, accurate, simple, efficient was elaborated to determine the labelling efficiency incorporation of iodine into immunoglobulin, and the radiochemical purity of sup(131)I-anti-CEA. (author)

  16. ANTITUMOR EFFECTS OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY FAB′ FRAGMENT CONTAINING IMMUNOCONJUGATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小云; 甄永苏

    2002-01-01

    Objective.Using monoclonal antibody (mAb) Fab′ fragment to develop mAb immunoconjugates for cancer. Methods.Fab′ fragment of mAb 3A5 was prepared by digestion of the antibody with pepsin and then reduced by dithiothreitol (DTT),while Fab′ fragment of mAb 3D6 was obtained by digestion of the antibody with ficin and subsequently reduced by β mercaptoethanol.The conjugation between Fab′ fragment and pingyangmycin (PYM),an antitumor antibiotic,was mediated by dextran T 40.Immunoreactivity of Fab′ PYM conjugates with cancer cells was determined by ELISA,and the cytotoxicity of those conjugates to cancer cells was determined by clonogenic assay.Antitumor effects of the Fab′ PYM conjugates were evaluated by subcutaneously transplanted tumors in mice. Results.The molecular weight of Fab′ fragment was approximately 53 kD,while the average molecular weight of Fab′ PYM conjugate was 170 kD.The Fab′ PYM conjugates showed immunoreactivity with antigen relevant cancer cells and selective cytotoxicity against target cells.Administered intravenously,Fab′ PYM conjugates were more effective against the growth of tumors in mice than free PYM and PYM conjugated with intact mAb. Conclusion.Fab′ PYM conjugate may be capable of targeting cancer cells and effectively inhibiting tumor growth,suggesting its therapeutic potential in cancer treatment.

  17. Warfarin improves neuropathy in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Gomez, Teny; Holkova, Beata; Noreika, Danielle; Del Fabbro, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 60-year-old man who was referred to a palliative care clinic with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)-associated neuropathy, responding to a therapeutic trial of warfarin. Electromyography showed distal symmetric sensory axonal neuropathy. The patient reported having had improvement of his neuropathic symptoms while taking warfarin postoperatively for thromboprophylaxis 1 year prior, and recurrence of his symptoms after the warfarin was discontinued. The patient was rechallenged with a trial of warfarin, targeting an international normalised ratio of 1.5-2.0. His pain scores decreased from 5/10 to 3/10 at 1 month and symptom improvement was maintained through 24 months of follow-up. Warfarin had a remarkable impact on our patient's symptoms and quality of life. The mechanisms mediating the symptomatic benefit with warfarin are unclear; however, a placebo effect is unlikely. Further studies may help guide the use of warfarin for MGUS-associated neuropathy. PMID:27317760

  18. Pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs: peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiunn H

    2009-09-01

    With the advances in recombinant DNA biotechnology, molecular biology and immunology, the number of biotech drugs, including peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies, available for clinical use has dramatically increased in recent years. Although pharmacokinetic principles are equally applicable to the large molecule drugs and conventional small molecule drugs, the underlying mechanisms for the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of large molecule drugs are often very different from that of small molecule drugs. Therefore, a good understanding of the ADME processes of large molecule drugs is essential in support of the development of therapeutic biologics. The purpose of this article is to review the current knowledge of the ADME processes that govern the pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs. The challenges encountered by orally administered peptide and protein drugs, and the nature of lymphatic absorption after subcutaneous administration will be discussed. In addition, molecular mechanisms of biodistribution, metabolism and renal excretion of biotech drugs will also be discussed. Finally, approaches used for prediction of human pharmacokinetics of protein drugs will be briefly discussed.

  19. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  20. Pegfilgrastim Enhances the Antitumor Effect of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Sébastien; Mathé, Doriane; Chettab, Kamel; Evesque, Anne; Matera, Eva-Laure; Trédan, Olivier; Dumontet, Charles

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic mAbs exert antitumor activity through various mechanisms, including apoptotic signalization, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or phagocytosis (ADCP). G-CSF and GM-CSF have been reported to increase the activity of antibodies in preclinical models and in clinical trials. To determine the potential role of pegfilgrastim as an enhancer of anticancer antibodies, we performed a comparative study of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim. We found that pegfilgrastim was significantly more potent than filgrastim in murine xenograft models treated with mAbs. This was observed with rituximab in CD20(+) models and with trastuzumab in HER2(+) models. Stimulation with pegfilgrastim was associated with significant enhancement of leukocyte content in spleen as well as mobilization of activated monocytes/granulocytes from the spleen to the tumor bed. These results suggest that pegfilgrastim could constitute a potent adjuvant for immunotherapy with mAbs possessing ADCC/ADCP properties. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1238-47. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26988998

  1. Suppression of Murine Allergic Airway Disease by IL-2:Anti-IL-2 Monoclonal Antibody-Induced Regulatory T Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Mark S; Pesce, John T; Thirumalai R Ramalingam; Thompson, Robert W.; Cheever, Allen; Wynn, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a decisive role in many diseases including asthma and allergen-induced lung inflammation. However, little progress has been made developing new therapeutic strategies for pulmonary disorders. In the current study we demonstrate that cytokine:antibody complexes of IL-2 and anti-IL-2 mAb reduce the severity of allergen-induced inflammation in the lung by expanding Tregs in vivo. Unlike rIL-2 or anti-IL-2 mAb treatment alone, IL-2:anti-IL-2 complexes dampened airwa...

  2. Functional characterization and evaluation of in vitro protective efficacy of murine monoclonal antibodies BURK24 and BURK37 against Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani V Peddayelachagiri

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis has been recognized by CDC as a category B select agent. Although substantial efforts have been made for development of vaccine molecules against the pathogen, significant hurdles still remain. With no licensed vaccines available and high relapse rate of the disease, there is a pressing need for development of alternate protection strategies. Antibody-mediated passive protection is promising in this regard and our primary interest was to unravel this frontier of specific mAbs against Burkholderia pseudomallei infections, as functional characterization of antibodies is a pre-requisite to demonstrate them as protective molecules. To achieve this, we designed our study on in vitro-based approach and assessed two mAbs, namely BURK24 and BURK37, reactive with outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide of the pathogen respectively, for their ability to manifest inhibitory effects on the pathogenesis mechanisms of B. pseudomallei including biofilm formation, invasion and induction of apoptosis. The experiments were performed using B. pseudomallei standard strain NCTC 10274 and a clinical isolate, B. pseudomallei 621 recovered from a septicemia patient with diabetic ailment. The growth kinetic studies of the pathogen in presence of various concentrations of each individual mAb revealed their anti-bacterial properties. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration of both the mAbs were determined by using standards of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI and experiments were performed using individual mAbs at their respective bacteriostatic concentration. As an outcome, both mAbs exhibited significant anti-Burkholderia pseudomallei properties. They limited the formation of biofilm by the bacterium and completely crippled its invasion into human alveolar adenocarcinoma epithelial cells. Also, the mAbs were appreciably successful in preventing the bacterium to induce apoptosis in A549 cells. The present study design revealed the protection attributes possessed by BURK24 and BURK37 that has to be further substantiated by additional in vivo studies.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of birch-pollen allergen Bet v 1 in complex with a murine monoclonal IgG Fab' fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangfort, M D; Mirza, Osman Asghar; Gajhede, M

    1999-01-01

    The human type I allergic response is characterized by the presence of allergen-specific serum immunoglobulin E (IgE). Allergen-mediated cross-linking of receptor-bound IgE on the surface of mast cells and circulating basophils triggers the release of mediators, resulting in the development of th......, with unit-cell parameters a = 91.65, b = 99.14, c = 108.90 A, alpha = 105.7, beta = 98.32, gamma = 97.62 degrees, and diffract to 2.9 A resolution when analyzed at 100 K using synchrotron-generated X--rays....

  4. Monoclonal antibody:the corner stone of modern biotherapeutics%Monoclonal antibody: the corner stone of modern biotherapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhi-nan; CAI Xue-ting; CAO Peng

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide sales of biologic drugs exceeded 100 billion USD in 2011.About 32% is from therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb).With many blockbuster biopharmaceutical patents expiring over the next decade,there is a great opportunity for biosimilar to enter the worldwide especially emerging market.Both European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have introduced regulatory frameworks for the potential approval of biosimilar mAb therapeutics.Rather than providing a highly abbreviated path,as in the case for small molecule chemical drug,approval for biosimilar mAb will require clinical trial and the details will be very much on a case-by-case basis.Since mAb is the dominant category of biologic drugs,mAb will be the focus of this review.First,the United States (US) and European Union (EU) approved mAb and those in phase 3 trials will be reviewed,then strategies on how to win biosimilar competition will be reviewed.

