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Sample records for anti tuberculosis treatment

  1. Anti-mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of polyherbal medicines used for the treatment of tuberculosis in Eastern Cape, South Africa.

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    Famewo, Elizabeth B; Clarke, Anna M; Wiid, Ian; Ngwane, Andile; van Helden, Paul; Afolayan, Anthony J

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become a global public health problem. Polyherbal medicines offer great hope for developing alternative drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis. To evaluate the anti-tubercular activity of polyherbal medicines used for the treatment of tuberculosis. The remedies were screened against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv using Middlebrook 7H9 media and MGIT BACTEC 960 system. They were liquid preparations from King Williams Town site A (KWTa), King Williams Town site B (KWTb), King Williams Town site C (KWTc), Hogsback first site (HBfs), Hogsback second site (HBss), Hogsback third site (HBts), East London (EL), Alice (AL) and Fort Beaufort (FB). The susceptibility testing revealed that all the remedies contain anti-tubercular activity with KWTa, KWTb, KWTc, HBfs, HBts, AL and FB exhibiting more activity at a concentration below 25 µl/ml. Furthermore, MIC values exhibited inhibitory activity with the most active remedies from KWTa, HBfs and HBts at 1.562 µg/ml. However, isoniazid showed more inhibitory activity against M. tuberculosis at 0.05 µg/ml when compare to the polyherbal remedies. This study has indicated that these remedies could be potential sources of new anti-mycobacterial agents against M. tuberculosis . However, the activity of these preparations and their active principles still require in vivo study in order to assess their future as new anti-tuberculosis agents.

  2. The Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR in Diagnosis of Spine Tuberculosis after Pre-operative Anti-tuberculosis Treatment

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    AH Rasit

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis after 2 weeks of preoperative anti-tuberculosis treatment and to compare PCR to the Löwenstein - Jensen Culture (LJC and histopathological examination (HPE methods. METHODS: Twenty-five patients were included in this study. Sixteen patients were diagnosed and treated for spinal tuberculosis based on clinical and radiological evidence. Nine patients were controls. The LJC method and HPE of the specimen were performed according to hospital protocol. PCR was performed using primer encoding insertion of sequences IS6110 for mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Clinical findings and radiological features were the gold standard for comparison. RESULTS: PCR results were 15 positive and one negative. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR was 94% and 100% respectively (with 95% confidence interval [CI] 67% to 99% and 63% to 100%, respectively. HPE results showed 13 were positive and 3 negative in the spinal tuberculosis group; for the control group, all were negative. Sensitivity and specificity value of HPE was 82 % and 100% respectively (with 95% confidence interval [CI] 54% to 95% and 63% to 100%, respectively. Use of LJC showed only one was positive and 15 were negative in the spinal tuberculosis group whole all nine in the control group were negative. Sensitivity and specificity value of LJC was 6% and 100% respectively (with 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.3% to 32% and 63% to 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that the PCR for Mycobacterium tuberculosis is reliable as a method for diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis, even after of 2 weeks of anti-TB treatment, with an overall sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 100%.

  3. The timing of death in patients with tuberculosis who die during anti-tuberculosis treatment in Andhra Pradesh, South India

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    Jonnalagada Subbanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background India has 2.0 million estimated tuberculosis (TB cases per annum with an estimated 280,000 TB-related deaths per year. Understanding when in the course of TB treatment patients die is important for determining the type of intervention to be offered and crucially when this intervention should be given. The objectives of the current study were to determine in a large cohort of TB patients in India:- i treatment outcomes including the number who died while on treatment, ii the month of death and iii characteristics associated with "early" death, occurring in the initial 8 weeks of treatment. Methods This was a retrospective study in 16 selected Designated Microscopy Centres (DMCs in Hyderabad, Krishna and Adilabad districts of Andhra Pradesh, South India. A review was performed of treatment cards and medical records of all TB patients (adults and children registered and placed on standardized anti-tuberculosis treatment from January 2005 to September 2009. Results There were 8,240 TB patients (5183 males of whom 492 (6% were known to have died during treatment. Case-fatality was higher in those previously treated (12% and lower in those with extra-pulmonary TB (2%. There was an even distribution of deaths during anti-tuberculosis treatment, with 28% of all patients dying in the first 8 weeks of treatment. Increasing age and new as compared to recurrent TB disease were significantly associated with "early death". Conclusion In this large cohort of TB patients, deaths occurred with an even frequency throughout anti-TB treatment. Reasons may relate to i the treatment of the disease itself, raising concerns about drug adherence, quality of anti-tuberculosis drugs or the presence of undetected drug resistance and ii co-morbidities, such as HIV/AIDS and diabetes mellitus, which are known to influence mortality. More research in this area from prospective and retrospective studies is needed.

  4. review of compliance to anti tuberculosis treatment and risk factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study is to assess anti TB treatment compliance and the factors predictive for poor adherence in Sub-Saharan Africa in the last 10 years. Methods: We searched Medline for articles written in English using the terms: "Patient Compliance"[Mesh] OR "Medication Adherence"[Mesh])) AND ...

  5. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

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    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  6. Tuberculosis Treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis Treatment, Lusaka, Zambia. 1. 2. 2. 3. 3 ... TB treatment has contributed to the steady rise of TB incidence in ... respondents (89.4%) had positive attitude towards TB treatment ..... respondents described feelings of depression, anger and apathy .... Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,. 1979, 37:1-11.

  7. Incidence, clinical features and impact on anti-tuberculosis treatment of anti-tuberculosis drug induced liver injury (ATLI in China.

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    Penghui Shang

    Full Text Available Anti-tuberculosis drug induced liver injury (ATLI is emerging as a significant threat to tuberculosis control in China, though limited data is available about the burden of ATLI at population level. This study aimed to estimate the incidence of ATLI, to better understand its clinical features, and to evaluate its impact on anti-tuberculosis (TB treatment in China.In a population-based prospective study, we monitored 4,304 TB patients receiving directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS treatment, and found that 106 patients developed ATLI with a cumulative incidence of 2.55% (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 2.04%-3.06%. Nausea, vomiting and anorexia were the top three most frequently observed symptoms. There were 35 (33.02% ATLI patients with no symptoms, including 8 with severe hepatotoxicity. Regarding the prognosis of ATLI, 84 cases (79.25% recovered, 18 (16.98% improved, 2 (1.89% failed to respond to the treatment with continued elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase, and 2 (1.89% died as result of ATLI. Of all the ATLI cases, 74 (69.81% cases changed their anti-TB treatment, including 4 (3.77% cases with medication administration change, 21 (19.81% cases with drugs replacement, 54 (50.94% cases with therapy interruption, and 12 (11.32% cases who discontinued therapy. In terms of treatment outcomes, 53 (51.46% cases had TB cured in time, 48 (46.60% cases had therapy prolonged, and 2 (1.94% cases died. Compared with non-ATLI patients, ATLI patients had a 9.25-fold (95%CI, 5.69-15.05 risk of unsuccessful anti-TB treatment outcomes and a 2.11-fold (95%CI, 1.23-3.60 risk of prolonged intensive treatment phase.ATLI could considerably impact the outcomes of anti-TB treatment. Given the incidence of ATLI and the size of TB population in China, the negative impact is substantial. Therefore, more research and efforts are warranted in order to enhance the diagnosis and the prevention of ATLI.

  8. A population-based case-control study of the safety of oral anti-tuberculosis drug treatment during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Olsen, J.

    2001-01-01

    OUTCOME MEASURES: Congenital abnormalities in newborn infants and fetuses diagnosed prenatally during the second and third trimesters, and postnatally from birth to the age of one year. RESULTS: Of 38,151 controls, 29 (0.08%) were exposed to anti-tuberculosis drug treatment during pregnancy......OBJECTIVE: To study the human teratogenic potential of isoniazid and other anti-tuberculosis drug treatment during pregnancy. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cases from a large population-based dataset at the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, and controls from the National Birth...... Registry, between 1980 and 1996. Information on all oral anti-tuberculosis drug treatments during pregnancy was medically recorded. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: Women who had newborns or fetuses with congenital abnormalities (case group), and women who had babies with no congenital abnormality (control group). MAIN...

  9. Correlates of default from anti-tuberculosis treatment: a case study using Kenya's electronic data system.

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    Sitienei, J; Kipruto, H; Mansour, O; Ndisha, M; Hanson, C; Wambu, R; Addona, V

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, the World Health Organization estimated that there were 120,000 new cases and 9500 deaths due to tuberculosis (TB) in Kenya. Almost a quarter of the cases were not detected, and the treatment of 4% of notified cases ended in default. To identify the determinants of anti-tuberculosis treatment default. Data from 2012 and 2013 were retrieved from a national case-based electronic data recording system. A comparison was made between new pulmonary TB patients for whom treatment was interrupted vs. those who successfully completed treatment. A total of 106,824 cases were assessed. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was the single most influential risk factor for default (aOR 2.7). More than 94% of patients received family-based directly observed treatment (DOT) and were more likely to default than patients who received DOT from health care workers (aOR 2.0). Caloric nutritional support was associated with lower default rates (aOR 0.89). Males were more likely to default than females (aOR 1.6). Patients cared for in the private sector were less likely to default than those in the public sector (aOR 0.86). Understanding the factors contributing to default can guide future program improvements and serve as a proxy to understanding the factors that constrain access to care among undetected cases.

  10. Smoking behavior and beliefs about the impact of smoking on anti-tuberculosis treatment among health care workers.

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    Magee, M J; Darchia, L; Kipiani, M; Chakhaia, T; Kempker, R R; Tukvadze, N; Berg, C J; Blumberg, H M

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) health care facilities throughout Georgia. To describe smoking behaviors among health care workers (HCWs) at TB facilities and determine HCWs' knowledge and beliefs regarding the impact of tobacco use on anti-tuberculosis treatment. Cross-sectional survey from May to December 2014 in Georgia. Adult HCWs (age 18 years) at TB facilities were eligible. We administered a 60-question anonymous survey about tobacco use and knowledge of the effect of smoking on anti-tuberculosis treatment. Of the 431 HCWs at TB facilities who participated, 377 (87.5%) were female; the median age was 50 years (range 20-77). Overall, 59 (13.7%) HCWs were current smokers and 35 (8.1%) were past smokers. Prevalence of current smoking was more common among physicians than among nurses (18.6% vs. 7.9%, P tuberculosis treatment, and only 25.3% of physicians/nurses received formal training in smoking cessation approaches. Physicians who smoked were significantly more likely to believe that smoking does not impact anti-tuberculosis treatment than non-smoking physicians (aOR 5.11, 95%CI 1.46-17.90). Additional education about the effect of smoking on TB treatment outcomes is needed for staff of TB health care facilities in Georgia. Nurses and physicians need more training about smoking cessation approaches for patients with TB.

  11. Therapeutic drug monitoring of isoniazid and rifampicin during anti-tuberculosis treatment in Auckland, New Zealand.

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    Maze, M J; Paynter, J; Chiu, W; Hu, R; Nisbet, M; Lewis, C

    2016-07-01

    There is uncertainty as to the optimal therapeutic concentrations of anti-tuberculosis drugs to achieve cure. To characterise the use of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), and identify risk factors and outcomes for those with concentrations below the drug interval. Patients treated for tuberculosis (TB) who had rifampicin (RMP) or isoniazid (INH) concentrations measured between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2012 were studied retrospectively. Matched concentrations and drug dosing time were assessed according to contemporary regional drug intervals (RMP > 6 μmol/l, INH > 7.5 μmol/l) and current international recommendations (RMP > 10 μmol/l, INH > 22 μmol/l). Outcomes were assessed using World Health Organization criteria. Of 865 patients, 121 had concentrations of either or both medications. RMP concentrations were within the regional drug intervals in 106/114 (93%) and INH in 91/100 (91%). Concentrations were within international drug intervals for RMP in 76/114 (67%) and INH in 53/100 (53%). Low weight-based dose was the only statistically significant risk factor for concentrations below the drug interval. Of the 35 patients with low concentrations, 21 were cured, 9 completed treatment and 5 transferred out. There were no relapses during follow-up (mean 66.5 months). There were no clinically useful characteristics to guide use of TDM. Many patients had concentrations below international therapeutic intervals, but were successfully treated.

  12. Tuberculosis treatment among smear positive tuberculosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, M.K.; Iqbal, R.; Shabbir, I.; Chaudhry, K

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem in many parts of the world. Delay in initiation of the treatment may result in prolonged infectious state, drug resistance, relapse and death. Objectives: To determine the factors responsible for not starting tuberculosis treatment among smear positive tuberculosis patients. Study type, settings and duration: This cross sectional study was done at Pakistan Medical Research Council TB Research Center, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from fifth March 2010 to fifth December 2010. Patients and Methods: Fifty sputum smear positive patients of tuberculosis who did not register themselves in treatment register and presumably did not initiate anti tuberculosis treatment were contacted using telephone or traced by their home addresses. Once contact was established, they were inquired about the reasons for not starting tuberculosis treatment. Results: Of 50 patients 38(76%)belonged to the lower socio economic class and 12(24%) to the lower middle class. Fourteen patients (28%) were illiterate and 23(46%) had only 8 years of education. Of the 50 cases 41(82%) were taking treatment from traditional healers and 4% did not go back to the DOTS program. Physical condition of the patient, social, domestic and religious issues also played some role in default. Conclusions: Lack of health education and poverty were the main factors responsible for non compliance from treatment. Policy message: Sputum testing sites should have a paramedic who should educate the patients about the benefits of treatment and the dangers of default or partial treatment. (author)

  13. Diagnostic pathways and direct medical costs incurred by new adult pulmonary tuberculosis patients prior to anti-tuberculosis treatment – Tamil Nadu, India

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    Veesa, Karun Sandeep; John, Kamalabhai Russell; Moonan, Patrick K.; Kaliappan, Saravanakumar Puthupalayam; Manjunath, Krishna; Sagili, Karuna D.; Ravichandra, Chinnappareddy; Menon, Pradeep Aravindan; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Luke, Nancy; Munshi, Kaivan; George, Kuryan; Minz, Shantidani

    2018-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) patients face substantial delays prior to treatment initiation, and out of pocket (OOP) expenditures often surpass the economic productivity of the household. We evaluated the pre-diagnostic cost and health seeking behaviour of new adult pulmonary TB patients registered at Primary Health Centres (PHCs) in Vellore district, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods This descriptive study, part of a randomised controlled trial conducted in three rural Tuberculosis Units from Dec 2012 to Dec 2015, collected data on number of health facilities, dates of visits prior to the initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment, and direct OOP medical costs associated with TB diagnosis. Logistic regression analysis examined the factors associated with delays in treatment initiation and OOP expenditures. Results Of 880 TB patients interviewed, 34.7% presented to public health facilities and 65% patients sought private health facilities as their first point of care. The average monthly individual income was $77.79 (SD 57.14). About 69% incurred some pre-treatment costs at an average of $39.74. Overall, patients experienced a median of 6 days (3–11 IQR) of time to treatment initiation and 21 days (10–30 IQR) of health systems delay. Age ≤ 40 years (aOR: 1.73; CI: 1.22–2.44), diabetes (aOR: 1.63; CI: 1.08–2.44) and first visit to a private health facility (aOR: 17.2; CI: 11.1–26.4) were associated with higher direct OOP medical costs, while age ≤ 40 years (aOR: 0.64; CI: 0.48–0.85) and first visit to private health facility (aOR: 1.79, CI: 1.34–2.39) were associated with health systems delay. Conclusion The majority of rural TB patients registering at PHCs visited private health facilities first and incurred substantial direct OOP medical costs and delays prior to diagnosis and anti-tuberculosis treatment initiation. This study highlights the need for PHCs to be made as the preferred choice for first point of contact, to combat TB more efficiently. PMID

  14. Diagnostic pathways and direct medical costs incurred by new adult pulmonary tuberculosis patients prior to anti-tuberculosis treatment - Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veesa, Karun Sandeep; John, Kamalabhai Russell; Moonan, Patrick K; Kaliappan, Saravanakumar Puthupalayam; Manjunath, Krishna; Sagili, Karuna D; Ravichandra, Chinnappareddy; Menon, Pradeep Aravindan; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Luke, Nancy; Munshi, Kaivan; George, Kuryan; Minz, Shantidani

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) patients face substantial delays prior to treatment initiation, and out of pocket (OOP) expenditures often surpass the economic productivity of the household. We evaluated the pre-diagnostic cost and health seeking behaviour of new adult pulmonary TB patients registered at Primary Health Centres (PHCs) in Vellore district, Tamil Nadu, India. This descriptive study, part of a randomised controlled trial conducted in three rural Tuberculosis Units from Dec 2012 to Dec 2015, collected data on number of health facilities, dates of visits prior to the initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment, and direct OOP medical costs associated with TB diagnosis. Logistic regression analysis examined the factors associated with delays in treatment initiation and OOP expenditures. Of 880 TB patients interviewed, 34.7% presented to public health facilities and 65% patients sought private health facilities as their first point of care. The average monthly individual income was $77.79 (SD 57.14). About 69% incurred some pre-treatment costs at an average of $39.74. Overall, patients experienced a median of 6 days (3-11 IQR) of time to treatment initiation and 21 days (10-30 IQR) of health systems delay. Age ≤ 40 years (aOR: 1.73; CI: 1.22-2.44), diabetes (aOR: 1.63; CI: 1.08-2.44) and first visit to a private health facility (aOR: 17.2; CI: 11.1-26.4) were associated with higher direct OOP medical costs, while age ≤ 40 years (aOR: 0.64; CI: 0.48-0.85) and first visit to private health facility (aOR: 1.79, CI: 1.34-2.39) were associated with health systems delay. The majority of rural TB patients registering at PHCs visited private health facilities first and incurred substantial direct OOP medical costs and delays prior to diagnosis and anti-tuberculosis treatment initiation. This study highlights the need for PHCs to be made as the preferred choice for first point of contact, to combat TB more efficiently.

  15. Differences in reactivation of tuberculosis induced from anti-TNF treatments are based on bioavailability in granulomatous tissue.

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    Simeone Marino

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection is complex. Experimental evidence has revealed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF plays a major role in host defense against Mtb in both active and latent phases of infection. TNF-neutralizing drugs used to treat inflammatory disorders have been reported to increase the risk of tuberculosis (TB, in accordance with animal studies. The present study takes a computational approach toward characterizing the role of TNF in protection against the tubercle bacillus in both active and latent infection. We extend our previous mathematical models to investigate the roles and production of soluble (sTNF and transmembrane TNF (tmTNF. We analyze effects of anti-TNF therapy in virtual clinical trials (VCTs by simulating two of the most commonly used therapies, anti-TNF antibody and TNF receptor fusion, predicting mechanisms that explain observed differences in TB reactivation rates. The major findings from this study are that bioavailability of TNF following anti-TNF therapy is the primary factor for causing reactivation of latent infection and that sTNF--even at very low levels--is essential for control of infection. Using a mathematical model, it is possible to distinguish mechanisms of action of the anti-TNF treatments and gain insights into the role of TNF in TB control and pathology. Our study suggests that a TNF-modulating agent could be developed that could balance the requirement for reduction of inflammation with the necessity to maintain resistance to infection and microbial diseases. Alternatively, the dose and timing of anti-TNF therapy could be modified. Anti-TNF therapy will likely lead to numerous incidents of primary TB if used in areas where exposure is likely.

  16. Enhanced Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Immunity over Time with Combined Drug and Immunotherapy Treatment

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    Sasha E. Larsen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that one third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. This astounding statistic, in combination with costly and lengthy treatment regimens make the development of therapeutic vaccines paramount for controlling the global burden of tuberculosis. Unlike prophylactic vaccination, therapeutic immunization relies on the natural pulmonary infection with Mtb as the mucosal prime that directs boost responses back to the lung. The purpose of this work was to determine the protection and safety profile over time following therapeutic administration of our lead Mtb vaccine candidate, ID93 with a synthetic TLR4 agonist (glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in a stable emulsion (GLA-SE, in combination with rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide (RHZ drug treatment. We assessed the host inflammatory immune responses and lung pathology 7–22 weeks post infection, and determined the therapeutic efficacy of combined treatment by enumeration of the bacterial load and survival in the SWR/J mouse model. We show that drug treatment alone, or with immunotherapy, tempered the inflammatory responses measured in brochoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma compared to untreated cohorts. RHZ combined with therapeutic immunizations significantly enhanced TH1-type cytokine responses in the lung over time, corresponding to decreased pulmonary pathology evidenced by a significant decrease in the percentage of lung lesions and destructive lung inflammation. These data suggest that bacterial burden assessment alone may miss important correlates of lung architecture that directly contribute to therapeutic vaccine efficacy in the preclinical mouse model. We also confirmed our previous finding that in combination with antibiotics therapeutic immunizations provide an additive survival advantage. Moreover, therapeutic immunizations with ID93/GLA-SE induced differential T cell immune responses over the course of infection that correlated

  17. Paradoxical response with increased tumor necrosis factor-α levels to anti-tuberculosis treatment in a patient with disseminated tuberculosis

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    Sho Watanabe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that tuberculosis (TB worsens after cessation of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors and starting anti-TB treatment. Little is known about the immunological pathogenesis of this paradoxical response (PR. We report the first case of a TB patient in whom PR occurred concurrently with elevation of circulating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα levels. A 75-year-old woman, who had been treated with adalimumab for SAPHO syndrome, developed disseminated TB. Soon after administration of anti-TB treatment (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and after discontinuation of adalimumab, a PR occurred. Serial testing of serum cytokine levels revealed a marked increase in TNFα, and a decline in interferon-γ levels. Despite intensive treatment with antibiotics, prednisolone, noradrenaline, and mechanical ventilation, acute respiratory distress syndrome developed and she died. Thus, overproduction of TNFα after cessation of TNFα inhibitors may partially account for the pathogenesis of a PR. This supports preventative or therapeutic reinitiation of TNFα inhibitors when PR occurs. Serial monitoring of circulating inflammatory cytokine levels could lead to earlier identification of a PR.

  18. Factors Associated with Fatality during the Intensive Phase of Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals, M.; Caminero, J. A.; García-García, J. M.; Jiménez-Fuentes, M. A.; Medina, J. F.; Millet, J. P.; Ruiz-Manzano, J.; Caylá, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the case-fatality rate (CFR) at the end of the intensive phase of tuberculosis (TB) treatment, and factors associated with fatality. Methods TB patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were followed-up during treatment. We computed the CFR at the end of the intensive phase of TB treatment, and the incidence of death per 100 person-days (pd) of follow-up. We performed survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression, and calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results A total of 5,182 patients were included, of whom 180 (3.5%) died; 87 of these deaths (48.3%) occurred during the intensive phase of treatment, with a CFR of 1.7%. The incidence of death was 0.028/100 pd. The following factors were associated with death during the intensive phase: being >50 years (HR = 36.9;CI:4.8–283.4); being retired (HR = 2.4;CI:1.1–5.1); having visited the emergency department (HR = 3.1;CI:1.2–7.7); HIV infection (HR = 3.4;CI:1.6–7.2); initial standard treatment with 3 drugs (HR = 2.0;CI:1.2–3.3) or non-standard treatments (HR = 2.68;CI:1.36–5.25); comprehension difficulties (HR = 2.8;CI:1.3–6.1); and smear-positive sputum (HR = 2.3-CI:1.0–4.8). Conclusion There is a non-negligible CFR during the intensive phase of TB, whose reduction should be prioritised. The CFR could be a useful indicator for evaluating TB programs. PMID:27487189

  19. The prevalence and factors associated for anti-tuberculosis treatment non-adherence among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in public health care facilities in South Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

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    Tadele Teshome Woimo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence exists pointing out how non-adherence to treatment remains a major hurdle to efficient tuberculosis control in developing countries. Many tuberculosis (Tb patients do not complete their six-month course of anti-tuberculosis medications and are not aware of the importance of sputum re-examinations, thereby putting themselves at risk of developing multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and relapse. However, there is a dearth of publications about non-adherence towards anti-Tb medication in these settings. We assessed the prevalence of and associated factors for anti-Tb treatment non-adherence in public health care facilities of South Ethiopia. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative study was conducted among 261 Tb patients from 17 health centers and one general hospital. The qualitative aspect included an in-depth interview of 14 key informants. For quantitative data, the analysis of descriptive statistics, bivariate and multiple logistic regression was carried out, while thematic framework analysis was applied for the qualitative data. Results The prevalence of non-adherence towards anti-Tb treatment was 24.5%. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that poor knowledge towards tuberculosis and its treatment (AOR = 4.6, 95%CI: 1.4-15.6, cost of medication other than Tb (AOR = 4.7, 95%CI: 1.7-13.4, having of health information at every visit (AOR = 3, 95% CI: 1.1-8.4 and distance of DOTS center from individual home (AOR = 5.7, 95%CI: 1.9-16.8 showed statistically significant association with non-adherence towards anti- tuberculosis treatment. Qualitative study also revealed that distance, lack of awareness about importance of treatment completion and cost of transportation were the major barriers for adherence. Conclusions A quarter of Tb patients interrupted their treatment due to knowledge

  20. Patients with secondary amenorrhea due to tuberculosis endometritis towards the induced anti-tuberculosis drug category 1.

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    Perdhana, Raditya; Sutrisno, Sutrisno; Sugiri, Yani Jane; Baktiyani, Siti Candra Windu; Wiyasa, Arsana

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease which can affect various organs, including human's genital organs such as the endometrium. Tuberculosis endometritis can cause clinical symptoms of secondary amenorrhea and infertility. Infertility in genital TB caused by the involvement of the endometrium. The case presentation is 33-year-old woman from dr. Saiful Anwar Public Hospital to consult that she has not menstruated since 5 years ago (28 years old). The diagnosis was done by performing a clinical examination until the diagnosis of secondary amenorrhea due to tuberculosis endometritis is obtained. A treatment by using category I of anti-tuberculosis drugs was done for 6 months, afterward an Anatomical Pathology observation found no signs of the tuberculosis symptoms. Based on that, patient, who was diagnosed to have secondary amenorrhea due to tuberculosis endometritis, has no signs of tuberculosis process after being treated by using category I of anti-tuberculosis drugs for 6 months.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of spinal tuberculosis after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Cheng Gu; Rong-Huan Wu; Xiang-Jin Lin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal tuberculosis is a common disease in orthopedic clinical practice; however, it is seldom reported after organ transplantation. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of spinal tuberculosis after organ transplantation. METHOD: Two cases were diagnosed as spinal tuberculosis after liver transplantation and were treated with socarboxazide, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol for more than one year. RESULTS: After treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs for several months, the symptoms of both patients clearly improved. Back pain disappeared, and erythrocyte sedimentation and body temperature returned to normal. CONCLUSIONS: We should highly suspect spinal tuberculosis if notalgia and night sweats are present after organ transplantation. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is an effective treatment for spinal tuberculosis after organ transplantation.

  2. Tuberculosis Treatment and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  3. Outcome correlation of smear-positivity but culture-negativity during standard anti-tuberculosis treatment in Taiwan.

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    Chao, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Wen; Yu, Ming-Chih; Yang, Wen-Ta; Lin, Chou-Jui; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Huang, Ruay-Ming; Shieh, Chi-Chang; Chien, Shun-Tien; Chien, Jung-Yien

    2015-02-18

    The appearance of smear-positivity but culture-negativity (SPCN) for acid-fast bacilli among sputum specimen is frequently found in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients during treatment. This study aimed to investigate clinical risk factors, impacts on treatment course, and relapse pattern associated with sputum SPCN. We retrospectively enrolled 800 patients with culture-proven pulmonary TB who were receiving standard treatment and follow-up at six TB-referral hospitals in Taiwan between January 2006 and December 2007. Relevant patient characteristics and chemotherapy data were analyzed for associations with incidence of SPCN. Data from patients who relapsed within 3 years after completing treatment were analyzed for associations with SPCN during treatment. Of the 800 subjects, 111 (13.8%) had sputum SPCN during treatment. Three factors were found to predict the development of SPCN; namely, high initial acid-fast staining grading (OR, 3.407; 95% CI, 2.090-5.553), cavitation on chest-X ray films (OR, 2.217; 95% CI, 1.359-3.615), and smoking (OR, 1.609; 95% CI, 1.006-2.841). Patients with SPCN had longer treatment duration (rifampicin: 284 ± 91 vs. 235 ± 69 days, P <0.001; isoniazid: 289 ± 90 vs. 234 ± 69 days, P < 0.001) than those without SPCN. Finally, the rate of relapse within 3 years of completing treatment was similar for groups with/without SPCN (2.7%, 3/111 vs. 1.0%, 7/689, respectively; P = 0.15). In conclusion, severity of infection was a major risk factor for SPCN during treatment; however, the relapse rate within 3 years of completing treatment was not affected by the appearance of SPCN.

  4. Multifaceted remodeling by vitamin C boosts sensitivity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis subpopulations to combination treatment by anti-tubercular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikri, Kriti; Duggal, Priyanka; Kumar, Chanchal; Batra, Sakshi Dhingra; Vashist, Atul; Bhaskar, Ashima; Tripathi, Kritika; Sethi, Tavpritesh; Singh, Amit; Tyagi, Jaya Sivaswami

    2018-05-01

    Bacterial dormancy is a major impediment to the eradication of tuberculosis (TB), because currently used drugs primarily target actively replicating bacteria. Therefore, decoding of the critical survival pathways in dormant tubercle bacilli is a research priority to formulate new approaches for killing these bacteria. Employing a network-based gene expression analysis approach, we demonstrate that redox active vitamin C (vit C) triggers a multifaceted and robust adaptation response in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) involving ~ 67% of the genome. Vit C-adapted bacteria display well-described features of dormancy, including growth stasis and progression to a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state, loss of acid-fastness and reduction in length, dissipation of reductive stress through triglyceride (TAG) accumulation, protective response to oxidative stress, and tolerance to first line TB drugs. VBNC bacteria are reactivatable upon removal of vit C and they recover drug susceptibility properties. Vit C synergizes with pyrazinamide, a unique TB drug with sterilizing activity, to kill dormant and replicating bacteria, negating any tolerance to rifampicin and isoniazid in combination treatment in both in-vitro and intracellular infection models. Finally, the vit C multi-stress redox models described here also offer a unique opportunity for concurrent screening of compounds/combinations active against heterogeneous subpopulations of Mtb. These findings suggest a novel strategy of vit C adjunctive therapy by modulating bacterial physiology for enhanced efficacy of combination chemotherapy with existing drugs, and also possible synergies to guide new therapeutic combinations towards accelerating TB treatment. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of interferon gamma release assays in the monitoring of response to anti-tuberculosis treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Junaid; Pillay, Manormoney; Jeena, Prakash

    2014-09-01

    Successful control of childhood TB requires early diagnosis, effective chemotherapy and a method of evaluating the response to therapy. Identification of suitable biomarkers that predict the response to anti-TB therapy may allow the duration of treatment to be shortened. The majority of biomarker studies in paediatric TB have focused on the role of T cell-based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) in the diagnosis of either latent or active disease. Little has been published on the role of IGRAs in the monitoring response to therapy in children. We reviewed the available literature to ascertain the value of IGRAs in the monitoring of response to anti-TB therapy in children. We explored the results of the few studies that have investigated the role of IGRAs as markers of response to anti-TB treatment in children. We conclude that the role of IGRAs as surrogate markers appears promising. Robust clinical trials are, however, needed to entrench the value of IGRAs as surrogate biomarkers of response to anti-TB therapy in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Patrick; Johnston, James

    2017-01-01

    Opinion statement The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is an essential component of tuberculosis (TB) elimination in regions that have a low incidence of TB. However, the decision to treat individuals with LTBI must consider the limitations of current diagnostic tests for LTBI, the risk of developing active TB disease, the potential adverse effects from chemoprophylactic therapy, and the importance of treatment adherence. When an individual has been diagnosed with LTBI and ac...

  7. Emerging drugs and alternative possibilities in the treatment of tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, S.; Segers, M.M.; Ghimire, S.; Bolhuis, M.S.; Sturkenboom, M.G.; Soolingen, D. van; Alffenaar, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem. Drug resistance, treatment duration, complexity, and adverse drug reactions associated with anti-TB regimens are associated with treatment failure, prolonged infectiousness and relapse. With the current set of anti-TB drugs the goal to

  8. Emerging drugs and alternative possibilities in the treatment of tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, S.; Segers, M. M.; Ghimire, S.; Bolhuis, M. S.; Sturkenboom, M. G. G.; Van Soolingen, D.; Alffenaar, J. W. C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem. Drug resistance, treatment duration, complexity, and adverse drug reactions associated with anti-TB regimens are associated with treatment failure, prolonged infectiousness and relapse. With the current set of anti-TB drugs the goal to

  9. New Treatment Regimen for Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses the December 9, 2011 CDC guidelines for the use of a new regimen for the treatment of persons with latent tuberculosis infection.

  10. Availability, price and affordability of anti-tuberculosis drugs in Europe: a TBNET survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günther, Gunar; Gomez, Gabriela B.; Lange, Christoph; Rupert, Stephan; van Leth, Frank; Andrejak, Claire; Pieridou-Bagatzouni, Despo; Anderson, Aase Bengard; Bojovic, Olivera; Bothamley, Graham; Bruchfeld, Judith; Codecasa, Luigi R.; Danilovits, Manfred; Davidaviciene, Edita; Dalemo, Paulina; Dimopoulos, Giorgos; Duarte, Raquel; Hafizi, Hasan; Horvath, Ildiko; Eyuboglu, Fusun; Ibraim, Elmira; Jankovic, Mateja; Kan, Boris; Kopecka, Emilia; Kruczak, Katarzyna; Kutsyna, Galyna; de lange, Wiel; Leimane, Vaira; Mack, Ulrich; Manzano, Juan Ruiz; Markova, Roumania; McDonald, Colm; McLaughlin, Anne-Marie; Mulliqi, Gjyle; Muylle, Inge; Pesut, Dragica; Polcova, Veronika; Rumetshofer, Rudolf; Rusu, Doina; Skrahina, Alena; Spiric, Nicolina; Solovic, Ivan; Svetina-Sorli, Petra; Vasakova, Martina; Vasankari, Tuula; Viiklepp, Piret; Wirz, Gil; Zakoska, Maja; Zellweger, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Data on availability and cost of anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs in relation to affordability at national level are scarce. We performed a cross-sectional study on availability and cost of anti-TB drugs at major TB-reference centres in 37 European countries. Costs of standardised treatment regimens

  11. National anti-tuberculosis drug resistance study in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chonde, T. M.; Basra, D.; Mfinanga, S. G. M.; Range, N.; Lwilla, F.; Shirima, R. P.; van Deun, A.; Zignol, M.; Cobelens, F. G.; Egwaga, S. M.; van Leth, F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in a national representative sample of tuberculosis (TB) patients in Tanzania according to recommended methodology. DESIGN: Cluster survey, with 40 clusters sampled proportional to size, of notified TB patients from all

  12. Vitamin D: Immuno-modulation and tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Paramasivam; Harishankar, Murugesan; Afsal, Kolloli

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem and often coincides with vitamin D deficiency. High doses of vitamin D were widely used to treat TB during the pre-antibiotic era. Vitamin D exerts its action through vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR gene polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility or resistance to tuberculosis as well as sputum smear and culture conversion during anti-TB treatment. In-vitro studies have revealed that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances innate immunity by increased expression of various antimicrobial peptides, including cathelicidin, and induction of autophagy of the infected cells thus restricts the intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages. On the other hand, vitamin D has been shown to suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokine response and enhance the anti-inflammatory response. Supplementation with vitamin D in concert with treatment for TB may be beneficial with respect to minimizing the excessive tissue damage that occurs during the active stage of tuberculosis disease. Several clinical trials have evaluated vitamin D supplementation as an adjunct therapy in the treatment for tuberculosis. However, results are conflicting, owing to variations in dose regimens and outcomes. Further investigations are needed to find the optimal concentration of vitamin D for supplementation with standard anti-TB drugs to optimize treatment, which could help to effectively manage both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  13. Risk assessment of hepatotoxicity among tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS-coinfected patients under tuberculosis treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Williams Ngouleun; Prosper Cabral Biapa Nya; Anatole Constant Pieme; Phelix Bruno Telefo

    2016-01-01

    Objective/background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a worldwide public health problem. It is a contagious and grave disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current drugs such as isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and rifampicin used for the treatment of tuberculosis are potentially hepatotoxic and can lead to drug hepatitis. In order to improve the follow-up of TB patients in Cameroon, we carried out a study which aimed to evaluate the hepatotoxicity risk factors associated with anti-TB drugs. Methods:...

  14. Risk factors for tuberculosis in inflammatory bowel disease: anti-tumor necrosis factor and hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabino Riestra

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine risk factors for active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: Retrospective, case-control study at 4 referral hospitals in Spain. Cases developed tuberculosis after a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Controls were inflammatory bowel disease patients who did not develop tuberculosis. For each case, we randomly selected 3 controls matched for sex, age (within 5 years and time of inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis (within 3 years. Inflammatory bowel disease characteristics, candidate risk factors for tuberculosis and information about the tuberculosis episode were recorded. Multivariate analysis and a Chi-squared automatic interaction detector were used. Results: Thirty-four cases and 102 controls were included. Nine of the 34 cases developed active tuberculosis between 1989 and 1999, and 25 became ill between 2000 and 2012. Multivariate regression showed an association between active tuberculosis and anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor therapy in the previous 12 months (OR 7.45; 95% CI, 2.39-23.12; p = 0.001; hospitalization in the previous 6 months (OR 4.38; 95% CI, 1.18-16.20; p = 0.027; and albumin levels (OR 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95; p = 0.001. The median time between the start of biologic therapy and the onset of active tuberculosis was 13 (interquartile range, 1-58 months. Tuberculosis developed after a year of anti-TNF therapy in 53%, and late reactivation occurred in at least 3 of 8 patients. Conclusions: The main risks factors for developing tuberculosis were anti-TNF therapy and hospitalization. Over half the cases related to anti-TNF treatment occurred after a year.

  15. Anti-tuberculosis lupane-type isoprenoids from Syzygium guineense Wild DC. (Myrtaceae stem bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Oladosu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant derived isoprenoids commonly called terpenoids, are not only useful as chemosytemic markers but are increasingly attracting attention in the development of newer drugs for the treatment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Anti-tuberculosis activity guided solvent fractionation and chromatographic separation of the chloroform extract of S. guineense stem bark resulted in the isolation of two bioactive 3-β-hydroxylupane-type isoprenoids: betulinic acid methylenediol ester (1 (MIC; 0.15 mg/mL and betulinic acid (2 (MIC; 0.60 mg/mL. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated using spectroscopic techniques. The antituberculosis assay was done using the Mycobacterium Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT method. This is the first report of the isolation of the anti-tuberculosis constituents of S. guineense and its potentials for the development of drug leads for the treatment of tuberculosis thus validating its ethno-medicinal uses.

  16. Asian Organization for Crohn's and Colitis and Asia Pacific Association of Gastroenterology consensus on tuberculosis infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment. Part 2: management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Il Park

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Because anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy has become increasingly popular in many Asian countries, the risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB among anti-TNF users may raise serious health problems in this region. Thus, the Asian Organization for Crohn's and Colitis and the Asia Pacific Association of Gastroenterology have developed a set of consensus statements about risk assessment, detection and prevention of latent TB infection, and management of active TB infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD receiving anti-TNF treatment. Twenty-three consensus statements were initially drafted and then discussed by the committee members. The quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations were assessed by using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology. Web-based consensus voting was performed by 211 IBD specialists from 9 Asian countries concerning each statement. A consensus statement was accepted if at least 75% of the participants agreed. Part 2 of the statements comprised 3 parts: management of latent TB in preparation for anti-TNF therapy, monitoring during anti-TNF therapy, and management of an active TB infection after anti-TNF therapy. These consensus statements will help clinicians optimize patient outcomes by reducing the morbidity and mortality related to TB infections in patients with IBD receiving anti-TNF treatment.

  17. ANEMIA DAN LAMA KONSUMSI OBAT ANTI TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anny Thuraidah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tuberkulosis adalah penyakit infeksi akibat kuman Mycobacterium tuberculosis yang dapat menginfeksi beberapa organ tubuh, diantaranya paru-paru, ginjal, dan tulang.Tujuan pengobatan tuberkulosis adalah memusnahkan basil tuberkulosis dengan cepat dan mencegah kekambuhan. Obat anti tuberkulosis (OAT dapat diterima dalam terapi, namun mempunyai efek toksik seperti agranulositosis, eosinofilia, trombositopenia dan anemia. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan lama konsumsi OAT pada pasien TB paru terhadap anemia. Penelitian ini bersifat Survey Analitic dengan rancangan Cross Sectional. Hasil penelitian rata-rata hitung sel darah merah 0 bulan 5,16 106/uL, 2 bulan 4,39 106/uL dan 6 bulan 4,61 106/uL, rata-rata kadar hemoglobin 0 bulan 15,17 g/dL, 2 bulan 12,73 g/dL dan 6 bulan 13,28 g/dL serta ratarata nilai hematokrit 0 bulan 44,26 %, 2 bulan 38,24 % dan 6 bulan 39,04 %. Dari hasil uji Spearman diperoleh nilai signifikan sebesar hitung sel darah merah 0,004 < α (0,05, kadar hemoglobin 0,007 < α (0,05 dan nilai hematokrit 0,015 < α (0,05 sehingga dapat disimpulkan ada hubungan antara lama konsumsi obat anti tuberkulosis pada pasien TB paru terhadap anemia dan nilai correlation coefficient hitung sel darah merah -0,531, kadar hemoglobin -0,479 serta nilai hematokrit -0,440 berarti memiliki kekuatan hubungan yang sedang. Disarankan untuk penelitian selanjutnya menggunakan parameter yang berbeda seperti jumlah trombosit, kadar AST/ALT dan sebaiknya menggunakan sampel atau pasien yang sama dari 0 bulan sampai 6 bulan.

  18. Asian Organization for Crohn's and Colitis and Asia Pacific Association of Gastroenterology consensus on tuberculosis infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment. Part 1: risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Il Park

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Because anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy has become increasingly popular in many Asian countries, the risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB among anti-TNF users may raise serious health problems in this region. Thus, the Asian Organization for Crohn's and Colitis and the Asia Pacific Association of Gastroenterology have developed a set of consensus statements about risk assessment, detection and prevention of latent TB infection, and management of active TB infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD receiving anti-TNF treatment. Twenty-three consensus statements were initially drafted and then discussed by the committee members. The quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations were assessed by using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology. Web-based consensus voting was performed by 211 IBD specialists from 9 Asian countries concerning each statement. A consensus statement was accepted if at least 75% of the participants agreed. Part 1 of the statements comprised 2 parts: risk of TB infection Recommendaduring anti-TNF therapy, and screening for TB infection prior to commencing anti-TNF therapy. These consensus statements will help clinicians optimize patient outcomes by reducing the morbidity and mortality related to TB infections in patients with IBD receiving anti-TNF treatment.

  19. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaip Krasniqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB. To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188. Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker’s commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  20. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Neziri, Burim

    2017-01-01

    The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients' adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109-0.188). Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker's commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  1. Supplementary Material for: Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody; Coll, Francesc; McNerney, Ruth; Ascher, David; Pires, Douglas; Furnham, Nick; Coeck, Nele; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant; Nair, Mridul; Mallard, Kim; Ramsay, Andrew; Campino, Susana; Hibberd, Martin; Pain, Arnab; Rigouts, Leen; Clark, Taane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure

  2. Tuberculosis Treatment in Patients with Comorbidities

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Young Ae

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a significant infectious problem in elderly patients with comorbidities in Korea. The age-associated diseases such as malignancy and diabetes mellitus may increase the risk of tuberculosis in this population. The medication treatments of tuberculosis in patients with comorbidities can cause adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs and inadequate treatment responses. Thus, clinicians must carefully monitor the toxicity of antituberculosis therapy and the efficacy of treatmen...

  3. Bedaquiline in the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment: Belarus experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Skrahina

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our interim results on safety and effectiveness of bedaquiline-containing regimens in multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB patients are encouraging. They will add value to understanding role and place of this new anti-TB drug in M/XDR-TB treatment.

  4. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS CHEMOTHERAPY TOLERANCE IN THE LIGHT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL STATUS OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Zolotova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific features of psychological state were studied in 295 pulmonary tuberculosis patients with satisfactory tolerance to anti-tuberculosis medications and 75 patients poorly tolerating the treatment.Before the treatment start the patients who later demonstrated adverse reactions to treatment were diagnosed with more intense neurotic and hypochondriac personal features, destructive reactions and higher level of emotional tension and frustration – all the above promote dysregulation of the host adaptation. The research demonstrated the need to consider psychological aspects when studying the tolerance to anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. 

  5. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morán López

    2001-04-01

    infested individual to a healthy subject mainly by means of saliva containing these microorganisms, or indirectly by inhaling the bacillus which may be present in daily used objects for months due to its high resistance. Myobacteria causing tuberculosis in the immunocompetent man are tuberculosis and bovis whereas other types may produce tuberculosis in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenecity of this bacillus is related to its capacity of escaping from macrophage-induced destruction and provoking retarded hypersensitivity. This disease has very few oral manifestations; in general, a sore mainly located in the back of the tongue is the only observed sign. Tuberculosis threatens to become an incurable disease because of the poor administration of anti-tuberculosis programs, that is why, WHO proposes DOTS (directly observed treatment of short duration for its detection and treatment. This programs begins to achieve satisfactory results, although in the last five-year period, 88% of the patients estimated to be tuberculosis-infested was not covered by DOTS.

  6. Inappropriate Tuberculosis Treatment Regimens in Chinese Tuberculosis Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue He, Guang; van den Hof, Susan; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Guo, Hui; Hu, Yuan Lian; Fan, Ji Huan; Zhang, Wei Min; Tostado, Christopher P.; Borgdorff, Martien W.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation of tuberculosis (TB) treatment regimens in 6 TB hospitals in China showed that only 18% of patients with new cases and 9% of patients with retreatment cases were prescribed standard TB treatment regimens. Adherence to treatment guidelines needs to be improved in TB hospitals to

  7. [Treatment of tuberculosis in patients with comorbidities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masahiro; Fujita, Akira

    2013-12-01

    Early detection and appropriate treatment are the keys to tuberculosis control. In particular, providing appropriate treatment for tuberculosis in patients with HIV infection, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), chronic hepatic disease, or renal failure necessitating hemodialysis, and taking appropriate measures against adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs are issues of critical importance. This mini-symposium, four experts explained the current status of "treatment of tuberculosis in patients with comorbidities" and proposed measures to address these problems. Dr. Aoki talked about "HIV infection complicated by tuberculosis." To the next, Dr. Yoshinaga gave a talk on "treatment of tuberculosis in RA patients receiving biological agents. Further, Dr. Sasaki lectured on "tuberculosis in patients with hepatic disease/impairment". Lastly, Dr. Takamori gave a lecture on "tuberculosis in patients with renal disease and those on hemodialysis. Tuberculosis patients often have some underlying diseases, and adverse reactions caused by antituberculosis drugs, such as hepatic and renal impairments, are matters of concern. I believe that this mini-symposium has provided useful information for physicians engaged in tuberculosis treatment and for many other healthcare professionals as well.

  8. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    C. Robert Horsburgh, Jr

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on tuberculosis from September 2012 to August 2013 and describes important advances in tuberculosis epidemiology, microbiology, pathology, clinical pharmacology, genetics, treatment and prevention.

  9. Design of the Anti-tuberculosis Drugs induced Adverse Reactions in China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme Study (ADACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ping

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB patients are receiving the standard anti-TB treatment provided by China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme (CNTS in China every year. Adverse reactions (ADRs induced by anti-TB drugs could both do harm to patients and lead to anti-TB treatment failure. The ADACS aimed to explore ADRs' incidences, prognoses, economical and public health impacts for TB patients and TB control, and build a DNA bank of TB patients. Methods/Design Multiple study designs were adopted. Firstly, a prospective cohort with 4488 sputum smears positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients was established. Patients were followed up for 6-9 months in 52 counties of four regions. Those suspected ADRs should be checked and confirmed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA. Secondly, if the suspected ADR was anti-TB drug induced liver injury (ATLI, a nested case-control study would be performed which comprised choosing a matched control and doing a plus questionnaire inquiry. Thirdly, health economical data of ADRs would be collected to analyze financial burdens brought by ADRs and cost-effectiveness of ADRs' treatments. Fourthly, a drop of intravenous blood for each patient was taken and saved in FTA card for DNA banking and genotyping. Finally, the demographic, clinical, environmental, administrative and genetic data would be merged for the comprehensive analysis. Discussion ADACS will give an overview of anti-TB drugs induced ADRs' incidences, risk factors, treatments, prognoses, and clinical, economical and public health impacts for TB patients applying CNTS regimen in China, and provide suggestions for individualized health care and TB control policy.

  10. Design of the Anti-tuberculosis Drugs induced Adverse Reactions in China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme Study (ADACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB) patients are receiving the standard anti-TB treatment provided by China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme (CNTS) in China every year. Adverse reactions (ADRs) induced by anti-TB drugs could both do harm to patients and lead to anti-TB treatment failure. The ADACS aimed to explore ADRs' incidences, prognoses, economical and public health impacts for TB patients and TB control, and build a DNA bank of TB patients. Methods/Design Multiple study designs were adopted. Firstly, a prospective cohort with 4488 sputum smears positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients was established. Patients were followed up for 6-9 months in 52 counties of four regions. Those suspected ADRs should be checked and confirmed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA). Secondly, if the suspected ADR was anti-TB drug induced liver injury (ATLI), a nested case-control study would be performed which comprised choosing a matched control and doing a plus questionnaire inquiry. Thirdly, health economical data of ADRs would be collected to analyze financial burdens brought by ADRs and cost-effectiveness of ADRs' treatments. Fourthly, a drop of intravenous blood for each patient was taken and saved in FTA card for DNA banking and genotyping. Finally, the demographic, clinical, environmental, administrative and genetic data would be merged for the comprehensive analysis. Discussion ADACS will give an overview of anti-TB drugs induced ADRs' incidences, risk factors, treatments, prognoses, and clinical, economical and public health impacts for TB patients applying CNTS regimen in China, and provide suggestions for individualized health care and TB control policy. PMID:20492672

  11. Drug resistance pattern of M. tuberculosis in category II treatment failure pulmonary tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmida Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the extent of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis (MTB isolated from category II treatment failure pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB patients. A total of 100 Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N smear positive category II failure PTB patients were included in this study. Sputum culture was done in Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J media. Conventional proportion method on Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J media was used to determine the drug susceptibility of M. tuberculosis to isoniazid (INH, rifampicin (RMP, ofloxacin (OFX and kanamycin (KA. Out of 100 sputum samples, a total of 87 samples were positive by culture. Drug susceptibility test (DST revealed that 82 (94.25% isolates were resistant to one or more anti -TB drugs. Resistance to isoniazide (INH, rifampicin (RMP, ofloxacin (OFX and kanamycin (KA was 94.25%, 82.75%, 29.90% and 3.45% respectively. Among these isolates, 79.31% and 3.45% isolates were multi-drug resistant (MDR and extended drug resistant (XDR M. tuberculosis respectively. High rate of anti-tubercular drug resistance was observed among the category II treatment failure TB patients. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2013; 7(1: 9-11

  12. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mochammad, Hatta

    2008-01-01

    This book chapter for medical students and researcher Tuberculosis is still one of the leading causes of death by infectious diseases with 2 million deaths per year and 9.2 million new cases of tuberculosis disease annually [1-3]. Besides, more than 2 milliard people are infected with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) [1-3]. Despite continuous effort in the prevention, monitoring and treatment of tuberculosis, the disease remains a major health problem in many countries [4-6...

  13. Adequacy of anti-tuberculosis drug prescriptions in Viet Nam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoa, N B; Lauritsen, J M; Rieder, H L

    2012-01-01

    SETTING: National Tuberculosis Program, Viet Nam, 2008. OBJECTIVES: To determine drug prescription adherence to national guidelines, to examine factors associated with an erroneous dosage of rifampin (RMP) and to evaluate the impact of an insufficient RMP dosage on treatment outcome. METHODS......: A representative sample of 30 treatment units was randomly selected. All patient treatment cards enrolled in these units were obtained, and data were double-entered and validated before calculating the adequacy of the individual drug prescriptions. RESULTS: Of 3412 tuberculosis treatment cards, 3225 (94.5%) had...