  5. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against waterfowl parvoviruses VP3 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Xiuchen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The VP3 protein of goose parvovirus (GPV or Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV, a major structural protein, can induce neutralizing antibodies in geese and ducks, but monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against VP3 protein has never been characterized. Results Three hybridoma cell lines secreting anti-GPV VP3 MAbs were obtained and designated 4A8, 4E2, and 2D5. Immunoglobulin subclass tests differentiated them as IgG2b (4A8 and 4E2 and IgG2a (2D5. Dot blotting assays showed that three MAbs reacted with His-VP3 protein in a conformation-independent manner. A competitive binding assay indicated that the MAbs delineated two epitopes, A and B of VP3. Immunofluorescence assay showed that MAbs 4A8, 4E2, and 2D5 could specifically bind to goose embryo fibroblast cells (GEF or duck fibroblast cells (DEF infected with GPV and MDPV. Dot blotting also showed that the MAbs recognized both nature GPV and MDPV antigen. Western blotting confirmed that the MAbs recognized VP3 proteins derived from purified GPV and MDPV particles. The MAbs 4A8 and 2D5 had universal reactivity to heterologous GPV and MDPV tested in an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Conclusions Preparation and characterization of these the MAbs suggests that they may be useful for the development of a MAb-capture ELISA for rapid detection of both GPV and MDPV. Virus isolation and PCR are reliable for detecting GPV and MDPV infection, but these procedures are laborious, time-consuming, and requiring instruments. These diagnosis problems highlight the ongoing demand for rapid, reproducible, and automatic methods for the sensitive detection of both GPV and MDPV infection.

  6. Reappraisal of risk factors for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursi, Ben; Weiss, Brendan M; Haynes, Kevin; Mamtani, Ronac; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    A number of epidemiologic studies have demonstrated associations between obesity and diabetes and the risk of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, since MGUS is an asymptomatic condition we evaluated whether these are true associations or the result of detection-bias. We conducted a nested case-control study using a large primary-care database. Cases were defined as those with incident diagnosis of MGUS. For every case, four eligible controls matched on age, sex, practice site, and duration of follow-up were selected. Exposure variables included obesity and diabetes (including antidiabetic therapies) as well as other metabolic risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. The study included 2363 MGUS patients and 9193 matched controls. In the primary analysis, obesity and diabetes were associated with higher MGUS risk with an adjusted ORs of 1.15 (95% CI 1.02-1.29) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.13-1.50), respectively. However, after adjustment to the number of laboratory tests prior to the MGUS diagnosis, there was no association between obesity and diabetes and MGUS risk (ORs of 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22 and 1.08, 95% CI 0.93-1.25, respectively). In an additional analysis of antidiabetic therapies and MGUS risk, there was a nonsignificant decrease in MGUS risk among diabetes patients treated with metformin alone compared to subjects without diabetes (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.56-1.05). In summary, while previously described risk factors for MGUS might be the result of detection bias, metformin should be further evaluated as a possible chemoprevention modality. Am. J. Hematol. 91:581-584, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26953904

  7. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Leili Aghebati; Jalal Abdolalizadeh; Jafar Majidi; Behzad Baradaran; Koushan Sineh Sepehr; Fatemeh Zare Shahneh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously ...

  8. Should a Study of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance Be of Clinical Interest to Predict Myeloma Overcome?

    OpenAIRE

    J Véronique-Baudin; Pierre-Louis, O.; Smith-Ravin, J; M Vestris; Rose, M.; J-C Méniane; J Macni; Joachim, C.; P Escarmant; M-S Pierre-Louis

    2016-01-01

    The majority of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are benign forms that require no treatment but can be considered as a pre-cancerous state. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is quite frequent, and related to age. The risk of progression to multiple myeloma or another type of malignant lymphoproliferation is estimated at 1% per year. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is twice as frequent in patients of African descent, and prevalence ...

  9. Monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli J5 lipopolysaccharide: cross-reaction with other gram-negative bacterial species.

    OpenAIRE

    Mutharia, L M; Crockford, G; Bogard, W C; Hancock, R E

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against Escherichia coli J5 were studied. Each of these monoclonal antibodies reacted with purified lipopolysaccharides from E. coli J5, the deep rough mutant Salmonella minnesota Re595, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as well as with the purified lipid A of P. aeruginosa. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using the outer membranes from a variety of gram-negative bacteria demonstrated that these lipid A-specific monoclonal antibodies inte...

  10. Immunodot blot assay to detect Helicobacter pylori using monoclonal antibodies against the 26 kDa protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini Najafabadi, Hossein; Paknejad, Maliheh; Farshad, Shohreh; Mohammadian, Taher; Seyyed Ebrahimi, Shadi Sadat; Amini Najafabadi, Azadeh

    2012-12-01

    Development of a specific immunoassay to detect Helicobacter pylori infection in stool samples requires monoclonal antibody against the specific antigen. The aims of this study were to establish monoclonal antibodies against the 26 kDa protein of H. pylori and develop an immunodot blot for their application to recognize H. pylori infection using stool samples. Mice were immunized intraperitoneally with homogenized gel containing the 26 kDa band of cell surface proteins of H. pylori in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The monoclonal antibodies were produced using the hybridoma technique. Reactivity of monoclonal antibodies was tested with the purified 26 kDa antigen and cell surface proteins from cultured H. pylori by ELISA. Furthermore reactivity of monoclonal antibodies was tested on negative and positive stool samples for H. pylori and suspensions of several major bacteria in stool by immunodot blot assay. Five stable hybridoma monoclones were obtained. The concordant reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with H. pylori present in the stool samples, which had been tested previously using an ACON ELISA kit for H. pylori stool antigen testing, and unreactivity with several different major fecal bacteria in immunodot blotting indicates high specificity of the immunodot blot based on the reaction of produced monoclonal antibodies with the H. pylori antigen in stools. The findings indicate that the novel immunodot blot developed based on new monoclonal antibodies for stool antigens would be useful as a noninvasive method of diagnosing H. pylori infection. PMID:23244318

  11. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  12. T Cell Integrin Overexpression as a Model of Murine Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Raymond L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrin adhesion molecules have important adhesion and signaling functions. They also play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Over the past few years we have described a T cell adoptive transfer model to investigate the role of T cell integrin adhesion molecules in the development of autoimmunity. This report summarizes the methods we used in establishing this murine model. By treating murine CD4+ T cells with DNA hypomethylating agents and by transfection we were able to test the in vitro effects of integrin overexpression on T cell autoreactive proliferation, cytotoxicity, adhesion and trafficking. Furthermore, we showed that the ability to induce in vivo autoimmunity may be unique to the integrin lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1.

  13. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV. RESULTS: Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  14. Pharmacodynamics of Fluconazole in a Murine Model of Systemic Candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, Arnold; Drusano, George L.; Banerjee, Partha; Liu, Qing-Feng; Liu, Weiguo; Kaw, Pamela; Shayegani, Mehdi; Taber, Harry; Miller, Michael H.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we defined the pharmacodynamic parameter that optimizes outcome in deep-seated Candida albicans infections treated with fluconazole. Using a murine model of systemic candidiasis, we conducted single-dose dose-ranging studies with fluconazole to determine the dosage of this drug that resulted in a 50% reduction in fungal densities (50% effective dose [ED50]) in kidneys versus the fungal densities in the kidneys of untreated controls. We found that the ED50 of fluconazole given in...

  15. A Murine Model of Contact Lens–Associated Fusarium Keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Pearlman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The 2006 outbreak of contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis resulted in more than 300 cases in the United States in which a commercial lens care product was implicated. In the current study, Fusarium grown as biofilm on silicone hydrogel lenses induced keratitis in a murine model and severity of disease and survival of the organisms were dependent on MyD88, IL-1R1, and TLR4.

  16. Integration of murine leukemia virus DNA depends on mitosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, T.; Reynolds, T. C.; Yu, G.; Brown, P O

    1993-01-01

    In synchronized rat or mouse cells infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), integration of viral DNA and production of viral proteins occur only after the cells traverse mitosis. Integration is blocked when cells are prevented from progressing through mitosis. Viral nucleoprotein complexes isolated from arrested cells contain full-length viral DNA and can integrate this viral DNA in vitro, showing that the block to integration in arrested cells is not due to a lack of mature integra...

  17. Factors Influencing RBC Alloimmunization: Lessons Learned from Murine Models

    OpenAIRE

    Ryder, Alex B.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization may occur following transfusion or pregnancy/delivery. Although observational human studies have described the immunogenicity of RBC antigens and the clinical significance of RBC alloantibodies, studies of factors influencing RBC alloimmunization in humans are inherently limited by the large number of independent variables involved. This manuscript reviews data generated in murine models that utilize transgenic donor mice, which express RBC-specific model...

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG as an Effective Probiotic for Murine Giardiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Nisha Goyal; Ram Prakash Tiwari; Geeta Shukla

    2011-01-01

    The gut microflora is an important constituent in the intestinal mucosal barrier and has been introduced as the concept of probiotic therapy that beneficially affects the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Therefore, the main objective of the study was to explore the protective potential of various lactobacilli strains for murine giardiasis. By experimentation, it was found that the probiotic supplementation of either Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, or L. r...

  19. Characterization of murine macrophages from bone marrow, spleen and peritoneum

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Changqi; Yu Xiao; Cao Qi; Wang Ya; Zheng Guoping; Tan Thian Kui; Zhao Hong; Zhao Ye; Wang Yiping; Harris David CH

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Macrophages have heterogeneous phenotypes and complex functions within both innate and adaptive immune responses. To date, most experimental studies have been performed on macrophages derived from bone marrow, spleen and peritoneum. However, differences among macrophages from these particular sources remain unclear. In this study, the features of murine macrophages from bone marrow, spleen and peritoneum were compared. Results We found that peritoneal macrophages (PMs) app...

  20. Osteopontin Is Upregulated in Human and Murine Acute Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Syn, Wing-Kin; Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Cunha, Pedro Henrique Diniz; Caporali, Julia Fonseca Morais; Trindade, Guilherme Vaz de Melo; Santos, Elisângela Trindade; Souza, Márcia Maria; Andrade, Zilton Araújo; Witek, Rafal P; Secor, William Evan; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic acute schistosomiasis mansoni is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction against the migrating schistosomula and mature eggs after a primary infection. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of acute schistosomiasis are not fully elucidated. Osteopontin has been implicated in granulomatous reactions and in acute hepatic injury. Our aims were to evaluate if osteopontin plays a role in acute Schistosoma mansoni infection in both human and experimentally infected mice and if circulating OPN levels could be a novel biomarker of this infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum/plasma osteopontin levels were measured by ELISA in patients with acute (n = 28), hepatointestinal (n = 26), hepatosplenic (n = 39) schistosomiasis and in uninfected controls (n = 21). Liver osteopontin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in needle biopsies of 5 patients. Sera and hepatic osteopontin were quantified in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni during acute (7 and 8 weeks post infection, n = 10) and chronic (30 weeks post infection, n = 8) phase. Circulating osteopontin levels are increased in patients with acute schistosomiasis (p = 0.0001). The highest levels of OPN were observed during the peak of clinical symptoms (7–11 weeks post infection), returning to baseline level once the granulomas were modulated (>12 weeks post infection). The plasma levels in acute schistosomiasis were even higher than in hepatosplenic patients. The murine model mirrored the human disease. Macrophages were the major source of OPN in human and murine acute schistosomiasis, while the ductular reaction maintains OPN production in hepatosplenic disease. Soluble egg antigens from S. mansoni induced OPN expression in primary human kupffer cells. Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni egg antigens induce the production of OPN by macrophages in the necrotic-exudative granulomas characteristic of acute schistosomiasis mansoni. Circulating OPN levels are upregulated in human and

  1. Specific receptor binding of staphylococcal enterotoxins by murine splenic lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Buxser, S; Bonventre, P F; Archer, D L

    1981-01-01

    We describe a reliable assay to measure the specific binding of 125I-labeled staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) by murine spleen cells. Toxin binding by lymphocytes was specific in that it was inhibited by unlabeled SEA but not by unrelated proteins. The biological activity of SEA (T-lymphocyte mitogenesis) correlated with toxin binding to splenic lymphocytes. In the presence of high concentrations of [125I]SEA, specific binding increased rapidly and approached saturation after 2 h. Toxin bin...

  2. Effect of blockage of costimulatory signal on murine abortion-prone model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Fu-xi; ZHANG Yuan-yuan; LIU Run-hua; LI Shuan-ming

    2007-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the key costimulatory signals results in T cell anergy, indicating the alloantigen-specific immunologic unresponsiveness. In this study, the effect of blockage of costimulatory signal CD86 on murine abortion-prone model was studied.Methods Thirty CBA/J female mice cohabitated with DBA/2 male or BALB/c male mice were investigated. CBA/J ×DBA/2 matings were used as the abortion-prone model, and CBA/J × BALB/c matings were used as the normal pregnant model. The abortion-prone models were divided into experimental and control groups, and the normal pregnant models were set as a normal group (10 mice in each group). The mice in the experimental group were treated with anti-mouse CD86 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (100 μg) on day 4.5 of gestation, while the controls received irrelevant-isotype matched rat IgG2b. As for the normal group, nothing was given to the mice. The mice were killed on day 13.5 of gestation, embryo resorption rate and the expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were detected. Then the data were analyzed by Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test.Results The embryo resorption rate in the experimental (8.2%) and normal groups (7.7%) was significantly lower than that of the control (23.5%, P<0.05). No significant difference was detected between the experimental and normal groups (P>0.05). The positive expression rates of TGF-β1 and PAI-1 proteins in the experimental and normal groups were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). The positive expression rate of MMP-9 protein in the experimental and normal groups was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). No significant difference in the positive expression rates of the three proteins was detected between the experimental and normal groups (P>0.05).Conclusions Blockage of costimulatory signal CD86 at early pregnancy can treat

  3. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  5. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Carly N; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26988372

  6. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics.

  7. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases

  8. Demonstration of two distinct antigenic determinants on hepatitis B e antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, M.; Nomura, M.; Gotanda, T.; Sano, T.; Tachibana, K.; Miyamoto, H.; Takahashi, K.; Toyama, S.; Miyakawa, Y.; Mayumi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mice were immunized against hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) isolated from sera of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Their spleen cells were fused with mouse myeloma (NS-1) cells, and 5 clones of hybridoma cells secreting antibody against HBeAg (anti-HBe) were isolated. For the production of anti-HBe in large scale, cells were cultivated both in vitro and in the peritoneal cavity of ascitic mice. Although monoclonal antibodies produced by these clones showed a strong reactivity of anti-HBe in hemagglutination tests, individual monoclonal anti-HBe did not reveal any precipitin line in immunodiffusion. When 2 of the 5 monoclonal antibodies were mixed together, however, some combinations showed a precipitin line against HBeAg, whereas others did not. Utilizing solid-phase radioimmunoassay involving a number of combinations of monoclonal antibodies used for solid-phase and radiolabeling, the 5 antibodies were classified into 2 groups. Three of the anti-HBe antibodies were found to be directed to 1 determinant of HBeAg (determinant a); the remaining 2 to the other determinant (determinant b). Determinants a and b were detected on HBeAg in the serum, as well as on the polypeptide of 19,000 daltons (P19) derived from the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal anti-HBe antibodies with different specificities may provide useful tools in delineating the antigenic structure of HBeAg and also in evaluating immune responses of the host directed to its subdeterminants.

  9. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  10. Murine eosinophil differentiation factor. An eosinophil-specific colony- stimulating factor with activity for human cells

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    A purified murine lymphokine, eosinophil differentiation factor (EDF), was found to be a selective stimulus for the clonal proliferation and differentiation of murine eosinophil progenitor cells, establishing it as the murine eosinophil colony-stimulating factor (Eo-CSF). EDF was also active on human eosinophil progenitors and mature blood eosinophils, but had no effect on neutrophil or macrophage precursor cells, nor on blood neutrophils. In culture of human bone marrow cells, EDF stimulated...

  11. The Monoclonal Antitoxin Antibodies (Actoxumab–Bezlotoxumab) Treatment Facilitates Normalization of the Gut Microbiota of Mice with Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Džunková, Mária; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Xu, Hua; Huang, Jun; Duan, Yinghua; Moya, Andrés; Kelly, Ciarán P.; Chen, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics have significant and long-lasting impacts on the intestinal microbiota and consequently reduce colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Standard therapy using antibiotics is associated with a high rate of disease recurrence, highlighting the need for novel treatment strategies that target toxins, the major virulence factors, rather than the organism itself. Human monoclonal antibodies MK-3415A (actoxumab–bezlotoxumab) to C. difficile toxin A and toxin B, as an emerging non-antibiotic approach, significantly reduced the recurrence of CDI in animal models and human clinical trials. Although the main mechanism of protection is through direct neutralization of the toxins, the impact of MK-3415A on gut microbiota and its restoration has not been examined. Using a CDI murine model, we compared the bacterial diversity of the gut microbiome of mice under different treatments including MK-3415A, vancomycin, or vancomycin combined with MK-3415A, sampled longitudinally. Here, we showed that C. difficile infection resulted in the prevalence of Enterobacter species. Sixty percent of mice in the vehicle group died after 2 days and their microbiome was almost exclusively formed by Enterobacter. MK-3415A treatment resulted in lower Enterobacter levels and restoration of Blautia, Akkermansia, and Lactobacillus which were the core components of the original microbiota. Vancomycin treatment led to significantly lower survival rate than the combo treatment of MK-3415A and vancomycin. Vancomycin treatment decreased bacterial diversity with predominant Enterobacter and Akkermansia, while Staphylococcus expanded after vancomycin treatment was terminated. In contrast, mice treated by vancomycin combined with MK-3415A also experienced decreased bacterial diversity during vancomycin treatment. However, these animals were able to recover their initial Blautia and Lactobacillus proportions, even though episodes of Staphylococcus overgrowth were