  14. Combined antiretroviral and anti- tuberculosis drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these epidemics, many challenges remain.[3] Antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance pose considerable threats to the control of these epidemics.[4,5]. The breakdown in HIV/TB control within prisons is another emerging threat.[6,7] We describe one of the first reports of combined antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance ...

  15. The fourth national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhung, N V; Hoa, N B; Sy, D N; Hennig, C M; Dean, A S

    2015-06-01

    Viet Nam's Fourth National Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Survey was conducted in 2011. To determine the prevalence of resistance to the four main first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs in Viet Nam. Eighty clusters were selected using a probability proportion to size approach. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) against the four main first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs was performed. A total of 1629 smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) patients were eligible for culture. Of these, DST results were available for 1312 patients, including 1105 new TB cases, 195 previously treated TB cases and 12 cases with an unknown treatment history. The proportion of cases with resistance to any drug was 32.7% (95%CI 29.1-36.5) among new cases and 54.2% (95%CI 44.3-63.7) among previously treated cases. The proportion of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases was 4.0% (95%CI 2.5-5.4) in new cases and 23.3 (95%CI 16.7-29.9) in previously treated cases. The fourth drug resistance survey in Viet Nam found that the proportion of MDR-TB among new and previously treated cases was not significantly different from that in the 2005 survey. The National TB Programme should prioritise the detection and treatment of MDR-TB to reduce transmission of MDR-TB in the community.

  16. Linezolid in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis: the challenge of its narrow therapeutic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Sean; Meintjes, Graeme; Maartens, Gary

    2016-10-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone with potent activity against M tuberculosis, and improves culture conversion and cure rates when added to treatment regimens for drug resistant tuberculosis. However, linezolid has a narrow therapeutic window, and the optimal dosing strategy that minimizes the substantial toxicity associated with linezolid's prolonged use in tuberculosis treatment has not been determined, limiting the potential impact of this anti-mycobacterial agent. This paper aims to review and summarize the current knowledge on linezolid for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. The focus is on the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic determinants of linezolid's efficacy and toxicity in tuberculosis, and how this relates to defining an optimal dose. Mechanisms of linezolid toxicity and resistance, and the potential role of therapeutic drug monitoring are also covered. Expert commentary: Prospective pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies are required to define optimal therapeutic targets and to inform improved linezolid dosing strategies for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  17. Paradoxical Deterioration During Anti-Tuberculous Therapy in Non-HIV-Infected Patients with Pleural Tuberculosis: A Pragmatic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Corral-Gudino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of paradoxical deterioration. A male patient diagnosed with pleural tuberculosis, but who was not infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, experienced clinical deterioration 3 weeks after the initiation of anti-tuberculous treatment. After other diagnoses were ruled out, a paradoxical response to treatment was established and the patient was started on systemic corticosteroids. Paradoxical response to treatment should be considered in patients with clinical deterioration after they start on anti-tuberculous treatment.

  18. New Treatment Regimen for Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-15

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses the December 9, 2011 CDC guidelines for the use of a new regimen for the treatment of persons with latent tuberculosis infection.  Created: 3/15/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/15/2012.

  19. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    1998-01-01

    The tuberculosis is an infection bacterial chronicle of world distribution. Three organisms of the family of the mycobacterium, the m. tuberculosis, the m. bovis and m. africanum, phenotypic and genetically similar, produce it, but only the m. tuberculosis has importance; the others rarely produce illness in the human. By definition, the lung tuberculosis is the localization of the m. tuberculosis in the breathing tract, the most common and main form in the affection and the only able to contaminate to other people. The koch bacillus, transmits the illness directly person to person. The paper Includes topics like pathogenesis, natural history, epidemiology, diagnose, symptomatology and treatment

  20. The role of the time-kill kinetics assay as part of a preclinical modeling framework for assessing the activity of anti-tuberculosis drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Hannelore I; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M; de Vogel, Corné P; van der Meijden, Aart; Verbon, Annelies; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M

    2017-07-01

    Novel treatment strategies for tuberculosis are urgently needed. Many different preclinical models assessing anti-tuberculosis drug activity are available, but it is yet unclear which combination of models is most predictive of clinical treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to determine the role of our in vitro time kill-kinetics assay as an asset to a predictive preclinical modeling framework assessing anti-tuberculosis drug activity. The concentration- and time-dependent mycobacterial killing capacities of six anti-tuberculosis drugs were determined during exposure as single drugs or in dual, triple and quadruple combinations towards a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype strain and drug resistance was assessed. Streptomycin, rifampicin and isoniazid were most active against fast-growing M. tuberculosis. Isoniazid with rifampicin or high dose ethambutol were the only synergistic drug combinations. The addition of rifampicin or streptomycin to isoniazid prevented isoniazid resistance. In vitro ranking showed agreement with early bactericidal activity in tuberculosis patients for some but not all anti-tuberculosis drugs. The time-kill kinetics assay provides important information on the mycobacterial killing dynamics of anti-tuberculosis drugs during the early phase of drug exposure. As such, this assay is a valuable component of the preclinical modeling framework. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of treatment failure among pulmonary tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Early identification of Tuberculosis (TB) treatment failure using cost effective means is urgently needed in developing nations. The study set out to describe affordable predictors of TB treatment failure in an African setting. Objective: To determine the predictors of treatment failure among patients with sputum ...

  2. Substantially Higher and Earlier Occurrence of Anti-Tuberculosis Drug-Related Adverse Reactions in HIV Coinfected Tuberculosis Patients: A Matched-Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matono, Takashi; Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Morino, Eriko; Takasaki, Jin; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Oka, Shinichi

    2017-11-01

    Little information exists on the frequency, severity, and timing of first-line anti-tuberculosis drug-related adverse events (TB-AEs) in HIV-tuberculosis coinfected (HIV-TB) patients in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. This matched-cohort study included HIV-TB patients as cases and HIV-uninfected tuberculosis (non-HIV-TB) patients as controls. Tuberculosis was culture-confirmed in both groups. Cases were matched to controls in a 1:4 ratio on age, sex, and year of diagnosis. TB-AEs were defined as Grade 2 or higher requiring drug discontinuation/regimen change. From 2003 to 2015, 94 cases and 376 controls were analyzed (95% men, 98% Asians). Standard four-drug combination therapy was initiated in 91% of cases and 89% of controls (p = 0.45). Cases had a higher frequency of TB-AE [51% (48/94) vs. 10% (39/376), p tuberculosis treatment. HIV infection was an independent risk factor for TB-AEs in the multivariate Cox analysis [adjusted HR (aHR): 6.96; 95% confidence interval: 3.93-12.3]. TB-AEs occurred more frequently in HIV-TB than in non-HIV-TB patients, and were more severe. The majority of TB-AEs occurred within 4 weeks of initiating anti-tuberculosis treatment. Because TB-AEs may delay ART initiation, careful monitoring during this period is warranted in coinfected patients.

  3. Intracranial tuberculosis in children : CT findings before and after treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hye Weon; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Hwang, Yong Seong; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1996-01-01

    To analyze the CT findings of intracranial tuberculosis in children at initial stage and during follow-up after treatment. We evaluated 25 patients who were diagnosed by CSF analysis or response to anti-tuberculous medication as suffering from intracranial tuberculosis. There were 13 boys and 12 girls aged between 4 months and 14 years. Twenty-five initial and sixty-three follow-up CT scans were retrospectively analyzed. We evaluated the pattern of cisternal enhancement, the locations of infarction, and the presence of calcification and parenchymal granuloma. The changes of hydrocephalus and related complications, as well as cisternal abnormality during anti-tuberculous medication were also evaluated. The initial findings on CT scan were hydrocephalus(75%), cisternal obliteration in precontrast study(64%), thick-line or ring-shaped cisternal enhancement on postcontrast study(44%), infarctions(32%), calcifications(32%), periventricular edema(28%), and parenchymal granulomas(16%). On follow-up CT scan, hydrocephalus and cisternal enhancement had decreased to 35% and 82%, respectively, and the granulomas had changed to calcified nodules(100%). Ventriculo-peritoneal shunt or external ventricular drainage was needed in nine patient, and ventriculitis or complication of shunt procedure developed in four. Intracranial tuberculosis in children presented predominantly as meningitis involving basal cisterns and was associated with hydrocephalus. Infarction and calcification may be seen as parenchymal lesion. In spite of medical treatment, drainage was needed in about half the patients. During this treatment, the resolution of hydrocephalus, decreased cisternal enhancement, and calcification of the granlomas were seen

  4. Sale of anti-tuberculosis drugs through private pharmacies: a cross sectional study in Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binoo Divakaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Private health care providers are largely the first point of contact for Tuberculosis (TB patients, who either undergo treatment from private practitioners or buy medicines on their own from private pharmacies. Aims: This study assessed the availability, sale and magnitude of anti-tuberculosis drugs dispensing through private pharmacies.

    Methodology: The present cross sectional study was conducted among private pharmacies located along the national highway from Thalassery to Payyannur in the Kannur district of Kerala, India. A total of 38 private pharmacies located along the national highway were included.

    Results: The duration that anti–TB drugs had been on sale showed that 74.3% of pharmacies had started to sell these drugs only less than ten years ago. The majority (82.9% of the private pharmacies received up to 5 prescriptions for anti-TB drugs weekly. Out of the total of 35 pharmacies selling these drugs, 22 (62.9% reported an increase in their sales. Nearly 82% of those pharmacies that reported an increase in the sale of anti-TB drugs were selling these drugs for less than the past ten years.

    Conclusions: The current study shows that a large number of tuberculosis patients are still approaching private pharmacies for anti-tuberculosis drugs. This tendency has to be completely stopped and needs properly planned strategies to encourage private pharmacies to participate actively in the DOTS (Direct Observation Treatment Short course program of the Government, by providing them attractive alternative incentives

  5. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhvaryu MR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Meghna Adhvaryu1, Bhasker Vakharia21Department of Biotechnology, SRK Institute of Computer Education and Applied Sciences, 2R&D, Bhuma Research in Ayurvedic and Herbal Medicine, Surat, Gujarat, IndiaAbstract: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and

  6. Tuberculosis treatment outcome in a tertiary care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhary, Zakeya A.; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman A.

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of the chemotherapy for pulmonary, extraplumonary and disseminated tuberculosis is not well documented, especially in developing countries. This study assessed tuberculosis treatment outcome, cure-to-treatment ratio and mortality among all types of tuberculosis patients in a tertiary care setting in Saudi Arabia. All cases diagnosed and treated for active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection between 1991 and 2000 were included retrospectively. Data collected included type of tuberculosis involvement, treatment outcome, relapse and co-morbidities. Over a ten-year period, 535 case of tuberculosis were diagnosed and treated. Isolated pulmonary tuberculosis was identified in 141 cases (26.4%), extrapulmonary tuberculosis in 339 cases (63.3%). Co-morbidities were noted in 277 (52%) patients. Immunosuppression was found in 181 (34%) cases. The cure rate was 82%. The cure-to-treatment ratio was 86% in extrapulmonary tuberculosis and 65% in disseminated tuberculosis. Overall mortality was 18%. Disseminated tuberculosis had the highest mortality (34.9%), followed by pulmonary (21.8%), the extrapulmonary tuberculosis (13.6%). Forty-seven percent of all mortalities were directly related to tuberculosis. Relapse was documented in 14 out of 349 patients (4%) who had 24 months of follow-up. Despite tertiary care support, complicated tuberculosis carries a high mortality. Earlier diagnosis and complete appropriate chemotherapy are essential for improved outcome. (author)

  7. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Andrade de Prince

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib. B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae, cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties.

  8. Risk factors for treatment default among re-treatment tuberculosis patients in India, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ugra Mohan; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Dewan, Puneet K; Chadha, Sarabjit; Wares, Fraser; Sahu, Suvanand; Gupta, Devesh; Chauhan, L S

    2010-01-25

    Under India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP), >15% of previously-treated patients in the reported 2006 patient cohort defaulted from anti-tuberculosis treatment. To assess the timing, characteristics, and risk factors for default amongst re-treatment TB patients. For this case-control study, in 90 randomly-selected programme units treatment records were abstracted from all 2006 defaulters from the RNTCP re-treatment regimen (cases), with one consecutively-selected non-defaulter per case. Patients who interrupted anti-tuberculosis treatment for >2 months were classified as defaulters. 1,141 defaulters and 1,189 non-defaulters were included. The median duration of treatment prior to default was 81 days (25%-75% interquartile range 44-117 days) and documented retrieval efforts after treatment interruption were inadequate. Defaulters were more likely to have been male (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-1.7), have previously defaulted anti-tuberculosis treatment (aOR 1.3 95%CI 1.1-1.6], have previous treatment from non-RNTCP providers (AOR 1.3, 95%CI 1.0-1.6], or have public health facility-based treatment observation (aOR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1-1.6). Amongst the large number of re-treatment patients in India, default occurs early and often. Improved pre-treatment counseling and community-based treatment provision may reduce default rates. Efforts to retrieve treatment interrupters prior to default require strengthening.

  9. Evaluación del tratamiento antituberculoso en la zona norte del conurbano bonaerense Anti- tuberculosis treatment evaluation in Northern districts of Buenos Aires suburbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Chirico

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue analizar el impacto epidemiológico producido por la aplicación de la estrategia del tratamiento para tuberculosis (TB de corta duración y directamente observado (DOTS, y su correlación con el éxito en la Región Sanitaria V, durante el año 2003. Se evaluó la curación comparando dos grupos de estudio. Grupo 1: municipios con 65% o más de los casos con DOTS, y Grupo 2: con 64% o menos de los pacientes bajo esta estrategia o sin su aplicación. Se analizó la letalidad global y de pacientes HIV (+ en ambos grupos. En el grupo 1 el éxito del tratamiento fue 85.7%, con curación en las formas pulmonares confirmadas de 86.2% y abandono de 8.8%. En el grupo 2 la curación alcanzó el 67.6%, en pulmonares confirmados 68.1% y el abandono de 21.8%. La letalidad global fue 5.2%, en pacientes HIV (+ 22.3% y en los HIV (- 4.1%. La curación en TB/HIV en el grupo 1 fue 55.2%, con abandono de 6.9%; en el grupo 2 curó el 46.4% y abandonó el 19.7%. El 31.0% de pacientes HIV (+ fallecieron en el grupo 1 y 16.1% en el grupo 2. La implementación del DOTS, permitió alcanzar la meta de curar el 85% de los casos, probando ser una herramienta eficaz, capaz de garantizar la curación de la mayoría de los pacientes y reducir el riesgo de enfermar de la comunidad.The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiologic impact produced by Direct Observed Treatment Strategy (DOTS application regarding to its success in the 5th Sanitary Region during the year 2 003. The cure was evaluated by a cohort study comparing two groups. Group 1: Districts in which DOTS were applied in 65% or more TB patients; group 2: Districts applying DOTS in 64% or less, or without its implementation. The global mortality was analyzed on HIV (- as well as on HIV (+ patients in both groups. In Municipalities where DOTS strategy was applied in >65% of notified cases, the treatment success was 85.7%; the cure rate of bacteriological confirmed

  10. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs As Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, Vera M.; Gröschel, Matthias I.; Martinson, Neil; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Vilaplana, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Lengthy, antimicrobial therapy targeting the pathogen is the mainstay of conventional tuberculosis treatment, complicated by emerging drug resistances. Host-directed therapies, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), in contrast, target host factors to mitigate disease severity. In

  11. Controlling the Seedbeds of Tuberculosis: Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Marais, Ben J.; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a critical opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programs focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programs that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control may continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly utilized tool that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the current epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. This paper outlines challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provides pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. It further advocates for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed global focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics, and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems, community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programs. PMID:26515679

  12. Biosynthesis of ilamycins featuring unusual building blocks and engineered production of enhanced anti-tuberculosis agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junying; Huang, Hongbo; Xie, Yunchang; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhao, Jin; Zhang, Chunyan; Jia, Yanxi; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Tianyu; Ju, Jianhua

    2017-08-30

    Tuberculosis remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases, novel anti-tuberculosis agents are urgently needed due to severe drug resistance and the co-epidemic of tuberculosis/human immunodeficiency virus. Here, we show the isolation of six anti-mycobacterial ilamycin congeners (1-6) bearing rare L-3-nitro-tyrosine and L-2-amino-4-hexenoic acid structural units from the deep sea-derived Streptomyces atratus SCSIO ZH16. The biosynthesis of the rare L-3-nitrotyrosine and L-2-amino-4-hexenoic acid units as well as three pre-tailoring and two post-tailoring steps are probed in the ilamycin biosynthetic machinery through a series of gene inactivation, precursor chemical complementation, isotope-labeled precursor feeding experiments, as well as structural elucidation of three intermediates (6-8) from the respective mutants. Most impressively, ilamycins E 1 /E 2 , which are produced in high titers by a genetically engineered mutant strain, show very potent anti-tuberculosis activity with an minimum inhibitory concentration value ≈9.8 nM to Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv constituting extremely potent and exciting anti-tuberculosis drug leads.Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases, novel anti-TB agents are urgently needed due to severe drug resistance and the co-epidemic of TB/HIV. Here, the authors show that anti-mycobacterial ilamycin congeners bearing unusual structural units possess extremely potent anti-tuberculosis activities.

  13. Treatment outcomes among pulmonary tuberculosis patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... in our environment. Keywords: Pulmonary tuberculosis; treatment centers; treatment outcome. Résumé paramètre: Centres de traitement de la tuberculose en Ibadan, Nigeria objectif: Pour évaluer les résultats de traitement et les déterminants de résultat entre la tuberculose patients. design: A plan d'étude ...

  14. Adequacy of anti-tuberculosis drug prescriptions in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, N B; Lauritsen, J M; Rieder, H L

    2012-03-21

    National Tuberculosis Program, Viet Nam, 2008. To determine drug prescription adherence to national guidelines, to examine factors associated with an erroneous dosage of rifampin (RMP) and to evaluate the impact of an insufficient RMP dosage on treatment outcome. A representative sample of 30 treatment units was randomly selected. All patient treatment cards enrolled in these units were obtained, and data were double-entered and validated before calculating the adequacy of the individual drug prescriptions. Of 3412 tuberculosis treatment cards, 3225 (94.5%) had information on treatment regimen and the patient's weight. Treatment was successful in 89.4%. Prescriptions of tablets/vials conforming to recommendations were found for respectively 91.2%, 89.9%, 92.3% and 94.6% of the patients for RMP/isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and streptomycin. Patients in the 25-39 kg weight bracket received insufficient dosages. This was almost entirely attributable to patients at the end of the weight bracket. Nevertheless, no significant association was found between treatment failure and death, body weight and insufficient RMP dosage. Adherence to national recommendations was high. RMP was given in insufficient dosage for patients at the end of a weight range bracket, but the under-dosage was small and did not measurably affect treatment outcome.

  15. Nanotechnology-Based Approach in Tuberculosis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasiruddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, commonly known as TB, is the second most fatal infectious disease after AIDS, caused by bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Prolonged treatment, high pill burden, low compliance, and stiff administration schedules are factors that are responsible for emergence of MDR and XDR cases of tuberculosis. Till date, only BCG vaccine is available which is ineffective against adult pulmonary TB, which is the most common form of disease. Various unique antibodies have been developed to overcome drug resistance, reduce the treatment regimen, and elevate the compliance to treatment. Therefore, we need an effective and robust system to subdue technological drawbacks and improve the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs which still remains a major challenge for pharmaceutical technology. Nanoparticle-based ideology has shown convincing treatment and promising outcomes for chronic infectious diseases. Different types of nanocarriers have been evaluated as promising drug delivery systems for various administration routes. Controlled and sustained release of drugs is one of the advantages of nanoparticle-based antituberculosis drugs over free drug. It also reduces the dosage frequency and resolves the difficulty of low poor compliance. This paper reviews various nanotechnology-based therapies which can be used for the treatment of TB.

  16. New drugs and perspectives for new anti-tuberculosis regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tiberi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is the ninth cause of global death, more than any other infectious disease. With growing drug resistance the epidemic remains and will require significant attention and investment for the elimination of this disease to occur. With susceptible TB treatment not changing over the last four decades and the advent of drug resistance, new drugs and regimens are required.Recently, through greater collaboration and research networks some progress with significant advances has taken place, not withstanding the comparatively low amount of resources invested. Of late the availability of the new drugs bedaquiline, delamanid and repurposed drugs linezolid, clofazimine and carbapenems are being used more frequently in drug-resistant TB regimens.The WHO shorter multidrug-resistant tuberculosis regimen promises to reach more patients and treat them more quickly and more cheaply.With this new enthusiasm and hope we this review gives an update on the new drugs and perspectives for the treatment of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. Keywords: Bedaquiline, Delamanid, Linezolid, MDR, XDR-TB, TB

  17. Reactivation of tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment in a patient with a positive QuantiFERON-RD1 test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2004-01-01

    A patient with polymyositis developed tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment. Tuberculin Skin Test and chest X-ray failed to demonstrate latent tuberculosis, whereas a blood sample that was tested with a modified QuantiFERON-TB-assay, using the recombinant ESAT-6 and CFP-10, was positive...... indicating that this patient was latently infected before immunosuppressive therapy. This case indicates the risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis given that the subject is RD1 responsive, and we believe that preventive anti-tuberculous treatment could have prevented this case...... of tuberculosis. We suggest that RD1 based tests are evaluated further in immunocompromised patients....

  18. Anti-tuberculosis treatment defaulting: an analysis of perceptions and interactions in Chiapas, Mexico Abandono del tratamiento antituberculosis: un análisis de percepciones e interacciones en Chiapas, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivett Reyes-Guillén

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the perceptions and interactions of the actors involved in anti-tuberculosis treatment, and to explore their influence in treatment defaulting in Los Altos region of Chiapas, Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From November 2002 to August 2003, in-depth interviews were administered to patients with PTB, patients' family members, institutional physicians, community health coordinators, and traditional medicine practitioners. RESULTS: We found different perceptions about PTB between patients and their families and among health personnel, as well as communication barriers between actors. Defaulting is considered to be mainly due to the treatment's adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS: It is necessary to conduct research and interventions in the studied area with the aim of changing perceptions, improving sensitization, quality and suitability of management of patients with PTB in a multicultural context, and promoting collaboration between institutional and traditional medicine.OBJETIVO: Analizar percepciones e interacciones entre actores involucrados en el tratamiento antituberculosis y su influencia en el abandono del tratamiento en los Altos de Chiapas, México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: De noviembre 2002 a agosto 2003, se realizaron entrevistas a profundidad a pacientes con TBP, familiares, médicos institucionales, coordinadores comunitarios de salud y médicos tradicionales. RESULTADOS: Se encontraron diferentes percepciones entre los pacientes y sus familiares, respecto a las del personal de salud, así como barreras de comunicación entre los distintos actores. Los efectos adversos del tratamiento antituberculosis, son consideradas como una de las principales causas de su abandono. CONCLUSIONES: Es necesario que en la región estudiada se realicen investigaciones e intervenciones encaminadas a: cambiar percepciones y mejorar la sensibilidad, calidad y adecuación del manejo de pacientes con TBP en contextos multiculturales, así como

  19. Gynaecomastia in two men on stable antiretroviral therapy who commenced treatment for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jeremy D; El-Shazly, Ahmad Y; Mambuque, Santos G; Demetria, Elpidio; Veldkamp, Peter; Anderson, Timothy S

    2016-12-01

    Gynaecomastia is a common clinical presentation that varies from benign presentations in stages of human development to hormonal pathology, mainly due to hepatic dysfunction, malignancy, and adverse pharmacologic effects. We describe the development of significant bilateral gynaecomastia after starting treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in two males with WHO stage III Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection on stable antiretroviral regimens. Emerging reports suggest that distinct hepatic impairment in efavirenz metabolism modulates oestrogenic activity, which may be potentiated by anti-tuberculosis therapy. Clinical application includes early recognition of efavirenz-induced gynaecomastia, especially after commencing tuberculosis treatment. To avoid decreased adherence resulting from the distressing side effect of gynecomastia, transition to an alternative ART regimen over the course of tuberculosis treatment should be considered.

  20. Classifying new anti-tuberculosis drugs: rationale and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Tiberi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The classification of anti-tuberculosis (TB drugs is important as it helps the clinician to build an appropriate anti-TB regimen for multidrug-resistant (MDR and extensively drug-resistant (XDR TB cases that do not fulfil the criteria for the shorter MDR-TB regimen. The World Health Organization (WHO has recently approved a revision of the classification of new anti-TB drugs based on current evidence on each drug. In the previous WHO guidelines, the choice of drugs was based on efficacy and toxicity in a step-down manner, from group 1 first-line drugs and groups 2–5 second-line drugs, to group 5 drugs with potentially limited efficacy or limited clinical evidence. In the revised WHO classification, exclusively aimed at managing drug-resistant cases, medicines are again listed in hierarchical order from group A to group D. In parallel, a possible future classification is independently proposed. The aim of this viewpoint article is to describe the evolution in WHO TB classification (taking into account an independently proposed new classification and recent changes in WHO guidance, while commenting on the differences between them. The latest evidence on the ex-group 5 drugs is also discussed.

  1. Ocular Tuberculosis II: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumru Önal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the clinical importance of tuberculin skin tests (TST, interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs, chest computed tomography (CT and polymerase chain reaction have provided a new approach to diagnosing ocular tuberculosis (TBC. However, both TST and IGRAs cannot distinguish between latent TBC infection and active disease. Another corroborative test in the diagnosis of intraocular TBC is the evaluation of the lungs by either chest radiography or CT. Direct evidence for the diagnosis can be obtained by examination of smears and staining for acid-fast organisms, cultures of intraocular tissue/fluid for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and nucleic acid amplification analysis. In recent years, guidelines have been suggested for the diagnosis of intraocular TBC. The current treatment of intraocular TBC consists of use of four drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide taken for a long period of time (total 9-15 months. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2011; 41: 182-90

  2. Anti-tubercular therapy for intraocular tuberculosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Ae Ra; Gonzalez-Lopez, Julio J; Al-Hity, Aws; Gupta, Bhaskar; Lee, Cecilia S; Gunasekeran, Dinesh Visva; Jayabalan, Nirmal; Grant, Robert; Kon, Onn Min; Gupta, Vishali; Westcott, Mark; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh

    2016-01-01

    Intraocular tuberculosis remains a diagnostic and management conundrum for both ophthalmologists and pulmonologists. We analyze the efficacy and safety of anti-tubercular therapy (ATT) in patients with intraocular tuberculosis and factors associated with favorable outcome. Twenty-eight studies are included in this review, with a total of 1,917 patients. Nonrecurrence of inflammation was observed in pooled estimate of 84% of ATT-treated patients (95% CI 79-89). There was minimal difference in the outcome between patients treated with ATT alone (85% successful outcome; 95% CI 25-100) and those with concomitant systemic corticosteroid (82%; 95% CI 73-90). The use of ATT may be of benefit to patients with suspected intraocular tuberculosis; however, this conclusion is limited by the lack of control group analysis and standardized recruitment and treatment protocols. We propose further prospective studies to better establish the efficacy of ATT and ascertain the factors associated with favorable treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an update on the manifestations and management of ocular tuberculosis. Tuberculosis affects one-third of the world's population. The incidence of tuberculosis has increased with the increase in the HIV infected population. Following a resurgence of the disease in the US, the incidence has recently declined. Patients may develop scleritis that can be focal, nodular or diffuse with or without keratitis. Anterior granulomatous uveitis may occur. The posterior segment reveals vitritis, choroiditis, and can mimic serpiginous choroiditis and other entities. Patients who are immunosuppressed or HIV infected may develop active mycobacterial disease in the eye leading to rapid destruction of the ocular structures. The diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis is made by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwestein-Jensen medium or by PCR. The diagnosis is supported by the clinical findings, imaging techniques including optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green and ultrasonography. Tuberculin skin test helps to confirm the diagnosis. Ocular tuberculosis may occur in the absence of pulmonary disease. Patients present with a spectrum of clinical signs. The disease may mimic several clinical entities. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of ocular tuberculosis may prevent ocular morbidity and blindness.

  4. Evaluation of disease patterns, treatment and prognosis of tuberculosis in AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atomiya Angela Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of disease, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of tuberculosis in 100 patients co-infected with AIDS at Casa da AIDS clinic was studied. Demographic characteristics were as follows: 76 male patients, 24 female patients, 67 caucasian, average 35.8 years-old (SD ± 8.5. Sexual transmission of HIV was reported in 68 patients. Pulmonary tuberculosis was seen in 40 patients, extrapulmonary in 11, and combined in 49 patients. In 63 patients, TCD4+ counts were below 200/mm³ when tuberculosis was diagnosed. Fifty-five patients had their diagnoses confirmed by bacteriological identification of Mycobacterium; either through direct observation and/or culture. Tuberculosis was treated with rifampin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide in 60 patients, reinforced treatment in 14 and alternative treatment in the other 13 patients. Tuberculosis therapy lasted up to 9 months in 66% of the patients. Fifty-four patients were treated with a two-drug antiretroviral regimen and the remaining 46 patients received a triple regimen, which included a protease inhibitor. Among the latter, 35 patients were co-treated with rifampin. The occurrence of hepatic liver enzyme abnormalities was statistically related to alternative antiretroviral regimens (p = 0.01 and to the co-administration of rifampin and protease inhibitor (p = 0.019. Clinical resolution of tuberculosis was obtained in 74 patients. Twelve patients died during tuberculosis treatment. Resolution of tuberculosis was statistically significant related to antituberculosis treatment adherence (p = 0.001. The risk of no response to the treatment was 1.84 times more frequent among patients treated with alternative regimens regardless of the duration of the therapy. We conclude that the characteristics of tuberculosis in HIV infected patients requires that special attention be directed to the types and duration of both antiretroviral and anti-TB therapy in order to achieve the highest level of care.

  5. Treating tuberculosis with high doses of anti-TB drugs: mechanisms and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuhui; Wu, Jianan; Liao, Sha; Sun, Zhaogang

    2017-10-03

    Tuberculosis (TB) is considered as one of the most serious threats to public health in many parts of the world. The threat is even more severe in the developing countries where there is a lack of advanced medical amenities and contemporary anti-TB drugs. In such situations, dosage optimization of existing medication regimens seems to be the only viable option. Therapeutic drug monitoring study results suggest that high-dose treatment regimens can compensate the low serum concentration of anti-TB drugs and shorten the therapy duration. The article presents a critical review on the possible changes that occur in the host and the pathogen upon the administration of standard and high-dose regimens. Some of the most common factors that are responsible for low anti-TB drug concentrations in the serum are differences in hosts' body weight, metabolic processing of the drug, malabsorption and/or drug-drug interaction. Furthermore, failure to reach the cavitary pulmonary and extrapulmonary tissues also contributes to the therapeutic inefficiency of the drugs. In such conditions, administration of higher doses can help in compensating the pathogenic outcomes of enhancement of the pathogen's physical barriers, efflux pumps and genetic mutations. The present article also presents a summary of the recorded treatment outcomes of clinical trials that were conducted to test the efficacy of administration of high dose of anti-tuberculosis drugs. This review will help physicians across the globe to understand the underlying pathophysiological changes (including side effects) that dictate the clinical outcomes in patients administered with standard and/or high dose anti-TB drugs.

  6. Lived experience of patients on tuberculosis treatment in Tshwane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oluwafunmilayo Olabisi Akeju

    a Adelaide Tambo School of Nursing, Tshwane University of Technology, ... better understanding of being a patient taking tuberculosis treatment and to improve ... tuberculosis treatment, which has contributed to an increase ... own perspective, what has been your lived experience since ... Intention to complete treatment.

  7. Study of MRI features of intracranial tuberculosis and its dynamic evolution during antituberculous treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lifang; Lu Yan; Zhou Xinhua; He Wei; Xie Ruming; Xu Jinping; Ning Fenggang; Zhou Zhen; Zhao Zegang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore MRI features of intracranial tuberculosis, and the dynamic evolution of intracranial tuberculosis during antituberculous treatment. Methods: From September 2009 to February 2012, seventy-two patients with intracranial tuberculosis were reviewed retrospectively. Intracranial tuberculosis lesions were divided into 3 categories: pure parenchymal tuberculosis, tuberculous meningitis and hybrid type with both parenchymal tuberculosis and tuberculous meningitis. The MRI characteristics of these lesions were analysed. According to the lesion size, pure parenchymal tuberculosis was divided into 3 subtypes: 0.3 cm or less was defined as miliary, >0.3 cm and <1.0 cm as nodule, greater than or equal to 1.0 cm as tuberculoma. Serial follow-up scans were performed in 36 patients, and dynamic MRI changes in the process of anti-tuberculosis treatment during 3 to 6 months were observed. The disappearance rate of the lesions was calculated and statistically analysed by using Chi-square test. Results: There were 883 lesions in 38 cases with parenchymal tuberculosis. Multiple lesions distributed widely, 423 lesions (47.9%) ≤0.3 cm, 330 lesions (37.4%) between 0.3-1.0 cm, and 130 lesions (14.7%) ≥ 1.0 cm. Twenty-four cases with tuberculous meningitis showed meningeal enhancement at basilar cistern. Ten cases with hybrid type presented both parenchymal tuberculosis and meningitis. Among 36 patients with serial MRI follow-up scans, 22 cases were pure parenchymal tuberculosis. The disappearance rates of military, nodules and tuberculomas were 52.2% (59/113), 33.3% (33/99) and 0, respectively, after 3 months treatment. The disappearance rates were 87.6% (99/113), 50.5% (50/99) and 18.2% (2/11), respectively, after 6 months treatment. Disappearance rate of miliary lesions was obviously higher than that of nodules at both 3 and 6 months, and the difference was statistically significant,(χ 2 =7.657, 34.786, P<0.01). Nine lesions of parenchymal tuberculosis enlarged

  8. Interferon-gamma response to the treatment of active pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L; Shi, R; Liu, X; Yuan, X; Zheng, S; Zhang, G; Wang, W; Wang, J; England, K; Via, L E; Cai, Y; Goldfeder, L C; Dodd, L E; Barry, C E; Chen, R Y

    2017-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) but not to measure treatment response. To measure IFN-γ response to active anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients from the Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Henan, China, with TB symptoms and/or signs were enrolled into this prospective, observational cohort study and followed for 6 months of treatment, with blood and sputum samples collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. The QuantiFERON® TB-Gold assay was run on collected blood samples. Participants received a follow-up telephone call at 24 months to determine relapse status. Of the 152 TB patients enrolled, 135 were eligible for this analysis: 118 pulmonary (PTB) and 17 extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. IFN-γ levels declined significantly over time among all patients (P = 0.002), with this decline driven by PTB patients (P = 0.001), largely during the initial 8 weeks of treatment (P = 0.019). IFN-γ levels did not change among EPTB patients over time or against baseline culture or drug resistance status. After 6 months of effective anti-tuberculosis treatment, IFN-γ levels decreased significantly in PTB patients, largely over the initial 8 weeks of treatment. IFN-γ concentrations may offer some value for monitoring anti-tuberculosis treatment response among PTB patients.

  9. Clinico-pathological profile and treatment outcome in smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients at a teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabir, I.; Iqbal, R.; Khan, S.U.; Munir, K.; Nazir, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains the single highest contributor to the world's morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment is essential to prevent its transmission. To see the treatment response of anti tuberculosis drugs in smear negative patients and study the predictors of culture positive among smear negative tuberculosis patients. Ninety four sputum smear negative patients clinically and radiologically suggestive of tuberculosis were selected. These patients were put on anti tuberculosis drugs without waiting for their culture results. They were then followed for 8 months to see their treatment outcome. A total of 94 smear negative patients were selected and given anti tuberculosis treatment. Of these 37(39%) were culture positive and 57(61%) were culture negative. Of the 37 culture positive patients 36(97%) showed clinical or radiological improvement as compared to 46(81%) out of 57 in culture negative cases. Symptoms of cough with sputum production was significantly associated with culture positivity. On x-ray chest moderate lesion with diffuse infiltration was more common finding in 64% while extensive and cavitatory lesion was seen in 24% of all cases. Association of extensive and cavitatory lesion were seen in culture positive group. Response to anti tuberculosis drugs in sputum smear negative tubercolosis suspects was found to be effective in majority of the patients. Cough, sputum and extensive cavitatory lung lesion were the predictors of culture positive cases. There is need to train physicians on the use of anti tuberculosis therapy in smear negative suspected pulmonary tuberculosis cases, especially if they have productive cough and cavitatory lung lesions. (author)

  10. Hypothyroidism during second-line treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, R; Khalid, N; Daniel, H; Dittmann, H; Reimold, M; Gallwitz, B; Schmotzer, C

    2016-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is an adverse effect of certain anti-tuberculosis drugs. This is a prospective study of the frequency and possible pathomechanisms associated with hypothyroidism due to second-line treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Fifty human immunodeficiency virus negative patients and 20 controls were included. All participants underwent ultrasonography of the thyroid and measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH levels were checked every 3 months. If hypothyroidism was present, T3, T4 and thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies were measured, and imaging extended to scintigraphy and repeated ultrasonography. Before treatment, 7 patients (14%) and 1 control (5%) were hypothyreotic. During the first 6 months of treatment, TSH levels increased in 41 patients (82%), 39 (78%) had values above the normal range and 19 (38%) had overt hypothyroidism. As none of the patients had signs of autoimmune thyroiditis, interaction with anti-tuberculosis drugs was assumed to be the cause of hypothyroidism. Nine patients died during treatment, all of whom had developed hypothyroidism. In seven, the metabolic situation at their death was known, and they had become euthyreotic following levothyroxine substitution. TSH levels should be checked before initiating anti-tuberculosis treatment and after 3 and 6 months to start timely replacement of levothyroxine. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact pathomechanism involved in hypothyroidism and whether hypothyroidism can be used as predictor of treatment failure.

  11. Barriers to tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus treatment guidelines adherence among nurses initiating and managing anti-retroviral therapy in KwaZulu-Natal and North West provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufuno Makhado

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: This qualitative study identified that nurses have substantial concerns over guideline adherence. If NIMART trained nurses’ barriers inhibiting adherence to treatment guidelines cannot be remedied, patient outcomes may suffer and South Africa will struggle to meet the 90-90-90 targets.

  12. [Immigrants treated for tuberculosis in Mazovian Center for Treatment of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Otwock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagodziński, Jacek; Zielonka, Tadeusz M

    2010-01-01

    Migration of population contributes to the transmission of tuberculosis (TB), particularly multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. In the countries of Western Europe, the immigrants' inflow contributes to the deterioration of the epidemiological situation. Majority of newly detected TB cases in some countries were affirmed among immigrant and foreign born population. In Poland, this problem has not been investigated up to 2005. The aim of the study was the assessment of the occurrence of tuberculosis in foreigners treated in the Mazovian Centre for Treatment of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Otwock. This work had a retrospective character. The number of cases of tuberculosis in foreigners admitted between 2002 and 2007 was calculated from the data base of the Mazovian Centre for Treatment of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis; 125 patients, whose basic demographic data, bacteriological status and the radiological changes suggested TB, were included in the study. The foreigners made up to 0.5-1.7% all tuberculosis cases treated in Mazovian Centre for Treatment of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis. Among confirmed cases, twenty four nationalities were seen. Nationals of the Russian Federation (coming from the Republic of Chechnya) formed the biggest group (24%), followed by the Vietnamese (21%) and the Ukrainians (12%). Most of all cases were young men (77%; average age - 34 years). Children made up to 12% of all cases. Tuberculosis of lungs was predominating, and there were culture confirmed extrapulmonary locations in 13.6% of cases. Bacteriological confirmation was achieved in 53% of cases, but up to 22.7% cases were resistant to one of the antituberculosis medicines and 13.6% was multidrug-resistant. Despite the fact, that foreigners made up a small proportion among all the patient treated for tuberculosis in Mazovia, their number systematically increases. High proportion of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis reported in foreign-born cases is a concern.

  13. 78 FR 66744 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability...) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Pulmonary Tuberculosis... of antimycobacterial drugs for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. This guidance applies to the...

  14. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnabharath S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 23-year-old male patient with tuberculosis verrucous cutis on the foot for a duration of six months without responding to routine treatment. Tuberculosis is a common disease worldwide. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis contributes to 10% of cases. Cutaneous tuberculosis occupies a small spectrum of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis is an exogenous infection occurring in a previously sensitized patient by direct inoculation of the organism. It occurs in sensitized patients with a moderate to high immune response. The diagnosis in our patient was confirmed by history, clinical examination, histopathological examination and the patient’s response to anti-tuberculous therapy.

  15. Improved consistency in dosing anti-tuberculosis drugs in Taipei, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chen-Yuan; Yu, Ming-Chih; Shih, Hsiu-Chen; Yen, Muh-Yong; Hsu, Yu-Ling; Yang, Shiang-Lin; Lin, Tao-Ping; Bai, Kuan-Jen

    2012-01-01

    It was reported that 35.5% of tuberculosis (TB) cases reported in 2003 in Taipei City had no recorded pre-treatment body weight and that among those who had, inconsistent dosing of anti-TB drugs was frequent. Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have taken actions to strengthen dosing of anti-TB drugs among general practitioners. Prescribing practices of anti-TB drugs in Taipei City in 2007-2010 were investigated to assess whether interventions on dosing were effective. Lists of all notified culture positive TB cases in 2007-2010 were obtained from National TB Registry at Taiwan CDC. A medical audit of TB case management files was performed to collect pretreatment body weight and regimens prescribed at commencement of treatment. Dosages prescribed were compared with dosages recommended. The proportion of patients with recorded pre-treatment body weight was 64.5% in 2003, which increased to 96.5% in 2007-2010 (pTaipei City has remarkably improved after health authorities implemented a series of interventions.

  16. Diabetes is a strong predictor of mortality during tuberculosis treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George

    2013-01-01

    Strong evidence suggests diabetes may be associated with tuberculosis (TB) and could influence TB treatment outcomes. We assessed the role of diabetes on sputum culture conversion and mortality among patients undergoing TB treatment.......Strong evidence suggests diabetes may be associated with tuberculosis (TB) and could influence TB treatment outcomes. We assessed the role of diabetes on sputum culture conversion and mortality among patients undergoing TB treatment....

  17. Socio-economic status and adherence to tuberculosis treatment:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P, Mishra; Hansen, E. H.; Sabroe, Svend

    2005-01-01

    SETTING: A western hill district in Nepal, where tuberculosis (TB) treatment under DOTS was offered by the regional tuberculosis centre, two primary health centres, eight health posts, three sub-health posts and one ward of sub-metropolitan Pokhara. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the contribution...

  18. Reactivation of tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment in a patient with a positive QuantiFERON-RD1 test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2004-01-01

    A patient with polymyositis developed tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment. Tuberculin Skin Test and chest X-ray failed to demonstrate latent tuberculosis, whereas a blood sample that was tested with a modified QuantiFERON-TB-assay, using the recombinant ESAT-6 and CFP-10, was positive...... indicating that this patient was latently infected before immunosuppressive therapy. This case indicates the risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis given that the subject is RD1 responsive, and we believe that preventive anti-tuberculous treatment could have prevented this case...

  19. Childhood Tuberculosis: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Sheng Tsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the existence of a government-run tuberculosis (TB control program, the current nationwide burden of TB continues to be a public health problem in Taiwan. Intense current and previous efforts into diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive interventions have focused on TB in adults, but childhood TB has been relatively neglected. Children are particularly vulnerable to severe disease and death following infection, and children with latent infections become reservoirs for future transmission following disease reactivation in adulthood, thus fueling future epidemics. Additional research, understanding, and prevention of childhood TB are urgently needed. This review assesses the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and relevant principles of TB vaccine development and presents efficacy data for the currently licensed vaccines.

  20. ¿(Anti-TNF-¿ y tuberculosis pulmonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Vinicio Caballero Uribe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentación de una paciente con artritis reumatoide severa en tratamiento con inhibidores del Factor de Necrosis Tumoral (Anti-TNF, quien presenta además un cuadro de tuberculosis pulmonar. La artritis reumatoide es una enfermedad inflamatoria crónica de las articulaciones, que afecta en un inicio la membrana sinovial, pero que si no es tratada oportunamente lleva a daño estructural irreversible del sistema músculo-esquelético y eventualmente de otros sistemas orgánicos. Dentro de los criterios de la American College of Rheumatology se incluyen la Rigidez Matutina, Artritis de 3 o más articulaciones, Artritis simétrica, Nódulos reumáticos, Factor Reumatoideo y hallazgos radiográficos. Dentro de la patogenia de esta enfermedad, el Factor de Necrosis Tumoral es una citocina que juega un papel importante, una producción elevada de TNF-α se ha encontrado en la sinovial de estos pacientes, y por su capacidad de inducir la producción de otras citocinas, como IL-6, IL-17, GM-CSF, M-CSF, e incluso IL-1 y TNF-α (función autócrina, parecería que el TNF-α ejerce una acción “jerárquica” dentro de la llamada red de citocinas y una inhibición de su acción da como resultado un beneficio terapéutico en los pacientes con AR. Sin embargo, es conocido que la infección concurrente más frecuentemente informada con el uso de agentes biológicos (Anti-TNF es la TB, y la incidencia de ésta se ha incrementado desde el advenimiento de la terapia biológica. Por tanto, la descripción de este caso no corresponde a un hecho médico aislado, sino a una problemática actual y real. Este es el primer caso que se reporta en la Costa Caribe.

  1. Renal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džamić Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is still a significant health problem in the world, mostly in developing countries. The special significance lies in immunocompromised patients, particularly those suffering from the HIV. Urogenital tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, while the most commonly involved organ is the kidney. Renal tuberculosis occurs by hematogenous dissemination of mycobacterium tuberculosis from a primary tuberculosis foci in the body. Tuberculosis is characterized by the formation of pathognomonic lesions in the tissues - granulomata. These granulomata may heal spontaneously or remain stable for years. In certain circumstances in the body associated with immunosuppression, the disease may be activated. Central caseous necrosis occurs within tuberculoma, leading to formation of cavities that destroy renal parenchyma. The process may gain access to the collecting system, forming the caverns. In this way, infection can be spread distally to renal pelvis, ureter and bladder. Scaring of tissue by tuberculosis process may lead to development of strictures of the urinary tract. The clinical manifestations are presented by nonspecific symptoms and signs, so tuberculosis can often be overlooked. Sterile pyuria is characteristic for urinary tuberculosis. Dysuric complaints, flank pain or hematuria may be presented in patients. Constitutional symptoms of fever, weight loss and night sweats are presented in some severe cases. Diagnosis is made by isolation of mycobacterium tuberculosis in urine samples, by cultures carried out on standard solid media optimized for mycobacterial growth. Different imaging studies are used in diagnostics - IVU, CT and NMR are the most important. Medical therapy is the main modality of tuberculosis treatment. The first line anti-tuberculosis drugs include isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. Surgical treatment is required in some cases, to remove severely damaged kidney, if

  2. Non‑Adherence of New Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients to Anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South East Asia Region carries about 40% of the global TB burden. India is the ... DOTS strategy, India's revised national tuberculosis control program (RNTCP) ... such as socio‑cultural, economic background, perceived health benefits and ...

  3. Determinants of tuberculosis transmission and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harling, Guy; Lima Neto, Antonio S; Sousa, Geziel S; Machado, Marcia M T; Castro, Marcia C

    2017-05-25

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem, despite recent achievements in reducing incidence and mortality rates. In Brazil, these achievements were above the worldwide average, but marked by large regional heterogeneities. In Fortaleza (5th largest city in Brazil), the tuberculosis cure rate has been declining and treatment abandonment has been increasing in the past decade, despite a reduction in incidence and an increase in directly observed therapy (DOT). These trends put efforts to eliminate tuberculosis at risk. We therefore sought to determine social and programmatic determinants of tuberculosis incidence and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza. We analyzed sociodemographic and clinical data for all new tuberculosis cases notified in the Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN) from Fortaleza between 2007 and 2014. We calculated incidence rates for 117 neighborhoods in Fortaleza, assessed their spatial clustering, and used spatial regression models to quantify associations between neighborhood-level covariates and incidence rates. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to evaluate how individual- and neighborhood-level covariates predicted tuberculosis treatment abandonment. There were 12,338 new cases reported during the study period. Case rates across neighborhoods were significantly positively clustered in two low-income areas close to the city center. In an adjusted model, tuberculosis rates were significantly higher in neighborhoods with lower literacy, higher sewerage access and homicide rates, and a greater proportion of self-reported black residents. Treatment was abandoned in 1901 cases (15.4%), a rate that rose by 71% between 2007 and 2014. Abandonment was significantly associated with many individual sociodemographic and clinical factors. Notably, being recommended for DOT was protective for those who completed DOT, but associated with abandonment for those who did not. Low socioeconomic status areas have higher tuberculosis

  4. Targeted delivery of anti-tuberculosis drugs to macrophages: targeting mannose receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, L. Yu; Klyachko, N. L.; Kudryashova, E. V.

    2018-04-01

    The development of systems for targeted delivery of anti-tuberculosis drugs is a challenge of modern biotechnology. Currently, these drugs are encapsulated in a variety of carriers such as liposomes, polymers, emulsions and so on. Despite successful in vitro testing of these systems, virtually no success was achieved in vivo, because of low accessibility of the foci of infection located in alveolar macrophage cells. A promising strategy for increasing the efficiency of therapeutic action of anti-tuberculosis drugs is to encapsulate the agents into mannosylated carriers targeting the mannose receptors of alveolar macrophages. The review addresses the methods for modification of drug substance carriers, such as liposomes and biodegradable polymers, with mannose residues. The use of mannosylated carriers to deliver anti-tuberculosis agents increases the drug circulation time in the blood stream and increases the drug concentration in alveolar macrophage cells. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  5. Successful drug desensitization in patients with delayed-type allergic reactions to anti-tuberculosis drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krittaecho Siripassorn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the outcomes of anti-tuberculosis drug desensitization. Methods: This was a retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were as follows: age >18 years, documented tuberculosis infection, a previous cutaneous allergic reaction to anti-tuberculosis drugs, and having undergone drug desensitization between January 2003 and March 2014. The definition of allergic reaction to anti-tuberculosis drugs included (1 a temporal relationship between drug use and the allergic reaction; (2 improvement in the allergic reaction after drug withdrawal; (3 recurrence of the allergic reaction after reintroduction of only the offending drug; and (4 absence of other causes. Results: A total of 19 desensitization procedures were performed. The drugs used for these procedures were isoniazid (n = 7, rifampicin (n = 6, or ethambutol (n = 6. Of note, severe allergic reactions (Stevens–Johnson syndrome (n = 4, erythema multiforme (n = 3, and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic syndrome (n = 1 were included. All patients underwent resolution of the previous allergic reactions before desensitization. The median duration of desensitization was 18 days. The success rate was 78.9%. The allergic reactions following failed desensitization were not severe; most were maculopapular rashes. Conclusions: The desensitization protocol for anti-tuberculosis drugs was associated with a high success rate, and the individuals who failed desensitization experienced mild allergic reactions. Keywords: Desensitization, Antituberculosis, Steven-Johnson syndrome, Allergic drug reaction, Tolerance induction, Drug allergy

  6. Tuberculosis: current trends in diagnosis and treatment | Njoku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among communicable diseases, tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading ... There may be need to modify the treatment modalities especially with the ... liver disease, renal failure or even in coexistence with HIV/AIDS or the drug resistant state.

  7. Supplementary Material for: Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure and interaction modelling are used to understand the functional effects of putative mutations and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to resistance. Methods To investigate the potential utility of these approaches, we analysed the genomes of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify polymorphisms associated with minimum inhibitory concentrations for first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. In addition, the effect of identified candidate mutations on protein stability and interactions was assessed quantitatively with well-established computational methods. Results The analysis revealed that mutations in the genes rpoB (rifampicin), katG (isoniazid), inhA-promoter (isoniazid), rpsL (streptomycin) and embB (ethambutol) were responsible for the majority of resistance observed. A subset of the mutations identified in rpoB and katG were predicted to affect protein stability. Further, a strong direct correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration values and the distance of the mutated residues in the three-dimensional structures of rpoB and katG to their respective drugs binding sites. Conclusions Using the TDR resource, we demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome association and convergent evolution approaches to detect known and potentially novel mutations associated with drug resistance. Further, protein structural modelling could provide a means of predicting the impact of polymorphisms on drug efficacy in the absence of phenotypic data. These approaches could ultimately lead to novel

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-03-23

    Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure and interaction modelling are used to understand the functional effects of putative mutations and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to resistance. Methods To investigate the potential utility of these approaches, we analysed the genomes of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify polymorphisms associated with minimum inhibitory concentrations for first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. In addition, the effect of identified candidate mutations on protein stability and interactions was assessed quantitatively with well-established computational methods. Results The analysis revealed that mutations in the genes rpoB (rifampicin), katG (isoniazid), inhA-promoter (isoniazid), rpsL (streptomycin) and embB (ethambutol) were responsible for the majority of resistance observed. A subset of the mutations identified in rpoB and katG were predicted to affect protein stability. Further, a strong direct correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration values and the distance of the mutated residues in the three-dimensional structures of rpoB and katG to their respective drugs binding sites. Conclusions Using the TDR resource, we demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome association and convergent evolution approaches to detect known and potentially novel mutations associated with drug resistance. Further, protein structural modelling could provide a means of predicting the impact of polymorphisms on drug efficacy in the absence of phenotypic data. These approaches could ultimately lead to novel resistance

  9. Plasma vitamins and essential trace elements in newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients and at different durations of anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.F. Edem

    2015-07-01

    This study concluded that there is micronutrient (Fe, Zn, Cu, Vit A, C, D and E malnutrition in tuberculosis patients at diagnosis and throughout the duration (6 months of chemotherapy. Supplementation with vitamins and zinc is advised within the first 4 months of commencing anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy.