  12. 99mTc-monoclonal antibody radiolabeled via hydrazino nicotinamide derivative for imaging disialoganglioside GD2-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3F8 is a murine IgG3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) selective for the ganglioside GD2. Previous studies using 131I-3F8 have shown great potential in the imaging of neuroectodermal tumors and the therapy of human neuroblastoma. 131I is commonly used in radioimmunodiagnosis, but its relatively long half-life (8 days) and its high energy γ-emission (364 KeV) are suboptimal for imaging purposes when compared with 99mTc (6 h and 140 KeV, respectively). To label 3F8 with 99mTc, the antibody was first coupled with a heterobifunctional linker, succinimidyl-6-hydrazinonicotinate hydrochloride (SHNH), obtaining a hydrazinonicotinamide-antibody conjugate. Using 99mTc-Tricine as the precursor complex, 3F8-SHNH was coupled efficiently to 99mTc, resulting in >90% radiometal incorporation, with a specific activity >10 mCi/mg and retaining full immunoreactivity. Immunoscintigraphy at 6, 22, and 46 h after intravenous injection of 1 mCi of 99mTc-3F8 showed selective neuroblastoma localization in xenografted nude mice, comparable to that obtained with the injection of 100 μCi of 131I-3F8. Biodistribution studies of 131I-3F8 and 99mTc-3F8 in mice demonstrated comparable %ID/g uptake in tumor (with a T/B ratio: ∼2.5 at 24 h and ∼3.5 at 48 h) and normal organs, including blood, except for spleen and liver which had about a three times higher uptake of the 99mTc conjugate. In conclusion, 99mTc can be coupled conveniently at high specific activity to 3F8 without compromising immunoreactivity. SHNH appears to be a useful linker for 99mTc in tumor diagnostic imaging and may have potential utility in coupling other radioisotopes (e.g., 94mTc) for positron imaging and therapy

  13. High-throughput and single-cell imaging of NF-κB oscillations using monoclonal cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machuy Nikolaus

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB family of transcription factors plays a role in a wide range of cellular processes including the immune response and cellular growth. In addition, deregulation of the NF-κB system has been associated with a number of disease states, including cancer. Therefore, insight into the regulation of NF-κB activation has crucial medical relevance, holding promise for novel drug target discovery. Transcription of NF-κB-induced genes is regulated by differential dynamics of single NF-κB subunits, but only a few methods are currently being applied to study dynamics. In particular, while oscillations of NF-κB activation have been observed in response to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, little is known about the occurrence of oscillations in response to bacterial infections. Results To quantitatively assess NF-κB dynamics we generated human and murine monoclonal cell lines that stably express the NF-κB subunit p65 fused to GFP. Furthermore, a high-throughput assay based on automated microscopy coupled to image analysis to quantify p65-nuclear translocation was established. Using this assay, we demonstrate a stimulus- and cell line-specific temporal control of p65 translocation, revealing, for the first time, oscillations of p65 translocation in response to bacterial infection. Oscillations were detected at the single-cell level using real-time microscopy as well as at the population level using high-throughput image analysis. In addition, mathematical modeling of NF-κB dynamics during bacterial infections predicted masking of oscillations on the population level in asynchronous activations, which was experimentally confirmed. Conclusions Taken together, this simple and cost effective assay constitutes an integrated approach to infer the dynamics of NF-κB kinetics in single cells and cell populations. Using a single system, novel factors modulating NF-κB can be identified and analyzed

  14. Preparation of Monoclonal Antibody and Development of Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay Specific for Escherichia coli O157 in Foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To prepare monoclonal antibodies (Mab) and antisera specific for Escherichia coli (E.coli) O157, and to develop a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect E.coli O157 in foods. Methods Spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with the somatic antigen of E.coli O157:H7 were fused with murine Sp2/0 myeloma cells. The hybridoma cell line specific for E.coli O157 was established after having been subcloned. Antisera specific for E.coli O157 was prepared by intravenous injection into New Zealand rabbits with a stain of E.coli O157:H7. The sandwich ELISA was developed with the polyclonal antibody as the capture antibody and the Mab 3A5 as the detection antibody. The inoculated ground poultry meat and pasteurized milk were tested to confirm efficiency of the method. Results Mab 3A5 specific for E.coli O157 and O113:H21 belonged to subtype IgM. The ascetic titers of the antibody was 1:1×106. No cross-reactivity of the Mab was observed with strains of Salmonella spp, Yersinia enterocolitica, Shigella dysenteriae, etc. The purified polyclonal antibody had a titer of 1:1×105 with E.coli O157. The detection limit of this sandwich ELISA was 103-104 cfu E.coli O157/mL in pure culture with a high specificity, which was characterized by every non-O157 strain with negative response. With 10h enrichment procedure, E.coli O157:H7 recovered well from inoculated ground poultry meat and pasteurized milk at levels of 0.1 cfu/g and 0.1 cfu/mL. Conclusion Mab 3A5 specific for E.coli O157 and O113:H21 can be produced by immunizing BALB/c mice with a strain of E.coli O157:H7. Then a sandwich ELISA can be developed with the polyclonal antibody as the capture antibody and the Mab 3A5 as the detection antibody. The method is proved to be a sensitive and specific technique to detect low number of E.coli O157 in food.

  15. Antibody glycosylation and its impact on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the impact of glycosylation and keeping a close control on glycosylation of product candidates are required for both novel and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fc-fusion protein development to ensure proper safety and efficacy profiles. Most therapeutic mAbs are of IgG class and contain a glycosylation site in the Fc region at amino acid position 297 and, in some cases, in the Fab region. For Fc-fusion proteins, glycosylation also frequently occurs in the fusion partners. Depending on the expression host, glycosylation patterns in mAb or Fc-fusions can be significantly different, thus significantly impacting the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of mAbs. Glycans that have a major impact on PK and PD of mAb or Fc-fusion proteins include mannose, sialic acids, fucose (Fuc), and galactose (Gal). Mannosylated glycans can impact the PK of the molecule, leading to reduced exposure and potentially lower efficacy. The level of sialic acid, N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), can also have a significant impact on the PK of Fc-fusion molecules. Core Fuc in the glycan structure reduces IgG antibody binding to IgG Fc receptor IIIa relative to IgG lacking Fuc, resulting in decreased antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activities. Glycoengineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) expression systems can produce afucosylated mAbs that have increased ADCC activities. Terminal Gal in a mAb is important in the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in that lower levels of Gal reduce CDC activity. Glycans can also have impacts on the safety of mAb. mAbs produced in murine myeloma cells such as NS0 and SP2/0 contain glycans such as Galα1-3Galβ1-4N-acetylglucosamine-R and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NGNA) that are not naturally present in humans and can be immunogenic when used as therapeutics. PMID:25872915

  16. Characterization and applications of monoclonal antibodies to the prolactin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced in BALB/c mice immunized with partially purified PRL receptors from rat liver. Two mAbs (T1 and T6) were able to completely inhibit [125I]ovine PRL ([125I]oPRL) binding to solubilized rat liver PRL receptors, while two other mAbs (U5 and U6) showed only a small effect on PRL binding, but were able to precipitate hormone-receptor complexes. Scatchard analysis of [125I]oPRL binding to rat liver microsomes in the presence of mAbs resulted in a decrease in the number of sites without changing the affinity of PRL binding by T1 and T6, whereas U5 and U6 altered neither parameter. [125I]mAb binding to rat liver microsomes was performed in the presence of various concentrations of unlabeled mAbs or oPRL to examine the interaction between mAbs. Competition of binding to the receptor was observed, respectively, between T1 and T6, U5 and U6, and U5 and E21 (a mAb to the rat liver PRL receptor previously produced). Both [125I]T1 and [125I]T6 binding were inhibited by oPRL, although not completely (80% inhibition at the higher concentrations). When [125I]T1 binding was analyzed by Scatchard analysis, two classes of binding sites to rat liver microsomes were found, of which only the number of higher affinity sites was affected by the presence of oPRL in incubation. Similar results were observed for [125I]T6 binding. [125I]mAb binding to microsomes from other tissues and species was examined. All five mAbs were able to bind to microsomes from rat tissues (liver, ovary, adrenal, prostate, and Nb2 lymphoma cells), similar to the level of [125I]oPRL binding in these tissues. The binding characteristics of [125I]T6 or [125I]U5 were essentially identical in all rat tissues examined

  17. Advantage of dose fractionation in monoclonal antibody-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) B72.3 IgG was radiolabeled with 131I and administered to female athymic NCr-nu mice bearing the LS-174T human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft to determine if fractionation of MAb dose had any advantage in tumor therapy. In the LS-174T xenograft, only approximately 30%-60% of tumor cells express the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen. The LS-174T xenograft was used to reflect the heterogeneity of the TAG-72 antigen often seen in biopsy specimens from patients. In contrast to a single 600-muCi dose of 131I-B72.3 IgG where 60% of the animals died from toxic effects, two 300-muCi doses of 131I-B72.3 IgG reduced or eliminated tumor growth in 90% of mice, with only 10% of the animals dying from toxic effects. Dose fractionation even permitted escalation of the dose to three doses of 300 muCi of 131I-B72.3 IgG, resulting in even more extensive tumor reduction or elimination and minimal toxic effects. The use of an isotype-matched control MAb revealed a nonspecific component to tumor growth retardation, but the use of the specific B72.3 IgG demonstrated a much greater therapeutic effect. Tumors that had escaped MAb therapy were analyzed for expression of the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen with the use of the immunoperoxidase method; they were shown to have the same antigenic phenotype as the untreated tumors. We verified tumor elimination by killing the test animals after a 7-week observation period and performing histologic examination of tumor sites. We also monitored toxic effects by histologic examination of numerous organs. These studies thus demonstrate the advantage of dose fractionation of a radiolabeled MAb for tumor therapy. We anticipate that the concept of dose fractionation can be practically applied in radioimmunotherapeutic clinical trials with the development and use of recombinant-chimeric MAbs and modified constructs

  18. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Shivangi M; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  19. Antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies isolated from B cells expressing constitutively active STAT5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc A Scheeren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against specific pathogens have a high therapeutic potential, but are difficult to generate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Memory B cells were immortalized by expressing an inducible active mutant of the transcription factor Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5. Active STAT5 inhibits the differentiation of B cells while increasing their replicative life span. We obtained cloned B cell lines, which produced antibodies in the presence of interleukin 21 after turning off STAT5. We used this method to obtain monoclonal antibodies against the model antigen tetanus toxin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we describe a novel and relatively simple method of immortalizing antigen-specific human B cells for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. These results show that STAT5 overexpression can be employed to isolate antigen specific antibodies from human memory B cells.