  10. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    Classification of clinical forms of tuberculosis of respiratory organs is m ade. It is shown, that diagnosis, determination of the clinical form of pulmona ry tuberculosis, extent and phase of the process are mainly based on the data of roentgenologic studies and in certain cases tomography is preferable. Roentgenologic picture of primary tuberculosis, tuberculosis of intrathoracis l ymp nodes, dissemenated tuberculosis, focal and infiltrative tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculomas of lungs, cavernous and fibrocavernous form of pulmonary tub erculosis, cirrhotic tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculosis of upper respiratory tracks, tuberculous pleurite and tuberculosis of respiratory organs, combined wi th dust occupational diseases, has been described

  11. PHARMACEUTICAL AEROSOLS FOR THE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumaila N Muhammad Hanif

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Historically, pharmaceutical aerosols have been employed for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but in the past decades their use has been expanded to treat lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory diseases. Tuberculosis (TB is acquired after inhalation of aerosol droplets containing the bacilli from the cough of infected individuals. Even though TB affects other organs, the lungs are the primary site of infection, which makes the pulmonary route an ideal alternative route to administer vaccines or drug treatments. Optimization of formulations and delivery systems for anti-TB vaccines and drugs, as well as the proper selection of the animal model to evaluate those is of paramount importance if novel vaccines or drug treatments are to be successful. Pharmaceutical aerosols for patient use are generated from metered dose inhalers, nebulizers and dry powder inhalers. In addition to the advantages of providing more efficient delivery of the drug, low cost and portability, pharmaceutical dry powder aerosols are more stable than inhalable liquid dosage forms and do not require refrigeration. Methods to manufacture dry powders in respirable sizes include micronization, spray drying and other proprietary technologies. Inhalable dry powders are characterized in terms of their drug content, particle size and dispersibility to ensure deposition in the appropriate lung region and effective aerosolization from the device. These methods will be illustrated as they were applied for the manufacture and characterization of powders containing anti-tubercular agents and vaccines for pulmonary administration. The influence of formulation, selection of animal model, method of aerosol generation and administration on the efficacy demonstrated in a given study will be illustrated by the evaluation of pharmaceutical aerosols of anti-TB drugs and vaccines in guinea pigs by

  12. Anti-tuberculosis therapy-induced hepatotoxicity among Ethiopian HIV-positive and negative patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Yimer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess and compare the prevalence, severity and prognosis of anti-TB drug induced hepatotoxicity (DIH in HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis (TB patients in Ethiopia.In this study, 103 HIV positive and 94 HIV negative TB patients were enrolled. All patients were evaluated for different risk factors and monitored biochemically and clinically for development of DIH. Sub-clinical hepatotoxicity was observed in 17.3% of the patients and 8 out of the 197 (4.1% developed clinical hepatotoxicity. Seven of the 8 were HIV positive and 2 were positive for HBsAg.Sub-clinical hepatotoxicity was significantly associated with HIV co-infection (p = 0.002, concomitant drug intake (p = 0.008, and decrease in CD4 count (p = 0.001. Stepwise restarting of anti TB treatment was also successful in almost all the patients who developed clinical DIH. We therefore conclude that anti-TB DIH is a major problem in HIV-associated TB with a decline in immune status and that there is a need for a regular biochemical and clinical follow up for those patients who are at risk.

  13. Reciprocity and Ethical Tuberculosis Treatment and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diego S; Dawson, Angus; Upshur, Ross E G

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the notion of reciprocity in the context of active pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis (TB) treatment and related control policies and practices. We seek to do three things: First, we sketch the background to contemporary global TB care and suggest that poverty is a key feature when considering the treatment of TB patients. We use two examples from TB care to explore the role of reciprocity: isolation and the use of novel TB drugs. Second, we explore alternative means of justifying the use of reciprocity through appeal to different moral and political theoretical traditions (i.e., virtue ethics, deontology, and consequentialism). We suggest that each theory can be used to provide reasons to take reciprocity seriously as an independent moral concept, despite any other differences. Third, we explore general meanings and uses of the concept of reciprocity, with the primary intention of demonstrating that it cannot be simply reduced to other more frequently invoked moral concepts such as beneficence or justice. We argue that reciprocity can function as a mid-level principle in public health, and generally, captures a core social obligation arising once an individual or group is burdened as a result of acting for the benefit of others (even if they derive a benefit themselves). We conclude that while more needs to be explored in relation to the theoretical justification and application of reciprocity, sufficient arguments can be made for it to be taken more seriously as a key principle within public health ethics and bioethics more generally.

  14. The production and sales of anti-tuberculosis drugs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang-Mu; Zhao, Qi-Peng; Ren, Qiao-Meng; Peng, Dan-Lu; Guo, Yan

    2016-10-04

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major infectious disease globally. Adequate and proper use of anti-TB drugs is essential for TB control. This study aims to study China's production capacity and sales situation of anti-TB drugs, and to further discuss the potential for China to contribute to global TB control. The production data of anti-TB drugs in China from 2011 to 2013 and the sales data from 2010 to 2014 were extracted from Ministry of Industry and Information Technology database of China and IMS Health database, respectively. The number of drugs was standardized to the molecular level of the key components before calculating. All data were described and analyzed by Microsoft Excel. First-line drugs were the majority in both sales (89.5 %) and production (92.3 %) of anti-TB drugs in China. The production of rifampicin held the majority share in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and finished products, whilst ethambutol and pyrazinamide were the top two sales in finished products. Fixed-dose combinations only held small percentages in total production and sales weight, though a slight increase was observed. The production and sales of streptomycin showed a tendency of decrease after 2012. The trends and proportion of different anti-TB drugs were similar in production and sales, however, the production weight was much larger than that of sales, especially for rifampicin and isoniazid. First-line drugs were the predominant medicine produced and used in China. While the low production and sales of the second-line TB drugs and FDCs rose concerns for the treatment of multiple drug resistant TB. The redundant production amount, as well as the prompt influence of national policy on drug production and sales, indicated the potential for China to better contribute to global TB control.

  15. Prescription practice of anti-tuberculosis drugs in Yunnan, China: A clinical audit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Xu

    Full Text Available China has a high burden of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB. As irrational use and inadequate dosing of anti-TB drugs may contribute to the epidemic of drug-resistant TB, we assessed the drug types and dosages prescribed in the treatment of TB cases in a representative sample of health care facilities in Yunnan.We applied multistage cluster sampling using probability proportion to size to select 28 counties in Yunnan. Consecutive pulmonary TB patients were enrolled from either the TB centers of Yunnan Center of Disease Control or designated TB hospitals. Outcomes of interest included the regimen used in the treatment of new and retreatment TB patients; and the proportion of patients treated with adequate dosing of anti-TB drugs. Furthermore, we assess whether there has been reduction in the use of fluoroquinolone and second line injectables in Tuberculosis Clinical Centre (TCC after the training activity in late 2012.Of 2390 TB patients enrolled, 582 (24.4% were prescribed second line anti-TB drugs (18.0% in new cases and 60.9% in retreatment cases; 363(15.2% prescribed a fluoroquinolone. General hospitals (adjusted odds ratio (adjOR 1.97, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.47-2.66, retreatment TB cases (adjOR 4.75, 95% CI 3.59-6.27, smear positive cases (adjOR 1.69, 95% CI 1.22-2.33, and extrapulmonary TB (adjOR 2.59, 95% CI 1.66-4.03 were significantly associated with the use of fluoroquinolones. The proportion of patients treated with fluoroquinolones decreased from 41.4% before 2013 to 13.5% after 2013 (adjOR 0.19, 95% CI 0.12-0.28 in TCC. The proportion of patients with correct, under and over dosages of isoniazid was 88.2%, 1.5%, and 10.4%, respectively; of rifampicin was 50.2%, 46.8%, and 2.9%; of pyrazinamide was 67.6%, 31.7% and 0.7%; and of ethambutol was 41.4%, 57.5%, and 1.0%.The prescribing practice of anti-TB drugs was not standardized, findings with significant programmatic implication.

  16. Global stability of two models with incomplete treatment for tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yali; Li Jianquan; Ma Zhien; Liu Luju

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Two tuberculosis models with incomplete treatment. → Intuitive epidemiological interpretations for the basic reproduction numbers. → Global dynamics of the two models. → Strategies to control the spread of tuberculosis. - Abstract: Two tuberculosis (TB) models with incomplete treatment are investigated. It is assumed that the treated individuals may enter either the latent compartment due to the remainder of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or the infectious compartment due to the treatment failure. The first model is a simple one with treatment failure reflecting the current TB treatment fact in most countries with high tuberculosis incidence. The second model refines the simple one by dividing the latent compartment into slow and fast two kinds of progresses. This improvement can be used to describe the case that the latent TB individuals have been infected with some other chronic diseases (such as HIV and diabetes) which may weaken the immunity of infected individuals and shorten the latent period of TB. Both of the two models assume mass action incidence and exponential distributions of transfers between different compartments. The basic reproduction numbers of the two models are derived and their intuitive epidemiological interpretations are given. The global dynamics of two models are all proved by using Liapunov functions. At last, some strategies to control the spread of tuberculosis are discussed.

  17. Anti-tuberculosis activities of the crude methanolic extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: Tuberculosis (TB) is of great public health burden globally especially in developing countries of Africa and Asia . Current TB regimen involves multiple therapies and of long duration leading to poor patient adherence. There is also the challenge of multidrug resistant TB. Hence, there is a need for discovery of new ...

  18. Anti-tuberculosis activities of the crude methanolic extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    standard drugs. The petri dishes were sealed with a carbon-dioxide permeable tape, left overnight in biosafety hood to allow diffusion of the extract, fractions. It was then incubated at 370C in a carbon- dioxide incubator for 4 weeks. The susceptibility of. M. tuberculosis isolates to the extract and the drugs was determined by ...

  19. [Factors associated with treatment adherence for tuberculosis infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Gea Velázquez de Castro, María Teresa; Requena Puche, Juana; Miralles Bueno, Juan José; Rigo Medrano, María Vicenta; Aranaz Andrés, Jesús M

    2014-01-01

    To analyze adherence to treatment of tuberculosis infection and to identify risk factors for its compliance. An observational historical cohort study. Hospital Universitari Sant Joan d'Alacant (Alicante). All patients with a tuberculin skin test (TST) done during tuberculosis contact tracing during 6 years. We included 764 tuberculosis contacts in the analysis. 59.7% of the 566 patients who completed the contact tracing, had tuberculosis infection (TI). Of the patients with TI, 45.6% had not started treatment for tuberculosis infection (TTBI). Factors associated with not starting TTBI were: age (36-65 years, RR: 5.8; 95% CI: 1.2-27.5, and > 65 years, RR: 11.3; 95% CI: 2.0-64.0), the social relationship with TB case (RR: 2.2; 95% CI 1.2-3.8), and the TST reaction (≥ 15mm; RR: 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9). The completion rate for TTBI was 80.4% among people who started therapy. The treatment regimen was associated with greater compliance to TTBT (7-9H, RR: 12.7; 95% CI: 1.5-107.3). The treatment compliance rate of Tuberculosis infection was high among people who started therapy. Almost a half of the contacts with TI did not start treatment, and associated factors were: age, social relationship, and the TST reaction. The treatment regimen was associated with greater compliance. It is important to know the factors associated with adherence to treatment of TI in each health area, and focus efforts on risk groups; thereby approaching the global control of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrating tuberculosis/HIV treatment: an evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Seventy-four per cent of patients completed their treatment and 26% were cured, with no defaults or deaths, in the tubercuolosis/HIV integrated cohort. Thirty-eight per cent completed their treatment, 45% were cured, 9% died and another 9% defaulted in the cohort receiving their tuberculosis treatment at a local ...

  1. Integrating tuberculosis/HIV treatment: an evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-25

    Jan 25, 2013 ... Scientific Letter: Integrating tuberculosis/HIV treatment: 479. Vol 55 No 5. SA Fam Pract 2013 treatment outcomes were applied where “cured” refers to patients with sputum conversion and “completed” to patients who completed treatment but did not meet the criteria for cure or failure – this includes patient ...

  2. First and second line drug resistance among treatment naïve pulmonary tuberculosis patients in a district under Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP in New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vithal Prasad Myneedu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information of level of drug resistance to first-line and second line anti-tuberculosis agents in treatment naïve pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB patients from the Indian region. Therefore, the present prospective study was conducted to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility to first-line and second line anti-TB drug resistance in such patients. Sputum samples from consecutive treatment naïve PTB cases registered in Lala Ram Sarup (LRS district, under RNTCP containing 12 Directly Observed Treatment Centre’s (DOTS, were enrolled using cluster sampling technology. A total of 453 samples were received from July 2011 to June 2012. All samples were cultured on solid medium followed by drug susceptibility to first and second line anti-tubercular drugs as per RNTCP guidelines. Primary multi-drug resistance (MDR was found to be 18/453; (4.0%. Extensively drug resistance (XDR was found in one strain (0.2%, which was found to be resistant to other antibiotics. Data of drug resistant tuberculosis among treatment naïve TB patients are lacking in India. The presence of XDR-TB and high MDR-TB in small population studied, calls for conducting systematic multi-centric surveillance across the country.

  3. The Effects of First-Line Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs on the Actions of Vitamin D in Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesdachai, Supavit; Zughaier, Susu M; Hao, Li; Kempker, Russell R; Blumberg, Henry M; Ziegler, Thomas R; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem. Patients with TB have a high rate of vitamin D deficiency, both at diagnosis and during the course of treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs. Although data on the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) clearance is uncertain from randomized controlled trials (RCTs), vitamin D enhances the expression of the anti-microbial peptide human cathelicidin (hCAP18) in cultured macrophages in vitro. One possible explanation for the mixed (primarily negative) results of RCTs examining vitamin D treatment in TB infection is that anti-TB drugs given to enrolled subjects may impact actions of vitamin D to enhance cathelicidin in macrophages. To address this hypothesis, human macrophage-like monocytic (THP-1) cells were treated with varying doses of first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs in the presence of the active form of vitamin D, 1N1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ). The expression of hCAP18 was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 strongly induced expression of hCAP18 mRNA in THP-1 cells (fold-change from control). The combination of the standard 4-drug TB therapy (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol) in the cultured THP-1 cells demonstrated a significant decrease of hCAP18 mRNA at the dosage of 10 ug/mL. In 31 subjects with newly diagnosed drug-sensitive TB randomized to either high-dose vitamin D 3 (1.2 million IU over 8 weeks, n=13) versus placebo (n=18), there was no change from baseline to week 8 in hCAP18 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells or in plasma concentrations of LL-37, the protein product of hCAP18.These data suggest that first-line anti-TB drugs may alter the vitamin D-dependent increase in hCAP18 and LL-37 human macrophages.

  4. MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO SUPPORTING TREATMENT COMPLIANCE IN TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Sherstneva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the algorithm for working with tuberculosis patients in TB hospital, providing implementation of multidisciplinary patient-centered activities for early diagnostics of psychiatric and social disorders, therapy and rehabilitation of concurrent psychiatric disorders and addictions. Multidisciplinary approach to activities within TB unit is aimed at improvement of treatment compliance of tuberculosis patients. The training programme has been developed in order to improve competency of medical personnel on the issue of treatment interruption prevention and motivating patients to undergo the continuous treatment.

  5. Sensitivity Pattern of Second Line Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs against Clinical Isolates of Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, T.; Ikram, A.; Abbasi, S. A.; Zaman, G.; Ayyub, M.; Palomino, J. C.; Vandamme, P.; Martin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine the current sensitivity pattern of second line anti-tuberculosis drugs against clinical isolates of Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Study Design: A cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from November 2011 to April 2013. Methodology: Samples received during the study period were processed on BACTEC MGIT 960 system for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) culture followed by first line drugs susceptibility testing of culture proven MTB isolates. On the basis of resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid, 100 clinical isolates of MDR-TB were further subjected to susceptibility testing against amikacin (AMK), capreomycin (CAP), ofloxacin (OFL) and ethionamide (ETH) as per standard BACTEC MGIT 960 instructions. Results: Out of 100 MDR-TB isolates, 62% were from male patients and 38% from female patients. 97% were sensitive to AMK, 53% to OFL, 87% to CAP; and 87% were sensitive to ETH. Conclusion: The majority of the MDR-TB isolates showed excellent sensitivity against AMK, CAP and ETH. However, sensitivity of MDR-TB isolates against fluoroquinolones like OFL was not encouraging. (author)

  6. Prevalence and factors associated with tuberculosis treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... health care, HIV co-infection and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) are ... and default, are a public health concern as they are at risk for clinical ..... national recording systems in Brazil, 2003-2008. PLoS. One 2012 ...

  7. Pleural Tuberculosis and its Treatment Outcomes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang, Malaysia, 4Discipline of ... 37.7 %) of cases among tuberculosis pleuritis patients were Chinese, followed by Malay (31.2 %). Out ... combined with culture, diagnosis can be made in ... Chinese (46.5 %), Indian (10.6 %) and ... left pleural effusion (48.6 % compared to 27.5.

  8. IMPACT OF THE FORM OF MEDICATION ON TREATMENT ADHERENCE IN RESPIRATORY TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Tyulkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study: to investigate treatment adherence in respiratory tuberculosis patients depending on the choice of therapy.Subjects and methods: retrospective full-design study. The case histories of adult new tuberculosis cases who were treated in TB Dispensary in 2015 were analyzed. The groups were formed based on the intake of combined drugs with fixed doses (1 tablet contained 60 mg of isoniazid, 120 mg of rifampicin, 300 mg of pyrazinamide, 225 mg of ethambutol, and 20 mg of pyridoxine – Group 1 (n = 38; or separate tablets in the doses as per drug use instructions (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol – Group 2 (n = 78. The groups were compatible as per sex, age, and clinical manifestations of tuberculosis. Patients from Group 1 with the weight of 60 kg received 5 tablets and patients from Group 2 received more than 12 tablets. Patients' adherence to treatment was assessed as per regularity of intake and number of doses during the intensive phase of treatment.Results. Patients from Group 1 were regularly taking anti-tuberculosis drugs, while in Group 2 there were interruptions of treatment (7-21 days in 12 (15.4% patients. In Group, the intensive phase increased up to 90.2 ± 30.6 doses and in Group 2 this increase made 131.6 ± 65.4 doses due to late sputum conversion. In Group 1, sputum conversion was achieved during the first month of treatment in 60% of patients; and in Group 2 – in 10% of cases (p = 0.044. The frequency of transaminase elevation as a side effect was higher in Group 1, but it did not result in discontinuation of drugs. Thus, the intake of combined medication with fixed doses improved tuberculosis patients' adherence to treatment.

  9. Time of default in tuberculosis patients on directly observed treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeshi, Geeta S

    2010-09-01

    Default remains an important challenge for the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme, which has achieved improved cure rates. This study describes the pattern of time of default in patients on DOTS. Tuberculosis Unit in District Tuberculosis Centre, Yavatmal, India; Retrospective cohort study. This analysis was done among the cohort of patients of registered at the Tuberculosis Unit during the year 2004. The time of default was assessed from the tuberculosis register. The sputum smear conversion and treatment outcome were also assessed. Kaplan-Meier plots and log rank tests. Overall, the default rate amongst the 716 patients registered at the Tuberculosis Unit was 10.33%. There was a significant difference in the default rate over time between the three DOTS categories (log rank statistic= 15.49, P=0.0004). Amongst the 331 smear-positive patients, the cumulative default rates at the end of intensive phase were 4% and 16%; while by end of treatment period, the default rates were 6% and 31% in category I and category II, respectively. A majority of the smear-positive patients in category II belonged to the group 'treatment after default' (56/95), and 30% of them defaulted during re-treatment. The sputum smear conversion rate at the end of intensive phase was 84%. Amongst 36 patients without smear conversion at the end of intensive phase, 55% had treatment failure. Patients defaulting in intensive phase of treatment and without smear conversion at the end of intensive phase should be retrieved on a priority basis. Default constitutes not only a major reason for patients needing re-treatment but also a risk for repeated default.

  10. Determinants of tuberculosis transmission and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Harling

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB remains a public health problem, despite recent achievements in reducing incidence and mortality rates. In Brazil, these achievements were above the worldwide average, but marked by large regional heterogeneities. In Fortaleza (5th largest city in Brazil, the tuberculosis cure rate has been declining and treatment abandonment has been increasing in the past decade, despite a reduction in incidence and an increase in directly observed therapy (DOT. These trends put efforts to eliminate tuberculosis at risk. We therefore sought to determine social and programmatic determinants of tuberculosis incidence and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza. Methods We analyzed sociodemographic and clinical data for all new tuberculosis cases notified in the Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN from Fortaleza between 2007 and 2014. We calculated incidence rates for 117 neighborhoods in Fortaleza, assessed their spatial clustering, and used spatial regression models to quantify associations between neighborhood-level covariates and incidence rates. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to evaluate how individual- and neighborhood-level covariates predicted tuberculosis treatment abandonment. Results There were 12,338 new cases reported during the study period. Case rates across neighborhoods were significantly positively clustered in two low-income areas close to the city center. In an adjusted model, tuberculosis rates were significantly higher in neighborhoods with lower literacy, higher sewerage access and homicide rates, and a greater proportion of self-reported black residents. Treatment was abandoned in 1901 cases (15.4%, a rate that rose by 71% between 2007 and 2014. Abandonment was significantly associated with many individual sociodemographic and clinical factors. Notably, being recommended for DOT was protective for those who completed DOT, but associated with abandonment for those who did not

  11. Cost effectiveness of Tuberculosis Treatment from the Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Directly Observed Treatment Short course is more cost effective from the patients' point of view. DOTS needs to be re-focused out of the hospitals and clinics and made community based in view of the increasing TB caseload occasioned by HI V/AIDS. Key Words: Cost effectiveness, Tuberculosis treatment, personal cost, ...

  12. Profile and treatment outcomes of patients with tuberculosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Data on the epidemiology of tuberculosis and its treatment outcomes were incomplete in the study area and this study was done to fill this gap. Methods: Institution based cross sectional study was conducted from January 2011 to December 2014. A total of 949 TB patients who were on treatment in North ...

  13. Safety of Resuming Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Concomitant with the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Nationwide Registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Won; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Baek, Han Joo; Seo, Mi Ryung; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Suh, Chang-Hee; Jung, Ju Yang; Son, Chang-Nam; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Geun; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Patients who develop an active tuberculosis infection during tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment typically discontinue TNF inhibitor and receive standard anti-tuberculosis treatment. However, there is currently insufficient information on patient outcomes following resumption of TNF inhibitor treatment during ongoing anti- tuberculosis treatment. Our study was designed to investigate the safety of resuming TNF inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients who developed tuberculosis as a complication of the use of TNF inhibitors. Methods Through the nationwide registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research, 3929 AS patients who were prescribed TNF inhibitors were recruited between June 2003 and June 2014 at fourteen referral hospitals. Clinical information was analyzed about the patients who experienced tuberculosis after exposure to TNF inhibitors. The clinical features of resumers and non-resumers of TNF inhibitors were compared and the outcomes of tuberculosis were surveyed individually. Findings Fifty-six AS patients were treated for tuberculosis associated with TNF inhibitors. Among them, 23 patients resumed TNF inhibitors, and these patients were found to be exposed to TNF inhibitors for a longer period of time and experienced more frequent disease flare-up after discontinuation of TNF inhibitors compared with those who did not resume. Fifteen patients resumed TNF inhibitors during anti-tuberculosis treatment (early resumers) and 8 after completion of anti-tuberculosis treatment (late resumers). Median time to resuming TNF inhibitor from tuberculosis was 3.3 and 9.0 months in the early and late resumers, respectively. Tuberculosis was treated successfully in all resumers and did not relapse in any of them during follow-up (median 33.8 [IQR; 20.8–66.7] months). Conclusions Instances of tuberculosis were treated successfully in our AS patients, even when given concomitantly with TNF inhibitors. We suggest that early

  14. Rapid determination of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance from whole-genome sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc

    2015-05-27

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance (DR) challenges effective tuberculosis disease control. Current molecular tests examine limited numbers of mutations, and although whole genome sequencing approaches could fully characterise DR, data complexity has restricted their clinical application. A library (1,325 mutations) predictive of DR for 15 anti-tuberculosis drugs was compiled and validated for 11 of them using genomic-phenotypic data from 792 strains. A rapid online ‘TB-Profiler’ tool was developed to report DR and strain-type profiles directly from raw sequences. Using our DR mutation library, in silico diagnostic accuracy was superior to some commercial diagnostics and alternative databases. The library will facilitate sequence-based drug-susceptibility testing.

  15. [Optimization of parodontitis treatment of patients with tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, E A; Lepilin, A V; Kazimirova, N E; Shul'diakov, A A

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose to determine the clinic-pathogenetic efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy of parodontitis of patients with focal tuberculosis medical examination and treatment of 40 patients is carried out. It is established, that use of liniment Cycloferon in the combined treatment of patients with focal tuberculosis allows to accelerate process of normalization of lipid peroxidation parameters and antioxidant potential of blood, to decrease infection load (Herpes symplex virus I, Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus) in parodontal recess and evidence of local inflammation with reduction of activity of the tumours necrosis factor and interleukin 1beta, that provides acceleration of recuperation processes, lowering the frequency of parodontitis relapses.

  16. Evaluation of Anti-TBGL Antibody in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Patients in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingge Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous glycolipid (TBGL is a component of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall, and anti-TBGL antibodies are used for serodiagnosis of tuberculosis. Anti-TBGL IgG and IgA levels were measured in 45 pulmonary TB patients (PTB, 26 extra-pulmonary TB patients (ETB, 16 AIDS-TB patients, and 58 healthy controls (HC including 39 health care workers (HW and 19 newly enrolled students (ST. Anti-TBGL IgG measurements yielded 68.9% and 46.2% sensitivity in PTB and ETB, respectively, and 81.0% specificity. However, anti-TBGL IgA measurements were significantly less sensitive in detecting ETB than PTB (15.4% versus 46.7% sensitivity but showed up to 89.7% specificity. Samples from AIDS-TB patients exhibited low reaction of anti-TBGL IgG and IgA with 6.3% and 12.5% sensitivity, respectively. Unlike anti-lipoarabinomannan (LAM IgG that was found to elevate in sputum smearpositive subjects, anti-TBGL IgG and IgA elevated in those with cavitation and bronchiectasis, respectively. Anti-TBGL IgG in cavitary TB yielded 78.2% sensitivity compared to 57.1% in those otherwise. Meanwhile, higher anti-TBGL IgA titers were observed in HW than in ST, and increasing anti-TBGL IgG titers were observed in HW on follow-up. Therefore, higher anti-TBGL antibody titers are present in patients presenting cavities and bronchiectasis and subjects under TB exposure risk.

  17. Primary and secondary anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in Hitossa District of Arsi Zone, Oromia Regional State, Central Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shallo Daba Hamusse

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB drugs which is resistant to the major first-line anti-TB drugs, Isoniazid and Rifampicin, has become a major global challenge in tuberculosis (TB control programme. However, its burden at community level is not well known. Thus, the aim of study was to assess the prevalence of primary and secondary resistance to any first line anti-TB drugs and MDR TB in Hitossa District of Oromia Regional State, Central Ethiopia. Methods Population based cross- sectional study was conducted on individuals aged ≥15 years. Those with symptoms suggestive of TB were interviewed and two sputum specimens were collected from each and examined using Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ culture medium. Further, the isolates were confirmed by the Ziehl-Neelsen microscopic examination method. Drug susceptibility test (DST was also conducted on LJ medium using a simplified indirect proportion method. The resistance strains were then determined by percentage of colonies that grew on the critical concentration of Isoniazid, Streptomycin, Rifampicin and Ethambutol. Results The overall resistance of all forms of TB to any first-line anti-TB drug was 21.7 %. Of the total new and previously treated culture positive TB cases, 15.3 and 48.8 % respectively were found to be a resistant to any of the first-line anti-TB drugs. Further, of all forms of TB, the overall resistance of MDR-TB was 4.7 %. However, of the total new TB cases, 2.4 % had primary while 14.3 % had secondary MDR-TB. Resistance to any of the first-line anti-TB drugs (adjusted odd ratio (AOR, 8.1; 95 % CI: 2.26–29.30 and MDR-TB (AOR, 7.1; 95 % CI: 2.6–43.8 was found to be linked with previous history of anti-TB treatment. Conclusions The study has identified a high rate of primary and secondary resistance to any of the first-line anti-TB drugs and MDR-TB in the study area. The resistance may have resulted from sub-optimal performance of directly observed

  18. Evaluation of anti-tuberculosis antibodies in healthy contact and non-contacts persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, N; Bukhari, M.H; Muneer, M; Tayyab, M; Chaudhry, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to see the presence of the antimycobacterial antibodies in healthy household contacts of tuberculosis patients and healthy normal subjects who have never been in contact with tuberculosis patients. A total of 200 subjects, 120 with history of household contact and 80 without such history were included in the study. Routine Haematological investigations were performed and all the sera of 200 subjects were tested who 19M, 19G and IgA anti tuberculosis antibodies using ELISA technique. There was no difference in the average age of the household contacts and non-contacts. The complaints of pyrexia, night sweats and loss of weight was more in house hold contacts as compared to non-contacts. The awareness about BCG vaccination was equal among the household contacts and non-contacts. The combined serological positivity of the household contacts was 65.8% and the combined serological positivity for non-contacts was 34.1%. There was no statistically significant difference in the presence of 19M among household contacts as compared to non-contacts. However both IgG and 19A were present in significantly higher number of household contacts as compared to non contacts. This study concludes that the persons living in the house with a patient suffering from active pulmonary tuberculosis (household contact) have more chances of being infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis as compared to the healthy non-contacts. (author)

  19. PROPOSAL OF ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS REGIMENS BASED ON SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ISONIAZID AND RIFAMPICIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto; Moore, David AJ; Alarcón, Valentina; Samalvides, Frine; Seas, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To elaborate optimal anti-tuberculosis regimens following drug susceptibility testing (DST) to isoniazid (H) and rifampicin (R). Design 12 311 M. tuberculosis strains (National Health Institute of Peru 2007-2009) were classified in four groups according H and R resistance. In each group the sensitivity to ethambutol (E), pirazinamide (Z), streptomycin (S), kanamycin (Km), capreomycin (Cm), ciprofloxacin (Cfx), ethionamide (Eto), cicloserine (Cs) and p-amino salicilic acid (PAS) was determined. Based on resistance profiles, domestic costs, and following WHO guidelines, we elaborated and selected optimal putative regimens for each group. The potential efficacy (PE) variable was defined as the proportion of strains sensitive to at least three or four drugs for each regimen evaluated. Results Selected regimes with the lowest cost, and highest PE of containing 3 and 4 effective drugs for TB sensitive to H and R were: HRZ (99,5%) and HREZ (99,1%), respectively; RZECfx (PE=98,9%) and RZECfxKm (PE=97,7%) for TB resistant to H; HZECfx (96,8%) and HZECfxKm (95,4%) for TB resistant to R; and EZCfxKmEtoCs (82.9%) for MDR-TB. Conclusion Based on resistance to H and R it was possible to select anti-tuberculosis regimens with high probability of success. This proposal is a feasible alternative to tackle tuberculosis in Peru where the access to rapid DST to H and R is improving progressively. PMID:23949502

  20. Evaluation of isoprinosine to be repurposed as an adjunct anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alok K; Yabaji, Shivraj M; Dubey, Rikesh K

    2018-06-01

    Isoprinosine (Inos) or immunovir is a synthetic purine derivative with immune-modulatory and antiviral properties. The drug shows apparent in vivo enhancement of host immune responses by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and rapid proliferation of T-cell subsets. Strikingly, the cytokines induced by Inos also play crucial roles in providing immune resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Inos has been licensed for several antiviral diseases; however, its efficacy against Mtb has not been tested yet. Since Mtb subverts the host immune system to survive within the host. Therefore, we hypothesized that the immune-stimulatory properties of Inos can be explored as an adjunct therapy for the management of tuberculosis. We have also outlined a systematic direction of study to evaluate if Inos could be repurposed for tuberculosis. The in vivo studies for therapeutic evaluation of Inos alone or in combination with the first line anti-TB drugs in a suitable TB disease model would provide a clearer picture of its utility as a host-directed anti-TB drug and may endow us with a new application of an existing drug to combat tuberculosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of the economic burden of diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis patients in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H-Q; Bele, S; Feng, Y; Qiu, S-S; Lü, J-Q; Tang, S-W; Shen, H-B; Wang, J-M; Zhu, L-M

    2013-12-01

    A county in Jiangsu Province, China. To estimate the costs of the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) from the patient's perspective and to identify determinants of the patient's financial burden. In a cross-sectional survey, we interviewed 316 patients diagnosed from January 2010 to May 2011 who had already completed their anti-tuberculosis treatment. The financial burden on TB patients included out-of-pocket costs and productivity losses. The average per capita total out-of-pocket cost was 3024.0 Chinese yuan (CNY), with a median cost of 1086 CNY (interquartile range [IQR] 480-2456). Mean out-of-pocket medical and non-medical costs were respectively 2565.7 CNY and 458.3 CNY. Productivity lost by patients and family members was 2615.2 CNY (median 500, IQR 250-2025). Factors associated with out-of-pocket costs and productivity losses included hospitalisation, adverse drug reactions, cost of drugs to 'protect' the liver, cost of second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs and diagnostic delay. Although the government of China has implemented a 'free TB service policy', the economic burden on patients is still heavy. More patient-centred interventions are essential to reduce the financial burden on patients.

  2. Adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic medicine with anti tubercular drugs on the therapeutic management of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, P K; Chattopadhyay, Jaydeb; Mitra, Achintya; Adhikari, Anjan; Alam, Mirza Samsur; Bandopadhyay, S K; Hazra, Jayram

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is an age old disease described in Vedic Medicine as 'Yakshma'. Later on, in Ayurveda it earned a prefix and found way into mythology as 'Rajayakshma'. After the discovery of streptomycin, the therapeutic management of PTB received a major breakthrough. The treatment module changed remarkably with the formulation of newer anti-tubercular drugs (ATD) with appreciable success. Recent resurgence of PTB in developed countries like United States posed a threat to the medical community due to resistant strains. Consequently, WHO looked toward traditional medicine. Literature reveals that Ayurvedic treatment of PTB was in vogue in India before the introduction of ATD with limited success. Records show that 2766 patients of PTB were treated with Ayurvedic drugs in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata in the year 1933-1947. To evaluate the toxicity reduction and early restoration by adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic drugs by increasing the bio-availability of ATDs. In the present study, treatment response of 99 patients treated with ATD as an adjunct with Aswagandha (Withania somnifera) and a multi-herbal formulation described in Chikitsa-sthana of Charaka samhita i.e. Chyawanprash were investigated. Hematological profile, sputum bacterial load count, immunoglobulin IgA and IgM, blood sugar, liver function test, serum creatinine were the assessed parameters besides blood isoniazid and pyrazinamide, repeated after 28 days of treatment. The symptoms abated, body weight showed improvement, ESR values were normal, there was appreciable change in IgA and IgM patterns and significantly increased bioavailability of isoniazid and pyrazinamide were recorded. This innovative clinical study coupled with empowered research may turn out to be promising in finding a solution for the treatment of PTB.

  3. Effectiveness of interventions for diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in hard-to-reach populations in countries of low and medium tuberculosis incidence: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelings, Charlotte C.; de Vries, Sophia G.; Greve, Patrick F.; Visser, Benjamin J.; Bélard, Sabine; Janssen, Saskia; Cremers, Anne L.; Spijker, René; Shaw, Beth; Hill, Ruaraidh A.; Zumla, Alimuddin; Sandgren, Andreas; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis is over-represented in hard-to-reach (underserved) populations in high-income countries of low tuberculosis incidence. The mainstay of tuberculosis care is early detection of active tuberculosis (case finding), contact tracing, and treatment completion. We did a systematic review with a

  4. Risk factors and timing of default from treatment for non-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, H E; Ciobanu, A; Plesca, V; Crudu, V; Galusca, I; Soltan, V; Cohen, T

    2013-03-01

    The Republic of Moldova, in Eastern Europe, has among the highest reported nationwide proportions of tuberculosis (TB) patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) worldwide. Default has been associated with increased mortality and amplification of drug resistance, and may contribute to the high MDR-TB rates in Moldova. To assess risk factors and timing of default from treatment for non-MDR-TB from 2007 to 2010. A retrospective analysis of routine surveillance data on all non-MDR-TB patients reported. A total of 14.7% of non-MDR-TB patients defaulted from treatment during the study period. Independent risk factors for default included sociodemographic factors, such as homelessness, living alone, less formal education and spending substantial time outside Moldova in the year prior to diagnosis; and health-related factors such as human immunodeficiency virus co-infection, greater lung pathology and increasing TB drug resistance. Anti-tuberculosis treatment is usually initiated within an institutional setting in Moldova, and the default risk was highest in the month following the phase of hospitalized treatment (among civilians) and after leaving prison (among those diagnosed while incarcerated). Targeted interventions to increase treatment adherence for patients at highest risk of default, and improving the continuity of care for patients transitioning from institutional to community care may substantially reduce risk of default.

  5. Is there an effect of glucose lowering treatment on incidence and prognosis of tuberculosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The association between diabetes and incidence of tuberculosis is well established, and observational studies have shown poor treatment outcome in tuberculosis related to hyperglycemia. The WHO recommends screening for diabetes among all patients with tuberculosis and optimized glycemic control...... aiming at improving tuberculosis outcome. However, no intervention studies support this notion. Patients with tuberculosis are often vulnerable with high degree of comorbidity, and, therefore, at high risk of adverse effects of intensive glucose control. Controlled intervention studies of the effect...... of glucose lowering treatment on tuberculosis outcomes are clearly warranted to justify screening for- and tight control of diabetes....

  6. Alcohol use disorder and tuberculosis treatment: A longitudinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The relationship between tuberculosis (TB) treatment and alcohol use disorders over time is under-researched. The aim of this investigation was to study alcohol use and TB medication adherence and its predictors among TB patients over a period of 6 months. Methods: A longitudinal investigation was carried out ...

  7. Risk factors for mortality among tuberculosis patients on treatment at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Though it can effectively be treated, still a significant proportion of patients die on the course of their treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the outcome and risk factors of mortality among patients diagnosed with ...

  8. Pleural Tuberculosis and its Treatment Outcomes | Khan | Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, treatment and clinical outcomes of tuberculosis pleuritis at a hospital in the state of Penang, Malaysia. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in Hospital of Penang, Malaysia. Patient records were reviewed retrospectively to identify patients with confirmed diagnosis of tuberculous ...

  9. Herbal solution to the treatment of tuberculosis infection in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the use of medicinal plants in the treatment of Tuberculosis in Kaduna south local government area in Kaduna state, Nigeria. Eighty randomly selected respondents comprising of 80 structure questionnaire were administered to traditional healer, herbs trader, farmers and civil servants in the Local ...

  10. Anti-tuberculosis medication-induced oculogyric crisis and the importance of proper history taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong LH

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lin Ho Wong,1 Endean Tan2 1University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 2Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Oculogyric crisis (OGC, frequently caused by medications such as antiemetics, antidepressants, and anti-epileptics, is an acute dystonic reaction of the ocular muscles. It consists of wide-staring gaze (lasting variably from seconds to minutes, seizures, and a widely-opened mouth. To date, there have been no reports of anti-tuberculosis medications such as rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide or ethambutol inducing OGC. It is of utmost importance to recognize this adverse reaction, which could be incorrectly diagnosed as an anaphylactic-like reaction. In this paper, we highlight a case of a 66-year-old Indian man who presented with OGC induced by anti-tuberculosis medications which was initially suspected to be an anaphylactic reaction and was subsequently halted with the administration of diphenhydramine. Keywords: oculogyric crisis, tuberculosis, rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, adverse drug reaction 

  11. Anti-tuberculosis activity of -lactam antibiotics: prospects for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review is prepared to show results on the anti-TB activity of -lactam antibiotics. -Lactams are among the oldest drugs with little or no side effects. Both in vitro studies and clinical data indicate that -lactams have a promising activity for use in the management of MDR-TB. More studies are required to define the interaction ...

  12. Risk assessment of hepatotoxicity among tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS-coinfected patients under tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngouleun, Williams; Biapa Nya, Prosper Cabral; Pieme, Anatole Constant; Telefo, Phelix Bruno

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a worldwide public health problem. It is a contagious and grave disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current drugs such as isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and rifampicin used for the treatment of tuberculosis are potentially hepatotoxic and can lead to drug hepatitis. In order to improve the follow-up of TB patients in Cameroon, we carried out a study which aimed to evaluate the hepatotoxicity risk factors associated with anti-TB drugs. The studies were performed on 75 participants who had visited the Loum District Hospital located in the littoral region of Cameroon for their routine consultation. Participants have been selected based on pre-established criteria of inclusion and exclusion. Prior to the informed consent signature, patients were given compelling information about the objective and the result output of the study. They were questioned about antioxidant food and alcohol consumption as well as some clinical signs of hepatotoxicity such as fever, nausea, vomiting, and tiredness. The collected blood was tested for the determination of biochemical markers (transaminases and C-reactive protein) using standard spectrophotometric methods. Biochemical analysis of samples showed a significant increase (pfactors, antioxidant food consumption significantly reduced the liver injury patient percentage for the above parameters, whereas an opposite situation was observed with alcohol consumption between TB-coinfection and TB patients. Regarding the C-reactive protein results, the percentage of positive tests was very high among coinfected patients (40%) compared with the control (15%). The interactions between parameters related to alcohol consumption and intake of antioxidant foods showed a slight decrease in activity compared with interactions without food. The results showed that human immunodeficiency virus status and alcohol consumption constitutes aggravating factors for the occurrence of hepatic toxicity. In addition, the consumption of

  13. Clinical significance of 2 h plasma concentrations of first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prahl, Julie B; Johansen, Isik S; Cohen, Arieh S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study 2 h plasma concentrations of the first-line tuberculosis drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide in a cohort of patients with tuberculosis in Denmark and to determine the relationship between the concentrations and the clinical outcome. METHODS: After 6......-207 days of treatment (median 34 days) 2 h blood samples were collected from 32 patients with active tuberculosis and from three patients receiving prophylactic treatment. Plasma concentrations were determined using LC-MS/MS. Normal ranges were obtained from the literature. Clinical charts were reviewed...... failure occurred more frequently when the concentrations of isoniazid and rifampicin were both below the normal ranges (P = 0.013) and even more frequently when they were below the median 2 h drug concentrations obtained in the study (P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: At 2 h, plasma concentrations of isoniazid...

  14. Factores asociados a la no adherencia al tratamiento anti tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Inés Plata-Casas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: describir los factores de riesgo asociados a la no adherencia al tratamiento en los pacientes adscritos al programa de tuberculosis en el Municipio de Villavicencio, cohorte 2012. Materiales y Métodos: se ha realizado un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal con enfoque cuantitativo. Se obtuvieron datos de caracterización sociodemográfica sobre factores de riesgo de personas que abandonaron el tratamiento para la enfermedad- cohorte 2012- mediante la aplicación de un instrumento diseñado por el investigador y revisado por expertos. Los datos fueron tabulados y analizados mediante la herramienta Microsoft Excel® 2007 y Epi-info 7.0. Resultados: el 75% de los pacientes pertenecen al género masculino; el promedio de edad es de 30 años, el 63% pertenecen al régimen subsidiado de salud. Las principales causas de abandono fueron: efectos adversos a los medicamentos (58%, inadecuada atención del personal de salud (43%, dificultad de acceso al servicio (32%. Los factores sociales encontrados fueron hacinamiento 67% y desempleo 62%. Conclusiones: algunos factores no modificables como la edad y el género, así como factores modificables como estilos de vida inadecuados y efectos adversos; cuyo control mejoraría el cumplimiento; contribuyen al abandono del tratamiento. Las variables psicológicas y sociales deben ser evaluadas para que se conviertan en predictores de probables abandonos o irregularidades en el tratamiento antituberculoso.

  15. RESEARCH ON NATURAL REMEDIES OF TUBERCULOSIS AND IDENITIFY NEW SYMPTOMS, TREATMENT REGIMENS, DIAGNOSTIC EVALUATION

    OpenAIRE

    MYLE AKSHAY KIRAN; Dr. Gangadhar Rao; Dr. Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an infection deadly disease and the treatment of which is one of the most important severe challenges at the global level currently more than a 20 chemicals medications are described for the treatment of tuberculosis. Regardless of availability of several drugs to treat TB. The cause agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis is now a days getting resistant towards the convenient drugs and leading to condition known as the multi drugs resistan...

  16. Evidence-Based Design of Fixed-Dose Combinations: Principles and Application to Pediatric Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Elin M; Yngman, Gunnar; Denti, Paolo; McIlleron, Helen; Kjellsson, Maria C; Karlsson, Mats O

    2018-05-01

    Fixed-dose combination formulations where several drugs are included in one tablet are important for the implementation of many long-term multidrug therapies. The selection of optimal dose ratios and tablet content of a fixed-dose combination and the design of individualized dosing regimens is a complex task, requiring multiple simultaneous considerations. In this work, a methodology for the rational design of a fixed-dose combination was developed and applied to the case of a three-drug pediatric anti-tuberculosis formulation individualized on body weight. The optimization methodology synthesizes information about the intended use population, the pharmacokinetic properties of the drugs, therapeutic targets, and practical constraints. A utility function is included to penalize deviations from the targets; a sequential estimation procedure was developed for stable estimation of break-points for individualized dosing. The suggested optimized pediatric anti-tuberculosis fixed-dose combination was compared with the recently launched World Health Organization-endorsed formulation. The optimized fixed-dose combination included 15, 36, and 16% higher amounts of rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide, respectively. The optimized fixed-dose combination is expected to result in overall less deviation from the therapeutic targets based on adult exposure and substantially fewer children with underexposure (below half the target). The development of this design tool can aid the implementation of evidence-based formulations, integrating available knowledge and practical considerations, to optimize drug exposures and thereby treatment outcomes.

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Wah Wah; Ei, Phyu Win; Nyunt, Wint Wint; Swe, Thyn Lei; Lwin, Thandar; Htwe, Mi Mi; Kim, Kyung Jun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Chang Ki; Cho, Sang Nae; Song, Sun Dae; Chang, Chulhun L

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious health problems in Myanmar. Because TB drug resistance is associated with genetic mutation(s) relevant to responses to each drug, genotypic methods for detecting these mutations have been proposed to overcome the limitations of classic phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST). We explored the current estimates of drug-resistant TB and evaluated the usefulness of genotypic DST in Myanmar. We determined the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from sputum smear-positive patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB at two main TB centers in Myanmar during 2013 by using conventional phenotypic DST and the GenoType MTBDRplus assay (Hain Lifescience, Germany). Discrepant results were confirmed by sequencing the genes relevant to each type of resistance (rpoB for rifampicin; katG and inhA for isoniazid). Of 191 isolates, phenotypic DST showed that 27.7% (n=53) were resistant to at least one first-line drug and 20.9% (n=40) were resistant to two or more, including 18.3% (n=35) multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) strains. Monoresistant strains accounted for 6.8% (n=13) of the samples. Genotypic assay of 189 isolates showed 17.5% (n=33) MDR-TB and 5.3% (n=10) isoniazid-monoresistant strains. Genotypic susceptibility results were 99.5% (n=188) concordant and agreed almost perfectly with phenotypic DST (kappa=0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.96-1.01). The results highlight the burden of TB drug resistance and prove the usefulness of the genotypic DST in Myanmar.

  18. TUBERCULOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Bajrović; Mahmud Nurkić; Šukrija Zvizdić

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, known as the "White Plague" in the early 19th century, is the infectious disease, which is being researched today even in some of the most developed countries in the world. Epidemiological- epizootiological research points to the importance of pasteurizing milk as well as the transmission in aerosolized droplets in humans and animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), M. bovis, M. africanum and M. microti are the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis. Other mycobacteria cause dis...

  19. Impact of drug resistance on the tuberculosis treatment outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lesnic

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The standard treatment of a new case of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB according to WHO recommendations in the Republic of Moldova is performed since 2005 showing a low treatment succes. Actually the treatment success rate increased due to excluding of MDR-TB patients from the general cohort. The major rate of patients with low outcome is represented by the failed and lost to follow-up cases. The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of multidrug-resiatnce and MDR-TB on the tuberculosis treatment outcome. Materials and methods. A retrospective selective, descriptive study targeting social, demographic, economic and epidemiological peculiarities, case-management, diagnostic radiological aspects and microbiological characteristics of 187 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis registered during 2013–2015 distributed in two groups: 1st group (61 patients with established multidrug-resistant strains using conventional cultural methods and the 2nd group (126 patients with MDR-TB. Results. Multidrug-resistance was established more frequently in new cases and MDR-TB in two thirds of retreated patients. No difference was identified in gender and age distribution, social, economical, educational characteristics; case-management assessment identified a similar proportion of patients revealed by general practitioners and specialists, with low rate of screened high risk groups. All patients from the multidrug-resistant group began the standard treatment for drug-responsiveness tuberculosis before drug susceptibility testing and one third of MDR-TB group was treated from the onset with the DOTS-Plus regimen. Highest success rate was identified in the new-case subgroups of both groups and higher rate of died patients was determined in the retreated subgroups. Such a low rate of patients aggrevates the resistance. Conclusions. Early diagnosis, drug responsiveness testing and raising awareness among about treatment compliance will

  20. Latent tuberculosis infection screening prior to biological treatment in Tunisian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouma, Marwa; Mahmoud, Ines; Saidane, Olfa; Bouden, Selma; Abdelmoula, Leila

    2017-10-01

    The screening of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is necessary to prevent infection in patients with chronic inflammatory disease (CID) undergoing biological treatment. We aimed to assess the efficacy of LTBI screening prior to biological treatment in Tunisia, considered as a high-incidence area of active TB disease. We conducted a retrospective study over a period of 8 years [2007-2014] including patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatism receiving biologic agents since at least 6 months. The screening of LTBI was performed according to national Tunisian guidelines. There were 35 men and 78 women. The mean age was 47.67±13.50 years. Rheumatoid arthritis (70.8%) was the most common cause of CID. The diagnosis of LTBI was established in 23 cases. Among these 23 patients, 12 patients had negative tuberculin skin test (TST) associated with positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G), 10 had TST more than 10mm, one patient had a TST between 5 and 10mm associated with positive QFT-G and one patient had a history of tuberculosis inadequately treated. Preventive anti-tuberculous therapy was prescribed before biological therapy initiation in cases of LTBI. During the follow-up period (3.91 years), no case of tuberculosis reactivation has been reported among patients diagnosed with LTBI. However, 2 cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis were reported in patients with initially negative TST and QFT-G. Our study showed that the Tunisian recommendations allowed detecting a LTBI in 20% of biologic therapy candidates. Preventive measures including screening of LTBI and eventually a prophylactic treatment improve the safety of biological treatments. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Vorster, Mariza; Sathekge, Mike M

    Tuberculosis (TB) is currently the world's leading cause of infectious mortality. Imaging plays an important role in the management of this disease. The complex immune response of the human body to Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in a wide array of clinical manifestations, making clinical and

  2. Paradoxical response during antituberculous treatment for abdominal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Kim, Mi Jeong; Chang, Hyuk Won; Hwang, Jae Seok; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate clinical and CT findings of paradoxical response during treatment for abdominal tuberculosis. Authors reviewed the patient records of 138 patients with abdominal tuberculosis during a recent 6-year period and we selected 11 patients with a paradoxical response. The CT findings and pathologic findings of the initial lesions and new lesions were reviewed. The intervals between initiation of therapy and the detection of new lesions, improvement of new lesion and the final follow-up were evaluated. At the initial presentation, we identified tuberculous peritonitis in 8 patients, tuberculous lymphadenitis in 3 patients and ileocolic tuberculosis in two patients. New lesions were identified at 2-10 months (mean: 3.8 months) after the initiation of therapy and following improvement of the initial lesions. The new lesions were perihepatic caseous abscess (n=4), hepatic tuberculoma (n=3), hepatic caseous abscess (n=1), tuberculous lymphadenitis (n=3), ileocolic tuberculosis (n=3), and splenic tuberculoma (n=1). Improvement of new lesions was noted at 4-14 months (mean: 7.6 months). At the final follow-up of seven patients, the new lesions disappeared and four patients still had small residual lesions. New lesions that develop in a patient with initial improvement should be considered a paradoxical response that will ultimately improve with continuation of the original medication.