  20. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the edta extract of Leptospira interrogans, serovar icterohaemorrhagiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Terezinha de Queiroz Leite

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (MABs ivere produced against an etbylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA extract of Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae being characterized by gel precipitation as IgM and IgG (IgGl and IgG2b. The EDTA extract was detected as several bands by silver staining in SDS-PAGE. In the Western blot the bands around 20 KDa reacted with a monoclonal antibody, 47B4D6, and was oxidized by periodate and was not digested by pronase, suggesting that the determinant is of carbohydrate nature, lmmunocytochemistry, using colloidal gold labeling, showed that an EDTA extract determinant recognized by monoclonal antibody 47B4D6, is localized under the outer envelope of serovar icterohaemorrhagiae. Hoe AIAB raised against the EDTA extract was not able to protect hamsters from lethal challenge with virulent homologous leptospires.

  1. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  2. Monoclonal antibody therapy in multiple myeloma: where do we stand and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanendrarajan, Sharmilan; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J; Schinke, Carolina; Mathur, Pankaj; Heuck, Christoph J; Zangari, Maurizio; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Weinhold, Niels; Barlogie, Bart; van Rhee, Frits

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy that is characterized by refractory and relapsing course of disease. Despite the introduction of high-dose chemotherapy in combination with autologous stem cell transplantation and innovative agents such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, achieving cure in multiple myeloma is a challenging endeavor. In the last couple of years, enormous advances were made in implementing monoclonal antibody therapy in multiple myeloma. A large number of preclinical and clinical studies have been introduced successfully, demonstrating a safe and efficient administration of monoclonal antibodies in multiple myeloma. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies in combination with immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors, corticosteroids or conventional chemotherapy seem to be promising and will expand the treatment arsenal for patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:26888183

  3. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  4. PURIFICATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY 3H11 AGAINST GASTRIC CANCER FOR IN VIVO USE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen-fu; ZHANG Hong; NIU Yong-ge

    1999-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (McAb) 3H11 against gastric cancer was grown in the mouse ascites system. To acquire a clinical grade product for cancer radioimmuno-imaging was purified by two step high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) protocol using protein A and high-performance hydroxylapatite (HPHT). An analysis of data reported shows the two step HPLC method to be the best purification procedure. This protocol satisfies purity and immunoreactivity requirement, and provides an sample sterility,free-pyrogens, free-mycoplasma and non-specific IgG contamination. This procedure described was capable of generating large amounts of clinical grade monoclonal antibody.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to human factor VII: a one step immunoradiometric assay for VII:Ag.

    OpenAIRE

    Takase, T.; Tuddenham, E G; Chand, S; Goodall, A H

    1988-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (RFF-VII/1, RFF-VII/2, and RFF-VII/3) which bind specifically to different epitopes on human factor VII antigen were raised. Two of the antibodies, RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/2, bound strongly to factor VII antigen (VII:Ag), but only RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/3 were potent inhibitors of factor VII coagulation activity (VII:C). RFF-VII/1 and RFF-VII/2 were used in a one step, double monoclonal immunoradiometric assay for VII:Ag. This was highly reproducible and detecte...

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinaa, L; Wulff, A M; Saermark, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide (aa 138-152) from HIV-1 Nef protein were produced and characterized. Three hybridoma lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the synthetic peptide were generated by fusion between P3-X63 Ag8.653 myeloma cells and BALB/c splenocytes from...... mice immunized with the synthetic peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The hybridomas were screened and selected by ELISA with the peptide coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) immobilized to the polystyrene surface and specificity for the peptide was confirmed by competitive ELISA...

  7. Limited cross-reactivity of mouse monoclonal antibodies against Dengue virus capsid protein among four serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Noda,1 Promsin Masrinoul,1 Chaweewan Punkum,1 Chonlatip Pipattanaboon,2,3 Pongrama Ramasoota,2,4 Chayanee Setthapramote,2,3 Tadahiro Sasaki,6 Mikiko Sasayama,1 Akifumi Yamashita,1,5 Takeshi Kurosu,6 Kazuyoshi Ikuta,6 Tamaki Okabayashi11Mahidol-Osaka Center for Infectious Diseases, 2Center of Excellence for Antibody Research, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 4Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand; 5Graduate School of Life Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 6Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, JapanBackground: Dengue illness is one of the important mosquito-borne viral diseases in tropical and subtropical regions. Four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 are classified in the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. We prepared monoclonal antibodies against DENV capsid protein from mice immunized with DENV-2 and determined the cross-reactivity with each serotype of DENV and Japanese encephalitis virus.Methods and results: To clarify the relationship between the cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies and the diversity of these viruses, we examined the situations of flaviviruses by analyses of phylogenetic trees. Among a total of 60 prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for DENV, five monoclonal antibodies stained the nuclei of infected cells and were found to be specific to the capsid protein. Three were specific to DENV-2, while the other two were cross-reactive with DENV-2 and DENV-4. No monoclonal antibodies were cross-reactive with all four serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV amino acid sequences of the capsid protein revealed that DENV-2 and DENV-4 were clustered in the same branch, while DENV-1 and DENV-3 were clustered in the other branch. However, these classifications of the capsid protein were different from those of the

  8. B lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab in Graves' disease: a controlled pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Bonnema, Steen J;

    2007-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb)-mediated disorder. Because B lymphocytes are important self-antigen presenting cells and precursors for antibody-secreting plasma cells, temporary B-lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) might be of bene......Graves' disease (GD) is a common TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb)-mediated disorder. Because B lymphocytes are important self-antigen presenting cells and precursors for antibody-secreting plasma cells, temporary B-lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) might...

  9. Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinaa, L; Wulff, A M; Saermark, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide (aa 138-152) from HIV-1 Nef protein were produced and characterized. Three hybridoma lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the synthetic peptide were generated by fusion between P3-X63 Ag8.653 myeloma cells and BALB/c splenocytes from...... mice immunized with the synthetic peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The hybridomas were screened and selected by ELISA with the peptide coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) immobilized to the polystyrene surface and specificity for the peptide was confirmed by competitive ELISA with...

  10. Daratumumab: a first-in-class CD38 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Larysa; Wang, Yucai; Siegel, David S; Wang, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Daratumumab is a human monoclonal antibody that targets CD38, a cell surface protein that is overexpressed on multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Preclinical studies have shown that daratumumab induces MM cell death through several mechanisms, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and apoptosis. Given the encouraging efficacy and acceptable safety profile of daratumumab demonstrated in clinical trials, daratumumab has emerged as a novel treatment option for myeloma and became the first monoclonal antibody approved by the FDA for the treatment of MM. PMID:27363983

  11. Kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoite neutralization by monoclonal antibodies, immune bovine serum, and immune bovine colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, L E; Riggs, M W; Mason, P H; Fayer, R

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, immune bovine serum, and immune bovine colostral whey neutralized infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites for mice in a time-dependent manner. Immune colostral whey neutralized sporozoites more rapidly and completely than immune serum, monoclonal antibody (MAb) 18.44, or a combination of MAb 18.44 and MAb 17.41. Mice were partially protected against oral challenge with C. parvum oocytes when treated with immune colostral whey, MAb 17.41, or a combination of MAb 17.41 and MAb 18.44. PMID:2294054

  12. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B L

    1985-01-01

    We used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several differe...

  13. Pneumocystis carinii and specific fungi have a common epitope, identified by a monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, B; Kovacs, J A; Nelson, N N;

    1992-01-01

    Because Pneumocystis carinii may be related to fungi, we evaluated the reactivities of monoclonal antibodies raised against P. carinii with a variety of fungi. Fifty-two fungi and six protozoa were evaluated by immunofluorescence. One of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested (MAb 7D7) reacted...... with 15 fungi but no protozoa. Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed the strongest reactivity by immunofluorescence. The reactive antigen was characterized for four fungi by the immunoblot technique. In all cases the antigen that was reactive with MAb 7D7 was larger than the P. carinii antigens that reacted...

  14. Rescue and expression of human immunoglobulin genes to generate functional human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A P; Parry, N; Peakman, T C; Crowe, J S

    1992-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibody production has been hampered for many years by the instability of cell lines and low levels of expression of the antibodies. We describe here the rescue of human immunoglobulin genes utilizing micro-mRNA preparation from a small number of human hybridoma cells and conventional cDNA cloning. This allows cloning and immediate high-level expression from full-length human heavy and light chain cDNA molecules and provides a mechanism to rescue whole human monoclonal antibodies of proven efficacy.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

  16. Two distinct classes of IgG Fc receptors on a human monocyte line (U937) defined by differences in binding of murine IgG subclasses at low ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two distinct classes of IgG Fc receptors (FcR) on cells of a human monocytic line (U937) by analyzing the direct binding of murine IgG subclasses in medium of low ionic strength. Four lines of evidence support this contention. (1) The binding of aggregated murine IgB2b (AggmIgG2b) to U937 and Daudi cells was enhanced at low ionic strength, whereas monomeric murine IgG2a (mIgG2a) did not bind to Daudi cells and its high affinity binding to U937 cells was unaffected by changes in ionic strength. (2) Double reciprocal inhibition experiments with U937 cells indicated that the binding of both ligands was inhibited 30 to 135 times more efficiently by the homologous ligand than by the heterologous one. That is, the binding of 125I-AggmIgG2b was inhibited 50% by 3.5 μg/ml of AggmIgG2b and 100 μg/ml of mIgG2a. Similarly, the binding of 125I-mIgG2a was inhibited 50% by 2.5 μg/ml of mIgG2a and only 44% by 243 μg/ml of AggmIgG2b. (3) A monoclonal antibody of the IgG2b subclass raised against an IgG FcR on K562 cells inhibited binding to U937 cells of AggmIgG2b but not of mIgG2a. (4) Trypsinization of U937 cells abrogated by 32% the binding of mIgG2a but did not affect the binding of AggmIgG2b. Human IgG inhibited binding of both AggmIgG2b and mIgG2a t U937 cells. They propose that the newly recognized FcR that binds AggmIgG2b is the human homologue of the murine macrophage IgG2b/1 FcR (FcRII), and that the previously described 72,000 dalton high-affinity FcR on U937 cells that binds mIgG2a is the human equivalent of the murine macrophage IgG2a FcR (FcRI)

  17. The diagnostic value of monoclonal antibody scan (leucoscan) compared with 99mTc MDP bone scan and Ga 67 in diagnosing bone and joint infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nowadays different radiopharmaceuticals have been developed as 99mTc MDP, 67Ga citrate, 111In oxine- and 99mTc HMPAO labeled leucocytes for the accurate localization of bone/joint infection, but all of them have limitations that encouraged the search of new agents characterized from high and early uptake in infectious/inflammatory tissues, low toxicity and no accumulation in non inflamed tissues. The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic value of a 99mTc labeled antigranulocyte Fab' fragment (Leucoscan) with 99mTc MDP bone scan and 67 Ga. The monoclonal antibody, Leucoscan, is an IgG murine Fab' fragment directed against a NCA-90 epitope located on the surface of granulocytes. 45 patients with suspected bone and joint infection (18 total hip prosthesis, 4 knee prosthesis, 8 vertebral infection and 15 long bones) were included in this study. All patients underwent conventional Rx, bone scan, 67Ga scan and Leucoscan. Three phase 99mTc MDP bone scan and 67Ga scan were performed using standard procedures. For Leucoscan the antibody was labeled with 25 mCi of 99mTc and was infected intravenously over 30 seconds. Ten minutes planar images were taken 1 h and 2 hrs p.i using a GE Millennium γ camera provided with a LEGP collimator. Images were evaluated as score 1 (no abnormal uptake), score 2 (probably positive), score 3 (definitely infected) according the intensity of abnormally increased uptake. Results were compared with 99mTc MDP bone scan and 67Ga scans. The final diagnosis was given by the surgical verification with histopathology or culture. All 45 patients had pathologic proof of presence/absence of bone and joint infection. 36/45 were positive for bone or joint infection and 9/45 were negative.30/36 patients with surgically proven bone and joint infection had true positive Leucoscan, 26/36 had true positive MDP bone scan and 20/36 true positive 67Ga scan. Nine out of 9 patients with proven absence of inflammation had true negative

  18. Experimental studies for immunoscintigraphy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate with [sup 125]I-labeled monoclonal antibody to [gamma]-seminoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujino, Awato; Suyama, Kazuho; Shidara, Toshiya; Ao, Teruaki; Ishibashi, Akira; Koshiba, Ken (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-02-01

    We established LNCaP tumor in male nude mice after inoculation of LNCaP cells. The tumor produces the organ-specific glycoproteins in the human prostate, [gamma]-seminoprotein ([gamma]-Sm). The LNCaP tumor is composed of fluid and solid portions. The fluid portion contains much more [gamma]-Sm than the solid part. Monoclonal antibody against [gamma]-Sm (murine IgG[sub 1], K) was radiolabeled with iodine-125 by lactoperoxidase method followed by passage over column chromatography. Finally the conjugates with specific activity of 49.8-56.6 KBq/[mu]g were obtained. Biodistribution of [sup 125]I- labeled monoclonal antibody to [gamma]-Sm ([sup 125]I-[gamma]MAb) was evaluated by whole-body autoradiography (ARG) and by determination of label uptake (DLU) by the LNCaP tumor using the well type gamma counter. The ARG were obtained 1-9 days after intravenous administration of 32-38 [mu]g of [sup 125]I-[gamma]MAb to 12 nude mice bearing LNCaP tumor. The DLU were evaluated 3, 4 and 7 days after intravenous administration of 18-25 [mu]g of [sup 125]I- [gamma]MAb to 9 nude mice bearing LNCaP tumor. The DLU by organs (fluid portion, solid portion, liver, kidney, spleen, lung, etc.) were expressed as F-values (%) which were calculated by the following formula: F=radioactivity per gram of tissue (dpm/g) / injected dose per gram of animal (dpm/g)x100 and tissue-to-blood ratios (T/B). The specific uptake by the LNCaP tumors, especially in the fluid portion, was observed on ARG, with optimal images of the tumor evaluated 4-7 days after administration. The F-values and T/B of the LNCaP tumors were always higher than those of other organs. Especially T/B of fluid portion were of 6.7 and 6.3, evaluated 4 and 7 days after administration of [sup 125]I-[gamma]MAb respectively. These results suggest that the radiolabeled [gamma] MAb is applicable for immunoscintigraphy of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. (author).

  19. Inhibition of the alternative complement activation pathway in traumatic brain injury by a monoclonal anti-factor B antibody: a randomized placebo-controlled study in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holers V Michael

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posttraumatic response to traumatic brain injury (TBI is characterized, in part, by activation of the innate immune response, including the complement system. We have recently shown that mice devoid of a functional alternative pathway of complement activation (factor B-/- mice are protected from complement-mediated neuroinflammation and neuropathology after TBI. In the present study, we extrapolated this knowledge from studies in genetically engineered mice to a pharmacological approach using a monoclonal anti-factor B antibody. This neutralizing antibody represents a specific and potent inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in mice. Methods A focal trauma was applied to the left hemisphere of C57BL/6 mice (n = 89 using a standardized electric weight-drop model. Animals were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: (1 Systemic injection of 1 mg monoclonal anti-factor B antibody (mAb 1379 in 400 μl phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at 1 hour and 24 hours after trauma; (2 Systemic injection of vehicle only (400 μl PBS, as placebo control, at identical time-points after trauma. Sham-operated and untreated mice served as additional negative controls. Evaluation of neurological scores and analysis of brain tissue specimens and serum samples was performed at defined time-points for up to 1 week. Complement activation in serum was assessed by zymosan assay and by murine C5a ELISA. Brain samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL histochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR. Results The mAb 1379 leads to a significant inhibition of alternative pathway complement activity and to significantly attenuated C5a levels in serum, as compared to head-injured placebo-treated control mice. TBI induced histomorphological signs of neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis in the injured brain hemisphere of placebo-treated control mice for up to 7 days. In contrast, the

  20. 77 FR 41792 - Prospective Grant of Co-Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... lymphoblastic leukemia, and autoimmune disease such as lupus and Sjogren's syndrome. The specific antibodies... of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers and Autoimmune Disease... Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for CD22'' , PCT Application PCT/ US2009/124109 entitled ``Human and...