  3. Paradoxical response during antituberculous treatment for abdominal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Kim, Mi Jeong; Chang, Hyuk Won; Hwang, Jae Seok; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate clinical and CT findings of paradoxical response during treatment for abdominal tuberculosis. Authors reviewed the patient records of 138 patients with abdominal tuberculosis during a recent 6-year period and we selected 11 patients with a paradoxical response. The CT findings and pathologic findings of the initial lesions and new lesions were reviewed. The intervals between initiation of therapy and the detection of new lesions, improvement of new lesion and the final follow-up were evaluated. At the initial presentation, we identified tuberculous peritonitis in 8 patients, tuberculous lymphadenitis in 3 patients and ileocolic tuberculosis in two patients. New lesions were identified at 2-10 months (mean: 3.8 months) after the initiation of therapy and following improvement of the initial lesions. The new lesions were perihepatic caseous abscess (n=4), hepatic tuberculoma (n=3), hepatic caseous abscess (n=1), tuberculous lymphadenitis (n=3), ileocolic tuberculosis (n=3), and splenic tuberculoma (n=1). Improvement of new lesions was noted at 4-14 months (mean: 7.6 months). At the final follow-up of seven patients, the new lesions disappeared and four patients still had small residual lesions. New lesions that develop in a patient with initial improvement should be considered a paradoxical response that will ultimately improve with continuation of the original medication

  4. Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton

    1999-01-01

    Avian tuberculosis is usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium. At least 20 different types of M. avium have been identified, only three of which are known to cause disease in birds. Other types of Mycobacterium rarely cause tuberculosis in most avian species; however, parrots, macaws, and other large perching birds are susceptible to human and bovine types of tuberculosis bacilli. Avian tuberculosis generally is transmitted by direct contact with infected birds, ingestion of contaminated feed and water, or contact with a contaminated environment. Inhalation of the bacterium can cause respiratory tract infections. Wild bird studies in the Netherlands disclosed tuberculosis-infected puncture-type injuries in birds of prey that fight at the nest site (kestrels) or on the ground (buteo-type buzzards), but tuberculosisinfected injuries were not found in accipiters (falco

  5. The Role of Efflux Pumps in Tuberculosis Treatment and Their Promise as a Target in Drug Development: Unraveling the Black Box

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Brake, Lindsey H.M.; de Knegt, Gerjo J.; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E.; van Dam, Teunis J.P.; Burger, David M; Russel, Frans G M; van Crevel, Reinout; Koenderink, Jan B.; Aarnoutse, Rob E.

    2018-01-01

    Insight into drug transport mechanisms is highly relevant to the efficacious treatment of tuberculosis (TB). Major problems in TB treatment are related to the transport of antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs across human and mycobacterial membranes, affecting the concentrations of these drugs

  6. Comparison of different treatments for isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis: an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fregonese, Federica; Ahuja, Shama D; Akkerman, Onno W; Arakaki-Sanchez, Denise; Ayakaka, Irene; Baghaei, Parvaneh; Bang, Didi; Bastos, Mayara; Benedetti, Andrea; Bonnet, Maryline; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Cegielski, Peter; Chien, Jung-Yien; Cox, Helen; Dedicoat, Martin; Erkens, Connie; Escalante, Patricio; Falzon, Dennis; Garcia-Prats, Anthony J; Gegia, Medea; Gillespie, Stephen H; Glynn, Judith R; Goldberg, Stefan; Griffith, David; Jacobson, Karen R; Johnston, James C; Jones-López, Edward C; Khan, Awal; Koh, Won-Jung; Kritski, Afranio; Lan, Zhi Yi; Lee, Jae Ho; Li, Pei Zhi; Maciel, Ethel L; Galliez, Rafael Mello; Merle, Corinne S C; Munang, Melinda; Narendran, Gopalan; Nguyen, Viet Nhung; Nunn, Andrew; Ohkado, Akihiro; Park, Jong Sun; Phillips, Patrick P J; Ponnuraja, Chinnaiyan; Reves, Randall; Romanowski, Kamila; Seung, Kwonjune; Schaaf, H Simon; Skrahina, Alena; Soolingen, Dick van; Tabarsi, Payam; Trajman, Anete; Trieu, Lisa; Banurekha, Velayutham V; Viiklepp, Piret; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Menzies, Dick

    Isoniazid-resistant, rifampicin-susceptible (INH-R) tuberculosis is the most common form of drug resistance, and is associated with failure, relapse, and acquired rifampicin resistance if treated with first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. The aim of the study was to compare success, mortality, and

  7. Comparison of different treatments for isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis : an individual patient data meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fregonese, Federica; Ahuja, Shama D; Akkerman, Onno W; Arakaki-Sanchez, Denise; Ayakaka, Irene; Baghaei, Parvaneh; Bang, Didi; Bastos, Mayara; Benedetti, Andrea; Bonnet, Maryline; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Cegielski, Peter; Chien, Jung-Yien; Cox, Helen; Dedicoat, Martin; Erkens, Connie; Escalante, Patricio; Falzon, Dennis; Garcia-Prats, Anthony J; Gegia, Medea; Gillespie, Stephen H; Glynn, Judith R; Goldberg, Stefan; Griffith, David; Jacobson, Karen R; Johnston, James C; Jones-López, Edward C; Khan, Awal; Koh, Won-Jung; Kritski, Afranio; Lan, Zhi Yi; Lee, Jae Ho; Li, Pei Zhi; Maciel, Ethel L; Galliez, Rafael Mello; Merle, Corinne S C; Munang, Melinda; Narendran, Gopalan; Nguyen, Viet Nhung; Nunn, Andrew; Ohkado, Akihiro; Park, Jong Sun; Phillips, Patrick P J; Ponnuraja, Chinnaiyan; Reves, Randall; Romanowski, Kamila; Seung, Kwonjune; Schaaf, H Simon; Skrahina, Alena; Soolingen, Dick van; Tabarsi, Payam; Trajman, Anete; Trieu, Lisa; Banurekha, Velayutham V; Viiklepp, Piret; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Menzies, Dick

    BACKGROUND: Isoniazid-resistant, rifampicin-susceptible (INH-R) tuberculosis is the most common form of drug resistance, and is associated with failure, relapse, and acquired rifampicin resistance if treated with first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. The aim of the study was to compare success,

  8. Mammary tuberculosis: percutaneous treatment of a mammary tuberculous abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, C.; Carreira, C.; Cereceda, C.; Pinto, J.; Lopez, R.; Bolanos, F.

    2000-01-01

    It is currently very rare to find mammary involvement in cases of tuberculosis, in either primary or secondary form. Diagnosis is classically clinical and microbiological, and the basic techniques used in imaging diagnosis are mammography and ultrasound. Computed tomography may define the involvement of the thoracic wall in those cases which present as mammary masses adhering to deep levels, and is also able to evaluate accompanying pulmonary disease, if it is present. Traditionally, treatment has consisted of quadrantectomy and specific antibiotic therapy. We present a case of tuberculous mammary abscess secondary to pulmonary disease, which was treated by percutaneous drainage controlled by CT and specific antibiotic therapy. We revise the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of mammary tuberculosis. (orig.)

  9. Mammary tuberculosis: percutaneous treatment of a mammary tuberculous abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, C.; Carreira, C.; Cereceda, C.; Pinto, J. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo (Spain); Lopez, R.; Bolanos, F. [Servicio de Cirugia, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo (Spain)

    2000-03-01

    It is currently very rare to find mammary involvement in cases of tuberculosis, in either primary or secondary form. Diagnosis is classically clinical and microbiological, and the basic techniques used in imaging diagnosis are mammography and ultrasound. Computed tomography may define the involvement of the thoracic wall in those cases which present as mammary masses adhering to deep levels, and is also able to evaluate accompanying pulmonary disease, if it is present. Traditionally, treatment has consisted of quadrantectomy and specific antibiotic therapy. We present a case of tuberculous mammary abscess secondary to pulmonary disease, which was treated by percutaneous drainage controlled by CT and specific antibiotic therapy. We revise the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of mammary tuberculosis. (orig.)

  10. Targeted nanodrug delivery systems for the treatment of Tuberculosis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lemmer, Yolandy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available patient treatment compliance and drug resistance pose a great challenge to TB treatment programs worldwide. To improve the current inadequate therapeutic management of TB, a polymeric anti-TB nanodrug delivery system for anti-TB drugs was developed...

  11. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pooja Ajay; Coj, Merida; Rohloff, Peter

    2017-10-09

    A 23-year-old indigenous Guatemalan man presented in 2016 to our clinic in Sololá, Guatemala, with 10 months of recurrent neck swelling, fevers, night sweats and weight loss. Previously, he had sought care in three different medical settings, including a private physician-run clinic, a tertiary private cancer treatment centre and, finally, a rural government health post. With assistance from our institution's accompaniment staff, the patient was admitted to a public tertiary care hospital for work-up. Rifampin-susceptible tuberculosis was diagnosed, and appropriate treatment was begun. The case illustrates how low tuberculosis recognition among community health workers and health system segmentation creates obstacles to appropriate care, especially for patients with limited means. As a result, significant diagnostic and treatment delays can occur, increasing the public health burden of tuberculosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. [Treatment of bronchial obstruction in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelev, E I; Kuklina, G M; Kalinina, E E

    2004-01-01

    Whether the main points of treatment for bronchial obstructive syndrome (BOS) in chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) can be adapted for patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PT) was studied. For this purpose, 435 patients with PT with signs of BOS (forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1) 70% of the normal values; 2) 229 patients with FEV1 69-50%; 3) 102 patients with FEV1 bronchial obstructive syndrome in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis was highly effective, promotes the amelioration of the degree of respiratory symptoms in patients with IPT by 2 to 8 times, in those with FCPT by more than 2-3 times, and in those with PS by 1.45-10 times. The differences in the efficiency of bronchodilator therapy depend on the baseline level of bronchial obstruction. In patients with pulmonary tuberculosis concurrent with BO, the use of current inhalation bronchodilator therapy results in a substantial increase in FEV1, which differentiates BOS in PT from COLD. The use of the proposed therapy in the multimodality treatment of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis showed no statistically significant differences in the changes in the degree of X-ray symptoms while this therapy permits acceleration of abacillation in patients with IPT by 16.8% and in those with FCPT by 14.8%. Effective bronchodilator therapy considerably enhances life quality in patients. Thus, early systematic and long-term performance of the bronchodilator therapy, based on the principles of bronchodilator therapy for COLD, in patients with PT concurrent with BOS may substantially enhance the efficiency of treatment in this category of patients.

  13. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs As Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera M. Kroesen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lengthy, antimicrobial therapy targeting the pathogen is the mainstay of conventional tuberculosis treatment, complicated by emerging drug resistances. Host-directed therapies, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, in contrast, target host factors to mitigate disease severity. In the present Systematic Review, we investigate whether NSAIDs display any effects as therapy of TB and discuss possible mechanisms of action of NSAIDs as adjunctive therapy of TB. Ten studies, seven preclinical studies in mice and three clinical trials, were included and systematically reviewed. Our results point toward a beneficial effect of NSAIDs as adjunct to current TB therapy regimens, mediated by decreased lung pathology balancing host-immune reaction. The determination of the best timing for their administration in order to obtain the potential beneficial effects needs further investigation. Even if the preclinical evidence requires clinical evaluation, NSAIDs might represent a potential safe, simple, and cheap improvement in therapy of TB.

  14. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of a novel anti-tuberculosis reconstruction implant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JunFeng Dong

    Full Text Available Reconstruction materials currently used in clinical for osteoarticular tuberculosis (TB are unsatisfactory due to a variety of reasons. Rifampicin (RFP is a well-known and highly effective first-line anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB drug. Poly-DL-lactide (PDLLA and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA are two promising materials that have been used both for orthopedic reconstruction and as carriers for drug release. In this study we report the development of a novel anti-TB implant for osteoarticular TB reconstruction using a combination of RFP, PDLLA and nHA.RFP, PDLLA and nHA were used as starting materials to produce a novel anti-TB activity implant by the solvent evaporation method. After manufacture, the implant was characterized and its biodegradation and drug release profile were tested. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the implant was also evaluated in pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells using multiple methodologies.A RFP/PDLLA/nHA composite was successfully synthesized using the solvent evaporation method. The composite has a loose and porous structure with evenly distributed pores. The production process was steady and no chemical reaction occurred as proved by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. Meanwhile, the composite blocks degraded and released drug for at least 12 weeks. Evaluation of in vitro cytotoxicity in MC3T3-E1 cells verified that the synthesized composite blocks did not affect cell growth and proliferation.It is feasible to manufacture a novel bioactive anti-TB RFP/PDLLA/nHA composite by the solvent evaporation method. The composite blocks showed appropriate properties such as degradation, drug release and biosafety to MC3T3-E1 cells. In conclusion, the novel composite blocks may have great potential for clinical applications in repairing bone defects caused by osteoarticular TB.

  15. Improving treatment outcome assessment in a mouse tuberculosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourik, Bas C; Svensson, Robin J; de Knegt, Gerjo J; Bax, Hannelore I; Verbon, Annelies; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M

    2018-04-09

    Preclinical treatment outcome evaluation of tuberculosis (TB) occurs primarily in mice. Current designs compare relapse rates of different regimens at selected time points, but lack information about the correlation between treatment length and treatment outcome, which is required to efficiently estimate a regimens' treatment-shortening potential. Therefore we developed a new approach. BALB/c mice were infected with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype strain and were treated with rifapentine-pyrazinamide-isoniazid-ethambutol (R p ZHE), rifampicin-pyrazinamide-moxifloxacin-ethambutol (RZME) or rifampicin-pyrazinamide-moxifloxacin-isoniazid (RZMH). Treatment outcome was assessed in n = 3 mice after 9 different treatment lengths between 2-6 months. Next, we created a mathematical model that best fitted the observational data and used this for inter-regimen comparison. The observed data were best described by a sigmoidal E max model in favor over linear or conventional E max models. Estimating regimen-specific parameters showed significantly higher curative potentials for RZME and R p ZHE compared to RZMH. In conclusion, we provide a new design for treatment outcome evaluation in a mouse TB model, which (i) provides accurate tools for assessment of the relationship between treatment length and predicted cure, (ii) allows for efficient comparison between regimens and (iii) adheres to the reduction and refinement principles of laboratory animal use.

  16. Implementation of a national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mfaume Saidi M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A drug resistance survey is an essential public health management tool for evaluating and improving the performance of National Tuberculosis control programmes. The current manuscript describes the implementation of the first national drug resistance survey in Tanzania. Methods Description of the implementation process of a national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Tanzania, in relation to the study protocol and Standard Operating Procedures. Results Factors contributing positively to the implementation of the survey were a continuous commitment of the key stakeholders, the existence of a well organized National Tuberculosis Programme, and a detailed design of cluster-specific arrangements for rapid sputum transportation. Factors contributing negatively to the implementation were a long delay between training and actual survey activities, limited monitoring of activities, and an unclear design of the data capture forms leading to difficulties in form-filling. Conclusion Careful preparation of the survey, timing of planned activities, a strong emphasis on data capture tools and data management, and timely supervision are essential for a proper implementation of a national drug resistance survey.

  17. Implementation of a national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonde, Timothy M; Doulla, Basra; van Leth, Frank; Mfinanga, Sayoki G M; Range, Nyagosya; Lwilla, Fred; Mfaume, Saidi M; van Deun, Armand; Zignol, Matteo; Cobelens, Frank G; Egwaga, Saidi M

    2008-12-30

    A drug resistance survey is an essential public health management tool for evaluating and improving the performance of National Tuberculosis control programmes. The current manuscript describes the implementation of the first national drug resistance survey in Tanzania. Description of the implementation process of a national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Tanzania, in relation to the study protocol and Standard Operating Procedures. Factors contributing positively to the implementation of the survey were a continuous commitment of the key stakeholders, the existence of a well organized National Tuberculosis Programme, and a detailed design of cluster-specific arrangements for rapid sputum transportation. Factors contributing negatively to the implementation were a long delay between training and actual survey activities, limited monitoring of activities, and an unclear design of the data capture forms leading to difficulties in form-filling. Careful preparation of the survey, timing of planned activities, a strong emphasis on data capture tools and data management, and timely supervision are essential for a proper implementation of a national drug resistance survey.

  18. Efetividade do tratamento da tuberculose Effectiveness of tuberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Nazareth Fernandes da Paz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as estratégias que influenciam a efetividade do tratamento da tuberculose em Unidades Básicas de Saúde (UBS. MÉTODOS: Levantamento epidemiológico, descritivo, retrospectivo, envolvendo os prontuários médicos de 588 pacientes com tuberculose cadastrados no programa de controle da tuberculose, entre janeiro de 2004 e dezembro de 2008, em duas UBS - Centro de Saúde Escola do Marco (CSEM e UBS da Pedreira (UBSP - localizadas na cidade de Belém (PA. Os critérios de exclusão foram ter idade 59 anos e ter alta por transferência ou mudança de diagnóstico. Os dados coletados foram idade, sexo, tipo de tratamento (autoadministrado ou supervisionado, coinfecção por HIV e desfecho do tratamento. Os profissionais de saúde envolvidos no programa da tuberculose das duas UBS foram entrevistados quanto às estratégias utilizadas no controle da doença e à rotina de atendimento. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferenças significativas quanto a idade, sexo e coinfecção com HIV nas duas UBS. A utilização de tratamento supervisionado foi significativamente maior no CSEM que na UBSP, assim como a taxa de cura, enquanto a taxa de abandono foi maior na UBSP que no CSEM. CONCLUSÕES: Para pacientes cadastrados em programas de controle da tuberculose em UBS no Brasil, o tratamento supervisionado provavelmente é uma estratégia de extrema importância para se alcançar uma menor taxa de abandono.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the treatment strategies that influence the effectiveness of tuberculosis treatment at primary care clinics (PCCs in Brazil. METHODS: This was a descriptive, retrospective epidemiological survey based on the medical records of 588 tuberculosis patients enrolled in the tuberculosis control programs at two PCCs located in the city of Belém, Brazil: Centro de Saúde Escola do Marco (CSEM and Unidade Básica de Saúde da Pedreira (UBSP. The survey was limited to patients enrolled between January of 2004 and December of 2008

  19. Heightened systemic levels of neutrophil and eosinophil granular proteins in pulmonary tuberculosis and reversal following treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moideen, Kadar; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Babu, Subash

    2018-04-09

    Granulocytes are activated during tuberculosis (TB) infection and act as immune effector cells and granulocyte responses are implicated in TB pathogenesis. Plasma levels of neutrophil and eosinophil granular proteins provide an indirect measure of degranulation. In this study, we wanted to examine the levels of neutrophil and eosinophil granular proteins in individuals with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and to compare them with the levels in latent TB (LTB) individuals. Hence, we measured the plasma levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), neutrophil elastase, and proteinase-3; major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) in these individuals. Finally, we also measured the levels of all of these parameters in PTB individuals following anti-tuberculosis (ATT) treatment. Our data reveal that PTB individuals are characterized by significantly higher plasma levels of MPO, elastase, human proteinase 3 as well as MBP and EDN in comparison to LTB individuals. Our data also reveal that ATT resulted in reversal of all of these changes, indicating an association with TB disease. Finally, our data show that the systemic levels of MPO and proteinase-3 can significantly discriminate PTB from LTB individuals. Thus, our data suggest that neutrophil and eosinophil granular proteins could play a potential role in the innate immune response and therefore, the pathogenesis of pulmonary TB. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Accelerating early anti-tuberculosis drug discovery by creating mycobacterial indicator strains that predict mode of action

    KAUST Repository

    Boot, Maikel

    2018-04-13

    Due to the rise of drug resistant forms of tuberculosis there is an urgent need for novel antibiotics to effectively combat these cases and shorten treatment regimens. Recently, drug screens using whole cell analyses have been shown to be successful. However, current high-throughput screens focus mostly on stricto sensu life-death screening that give little qualitative information. In doing so, promising compound scaffolds or non-optimized compounds that fail to reach inhibitory concentrations are missed. To accelerate early TB drug discovery, we performed RNA sequencing on Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium marinum to map the stress responses that follow upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics with known targets: ciprofloxacin, ethambutol, isoniazid, streptomycin and rifampicin. The resulting dataset comprises the first overview of transcriptional stress responses of mycobacteria to different antibiotics. We show that antibiotics can be distinguished based on their specific transcriptional stress fingerprint. Notably, this fingerprint was more distinctive in M. marinum. We decided to use this to our advantage and continue with this model organism. A selection of diverse antibiotic stress genes was used to construct stress reporters. In total, three functional reporters were constructed to respond to DNA damage, cell wall damage and ribosomal inhibition. Subsequently, these reporter strains were used to screen a small anti-TB compound library to predict the mode of action. In doing so, we could identify the putative mode of action for three novel compounds, which confirms our approach.

  1. TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Bajrović

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, known as the "White Plague" in the early 19th century, is the infectious disease, which is being researched today even in some of the most developed countries in the world. Epidemiological- epizootiological research points to the importance of pasteurizing milk as well as the transmission in aerosolized droplets in humans and animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, M. bovis, M. africanum and M. microti are the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis. Other mycobacteria cause diseases commonly known as mycobacteriosae. Pathogenesis of tuberculosis includes both host- related and mycobacterium-related factors (virulence. Mtb acts through the expression of various genes and their proteins that are detectable in the serums of the diseased only, proving these proteins are formed in the course of the disease. In humans, a diagnosis is established by the detection of antigens (and antibodies, and in animals, with the allergy tests. As far as the bovine tuberculosis is concerned, the combination of skin tuberculin and blood gamma interferon test is recommended. Sequential genome (Mtb analysis has given the basis for further research of the new vaccines.Key words: Tuberculosis, pathogenesis, immunity

  2. Factors associated with default from treatment among tuberculosis patients in nairobi province, Kenya: A case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Successful treatment of tuberculosis (TB) involves taking anti-tuberculosis drugs for at least six months. Poor adherence to treatment means patients remain infectious for longer, are more likely to relapse or succumb to tuberculosis and could result in treatment failure as well as foster emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis. Kenya is among countries with high tuberculosis burden globally. The purpose of this study was to determine the duration tuberculosis patients stay in treatment before defaulting and factors associated with default in Nairobi. Methods A Case-Control study; Cases were those who defaulted from treatment and Controls those who completed treatment course between January 2006 and March 2008. All (945) defaulters and 1033 randomly selected controls from among 5659 patients who completed treatment course in 30 high volume sites were enrolled. Secondary data was collected using a facility questionnaire. From among the enrolled, 120 cases and 154 controls were randomly selected and interviewed to obtain primary data not routinely collected. Data was analyzed using SPSS and Epi Info statistical software. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine association and Kaplan-Meier method to determine probability of staying in treatment over time were applied. Results Of 945 defaulters, 22.7% (215) and 20.4% (193) abandoned treatment within first and second months (intensive phase) of treatment respectively. Among 120 defaulters interviewed, 16.7% (20) attributed their default to ignorance, 12.5% (15) to traveling away from treatment site, 11.7% (14) to feeling better and 10.8% (13) to side-effects. On multivariate analysis, inadequate knowledge on tuberculosis (OR 8.67; 95% CI 1.47-51.3), herbal medication use (OR 5.7; 95% CI 1.37-23.7), low income (OR 5.57, CI 1.07-30.0), alcohol abuse (OR 4.97; 95% CI 1.56-15.9), previous default (OR 2.33; 95% CI 1.16-4.68), co-infection with Human immune-deficient Virus (HIV) (OR 1

  3. Induced sputum MMP-1, -3 & -8 concentrations during treatment of tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar A Ugarte-Gil

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB destroys lung tissues and this immunopathology is mediated in part by Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs. There are no data on the relationship between local tissue MMPs concentrations, anti-tuberculosis therapy and sputum conversion.Induced sputum was collected from 68 TB patients and 69 controls in a cross-sectional study. MMPs concentrations were measured by Luminex array, TIMP concentrations by ELISA and were correlated with a disease severity score (TBscore. 46 TB patients were then studied longitudinally at the 2nd, 8th week and end of treatment.Sputum MMP-1,-2,-3,-8,-9 and TIMP-1 and -2 concentrations are increased in TB. Elevated MMP-1 and -3 concentrations are independently associated with higher TB severity scores (p<0.05. MMP-1, -3 and -8 concentrations decreased rapidly during treatment (p<0.05 whilst there was a transient increase in TIMP-1/2 concentrations at week 2. MMP-2, -8 and -9 and TIMP-2 concentrations were higher at TB diagnosis in patients who remain sputum culture positive at 2 weeks and MMP-3, -8 and TIMP-1 concentrations were higher in these patients at 2nd week of TB treatment.MMPs are elevated in TB patients and associate with disease severity. This matrix-degrading phenotype resolves rapidly with treatment. The MMP profile at presentation correlates with a delayed treatment response.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis in patients with multiple sclerosis, expert consensus. On behalf of the Colombian Association of Neurology, Committee of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Carlos; Torres-Duque, Carlos A; Munoz-Ceron, Joe; Álvarez, Carlos; García, Juan R; Zarco, Luis; Vélez, Lázaro A; Awad, Carlos; Castro, Carlos Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative demyelinating disease. Current treatment of multiple sclerosis focuses on the use of immunomodulatory, immunosuppressant, and selective immunosuppressant agents. Some of these medications may result in high risk of opportunistic infections including tuberculosis. The purpose of this study was to obtain consensus from a panel of neurologists, pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists, and epidemiology experts regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of latent tuberculosis in patients with multiple sclerosis. A panel of experts in multiple sclerosis and tuberculosis was established. The methodological process was performed in three phases: definition of questions, answer using Delphi methodology, and the discussion of questions not agreed. Tuberculosis screening is suggested when multiple sclerosis drugs are prescribed. The recommended tests for latent tuberculosis are tuberculin and interferon gamma release test. When an anti-tuberculosis treatment is indicated, monitoring should be performed to determine liver enzyme values with consideration of age as well as comorbid conditions such as a history of alcoholism, age, obesity, concomitant hepatotoxic drugs, and history of liver disease. Latent tuberculosis should be considered in patients with multiple sclerosis who are going to be treated with immunomodulatory and immunosuppressant medications. Transaminase level monitoring is required on a periodic basis depending on clinical and laboratory characteristics. In addition to the liver impairment, other side effects should be considered when Isoniazid is prescribed.

  5. Problems in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsara, V; Serasli, E; Christaki, P

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem in industrialized countries due to specific socioeconomic factors and there is the growing need of new rapid and accurate diagnostic methods, in order to achieve higher sensitivity and specificity compared to traditional methods of microscopic sputum examination and culture. Such methods, recently introduced, are nucleic acid amplification (NAA) tests, used directly on clinical specimens and blood tests (QuantiFERON-TB, T-SPOT.TB test), measuring the IFN-gamma released by stimulated T cells. Furthermore, new drugs for the disease need to be developed, aiming to better treatment results and to prevention of Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR) cases. Critical aspects in the management of drug resistance cases should be the careful choices of drugs combination, the close follow up of the patients alongside with the patients adherence to therapy. The role of national and international tuberculosis programs is invaluable in TB control and therapy, as well as the collaboration of all the health system departments. However, most of the clinical problems that may arise are addressed by the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care-ISTC and these guidelines should be taken into consideration, at least until future research provides more promising diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for control of the disease.

  6. Trends of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance pattern in new cases and previously treated cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis cases in referral hospitals in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Maurya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-resistant tuberculosis is one of major current challenges to global public health. The transmission of resistant strains is increasing as a burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB patients in extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB cases in India. Aim and Objectives: The aim was to study trends of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance pattern in new cases and previously treated cases of EPTB in referral hospitals in northern India. Study Design and Setting: A prospectively observational study and referral medical institutions in northern India. Materials and Methods: All EPTB specimens were processed for Ziehl Neelsen staining, BACTEC culture and BACTEC NAP test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. All M. tuberculosis complex isolates were performed for radiometric-based drug susceptibility pattern against streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol using the 1% proportion method. Results: We found that 165/756 (20.5% isolates were identified as M. tuberculosis complex by the NAP test. We observed that 39.9% were resistant to first-line antitubercular drugs. The resistance rate was higher in previously treated patients: H (30.3%, R (16.3%, E (15.7% and S (16.3%. MDR-TB was observed in 13.4%, but, in new cases, this was 11.4% and 19.1% of the previously treated patients (P<0.05. Conclusion: MDR-TB is gradually increased in EPTB cases and predominant resistance to previous treated cases of EPTB. The molecular drug sensitivity test (DST method can be an early decision for chemotherapy in MDR-TB patients. The International Standards of TB Care need to be used by the RNTCP and professional medical associations as a tool to improve TB care in the country.

  7. Design and construction of a DNA origami drug delivery system based on MPT64 antibody aptamer for tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Hafezi-Moghadam, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-02-01

    With all of the developments on infectious diseases, tuberculosis (TB) remains a cause of death among people. One of the most promising assembly techniques in nano-technology is "scaffolded DNA origami" to design and construct a nano-scale drug delivery system. Because of the global health problems of tuberculosis, the development of potent new anti-tuberculosis drug delivery system without cross-resistance with known anti-mycobacterial agents is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to design a nano-scale drug delivery system for TB treatment using the DNA origami method. In this study, we presented an experimental research on a DNA drug delivery system for treating Tuberculosis. TEM images were visualized with an FEI Tecnai T12 BioTWIN at 120 kV. The model was designed by caDNAno software and computational prediction of the 3D solution shape and its flexibility was calculated with a CanDo server. Synthesizing the product was imaged using transmission electron microscopy after negative-staining by uranyl formate. We constructed a multilayer 3D DNA nanostructure system by designing square lattice geometry with the scaffolded-DNA-origami method. With changes in the lock and key sequences, we recommend that this system be used for other infectious diseases to target the pathogenic bacteria.

  8. Active tuberculosis patients have high levels of IgA anti-alpha-crystallin and isocitrate lyase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera-Paulín, M; García-Morales, L; Ruíz-Sánchez, B P; Caamal-Ley, Á D; Hernández-Solis, A; Ramírez-Casanova, E; Cicero-Sabido, R; Espitia, C; Helguera-Repetto, C; González-Y-Merchand, J A; Flores-Mejía, R; Estrada-Parra, S; Estrada-García, I; Chacón-Salinas, R; Wong-Baeza, I; Serafín-López, J

    2016-12-01

    Mexico City, Mexico. To identify proteins synthetised by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in hypoxic culture, which resemble more closely a granuloma environment than aerobic culture, and to determine if they are recognised by antibodies from patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Soluble extracts from M. tuberculosis H37Rv cultured under aerobic or hypoxic conditions were analysed using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and proteins over-expressed under hypoxia were identified by mass spectrometry. The presence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA and IgM antibodies against these proteins was determined in the serum of 42 patients with active PTB and 42 healthy controls. We selected three M. tuberculosis H37Rv proteins (alpha-crystallin protein [Acr, Rv2031c], universal stress protein Rv2623 and isocitrate lyase [ICL, RV0467]) that were over-expressed under hypoxia. Titres of anti-Acr and anti-ICL IgA antibodies were higher in patients than in healthy controls, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.71 for anti-ICL IgA antibodies. ICL could be used in combination with other M. tuberculosis antigens to improve the sensitivity and specificity of current serological TB diagnostic methods.

  9. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  10. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácidos y alcohol, de ahí el nombre de bacilos ácido-alcohol resistente (BAAR. Su transmisión es directa, de persona a persona.

  11. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  12. Use of anti-retroviral therapy in tuberculosis patients on second-line anti-TB regimens: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Arentz

    Full Text Available Use of antiretroviral therapy (ART during treatment of drug susceptible tuberculosis (TB improves survival. However, data from HIV infected individuals with drug resistant TB are lacking. Second line TB drugs when combined with ART may increase drug interactions and lead to higher rates of toxicity and greater noncompliance. This systematic review sought to determine the benefit of ART in the setting of second line drug therapy for drug resistant TB.We included individual patient data from studies that evaluated treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-1 infected individuals published between January 1980 and December of 2009. We evaluated the effect of ART on treatment outcomes, time to smear and culture conversion, and adverse events.Ten observational studies, including data from 217 subjects, were analyzed. Patients using ART during TB treatment had increased likelihood of cure (hazard ratio (HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-7.4 and decreased likelihood of death (HR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.6 during treatment for drug resistant TB. These associations remained significant in patients with a CD4 less than 200 cells/mm(3 and less than 50 cells/mm(3, and when correcting for drug resistance pattern.We identified only observational studies from which individual patient data could be drawn. Limitations in study design, and heterogeneity in a number of the outcomes of interest had the potential to introduce bias.While there are insufficient data to determine if ART use increases adverse drug interactions when used with second line TB drugs, ART use during treatment of drug resistant TB appears to improve cure rates and decrease risk of death. All individuals with HIV appear to benefit from ART use during treatment for TB.

  13. The outcome of tuberculosis treatment in subjects with chronic kidney disease in Brazil: a multinomial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Reis-Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between clinical/epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of tuberculosis treatment in patients with concomitant tuberculosis and chronic kidney disease (CKD in Brazil. METHODS: We used the Brazilian Ministry of Health National Case Registry Database to identify patients with tuberculosis and CKD, treated between 2007 and 2011. The tuberculosis treatment outcomes were compared with epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the subjects using a hierarchical multinomial logistic regression model, in which cure was the reference outcome. RESULTS: The prevalence of CKD among patients with tuberculosis was 0.4% (95% CI: 0.37-0.42%. The sample comprised 1,077 subjects. The outcomes were cure, in 58%; treatment abandonment, in 7%; death from tuberculosis, in 13%; and death from other causes, in 22%. The characteristics that differentiated the ORs for treatment abandonment or death were age; alcoholism; AIDS; previous noncompliance with treatment; transfer to another facility; suspected tuberculosis on chest X-ray; positive results in the first smear microscopy; and indications for/use of directly observed treatment, short-course strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate the importance of sociodemographic characteristics for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients with CKD and underscore the need for tuberculosis control strategies targeting patients with chronic noncommunicable diseases, such as CKD.

  14. Attitudes towards preventive tuberculosis treatment among hospital staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Pathak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Healthcare workers have an increased risk of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, but previous studies suggested that they might be reluctant to accept preventive tuberculosis (TB treatment. We aimed to examine doctors’ and nurses’ experience of TB screening and to explore their attitudes towards preventive TB treatment. Methods. We conducted a survey among randomly selected healthcare workers at a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia, using a paper-based questionnaire. Results. A total of 1,304 questionnaires were distributed and 311 (24% responses were received. The majority of hospital staff supported preventive TB treatment in health care workers with evidence of latent TB infection (LTBI in general (74%, 164/223 and for them personally (81%, 198/244 while 80 and 53 healthcare workers respectively had no opinion on the topic. Staff working in respiratory medicine were significantly less likely to support preventive TB treatment in health care workers in general or for them personally if they would have evidence of LTBI compared to other specialties (p = 0.001. Only 13% (14/106 of respondents with evidence of LTBI indicated that they had been offered preventive TB treatment. Twenty-one percent (64/306 of respondents indicated that they did not know the difference between active and latent TB. Among staff who had undergone testing for LTBI, only 33% (75/230 felt adequately informed about the meaning of their test results. Discussion. Hospital staff in general had positive attitudes towards preventive TB treatment, but actual treatment rates were low and perceived knowledge about LTBI was insufficient among a significant proportion of staff. The gap between high support for preventive TB treatment among staff and low treatment rates needs to be addressed. Better education on the concept of LTBI and the meaning of screening test results is required.

  15. Fresh Air and Good Food: Children and the Anti-Tuberculosis Campaign in the Netherlands c.1900-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Nelleke

    2010-01-01

    As elsewhere in the Western world, between 1900 and 1940 the anti-tuberculosis campaign in the Netherlands produced a wide range of initiatives to promote child health. In each of these the social and the medical were linked, as the hygienic "mood" was encouraged by a child-saving ethos that focused upon the poor. In this article the…

  16. Anti-angiogenic treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, J Stuart; Lockhart, A Craig; Berlin, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    The scientific rationale to block angiogenesis as a treatment strategy for human cancer has been developed over the last 30 years, but is only now entering the clinical arena. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the importance of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathways in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis, and have led to the development of approaches to block its role in tumor angiogenesis. Bevacizumab is an antibody to VEGF and has been shown to prolong survival when given with chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Although this is the first anti-angiogenic treatment to be approved for the treatment of human epithelial malignancy, a number of other approaches currently are in development. Soluble chimeric receptors to sequester serum VEGF and monoclonal antibodies against VEGF receptors have both shown considerable promise in the laboratory and are being brought into clinical investigation. A number of small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have activity against VEGF receptors also are in clinical trials. Although these novel treatments are being pioneered in CRC, anti-angiogenic approaches also are being tested in the treatment of other gastrointestinal malignancies. Anti-VEGF therapy has shown promise in such traditionally resistant tumors as pancreatic cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. This review will examine the preclinical foundation and then focus on the clinical studies of anti-VEGF therapy in gastrointestinal cancers.

  17. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Zuñiga, Marleny; Bastidas Párraga, Gustavo; León Untiveros, Paúl Albert

    2013-01-01

    La tuberculosis es una enfermedad infectocontagiosa producida por el bacilo de Koch, que ataca a los pulmones pero puede ser difuminada por todo el cuerpo. El siguiente artículo de información nos da una visión amplia de la detección, diagnóstico y tratamiento de la misma.

  18. [Surgical Treatment of Bronchial Stricture due to Endobronchial Tuberculosis: 
Results in 36 Consecutive Cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Junzhong; Zhang, Tianhui; Li, Fugen; Duan, Yong; Han, Ming; Wang, Zitong

    2018-04-20

    Bronchial tuberculosis is a common complication of pulmonary tuberculosis. The present report is to investigate and analyze the indication and efficacy of surgical treatment of bronchial stricture due to severe endobronchial tuberculosis, when the drug and endoscopic treatment were no effect. Reviewed the clinical-pathological records documenting the surgical outcomes in 36 bronchial stricture due to severe endobronchial tuberculosis who underwent lobectomy or pneumonectomy enrolled in our hospital between January 2000 and February 2016. Pneumonectomy in 8 cases, lobectomy in 23 cases, sleeve resection in 5 cases. No intraoperative or early postoperative death occurred. Six patients developed complications. All 6 cases recovered well after treatment. Surgical treatment is still the recommended treatment modatity for bronchial stricture caused by endobronchial tuberculosis due to its good results. It should be performed in time when the drug and intraluninal treatment were no effect for avoiding of being progeressed.

  19. Evaluation of patterns of liver toxicity in patients on antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drugs: a prospective four arm observational study in ethiopian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Yimer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the incidence, type, severity and predictors of antiretroviral and/or anti-tuberculosis drugs induced liver injury (DILI. METHODS: A total of 1,060 treatment naive patients were prospectively enrolled into four treatment groups: HIV patients receiving efavirenz based HAART alone (Arm-1; TB-HIV co-infected patients with CD4≤200 cells/μL, receiving concomitant rifampicin based anti-TB and efavirenz based HAART (Arm-2; TB-HIV co-infected patients with CD4>200 cells/μL, receiving anti-TB alone (Arm-3; TB patients taking rifampicin based anti-TB alone (Arm-4. Liver enzyme levels were monitored at baseline, 1st, 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th and 24th weeks during treatment. CD4 and HIV viral load was measured at baseline, 24th and 48th weeks. Data were analyzed using multivariate Cox Proportional Hazards Model. RESULTS: A total of 159 patients (15% developed DILI with severity grades 1, 2, 3 and 4 of 53.5%, 32.7%, 11.3% and 2.5% respectively. The incidence of cholestatic, hepatocellular or mixed pattern was 61%, 15% and 24%, respectively. Incidence of DILI was highest in Arm-2 (24.2%>Arm-3 (10.8%>Arm-1 (8.8%>Arm-4 (2.9%. Concomitant anti-TB-HIV therapy increased the risk of DILI by 10-fold than anti-TB alone (p<0.0001. HIV co-infection increased the risk of anti-TB DILI by 4-fold (p = 0.004. HAART associated DILI was 3-fold higher than anti-TB alone, (p = 0.02. HAART was associated with cholestatic and grade 1 DILI whereas anti-TB therapy was associated with hepatocellular and grade ≥ 2. Treatment type, lower CD4, platelet, hemoglobin, higher serum AST and direct bilirubin levels at baseline were significant DILI predictors. There was no effect of DILI on immunologic recovery or virologic suppression rate of HAART. CONCLUSION: HAART associated DILI is mainly cholestatic and mild whereas hepatocellular or mixed pattern with high severity grade is more common in anti-tuberculosis DILI. TB-HIV co-infection, disease severity

  20. Drug therapy in spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, S; Khandelwal, Gaurav

    2013-06-01

    Although the discovery of effective anti-tuberculosis drugs has made uncomplicated spinal tuberculosis a medical disease, the advent of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the co-infection of HIV with tuberculosis have led to a resurgence of the disease recently. The principles of drug treatment of spinal tuberculosis are derived from our experience in treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is classified to be a severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and hence is included in Category I of the WHO classification. The tuberculosis bacilli isolated from patients are of four different types with different growth kinetics and metabolic characteristics. Hence multiple drugs, which act on the different groups of the mycobacteria, are included in each anti-tuberculosis drug regimen. Prolonged and uninterrupted chemotherapy (which may be 'short course' and 'intermittent' but preferably 'directly observed') is effective in controlling the infection. Spinal Multi-drug-resistant TB and spinal TB in HIV-positive patients present unique problems in management and have much poorer prognosis. Failure of chemotherapy and emergence of drug resistance are frequent due to the failure of compliance hence all efforts must be made to improve patient compliance to the prescribed drug regimen.

  1. Cerebral tuberculoma in a patient receiving anti-TNF alpha (adalimumab) treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Karen

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of a cerebral tuberculoma in a 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis while receiving the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha monoclonal antibody, adalimumab (Humira), for active disease. MR brain imaging for dyspraxia revealed a left parietal ring-enhancing lesion, which on resection was shown to be a necrotizing granuloma. There were no associated pulmonary lesions, and the patient was systemically well. Sputum and urine cultures were negative for tuberculosis. The patient was treated with anti-tuberculous medications and made an excellent recovery. We consider this to be the first documented case of tuberculosis involving the central nervous system occurring in the setting of adalimumab treatment.

  2. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activity of Esters of Quinoxaline 1,4-Di-N-Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Palos

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis continues to be a public health problem in the world, and drug resistance has been a major obstacle in its treatment. Quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide has been proposed as a scaffold to design new drugs to combat this disease. To examine the efficacy of this compound, this study evaluates methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and n-propyl esters of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives in vitro against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (pansusceptible and monoresistant strains. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of esters of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide on M. tuberculosis gyrase supercoiling was examined, and a stability analysis by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS was also carried out. Results showed that eight compounds (T-007, T-018, T-011, T-069, T-070, T-072, T-085 and T-088 had an activity similar to that of the reference drug isoniazid (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC = 0.12 µg/mL with an effect on nonreplicative cells and drug monoresistant strains. Structural activity relationship analysis showed that the steric effect of an ester group at 7-position is key to enhancing its biological effects. Additionally, T-069 showed a high stability after 24 h in human plasma at 37 °C.

  3. Evaluation of anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rogério Pavan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Campomanesia adamantium fruits extracts were evaluated. Six compounds, identified as flavanones and chalcones were quantified by HPLC-DAD-UV. Promising antitubercular activity was observed with ethyl acetate extract (MIC 62.5 µg/mL and their fractions (MIC values ranging from 39 to above 250 µg/mL. The better MIC result of 39 µg/mL was associated with two fractions that contain bigger amounts of 5,7-dihydroxy-6, 8-di-C-methylflavanone and 2',4'-dihydroxy-3',5'-dimethyl-6'-methoxychalcone. These compounds exhibited MICs >250 and 62.5 µg/mL, respectively, while their mixtures showed values ranging from 62.5 to 7.8 µg/mL, demonstrating a synergism between them.

  4. Evaluation of anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavan, Fernando Rogerio; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2009-01-01

    The anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Campomanesia adamantium fruits extracts were evaluated. Six compounds, identified as flavanones and chalcones were quantified by HPLC-DAD-UV. Promising antitubercular activity was observed with ethyl acetate extract (MIC 62.5 μg/mL) and their fractions (MIC values ranging from 39 to above 250 μg/mL). The better MIC result of 39 μg/mL was associated with two fractions that contain bigger amounts of 5,7-dihydroxy-6, 8-di-C-methylflavanone and 2',4'-dihydroxy-3',5'-dimethyl-6'-methoxychalcone. These compounds exhibited MICs >250 and 62.5 μg/mL, respectively, while their mixtures showed values ranging from 62.5 to 7.8 μg/mL, demonstrating a synergism between them. (author)

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody; Coll, Francesc; McNerney, Ruth; Ascher, David B.; Pires, Douglas E. V.; Furnham, Nick; Coeck, Nele; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Nair, Mridul; Mallard, Kim; Ramsay, Andrew; Campino, Susana; Hibberd, Martin L.; Pain, Arnab; Rigouts, Leen; Clark, Taane G.

    2016-01-01

    of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify

  6. Tratamiento acortado estrictamente supervisado para tuberculosis pulmonar Shortened directly observed treatment applied to the tuberculosis control program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe del Carmen Alvarez-Gordillo

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la posibilidad de aplicar el tratamiento acortado estrictamente supervisado (TAES en el Programa de Control de la Tuberculosis en Chiapas, México. Material y métodos. Se evaluó la eficacia y la eficiencia del tratamiento en una cohorte de pacientes con tuberculosis pulmonar confirmada por baciloscopía, que ingresaron a tratamiento con esquemas de autoadministración semisupervisión y estricta supervisión, de enero a junio de 1996. Resultados. La eficacia fue de 90.9. 97.7 y 100% para los esquemas de tratamiento autoadministrado, semisupervisado y TAES, respectivamente, mientras que la eficiencia fue de 68.1. 77.6 y 88.5% en el mismo orden. Conclusiones. Para la salud pública el TAES demostró ser la actividad más importante en el control de la tuberculosis, al elevar las tasas de curación y disminuir, por lo tanto, las fuentes de transmisión de la enfermedad.Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the Shortened Directly Observed Treatment (DOT, S applied to the Tuberculosis Control Program in Chiapas, Mexico. Material and methods. The efficacy and efficiency of treatment was evaluated in a cohort of pulmonary tuberculosis patients confirmed by baciloscopy, who were subjected to treatment under one of three different regimes, self-administered. supervised and DOT,S from January to June 1996. Results. Efficacy was 90.9%, 97.7% and 100% for self-administered, supervised and DOT,S treatment, respectively. Efficiency was 68.1%, 77.6% and 88.5% in the same order Conclusions. For public health ends, the DOT,S proved to be the most efficient in the control of tuberculosis. since healing rates were increased and this reduces sources of disease transmission.

  7. Bone scintigraphy, radiography and MRI in the diagnosis and evaluation of treatment response of calcaneal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Bharathi Dasan, J.; Choudhury, S.K.; Thomas, E.J.; Sharma, S.; Ashok, S.; Trika, V.; Gupta, V.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: We describe the role of various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and follow up of calcaneal tuberculosis. Materials and methods: Six patients (5 males, 1 female; age range 16-49 years) presented with heel pain. All patients underwent routine laboratory and radiological investigations e.g. radiographs, MRI and skeletal scintigraphy as part of initial diagnostic work-up. In all patients the diagnosis of tuberculosis was confirmed based on histopathology or culture. Standard multi-drug anti-tubercular therapy (ATT) was administered for 15 months. All patients were subsequently followed up with clinical evaluation, laboratory investigations and imaging. Skeletal scintigraphy, MRI and radiographs were repeated at 12 to 15 months from the initiation of anti-tubercular treatment in all patients. Results: Five out of six patients had lytic lesions at presentation on radiographs. Four of these 5 patients also had surrounding sclerosis. Follow-up radiographs obtained 12-15 months after starting ATT, showed an increase in surrounding sclerosis with progressive reduction in area of osteopenia in four and mild sclerotic changes in one. In the remaining one patient radiograph were normal both at presentation and follow up. Three phase bone scintigraphy revealed increased blood flow and blood pool activity and 'hot spots' in 5 and a central photopenic area in the calcaneum in one patient at the time of diagnosis. After starting ATT, significant reduction in vascularity and reactive bone changes in 5 patients and mild improvement in one patient. MRI was done in three patients, which revealed hyperintense lesion with erosion of the superior articular surface in 2 and 'Bull's eye' lesion with a hypointense centre and a surrounding hyperintense rim on post contrast T1W images in one patient. Follow-up MRI showed intermediate signal intensity on T2 weighted images that corresponded to caseous necrosis and high signal intensity related to granulomas or effusion. Conclusion

  8. A Review of Moxifloxacin for the Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Anushka; Naidoo, Kogieleum; McIlleron, Helen; Essack, Sabiha; Padayatchi, Nesri

    2017-11-01

    Moxifloxacin, an 8-methoxy quinolone, is an important drug in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and is being investigated in novel drug regimens with pretomanid, bedaquiline, and pyrazinamide, or rifapentine, for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Early results of these studies are promising. Although current evidence does not support the use of moxifloxacin in treatment-shortening regimens for drug-susceptible tuberculosis, it may be recommended in patients unable to tolerate standard first-line drug regimens or for isoniazid monoresistance. Evidence suggests that the standard 400-mg dose of moxifloxacin used in the treatment of tuberculosis may be suboptimal in some patients, leading to worse tuberculosis treatment outcomes and emergence of drug resistance. Furthermore, a drug interaction with the rifamycins results in up to 31% reduced plasma concentrations of moxifloxacin when these are combined for treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, although the clinical relevance of this interaction is unclear. Moxifloxacin exhibits extensive interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. Higher doses of moxifloxacin may be needed to achieve drug exposures required for improved clinical outcomes. Further study is, however, needed to determine the safety of proposed higher doses and clinically validated targets for drug exposure to moxifloxacin associated with improved tuberculosis treatment outcomes. We discuss in this review the evidence for the use of moxifloxacin in drug-susceptible tuberculosis and explore the role of moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug interactions with rifamycins, on tuberculosis treatment outcomes when used in first-line tuberculosis drug regimens. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  9. Delay in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in Uzbekistan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Tatiana V; Khojiev, Doniyor S; Tillyashaykhov, Mirzagaleb N; Tigay, Zinaida N; Kudenov, Marat U; Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer; Vlcek, Jiri

    2014-11-25

    Early diagnosis and prompt effective therapy are crucial for the prevention of tuberculosis (TB) transmission, particularly in regions with high levels of multi-drug resistant TB. This study aimed to evaluate the extent of delay in diagnosis and treatment of TB in Uzbekistan and identify associated risk factors. A cross-sectional study was performed on hospital patients with newly diagnosed TB. The time between the onset of respiratory symptoms and initiation of anti-TB treatment was assessed and delays were divided into patient, health system and total delays. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate determinants of diagnostic and treatment delay. Among 538 patients enrolled, the median delay from onset of symptoms until treatment with anti-TB drugs was 50 days. Analysis of the factors affecting health-seeking behaviour and timely treatment showed the presence of the patient factor. Self-medication was the first health-seeking action for 231 (43%) patients and proved to be a significant predictor of delay (p = 0.005), as well as coughing (p = 0.009), loss of weight (p = 0.001), and visiting private and primary healthcare facilities (p = 0.03 and p = 0.02, respectively). TB diagnostic and treatment delay was mainly contributed to by patient delay and should be reduced through increasing public awareness of TB symptoms and improving public health-seeking behaviour for timely initiation of anti-TB treatment. Efforts should be made to minimise irrational use of antibiotics and support interventions to restrict over-the-counter availability of antibiotics.