  1. Increased risk of monoclonal gammopathy in first-degree relatives of patients with multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    Vachon, Celine M.; Kyle, Robert A.; Therneau, Terry M.; Foreman, Barbara J.; Larson, Dirk R.; Colby, Colin L.; Phelps, Tara K.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji K.; Katzmann, Jerry A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2009-01-01

    We examined whether monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is increased in first-degree relatives of multiple myeloma (MM) or MGUS patients. Probands were recruited from a population-based prevalence study (MGUS) and the Mayo Clinic (MM). Serum samples were collected from first-degree relatives older than 40 years and subjected to electrophoresis and immunofixation. The prevalence of MGUS in relatives was compared with population-based rates. Nine-hundred eleven relatives o...

  2. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  3. Anti-EphA2 Antibodies Decrease EphA2 Protein Levels in Murine CT26 Colorectal and Human MDA-231 Breast Tumors But Do Not Inhibit Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kiewlich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase has been shown to be over-expressed in cancer and a monoclonal antibody (mAb that activates and down-modulates EphA2 was reported to inhibit the growth of human breast and lung tumor xenografts in nude mice. Reduction of EphA2 levels by treatment with anti-EphA2 siRNA also inhibited tumor growth, suggesting that the anti-tumor effects of these agents are mediated by decreasing the levels of EphA2. As these studies employed human tumor xenograft models in nude mice with reagents whose crossreactivity with murine EphA2 is unknown, we generated a mAb (Ab20 that preferentially binds, activates, and induces the degradation of murine EphA2. Treatment of established murine CT26 colorectal tumors with Ab20 reduced EphA2 protein levels to ~12% of control tumor levels, yet had no effect on tumor growth. CT26 tumor cell colonization of the lung was also not affected by Ab20 administration despite having barely detectable levels of EphA2. We also generated and tested a potent agonistic mAb against human EphA2 (1G9-H7. No inhibition of human MDA-231 breast tumor xenograft growth was observed despite evidence for >85% reduction of EphA2 protein levels in the tumors. These results suggest that molecular characteristics of the tumors in addition to EphA2 over-expression may be important for predicting responsiveness to EphA2-directed therapies.

  4. Nanomechanical phenotype of chondroadherin-null murine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Michael A; Nia, Hadi T; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Cox, Karen A; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Heinegård, Dick; Han, Lin

    2014-09-01

    Chondroadherin (CHAD), a class IV small leucine rich proteoglycan/protein (SLRP), was hypothesized to play important roles in regulating chondrocyte signaling and cartilage homeostasis. However, its roles in cartilage development and function are not well understood, and no major osteoarthritis-like phenotype was found in the murine model with CHAD genetically deleted (CHAD(-/-)). In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation to quantify the effects of CHAD deletion on changes in the biomechanical function of murine cartilage. In comparison to wild-type (WT) mice, CHAD-deletion resulted in a significant ≈70-80% reduction in the indentation modulus, Eind, of the superficial zone knee cartilage of 11 weeks, 4 months and 1 year old animals. This mechanical phenotype correlates well with observed increases in the heterogeneity collagen fibril diameters in the surface zone. The results suggest that CHAD mainly plays a major role in regulating the formation of the collagen fibrillar network during the early skeletal development. In contrast, CHAD-deletion had no appreciable effects on the indentation mechanics of middle/deep zone cartilage, likely due to the dominating role of aggrecan in the middle/deep zone. The presence of significant rate dependence of the indentation stiffness in both WT and CHAD(-/-) knee cartilage suggested the importance of both fluid flow induced poroelasticity and intrinsic viscoelasticity in murine cartilage biomechanical properties. Furthermore, the marked differences in the nanomechanical behavior of WT versus CHAD(-/-) cartilage contrasted sharply with the relative absence of overt differences in histological appearance. These observations highlight the sensitivity of nanomechanical tools in evaluating structural and mechanical phenotypes in transgenic mice. PMID:24892719

  5. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  6. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  7. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  8. Adrenaline influences the release of interleukin-6 from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J D; Hansen, E W; Frederiksen, C;

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of adrenaline and interleukin-1beta on interleukin-6 secretion from cultured murine neurohypophyseal cells. Cells were cultured from neurohypophyses of 3- to 5-week-old mice and experiments were performed after 13 days in culture. Interleukin-6 was measured...... in 24-h samples using a sandwich fluoroimmunoassay. Unstimulated cells released 19+/-3 fmol interleukin-6/neurohypophysis/24 h (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 42). Adrenaline and interleukin-1beta increased the release of interleukin-6 from the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation with adrenaline...

  9. Dystrophic Spinal Deformities in a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Murine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Steven D.; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Dalong; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shi; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Guise, Theresa A.; Amanda L Bergner; Stevenson, David A.; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf...

  10. DMPD: The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534106 The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. Sester DP, Stacey KJ, ...Sweet MJ, Beasley SJ, Cronau SL, Hume DA. J Leukoc Biol. 1999 Oct;66(4):542-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The action...s of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. PubmedID 10534106 Title The actions of bacterial D

  11. Murine T-lymphocyte activation by mycobacterial antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been renewed interest in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections in the United States. Effective immunity to mycobacterial infections, as well as diagnosis by the skin test, involves T-cells rather than antibodies. Studies currently underway use the new technologies of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant DNA to define better mycobacterial antigens for T-cell activation, in the hope of identifying species specific antigens. Lymph node cells from mice sensitized to Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium avium were assayed for activation by mycobacterial fractions, and cell lines and clones were generated. Comparing BALB/c and B10 mice indicated better responses to M. avium sonicate by B10 mice. A recombinant gene product containing a M. intracellulare peptide was assayed with lymph node cells and indicated excellent T-cell stimulation in BALB/c lymph node cells and cell lines. However, assays using B10 T-cell clones have yet to detect responders to the recombinant protein. Future studies using synthetic epitopes produced by recombinant DNA techniques and defined by monoclonal antibodies are necessary for the identification of reactive T-cell epitopes that are potentially species specific. 4 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  12. Evaluation of a monoclonal antibody able to detect live Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølve, Marianne; Boel, Jeppe; Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal Listeria antibody, designated B4, was evaluated. The ability of the antibody to bind to viable bacteria belonging to Listeria spp, compared to bacteria of the same species killed by beat treatment, acid or base treatment, sanitizers, and irradiation was examined. The antibody was found...

  13. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    1999-01-01

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell kil

  14. Production, characterization and application of monoclonal antibody to spherulocytes: A subpopulation of coelomocytes of Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    One monoclonal antibody (mAb 3F6) against coelomocytes of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus was developed by immunization of Balb/C mice. Analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay test (IIFAT), immunocytochemical assay (ICA),Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), mAb 3...

  15. Characterization and application of monoclonal antibodies against Shewanella marisflavi, a novel pathogen of Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewanella marisflavi strain AP629 was certified as a novel pathogen of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. In this study, four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (3C1, 3D9, 2F2, 2A8) against strain AP629 were developed by immunizing Balb/C mice. 3C1 and 3D9 recognized S. marisflavi only, showing no ...

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C;

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N...

  17. Inhibition of middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection by anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ohnuma (Kei); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); R. Hatano (Ryo); V.S. Raj (Stalin); H. Mou (Huihui); S. Iwata (Satoshi); R.L. Dang (Rong); B.J. Bosch (Berend Jan); C. Morimoto (Chikao)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe identified the domains of CD26 involved in the binding of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) using distinct clones of anti-CD26 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). One clone, named 2F9, almost completely inhibited viral entry. The humanized anti-CD26 MAb YS110 also sign

  18. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers Against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne’s disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced fr...

  19. Harnessing the immune system's arsenal: producing human monoclonal antibodies for therapeutics and investigating immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Meghan; Kaur, Kaval; Pauli, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technology has undergone rapid and innovative reinvention over the last 30 years. Application of these technologies to human samples revealed valuable therapeutic and experimental insights. These technologies, each with their own benefits and flaws, have proven indispensable for immunological research and in our fight to provide new treatments and improved vaccines for infectious disease. PMID:21876728

  20. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes an antigenic determinant shared by HLA A2 and B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, A J; Parham, P; Rust, N; Brodsky, F

    1980-09-01

    A hybridoma monoclonal anti-HLA antibody has been produced by the technique of Kohler and Milstein [1]. This antibody recognizes a new specificity common to HLA A2 and B17. It was shown to be a single antibody by isoelectric focusing and absorption experiments.

  1. The generation of monoclonal antibodies and their use in rapid diagnostic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibodies are the most important component of an immunoassay. In these proceedings we outline novel methods used to generate and select monoclonal antibodies that meet performance criteria for use in rapid lateral flow and microfluidic immunoassay tests for the detection of agricultural pathogens ...

  2. Imaging of multiple myeloma and related monoclonal plasma cell diseases. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple myeloma is a hematologic disorder characterized by the infiltration and proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells mainly in the bone marrow. The main symptoms are hypercalcemia, renal impairment, cytopenia/anemia and bone disease - summarized as CRAB-criteria. Symptomatic multiple myeloma is consistently preceded by asymptomatic premalignant stages called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma. Staging of multiple myeloma is based on the measurement of the monoclonal protein in serum and urine as well as the assessment of impairment of hematopoiesis, renal function and mineralized bone. In the last decade the development of novel therapeutic agents has led to an increase in response rates and survival time of patients with multiple myeloma, which further stresses the value of response assessment by imaging. Cross sectional imaging like MRI and CT is currently replacing conventional radiological surveys in the initial work-up and follow-up of patients with monoclonal plasma cell diseases. The added value of MRI is to improve initial staging by unraveling a diffuse infiltration of bone marrow by plasma cells, a focal pattern or a combination of both. Furthermore, a complete remission of myeloma confirmed by MRI and CT goes along with a better prognosis compared to a complete response based only on serological parameters.

  3. Intravenous cidofovir for resistant cutaneous warts in a patient with psoriasis treated with monoclonal antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McAleer, M A

    2012-02-01

    Human papilloma virus is a common and often distressing cutaneous disease. It can be therapeutically challenging, especially in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of recalcitrant cutaneous warts that resolved with intravenous cidofovir treatment. The patient was immunocompromised secondary to monoclonal antibody therapy for psoriasis.

  4. Development of a Highly Protective Combination Monoclonal Antibody Therapy against Chikungunya Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, Pankaj; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Brien, James D.; Edeling, Melissa A.; Gorlatov, Sergey; Johnson, Syd; Lee, Iris; Akahata, Wataru; Nabel, Gary J.; Richter, Mareike K. S.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Fremont, Daved H.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Heise, Mark T.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes global epidemics of a debilitating polyarthritis in humans. As there is a pressing need for the development of therapeutic agents, we screened 230 new mouse anti-CHIKV monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for their ability to inhibit

  5. Ultrastructural study of Chlamydia trachomatis surface antigens by immunogold staining with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, C C; Chi, E Y

    1987-01-01

    Surface antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis were studied by immunogold staining with monoclonal antibodies and by electron microscopy. The serovar- and subspecies-specific epitopes were the most surface accessible. The species- and genus-specific epitopes were the least surface exposed. Similar serological specificity as that in the microimmunofluorescence test was demonstrated by immunogold staining.

  6. Application and staining patterns of commercial anti-Pneumocystis carinii monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Elvin, K; Linder, E.

    1993-01-01

    Commercially available monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii were compared with respect to immunofluorescence staining patterns of human immunodeficiency virus-inactivated smears. Only the indirect staining kits were suitable for application to ethanol-inactivated samples. When antibodies from Dakopatts and Northumbria were compared, the staining of cysts and trophozoites showed different patterns.

  7. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies Which Specifically Recognize Entamoeba histolytica in Preserved Stool Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Crandall, Ian; kain, kevin c.

    2001-01-01

    We report the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a recombinant 170-kDa subunit of the Gal or GalNAc lectin of Entamoeba histolytica that specifically recognize E. histolytica but not Entamoeba dispar in preserved stool samples. These antibodies do not cross-react with other bowel protozoa, including Entamoeba coli, Giardia lamblia, and Dientamoeba fragilis.

  8. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  9. B lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab in Graves' disease: a controlled pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Bonnema, Steen Joop;

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Graves' disease (GD) is a common TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb)-mediated disorder. Because B lymphocytes are important self-antigen presenting cells and precursors for antibody-secreting plasma cells, temporary B-lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) might...

  10. Anti-interleukin-17 monoclonal antibody ixekizumab in chronic plaque psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardi, Craig; Matheson, Robert; Zachariae, Claus;

    2012-01-01

    Type 17 helper T cells have been suggested to play a pathological role in psoriasis. They secrete several proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-17A (also known as interleukin-17). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of ixekizumab (LY2439821), a humanized anti-interleukin-17 monoclonal...

  11. Comprehensive analysis of varicella-zoster virus proteins using a new monoclonal antibody collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.L. Roviš (Tihana Lenac); S.M. Bailer (Susanne); V.R. Pothineni (Venkata R); W.J.D. Ouwendijk (Werner ); H. Šimić (Hrvoje); M. Babić (Marina); K. Miklić (Karmela); S. Malić (Suzana); M.C. Verweij; M. Baiker (Martin); O. Gonzalez (Orland); A. Brunn (Albrecht von); R. Zimmer; K. Früh (Klaus); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); S. Jonjic (Stipan); J. Haasb (Jürgeni)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractVaricella-zoster virus (VZV) is the etiological agent of chickenpox and shingles. Due to the virus's restricted host and cell typetropism and the lack of tools for VZV proteomics, it is one of the least-characterized human herpesviruses. We generated 251monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) again

  12. Production and Quality Control of Technetium-99m Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Babaei, Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and purpose: Binding a monoclonal antibody to tumor associated antigens is an effective method for cancer therapy because these agents can specifically target malignant cells. In fact, monoclonal antibodies are effective agents for diagnosis, grading and treatment of different kinds of cancers. In this research, a new monoclonal antibody against colon cancer cells was prepared and radiolabeling with technetium-99m evaluated.Materials and Methods: This research was done in three parts: preparation of hybridoma cell against colon cancer cell line (HT29, production of monoclonal antibody, determination of its characterizations and radiolabeling with technetium-99m.Results: mAb-D2 is an IgG1 with affinity constant of 7.2 × 109M-1 which can recognize CEA in tumor cells. Radiolabeling showed that 99mTc-HYNIC-mAb-D2 complex is stable, immunoradioactive, and has a desirable biodistribution.Conclusion: In this study, we gained a new radiopharmaceutical that may be a good candidate for radioimmunoscintigraphy.

  13. Purification of infectious canine parvovirus from cell culture by affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groen (Jan); N. Juntti; J.S. Teppema; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractImmuno affinity chromatography with virus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, directed to the haemagglutinating protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was used to purify and concentrate CPV from infected cell culture. The procedure was monitored by testing the respective fractions in an infe

  14. 77 FR 5036 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers AGENCY: National..., Department of Health and Human Services, is contemplating the grant of an exclusive evaluation option...

  15. Prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia in mice by intratracheal instillation of monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study on passive immunity dealt principally with the following topics: pathogenesis of the pneumonia produced by influenza virus (PR8) in CF-1 mice; the distribution and retention of monoclonal antibody instilled intratracheally (IT) into the lung; and prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia using specific monoclonal antibody (IgG 2a/k anti-HA). The fate of a single 50 ul bolus of antibody instilled IT was determined by monitoring the activity of 125I-labelled monoclonal IgG in the lungs and by lavage recovery of functional antibody.Antibody was demonstrated in high concentrations for the first 3 days and was present in the lungs for a period of 7 days. For prophylaxis several trials indicated that monoclonal antibody provided significant protection from lethal effects of the virus. Antibody given to clinically ill mice on day 3 produced a highly significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001) when compared to control mice. The treatment reversed the weight loss and apparently arrested the development of lesions in most of the mice within 2 days following antibody administration

  16. Synthetic methyl hexagalacturonate hapten inhibitors of antihomogalacturonan monoclonal antibodies LM7, JIM5 and JIM7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Willats, William George Tycho; Knox, J. Paul

    2003-01-01

    A range of synthetic methyl hexagalacturonates were used as potential hapten inhibitors in competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) with anti-homogalacturonan monoclonal antibodies LM7, JIM5 and JIM7. The selective inhibition of these antibodies by different haptens...

  17. MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES TO HUMAN EMBRYONAL CARCINOMA-CELLS - ANTIGENIC RELATIONSHIPS OF GERM-CELL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEWIT, TFR; WILSON, L; VANDENELSEN, PJ; THIELEN, F; BREKHOFF, D; OOSTERHUIS, JW; PERA, MF; STERN, PL

    1991-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that show specificity for human embryonal carcinoma cells are described. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with Tera-2 embryonal carcinoma cells, and hybridomas were isolated and tested versus a set of human developmental tumor cell lines. The antigens exhibit relativel

  18. Summary of workshop findings for porcine T-lymphocyte-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saalmuller, A.; Kuebart, G.; Hollemweguer, E.;

    2001-01-01

    blood mononuclear cells, nylon-wool enriched T-lymphocytes, thymocytes, splenocytes, and lymphocytes derived from Peyer's patches. These second round analyses revealed 15 different data sets. Together with 22 pre-selected data sets from the first round analyses with the whole panel of monoclonal...

  19. Harnessing the immune system's arsenal: producing human monoclonal antibodies for therapeutics and investigating immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Meghan; Kaur, Kaval; Pauli, Noel; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technology has undergone rapid and innovative reinvention over the last 30 years. Application of these technologies to human samples revealed valuable therapeutic and experimental insights. These technologies, each with their own benefits and flaws, have proven indispensable for immunological research and in our fight to provide new treatments and improved vaccines for infectious disease.

  20. Harnessing the immune system's arsenal: producing human monoclonal antibodies for therapeutics and investigating immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Meghan; Kaur, Kaval; Pauli, Noel; Wilson, Patrick C

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technology has undergone rapid and innovative reinvention over the last 30 years. Application of these technologies to human samples revealed valuable therapeutic and experimental insights. These technologies, each with their own benefits and flaws, have proven indispensable for immunological research and in our fight to provide new treatments and improved vaccines for infectious disease. PMID:21876728