  10. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN TREATMENT OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Lvova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive examination of 62 adolescents, hospitalized for pulmonary tuberculosis, established high spread of clinical and laboratory markers of secondary immune deficiency: chronic diseases of ear, throat and nose (59,6%, recurrent infection caused by the herpes simplex viruses (SPGV (55,8% ; serological SPGV activation (90,4% and cytomegalovirus infection (CMV (94,2%; absolute lymphopenia (53,8%, low level and lack of interferon-alpha (28,9% and interferongamma (76,9%. Validity, effectiveness and safety of modern technology immunization with interferon -α-2b (VIFERON® 3 million IU and 1 million IU suppositories in 1 month course in the complex treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis was proved with a random research by a «case-control» method. Significant positive clinical and laboratory dynamics was registered: increase in body weight in 84,6 % of adolescents; reduction in the frequency of arrhythmias; increase absolute lymphocyte count (46,1%, decrease in serological SPGV activation (30,8% and CMV infection (61,5% increase in the amount of interferon-alpha (61,5%, and interferon-gamma (61,5% and absence of intolerance and 3 times less undesirable effects of chemotherapy.

  11. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody is not useful to differentiate between Crohn′s disease and intestinal tuberculosis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoshal U

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological parameters of intestinal tuberculosis (IT and Crohn′s disease (CD are so similar that differentiation between these two diseases, which require different treatment, is difficult. Anti- Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody (ASCA, which is often present in the sera of patients with CD, may be potentially useful to differentiate CD from IT. Aim : To evaluate the role of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test for ASCA in serum in differentiating CD from intestinal tuberculosis. Settings and Design : Prospective case-control study. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with IT, 16 CD, 36 UC diagnosed using standard parameters and 12 controls (11 healthy subjects and one with colonic carcinoma were tested for IgG ASCA in serum. Statistical Analysis Used : Categorical variables were analyzed using Chi-square test with Yates′ correction, as applicable. Continuous variables were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results : Eight of 16 (50% patients with IT, 10 of 16 with CD (62%, nine of 35 with UC (26% and one of 12 controls tested positive for ASCA in serum. Though the frequency of ASCA in serum was comparable among patients with IT and CD (8/16 vs. 10/16, P = ns, IT and UC (8/16 vs. 9/35, P =ns, CD and UC (10/16 vs. 9/35, P =ns, its frequency in CD or IT but not in UC was higher than healthy controls ( P < 0.01. Conclusions : Serum ASCA is unlikely to be useful to differentiate between CD and IT in India.

  12. Psychological distress and its effect on tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habteyes Hailu Tola

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychological distress is the major comorbidity among tuberculosis (TB patients. However, its magnitude, associated factors, and effect on treatment outcome have not been adequately studied in low-income countries. Objective: This study aimed to determine the magnitude of psychological distress and its effect on treatment outcome among TB patients on treatment. Design: A follow-up study was conducted in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, from May to December 2014. Patients (N=330 diagnosed with all types of TB who had been on treatment for 1–2 months were enrolled consecutively from 15 randomly selected health centers and one TB specialized hospital. Data on sociodemographic variables and economic status were collected using a structured questionnaire. The presence of psychological distress was assessed at baseline (within 1–2 months after treatment initiation and end point (6 months after treatment initiation using the 10-item Kessler (K-10 scale. Alcohol use and tobacco smoking history were assessed using WHO Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test and Australian Smoking Assessment Checklist, respectively. The current WHO TB treatment outcome definition was used to differentiate the end result of each patient at completion of the treatment. Results: The overall psychological distress was 67.6% at 1–2 months and 48.5% at 6 months after treatment initiation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that past TB treatment history [adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 3.76; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.67–8.45], being on anti-TB and anti-HIV treatments (AOR: 5.35; 95% CI: 1.83–15.65, being unmarried (AOR: 4.29; 95% CI: 2.45–7.53, having alcohol use disorder (AOR: 2.95; 95% CI: 1.25–6.99, and having low economic status (AOR: 4.41; 95% CI: 2.44–7.97 were significantly associated with psychological distress at baseline. However, at 6 months after treatment initiation, only being a multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB patient (AOR: 3

  13. Free tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment are not enough: patient cost evidence from three continents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauch, V.; Bonsu, F.; Gyapong, M.; Awini, E.; Suarez, P.; Marcelino, B.; Melgen, R. E.; Lönnroth, K.; Nhung, N. V.; Hoa, N. B.; Klinkenberg, E.

    2013-01-01

    The National Tuberculosis Programs of Ghana, Viet Nam and the Dominican Republic. To assess the direct and indirect costs of tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and treatment for patients and households. Each country translated and adapted a structured questionnaire, the Tool to Estimate Patients' Costs. A

  14. The susceptibility of anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury and chronic hepatitis C infection: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tien-En; Huang, Yi-Shin; Chang, Chih-Hao; Perng, Chin-Lin; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Hou, Ming-Chih

    2018-02-01

    Anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury (ATDILI) is a major safety concern in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The impact of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection on the risk of ATDILI is still controversial. We aimed to assess the influence of CHC infection on ATDILI through a systematic review and meta-analysis. We systemically reviewed all English-language literature in the major medical databases with the subject search terms "anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury" and "anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity". We then performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the papers relevant to hepatitis C in qualified publications. A total of 14 studies were eligible for analysis, which included 516 cases with ATDILI and 4301 controls without ATDILI. The pooled odds ratio (OR) of all studies for CHC infection to ATDILI was 3.21 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.30-4.49). Subgroup analysis revealed that the CHC carriers had a higher risk of ATDILI than those without CHC both in Asians (OR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.79-4.90) and Caucasians (OR = 4.07, 95% CI: 2.70-6.14), in those receiving standard four combination anti-TB therapy (OR = 2.94, 95% CI: 1.95-4.41) and isoniazid monotherapy (OR = 4.18, 95% CI: 2.36-7.40), in those with a strict definition of DILI (serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] > 5 upper limit of normal value [ULN], OR = 2.59, 95% CI: 1.58-4.25) and a loose definition of DILI (ALT > 2 or 3 ULN, OR = 4.34, 95% CI: 2.96-6.37), and in prospective studies (OR = 4.16, 95% CI: 2.93-5.90) and case-control studies (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.29-4.58). This meta-analysis suggests that CHC infection may increase the risk of ATDILI. Regular liver tests are mandatory for CHC carriers under anti-TB therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  15. Rapid determination of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance from whole-genome sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Coll, Francesc; McNerney, Ruth; Preston, Mark D; Guerra-Assunç ã o, José Afonso; Warry, Andrew; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Mallard, Kim; Nair, Mridul; Miranda, Anabela; Alves, Adriana; Perdigã o, Joã o; Viveiros, Miguel; Portugal, Isabel; Hasan, Zahra; Hasan, Rumina; Glynn, Judith R; Martin, Nigel; Pain, Arnab; Clark, Taane G

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance (DR) challenges effective tuberculosis disease control. Current molecular tests examine limited numbers of mutations, and although whole genome sequencing approaches could fully characterise DR, data

  16. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Rodríguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    La tuberculosis sigue constituyendo un problema de salud pública a nivel mundial con casi nueve millones de casos nuevos en 2012 y se estima que un tercio de la humanidad está infectada. A nivel nacional, si bien las tasas son alentadoras, la variación regional es muy importante. En los últimos años se han registrado progresos importantes tanto en el conocimiento de la conducta del bacilo de Koch, el causante de la enfermedad, como en los métodos para detectarlo. Así los IGRAS (Interferon G R...

  17. Assessment of treatment interruption among pulmonary tuberculosis patients: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Bhgath Gorityala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (TB is a rising peril of the TB control in India caused mostly by incomplete treatment. Aim: The aim was to assess the treatment interruption among pulmonary TB (PTB patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out for a period of 9 months among PTB patients. Patients admitted with active pulmonary Koch′s and history of anti-TB treatment (ATT for 1-month or more from any source and who returns to treatment after not taking ATT consecutively for 2 months or more were included in the study. The data were collected from the patients or their caretakers to obtain the source of treatment given previously before default, number of treatment interruptions, phase and reasons for treatment interruption treatment. Results: A total of 107 defaulters were identified during the study period. In the present study, 62.6% of the patients interrupted treatment only once, 55.34% of the patient′s early continuation (3-4 months treatment, and 47.66% of the patient′s only one reason for the treatment interruptions during the course of the treatment. The most common reason for the treatment interruptions were felt well with TB treatment (29.53% followed by side effects (16.06%, lack of money (8.29%, and other reasons. Conclusion: The study revealed that most of the defaulters were in the age group between 35 and 60 years, male gender, illiterates, daily wage labor, and married. The treatment interruptions were minimized by putting the efforts to improve direct supervision; pretreatment counseling and retrieve treatment interrupters were recommended.

  18. Impact of tuberculosis treatment on CD4 cell count, HIV RNA, and p24 antigen in patients with HIV and tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejse, Christian; Furtado, A.; Camara, C.

    2013-01-01

    To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment.......To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment....

  19. Biotransformation enzymes for xenobiotics and personalization of treatment regimens for tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Mozhokina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of the literature on specific metabolism of anti-tuberculosis drugs depending on polymorphism of genes controlling synthesis and action of biotransformation enzymes, in particular cytochrome P-450 isozymes and enzymes of the IInd phase of biotransformation (N-acetyltransferase, glutathione S-transferase respective adverse reactions development, first of  all hepatotoxic ones. The  possibility of pharmacogenetic studies with the evaluation of genetic predisposition to developing adverse reactions to medications has been discussed in respect of personalized approach to effective and safe treatment of tuberculosis patients.

  20. Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Personalized Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Emerging Role of Gamma-Glutamyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Mokondjimobe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objectives were (i to evaluate the impact of acute pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB and anti-TB therapy on the relationship between AST, ALT, and GGT levels in absence of conditions related to hepatotoxicity; (ii to evaluate the rate and the time of alterations of AST, ALT, and GGT. Design and Methods. A prospective followup of 40 adults (21 males; mean age of 34.7±5.8 years with active PTB on initial phase and continuation phase anti-TB. Results. Only 3% (n=1 developed a transient and benign ADR at day 30 without interruption of anti-TB treatment. Within normal ranges, GGT decreased significantly from day 0 to day 60, while AST and ALT increased significantly and respectively. During day 0–day 60, there was a significant, negative, and independent association between GGT and AST. Conclusion. The initial two months led to significant improvement of oxidative stress. Values of oxidative markers in normal ranges might predict low rate of ADR.

  1. Sputum and serum microRNA-144 levels in patients with tuberculosis before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yan; Guo, Shuai; Li, Xue-Gang; Chi, Jing-Yu; Qu, Yi-Qing; Zhong, Hai-Lai

    2016-02-01

    To measure the expression levels of sputum and serum microRNA-144 (miR-144) before and after the treatment of patients with tuberculosis (TB). Details of the cases of a total of 124 TB patients were collected at Qilu Hospital of Shandong University between April 2014 and April 2015. Fifty-three of these patients had sputum positive for bacteria and a cavity on imaging (group A), 20 patients had sputum negative for bacteria and a cavity on imaging (group B), and 51 patients had sputum negative for bacteria and no cavity on imaging (group C). One hundred seventeen healthy people who attended the hospital for a physical examination were recruited as controls. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to measure the levels of sputum and serum miR-144 before anti-TB treatment and at 1 month after treatment. Before treatment, sputum and serum miR-144 expression levels in the TB patients were both higher than those of the controls (both p<0.05). After treatment, sputum and serum miR-144 levels in the TB patients were significantly lower than those measured before treatment (both p<0.05). The levels of sputum and serum miR-144 in the improved TB patients decreased significantly after treatment compared to those measured before treatment (both p<0.001). Significant differences were found in sputum and serum miR-144 levels in the TB patients, with or without improvement, compared with the healthy controls (all p<0.05). Sputum and serum miR-144 levels were significantly upregulated in the TB patients, but were found to decrease significantly after anti-TB treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure/activity of Pt{sup II}/N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthiourea complexes: Anti-tumor and anti-mycobacterium tuberculosis activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plutín, Ana M.; Alvarez, Anislay; Mocelo, Raúl; Ramos, Raúl; Sánchez, Osmar C. [Laboratorio de Síntesis Orgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Castellano, Euardo E. [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Silva, Monize M. da; Villarreal, Wilmer; Colina-Vegas, Legna; Batista, Alzir A. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil); Pavan, Fernando R., E-mail: anap@fq.uh.cu, E-mail: daab@ufscar.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas

    2018-05-01

    The syntheses, characterization, cytotoxicity against tumor cells and anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity assays of Pt{sup II}/PPh{sub 3}/N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthioureas complexes with general formulae [Pt(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}(L)]PF{sub 6}, PPh{sub 3} = triphenylphosphine; L = N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthiourea, are here reported. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) ({sup 1} H, {sup 13}C{1 H} and {sup 31}P{"1 H}) spectroscopy. The {sup 31}P{"1 H} NMR data are consistent with the presence of two PPh{sup 3} ligands cis to each other position, and one N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthiourea coordinated to the metal through O and S, in a chelate form. The structures of the complexes were determined by X-ray crystallography, forming distorted square-planar structures. The complexes were tested in human cell lines carcinomas and also screened with respect to their anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity (H37RvATCC 27294). It was found that complexes with N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthiourea containing open and small chains as R2 groups show higher cytotoxic and higher anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity than those containing rings in this position. (author)

  3. Viral hepatitis and HIV-associated tuberculosis: Risk factors and TB treatment outcomes in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likanonsakul Sirirat

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of tuberculosis (TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and viral hepatitis infections in the same patient poses unique clinical and public health challenges, because medications to treat TB and HIV are hepatotoxic. We conducted an observational study to evaluate risk factors for HBsAg and/or anti-HCV reactivity and to assess differences in adverse events and TB treatment outcomes among HIV-infected TB patients. Methods Patients were evaluated at the beginning, during, and at the end of TB treatment. Blood samples were tested for aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin (BR, complete blood count, and CD4+ T lymphocyte cell count. TB treatment outcomes were assessed at the end of TB treatment according to international guidelines. Results Of 769 enrolled patients, 752 (98% had serologic testing performed for viral hepatitis: 70 (9% were reactive for HBsAg, 237 (31% for anti-HCV, and 472 (63% non-reactive for both markers. At the beginning of TB treatment, 18 (26% patients with HBsAg reactivity had elevated liver function tests compared with 69 (15% patients non-reactive to any viral marker (p = 0.02. At the end of TB treatment, 493 (64% were successfully treated. Factors independently associated with HBsAg reactivity included being a man who had sex with men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–4.3 and having low TB knowledge (AOR, 1.8; CI, 1.0–3.0. Factors most strongly associated with anti-HCV reactivity were having injection drug use history (AOR, 12.8; CI, 7.0–23.2 and living in Bangkok (AOR, 15.8; CI, 9.4–26.5. The rate of clinical hepatitis and death during TB treatment was similar in patients HBsAg reactive, anti-HCV reactive, both HBsAg and anti-HCV reactive, and non-reactive to any viral marker. Conclusion Among HIV-infected TB patients living in Thailand, markers of viral hepatitis infection, particularly hepatitis C virus

  4. Factors associated with anti-tuberculosis medication adverse effects: a case-control study in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Delgado, Kocfa; Revilla-Montag, Alejandro; Guillen-Bravo, Sonia; Velez-Segovia, Eduardo; Soria-Montoya, Andrea; Nuñez-Garbin, Alexandra; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Long-term exposure to anti-tuberculosis medication increases risk of adverse drug reactions and toxicity. The objective of this investigation was to determine factors associated with anti-tuberculosis adverse drug reactions in Lima, Peru, with special emphasis on MDR-TB medication, HIV infection, diabetes, age and tobacco use. A case-control study was performed using information from Peruvian TB Programme. A case was defined as having reported an anti-TB adverse drug reaction during 2005-2010 with appropriate notification on clinical records. Controls were defined as not having reported a side effect, receiving anti-TB therapy during the same time that the case had appeared. Crude, and age- and sex-adjusted models were calculated using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A multivariable model was created to look for independent factors associated with side effect from anti-TB therapy. A total of 720 patients (144 cases and 576 controls) were analyzed. In our multivariable model, age, especially those over 40 years (OR = 3.93; 95%CI: 1.65-9.35), overweight/obesity (OR = 2.13; 95%CI: 1.17-3.89), anemia (OR = 2.10; IC95%: 1.13-3.92), MDR-TB medication (OR = 11.1; 95%CI: 6.29-19.6), and smoking (OR = 2.00; 95%CI: 1.03-3.87) were independently associated with adverse drug reactions. Old age, anemia, MDR-TB medication, overweight/obesity status, and smoking history are independent risk factors associated with anti-tuberculosis adverse drug reactions. Patients with these risk factors should be monitored during the anti-TB therapy. A comprehensive clinical history and additional medical exams, including hematocrit and HIV-ELISA, might be useful to identify these patients.

  5. Factors associated with anti-tuberculosis medication adverse effects: a case-control study in Lima, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocfa Chung-Delgado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term exposure to anti-tuberculosis medication increases risk of adverse drug reactions and toxicity. The objective of this investigation was to determine factors associated with anti-tuberculosis adverse drug reactions in Lima, Peru, with special emphasis on MDR-TB medication, HIV infection, diabetes, age and tobacco use. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: A case-control study was performed using information from Peruvian TB Programme. A case was defined as having reported an anti-TB adverse drug reaction during 2005-2010 with appropriate notification on clinical records. Controls were defined as not having reported a side effect, receiving anti-TB therapy during the same time that the case had appeared. Crude, and age- and sex-adjusted models were calculated using odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. A multivariable model was created to look for independent factors associated with side effect from anti-TB therapy. A total of 720 patients (144 cases and 576 controls were analyzed. In our multivariable model, age, especially those over 40 years (OR = 3.93; 95%CI: 1.65-9.35, overweight/obesity (OR = 2.13; 95%CI: 1.17-3.89, anemia (OR = 2.10; IC95%: 1.13-3.92, MDR-TB medication (OR = 11.1; 95%CI: 6.29-19.6, and smoking (OR = 2.00; 95%CI: 1.03-3.87 were independently associated with adverse drug reactions. CONCLUSIONS: Old age, anemia, MDR-TB medication, overweight/obesity status, and smoking history are independent risk factors associated with anti-tuberculosis adverse drug reactions. Patients with these risk factors should be monitored during the anti-TB therapy. A comprehensive clinical history and additional medical exams, including hematocrit and HIV-ELISA, might be useful to identify these patients.

  6. Tolerability and Healthcare Utilization in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients Undergoing Treatment for Tuberculosis-Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadah, Abdurrahman M; Beaulieu, Lynn M; Wilson, John W; Aksamit, Timothy R; Gregoire, James R; Williams, Amy W; Dillon, John J; Albright, Robert C; Onuigbo, Macaulay; Iyer, Venkateshwaran K; Hickson, LaTonya J

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in end-stage renal disease is significantly higher than that in the general population. Among those with kidney dysfunction, anti-TB treatment is associated with increased side effects, but the effect on healthcare utilization is unknown. Methods/Aim: To assess patient-reported symptoms, adverse effects and describe changes in healthcare utilization patterns during treatment for TB, we conducted a case series (n = 12) of patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis (HD) from Mayo Clinic Dialysis Services and concurrent drug therapy for TB from January 2002 through May 2014. Healthcare utilization (hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits independent of hospital admission) was compared before and during treatment. Patients were treated for latent (n = 7) or active (n = 5) TB. The majority of patients with latent disease were treated with isoniazid (n = 5, 71%), while active-disease patients received a 4-drug regimen. Adverse effects were reported in 83% of patients. Compared to measurements prior to drug initiation, serum albumin and dialysis weights were similar at 3 months. Commonly reported anti-TB drug toxicities were described. More than half (58%) of the patients were hospitalized at least once. No ED or hospital admissions occurred in the period prior to drug therapy, but healthcare utilization increased during treatment in the latent disease group (hospitalization rate per person-month: pre 0 vs. post 1). Among HD patients, anti-TB therapy is associated with frequently reported symptoms and increased healthcare utilization. Among this subset, patients receiving treatment for latent disease may be those with greatest increase in healthcare use. Careful monitoring and early complication detection may help optimize medication adherence and minimize hospitalizations. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Socio-economic status and the duration of pulmonary tuberculosis symptoms in women treated at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Otwock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Maria; Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Błachnio, Antoni; Jagodziński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of tuberculosis depends on various factors such as migration, homelessness, malnutrition, unemployment, bad life conditions and the aging of a society. The aim of this study was to evaluate tuberculosis in females treated at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (Mazowieckie Centrum Leczenia Chorób Płuc i Gruźlicy) in Otwock, regarding the context of demographic, social and professional status of female patients. The duration of the illness and the extent of radiographic changes were also taken into consideration. The study was carried out retrospectively. The medical documentation that was evaluated concerned 100 women, aged between 20 and 92, hospitalized at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Otwock in the years 2005 and 2006 due to bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis. Most women with tuberculosis lived in cities (65%), 32% of the evaluated patients lived in villages and 3% were homeless. 1/3 of females were under 40 years of age, and 1/3 were over 60 years of age. Only 29% of the women were professionally active and 25% were unemployed. 60% of women were not married. 35% of women with tuberculosis were bringing up children and 7% had abandoned their offspring. More than 1/3 of women had had tuberculosis symptoms for more than half a year before tuberculosis was diagnosed. 40% of women with tuberculosis had small radiological changes (1 to 2 lung fields); however, 26% of them had extensive changes covering 4 to 6 lung fields. The majority of women with tuberculosis in the Mazovian district are single, over 40 years old, unemployed inhabitants of cities. 30% of women in the study group had had symptoms for more than 6 months before tuberculosis was diagnosed. 40% of women with tuberculosis had very extensive radiological changes covering 4 to 6 lung fields.

  8. Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection: An Updated Network Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zenner, D.; Beer, N.; Harris, R. J.; Lipman, M. C.; Stagg, H. R.; van der Werf, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is an important component of tuberculosis (TB) control, and this study updates a previous network meta-analysis of the best LTBI treatment options to inform public health action and programmatic management of LTBI. Purpose: To evaluate the comparative efficacy and harms of LTBI treatment regimens aimed at preventing active TB among adults and children. Data Sources: PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science from indexing ...

  9. Treatment of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and role of the pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrzyk, Beatriz Manzor

    2008-10-01

    Abstract Outbreaks of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) in developing countries and recent headlines of an American traveling with a resistant variant of tuberculosis have brought XDR-TB into the spotlight. The World Health Organization and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have identified XDR-TB as a serious public health threat and are mandating increased efforts at control of tuberculosis. Although XDR-TB is believed to be no more infectious than other variants of tuberculosis, infection with and spread of XDR-TB are concerning because of the ineffectiveness, toxicity, and cost of the available tuberculosis treatment options. Pharmacists may not be aware of the recent trends in tuberculosis resistance or of the impact that they can have on educating the public about this disease. To gain a better understanding of this disease and the potential roles for pharmacists in public health awareness of tuberculosis and in the care of patients with and at risk for this disease, we undertook an extensive search of the Internet, including Web sites of tuberculosis advocacy groups, and of MEDLINE from January 1968-March 2008. Currently, XDR-TB infection is uncommon in the United States, but if history is any indication, there is a high potential for an outbreak or epidemic. The XDR-TB variant has emerged from mismanaging multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, treating tuberculosis with too few drugs, using less effective second-line drugs, and not educating patients about the dangers of nonadherence. With only limited hopes of a novel effective drug combination regimen, use of available antimycobacterial drugs needs to be optimized. Pharmacists can be key players in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis by promoting adherence, assessing patients for risk factors for resistant disease, providing information about disease control and prevention, and monitoring for effectiveness, adverse effects, and drug interactions.

  10. Vitamin C supplementation improve the sputum conversion culture rate in pulmonary tuberculosis treatment while rifampicin susceptible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, L.; Siregar, Y.; Kusumawati, L.

    2018-03-01

    The failure of first-line tuberculosis treatment greatly affects multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis. In vitro study of vitamin C induces the death of M. tuberculosis bacteria and accelerates healing of tuberculosis, so the multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis can be avoided. This research aimed to identify the effect of vitamin C as a supportive treatment on the sputum conversion rate. The randomizedand double group with a parallel design by matching pair method was used to collect samples. The first group was treated with standard tuberculosis treatment, and the other was given vitamin C supplementation. Vitamin C plasma level analyzation was performed before and after two months of treatment. Sputum conversion was evaluated every week for eight weeks. The comparison of vitamin C plasma level in pre and post-treatment group was significant (p=0.03) but not in the other group. There was no significant difference in vitamin C plasma level between two groups (p=0.21). The proportion of sputum conversion rate in both group in the first week was 0% vs. 9.6% (p=0.83) and the last week of study was 83.9% vs. 100% (p=0.02). In conclusion, vitamin C supplementation has effects in improving the healing process of tuberculosis patients as indicated by higher in sputum conversion rate.

  11. Cost of Tuberculosis Treatment: Evidence from Iran's Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Vahid; Tabarsi, Payam; Rezapour, Aziz; Marzban, Sima; Zarei, Ehsan

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to estimate the cost of smear-positive drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) treatment of the patients in the Azadshahr district, Golestan Province, Iran. In this retrospective study, all new smear positive pulmonary TB patients who had been registered at the district's health network between April, 2013 and December, 2015 and had successfully completed their treatment were entered into the study (45 patients). Treatment costs were estimated from the provider's perspective using an activity-based costing (ABC) method. The cost of treating a new smear-positive pulmonary TB patient was US dollar (USD) 1,409.00 (Iranian Rial, 39,438,260), which can be divided into direct and indirect costs (USD 1,226.00 [87%] and USD 183.00 [13%], respectively). The highest cost (58.1%) was related to care and management of TB patients (including 46.1% human resources costs and 12% directly-observed treatment, short course implementation) and then respectively related to hospitalization (12.1%), supportive activity centers (11.4%), transportation (6.5%), medicines (5.3%), and laboratory tests and radiography (3.2%). Using disease-specific cost studies can help the healthcare system management to have correct insight into the financial burden created by the disease. This can subsequently be used in prioritization, planning, operational budgeting, economic evaluation of programs, interventions, and ultimately in disease management.

  12. Cost analysis of tuberculosis treatment in two tertiary hospitals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study has brought to light the financial burden of tuberculosis care on patients and their families and therefore emphasized the need for the review of cost reduction by the relevant stakeholders and policy makers. This will help to increase the access of tuberculosis care to the poor and unreached ...

  13. Tuberculosis treatment outcome monitoring in European Union countries: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hest, Rob; Ködmön, Csaba; Verver, Suzanne; Erkens, Connie G.M.; Straetemans, Masja; Manissero, Davide; de Vries, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Treatment success measured by treatment outcome monitoring (TOM) is a key programmatic output of tuberculosis (TB) control programmes. We performed a systematic literature review on national-level TOM in the 30 European Union (EU)/European Economic Areas (EEA) countries to summarise methods used to collect and report data on TOM. Online reference bibliographic databases PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched to identify relevant indexed and non-indexed literature published between January 2000 and August 2010. The search strategy resulted in 615 potentially relevant indexed citations, of which 27 full-text national studies (79 data sets) were included for final analysis. The selected studies were performed in 10 EU/EEA countries and gave a fragmented impression of TOM in the EU/EEA. Publication year, study period, sample size, databases, definitions, variables, patient and outcome categories, and population subgroups varied widely, portraying a very heterogeneous picture. This review confirmed previous reports of considerable heterogeneity in publications of TOM results across EU/EEA countries. PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE indexed studies are not a suitable instrument to measure representative TOM results for the 30 EU/EEA countries. Uniform and complete reporting to the centralised European Surveillance System will produce the most timely and reliable results of TB treatment outcomes in the EU/EEA. PMID:22790913

  14. A computational tool integrating host immunity with antibiotic dynamics to study tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, Elsje; Cilfone, Nicholas A; Lin, Philana Ling; Dartois, Véronique; Mattila, Joshua T; Butler, J Russell; Flynn, JoAnne L; Kirschner, Denise E; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2015-02-21

    While active tuberculosis (TB) is a treatable disease, many complex factors prevent its global elimination. Part of the difficulty in developing optimal therapies is the large design space of antibiotic doses, regimens and combinations. Computational models that capture the spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotics at the site of infection can aid in reducing the design space of costly and time-consuming animal pre-clinical and human clinical trials. The site of infection in TB is the granuloma, a collection of immune cells and bacteria that form in the lung, and new data suggest that penetration of drugs throughout granulomas is problematic. Here we integrate our computational model of granuloma formation and function with models for plasma pharmacokinetics, lung tissue pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for two first line anti-TB antibiotics. The integrated model is calibrated to animal data. We make four predictions. First, antibiotics are frequently below effective concentrations inside granulomas, leading to bacterial growth between doses and contributing to the long treatment periods required for TB. Second, antibiotic concentration gradients form within granulomas, with lower concentrations toward their centers. Third, during antibiotic treatment, bacterial subpopulations are similar for INH and RIF treatment: mostly intracellular with extracellular bacteria located in areas non-permissive for replication (hypoxic areas), presenting a slowly increasing target population over time. Finally, we find that on an individual granuloma basis, pre-treatment infection severity (including bacterial burden, host cell activation and host cell death) is predictive of treatment outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A randomized controlled study of socioeconomic support to enhance tuberculosis prevention and treatment, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Marco A; Huff, Doug; Boccia, Delia; Montoya, Rosario; Ramos, Eric; Datta, Sumona; Saunders, Matthew J; Lewis, James J; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the impact of socioeconomic support on tuberculosis preventive therapy initiation in household contacts of tuberculosis patients and on treatment success in patients. Methods A non-blinded, household-randomized, controlled study was performed between February 2014 and June 2015 in 32 shanty towns in Peru. It included patients being treated for tuberculosis and their household contacts. Households were randomly assigned to either the standard of care provided by Peru’s national tuberculosis programme (control arm) or the same standard of care plus socioeconomic support (intervention arm). Socioeconomic support comprised conditional cash transfers up to 230 United States dollars per household, community meetings and household visits. Rates of tuberculosis preventive therapy initiation and treatment success (i.e. cure or treatment completion) were compared in intervention and control arms. Findings Overall, 282 of 312 (90%) households agreed to participate: 135 in the intervention arm and 147 in the control arm. There were 410 contacts younger than 20 years: 43% in the intervention arm initiated tuberculosis preventive therapy versus 25% in the control arm (adjusted odds ratio, aOR: 2.2; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.1–4.1). An intention-to-treat analysis showed that treatment was successful in 64% (87/135) of patients in the intervention arm versus 53% (78/147) in the control arm (unadjusted OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0–2.6). These improvements were equitable, being independent of household poverty. Conclusion A tuberculosis-specific, socioeconomic support intervention increased uptake of tuberculosis preventive therapy and tuberculosis treatment success and is being evaluated in the Community Randomized Evaluation of a Socioeconomic Intervention to Prevent TB (CRESIPT) project. PMID:28479622

  16. Effectiveness of interventions for diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in hard-to-reach populations in countries of low and medium tuberculosis incidence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuvelings, Charlotte C; de Vries, Sophia G; Greve, Patrick F; Visser, Benjamin J; Bélard, Sabine; Janssen, Saskia; Cremers, Anne L; Spijker, René; Shaw, Beth; Hill, Ruaraidh A; Zumla, Alimuddin; Sandgren, Andreas; van der Werf, Marieke J; Grobusch, Martin P

    2017-05-01

    Tuberculosis is over-represented in hard-to-reach (underserved) populations in high-income countries of low tuberculosis incidence. The mainstay of tuberculosis care is early detection of active tuberculosis (case finding), contact tracing, and treatment completion. We did a systematic review with a scoping component of relevant studies published between 1990 and 2015 to update and extend previous National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) reviews on the effectiveness of interventions for identifying and managing tuberculosis in hard-to-reach populations. The analyses showed that tuberculosis screening by (mobile) chest radiography improved screening coverage and tuberculosis identification, reduced diagnostic delay, and was cost-effective among several hard-to-reach populations. Sputum culture for pre-migration screening and active referral to a tuberculosis clinic improved identification. Furthermore, monetary incentives improved tuberculosis identification and management among drug users and homeless people. Enhanced case management, good cooperation between services, and directly observed therapy improved treatment outcome and compliance. Strong conclusions cannot be drawn because of the heterogeneity of evidence with regard to study population, methodology, and quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Packaging BCG: standardizing an anti-tuberculosis vaccine in interwar Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonah, Christian

    2008-06-01

    Using the example of the anti-tuberculosis vaccine BCG during the 1920s and 1930s, this article asks how a labile laboratory-modified bacteria was transformed into a genuine standard vaccine packaged and commercialized as a pharmaceutical product. At the center of the analysis lies the notion of standardization inquiring why and how a local laboratory process with standard operating procedures (SOPs) reached its limits and was transformed when the product faced international distribution. Moving from Paul Ehrlich's initial technological notion of Wertbestimmung referring to a practice physiologically testing the effects of ill-defined antitoxins, the concept of standardization is extended to pharmaceutical and economical meanings implying quality control for biological therapeutic agents produced by a variety of industrial entrepreneurs. Following the request for product uniformity, two ways to maintain levels of compatibility and commonality are depicted opposing SOPs and end-product control. Furthermore, standardization is understood as a spiral, never ending process where progressive transformation of the vaccine in its production and medical uses periodically recreated the necessity of standardization. Developments analyzed are thus understood as a stabilization process aligning laboratory settings, products, and practices with medical theories and practices through technical, bureaucratic, and organizational systems. A paradox of the analysis is that standardization as a historical phenomenon and moment in the history of drug development was initially linked to a problem of under-determination of what was to be standardized and to a knowledge gap before it could become a central concept for quality control.

  18. Childhood Tuberculosis in Nigeria: Disease Presentation and Treatment Outcomes

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    Chidubem L Ogbudebe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Understanding the factors that influence tuberculosis (TB treatment outcomes in children is key to designing interventions to address them. This study aimed to determine the case category distribution of childhood TB in Nigeria and assess which clinical and demographic factors are associated with different treatment outcomes in childhood TB. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective cohort study involving a review of medical records of children (0-14 years with TB in 3 states in Nigeria in 2015. Results: Of 724 childhood TB cases registered during the review period, 220 (30.4% were aged 0–4 years. A high proportion of patients had pulmonary TB 420/724 (58.0%, new TB infection 713/724 (98.5%, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection 108/724 (14.7%. About 28% (n = 201 were bacteriologically diagnosed. The proportion of TB treatment success was 601/724 (83.0%. Treatment success was significantly higher in children aged 5–14 years than those 0–4 years (85.3% vs 77.7%, P  = .01. Factors associated with unsuccessful outcomes in patients aged 0–4 years are male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.2, HIV-positive status (aOR: 1.2, and clinical method of diagnosis (aOR: 5.6. Conclusions: Efforts should be made to improve TB treatment outcomes in children by ensuring early and accurate diagnosis, focused training of health workers on childhood TB-HIV care, and effective adherence counseling of caregivers.

  19. Therapeutic drug monitoring: how to improve drug dosage and patient safety in tuberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Sotgiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we describe the key role of tuberculosis (TB treatment, the challenges (mainly the emergence of drug resistance, and the opportunities represented by the correct approach to drug dosage, based on the existing control and elimination strategies. In this context, the role and contribution of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is discussed in detail. Treatment success in multidrug-resistant (MDR TB cases is low (62%, with 7% failing or relapsing and 9% dying and in extensively drug-resistant (XDR TB cases is even lower (40%, with 22% failing or relapsing and 15% dying. The treatment of drug-resistant TB is also more expensive (exceeding €50 000 for MDR-TB and €160 000 for XDR-TB and more toxic if compared to that prescribed for drug-susceptible TB. Appropriate dosing of first- and second-line anti-TB drugs can improve the patient's prognosis and lower treatment costs. TDM is based on the measurement of drug concentrations in blood samples collected at appropriate times and subsequent dose adjustment according to the target concentration. The ‘dried blood spot’ technique offers additional advantages, providing the rationale for discussions regarding a possible future network of selected, quality-controlled reference laboratories for the processing of dried blood spots of difficult-to-treat patients from reference TB clinics around the world.

  20. Risk factors for treatment default among adult tuberculosis patients in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M E; Hill, P C; Maharani, W; Sampurno, H; Ruslami, R

    2013-10-01

    Defaulting from anti-tuberculosis treatment hinders tuberculosis (TB) control. To identify potential defaulters. We conducted a cohort study in newly diagnosed Indonesian TB patients. We administered a questionnaire, prospectively identified defaulters (discontinued treatment ≥ 2 weeks) and assessed risk factors using Cox's regression. Of 249 patients, 39 (16%) defaulted, 61% in the first 2 months. Default was associated with liver disease (HR 3.40, 95%CI 1.02-11.78), chest pain (HR 2.25, 95%CI 1.06-4.77), night sweats (HR 1.98, 95%CI 1.03-3.79), characteristics of the head of the household (self-employed, HR 2.47, 95%CI 1.15-5.34; patient's mother, HR 7.72, 95%CI 1.66-35.88), household wealth (HR 4.24, 95%CI 1.12-16.09), walking to clinic (HR 4.53, 95%CI 1.39-14.71), being unaccompanied at diagnosis (HR 30.49, 95%CI 7.55-123.07) or when collecting medication (HR 3.34, 95%CI 1.24-8.98) and low level of satisfaction with the clinic (HR 3.85, 95%CI 1.17-12.62) or doctors (HR 2.45, 95%CI 1.18-5.10). Health insurance (HR 0.24, 95%CI 0.07-0.74) and paying for diagnosis (HR 0.14, 95%CI 0.04-0.48) were protective. Defaulting is common and occurs early. Interventions that improve clinic services, strengthen patient support and increase insurance coverage may reduce default in Indonesia.

  1. Serial interferon-gamma release assays during treatment of active tuberculosis in young adults

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    Lee Choon-Taek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of interferon-γ release assay (IGRA in monitoring responses to anti-tuberculosis (TB treatment is not clear. We evaluated the results of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT assay over time during the anti-TB treatment of adults with no underlying disease. Methods We enrolled soldiers who were newly diagnosed with active TB and admitted to the central referral military hospital in South Korea between May 1, 2008 and September 30, 2009. For each participant, we preformed QFT-GIT assay before treatment (baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months after initiating anti-TB medication. Results Of 67 eligible patients, 59 (88.1% completed the study protocol. All participants were males who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-negative and had no chronic diseases. Their median age was 21 years (range, 20-48. Initially, 57 (96.6% patients had positive QFT-GIT results, and 53 (89.8%, 42 (71.2%, and 39 (66.1% had positive QFT-GIT results at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. The IFN-γ level at baseline was 5.31 ± 5.34 IU/ml, and the levels at 1, 3, and 6 months were 3.95 ± 4.30, 1.82 ± 2.14, and 1.50 ± 2.12 IU/ml, respectively. All patients had clinical and radiologic improvements after treatment and were cured. A lower IFN-γ level, C-reactive protein ≥ 3 mg/dl, and the presence of fever (≥ 38.3°C at diagnosis were associated with negative reversion of the QFT-GIT assay. Conclusion Although the IFN-γ level measured by QFT-GIT assay decreased after successful anti-TB treatment in most participants, less than half of them exhibited QFT-GIT reversion. Thus, the reversion to negativity of the QFT-GIT assay may not be a good surrogate for treatment response in otherwise healthy young patients with TB.

  2. Effectiveness of hepatoprotective drugs for anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenya Saito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of hepatoprotective drugs for DIH (drug induced hepatotoxicity during tuberculosis treatment is not clear. We evaluated the effectiveness of hepatoprotective drugs by comparing the period until the normalization of hepatic enzymes between patients who were prescribed with the hepatoprotective drugs after DIH was occurred and patients who were not prescribed with the hepatoprotective drugs. Methods During 2006–2010, 389 patients with active tuberculosis were included in this study. DIH was defined as elevation of peak serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST and/or alanine aminotransferase (ALT of more than twice the upper limit of normal (ULN. We divided the patients into the severe (peak serum AST and/or ALT elevation of >5 times the ULN, moderate (peak serum AST and/or ALT elevation of >3 to ≤5 times the ULN, and mild DIH groups (peak serum AST and/or ALT elevation of >2 to ≤3 times the ULN. We compared the average period until the normalization of hepatic enzymes between patient subgroups with and without hepatoprotective drugs (ursodeoxycholic acid: UDCA, stronger neo-minophagen C: SNMC, and glycyrrhizin. Results In the severe group, there was no significant difference in the average period until the normalization between subgroups with and without hepatoprotective drugs (21.4 ± 10.8 vs 21.5 ± 11.1 days, P = 0.97. In the mild group, the period was longer in the subgroup with hepatoprotective drugs than that without hepatoprotective drugs (15.7 ± 6.2 vs 12.4 ± 7.9 days, P = 0.046. Conclusion Regardless of the severity, hepatoprotective drugs did not shorten the period until the normalization of hepatic enzymes.

  3. Determinants of Default from Tuberculosis Treatment among Patients with Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis in Karachi, Pakistan: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Natasha; Ansari, Zara; Hussain, Hamidah; Jaswal, Maria; Symes, Stephen; Khan, Aamir J; Mohammed, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Non-adherence to tuberculosis therapy can lead to drug resistance, prolonged infectiousness, and death; therefore, understanding what causes treatment default is important. Pakistan has one of the highest burdens of tuberculosis in the world, yet there have been no qualitative studies in Pakistan that have specifically examined why default occurs. We conducted a mixed methods study at a tuberculosis clinic in Karachi to understand why patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis default from treatment, and to identify factors associated with default. Patients attending this clinic pick up medications weekly and undergo family-supported directly observed therapy. In-depth interviews were administered to 21 patients who had defaulted. We also compared patients who defaulted with those who were cured, had completed, or had failed treatment in 2013. Qualitative analyses showed the most common reasons for default were the financial burden of treatment, and medication side effects and beliefs. The influence of finances on other causes of default was also prominent, as was concern about the effect of treatment on family members. In quantitative analysis, of 2120 patients, 301 (14.2%) defaulted. Univariate analysis found that male gender (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.04-1.71), being 35-59 years of age (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14-2.08), or being 60 years of age or older (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.17-2.88) were associated with default. After adjusting for gender, disease site, and patient category, being 35-59 years of age (aOR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.10-2.03) or 60 years of age or older (aOR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.12-2.77) were associated with default. In multivariate analysis age was the only variable associated with default. This lack of identifiable risk factors and our qualitative findings imply that default is complex and often due to extrinsic and medication-related factors. More tolerable medications, improved side effect management, and innovative cost-reduction measures are needed to reduce

  4. Determinants of Default from Tuberculosis Treatment among Patients with Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis in Karachi, Pakistan: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Chida

    Full Text Available Non-adherence to tuberculosis therapy can lead to drug resistance, prolonged infectiousness, and death; therefore, understanding what causes treatment default is important. Pakistan has one of the highest burdens of tuberculosis in the world, yet there have been no qualitative studies in Pakistan that have specifically examined why default occurs. We conducted a mixed methods study at a tuberculosis clinic in Karachi to understand why patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis default from treatment, and to identify factors associated with default. Patients attending this clinic pick up medications weekly and undergo family-supported directly observed therapy.In-depth interviews were administered to 21 patients who had defaulted. We also compared patients who defaulted with those who were cured, had completed, or had failed treatment in 2013.Qualitative analyses showed the most common reasons for default were the financial burden of treatment, and medication side effects and beliefs. The influence of finances on other causes of default was also prominent, as was concern about the effect of treatment on family members. In quantitative analysis, of 2120 patients, 301 (14.2% defaulted. Univariate analysis found that male gender (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.04-1.71, being 35-59 years of age (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14-2.08, or being 60 years of age or older (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.17-2.88 were associated with default. After adjusting for gender, disease site, and patient category, being 35-59 years of age (aOR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.10-2.03 or 60 years of age or older (aOR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.12-2.77 were associated with default.In multivariate analysis age was the only variable associated with default. This lack of identifiable risk factors and our qualitative findings imply that default is complex and often due to extrinsic and medication-related factors. More tolerable medications, improved side effect management, and innovative cost-reduction measures are needed to

  5. Diagnostic and treatment delay among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

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    Yimer Solomon

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB results in severe disease and a higher mortality. It also leads to an increased period of infectivity in the community. The objective of this study was to determine the length of delays, and analyze the factors affecting the delay from onset of symptoms of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB until the commencement of treatment. Methods In randomly selected TB management units (TBMUs, i.e. government health institutions which have diagnosing and treatment facilities for TB in Amhara Region, we conducted a cross sectional study from September 1-December 31/2003. Delay was analyzed from two perspectives, 1. Period between onset of TB symptoms to first visit to any health provider (health seeking period, and from the first health provider visit to initiation of treatment (health providers' delay, and 2. Period between onset of TB symptoms to first visit to a medical provider (patients' delay, and from this visit to commencement of anti-TB treatment (health systems' delay. Patients were interviewed on the same date of diagnosis using a semi-structured questionnaire. Logistics regression analysis was applied to analyze the risk factors of delays. Results A total of 384 new smear positive PTB patients participated in the study. The median total delay was 80 days. The median health-seeking period and health providers' delays were 15 and 61 days, respectively. Conversely, the median patients' and health systems' delays were 30 and 21 days, respectively. Taking medical providers as a reference point, we found that forty eight percent of the subjects delayed for more than one month. Patients' delays were strongly associated with first visit to non-formal health providers and self treatment (P Conclusion Delay in the diagnosis and treatment of PTB is unacceptably high in Amhara region. Health providers' and health systems' delays represent the major portion of the total delay. Accessing a

  6. New roentgen technologies (tomosynthesis for diagnostics and outcomes evaluation of genital tuberculosis treatment

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    Yu. A. Tsybulskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the specific primary disorder of small pelvis organs in the female patient with no tuberculosis in her medical history. Use of this roentgen technique for genital tuberculosis detection and assessment of treatment efficacy enhances the effectiveness of diagnostic activities and allows early detection of this pathology thus reducing the risk of complications which is crucial for pregnancy planning given the young age of the patient.

  7. Serum Concentrations of Trace Elements in Patients with Tuberculosis and Its Association with Treatment Outcome

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    Rihwa Choi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in essential trace elements are associated with impaired immunity in tuberculosis infection. However, the trace element concentrations in the serum of Korean patients with tuberculosis have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to compare the serum trace element concentrations of Korean adult patients with tuberculosis with noninfected controls and to assess the impact of serum trace element concentration on clinical outcome after antituberculosis treatment. The serum concentrations of four trace elements in 141 consecutively recruited patients with tuberculosis and 79 controls were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Demographic characteristics were also analyzed. Serum cobalt and copper concentrations were significantly higher in patients with tuberculosis compared with controls, while zinc and selenium concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.01. Moreover, serum selenium and zinc concentrations were positively correlated (ρ = 0.41, p < 0.05. A high serum copper concentration was associated with a worse clinical outcome, as assessed after one month of antituberculosis therapy. Specifically, culture-positive patients had higher serum copper concentrations than culture-negative patients (p < 0.05. Patients with tuberculosis had altered serum trace element concentrations. Further research is needed to elucidate the roles of individual trace elements and to determine their clinical impact on patients with tuberculosis.

  8. Tuberculosis post-liver transplantation: a rare but complicated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W; Wai, C T; Da Costa, M; Tambyah, P A; Prabhakaran, K; Lee, K H

    2005-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a rare but serious complication after transplantation. We report a case and discuss its presentation and management. A 60-year-old Indonesian male presented initially with fever, acute confusion and rapidly progressive right upper lobe pneumonia 3.5 months post-liver transplant, and was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis by positive sputum smear for acid-fast bacilli and tuberculosis culture. Standard anti-tuberculosis therapy was administered but was complicated by interaction with cyclosporine and drug-induced cholestasis. A high level of suspicion, prompt antituberculosis treatment and close follow-up are essential in management of post-transplant tuberculosis.

  9. Patient satisfaction on tuberculosis treatment service and adherence to treatment in public health facilities of Sidama zone, South Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient compliance is a key factor in treatment success. Satisfied patients are more likely to utilize health services, comply with medical treatment, and continue with the health care providers. Yet, the national tuberculosis control program failed to address some of these aspects in order to achieve the national targets. Hence, this study attempted to investigate patient satisfaction and adherence to tuberculosis treatment in Sidama zone of south Ethiopia. Methods A facility based cross sectional study was conducted using quantitative method of data collection from March to April 2011. A sample of 531 respondents on anti TB treatment from 11 health centers and 1 hospital were included in the study. The sample size to each facility was allocated using probability proportional to size allocation, and study participants for the interview were selected by systematic random sampling. A Pre tested, interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Collected data was edited, coded and entered to Epi data version 3.1 and exported to SPSS version 16. Confirmatory factor analysis was done to identify factors that explain most of the variance observed in most of the manifested variables. Bivariate and Multivariate analysis were computed to analyze the data. Result The study revealed 90% of the study participants were satisfied with TB treatment service. However, 26% of respondents had poor adherence to their TB treatment. Patient perceived on professional care, time spent with health care provider, accessibility, technical competency, convenience (cleanliness) and consultation and relational empathy were independent predictors of overall patient satisfaction (P patient satisfaction (Beta = 0.262). In multivariate analysis occupational status, area of residence, perceived time spent with health care provider, perceived accessibility, perceived waiting time, perceived professional care and over all patient satisfaction were significantly

  10. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic modelling of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth and kill rates is predictive of clinical treatment duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljayyoussi, Ghaith; Jenkins, Victoria A; Sharma, Raman; Ardrey, Alison; Donnellan, Samantha; Ward, Stephen A; Biagini, Giancarlo A

    2017-03-29

    Tuberculosis (TB) treatment is long and complex, typically involving a combination of drugs taken for 6 months. Improved drug regimens to shorten and simplify treatment are urgently required, however a major challenge to TB drug development is the lack of predictive pre-clinical tools. To address this deficiency, we have adopted a new high-content imaging-based approach capable of defining the killing kinetics of first line anti-TB drugs against intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) residing inside macrophages. Through use of this pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) approach we demonstrate that the killing dynamics of the intracellular Mtb sub-population is critical to predicting clinical TB treatment duration. Integrated modelling of intracellular Mtb killing alongside conventional extracellular Mtb killing data, generates the biphasic responses typical of those described clinically. Our model supports the hypothesis that the use of higher doses of rifampicin (35 mg/kg) will significantly reduce treatment duration. Our described PK-PD approach offers a much needed decision making tool for the identification and prioritisation of new therapies which have the potential to reduce TB treatment duration.

  11. A Phase 2 Randomized Trial of a Rifapentine plus Moxifloxacin-Based Regimen for Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

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    Marcus B Conde

    Full Text Available The combination of rifapentine and moxifloxacin administered daily with other anti-tuberculosis drugs is highly active in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy. The objective of this phase 2 clinical trial was to determine the bactericidal activity, safety, and tolerability of a regimen comprised of rifapentine, moxifloxacin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide administered daily during the first 8 weeks of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment.Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were randomized to receive either rifapentine (approximately 7.5 mg/kg plus moxifloxacin (investigational arm, or rifampin (approximately 10 mg/kg plus ethambutol (control daily for 8 weeks, along with isoniazid and pyrazinamide. The primary endpoint was sputum culture status at completion of 8 weeks of treatment.121 participants (56% of accrual target were enrolled. At completion of 8 weeks of treatment, negative cultures using Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ medium occurred in 47/60 (78% participants in the investigational arm vs. 43/51 (84%, p = 0.47 in the control arm; negative cultures using liquid medium occurred in 37/47 (79% in the investigational arm vs. 27/41 (66%, p = 0.23 in the control arm. Time to stable culture conversion was shorter for the investigational arm vs. the control arm using liquid culture medium (p = 0.03, but there was no difference using LJ medium. Median rifapentine area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24 was 313 mcg*h/mL, similar to recent studies of rifapentine dosed at 450-600 mg daily. Median moxifloxacin AUC0-24 was 28.0 mcg*h/mL, much lower than in trials where rifapentine was given only intermittently with moxifloxacin. The proportion of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiological ineligibility was higher in the investigational arm vs. the control arm (11/62 [18%] vs. 3/59 [5%], p = 0.04 although the proportions of grade 3 or higher adverse events were similar (5/62 [8%] in the

  12. Thai people living with tuberculosis and how they adhere to treatment: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choowong, Jiraporn; Tillgren, Per; Söderbäck, Maja

    2017-12-01

    To develop a conceptual framework of adherence to treatment among Thai people living with tuberculosis, a grounded theory approach was used. A purposive sample of 20 Thai people living with tuberculosis, aged from 23 to 85 years, was interviewed. From the participants' perspective, a core category of social belonging was highlighted, with three categories of conditions connected: personal barriers, personal resilience, and social facilitation. Personal barriers encompassed fear of stigma, concealing the illness, and lack of knowledge and motivation to complete the treatment regime. Personal resilience encompassed positive thinking and self-awareness. Social facilitation encompassed the ease of access to health services, continuity in the health service's ability to choose a directly-observed therapy observer, and social support. This study contributes a deeper understanding of the perspective of Thai people living with tuberculosis with regards to adherence to tuberculosis treatment. It might improve how local healthcare workers provide tuberculosis care, and inspire them to tailor care to people living with tuberculosis in a local community to increase personal resilience and reduce stigma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Potential antimicrobial agents for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsaad, Noor; Wilffert, Bob; van Altena, Richard; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is challenging because of the high toxicity of second-line drugs and the longer treatment duration than for drug-susceptible TB patients. In order to speed up novel treatment for MDR-TB, we suggest considering expanding the indications of

  14. New drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis: needs, challenges, promise, and prospects for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhardt, Christian; Raviglione, Mario; Spigelman, Mel; Hafner, Richard; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Hoelscher, Michael; Zumla, Alimuddin; Gheuens, Jan

    2012-05-15

    For the first time in 40 years, a portfolio of promising new compounds for the treatment of tuberculosis is on the horizon. The introduction of new drugs in combination treatment for all forms of tuberculosis raises several issues related to patients' access to novel treatments, programmatic feasibility, cost effectiveness, and implications for monitoring and surveillance, particularly with regard to the development of drug resistance. Particular attention should be given to the identification of optimal drug combination(s) for the treatment of all forms of tuberculosis, particularly in high-risk and vulnerable groups, such as human immunodeficiency virus-coinfected persons and children, and to the rational use of new drugs. Addressing these issues adequately requires the establishment of clear guidelines to assist countries in the development of policies for the proper use of tuberculosis drugs in a way that guarantees access to best treatments for all those in need and avoids inappropriate use of new drugs. After a description of these various challenges, we present activities that will be carried out by the World Health Organization in collaboration with key stakeholders for the development of policy guidelines for optimal treatment of tuberculosis.

  15. Adherence to Tuberculosis Therapy among Patients Receiving Home-Based Directly Observed Treatment: Evidence from the United Republic of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mkopi, Abdallah; Range, Nyagosya; Lwilla, Fred; Egwaga, Saidi; Schulze, Alexander; Geubbels, Eveline; van Leth, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is the leading contributor to the selection of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and subsequent treatment failure. Tanzania introduced a TB Patient Centred Treatment (PCT) approach which gives new TB patients the choice

  16. The prevalence of and reasons for interruption of anti-tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the availability of TB drugs at the health centre/clinic, patient education about TB and strengthening .... without food might make them sick and since meals were often missed .... Jeena P M. The interaction of HIV and tuberculosis in childhood.

  17. Implementation of a national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chonde, Timothy M.; Doulla, Basra; van Leth, Frank; Mfinanga, Sayoki G. M.; Range, Nyagosya; Lwilla, Fred; Mfaume, Saidi M.; van Deun, Armand; Zignol, Matteo; Cobelens, Frank G.; Egwaga, Saidi M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A drug resistance survey is an essential public health management tool for evaluating and improving the performance of National Tuberculosis control programmes. The current manuscript describes the implementation of the first national drug resistance survey in Tanzania. METHODS:

  18. Natural Compounds from Mexican Medicinal Plants as Potential Drug Leads for Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCIO GÓMEZ-CANSINO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In Mexican Traditional Medicine 187 plant species are used in the treatment of respiratory conditions that may be associated with tuberculosis. In this contribution, we review the ethnobotany, chemistry and pharmacology of 63 species whose extracts have been assayed for antimycobacterial activity in vitro. Among these, the most potent is Aristolochia brevipes (MIC= 12.5 µg/mL, followed by Aristolochia taliscana, Citrus sinensis, Chrysactinia mexicana, Persea americana, and Olea europaea (MIC 95%, 50 µg/mL include: Amphipterygium adstringens, Larrea divaricata, and Phoradendron robinsoni. Several active compounds have been identified, the most potent are: Licarin A (isolated from A. taliscana, and 9-amino-9-methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[h]-chromen-2-one (transformation product of 9-methoxytariacuripyrone isolated from Aristolochia brevipes, both with MIC= 3.125 µg/mL, that is 8-fold less potent than the reference drug Rifampicin (MIC= 0.5 µg/mL. Any of the compounds or extracts here reviewed has been studied in clinical trials or with animal models; however, these should be accomplished since several are active against strains resistant to common drugs.

  19. 2-Thiophenecarboxylic acid hydrazide Derivatives: Synthesis and Anti-Tuberculosis Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, M. R. G.; Khumaidah, L.; Ilmiah, T. K.; Fadlan, A.; Santoso, M.

    2018-04-01

    One of the most frequent and widespread infectious diseases especially in developing countries is tuberculosis (TB). The number of TB drug resistant tend to increase, and there has been no new TB drug introduce since the 1960s. Six 2-Thiophenecarboxylic acid hydrazide derivatives were synthesized in 90-97% yields, and 2-thiophenecarbonylhydrazone-5, 7-dibromoisatin showed the highest activity in inhibiting M. tuberculosis H37Rv.

  20. Anti-TNFα Treatment for HLA-B27-Positive Ankylosing Spondylitis-Related Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mirinae; Won, Jae-Yon; Choi, Seung Yong; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Park, Young-Hoon

    2016-10-01

    To assess the long-term efficacy of the most widely used anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) agents for treatment of HLA-B27-positive ankylosing spondylitis (AS)-related uveitis. Retrospective cohort study. The medical records of 143 patients with HLA-B27-positive AS who visited Seoul St. Mary's Hospital and were taking an anti-TNFα agent for at least 1 year were studied. Subjects were divided into 3 groups according to anti-TNFα treatment: Group 1 (infliximab, 66), Group 2 (adalimumab, 45), and Group 3 (etanercept, 32). Mean age was 41.0 ± 13.0 years, and 97 patients (67.8%) were male. Mean follow-up period was 70.6 ± 37.9 months. In cases of active ocular inflammation at the onset of anti-TNFα treatment, patients showed improved activity of uveitis after 24.0 ± 15.0 days (Group 1), 17.9 ± 6.0 days (Group 2), and 25.9 ± 18.0 days (Group 3). After the anti-TNFα treatment, 71 of 94 patients (32 [76.2%] in Group 1, 26 [78.8%] in Group 2, and 13 [68.4%] in Group 3) remained without uveitis relapse. A reduction in the number of systemic medications was achieved in 129 patients (90.2%). Twenty-eight cases of minor side effects were observed, and 4 cases were tuberculosis leading to discontinuation of anti-TNFα treatment. Infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept were effective for treating and reducing the number of uveitis relapses in HLA-B27-positive AS. However, the risk of serious infections was noted, so ophthalmologists should consider the possibility that prolonged use of biologic agents may result in systemic side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Trends of tuberculosis prevalence and treatment outcome in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The annual number of all TB cases showed a rising trend from 914 cases in the year 2000 to 1684 in 2009; but the proportion of new sputum smear (ss+) pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases declined (Trend X2 = 7.37, P = 0.007). The average number of extra-pulmonary TB cases increased fourfold from 2000-2004 to ...

  2. Lipid containing nanodrug delivery system for the treatment of Tuberculosis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lemmer, Yolandy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available of the antibiotics in the cells, hence reducing the dose frequency and simultaneously improve patient compliance. The cell wall envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) contains unique high molecular weight lipids. Of these, the most abundant are mycolic acids...

  3. Prevalence of Tuberculosis and Treatment Outcomes of Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-05-01

    May 1, 2018 ... Yonas A. et al. ... North Shoa Ethiopia. Ethiop J Health Sci.2017;28(3):347. ... Berihun, et al . This is an ... RESULTS: A total of 162 patients with tuberculosis were registered ..... Ribeiro ML, Reis-Santos B, Riley LW, Maciel. EL.

  4. Treatment of childhood tuberculosis: caregivers' practices and perceptions in Cape Town, South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bélard, Sabine; Isaacs, Washiefa; Black, Faye; Bateman, Lindy; Madolo, Lucia; Munro, Jacinta; Workman, Lesley; Grobusch, Martin P.; Zar, Heather J.

    2015-01-01

    A child's caregiver is key to the successful drug delivery and outcome of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Understanding caregivers' practices and perceptions is important in the management of childhood TB. To investigate caregivers' practices and perceptions regarding TB treatment of children. A

  5. Individualized treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis using therapeutic drug monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu S Bolhuis

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: TDM is highly valuable to individualize and optimize treatment of complex MDR-TB patients. TDM is routinely applied in Tuberculosis Center Beatrixoord, and high success rates for treatment of MDR-TB patients have been achieved. DBS and LSS make implementation of TDM feasible, even in low- and middle-income countries.

  6. Treatment outcome of Tuberculosis and HIV Co-infection at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . TB is a reemerging disease linked with HIV infections. It is necessary to compare the treatment outcome of patients with only Tuberculosis with those with HIV/AIDs co-infection. This study will also provide baseline information on treatment ...

  7. Time to unsuccessful tuberculosis treatment outcome, Cambodia, China, and Viet Nam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoa, N B; Sokun, C; Wei, C

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and characteristics of patients with unsuccessful tuberculosis (TB) treatment. METHODS: Random selection of TB case registers among all treatment units in Cambodia, two provinces in China, and Viet Nam. The data of two calendar years were analyzed to assess u...

  8. [THE RESULTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT LOAN PROJECT "PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS AND AIDS", A "TUBERCULOSIS" COMPONENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan project "Prevention, diagnosis, treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "Tuberculosis" component that is an addition to the national tuberculosis control program in 15 subjects of the Russian Federation, followed up by the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, the 2005-2008 measures stipulated by the Project have caused substantial changes in the organization of tuberculosis control: implementation of Orders Nos. 109, 50, and 690 and supervision of their implementation; modernization of the laboratories of the general medical network and antituberbulosis service (404 kits have been delivered for clinical diagnostic laboratories and 12 for bacteriological laboratories, including BACTEC 960 that has been provided in 6 areas); 91 training seminars have been held at the federal and regional levels; 1492 medical workers have been trained in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with tuberculosis; 8 manuals and guidelines have been prepared and sent to all areas. In the period 2005-2008, the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates in the followed-up areas reduced by 1.2 and 18.6%, respectively. The analysis of patient cohorts in 2007 and 2005 revealed that the therapeutic efficiency evaluated from sputum smear microscopy increased by 16.3%; there were reductions in the proportion of patients having ineffective chemotherapy (from 16.1 to 11.1%), patients who died from tuberculosis (from 11.6 to 9.9%), and those who interrupted therapy ahead of time (from 11.8 to 7.8%). Implementation of the IBR project has contributed to the improvement of the national strategy and the enhancement of the efficiency of tuberculosis control.

  9. Untreated depression and tuberculosis treatment outcomes, quality of life and disability, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambaw, Fentie; Mayston, Rosie; Hanlon, Charlotte; Medhin, Girmay; Alem, Atalay

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the association between comorbid depression and tuberculosis treatment outcomes, quality of life and disability in Ethiopia. The study involved 648 consecutive adults treated for tuberculosis at 14 primary health-care facilities. All were assessed at treatment initiation (i.e. baseline) and after 2 and 6 months. We defined probable depression as a score of 10 or above on the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Data on treatment default, failure and success and on death were obtained from tuberculosis registers. Quality of life was assessed using a visual analogue scale and we calculated disability scores using the World Health Organization's Disability Assessment Scale. Using multivariate Poisson regression analysis, we estimated the association between probable depression at baseline and treatment outcomes and death. Untreated depression at baseline was independently associated with tuberculosis treatment default (adjusted risk ratio, aRR: 9.09; 95% confidence interval, CI: 6.72 to 12.30), death (aRR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.54 to 5.78), greater disability ( β : 0.83; 95% CI: 0.67 to 0.99) and poorer quality of life ( β : -0.07; 95% CI: -0.07 to -0.06) at 6 months. Participants with probable depression had a lower mean quality-of-life score than those without (5.0 versus 6.0, respectively; P  < 0.001) and a higher median disability score (22.0 versus 14.0, respectively; P  < 0.001) at 6 months. Untreated depression in people with tuberculosis was associated with worse treatment outcomes, poorer quality of life and greater disability. Health workers should be given the support needed to provide depression care for people with tuberculosis.

  10. Treatment practices in pulmonary tuberculosis by private sector physicians of Meerut, Uttar Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, A; Garg, S K; Chopra, H; Bajpai, S K; Bano, T; Jain, S; Kumar, A

    2012-01-01

    Majority of the qualified medical practitioners in the country are in the private sector and more than half of patients with tuberculosis (TB) seek treatment from them. The present study was conducted with the objective of assessing the treatment modalities in pulmonary tuberculosis by the private physicians in Meerut City, Uttar Pradesh, India. A cross-sectional study was carried out covering all the private physicians (graduates and postgraduates in Medicine and Chest Diseases) registered under the Indian Medical Association, Meerut Branch (n = 154). The physicians were interviewed by a pre-designed and pre-tested questionnaire about the treatment modalities practiced by them. Only 43.5% private physicians had attended any Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) training in the past five years. Only 33.1% of them were aware of the International Standards of Tuberculosis Care (ISTC). Fifty-three different regimens were used to treat the patients. Majority of physicians (76%) prescribed daily regimens while 24% administered both daily and intermittent treatment. None of the private physicians prescribed exclusive intermittent regimen. Eighty-seven different treatment regimens were used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) with none of them prescribing standard treatment under RNTCP. As majority of private practitioners do not follow RNTCP guidelines for treating TB, there is an urgent need for their continued education in this area.

  11. Isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in Denmark: mutations, transmission and treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Didi; Andersen, Peter Henrik; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective study on isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis (TB) was conducted in the low-burden country, Denmark (DK). The aim was to describe treatment outcome and transmission and to evaluate a mutation analysis for high- and low-level isoniazid resistance detection.......A retrospective study on isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis (TB) was conducted in the low-burden country, Denmark (DK). The aim was to describe treatment outcome and transmission and to evaluate a mutation analysis for high- and low-level isoniazid resistance detection....

  12. Investigation of Susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains Isolated from Clinical Samples Against the First and Second-Line Anti-tuberculosis Drugs by the Sensititre MycoTB Plate Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen KAYSERİLİ ORHAN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phenotypic methods for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC to second-line drugs are not yet standardized. The Sensititre MycoTB Plate is a microtiter plate containing lyophilized antibiotics and configured for determination of MIC to first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. The purpose of this study is to detect the susceptibility rates of MTC strains isolated from patients’ specimens for first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. Materials and Methods: This study included 50 MTC strains isolated from various clinical specimens. Out of the 50 strains, 38 were isolated from sputum, three from cerebrospinal fluid, three from bronchoalveolar lavage, and six from other samples in this study. The susceptibility of strains to anti-tuberculosis drugs were determined by the Sensititre MycoTB Plate Method. Thawed isolates were subcultured, and dilutions were inoculated into MycoTB wells. The results were read at days 7, 14 and 21. Results: At the end of study, out of 50 MTC isolates, 7 (14% showed resistance to Isoniazid (INH, 5 (10% to streptomycin (SM, 4 (8% to ethambutol (EMB, 4 (8% to ethionamide (ETH, 3 (6% to rifampicin (RIF, 3 (6% to rifabutin (RFB, 2 (4% to kanamycin (KAN, 2 (4% to ofloxacin (OFL, 2 (4% to P-aminosalicyclic acid (PAS, 1 (2% to moxiflocacin (MOX, and 1 (2% to cycloserine (CYC. All strains were found sensitive to amikacin while 2 strains (4% were identified as multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB. Thirty-five strains (70% were sensitive to all drugs. Extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB was not determined in this study. Conclusion: This is the first study that tests second line anti-tuberculosis drugs in our location and provides us valuable data regarding MDR-TB and XDR-TB rates. The Sensititre MycoTB Plate Method is a fast, reliable and practical method and can be used to determine the susceptibility of first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs.

  13. Cytochrome P450 2E1 gene polymorphisms/haplotypes and anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatitis in a Chinese cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowen Tang

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanism of anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB drug-induced hepatitis is associated with drug metabolizing enzymes. No tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs of cytochrome P450 2E1(CYP2E1 in the risk of anti-TB drug-induced hepatitis have been reported. The present study was aimed at exploring the role of tSNPs in CYP2E1 gene in a population-based anti-TB treatment cohort.A nested case-control study was designed. Each hepatitis case was 14 matched with controls by age, gender, treatment history, disease severity and drug dosage. The tSNPs were selected by using Haploview 4.2 based on the HapMap database of Han Chinese in Beijing, and detected by using TaqMan allelic discrimination technology.Eighty-nine anti-TB drug-induced hepatitis cases and 356 controls were included in this study. 6 tSNPs (rs2031920, rs2070672, rs915908, rs8192775, rs2515641, rs2515644 were genotyped and minor allele frequencies of these tSNPs were 21.9%, 23.0%, 19.1%, 23.6%, 20.8% and 44.4% in the cases and 20.9%, 22.7%, 18.9%, 23.2%, 18.2% and 43.2% in the controls, respectively. No significant difference was observed in genotypes or allele frequencies of the 6 tSNPs between case group and control group, and neither of haplotypes in block 1 nor in block 2 was significantly associated with the development of hepatitis.Based on the Chinese anti-TB treatment cohort, we did not find a statistically significant association between genetic polymorphisms of CYP2E1 and the risk of anti-TB drug-induced hepatitis. None of the haplotypes showed a significant association with the development of hepatitis in Chinese TB population.

  14. A mode of error: Immunoglobulin binding protein (a subset of anti-citrullinated proteins can cause false positive tuberculosis test results in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Greenwald

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrullinated Immunoglobulin Binding Protein (BiP is a newly described autoimmune target in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, one of many cyclic citrullinated peptides(CCP or ACPA. BiP is over-expressed in RA patients causing T cell expansion and increased interferon levels during incubation for the QuantiFERON-Gold tuberculosis test (QFT-G TB. The QFT-G TB has never been validated where interferon is increased by underlying disease, as for example RA.Of ACPA-positive RA patients (n = 126, we found a 13% false-positive TB test rate by QFT-G TB. Despite subsequent biologic therapy for 3 years of all 126 RA patients, none showed evidence of TB without INH. Most of the false-positive RA patients after treatment with biologic therapy reverted to a negative QFT-G test. False TB tests correlated with ACPA level (p < 0.02.Three healthy women without arthritis or TB exposure had negative QFT-G TB. In vitro, all three tested positive every time for TB correlating to the dose of BiP or anti-BiP added, at 2 ug/ml, 5 ug/ml, 10 ug/ml, and 20 ug/ml.BiP naturally found in the majority of ACPA-positive RA patients can result in a false positive QFT-G TB. Subsequent undertreatment of RA, if biologic therapy is withheld, and overtreatment of presumed latent TB may harm patients. Keywords: Tuberculosis, IGRA, Rheumatoid arthritis, Interferon, Anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA, Immunoglobulin binding protein (BiP

  15. The imaging feature of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jun; Zhou Xinhua; Li Xi; Fu Yuhong; Zheng Suhua; Lv Pingxin; Ma Daqing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging features of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis by collecting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis verified by test of drug-sensitivity, which defined as resistance to three anti-tuberculosis drugs. Methods:Fifty-one cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were categorized as group of observed, and 46 cases of drug sensitive tuberculosis were categorized as control. Cultures were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in all cases with no other illness such as diabetes mellitus. All patients had chest radiographs available for review, while 64 cases had tomography and 30 cases had CT during the same time. All images were analyzed by three of the radiologists, disagreement among them was discussed and a consensus was reached. Results: There was no difference in the distribution of lesions between the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis group and control group. However, the radiological findings in the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis group were significantly more common than in control group, such as multiple nodules (10 cases), disseminated foci (23 cases), cavity (9 cases), and complications (10 cases). Comparing the dynamic cases, deteriorating cases were more commonly seen in observed group than in control group, while improved cases were less in observed group than in control group. Conclusion: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is the most serious tuberculosis, which is characterized with significant activity, more disseminated foci, cavity, and complications. The lesion deteriorated while correct anti-tuberculosis treatment is applied. (authors)

  16. Impaired pulmonary function after treatment for tuberculosis: the end of the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chushkin, Mikhail Ivanovich; Ots, Oleg Nikolayevich

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of pulmonary function abnormalities and to investigate the factors affecting lung function in patients treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: A total of 214 consecutive patients (132 men and 82 women; 20-82 years of age), treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and followed at a local dispensary, underwent spirometry and plethysmography at least one year after treatment. Results: Pulmonary impairment was present in 102 (47.7%) of the 214 patients evaluated. The most common functional alteration was obstructive lung disease (seen in 34.6%). Of the 214 patients, 60 (28.0%) showed reduced pulmonary function (FEV1 below the lower limit of normal). Risk factors for reduced pulmonary function were having had culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the past, being over 50 years of age, having recurrent tuberculosis, and having a lower level of education. Conclusions: Nearly half of all tuberculosis patients evolve to impaired pulmonary function. That underscores the need for pulmonary function testing after the end of treatment. PMID:28380187

  17. Anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in Sub-Saharan Africa: The case of Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukoye, D.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis reports findings of six studies including two tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance surveys, a comparative study of HIV infection rates among patients enrolled in the survey and those under routine TB/HIV surveillance, two TB molecular epidemiological analyses and a systematic review and

  18. New diagnostic and therapeutic tools for tuberculosis using anti-ESAT-6/CFP-10 aptamers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rotherham, L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available to form the heterodimer in vitro. The scientists test the ability of the apmaters to: 1) be used as TB diagnostics tools by detecting the presence of ESAT-6 and/or CFP-10 in blood or sputum samples; 2) inhibit the virulence of M. tuberculosis in vitro...

  19. Is tuberculosis treatment really free in China? A study comparing two areas with different management models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsang Qiu

    Full Text Available China has implemented a free-service policy for tuberculosis. However, patients still have to pay a substantial proportion of their annual income for treatment of this disease. This study describes the economic burden on patients with tuberculosis; identifies related factors by comparing two areas with different management models; and provides policy recommendation for tuberculosis control reform in China.There are three tuberculosis management models in China: the tuberculosis dispensary model, specialist model and integrated model. We selected Zhangjiagang (ZJG and Taixing (TX as the study sites, which correspond to areas implementing the integrated model and dispensary model, respectively. Patients diagnosed and treated for tuberculosis since January 2010 were recruited as study subjects. A total of 590 patients (316 patients from ZJG and 274 patients from TX were interviewed with a response rate of 81%. The economic burden attributed to tuberculosis, including direct costs and indirect costs, was estimated and compared between the two study sites. The Mann-Whitney U Test was used to compare the cost differences between the two groups. Potential factors related to the total out-of-pocket costs were analyzed based on a step-by-step multivariate linear regression model after the logarithmic transformation of the costs.The average (median, interquartile range total cost was 18793.33 (9965, 3200-24400 CNY for patients in ZJG, which was significantly higher than for patients in TX (mean: 6598.33, median: 2263, interquartile range: 983-6688 (Z = 10.42, P < 0.001. After excluding expenses covered by health insurance, the average out-of-pocket costs were 14304.4 CNY in ZJG and 5639.2 CNY in TX. Based on the multivariable linear regression analysis, factors related to the total out-of-pocket costs were study site, age, number of clinical visits, residence, diagnosis delay, hospitalization, intake of liver protective drugs and use of the second

  20. Recognition of anti-mycolic acid antibody at self-assembled mycolic acid antigens on a gold electrode: a potential impedimetric immunosensing platform for active tuberculosis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathebula, NS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical impedimetric recognition by anti-mycolic acid antibodies, present in tuberculosis (TB)-positive human serum co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of mycolic acids (MA) integrated into a self-assembled monolayer of N-(2...

  1. Risk factors for tuberculosis treatment failure, default, or relapse and outcomes of retreatment in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Kelly E; Lahlou, Ouafae; Ghali, Iraqi; Knudsen, Janine; Elmessaoudi, My Driss; Cherkaoui, Imad; El Aouad, Rajae

    2011-02-28

    Patients with tuberculosis require retreatment if they fail or default from initial treatment or if they relapse following initial treatment success. Outcomes among patients receiving a standard World Health Organization Category II retreatment regimen are suboptimal, resulting in increased risk of morbidity, drug resistance, and transmission.. In this study, we evaluated the risk factors for initial treatment failure, default, or early relapse leading to the need for tuberculosis retreatment in Morocco. We also assessed retreatment outcomes and drug susceptibility testing use for retreatment patients in urban centers in Morocco, where tuberculosis incidence is stubbornly high. Patients with smear- or culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis presenting for retreatment were identified using clinic registries in nine urban public clinics in Morocco. Demographic and outcomes data were collected from clinical charts and reference laboratories. To identify factors that had put these individuals at risk for failure, default, or early relapse in the first place, initial treatment records were also abstracted (if retreatment began within two years of initial treatment), and patient characteristics were compared with controls who successfully completed initial treatment without early relapse. 291 patients presenting for retreatment were included; 93% received a standard Category II regimen. Retreatment was successful in 74% of relapse patients, 48% of failure patients, and 41% of default patients. 25% of retreatment patients defaulted, higher than previous estimates. Retreatment failure was most common among patients who had failed initial treatment (24%), and default from retreatment was most frequent among patients with initial treatment default (57%). Drug susceptibility testing was performed in only 10% of retreatment patients. Independent risk factors for failure, default, or early relapse after initial treatment included male gender (aOR = 2.29, 95% CI 1

  2. Evaluation of electrolyte imbalance among tuberculosis patients receiving treatments in Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebimpe Wasiu Olalekan

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Hyponatraemia, hyperkalaemia, and hypochloremia characterized some of the electrolyte imbalance among TB patients receiving treatments. The raised level of bicarbonate may be attributed to overcorrection of respiratory acidosis often found in patients with tuberculosis. Monitoring electrolytes is therefore an important component of TB management.

  3. Surgery as an Adjunctive Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis : An Individual Patient Data Metaanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Gregory J.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Benedetti, Andrea; Chan, Edward D.; Becerra, Mercedes; Chiang, Chen-Yuan; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Koh, Won-Jung; Shiraishi, Yuji; Viiklepp, Piret; Yim, Jae-Joon; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Robert, Jerome; Shim, Tae Sun; Shin, Sonya S.; Menzies, Dick; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Medical treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR)-tuberculosis is complex, toxic, and associated with poor outcomes. Surgical lung resection may be used as an adjunct to medical therapy, with the intent of reducing bacterial burden and improving cure rates. We conducted an individual

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis coinfection in children: challenges in diagnosis and treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, L.M.; Warris, A.; Soolingen, D. van; Groot, R. de; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    The burden of childhood tuberculosis (TB) is influenced by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and this dangerous synergy affects various aspects of both diseases; from pathogenesis and the epidemiologic profile to clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. HIV-infected

  5. Antimicrobial peptides for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, allies or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Torres-Juarez, Flor

    2018-03-27

    Tuberculosis is an ancient disease that has become a serious public health issue in recent years, although increasing incidence has been controlled, deaths caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been accentuated due to the emerging of multi-drug resistant strains and the comorbidity with diabetes mellitus and HIV. This situation is threatening the goals of world health organization (WHO) to eradicate tuberculosis in 2035. WHO has called for the creation of new drugs as an alternative for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, among the plausible molecules that can be used are the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These peptides have demonstrated remarkable efficacy to kill mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo in experimental models, nevertheless, these peptides not only have antimicrobial activity but also have a wide variety of functions such as angiogenesis, wound healing, immunomodulation and other well-described roles into the human physiology. Therapeutic strategies for tuberculosis using AMPs must be well thought prior to their clinical use; evaluating comorbidities, family history and risk factors to other diseases, since the wide function of AMPs, they could lead to collateral undesirable effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. The Correlation of Initial Sputum Smear Positivity on Treatment Failure of Category 1 Therapy for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

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    Puput Dyah Ayu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease and is an important public health problem. Based on data from East Java Province Health Department reported that number of tuberculosis patient in Surabaya is the highest in East Java on year 2014. Early identification and good treatment based on the result of sputum identification are the strategy use to control tuberculosis widespread. So that why, microscopic observation to identify acid fast bacilli (AFB is the fundamental stage to determine recovery treatment. Initial sputum smear positivity is necessary to determine infectious graded. The objectives of the study were to identify of initial sputum smear positivity on treatment failure of category 1 therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in RS Paru Surabaya year 2011-2014. This study used case control method with quantitative approach. Forty two samples were taken from secondary data. Case group is 21 samples who have treatment failure and control group is 21 successful treatment. Samples were selected by simple random sampling. The chi square correlation showed that highly positive initial smear (p = 0,045; OR = 5,4 have correlated and risk factor to treatment failure on category 1 therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis. The conclusion is patient’s high positive sputum smear initially correlated to treatment failure on category 1 therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in RS Paru Surabaya year 2011–2014. Keywords: initial sputum smear positivity, treatment failure,, category 1 therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

  7. High mortality during tuberculosis treatment does not indicate long diagnostic delays in Vietnam: a cohort study

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    Sy Dinh N

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delay in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment initiation may increase disease severity and mortality. In evaluations of tuberculosis control programmes high fatality rates during tuberculosis treatment, are used as an indicator of long delays in low HIV-prevalence settings. However, data for this presumed association between delay and fatality are lacking. We assessed the association between diagnostic delay and mortality of new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Vietnam. Methods Follow-up of a patient cohort included in a survey of diagnostic delay in 70 randomly selected districts. Data on diagnosis and treatment were extracted from routine registers. Patients who had died during the course of treatment were compared to those with reported cure, completed treatment or failure (survivors. Results Complete data were available for 1881/2093 (89.9% patients, of whom 82 (4.4% had died. Fatality was 4.5% for patients with ≤ 4 weeks delay, 5.0% for 5- ≤ 8 weeks delay (aOR 1.11, 95%CI 0.67–1.84 and 3.2% for > 9 weeks delay (aOR 0.69, 95%CI 0.37–1.30. Fatality tended to decline with increasing delay but this was not significant. Fatality was not associated with median diagnostic delay at district level (Spearman's rho = -0.08, P = 0.5. Conclusion Diagnostic delay is not associated with treatment mortality in Vietnam at individual nor district level, suggesting that high case fatality should not be used as an indicator of long diagnostic delay in national tuberculosis programmes.

  8. Reactivation of tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment in a patient with a positive QuantiFERON-RD1 test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2004-01-01

    A patient with polymyositis developed tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment. Tuberculin Skin Test and chest X-ray failed to demonstrate latent tuberculosis, whereas a blood sample that was tested with a modified QuantiFERON-TB-assay, using the recombinant ESAT-6 and CFP-10, was positive...

  9. A Pilot Trial of Jawarish Amla as Adjuvant to Anti-Tubercular Treatment Drugs for Control of Adverse Reactions in DOTS Regime in Pulmonary TB

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwani, Arish Mohammad Khan; Zulkifle, Mohammad; Rehmatulla,

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives One of the greatest challenges of health care systems at the dawn of the 21st century is tuberculosis (TB). Drug resistant strains of TB are becoming a global public health risk. These strains commonly appear due to faulty therapies. Patients frequently stop treatment due to the toxicity of anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) drugs. Amla (Emblica officinalis) is a well-known Unani single drug. Jawarish amla is a Unani compound formulation which is commonly used to admini...

  10. [Anti-infectious treatments in urology: general remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyère, F; Karsenty, G; Guy, L; Bastide, C; Bernard, L

    2013-11-01

    To define the general use of anti-infectious treatments in urology. A review of national guidelines and articles published on the subject in the Medline database, selected by keywords, depending on the scientific relevance was performed. While the epidemiology clearly shows the non-reduction of the anti-infectious treatments use in France, the resistance increases to highlight foo-resistant germs. Urology is not an exception to this observation, and different means are set to improve the prescription made by urologists. The epidemiological observation confirms the urgent need to improve the prescription of anti-infectious treatments particularly in urology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of the effect of retinol and vitamin D supplementation on treatment in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qiuzhen; Ma, Aiguo; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2013-01-01

    The association between pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) has been previously attracted much attention. Diabetes alters immunity to tuberculosis, leading to more frequent treatment failure in TB patients with DM. Moreover, TB and DM often coincide with micronutrients...

  12. Latent tuberculosis infection in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection: comparison of tuberculin skin test to the anti TB-IgM antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvi, S.M.; Nadimi, M.; Shokri, S.; Zamani, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    To determine Latent Tuberculosis Infection (LTBI) prevalence and compare TST results to the anti TB-IgM anti bodies (ATIA) for the diagnosis of LTBI in HIV infected individuals. Sixty two randomized sampled HIV infected subjects from an addict treatment center in Ahvaz southwest Iran underwent TST, using 5 TU of purified protein derivative, and measuring ATIA. Data were analyzed in SPSS (version 16, USA). Of 62 participants, 34 (54.8%) had positive result for TST, whereas 6(9.7%) had positive ATIA. Overall concordance between TST and ATIA was 45.2% (Kappa= 0.37, P = 0.32). In subjects with positive test results by either TST or ATIA, only 4.8% had positive test results by both tests. Discordant results were found in 54.8% of subjects. Positive results for both tests in subjects categorized in two groups (above and below 200 CD4-cell/mm3) had no significant difference (P>0.05). LTBI prevalence among HIV infected individuals in studied area is higher than other parts of the world. TST is a useful test for LTBI diagnosis and prefer to ATIA. Concordance between TST and ATIA is low. (author)

  13. Association of diabetes and tuberculosis: impact on treatment and post-treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; García-García, Lourdes; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Bobadilla-Del-Valle, Miriam; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Mongua-Rodriguez, Norma; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo

    2013-03-01

    To determine the clinical consequences of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). We conducted a prospective study of patients with TB in Southern Mexico. From 1995 to 2010, patients with acid-fast bacilli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples underwent epidemiological, clinical and microbiological evaluation. Annual follow-ups were performed to ascertain treatment outcome, recurrence, relapse and reinfection. The prevalence of DM among 1262 patients with pulmonary TB was 29.63% (n=374). Patients with DM and pulmonary TB had more severe clinical manifestations (cavities of any size on the chest x-ray, adjusted OR (aOR) 1.80, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.41), delayed sputum conversion (aOR 1.51, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.10), a higher probability of treatment failure (aOR 2.93, 95% CI 1.18 to 7.23), recurrence (adjusted HR (aHR) 1.76, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.79) and relapse (aHR 1.83, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.23). Most of the second episodes among patients with DM were caused by bacteria with the same genotype but, in 5/26 instances (19.23%), reinfection with a different strain occurred. Given the growing epidemic of DM worldwide, it is necessary to add DM prevention and control strategies to TB control programmes and vice versa and to evaluate their effectiveness. The concurrence of both diseases potentially carries a risk of global spreading, with serious implications for TB control and the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

  14. Efficacy of amikacin and ciprofloxacin against clinical isolates of mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, M.; Faqir, F.; Sattar, A.; Abbasi, S.; Butt, T.; Karamat, K.A.; Abidi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis was a leading cause of death at the turn of the 20 century and continues to be one of the medical scourges of mankind. Before the availability of antimicrobial drugs the cornerstone of treatment was rest in the open air in sanatoria. The major breakthrough in treatment of tuberculosis came with the discovery of Streptomycin. Later, INH, Ethambutol, Pyrazinamide, Rifampicin were added to the arsenal. Objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis against two second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs, Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) Rawalpindi. All routine clinical samples received for acid fast bacilli (AFB) in the Department of Microbiology, AFIP, Rawalpindi were processed by modified Petroff's technique and inoculated on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) medium and Bactec 460 Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture system. After identification of M. tuberculosis sensitivity was performed against first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. Then susceptibility of M. tuberculosis isolates against Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin was performed on LJ medium. H37Rv was used as control strain. Results: Results were interpreted using resistance ratio method. Out of 100 M. tuberculosis isolates, 98% were sensitive to Amikacin and 97% to Ciprofloxacin. Conclusion: Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin are very effective second line anti-tuberculosis drugs against tuberculosis isolates in our set-up. (author)

  15. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for treatment of acute gout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Durme, Caroline M. P. G.; Wechalekar, Mihir D.; Landewé, Robert B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) associated with better outcomes than cyclooxygenase inhibitors, glucocorticoids, IL-1 inhibitors or placebo in the treatment of acute gout? NSAIDs are not significantly associated with a difference in pain reduction compared with cyclooxygenase

  16. HIV INFECTION AS A RISK FACTOR OF TUBERCULOSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Eremenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of three year follow-up over 96 HIV positive children registered in the AIDS Center. During 3 year follow up the infection with tuberculous mycobacteria was diagnosed in 27.3% (n = 23 of HIV positive children from the followed up group. The leading risk factor of tuberculosis is family exposure to a tuberculosis patient – 22.6% (n = 19. Compliance to follow-up and treatment, timely prescribed preventive anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy enhanced prevention of development of local forms of tuberculosis in the followed up group of children.

  17. Impact of fluoroquinolone treatment on delay of tuberculosis diagnosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Hogan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoroquinolones are among the most commonly used antibiotics for the treatment of respiratory infections. Because fluoroquinolones show bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, there is concern that their use can delay the diagnosis of tuberculosis. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess whether empiric treatment with fluoroquinolones delays the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in patients with respiratory tract infections. Objectives: The primary objective was to assess the delay in days in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis, among patients who received quinolones, compared to those who received non-fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Methods: We included studies of adult patients treated with fluoroquinolones prior to a confirmed diagnosis of tuberculosis. We performed a literature search of 7 databases (including PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library with no language restrictions. We calculated an unweighted mean of estimate of difference in delay across all studies. For the studies for which the estimate was available as a mean with standard deviation, a weighted average using a random effects meta-analysis model was estimated. Results: A total of 3983 citations were identified from the literature search; of these, 17 articles were selected for full-text review. A total of 10 studies were retained for the synthesis. These included 7 retrospective cohort studies and 3 case-control studies. Only one of these studies was from a high TB burden country, South Africa. The most commonly used fluoroquinolones were levofloxacin, gemifloxacin and moxifloxacin. The unweighted average of difference in delay between the fluoroquinolone group and non-fluoroquinolone group was 12.9 days (95% CI 6.1–19.7. When these differences were pooled using a random effects model, the weighted estimate was 10.9 days (95% CI 4.2–17.6. When stratified by acid-fast smear status, the delay was

  18. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia C. Dobler; Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich; Carol L. Armour

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB) physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI), focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explain...

  19. Cytokine Polymorphisms, Their Influence and Levels in Brazilian Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis during Antituberculosis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Peresi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play an essential role during active tuberculosis disease and cytokine genes have been described in association with altered cytokine levels. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify if IFNG, IL12B, TNF, IL17A, IL10, and TGFB1 gene polymorphisms influence the immune response of Brazilian patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB at different time points of antituberculosis treatment (T1, T2, and T3. Our results showed the following associations: IFNG +874 T allele and IFNG +2109 A allele with higher IFN-γ levels; IL12B +1188 C allele with higher IL-12 levels; TNF −308 A allele with higher TNF-α plasma levels in controls and mRNA levels in PTB patients at T1; IL17A A allele at rs7747909 with higher IL-17 levels; IL10 −819 T allele with higher IL-10 levels; and TGFB1 +29 CC genotype higher TGF-β plasma levels in PTB patients at T2. The present study suggests that IFNG +874T/A, IFNG +2109A/G, IL12B +1188A/C, IL10 −819C/T, and TGFB1 +21C/T are associated with differential cytokine levels in pulmonary tuberculosis patients and may play a role in the initiation and maintenance of acquired cellular immunity to tuberculosis and in the outcome of the active disease while on antituberculosis treatment.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of efavirenz and treatment of HIV-1 among pregnant women with and without tuberculosis coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Kelly E; Denti, Paolo; Martinson, Neil; Cohn, Silvia; Mashabela, Fildah; Hoffmann, Jennifer; Haas, David W; Hull, Jennifer; Msandiwa, Regina; Castel, Sandra; Wiesner, Lubbe; Chaisson, Richard E; McIlleron, Helen

    2015-01-15

    Pregnancy and tuberculosis treatment or prophylaxis can affect efavirenz pharmacokinetics, maternal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) treatment outcomes, and mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) risk. We evaluated a prospective cohort of pregnant, HIV-infected women with and without tuberculosis in Soweto, South Africa. Pharmacokinetic sampling was performed at gestation week 37 and during the postpartum period. Efavirenz trough concentrations (Cmin) were predicted using population pharmacokinetic models. HIV-viral load was measured at delivery for mothers and at 6 weeks of age for infants. Ninety-seven women participated; 44 had tuberculosis. Median efavirenz Cmin during pregnancy was 1.35 µg/mL (interquartile range [IQR], 0.90-2.07 µg/mL; 27% had an efavirenz Cmin of pregnant women with extensive CYP2B6 genotypes had an efavirenz Cmin of HIV-viral load at delivery was more common among pregnant women with tuberculosis, in whom ART was generally initiated later. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Surgery as an Adjunctive Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis: An Individual Patient Data Metaanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Gregory J; Mitnick, Carole D; Benedetti, Andrea; Chan, Edward D; Becerra, Mercedes; Chiang, Chen-Yuan; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Koh, Won-Jung; Shiraishi, Yuji; Viiklepp, Piret; Yim, Jae-Joon; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Robert, Jerome; Shim, Tae Sun; Shin, Sonya S; Menzies, Dick; Ahuja, S; Ashkin, D; Avendaño, M; Banerjee, R; Bauer, M; Burgos, M; Centis, R; Cobelens, F; Cox, H; D'Ambrosio, L; de Lange, W C M; DeRiemer, K; Enarson, D; Falzon, D; Flanagan, K; Flood, J; Gandhi, N; Garcia-Garcia, L; Granich, R M; Hollm-Delgado, M G; Holtz, T H; Hopewell, P; Iseman, M; Jarlsberg, L G; Kim, H R; Lancaster, J; Lange, C; Leimane, V; Leung, C C; Li, J; Menzies, D; Migliori, G B; Narita, M; Nathanson, E; Odendaal, R; O'Riordan, P; Pai, M; Palmero, D; Park, S K; Pena, J; Pérez-Guzmán, C; Ponce-de-Leon, A; Quelapio, M I D; Quy, H T; Riekstina, V; Royce, S; Salim, M; Schaaf, H S; Seung, K J; Shah, L; Shean, K; Sifuentes-Osornio, J; Sotgiu, G; Strand, M J; Sung, S W; Tabarsi, P; Tupasi, T E; Vargas, M H; van Altena, R; van der Walt, M; van der Werf, T S; Westenhouse, J; Yew, W W

    2016-04-01

    Medical treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR)-tuberculosis is complex, toxic, and associated with poor outcomes. Surgical lung resection may be used as an adjunct to medical therapy, with the intent of reducing bacterial burden and improving cure rates. We conducted an individual patient data metaanalysis to evaluate the effectiveness of surgery as adjunctive therapy for MDR-tuberculosis. Individual patient data, was obtained from the authors of 26 cohort studies, identified from 3 systematic reviews of MDR-tuberculosis treatment. Data included the clinical characteristics and medical and surgical therapy of each patient. Primary analyses compared treatment success (cure and completion) to a combined outcome of failure, relapse, or death. The effects of all forms of resection surgery, pneumonectomy, and partial lung resection were evaluated. A total of 4238 patients from 18 surgical studies and 2193 patients from 8 nonsurgical studies were included. Pulmonary resection surgery was performed on 478 patients. Partial lung resection surgery was associated with improved treatment success (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-5.9; I(2)R, 11.8%), but pneumonectomy was not (aOR, 1.1; 95% CI, .6-2.3; I(2)R, 13.2%). Treatment success was more likely when surgery was performed after culture conversion than before conversion (aOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 0.9-7.1; I(2)R, 0.2%). Partial lung resection, but not pneumonectomy, was associated with improved treatment success among patients with MDR-tuberculosis. Although improved outcomes may reflect patient selection, partial lung resection surgery after culture conversion may improve treatment outcomes in patients who receive optimal medical therapy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. A meta-analysis of drug resistant tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa: how strongly associated with previous treatment and HIV co-infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru; Yizengaw, Desalegn

    2013-11-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, the fight against tuberculosis (TB) has encountered a great challenge because of the emergence of drug resistant TB strains and the high prevalence of HIV infection. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the association of drug-resistant TB with anti-TB drug treatment history and HIV co-infection. After electronic based literature search in the databases of Medline, HINARI, EMBASE and the Cochrane library, article selection and data extraction were carried out. HIV co-infection and previous history of TB treatment were used as predictors for the occurrence of any anti-TB drug resistant or multiple drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). The risk ratios for each included study and for the pooled sample were computed using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analyses and funnel plots were also done. The pooled analysis showed that the risk of developing drug-resistant TB to at least one anti-TB drug was about 3 times higher in individuals who had a previous history of anti-TB treatment than new TB cases. The risk of having MDR-TB in previously anti-TB treated TB cases was more than 5-fold higher than that of new TB cases. Resistance to Ethambutol and Rifampicin was more than fivefold higher among the previously treated with anti-TB drugs. However, HIV infection was not associated with drug-resistant TB. There was a strong association of previous anti-TB treatment with MDR-TB. Primary treatment warrants special emphasis, and screening for anti-TB drugs sensitivity has to be strengthened.

  3. Nodo-colonic fistula caused by intra-abdominal tuberculous lymphadenitis during treatment with anti-tuberculous medication: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Kyung Sun; Bae, Kyung Eun; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Lee, Ji Hae; Kang, Mi Jin; Kim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Recently, the overall incidence of tuberculosis has decreased, but the incidence of an extrapulmonary manifestation in patients with tuberculosis has increased in the Republic of Korea. Although intestinal tuberculosis is not infrequent, a fistula caused by tuberculosis is a rare condition. A 23-year-old man presented with fever, diarrhea and right lower quadrant pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a lobulated, peripherally enhancing, low density mass in the mesentery. The patient underwent laparoscopic biopsy for necrotic lymph node, and intra-abdominal tuberculous lymphadenitis was diagnosed. Four months after initiating treatment with anti-tuberculous medication, the patient developed fever together with lower abdominal pain. A follow-up CT scan revealed a fistulous tract that had developed between the initially noted lymphadenopathy and the proximal ascending colon. Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was performed as a curative treatment. This case suggests that a nodo-colonic fistula may occur as a paradoxical response in patients with intra-abdominal tuberculous lymphadenitis during treatment with anti-tuberculous medication.

  4. [On the way to shortening tuberculosis treatments: clinical trials of the Unitat d' Investagació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Antonio; Sánchez, Francesca; Nelson, Jeanne; Miró, José M; Caylà, Joan A

    2010-01-01

    New treatment guidelines are required to improve the tuberculosis control strategies that have been used for 30 years. Seven centers of the Barcelona Tuberculosis Research Unit (BTRU) (Unitat d'Investigació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona) are collaborating with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a series of clinical trials on latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. BTRU participation began in 2004 with Study 26, an evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of rifapentine plus isoniazid administered once weekly for 3 months compared with the standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection. The BTRU centers together enrolled 246 patients (3% of the total). General enrollment was completed in February, 2008. HIV-infected patient and child enrollment continues. Treatment with 12 doses instead of 270 doses is expected to be a clear success. However, the analysis will be completed in 2010. Study 28 (started in 2006), designed for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, compared standard treatment with an experimental regimen substituting moxifloxacin for isoniazid. BTRU centers together enrolled 15 patients (3.5% of the total). The provisional results (presented at the 47th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Chicago, 2007) showed no difference between the sputum conversion rate of each regimen at week 8 of treatment. Study 29 is currently underway, in which rifapentine was introduced in the experimental regimen for active tuberculosis treatment. Copyright (c) 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Experience with mesodiencephalic modulation in the combination treatment of patients with tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kornienko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the clinical efficiency of using mesodiencephalic modulation (MDM as therapy in the combination treatment of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, the authors examined two groups: 1 the patients who received a MDM cycle in combination with chemotherapy regimens (a study group; 2 those treated using standard chemotherapy regimens (a control group. By the end of one-month therapy, the study group ceased bacterial excretion twice more often than the control group that exhibited the similar results only by the end of three-month treatment. MDM as therapy produced positive X-ray changes in 76.0% of the cases in the study group and in 44.4% in the control one. MDM used in the combination treatment of patients with tuberculosis makes it possible to reduce the length of hospital stay, the number of round-the-clock beds, and the cost of treating these patients.

  6. Care seeking and attitudes towards treatment compliance by newly enrolled tuberculosis patients in the district treatment programme in rural western Kenya: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayisi, J.G.; van 't Hoog, A.H.; Agaya, J.A.; Mchembere, W.; Nyamthimba, P.O.; Muhenje, O.; Marston, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    The two issues mostly affecting the success of tuberculosis (TB) control programmes are delay in presentation and non-adherence to treatment. It is important to understand the factors that contribute to these issues, particularly in resource limited settings, where rates of tuberculosis are high.

  7. [Tuberculosis and refusal of treatment: resorting to legislation on serious health threats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, R; Le Gueut, M

    2013-06-01

    Clinicians are regularly confronted with the question of refusal of treatment from patients with tuberculosis. For several years, the French public health authorities have been studying the possibility of compelling treatment or isolation, but no plan has been implemented even though European and American experiences have shown the effectiveness of restrictive measures. Neither the statutory exceptions to the principle of consent to medical treatment nor the conditions of implementation of "required care" allow legally binding measures against patients refusing care or isolation. The legislation on serious health threats has recently been applied to the situation of a refusal of treatment in the context of tuberculosis. It allowed the patient to be ordered to observe prescribed care and the possibility of forced isolation in the event of breach of this order. The legislation on serious health threats is a response to the question of refusal of treatment from patients with tuberculosis. However the opinion of the legal authority as to its necessity and proportionality to the risk remains unknown. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS OF TUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA DEFINING DRUG RESISTANCE IN HIV POSITIVE AND HIV NEGATIVE TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS WITHOUT PRIOR HISTORY OF TREATMENT IN SVERDLOVSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Panov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the study: to identify profile of mutations of tuberculous mycobacteria responsible for resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis patients without prior history of treatment.Materials and methods. 165 strains of tuberculous mycobacteria from HIV positive patients and 166 strains of tuberculous mycobacteria from HIV negative patients were studied in Sverdlovsk Region (TB Dispensary, Yekaterinburg. Mutations in genes were identified using microchips of TB-BIOCHIP® and TB-BIOCHIP®-2 in compliance with the manufacturer's guidelines (OOO Biochip-IMB, Moscow.Results. It was observed that 85/165 (51.52% strains isolated from HIV positive tuberculosis patients and 58/166 (34.94% strains isolated from tuberculosis patients not associated with HIV possessed MDR genotype (p < 0.01. The majority of MDR strains had mutations in the 531th codon of rpoB (Ser→Leu and 315th codon of katG (Ser→Thr (64/85, 75.29% and 38/58, 65.52% respective the groups, resulting in the high level of resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid. Each group also had approximately equal ratio (11/165, 6.67% and 12/166, 7.23% respective the groups of strains with genomic mutations defining the resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin and fluoruquinolones. No confident difference was found in mutation patterns of genome of tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis patients. 

  9. Trends of Mycobacterium bovis Isolation and First-Line Anti-tuberculosis Drug Susceptibility Profile: A Fifteen-Year Laboratory-Based Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla-del Valle, Miriam; Torres-González, Pedro; Cervera-Hernández, Miguel Enrique; Martínez-Gamboa, Areli; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda; Chávez-Mazari, Bárbara; Ortiz-Conchi, Narciso; Rodríguez-Cruz, Luis; Cervantes-Sánchez, Axel; Gudiño-Enríquez, Tomasa; Cinta-Severo, Carmen; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce de León, Alfredo

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis causes the majority of tuberculosis (TB) cases in humans; however, in developing countries, human TB caused by M. bovis may be frequent but undetected. Human TB caused by M. bovis is considered a zoonosis; transmission is mainly through consumption of unpasteurized dairy products, and it is less frequently attributed to animal-to-human or human-to-human contact. We describe the trends of M. bovis isolation from human samples and first-line drug susceptibility during a 15-year period in a referral laboratory located in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. Data on mycobacterial isolates from human clinical samples were retrieved from the laboratory's database for the 2000-2014 period. Susceptibility to first-line drugs: rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin (STR) and ethambutol was determined. We identified 1,165 isolates, 73.7% were M. tuberculosis and 26.2%, M. bovis. Among pulmonary samples, 16.6% were M. bovis. The proportion of M. bovis isolates significantly increased from 7.8% in 2000 to 28.4% in 2014 (X(2)trend, ptuberculosis isolates (10.9% vs.3.4%, ptuberculosis, respectively (p = 0.637). A rising trend of primary STR monoresistance was observed for both species (3.4% in 2000-2004 vs. 7.6% in 2010-2014; p = 0.02). There is a high prevalence and a rising trend of M. bovis isolates in our region. The proportion of pulmonary M. bovis isolates is higher than in previous reports. Additionally, we report high rates of primary anti-tuberculosis resistance and secondary MDR in both M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. This is one of the largest reports on drug susceptibility of M. bovis from human samples and shows a significant proportion of first-line anti-tuberculosis drug resistance.

  10. Trends of Mycobacterium bovis Isolation and First-Line Anti-tuberculosis Drug Susceptibility Profile: A Fifteen-Year Laboratory-Based Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla-del Valle, Miriam; Torres-González, Pedro; Cervera-Hernández, Miguel Enrique; Martínez-Gamboa, Areli; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda; Chávez-Mazari, Bárbara; Ortiz-Conchi, Narciso; Rodríguez-Cruz, Luis; Cervantes-Sánchez, Axel; Gudiño-Enríquez, Tomasa; Cinta-Severo, Carmen; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce de León, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis causes the majority of tuberculosis (TB) cases in humans; however, in developing countries, human TB caused by M. bovis may be frequent but undetected. Human TB caused by M. bovis is considered a zoonosis; transmission is mainly through consumption of unpasteurized dairy products, and it is less frequently attributed to animal-to-human or human-to-human contact. We describe the trends of M. bovis isolation from human samples and first-line drug susceptibility during a 15-year period in a referral laboratory located in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. Methodology/Principal Findings Data on mycobacterial isolates from human clinical samples were retrieved from the laboratory’s database for the 2000–2014 period. Susceptibility to first-line drugs: rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin (STR) and ethambutol was determined. We identified 1,165 isolates, 73.7% were M. tuberculosis and 26.2%, M. bovis. Among pulmonary samples, 16.6% were M. bovis. The proportion of M. bovis isolates significantly increased from 7.8% in 2000 to 28.4% in 2014 (X 2 trend, ptuberculosis isolates (10.9% vs.3.4%, ptuberculosis, respectively (p = 0.637). A rising trend of primary STR monoresistance was observed for both species (3.4% in 2000–2004 vs. 7.6% in 2010–2014; p = 0.02). Conclusions/Significance There is a high prevalence and a rising trend of M. bovis isolates in our region. The proportion of pulmonary M. bovis isolates is higher than in previous reports. Additionally, we report high rates of primary anti-tuberculosis resistance and secondary MDR in both M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. This is one of the largest reports on drug susceptibility of M. bovis from human samples and shows a significant proportion of first-line anti-tuberculosis drug resistance. PMID:26421930

  11. Efavirenz, tenofovir and emtricitabine combined with first-line tuberculosis treatment in tuberculosis-HIV-coinfected Tanzanian patients: a pharmacokinetic and safety study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semvua, H.H.; Mtabho, C.M.; Fillekes, Q.; Boogaard, J. van den; Kisonga, R.M.; Mleoh, L.; Ndaro, A.; Kisanga, E.R.; Ven, A. van der; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Kibiki, G.S.; Boeree, M.J.; Burger, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effect of rifampicin-based tuberculosis (TB) treatment on the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine in a fixed-dose combination tablet, and vice versa, in Tanzanian TB-HIV-coinfected patients. METHODS: This was a Phase II open-label multiple dose

  12. Changes in avidity and level of immunoglobulin G antibodies to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sera of patients undergoing treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arias-Bouda, Lenka M. Pereira; Kuijper, Sjoukje; van der Werf, Anouk; Nguyen, Lan N.; Jansen, Henk M.; Kolk, Arend H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Much is known about specific antibodies and their titers in patients with tuberculosis. However, little is known about the avidity of these antibodies or whether changes in avidity occur during the progression of the disease or during treatment. The aims of this study were to determine the avidity

  13. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Tuberculosis Treatment Outcome and Adverse Reactions in Patients Receiving Directly Observed Treatment Strategy in India: A Prospective Study

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    Ali Nasir Siddiqui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite successful implementation of directly observed treatment, short course (DOTS in India, the growing number of diabetes mellitus (DM patients appears to be a cause in the increasing tuberculosis (TB incidence, affecting their management. In this regard, a prospective study was conducted on DOTS patients in three primary health care centers in urban slum region of South Delhi, India, to evaluate the effect of DM on sputum conversion, treatment outcome, and adverse drug reactions (ADR due to anti-TB treatment. Eligible TB patients underwent blood glucose screening at treatment initiation. Disease presentation, clinical outcome, and ADRs were compared between patients of TB with and without DM. Out of 316 patients, the prevalence of DM was found to be 15.8%, in which 19.4% and 9.6% were PTB and EPTB patients, respectively. DM patients have observed higher sputum positivity (OR 1.247 95% CI; 0.539–2.886 at the end of 2-month treatment and poor outcome (OR 1.176 95% CI; 0.310–4.457 at the completion of treatment compared with non DM patients. Presence of DM was significantly associated (OR 3.578 95% CI; 1.114–11.494, p=0.032 with the development of ADRs. DM influences the treatment outcome of PTB patients in our setting and also on the ADR incidence.

  14. Social capital and adverse treatment outcomes of tuberculosis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, P R; Mundra, A; Dawale, A

    2017-08-01

    'Social capital' refers to social norms, relationships, networks and values that affect the functioning and development of society. Social capital influences health positively, but its role in the treatment outcomes of tuberculosis (TB) is not known. To study the role of social capital in determining adverse TB treatment outcomes. Of 516 patients registered under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme in 2014 in Wardha Tuberculosis Unit, Wardha, India, we included 88 patients with adverse treatment outcomes as cases and 187 controls from among those without adverse outcomes. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare standardised Z-scores. A greater proportion of controls than cases belonged to higher quartiles of social capital and its domains than cases, and the mean standardised Z-score was also consistently higher among controls than cases. Respectively 47% and 15% of cases and controls were in the poorest quartile of social capital, whereas respectively 10% and 33% of cases and controls were in the richest quartile. Each unit increase in Z-score of overall social capital reduced the odds of adverse treatment outcomes by 63.1%. Appropriate interventions for building social capital for TB patients and linking them with the programme would improve programme performance.

  15. Resistance to first-line anti-TB drugs is associated with reduced nitric oxide susceptibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idh, Jonna; Mekonnen, Mekidim; Abate, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    The relative contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to the killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human tuberculosis (TB) is controversial, although this has been firmly established in rodents. Studies have demonstrated that clinical strains of M. tuberculosis differ in susceptibility to NO, but how...

  16. The application of anti-ESAT-6 monoclonal antibody fluorescent probe in ex vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging in mice with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Zhang, Haoling; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Li, Cong; Shi, Yuxin; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-09-01

    Here, we aimed to assess the feasibility of anti-ESAT-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) coupling with IR783 and rhodamine fluorescent probe in the detection of ESAT-6 expression in tuberculosis tissue of mice using near-infrared fluorescence imaging. IR783 and rhodamine were conjugated to the anti-ESAT-6 mAb or IgG. Mice in the experimental group were injected with fluorescence-labeled mAb probe, and mice in the control group were injected with fluorescence-labeled non-specific IgG antibody. Twenty-four hours later, the lung tissue of mice was examined using ex vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging. In addition, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated by measuring the signal intensities of the pulmonary lesions, normal lung tissue and background noise. The frozen lung tissue section was examined under fluorescence microscopy and compared with hemoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The ex vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging showed that the fluorescence signal in the lung tuberculosis lesions in the experimental group was significantly enhanced, whereas there was only a weak fluorescence signal or even no fluorescence signal in the control group. CNR values were 64.40 ± 7.02 (n = 6) and 8.75 ± 3.87 (n = 6), respectively (t = 17.01, p fluorescence accumulation distribution detected under fluorescence microscopy was consistent with HE staining of the tuberculosis region. In conclusion, anti-ESAT-6 mAb fluorescent probe could target and be applied in specific ex vivo imaging of mice tuberculosis, and may be of further use in tuberculosis in living mice. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Anti-Tuberculosis Activity of Extract Ethyl Acetate Kenikir Leaves (Cosmos caudatus H.B.K and Sendok Leaves (Plantago Major L. By In Vitro Test

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    Tatang Irianti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing therapy problem including multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB has made it important to discover a new anti-TB drug candidate. The aim of this study was to acknowledge the activity of ethyl acetate extracts of kenikir (Cosmos caudatus H.B.K and sendok (Plantago major L. leaves against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis H37Rv. This research used Middlebrook (MB 7H9 media and observed the growth of M. tuberculosis using Lowenstein Jensen (LJ media. The concentration of extracts were 0.25 mg/ml, 0.50 mg/ml, and 1.00 mg/ml. The result of this study showed that ethyl acetate extracts exhibited anti-TB activity in 1000 µg/ml of both extracts. The active compound group was detected by thin layer chromatography (TLC and the separation of compounds was shown by retardation factor (Rf and the color of the spots. Based on TLC chromatograms, it is known that there are types of compounds, such as ortho-dihydroxy compounds, phenolic compounds, and compound leads to terpenoids for both extracts.

  18. Treatment compliance and challenges among tuberculosis patients across selected health facilities in Osun State Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajao, K O; Ogundun, O A; Afolabi, O T; Ojo, T O; Atiba, B P; Oguntunase, D O

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in the world and Africa has approximately one quarter of the world's cases. One of the greatest challenges facing most TB programmes is the non-compliance to TB treatment among TB patients. This study aimed at determining the challenges of management of tuberculosis (TB) across selected Osun State health facilities. The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional design. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 102 TB patients in the health facilities. The instrument measured socio-demographic variables, patient related factors, socio-economic variables, health care system related factors to TB disease and treatment. Data were analysed and summarized using descriptive and inferential statistics. Statistical significance was placed at p facilities (χ2 = 21.761, p facility and patient-related factors were largely responsible.

  19. PREDNISONE THERAPY SAFETY FOR TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH MIX OF TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV-INFECTION

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    G. V. Maksimov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The study of prednisone safety for treatment of TB mixed with HIV-infection has been conducted. Two groups of patients were compared. The first group was consisted of 88 patients who were treated by prednisone and standard tuberculosis therapy, the second group of patients presented by 45 patients received only tuberculosis medicines. It was demonstrated that in case of prednisone using (1st group the number of CD4 limphocytes increased, intoxication symptoms disappeared fast and recovery process accelerated. Increasing of cases with unfavorable course of TB and HIV-infection in patients of first group was not registered in compare with the second group. Thus, using of prednisone therapy to treat TB mixed with HIV-infection was safe, not lead to unfavorable course of TB or HIV-infection. Such kind of treatment especially important for patients with exudative reactions.

  20. Anti-infection treatment of iatrogenic acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shulan; Ke Xiaoyan; Jia Tengzhen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To occumulatle experience of anti-infection treatment in acute radiation sickness (ARS) induced by medical treatment in order to provide beneficial help for victims of accidental of acute radiation sickness. Methods: The changes of peripheral blood indices, body temperature and clinical symptoms of 17 cases who were clinically irradiated with 6.0-7.2 Gy X-rays were observed both before peripheral blood stem cell transplantation(PBSCT) and after anti-infection treatment. Results: WBC count began to decrease to below 1 x 10 9 /L from the 8th to 10th days after irradiation and maintained at row level for 4 days or for 13.3 days if the patients had not received rhG-CSF treatment. In 29.4% of patients the body temperature was higher than 38.5 degree C. After comprehensive enviromental protection and anti-infection treatment, all patients could successfully tide over the period of bone marrow depression without appearance of the typical critical phase of ARS. Conclusion: PBSCT and rhG-CSF treatment can reduce the time span for reconstruction of bone marrow. Comprehensive enviromental protection and combined anti-infection treatment are key points fm successful treatment. (authors)

  1. Tuberculosis treatment and Smoking, Armenia, 2014–2016

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    Dikran Raffi Balian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis and tobacco prove to be increasingly apparent world problems. Armenia is a developing country which is facing issues related to the high rates of tobacco consumption. Moreover, it is among the list of high multi-drug resistant (MDR Tuberculosis TB burden countries. Treatment success rate in Armenia for sputum smear-positive cases never reached World Health Organization's (WHO target of 85% in last 15 years. Data from different studies completed across the world suggests that there is an association between smoking and negative treatment outcomes. Methods: This retrospective study was designed to investigate aforementioned associations between TB treatment outcomes and smoking status of TB patients. Data for the study were derived from the national data available in the electronic database of the Armenian National TB Center. Results: Based on inclusion and exclusion criteria 992 TB patients registered in 2014 were enrolled in this study. All of them are were TB patients in which 387 were smokers and 605 were non-smokers. Notably, adjusted analysis showed that individuals who smoked during TB treatment had 1.61 higher odds of having unsuccessful TB treatment outcome. Additionally, consistent with the literature, statistically significant association was identified between TB treatment outcome and other well factors such as sputum smear status (OR=2.24, p<0.01, HIV status (OR,=1.87, p<0.01 of patients, etc. Conclusions: The smoking, HIV positive status, positive sputum smear microscopy test were identified as an important factors associated with the unsuccessful TB treatment outcome in Armenia. It highlights the necessity of having specific restrictions and campaign programs to reduce smoking rates among TB patients in order to improve current TB treatment and care services throughout Armenia. Keywords: Tuberculosis, Smoking, Treatment outcome, Treatment success

  2. Ursolic and oleanolic acids as antimicrobial and immunomodulatory compounds for tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; Cornejo-Garrido, Jorge; López-García, Sonia; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Meckes-Fischer, Mariana; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Marquina, Brenda; Torres, Javier; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2013-10-07

    New alternatives for the treatment of Tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed and medicinal plants represent a potential option. Chamaedora tepejilote and Lantana hispida are medicinal plants from Mexico and their hexanic extracts have shown antimycobacterial activity. Bioguided investigation of these extracts showed that the active compounds were ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA). The activity of UA and OA against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, four monoresistant strains, and two drug-resistant clinical isolates were determined by MABA test. The intracellular activity of UA and OA against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and a MDR clinical isolate were evaluated in a macrophage cell line. Finally, the antitubercular activity of UA and OA was tested in BALB/c mice infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv or a MDR strain, by determining pulmonary bacilli loads, tissue damage by automated histomorphometry, and expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and iNOS by quantitative RT-PCR. The in vitro assay showed that the UA/OA mixture has synergistic activity. The intracellular activity of these compounds against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and a MDR clinical isolate in a macrophage cell line showed that both compounds, alone and in combination, were active against intracellular mycobacteria even at low doses. Moreover, when both compounds were used to treat BALB/c mice with TB induced by H37Rv or MDR bacilli, a significant reduction of bacterial loads and pneumonia were observed compared to the control. Interestingly, animals treated with UA and OA showed a higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α in their lungs, than control animals. UA and OA showed antimicrobial activity plus an immune-stimulatory effect that permitted the control of experimental pulmonary TB.

  3. The similar hexheimer reaction during initial treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: CT appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Zhou Xinhua; Xie Ruming; Xu Jinping

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CT features of similar Hexheimer's reaction during initial treatment of active pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: The similar Hexheimer's reaction in 44 patients diagnosed by clinic and follow-up CT scans were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists. Results: During initial treatment of active pulmonary tuberculosis, development of radiographic progression were observed in 57 foci, including 28 pulmonary lesions increased at the site of their original lesion or new opacities elsewhere, ipsilateral or contralateral to the original lesion or both, 10 lesions related to the pleura (pleural effusion, pleural tuberculoma), 15 lymphadenectasis, 3 thymus reactions, and 1 cardiac pericardium thickening, respectively. These reactions appeared from the 20 days to 3.5 months, then with continuation of the initial chemotherapy for 1.0-3.0 months, the radiographic response was excellent with the areas of progression and the original lesions demonstrating resolution or improvement. Conclusion: The CT appearances of similar Hexheimer's reaction during initial treatment of active tuberculosis are specific to a certainty. (authors)

  4. Tuberculosis Prevention in the Private Sector: Using Claims-Based Methods to Identify and Evaluate Latent Tuberculosis Infection Treatment With Isoniazid Among the Commercially Insured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, Erica L; Miller, Thaddeus L; Carlson, Erin K; Ho, Christine

    Targeted identification and treatment of people with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are key components of the US tuberculosis elimination strategy. Because of recent policy changes, some LTBI treatment may shift from public health departments to the private sector. To (1) develop methodology to estimate initiation and completion of treatment with isoniazid for LTBI using claims data, and (2) estimate treatment completion rates for isoniazid regimens from commercial insurance claims. Medical and pharmacy claims data representing insurance-paid services rendered and prescriptions filled between January 2011 and March 2015 were analyzed. Four million commercially insured individuals 0 to 64 years of age. Six-month and 9-month treatment completion rates for isoniazid LTBI regimens. There was an annual isoniazid LTBI treatment initiation rate of 12.5/100 000 insured persons. Of 1074 unique courses of treatment with isoniazid for which treatment completion could be assessed, almost half (46.3%; confidence interval, 43.3-49.3) completed 6 or more months of therapy. Of those, approximately half (48.9%; confidence interval, 44.5-53.3) completed 9 months or more. Claims data can be used to identify and evaluate LTBI treatment with isoniazid occurring in the commercial sector. Completion rates were in the range of those found in public health settings. These findings suggest that the commercial sector may be a valuable adjunct to more traditional venues for tuberculosis prevention. In addition, these newly developed claims-based methods offer a means to gain important insights and open new avenues to monitor, evaluate, and coordinate tuberculosis prevention.

  5. Trends of Mycobacterium bovis Isolation and First-Line Anti-tuberculosis Drug Susceptibility Profile: A Fifteen-Year Laboratory-Based Surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bobadilla-del Valle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis causes the majority of tuberculosis (TB cases in humans; however, in developing countries, human TB caused by M. bovis may be frequent but undetected. Human TB caused by M. bovis is considered a zoonosis; transmission is mainly through consumption of unpasteurized dairy products, and it is less frequently attributed to animal-to-human or human-to-human contact. We describe the trends of M. bovis isolation from human samples and first-line drug susceptibility during a 15-year period in a referral laboratory located in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City.Data on mycobacterial isolates from human clinical samples were retrieved from the laboratory's database for the 2000-2014 period. Susceptibility to first-line drugs: rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin (STR and ethambutol was determined. We identified 1,165 isolates, 73.7% were M. tuberculosis and 26.2%, M. bovis. Among pulmonary samples, 16.6% were M. bovis. The proportion of M. bovis isolates significantly increased from 7.8% in 2000 to 28.4% in 2014 (X(2trend, p<0.001. Primary STR resistance was higher among M. bovis compared with M. tuberculosis isolates (10.9% vs.3.4%, p<0.001. Secondary multidrug resistance (MDR rates were 38.5% and 34.4% for M. bovis and M. tuberculosis, respectively (p = 0.637. A rising trend of primary STR monoresistance was observed for both species (3.4% in 2000-2004 vs. 7.6% in 2010-2014; p = 0.02.There is a high prevalence and a rising trend of M. bovis isolates in our region. The proportion of pulmonary M. bovis isolates is higher than in previous reports. Additionally, we report high rates of primary anti-tuberculosis resistance and secondary MDR in both M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. This is one of the largest reports on drug susceptibility of M. bovis from human samples and shows a significant proportion of first-line anti-tuberculosis drug resistance.

  6. OROPHARYNGEAL TUBERCULOSIS: AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION

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    M H Dadgarnia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nTuberculosis (TB still represents a major public health problem worldwide. The primary form of disease is most often localized to the lung. In a minority of patients, progressive pulmonary disease spreads to other organ systems through self inoculation via infected sputum, blood and lymphatic system, establishing the secondary form of tuberculosis. We present a patient that was referred to us with complaint of ulcerative mouth lesions from 3 months ago. In physical examination multiple erythematous and irregularly ulcerative lesions affecting soft palate area, uvula and anterior tonsillar pillar was noted bilaterally. Punch biopsy was done from several points that revealed chronic granulomatous inflammation. Ziehl-Nielsen staining of cultured specimen demonstrated acid-fast bacilli. Chest X-ray showed apical pulmonary involvement, suggesting tuberculosis infection. Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis 4 drugs regimen. In the one year follow-up period after complete treatment; patient didn't have any evidence of disease. Oral and oropharyngeal TB lesions are uncommon, it is estimated that only 0.05-5% of total TB cases may present with oral manifestations, but should be an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of lesions that appear in the oral cavity and oropharynx. The secondary form is more frequent and involves mainly the tongue but involvement of pharynx is quite rare condition. Although tuberculosis of oropharynx is relatively rare, with the increasing incidence of tuberculosis, it must be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical ulcerative lesions of the mouth and oropharynx.

  7. Tuberculosis incidence and treatment completion among Ugandan prison inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitters, A.; Kaggwa, M.; Omiel, P.; Nagadya, G.; Kisa, N.; Dalal, S.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND The Uganda Prisons Service (UPS) is responsible for the health of approximately 32 500 inmates in 233 prisons. In 2008 a rapid UPS assessment estimated TB prevalence at 654/100 000, three times that of the general population (183/100 000). Although treatment programs exist, little is known about treatment completion in sub-Saharan African prisons. METHODS We conducted a retrospective study of Ugandan prisoners diagnosed with TB from June 2011 to November 2012. We analyzed TB diagnosis, TB-HIV comorbidity and treatment completion from national registers and tracked prison transfers and releases. RESULTS A total of 469 prisoners were diagnosed with TB over the 1.5-year period (incidence 955/100 000 person-years). Of 466 prisoners starting treatment, 48% completed treatment, 43% defaulted, 5% died and 4% were currently on treatment. During treatment, 12% of prisoners remaining in the same prison defaulted, 53% of transfers defaulted and 81% of those released were lost to follow-up. The odds of defaulting were 8.36 times greater among prisoners who were transferred during treatment. CONCLUSIONS TB incidence and treatment default are high among Ugandan prisoners. Strategies to improve treatment completion and prevent multidrug resistance could include avoiding transfer of TB patients, improving communications between prisons to ensure treatment follow-up after transfer and facilitating transfer to community clinics for released prisoners. PMID:24902552

  8. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis and treatment adherence among patients with chronic kidney disease in Campo Grande, State of Mato Grosso do Sul

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    Aucely Corrêa Fernandes Chagas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The primary strategy for tuberculosis control involves identifying individuals with latent tuberculosis. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients who were undergoing hemodialysis in Campo Grande, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, to characterize the sociodemographic and clinical profiles of patients with latent tuberculosis, to verify the association between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and the occurrence of latent tuberculosis, and to monitor patient adherence to latent tuberculosis treatment. Methods This epidemiological study involved 418 CKD patients who were undergoing hemodialysis and who underwent a tuberculin skin test. Results The prevalence of latent tuberculosis was 10.3%. The mean patient age was 53.43±14.97 years, and the patients were predominantly men (63.9%. The population was primarily Caucasian (58.6%; half (50% were married, and 49.8% had incomplete primary educations. Previous contact with tuberculosis patients was reported by 80% of the participants. Treatment adherence was 97.7%. Conclusions We conclude that the prevalence of latent tuberculosis in our study population was low. Previous contact with patients with active tuberculosis increased the occurrence of latent infection. Although treatment adherence was high in this study, it is crucial to monitor tuberculosis treatment administered to patients in health services to maintain this high rate.

  9. Anti-PD-L1 Treatment Induced Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Tella, Sri Harsha; Del Rivero, Jaydira; Kommalapati, Anuhya; Ebenuwa, Ifechukwude; Gulley, James; Strauss, Julius; Brownell, Isaac

    2018-02-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), anti-programmed cell death protein ligand 1 (PD-L1), and anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (anti-CTLA4) monoclonal antibodies, have been widely used in cancer treatment. They are known to cause immune-related adverse events (irAEs), which resemble autoimmune diseases. Anterior pituitary hypophysitis with secondary hypopituitarism is a frequently reported irAE, especially in patients receiving anti-CTLA4 treatment. In contrast, posterior pituitary involvement, such as central diabetes insipidus (DI), is relatively rare and is unreported in patients undergoing PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. We describe a case of a 73-year-old man with Merkel cell carcinoma who received the anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody avelumab and achieved partial response. The patient developed nocturia, polydipsia, and polyuria 3 months after starting avelumab. Further laboratory testing revealed central DI. Avelumab was held and he received desmopressin for the management of central DI. Within 6 weeks after discontinuation of avelumab, the patient's symptoms resolved and he was eventually taken off desmopressin. The patient remained off avelumab and there were no signs or symptoms of DI 2 months after the discontinuation of desmopressin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of central DI associated with anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy. The patient's endocrinopathy was successfully managed by holding treatment with the immune checkpoint inhibitor. This case highlights the importance of early screening and appropriate management of hormonal irAEs in subjects undergoing treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors to minimize morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  10. Importance of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis - A Retrospective Study of 4 Cases

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    Sanaa HAMMI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the treatment of active tuberculosis, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is used to optimize dosing that maximizes therapeutic benefit while minimizing toxicity. In Morocco, TDM is not routinely used, yet low levels of anti-TB drugs can be associated with poorer treatment outcomes.Methods: We retrospectively checked our archives for patients with active TB for whom TDM was performed during 2014. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographic, clinical, radiographic and microbiological data including time until smear and culture conversion. Then, we looked for cases with delay of TB conversion.Results: In total, 24 patients were identified, for whom TDM was performed, they all had low serum drug levels. Among them, 4 patients showed delayed bacteriological conversion.Conclusions: Our study cases are showing the benefit of serum dosage in the follow-up of the patients showing a delay of sputum examination conversion, both direct and culture, during their evolutions. TDM is potentially useful for the treatment of active TB, but is currently underused in Morocco.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment for ocular tuberculosis among uveitis specialists: the international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Susan M; Montgomery, Paul A; Larkin, Kelly L; Winthrop, Kevin; Zierhut, Manfred; Rosenbaum, James T

    2015-02-01

    To assess the approach of international specialists, who primarily practice in tuberculosis-endemic areas, to ocular tuberculosis (TB). International experts from India, Brazil, Taiwan, and more than 10 other countries were surveyed using two clinical cases and general questions. A total of 244 experts were sent a survey about the treatment and diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis; 65 responded (27%), of whom 34 were affiliated with practices in India, while 31 primarily practice at international sites outside of India and North America. The data from this survey were compared with the results of a similar survey sent to members of the American Uveitis Society. The survey provided normative data on how physicians evaluate patients with uveitis as well as opinions about ocular TB. Responses varied widely on topics such as tests to include in the workup of undifferentiated uveitis, initial therapy, and duration of treatment. Physicians from developing countries relied more on chest CT scans and tuberculin skin testing (TST) than their counterparts in developed countries. The approach to diagnosis and management of TB is heterogeneous worldwide. However, there are substantial differences in the clinical approach to uveitis depending on the clinician's location of practice.

  12. Naphthoquinone Derivatives as Scaffold to Develop New Drugs for Tuberculosis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halicki, Priscila C B; Ferreira, Laís A; De Moura, Kelly C G; Carneiro, Paula F; Del Rio, Karina P; Carvalho, Tatiane Dos S C; Pinto, Maria do C F R; da Silva, Pedro E A; Ramos, Daniela F

    2018-01-01

    Despite being a curable disease, tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem worldwide mainly due to lengthy treatment, as well as its toxic effects, TB/HIV co-infection and the emergence of resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. These barriers reinforcing the need for development of new antimicrobial agents, that ideally should reduce the time of treatment and be active against susceptible and resistant strains. Quinones are compounds found in natural sources and among them, the naphthoquinones show antifungal, antiparasitic, and antimycobacterial activity. Thus, we evaluated the potential antimycobacterial activity of six 1,4-naphthoquinones derivatives. We determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the compounds against three M. tuberculosis strains: a pan-susceptible H37Rv (ATCC 27294); one mono-resistant to isoniazid (ATCC 35822); and one mono-resistant to rifampicin (ATCC 35838); the cytotoxicity in the J774A.1 (ATCC TIB-67) macrophage lineage; performed in silico analysis about absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) and docking sites. All evaluated naphthoquinones were active against the three strains with MIC between 206.6 and 12.5 μM, and the compounds with lower MIC values have also showed low cytotoxicity. Moreover, two naphthoquinones derivatives 5 and 6 probably do not exhibit cross resistance with isoniazid and rifampicin, respectively, and regarding ADME analysis, no compound violated the Lipinski's rule-of-five. Considering the set of findings in this study, we conclude that these naphthoquinones could be promising scaffolds to develop new therapeutic strategies to TB.

  13. Latent M. tuberculosis infection--pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Fol, Marek; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2012-01-01

    One third of the earths population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), but only 5-10% of the infected individuals develop active tuberculosis (TB) over their lifetime. The remaining 90-95% stay healthy and are called latently infected individuals. They are the biggest reservoir of the tubercle bacilli and identifying the cases of latent TB is a part of the global plan of TB control. From the clinical point of view detection of latent TB infections (LTBI) in individuals with the highest active TB risk including cases of HIV infection, autoimmune inflammatory diseases or cancer, is a priority. This review summarizes the recent findings in the pathogenesis of latent TB, its diagnosis, treatment and prevention.

  14. The indirect cost due to pulmonary Tuberculosis in patients receiving treatment in Bauchi State—Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Nisser

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the time spent and income lost by patients and their households for seeking tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment in Bauchi State-Nigeria. Method A cross sectional study where 242 TB patients were sampled from 27 out of 67 facilities providing TB services in a north-eastern state of Nigeria. Sampling was stratified based on facility type, patients’ HIV status and gender. Results The income lost among the hospitalized group was estimated at $156/patient and about $114 in the non-hospitalized patients group. Age, gender, facility of diagnosis, level of education and occupation were significant (p-values Conclusion Tuberculosis poses causes tremendous burden in terms of time and productivity lost to both patients and their households in Bauchi State Nigeria.

  15. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

  16. [Tuberculosis in compromised hosts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    treatment is delayed, it is fatally because hematogenous metastasis are easy to occur and become miliary tuberculosis. 4. AIDS and tuberculosis: Hideaki NAGAI (Department of Respiratory Diseases, National Tokyo Hospital). With AIDS patients with tuberculosis, there are the following problems on the treatment. (1) The adverse reactions by antituberculosis drugs tend to occur in AIDS patients. Eleven of 33 AIDS patients with tuberculosis had the adverse reactions (skin rash, fever, liver dysfunction) considered to be due to antituberculosis drugs. It is a very large burden for the HIV infected persons to take simultaneously antituberculosis drugs, medicines for opportunistic infections, and anti-HIV medicines. Since many medicines are taken, it is difficult to determine which drug is the cause once an adverse reaction occurs and all medicines should be often stopped. (2) The combined use with rifampicin (RFP) is difficult for the protease inhibitors and nonnuclear acid reverse transcriptase inhibitors. RFP induces cytochrome P-450 in liver, accelerates the metabolism of some concomitant drug agents, and reduces blood concentration them remarkably. When starting the two above-mentioned medicines during tuberculosis treatment, RFP should be changed to rifabutin (RFB) which has less induction of P-450 than RFP. However, some procedures are required for acquisition of RFB and it is a little complicated in Japan. CDC mentioned the combined use with RFP and efavirenz (EFV) is possible. So, the treatment with EFV and RFP is recently chosen. However, the monitor of the blood concentration of EFV is required, and the dose of EFV should be increased if it is a low value. (3) When a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is given to AIDS patients with tuberculosis, transient worsening of tuberculosis may develop after about two weeks. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  17. adverse events to first line anti-tuberculosis drugs in patients co

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    status on the risk of developing adverse events to first line anti-TB therapy. Method: The ... with TB-HIV infection were allocated to a second group. ... and negative responses were entered into individual .... Extra-pulmonary TB (yes versus no).

  18. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  19. An evaluation of culture results during treatment for tuberculosis as surrogate endpoints for treatment failure and relapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P J Phillips

    Full Text Available It is widely acknowledged that new regimens are urgently needed for the treatment of tuberculosis. The primary endpoint in the Phase III trials is a composite outcome of failure at the end of treatment or relapse after stopping treatment. Such trials are usually both long and expensive. Valid surrogate endpoints measured during or at the end of treatment could dramatically reduce both the time and cost of assessing the effectiveness of new regimens. The objective of this study was to evaluate sputum culture results on solid media during treatment as surrogate endpoints for poor outcome. Data were obtained from twelve randomised controlled trials conducted by the British Medical Research Council in the 1970s and 80s in East Africa and East Asia, consisting of 6974 participants and 49 different treatment regimens. The month two culture result was shown to be a poor surrogate in East Africa but a good surrogate in Hong Kong. In contrast, the month three culture was a good surrogate in trials conducted in East Africa but not in Hong Kong. As well as differences in location, ethnicity and probable strain of Mycobacteria tuberculosis, Hong Kong trials more often evaluated regimens with rifampicin throughout and intermittent regimens, and patients in East African trials more often presented with extensive cavitation and were slower to convert to culture negative during treatment. An endpoint that is a summary measure of the longitudinal profile of culture results over time or that is able to detect the presence of M. tuberculosis later in treatment is more likely to be a better endpoint for a phase II trial than a culture result at a single time point and may prove to be an acceptable surrogate. More data are needed before any endpoint can be used as a surrogate in a confirmatory phase III trial.

  20. Market size and sales pattern of tuberculosis drugs in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, T; van Weezenbeek, C; Vianzon, R; Garfin, A M C G; Hiatt, T; Lew, W J; Tisocki, K

    2013-12-21

    To identify the availability, types and quantity of anti-tuberculosis drugs in the public and private sectors from 2007 to 2011 in the Philippines. Analysis of the procurement of and sales data on anti-tuberculosis drugs from both the public and private sectors from 2007 to 2011. Publicly procured anti-tuberculosis drugs were sufficient to treat all reported new tuberculosis (TB) cases from 2007 to 2011 in the Philippines. Nevertheless, the volume of anti-tuberculosis drugs in the private sector would have sufficed for the intensive phase of treatment for an additional 250 000 TB patients annually, assuming compliance with national treatment guidelines. Fixed-dose combination drugs comprised the main bulk (81%) of private market sales, while sales of loose drugs decreased over the years. Combining public and private sales in 2011, 484 725 new TB patients, i.e., 2.4 times the number of notified cases, could have been placed on treatment and treated for at least the intensive phase. Key second-line drugs are not available in the private market, making it impossible to design an adequate treatment regimen for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) in the private sector. An enormous quantity of anti-tuberculosis drugs was channelled through the private market outside the purview of the Philippine National Tuberculosis Control Program, suggesting significant out-of-pocket expenditure, severe underreporting of TB cases and/or misuse of drugs due to overdiagnosis and overtreatment.

  1. Concordance of programmatic and laboratory-based multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexy, E R; Podewils, L J; Mitnick, C D; Becerra, M C; Laserson, K F; Bonilla, C

    2012-01-01

    Confirmation of cure for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients requires laboratory tests for Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth on culture media. Outcome decisions dictate patient management, and inaccuracies place patients at an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and may contribute to continued transmission of MDR-TB. To examine concordance between programmatic and laboratory-based MDR-TB treatment outcomes. The study population included 1658 MDR-TB patients in Peru treated between 1996 and 2002 with both program and laboratory-based outcomes. Laboratory-based outcomes were assigned according to international standards requiring at least five consecutive negative cultures in the last 12 months of treatment to confirm cure. Compared to the global culture-defined standard classification, only 1.1% of treatment successes, but 54.3% of failures, were misclassified programmatically. Overall, 10.4% of patients identified by a clinician as having a successful treatment outcome still had cultures positive for MDR-TB. Most patients with successful treatment outcomes by strict culture definitions were also classified by clinicians as having successful outcomes. However, many culture-confirmed failures were missed. In light of delays and incomplete access to culture in MDR-TB programs, efforts should be made to improve the accuracy of programmatically determined treatment outcomes.

  2. Effect of antitubercular treatment on ovarian function in female genital tuberculosis with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Bhagwan Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of antitubercular therapy (ATT on an ovarian function such as ovarian reserve, ovarian dimensions, and ovarian stromal blood flow. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Prospective study design. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty infertile women with female genital tuberculosis (FGTB without tubo-ovarian masses diagnosed by positive acid-fast bacilli culture or epithelioid granuloma on endometrial aspirate or positive polymerase chain reaction with positive findings on laparoscopy or hysteroscopy were recruited. The ovarian function tests were performed on day 2/3 as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH levels and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH levels. Ovarian dimensions (length, width, and depth were measured using a transvaginal ultrasound. Mean antral follicle count (AFC and ovarian stromal blood flow (peak systolic velocity [PSV], pulsatility index (PI, and resistive index [RI] were measured using a transvaginal ultrasound. All women were started on ATT for 6 months by directly observed treatment strategy. After completion of ATT, all the parameters were repeated. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in AMH (2.68 ± 0.97 ng/ml to 2.8 ± 1.03 ng/ml pre- to post-ATT, nonsignificant increase in FSH (7.16 ± 2.34 mIU/ml to 7.26 ± 2.33 mIU/ml post-ATT, significant increase in mean AFC (7.40 ± 2.12-8.14 ± 2.17, PSV in the right ovary (6.015-6.11 cm/s and left ovary (6.05-6.08 cm/s, PI in the right ovary (0.935-0.951 cm/s and left ovary (0.936-0.957 cm/s, and RI in the right ovary (0.62 ± 0.01-0.79 ± 0.02 and left ovary (0.65 ± 0.02-0.84 ± 0.01 with ATT. There was no significant change in mean ovarian dimensions (ovarian length, breadth, and width and summed ovarian volume with ATT. On laparoscopy, tubercles were seen in 27 (54% women. Caseous nodules and encysted ascites were seen in 8% cases each. CONCLUSION: ATT improves the ovarian function (AMH and AFC and ovarian blood flow in women with FGTB.

  3. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D J; Scott, R N

    1986-10-01

    In the developed countries gastrointestinal tuberculosis is no longer common in clinical practice. In this setting the importance of the condition lies in the vagaries of its presentation and the fact that it is eminently treatable, usually by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. The clinical features and complications of gastrointestinal tuberculosis are highlighted by the seven cases which we report. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition is discussed and attention is drawn to the importance of case notification. Clinicians should bear in mind the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tuberculosis when dealing with any patient with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  4. Risk factors of treatment default and death among tuberculosis patients in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobu, Isaac; Oshi, Sarah N; Oshi, Daniel C; Ukwaja, Kingsley N

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the rates, timing and determinants of default and death among adult tuberculosis patients in Nigeria. Routine surveillance data were used. A retrospective cohort study of adult tuberculosis patients treated during 2011 and 2012 in two large health facilities in Ebonyi State, Nigeria was conducted. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent predictors for treatment default and death. Of 1 668 treated patients, the default rate was 157 (9.4%), whilst 165 (9.9%) died. Also, 35.7% (56) of the treatment defaults and 151 (91.5%) of deaths occurred during the intensive phase of treatment. Risk of default increased with increasing age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-1.9), smear-negative TB case (aOR 2.3; CI 1.5-3.6), extrapulmonary TB case (aOR 2.7; CI 1.3-5.2), and patients who received the longer treatment regimen (aOR 1.6; 1.1-2.2). Risk of death was highest in extrapulmonary TB (aOR 3.0; CI 1.4-6.1) and smear-negative TB cases (aOR 2.4; CI 1.7-3.5), rural residents (aOR 1.7; CI 1.2-2.6), HIV co-infected (aOR 2.5; CI 1.7-3.6), not receiving antiretroviral therapy (aOR 1.6; CI 1.1-2.9), and not receiving cotrimoxazole prophylaxis (aOR 1.7; CI 1.2-2.6). Targeted interventions to improve treatment adherence for patients with the highest risk of default or death are urgently needed. This needs to be urgently addressed by the National Tuberculosis Programme. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Delays in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis patients in Vietnam: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Vu T

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment delay is an important indicator of access to tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Analyses of patient delay (i.e. time interval between onset of symptoms and first consultation of a health care provider and health care delay (i.e. time interval between first consultation and start of treatment can inform policies to improve access. This study assesses the patient, health care provider and total delay in diagnosis and treatment of new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients, and the risk factors for long delay, in Vietnam. Methods A cross-sectional survey of new patients treated by the National Tuberculosis Control Programme was conducted in 70 randomly selected districts in Vietnam. All consecutively registered patients in one quarter of 2002 were interviewed using a pre-coded structured questionnaire. Results Median (range delay was 4 weeks (1–48 for total, 3 (1–48 weeks for patient and 1 (0–25 week for health care delay. Patients with long total delay (≥ 12 weeks, 15% accounted for 49% of the cumulative number of delay-weeks. Independent risk factors (p 5 km distance from a health facility or in the northern area. For long health care delay (≥ 6 weeks this was urban setting, residence in the central area and initial visit to a communal health post, TB hospital or the private sector. Conclusion Analyses of patient and treatment delays can indicate target groups and areas for health education and strengthening of the referral system, in particular between the private sector and the NTP.

  6. Monitoring anti-TNFalpha treatment in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, E A; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hammer, H B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the responsiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) compared with conventional measures of disease activity and structural damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during the first year of treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha...

  7. Adherence to tuberculosis treatment, sputum smear conversion and mortality: a retrospective cohort study in 48 rwandan clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Mugisha, Veronicah; de Naeyer, Ludwig; Gasana, Michel; Cobelens, Frank; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to treatment and sputum smear conversion after 2 months of treatment are thought to be important for successful outcome of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Retrospective cohort study of new adult TB patients diagnosed in the first quarter of 2007 at 48 clinics in Rwanda. Data were abstracted

  8. In Silico-Based High-Throughput Screen for Discovery of Novel Combinations for Tuberculosis Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ragini; Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Shandil, Radha; Sharma, Sreevalli; Khandelwal, Swati; Karmarkar, Malancha; Kumar, Naveen; Solapure, Suresh; Saralaya, Ramanatha; Nanduri, Robert; Panduga, Vijender; Reddy, Jitendar; Prabhakar, K. R.; Rajagopalan, Swaminathan; Rao, Narasimha; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anandkumar, Anand; Datta, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    There are currently 18 drug classes for the treatment of tuberculosis, including those in the development pipeline. An in silico simulation enabled combing the innumerably large search space to derive multidrug combinations. Through the use of ordinary differential equations (ODE), we constructed an in silico kinetic platform in which the major metabolic pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the mechanisms of the antituberculosis drugs were integrated into a virtual proteome. The optimized model was used to evaluate 816 triplets from the set of 18 drugs. The experimentally derived cumulative fractional inhibitory concentration (∑FIC) value was within twofold of the model prediction. Bacterial enumeration revealed that a significant number of combinations that were synergistic for growth inhibition were also synergistic for bactericidal effect. The in silico-based screen provided new starting points for testing in a mouse model of tuberculosis, in which two novel triplets and five novel quartets were significantly superior to the reference drug triplet of isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol (HRE) or the quartet of HRE plus pyrazinamide (HREZ). PMID:26149995

  9. A New Method to Directly Observe Tuberculosis Treatment: Skype Observed Therapy, a Patient-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Tavora; Cabello, Celina

    Tuberculosis (TB) treatment completion is in part determined by patient's adherence to long-term drug regimens. To best ensure compliance, directly observed therapy (DOT) is considered the standard of practice. Nassau County Department of Health TB Control is responsible for providing DOT to patients with TB. Tuberculosis Control sought to use and evaluate Skype Observed Therapy (SOT) as an alternative to DOT for eligible patients. The evaluation included analysis of patient's acceptance and adherence to drug regimen using SOT. Tuberculosis Control assessed staff efficiency and cost savings for this program. Percentages of SOT of patients and successful SOT visits, mileage, and travel time savings. Twenty percent of the caseload used SOT and 100% of patients who were eligible opted in. Average SOT success was 79%. Total mileage savings and time saved were $9,929.07 and 614 hours. Because SOT saves cost and time and is a suitable alternative to DOT for patients, it should be considered as part of new policies and practices in TB control programs.

  10. Time Delay and Associated Factors in Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Markazi Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Farazi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Delay in the diagnosis of tuberculosis increases the risk of death and enhances the transmission of disease in the community. This study aims to determine the patient and health service delay and factors affecting it in tuberculosis diagnosis. Materials & Methods: A cross-sectional survey that included all the public health centers was conducted in Markazi province from March 2009 till June 2011. Patients were interviewed after diagnosis by using a structured questionnaire. Results: One hundred and sixty-six patients aged between 9 and 87 (median; 66 years were included in the study. They comprised 87 (52.4% females and 79 (47.6% males. The median and mean of patient delay was 35 and 62 days, respectively; the median and mean of health system diagnosis delay was 34 and 53 days, respectively; the median and mean of health system treatment delay was 5 and 6 days, respectively; The median and mean of total delays were 86 and 121 days, respectively for all patients. The main determinants of delay were non education, poor economic, private sector, female gender and age≥55. Conclusion: The results of this review suggest that there is a need for revising case-finding strategies and reduction of infectious cases for better control of tuberculosis.

  11. Hypopituitarism as unusual sequelae to central nervous system tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mageshkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological tuberculosis can very rarely involve the hypophysis cerebri. We report a case of an eighteen year old female who presented with five months duration of generalised apathy, secondary amenorrhea and weight gain. She was on irregular treatment for tuberculosis of the central nervous system for the last five months. Neuroimaging revealed sellar and suprasellar tuberculomas and communicating hydrocephalus requiring emergency decompression. Endocrinological investigation showed hypopituitarism manifesting as pituitary hypothyroidism, hypocortisolism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and hyperprolactinemia. Restarting anti-tuberculosis treatment, hormone replacement therapy, and a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt surgery led to remarkable improvement in the general condition of the patient.

  12. Pulmonary tuberculosis treatment regimen recommended by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health: predictors of treatment noncompliance in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, Simone Teresinha Aloise; Moreira, José da Silva; Tietbohel, Carlos Nunes

    2011-01-01

    To determine the predictors of noncompliance with the pulmonary tuberculosis treatment regimen recommended by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health, in previously treatment-naïve patients with active tuberculosis treated in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. This was a case-control study involving six referral primary health care clinics for tuberculosis in Porto Alegre. We reviewed the medical charts of all previously treatment-naïve patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis who were noncompliant with the treatment between 2004 and 2006. Those were paired with other patients having similar characteristics and having been cured. We conducted univariate and multivariate analyses. Of the 2,098 patients included, 218 (10.4%) became noncompliant with the treatment. In the multivariate analysis, the factors most strongly associated with treatment noncompliance were being an alcoholic (with or without concomitant use of illicit drugs), being HIV-infected, not residing with family members, and having a low level of education. In the univariate analysis, treatment noncompliance was also significantly associated with being younger and with being non-White. Gender was not significantly associated with treatment noncompliance; nor was the occurrence of adverse effects of the drugs included in the regimen. In the population studied, being an alcoholic, being HIV-infected, and not residing with family members were the major predictors of noncompliance with treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis among previously treatment-naïve patients.

  13. Social inclusion: An effort to end loss-to-treatment follow-up in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, S; Manikantan, J; Sreenivas, A; Jayasankar, S; Sunilkumar, M; Rakesh, P S; Karthickeyan, D S A; Mohandas, C R

    2015-10-01

    Pathanamthitta district is implementing Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program as a pilot district since 1993. The district programme was reporting approximately 5% of their diagnosed smear positive patients as never put on treatment (Initial lost to follow up - ILFU) and 5% of the new smear positive [NSP] Pulmonary TB patients as lost to follow up [LFU] during treatment. Attempts based on reengineering of DOTS were not largely successful in bringing down these proportions. A treatment support group [TSG] is a non-statutory body of socially responsible citizens and volunteers to provide social support to each needy TB patient safeguarding his dignity and confidentiality by ensuring access to information, free and quality services and social welfare programs, empowering the patient for making decision to complete treatment successfully. It is a complete fulfilment of social inclusion standards enumerated by Standards for TB Care in India. Pathanamthitta district started implementing this strategy since 2013. After intervention, proportion of LFU among NSPTB cases dropped markedly and no LFU were reported among the latest treatment cohorts. Proportion of ILFU keeps similar trend and none were reported among the latest diagnostic cohorts. Social support for TB care is feasible under routine program conditions. Addition of standards for social inclusion in STCI is meaningful. Its meaning is translated well by a society empowered with literacy and political sense. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients’ views of interventions to reduce treatment loss to follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupasi, T.; Garfin, A. M. C. G.; Mangan, J. M.; Orillaza-Chi, R.; Naval, L. C.; Balane, G. I.; Basilio, R.; Golubkov, A.; Joson, E. S.; Lew, W-J.; Lofranco, V.; Mantala, M.; Pancho, S.; Sarol, J. N.; Blumberg, A.; Burt, D.; Kurbatova, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING Patients who initiated treatment for multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) at 15 Programmatic Management of Drug-resistant Tuberculosis (PMDT) health facilities in the Philippines between July and December 2012. OBJECTIVES To describe patients’ views of current interventions, and suggest changes likely to reduce MDR-TB loss to follow-up. METHODS In-depth interviews were conducted between April and July 2014 with MDR-TB patients who were undergoing treatment, had finished treatment at the time of the interview (controls), or had been lost to follow-up (LTFU). Responses were thematically analyzed. RESULTS Interviews were conducted with 182 patients who were undergoing or had completed treatment and 91 LTFU patients. Views and suggestions could be thematically categorized as approaches to facilitate adherence or address barriers to adherence. The top themes were the need for transportation assistance or improvements to the current transportation assistance program, food assistance, and difficulties patients encountered related to their medications. These themes were addressed by respectively 63%, 60%, and 32% of the participants. CONCLUSIONS A more patient-centered approach is needed to improve MDR-TB treatment adherence. Programs should strive to provide assistance that considers patient preferences, is adequate to cover actual costs or needs, and is delivered in a timely, uninterrupted manner. PMID:28157461

  15. Low prevalence of hepatitis B and C among tuberculosis patients in Duhok Province, Kurdistan: Are HBsAg and anti-HCV prerequisite screening parameters in tuberculosis control program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merza, Muayad A; Haji, Safer M; Alsharafani, Abid Mohialdeen Hasan; Muhammed, Shivan U

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), infections and tuberculosis (TB) are a global public health concern. Co-infection with HBV or HCV among TB patients may potentiate the risk of hepatotoxicity induced by anti-TB drugs. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of HBV and HCV among TB patients included in the Duhok National Tuberculosis Program (NTP). The Duhok NTP Center is a specialized institution in Duhok City, Iraq, concerned with management and follow-up of TB patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the center between June 2015 and May 2016. All documented TB patients were analyzed on the basis of socio-demographic and other characteristics. Thereafter, all patients underwent screening for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HCV, and anti-HIV using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results obtained were analyzed by entering the data in binary format into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. A p value of Kurdistan, the negative history of injection drug use, and adherence to universal infection-control measures, including vaccination for HBV. Both history of dental intervention and belonging to a Syrian population were independent risk factors for HBV/TB co-infection. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The costs and outcomes of paediatric tuberculosis treatment at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the public sector clinics in which most TB patients access care and treatment. .... reflecting the time spent by clinical personnel (nurses), was estimated as the total ...... the data, in manuscript preparation or the decision to publish. Conflicts of ...

  17. [Surgical treatment of thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis complicated with severe kyphotic deformity and paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiang; Wang, Yue; Liu, Zhongqian; Tang, Liuyi; Wan, Lun; Zhang, Yaoming; Deng, Juncai

    2014-09-01

    To explore an method and the effectiveness of surgical treatment of thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis complicated with severe kyphotic deformity (Cobb angle ≥ 55°) and paraplegia. Between January 2009 and January 2013, 13 cases of thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis complicated with severe kyphotic deformity and paraplegia were treated by one-stage posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR), debridement, bone grafting, and instrumentation fixation. Of 13 patients, 7 were male and 6 were female with an average age of 23.5 years (range, 14-49 years). The disease duration was 13-38 months (mean, 19 months). The Cobb angle of kyphosis was (65.23 ± 7.95)°. The visual analogue scale score (VAS) was 7.38 ± 0.31. In 13 patients with incomplete paraplegia, 1 case was classified as Frankel grade B, 7 cases as grade C, and 5 cases as grade D. The lesion involved 2 vertebrae bodies in 7 cases (T8, 9 in 1 case, T11, 12 in 2 cases, and T12, L1 in 4 cases), 3 vertebrae bodies in 4 cases (T10-12 in 2 cases, T9-11 in 1 case, and T11-L1 in 1 case), and 4 vertebrae bodies in 2 cases (T4-7 in 1 case and T6-9 in 1 case). Imaging examination showed paravertebral abscess in 10 cases. Healing of incision by first intention was obtained in all patients. The neurological injury and pulmonary infection occurred in 3 cases and 2 cases respectively, which were cured after symptomatic treatment. Thirteen patients were followed up 12-48 months (mean, 17 months). The erythrocyte sedimentation rate restored to normal level in all cases at 3-7 months after operation. All the patients achieved bony fusion at 10-20 months (mean, 14 months) after operation. No fixation loosening, displacement, or fracture occurred during follow-up. Common toxic symptom of tuberculosis disappeared, and there was no recurrence of local tuberculosis. The Cobb angle of kyphosis was corrected to (22.38 ± 1.76)° at 1 week and (22.15 ± 1.83)° at last follow-up, showing significant difference when compared with

  18. Urine colorimetry for therapeutic drug monitoring of pyrazinamide during tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentner, Isaac; Modongo, Chawangwa; Zetola, Nicola M; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Srivastava, Shashikant; Heysell, Scott K; Mpagama, Stellah; Schlect, Hans P; Gumbo, Tawanda; Bisson, Gregory P; Vinnard, Christopher

    2018-03-01

    Pyrazinamide is a key drug in the first-line treatment regimen for tuberculosis, with a potent sterilizing effect. Although low pyrazinamide peak serum concentrations (C max ) are associated with poor treatment outcomes, many resource-constrained settings do not have sufficient laboratory capacity to support therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). The objective of this study was to determine whether a colorimetric test of urine can identify tuberculosis patients with adequate pyrazinamide exposures, as defined by serum C max above a target threshold. In the derivation study of healthy volunteers, three dose sizes of pyrazinamide were evaluated, and intensive pharmacokinetic blood sampling was performed over an 8-h period, with a timed urine void at 4h post-dosing. Pyrazinamide in urine was isolated by spin column centrifugation with an exchange resin, followed by colorimetric analysis; the absorbance peak at 495nm was measured. The urine assay was then evaluated in a study of 39 HIV/tuberculosis patients in Botswana enrolled in an intensive pharmacokinetic study. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to measure diagnostic accuracy. The guideline-recommended pyrazinamide serum C max target of 35mg/l was evaluated in the primary analysis; this target was found to be predictive of favorable outcomes in a clinical study. Following this, a higher serum C max target of 58mg/l was evaluated in the secondary analysis. At the optimal cut-off identified in the derivation sample, the urine colorimetric assay was 97% sensitive and 50% specific to identify 35 of 39 HIV/tuberculosis patients with pharmacokinetic target attainment, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.60-0.97). Diagnostic accuracy was lower at the 58mg/l serum C max target, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.84). Men were less likely than women to attain either serum pharmacokinetic target. The urine colorimetric assay was

  19. Impaired pulmonary function after treatment for tuberculosis: the end of the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chushkin, Mikhail Ivanovich; Ots, Oleg Nikolayevich

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of pulmonary function abnormalities and to investigate the factors affecting lung function in patients treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. A total of 214 consecutive patients (132 men and 82 women; 20-82 years of age), treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and followed at a local dispensary, underwent spirometry and plethysmography at least one year after treatment. Pulmonary impairment was present in 102 (47.7%) of the 214 patients evaluated. The most common functional alteration was obstructive lung disease (seen in 34.6%). Of the 214 patients, 60 (28.0%) showed reduced pulmonary function (FEV1 below the lower limit of normal). Risk factors for reduced pulmonary function were having had culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the past, being over 50 years of age, having recurrent tuberculosis, and having a lower level of education. Nearly half of all tuberculosis patients evolve to impaired pulmonary function. That underscores the need for pulmonary function testing after the end of treatment. Avaliar a prevalência de alterações da função pulmonar e investigar os fatores que afetam a função pulmonar em pacientes tratados para tuberculose pulmonar. Um total de 214 pacientes consecutivos (132 homens e 82 mulheres; 20-82 anos de idade), tratados para tuberculose pulmonar e acompanhados em um dispensário local, foi submetido a espirometria e pletismografia pelo menos um ano após o tratamento. O comprometimento pulmonar estava presente em 102 (47,7%) dos 214 pacientes avaliados. A alteração funcional mais comum foi o distúrbio ventilatório obstrutivo (observado em 34,6%). Dos 214 pacientes, 60 (28,0%) apresentaram função pulmonar reduzida (VEF1 abaixo do limite inferior de normalidade). Os fatores de risco para função pulmonar reduzida foram tuberculose pulmonar com cultura positiva no passado, idade acima de 50 anos, recidiva de tuberculose e menor nível de escolaridade. Quase metade de todos os pacientes com tuberculose

  20. Cerium sorption in grounds modified by anti-deflation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.; Bogatyrev, I.O.

    2001-01-01

    Influence of soils and grounds treatment by anti-deflation compositions on the size of the soil particles was studied. Under static conditions sorption of 144 Ce by turf-podsolic soils prior to an after their modification by the anti-deflation reagents, i.e. bitumens and insoluble in water polyelectrolytic complexes, was considered. Degrees of 144 Ce sorption in the soil-solution systems, depending on solutions pH, presence of alkali metal carbonates and cerium concentration, were determined [ru

  1. Factors influencing non-adherence to tuberculosis treatment in Jepara, central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondags, Angelique; Himawan, Ari Budi; Metsemakers, Job Fm; Kristina, Tri Nur

    2014-07-01

    One of the most serious problems for tuberculosis (TB) control is non-adherence to TB treatment. We studied the factors influencing non-adherence to TB treatment in Indonesia to inform TB treatment adherence strategies. We con- ducted semi-structured interviews with non-adherent patients and key informants in Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. Three major themes were found in reasons for non-adherence to TB treatment: 1) knowledge about TB, 2) knowledge about TB treatment and 3) choosing and changing a health care treatment facility. Respondents had an inadequate knowledge about TB and its treatment. Feeling healthy and having financial problems were the most common reasons for TB treatment non-adherence. Respondents sought treatment from many different health care providers, and often changed the treatment facility location. TB treatment adherence might improve by providing better education about the disease and its treatment to those undergoing treatment. Providing information about where to receive treatment and that treatment is free could also improve compliance.

  2. Lack of consensus in the diagnosis and treatment for ocular tuberculosis among uveitis specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Susan M; Larkin, Kelly L; Winthrop, Kevin; Rosenbaum, James T

    2015-02-01

    To assess the approach of specialists to ocular tuberculosis (TB). The American Uveitis Society (AUS) Listserv was surveyed using two clinical cases and general questions. Of 196 members, 87 responded (44.4%), of whom 64 were affiliated with practices in North America, while 23 were outside of North America. The survey provided normative data on how physicians evaluate patients with uveitis as well as opinions about ocular TB. Responses varied widely on such issues as (1) the pretest probability that a patient with granulomatous panuveitis had TB uveitis (range 1-75%) or that a patient with a risk factor for TB had ocular TB (range 0-90%); (2) the optimal duration of anti-TB therapy; and (3) whether therapy should be discontinued after 2 months in nonresponders. Consensus is lacking among uveitis specialists for the diagnosis or management of ocular TB.

  3. Reversible reduction of nevirapine plasma concentrations during rifampicin treatment in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteelli, Alberto; Saleri, Nuccia; Villani, Paola; Bonkoungou, Victor; Carvalho, Anna Cristina C; Kouanda, Seni; Sanou, Marie J; Simporé, Jacques; Monno, Laura; Carosi, Giampiero; Regazzi, Mario; Dembele, Mathurin

    2009-09-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) plasma levels are reduced in patients receiving rifampicin (RFM) for tuberculosis (TB) treatment. We determined variations over time of the pharmacokinetic parameters of NVP in patients who receive RFM. HIV-1-infected patients with CD4+ T-lymphocyte count anti-TB therapy and a fixed-dose combination of stavudine, lamivudine, and NVP. Full NVP pharmacokinetic curves were calculated at 4 (T1) and 10 weeks (T2) of combined therapy and at 4 (T3) and 26 weeks after termination of anti-TB therapy. In 16 enrolled subjects, the median value of the area under the curve of NVP was reduced by 25.6% at T1 compared with NVP alone (43.7 vs. 58.7 microg x mL(-1) x h(-1); P = 0.02). The reduction was only 7.5% at T2 (54.3 vs. 58.7 microg x mL(-1) x h(-1); P = 0.17). The median C trough was reduced of 19.5% at T1 compared with T3 (3.3 vs. 4.2 microg/mL; P = 0.02) and of 7.1% at T2 compared with T3 (3.9 vs. 4.2 microg/mL; P = 0.17). The proportion of subjects with C trough values treatment substantially decreases over time.

  4. The profile and treatment outcomes of sputum smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis re-treatment cases, in a district medical college of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinash Agarwala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a high tuberculosis (TB burden county like India with different regional demography, knowledge about patient profile has a pivotal role in determining and identifying the factors associated with poor treatment outcomes among TB re-treatment cases. Aim: The aim was to describe the demography and clinical characteristics of TB re-treatment cases and to evaluate the factors associated with poor treatment outcomes among those patients. Settings and Design: A prospective longitudinal cohort study was carried out at chest medicine outdoor from February, 2011 to 2014 in a district medical college of West Bengal, India. Materials and Methods: Sputum smear positive re-treatment pulmonary TB patients attending our chest medicine outdoor during the 3 years study period were evaluated for demographic and clinical characteristics on the basis of previous treatment history and records at the beginning of the study. Patients were followed-up during the 8 months treatment period (Category II treatment regimen under Revised National TB Control Program. At the end of the study period, treatment outcomes were analyzed and factors associated with poor treatment outcomes were identified. Statistical Analysis: All variables were described by proportions, and differences between independent groups were compared using the Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact test, as applicable. Results: Among 74 patients, re-treatment was successful in 75.7% of relapse case, 66.7% of loss to follow-up cases and 53.8% of failure cases. Re-treatment failure was higher (38.5% in treatment failure cases compare to relapse cases (10.8% and initial loss to follow-up cases (16.7%. Young age, male, unmarried, employed who work outside appears to be the risk factors for loss to follow-up. Low body mass index, treatment from the private sector, history of alcoholism, radiological cavitory lesion, larger duration of previous treatment, lesser gap from previous treatment has

  5. Poor Outcomes in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Adolescents Undergoing Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaakidis, Petros; Paryani, Roma; Khan, Samsuddin; Mansoor, Homa; Manglani, Mamta; Valiyakath, Asmaa; Saranchuk, Peter; Furin, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in HIV-co-infected adolescents. This study aimed to present the intermediate outcomes of HIV-infected adolescents aged 10–19 years receiving second-line anti-TB treatment in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) project in Mumbai, India. Methods A retrospective review of medical records of 11 adolescents enrolled between July 2007 and January 2013 was undertaken. Patients were initiated on either empirical or individualized second-line ambulatory anti-TB treatment under direct observation. Results The median age was 16 (IQR 14–18) years and 54% were female. Five (46%) adolescents had pulmonary TB (PTB), two (18%) extrapulmonary disease (EPTB) and four (36%) had both. Median CD4 count at the time of MDR-TB diagnosis was 162.7 cells/µl (IQR: 84.8–250.5). By January 2013, eight patients had final and 3 had interim outcomes. Favourable results were seen in four (36.5%) patients: one was cured and three were still on treatment with negative culture results. Seven patients (64%) had poor outcomes: four (36.5%) died and three (27%) defaulted. Three of the patients who died never started on antiretroviral and/or TB treatment and one died 16 days after treatment initiation. Two of the defaulted died soon after default. All patients (100%) on-treatment experienced adverse events (AEs): two required permanent discontinuation of the culprit drug and two were hospitalized due to AEs. No patient required permanent discontinuation of the entire second-line TB or antiretroviral regimens. Conclusions Early mortality and mortality after default were the most common reasons for poor outcomes in this study. Early mortality suggests the need for rapid diagnosis and prompt treatment initiation, and adolescents might benefit from active contact-tracing and immediate referral. Default occurred at different times, suggesting the need for continuous, intensified and individualized psychosocial

  6. Poor outcomes in a cohort of HIV-infected adolescents undergoing treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Mumbai, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Isaakidis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in HIV-co-infected adolescents. This study aimed to present the intermediate outcomes of HIV-infected adolescents aged 10-19 years receiving second-line anti-TB treatment in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF project in Mumbai, India. METHODS: A retrospective review of medical records of 11 adolescents enrolled between July 2007 and January 2013 was undertaken. Patients were initiated on either empirical or individualized second-line ambulatory anti-TB treatment under direct observation. RESULTS: The median age was 16 (IQR 14-18 years and 54% were female. Five (46% adolescents had pulmonary TB (PTB, two (18% extrapulmonary disease (EPTB and four (36% had both. Median CD4 count at the time of MDR-TB diagnosis was 162.7 cells/µl (IQR: 84.8-250.5. By January 2013, eight patients had final and 3 had interim outcomes. Favourable results were seen in four (36.5% patients: one was cured and three were still on treatment with negative culture results. Seven patients (64% had poor outcomes: four (36.5% died and three (27% defaulted. Three of the patients who died never started on antiretroviral and/or TB treatment and one died 16 days after treatment initiation. Two of the defaulted died soon after default. All patients (100% on-treatment experienced adverse events (AEs: two required permanent discontinuation of the culprit drug and two were hospitalized due to AEs. No patient required permanent discontinuation of the entire second-line TB or antiretroviral regimens. CONCLUSIONS: Early mortality and mortality after default were the most common reasons for poor outcomes in this study. Early mortality suggests the need for rapid diagnosis and prompt treatment initiation, and adolescents might benefit from active contact-tracing and immediate referral. Default occurred at different times, suggesting the need for continuous, intensified and individualized psychosocial

  7. Poor outcomes in a cohort of HIV-infected adolescents undergoing treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaakidis, Petros; Paryani, Roma; Khan, Samsuddin; Mansoor, Homa; Manglani, Mamta; Valiyakath, Asmaa; Saranchuk, Peter; Furin, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in HIV-co-infected adolescents. This study aimed to present the intermediate outcomes of HIV-infected adolescents aged 10-19 years receiving second-line anti-TB treatment in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) project in Mumbai, India. A retrospective review of medical records of 11 adolescents enrolled between July 2007 and January 2013 was undertaken. Patients were initiated on either empirical or individualized second-line ambulatory anti-TB treatment under direct observation. The median age was 16 (IQR 14-18) years and 54% were female. Five (46%) adolescents had pulmonary TB (PTB), two (18%) extrapulmonary disease (EPTB) and four (36%) had both. Median CD4 count at the time of MDR-TB diagnosis was 162.7 cells/µl (IQR: 84.8-250.5). By January 2013, eight patients had final and 3 had interim outcomes. Favourable results were seen in four (36.5%) patients: one was cured and three were still on treatment with negative culture results. Seven patients (64%) had poor outcomes: four (36.5%) died and three (27%) defaulted. Three of the patients who died never started on antiretroviral and/or TB treatment and one died 16 days after treatment initiation. Two of the defaulted died soon after default. All patients (100%) on-treatment experienced adverse events (AEs): two required permanent discontinuation of the culprit drug and two were hospitalized due to AEs. No patient required permanent discontinuation of the entire second-line TB or antiretroviral regimens. Early mortality and mortality after default were the most common reasons for poor outcomes in this study. Early mortality suggests the need for rapid diagnosis and prompt treatment initiation, and adolescents might benefit from active contact-tracing and immediate referral. Default occurred at different times, suggesting the need for continuous, intensified and individualized psychosocial support for co-infected adolescents

  8. Reagent Precoated Targets for Rapid In-Tissue Derivatization of the Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Isoniazid Followed by MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manier, M. Lisa; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Goh, Anne; Dartois, Veronique; Via, Laura E.; Barry, Clifton E.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-08-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is an important component of front-line anti-tuberculosis therapy with good serum pharmacokinetics but unknown ability to penetrate tuberculous lesions. However, endogenous background interferences hinder our ability to directly analyze INH in tissues. Chemical derivatization has been successfully used to measure isoniazid directly from tissue samples using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). MALDI targets were pretreated with trans-cinnamaldehyde (CA) prior to mounting tissue slices. Isoniazid present in the tissues was efficiently derivatized and the INH-CA product measured by MS/MS. Precoating of MALDI targets allows the tissues to be directly thaw-mounted and derivatized, thus simplifying the preparation. A time-course series of tissues from tuberculosis infected/INH dosed animals were assayed and the MALDI MS/MS response correlates well with the amount of INH determined to be in the tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS.

  9. Pseudo-tumoral hepatic tuberculosis discovered after surgical resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloudi Nizar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-tumoral hepatic tuberculosis is rare. It is characterized by non-specific symptoms and radiological polymorphism. Diagnosis is problematic. This article presents three cases, each clinically different from each other, that illustrate how difficult diagnosis can be. The definitive diagnosis of pseudo-tumoral hepatic tuberculosis was reached on the basis of histological examination of surgical samples. Treatment of the disease based on appropriate anti-tubercular therapy generally gives a positive outcome.

  10. Host-Directed Therapeutics as a Novel Approach for Tuberculosis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Ram; Yang, Chul-Su

    2017-09-28

    Despite significant efforts to improve the treatment of tuberculosis (TB), it remains a prevalent infectious disease worldwide owing to the limitations of current TB therapeutic regimens. Recent work on novel TB treatment strategies has suggested that directly targeting host factors may be beneficial for TB treatment. Such strategies, termed host-directed therapeutics (HDTs), focus on host-pathogen interactions. HDTs may be more effective than the currently approved TB drugs, which are limited by the long durations of treatment needed and the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Targets of HDTs include host factors such as cytokines, immune checkpoints, immune cell functions, and essential enzyme activities. This review article discusses examples of potentially promising HDTs and introduces novel approaches for their development.

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of valproic acid and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (vorinostat in enhancing the effects of first-line tuberculosis drugs against intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: New tuberculosis (TB drug treatment regimens are urgently needed. This study evaluated the potential of the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs valproic acid (VPA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA to enhance the effects of first-line anti-TB drugs against intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methods: M. tuberculosis H37Rv cultures were exposed to VPA or SAHA over 6 days, in the presence or absence of isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF. The efficacy of VPA and SAHA against intracellular M. tuberculosis with and without INH or RIF was tested by treating infected macrophages. Bactericidal activity was assessed by counting mycobacterial colony-forming units (CFU. Results: VPA treatment exhibited superior bactericidal activity to SAHA (2-log CFU reduction, while both HDIs moderately improved the activity of RIF against extracellular M. tuberculosis. The bactericidal effect of VPA against intracellular M. tuberculosis was greater than that of SAHA (1-log CFU reduction and equalled that of INH (1.5-log CFU reduction. INH/RIF and VPA/SAHA combination treatment inhibited intracellular M. tuberculosis survival in a shorter time span than monotherapy (3 days vs. 6 days. Conclusions: VPA and SAHA have adjunctive potential to World Health Organization-recommended TB treatment regimens. Clinical evaluation of the two drugs with regard to reducing the treatment duration and improving treatment outcomes in TB is warranted. Keywords: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Adjunct host-directed therapy, Tuberculosis, Histone deacetylase inhibitors, Repurposed drugs

  12. Treatment outcomes of rifabutin-containing regimens for rifabutin-sensitive multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether rifabutin can improve treatment outcomes in patients with rifabutin-sensitive MDR-TB. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed on 76 patients with rifabutin-sensitive MDR-TB who were treated with or without rifabutin between 2006 and 2011. Results: Overall, 75% (57/76 of patients achieved favorable outcomes, including cure (53/76, 70% and treatment completion (4/76, 5%. In contrast, 25% (19/76 had unfavorable treatment outcomes, which included treatment failure (6/76, 8%, death (2/76, 3%, loss to follow-up (4/76. 5%, and no evaluation due to transfer to other institutions (7/76, 9%. Rifabutin was given to 52 (68% of the 76 patients with rifabutin-sensitive MDR-TB. Although favorable treatment outcomes were more frequent in patients who received rifabutin [81% (42/52] than in those who did not receive rifabutin [63% (15/24], this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.154. However, in multivariable regression logistic analysis, use of rifabutin was significantly associated with favorable treatment outcomes in patients with rifabutin-sensitive MDR-TB (adjusted odds ratio = 9.80, 95% confidence interval = 1.65–58.37, P = 0.012. Conclusions: These results suggest that the use of rifabutin can improve treatment outcomes in patients with rifabutin-sensitive MDR-TB. Keywords: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, Rifabutin, Treatment outcome

  13. Totality of outcomes: A different paradigm in assessing interventions for treatment of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Montepiedra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Conventional analytic methods used for tuberculosis (TB outcomes research use standardized outcomes definitions and assess safety and efficacy separately. These methods are subject to important limitations. Conventionally utilized outcome definitions fail to capture important aspects of patients' treatment experience and obscure meaningful differences between patients.Assessing safety and efficacy separately fails to yield an objective risk–benefit comparison to guide clinical practice. We propose to address these issues through an analytic approach based on prioritized outcomes. This approach enables a more comprehensive and integrated assessment of TB interventions. It simultaneously considers a “totality of outcomes”, including clinical benefit, adverse events, and quality of life. These composite outcomes are ranked terms of overall desirability and compared using statistical methods for ordinal outcomes. Here we discuss the application of this approach to TB research, the considerations involved with prioritizing TB treatment outcomes, and the statistical methods involved in comparing prioritized outcomes. Keywords: Tuberculosis, Treatment outcome, Risk–benefit assessment

  14. Anti-Tuberculosis Bacteriophage D29 Delivery with a Vibrating Mesh Nebulizer, Jet Nebulizer, and Soft Mist Inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigy, Nicholas B; Chang, Rachel Y; Leung, Sharon S Y; Harrison, Melissa; Petrova, Zaritza; Pope, Welkin H; Hatfull, Graham F; Britton, Warwick J; Chan, Hak-Kim; Sauvageau, Dominic; Finlay, Warren H; Vehring, Reinhard

    2017-10-01

    To compare titer reduction and delivery rate of active anti-tuberculosis bacteriophage (phage) D29 with three inhalation devices. Phage D29 lysate was amplified to a titer of 11.8 ± 0.3 log 10 (pfu/mL) and diluted 1:100 in isotonic saline. Filters captured the aerosolized saline D29 preparation emitted from three types of inhalation devices: 1) vibrating mesh nebulizer; 2) jet nebulizer; 3) soft mist inhaler. Full-plate plaque assays, performed in triplicate at multiple dilution levels with the surrogate host Mycobacterium smegmatis, were used to quantify phage titer. Respective titer reductions for the vibrating mesh nebulizer, jet nebulizer, and soft mist inhaler were 0.4 ± 0.1, 3.7 ± 0.1, and 0.6 ± 0.3 log 10 (pfu/mL). Active phage delivery rate was significantly greater (p pfu/min) than for the jet nebulizer (5.4x10 4  ± 1.3x10 4 pfu/min). The soft mist inhaler delivered 4.6x10 6  ± 2.0x10 6 pfu per 11.6 ± 1.6 μL ex-actuator dose. Delivering active phage requires a prudent choice of inhalation device. The jet nebulizer was not a good choice for aerosolizing phage D29 under the tested conditions, due to substantial titer reduction likely occurring during droplet production. The vibrating mesh nebulizer is recommended for animal inhalation studies requiring large amounts of D29 aerosol, whereas the soft mist inhaler may be useful for self-administration of D29 aerosol.

  15. Treatment effect, postoperative complications, and their reasons in juvenile thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing-Yi; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Zhou, Qiang; Luo, Fei; Hou, Tianyong; Zhang, Zehua

    2015-10-01

    Fifty-four juvenile cases under 18 years of age with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis underwent focus debridement, deformity correction, bone graft fusion, and internal fixation. The treatment effects, complications, and reasons were analyzed retrospectively. There were 54 juvenile cases under 18 years of age with thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis. The average age was 9.2 years old, and the sample comprised 38 males and 16 females. The disease types included 28 thoracic cases, 17 thoracolumbar cases, and 9 lumbar cases. Nerve function was evaluated with the Frankel classification. Thirty-six cases were performed with focus debridement and deformity correction and were supported with allograft or autograft in mesh and fixed with pedicle screws from a posterior approach. Eight cases underwent a combined anterior and posterior surgical approach. Nine cases underwent osteotomy and deformity correction, and one case received focus debridement. The treatment effects, complications, and bone fusions were tracked for an average of 52 months. According to the Frankel classification, paralysis was improved from 3 cases of B, 8 cases of C, 18 cases of D, and 25 cases of E preoperatively. This improvement was found in 3 cases of C, 6 cases of D, and 45 cases of E at a final follow-up postoperatively. No nerve dysfunction was aggravated. VAS was improved from 7.8 ± 1.7 preoperatively to 3.2 ± 2.1 at final follow-up postoperatively. ODI was improved from 77.5 ± 17.3 preoperatively to 28.4 ± 15.9 at final follow-up postoperatively. Kyphosis Cobb angle improved from 62.2° ± 3.7° preoperatively to 37° ± 2.4° at final follow-up postoperatively. Both of these are significant improvements, and all bone grafts were fused. Complications related to the operation occurred in 31.5% (17/54) of cases. Six cases suffered postoperative aggravated kyphosis deformity, eight cases suffered proximal kyphosis deformity, one case suffered pedicle penetration

  16. Performance of centralized versus decentralized tuberculosis treatment services in Southern Brazil, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Mara Cristina; Prim, Rodrigo Ivan; Wildner, Leticia Muraro; Medeiros, Taiane Freitas; Maurici, Rosemeri; Kupek, Emil; Bazzo, Maria Luiza

    2018-04-25

    Tuberculosis (TB) control programs face the challenges of decreasing incidence, mortality rates, and drug resistance while increasing treatment adherence. The Brazilian TB control program recommended the decentralization of patient care as a strategy for combating the disease. This study evaluated the performance of this policy in an area with high default rates, comparing epidemiological and operational indicators between two similar municipalities. This study analyzed epidemiological and operational indicators on new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis reported in the Brazilian Notifiable Diseases Information System between 2006 and 2015. In addition, to characterize differences between the populations of the two studied municipalities, a prospective cohort study was conducted between 2014 and 2015, in which patients with new cases of culture-confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis were interviewed and monitored until the disease outcome. A descriptive analysis, the chi-square test, and a Poisson regression model were employed to compare TB treatment outcomes and health care indicators between the municipalities. Two thousand three hundred nine cases were evaluated, of which 207 patients were interviewed. Over the 2006-2015 period, TB incidence per 100,000 population in the municipality with decentralized care was significantly higher (39%, 95% CI 27-49%) in comparison to that of the municipality with centralized care. TB treatment default rate (45%, 95% CI 12-90%) was also higher in the municipality with decentralized care. During the two-year follow-up, significant differences were found between patients in centralized care and those in decentralized care regarding treatment success (84.5 vs. 66.1%), treatment default (10.7 vs. 25.8%), illicit drug use (27.7 vs. 45.9%), and homelessness (3.6 vs. 12.9%). The operational indicators revealed that the proportion of control smear tests, medical imaging, and HIV tests were all significantly higher in the centralized care

  17. Previous treatment, sputum-smear nonconversion, and suburban living: The risk factors of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Shariff, Noorsuzana; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Kamaludin, Fadzilah

    2016-03-01

    The number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients is increasing each year in many countries all around the globe. Malaysia has no exception in facing this burdensome health problem. We aimed to investigate the factors that contribute to the occurrence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among Malaysian tuberculosis patients. An unmatched case-control study was conducted among tuberculosis patients who received antituberculosis treatments from April 2013 until April 2014. Cases are those diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis patients clinically, radiologically, and/or bacteriologically, and who were confirmed to be resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin through drug-sensitivity testing. On the other hand, pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were sensitive to all first-line antituberculosis drugs and were treated during the same time period served as controls. A total of 150 tuberculosis patients were studied, of which the susceptible cases were 120. Factors found to be significantly associated with the occurrence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are being Indian or Chinese (odds ratio 3.17, 95% confidence interval 1.04-9.68; and odds ratio 6.23, 95% confidence interval 2.24-17.35, respectively), unmarried (odds ratio 2.58, 95% confidence interval 1.09-6.09), living in suburban areas (odds ratio 2.58, 95% confidence interval 1.08-6.19), are noncompliant (odds ratio 4.50, 95% confidence interval 1.71-11.82), were treated previously (odds ratio 8.91, 95% confidence interval 3.66-21.67), and showed positive sputum smears at the 2nd (odds ratio 7.00, 95% confidence interval 2.46-19.89) and 6th months of treatment (odds ratio 17.96, 95% confidence interval 3.51-91.99). Living in suburban areas, positive sputum smears in the 2nd month of treatment, and was treated previously are factors that independently contribute to the occurrence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Those with positive smears in the second month of treatment, have a history of previous

  18. Previous treatment, sputum-smear nonconversion, and suburban living: The risk factors of multidrugresistant tuberculosis among Malaysians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorsuzana Mohd Shariff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients is increasing each year in many countries all around the globe. Malaysia has no exception in facing this burdensome health problem. We aimed to investigate the factors that contribute to the occurrence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among Malaysian tuberculosis patients. An unmatched case-control study was conducted among tuberculosis patients who received antituberculosis treatments from April 2013 until April 2014. Cases are those diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis patients clinically, radiologically, and/or bacteriologically, and who were confirmed to be resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin through drug-sensitivity testing. On the other hand, pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were sensitive to all first-line antituberculosis drugs and were treated during the same time period served as controls. A total of 150 tuberculosis patients were studied, of which the susceptible cases were 120. Factors found to be significantly associated with the occurrence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are being Indian or Chinese (odds ratio 3.17, 95% confidence interval 1.04–9.68; and odds ratio 6.23, 95% confidence interval 2.24–17.35, respectively, unmarried (odds ratio 2.58, 95% confidence interval 1.09–6.09, living in suburban areas (odds ratio 2.58, 95% confidence interval 1.08–6.19, are noncompliant (odds ratio 4.50, 95% confidence interval 1.71–11.82, were treated previously (odds ratio 8.91, 95% confidence interval 3.66–21.67, and showed positive sputum smears at the 2nd (odds ratio 7.00, 95% confidence interval 2.46–19.89 and 6th months of treatment (odds ratio 17.96, 95% confidence interval 3.51–91.99. Living in suburban areas, positive sputum smears in the 2nd month of treatment, and was treated previously are factors that independently contribute to the occurrence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Those with positive smears in the second month of treatment

  19. Tuberculosis outcomes in Taipei: factors associated with treatment interruption for 2 months and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, C-Y; Lee, J-J; Yu, M-C; Enarson, D A; Lin, T-P; Luh, K-T

    2009-01-01

    All individuals reported as being treated for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) among citizens of Taipei City, Taiwan, in 2003. To investigate risk factors associated with treatment interruption for at least 2 consecutive months and death. The outcome of PTB cases was determined by consulting medical charts. Of 1127 PTB patients registered, 824 (73.1%) were successfully treated, 189 (16.8%) died, 65 (5.8%) interrupted treatment, 17 (1.5%) were still on treatment 15 months after commencing treatment and 32 (2.8%) failed. The only significant factor associated with treatment interruption was visits to other health facilities after commencing tuberculosis (TB) treatment. TB patients had a standardised mortality ratio of 8.7 (95%CI 7.5-10.0). Factors significantly associated with death were age (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR] 1.06. 95%CI 1.05-1.08), sputum culture not performed/unknown (adjHR 2.07, 95%CI 1.47-2.92), and comorbidity with respiratory disease (adjHR 1.68, 95%CI 1.24-2.27), infectious disease (adjHR 2.80, 95%CI 2.07-3.78), renal disease (adjHR 2.58, 95%CI 1.82-3.66) or cancer (adjHR 3.31, 95%CI 2.35-4.65), compared with other patients. Visits to other health facilities were associated with interruption of treatment for at least 2 months. A high proportion of deaths was due to old age and comorbidity.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific CD8(+ T cells rapidly decline with antituberculosis treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa R Nyendak

    Full Text Available Biomarkers associated with response to therapy in tuberculosis could have broad clinical utility. We postulated that the frequency of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb specific CD8(+ T cells, by virtue of detecting intracellular infection, could be a surrogate marker of response to therapy and would decrease during effective antituberculosis treatment.We sought to determine the relationship of Mtb specific CD4(+ T cells and CD8(+ T cells with duration of antituberculosis treatment.We performed a prospective cohort study, enrolling between June 2008 and August 2010, of HIV-uninfected Ugandan adults (n = 50 with acid-fast bacillus smear-positive, culture confirmed pulmonary TB at the onset of antituberculosis treatment and the Mtb specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses to ESAT-6 and CFP-10 were measured by IFN-γ ELISPOT at enrollment, week 8 and 24.There was a significant difference in the Mtb specific CD8(+ T response, but not the CD4(+ T cell response, over 24 weeks of antituberculosis treatment (p<0.0001, with an early difference observed at 8 weeks of therapy (p = 0.023. At 24 weeks, the estimated Mtb specific CD8(+ T cell response decreased by 58%. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the Mtb specific CD4(+ T cell during the treatment. The Mtb specific CD4(+ T cell response, but not the CD8(+ response, was negatively impacted by the body mass index.Our data provide evidence that the Mtb specific CD8(+ T cell response declines with antituberculosis treatment and could be a surrogate marker of response to therapy. Additional research is needed to determine if the Mtb specific CD8(+ T cell response can detect early treatment failure, relapse, or to predict disease progression.

  1. Plant natural products research in tuberculosis drug discovery and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant natural products research in tuberculosis drug discovery and development: A situation report ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... tuberculosis (XDR-TB), call for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs to combat this disease.

  2. Sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis: sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugusi Ferdinand M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is complicated by the increased presence of sputum smear negative tuberculosis. Diagnosis of smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis is made by an algorithm recommended by the National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Programme that uses symptoms, signs and laboratory results. The objective of this study is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the tuberculosis treatment algorithm used for the diagnosis of sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods A cross-section study with prospective enrollment of patients was conducted in Dar-es-Salaam Tanzania. For patients with sputum smear negative, sputum was sent for culture. All consenting recruited patients were counseled and tested for HIV. Patients were evaluated using the National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Programme guidelines and those fulfilling the criteria of having active pulmonary tuberculosis were started on anti tuberculosis therapy. Remaining patients were provided appropriate therapy. A chest X-ray, mantoux test, and Full Blood Picture were done for each patient. The sensitivity and specificity of the recommended algorithm was calculated. Predictors of sputum culture positive were determined using multivariate analysis. Results During the study, 467 subjects were enrolled. Of those, 318 (68.1% were HIV positive, 127 (27.2% had sputum culture positive for Mycobacteria Tuberculosis, of whom 66 (51.9% were correctly treated with anti-Tuberculosis drugs and 61 (48.1% were missed and did not get anti-Tuberculosis drugs. Of the 286 subjects with sputum culture negative, 107 (37.4% were incorrectly treated with anti-Tuberculosis drugs. The diagnostic algorithm for smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis had a sensitivity and specificity of 38.1% and 74.5% respectively. The presence of a dry cough, a high respiratory rate, a low eosinophil count, a mixed type of anaemia and

  3. Nursing performance in the policy transfer of directly observed treatment of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Káren Mendes Jorge de Souza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Analyzing the policy transfer of directly observed treatment of tuberculosis from the perspective of nursing. Method This is a descriptive study with qualitative approach, which had 10 nurses of the Family Health Strategy in São Paulo as subjects. The interviews were carried out between May and June 2013, and were adopted the technique of thematic content analysis and the referential of policy transfer. Results On the signification of this treatment, are related the senses of disciplinary monitoring, the bond and approximation to the context of patients’ lives. Operationally, nurses, community health agents and nursing technicians stand out as agents of implementation of this policy, developing multiple actions of user embracement. The nurse is evidenced as an educator in health, leader in the family health team, and capable of creating emotional bond with users. Conclusion It was found that the innovations proposed in the treatment are incipient in the daily work of nurses.

  4. [Nursing performance in the policy transfer of directly observed treatment of tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Káren Mendes Jorge de; Sá, Lenilde Duarte de; Silva, Laís Mara Caetano da; Palha, Pedro Fredemir

    2014-10-01

    Analyzing the policy transfer of directly observed treatment of tuberculosis from the perspective of nursing. This is a descriptive study with qualitative approach, which had 10 nurses of the Family Health Strategy in São Paulo as subjects. The interviews were carried out between May and June 2013, and were adopted the technique of thematic content analysis and the referential of policy transfer. On the signification of this treatment, are related the senses of disciplinary monitoring, the bond and approximation to the context of patients' lives. Operationally, nurses, community health agents and nursing technicians stand out as agents of implementation of this policy, developing multiple actions of user embracement. The nurse is evidenced as an educator in health, leader in the family health team, and capable of creating emotional bond with users. It was found that the innovations proposed in the treatment are incipient in the daily work of nurses.

  5. Integration of PET/CT in Current Diagnostic and Response Evaluation Methods in Patients with Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezmen, Oelem; Goekcek, Atila; Tatci, Ebru; Biner, Inci; Akkalyoncu, Behiye

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a systemic disease that still affects many people. While pleural involvement is frequently observed in extrapulmonary tuberculosis, multiple skeletal system and articular involvements are quite rare. FDG PET imaging could be a promising diagnostic and treatment monitoring method, especially in complicated cases and if the other methods are inadequate. In this case study, we report a patient who was admitted with suspected malignancy and then diagnosed with tuberculosis pleuritis, lymphadenitis, spondylodiscitis, and sacroiliitis with specific symptoms; the response to anti-tuberculosis therapy was shown using FDG PET/CT

  6. Integration of PET/CT in Current Diagnostic and Response Evaluation Methods in Patients with Tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezmen, Oelem; Goekcek, Atila; Tatci, Ebru; Biner, Inci; Akkalyoncu, Behiye [Atatuerk Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2014-03-15

    Tuberculosis is a systemic disease that still affects many people. While pleural involvement is frequently observed in extrapulmonary tuberculosis, multiple skeletal system and articular involvements are quite rare. FDG PET imaging could be a promising diagnostic and treatment monitoring method, especially in complicated cases and if the other methods are inadequate. In this case study, we report a patient who was admitted with suspected malignancy and then diagnosed with tuberculosis pleuritis, lymphadenitis, spondylodiscitis, and sacroiliitis with specific symptoms; the response to anti-tuberculosis therapy was shown using FDG PET/CT.

  7. Immunotherapy Added to Antibiotic Treatment Reduces Relapse of Disease in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourik, Bas C; Leenen, Pieter J M; de Knegt, Gerjo J; Huizinga, Ruth; van der Eerden, Bram C J; Wang, Jinshan; Krois, Charles R; Napoli, Joseph L; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M

    2017-02-01

    Immune-modulating drugs that target myeloid-derived suppressor cells or stimulate natural killer T cells have been shown to reduce mycobacterial loads in tuberculosis (TB). We aimed to determine if a combination of these drugs as adjunct immunotherapy to conventional antibiotic treatment could also increase therapeutic efficacy against TB. In our model of pulmonary TB in mice, we applied treatment with isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide for 13 weeks alone or combined with immunotherapy consisting of all-trans retinoic acid, 1,25(OH) 2 -vitamin D3, and α-galactosylceramide. Outcome parameters were mycobacterial load during treatment (therapeutic activity) and 13 weeks after termination of treatment (therapeutic efficacy). Moreover, cellular changes were analyzed using flow cytometry and cytokine expression was assessed at the mRNA and protein levels. Addition of immunotherapy was associated with lower mycobacterial loads after 5 weeks of treatment and significantly reduced relapse of disease after a shortened 13-week treatment course compared with antibiotic treatment alone. This was accompanied by reduced accumulation of immature myeloid cells in the lungs at the end of treatment and increased TNF-α protein levels throughout the treatment period. We demonstrate, in a mouse model of pulmonary TB, that immunotherapy consisting of three clinically approved drugs can improve the therapeutic efficacy of standard antibiotic treatment.

  8. [Considerations about the efficiency of treatment regimens with fixed Rifampicin-Isoniazid combinations in pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Ioana; Husar, Iulia; Didilescu, C; Stoicescu, I P

    2004-01-01

    Here are presented the results of a prospective, randomized study regarding the efficiency of regimens with fixed drug combination Rifampicin-Isoniazide manufactured by Antibiotics S.A. of Iasi in comparison with single drugs routinely used in treatment of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Newly diagnosed (confirmed by smear and culture) pulmonary tuberculosis patients were selected, and those who accepted to be included in the study, were admitted to the National Institute of Pneumology "Marius Nasta" between August 2001 and September 2002. At the time of admission, they were randomized into two groups: 20 patients received fixed drug combination RMP300 HIN150, and 18 patients received RMP and HIN in single drug tablets (2 patients were excluded). The follow-up of the patients was for one year from the date of enclosure. The smear conversion rate was 83,3% for the patients using single drug tablets, and 70% for those using fixed drug combination, motivated with some more severe TB patterns. The success rate was 100% for all TB patients. Although the present study was done for few patients, we can say that it demonstrated the same efficiency of fixed drug combination produced in Romania, with the single drug tablets, and it suggests a better compliance to treatment with a lower price.

  9. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Treatment of Tuberculosis--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Patricia Bento; de Freitas, Eduardo Sinésio; Bernegossi, Jessica; Gonçalez, Maíra Lima; Sato, Mariana Rillo; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious and transmissible disease that is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and primarily affects the lungs, although it can affect other organs and systems. The pulmonary presentation of TB, in addition to being more frequent, is also the most relevant to public health because it is primarily responsible for the transmission of the disease. The to their low World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a combined therapeutic regimen of several drugs, such as rifampicin (RIF), isoniazid (INH), pyrazinamide (PZA) and ethambutol (ETB). These drugs have low plasma levels after oral administration, due to their low water solubility, poor permeability and ability to be rapidly metabolized by the liver and at high concentrations. Furthermore, they have short t₁/₂ (only 1-4 hours) indicating a short residence in the plasma and the need for multiple high doses, which can result in neurotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Nanotechnology drug delivery systems have considerable potential for the treatment of TB. The systems can also be designed to allow for the sustained release of drugs from the matrix and drug delivery to a specific target. These properties of the systems enable the improvement of the bioavailability of drugs, can reduce the dosage and frequency of administration, and may solve the problem of non-adherence to prescribed therapy, which is a major obstacle to the control of TB. The purpose of this study was to systematically review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for the treatment of TB.

  10. A case report on esophageal tuberculosis – A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatsal Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a rare form of tuberculosis in a patient presenting with dysphagia. Patient was subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, which revealed an ulcerative growth in the distal esophagus. Histopathology revealed esophageal tuberculosis. Patient was managed conservatively with Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment (ATT. Follow up endoscopy after two months revealed resolution of the growth and patient was symptomatically better. In spite of the rare nature of the disease, it can be managed effectively with ATT to avoid complications (fistula, stricture, and esophageal perforation, which might warrant surgery.

  11. Anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenblat, Joshua D; Kakar, Ron; Berk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    for qualitative review. Eight RCTs (n = 312) assessing adjunctive nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n = 53), omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n = 140), N-acetylcysteine (n = 76), and pioglitazone (n = 44) in the treatment of BD met the inclusion criteria for quantitative analysis. The overall effect size...... sample sizes limited interpretation of the current analysis.......OBJECTIVE: Inflammation has been implicated in the risk, pathophysiology, and progression of mood disorders and, as such, has become a target of interest in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD). Therefore, the objective of the current qualitative and quantitative review was to determine...

  12. Treatment outcomes of childhood tuberculosis in Addis Ababa: a five-year retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genene Tilahun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB kills one child every 5 min. Childhood TB is given low priority in most national health programmes particularly in TB-endemic areas. TB among children is an indicator of a recent transmission of the disease in the community. Treatment outcome results serve as a proxy of the quality of treatment provided by a health care system. In Ethiopia, data on treatment outcomes of childhood TB are limited. The aim of the study was to determine the treatment outcomes of childhood TB in a hospital setting in Addis Ababa. Methods The study was conducted during June to August 2014. The data of 491 children treated for TB in Zewditu Memorial Hospital during a 5 year (2009–2013 was analysed. TB was diagnosed using standard methods. Demographic and clinical data including type of TB, TB-HIV co-infection and treatment outcomes were collected from registry of the TB clinic. Treatment outcome definitions are used according to the World Health Organization. Results Of the 491 children, 272(55.4 % were females, 107(21.8 % were under 5 year old, 454(92.5 % of them were new cases. The types of TB were extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB 243(49.5 % and 248(50.5 % pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB. Of the PTB cases, 42(16.9 % were sputum smear positive. Of the 291 children tested for HIV, 82(28.2 % were positive. The overall treatment success rate was 420(85.5 % and the poor treatment outcome was 71(14.5 %. Of the children with poor treatment outcome, 9(1.8 % died, 3(0.6 % defaulted from treatment, 2(0.4 % were treatment failure and 55(11.2 % were transferred out. Males and females had similar treatment success rates of 85.8 % and 85.3 %, respectively. Infants under one year had significantly lower treatment success rate of 72.7 % compared to those above 1 years of age of 86.5 % (P < 0.001. Treatment success rate ranged from 78.0 to 92.6 % during the study period. Associated factors for treatment outcome were age above

  13. Biomarkers Associated with Death After Initiating Treatment for Tuberculosis and HIV in Patients with Very Low CD4 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Richard Sattler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The risk of short-term death for treatment naive patients dually infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV may be reduced by early anti-retroviral therapy. Of those dying, mechanisms responsible for fatal outcomes are unclear. We hypothesized that greater malnutrition and/or inflammation when initiating treatment are associated with an increased risk for death. Methods: We utilized a retrospective case-cohort design among participants of the ACTG A5221 study who had baseline CD4 < 50 cells/mm3. The case-cohort sample consisted of 51 randomly selected participants, whose stored plasma was tested for C-reactive protein, cytokines, chemokines, and nutritional markers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association of nutritional, inflammatory, and immunomodulatory markers for survival. Results: The case-cohort sample was similar to the 282 participants within the parent cohort with CD4 < 50 cells/mm3. In the case cohort, 7 (14% had BMI < 16.5 (kg/m2 and 17 (33% had BMI 16.5-18.5(kg/m2. Risk of death was increased per 1 IQR width higher of log10 transformed level of C-reactive protein (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR = 3.42 [95% CI = 1.33-8.80],P = 0.011, interferon gamma (aHR = 2.46 [CI = 1.02-5.90], P = 0.044, MCP-3 (3.67 [CI = 1.08-12.42], P = 0.037, and with IL-15 (aHR = 2.75 [CI = 1.08-6.98], P = 0.033 and IL-17 (aHR = 3.99 [CI = -1.06-15.07], P = 0.041. BMI, albumin, hemoglobin, and leptin levels were not associated with risk of death. Conclusions: Unlike patients only infected with M. tuberculosis for whom malnutrition and low BMI increase the risk of death, this relationship was not evident in our dually infected patients. Risk of death was associated with significant increases in markers of global inflammation along with soluble biomarkers of innate and adaptive immunity.

  14. Estrategia de tratamiento acortado y estrictamente supervisado en pacientes con tuberculosis pulmonar confirmada Strategy of strictly monitored and shortened treatment in patients with confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis René Tablada del Risco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una investigación descriptiva y transversal para caracterizar a los pacientes con tuberculosis pulmonar, cuyos esputos fueran positivos para bacilos-ácido-alcohol-resistente, en una población abierta del municipio de Santiago de Cuba, desde el 2003 hasta el 2007, los cuales se acogieron a la estrategia de tratamiento acortado estrictamente supervisado. En la casuística predominaron el sexo masculino, los adultos jóvenes, así como los factores de riesgo: hábito tabáquico, alcoholismo y antecedente de contactos con personas afectadas por dicha enfermedad. La atención primaria de salud no cumplió el indicador operacional del diagnóstico de estos pacientes ni el seguimiento baciloscópico mensual. Se recomienda elaborar una estrategia de intervención que contemple un proyecto capacitante, encaminado a elevar la competencia profesional del personal sanitario en relación con la asistencia integral incluida en el Programa Nacional de Control de la Tuberculosis.A cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted to characterize patients with pulmonary tuberculosis whose sputa were positive for acid-alcohol resistant bacilli, in a general population of Santiago de Cuba municipality, from 2003 to 2007, who opted for the strategy of strictly monitored and shortened treatment. Male sex, young adults as well as risk factors: smoking habit, alcoholism and history of contacts with people affected by this disease prevailed in the case material. Primary health care neither meet the operational indicator of the diagnosis of these patients nor the monthly bacilloscopy. It is recommended to develop an intervention strategy that includes a project aimed at improving the professional competence of health personnel with regard to comprehensive care included in the National Program of Tuberculosis Control.

  15. Life experiences of patients who have completed tuberculosis treatment: a qualitative investigation in southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite being curable, tuberculosis is still a stigmatized disease. Not only is TB patients’ suffering due to its clinical manifestations, but also because of society’s prejudice, embarrassing situations, and even self-discrimination. This study aims to investigate psychosocial experiences of patients who have completed tuberculosis treatment in São Carlos a municipality in the interior of São Paulo State, Brazil. Methods This study, of a clinical-qualitative nature, sought to understand the meanings provided by the participants themselves. Fifteen individuals, who had successfully completed tuberculosis treatment, participated in this research. The sample size was established using the information saturation criterion. Data were collected by means of interviews with in-depth open-ended questions. Data were treated by categorizing and analyzing content according to themes. Results Regardless of all progress, this study found that TB still causes patients to suffer from fear of transmission, social prejudice, and death. Despite the fact that the emotional support provided by families and healthcare professionals is considered essential to treatment adherence and completion, participants in this study reveal that friends and colleagues have distanced themselves from them for fear of contagion and/or prejudice. Ignorance about the disease and its transmission modes can be found in the interviewees’ statements, which seems to indicate that they have become vectors of transmission of stigma themselves. Patients’ medical leave from work during treatment may be due to both their health conditions and their attempt to avoid social/emotional embarrassment. There are accounts that TB has caused psychosocial damage to patients’ lives and that they feel more fatigue and lassitude and have begun to pay more attention to their own health. Conclusions Healthcare workers should be aware of the ways TB treatment affect patients’ psychosocial life and

  16. Conjugated and Entrapped HPMA-PLA Nano-Polymeric Micelles Based Dual Delivery of First Line Anti TB Drugs: Improved and Safe Drug Delivery against Sensitive and Resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Seema; Khan, Iliyas; Gothwal, Avinash; Pachouri, Praveen K; Bhaskar, N; Gupta, Umesh D; Chauhan, Devendra S; Gupta, Umesh

    2017-09-01

    First line antiTB drugs have several physical and toxic manifestations which limit their applications. RIF is a hydrophobic drug and has low water solubility and INH is hepatotoxic. The main objective of the study was to synthesize, characterize HPMA-PLA co-polymeric micelles for the effective dual delivery of INH and RIF. HPMA-PLA co-polymer and HPMA-PLA-INH (HPI) conjugates were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR and 1 H-NMR spectroscopy. Later on RIF loaded HPMA-PLA-INH co-polymeric micelles (PMRI) were formulated and characterized for size, zeta potential and surface morphology (SEM, TEM) as well as critical micellar concentration. The safety was assessed through RBC's interaction study. The prepared PMRI were evaluated through MABA assay against sensitive and resistant strains of M. Tuberculosis. Size, zeta and entrapment efficiency for RIF loaded HPMA-PLA-INH polymeric micelles (PMRI) was 87.64 ± 1.98 nm, -19 ± 1.93 mV and 97.2 ± 1.56%, respectively. In vitro release followed controlled and sustained delivery pattern. Sustained release was also supported by release kinetics. Haemolytic toxicity of HPI and PMRI was 8.57 and 7.05% (p PLA polymeric micelles (PMRI) were more effective against sensitive and resistant M tuberculosis. The developed approach can lead to improved patient compliance and reduced dosing in future, offering improved treatment of tuberculosis.

  17. Tuberculosis treatment delivery in high burden settings: does patient choice of supervision matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kironde, S; Meintjies, M

    2002-07-01

    The Northern Cape Province, Republic of South Africa. To determine the effect of patient choice of treatment delivery option on the treatment outcomes of tuberculosis (TB) patients in a high burden setting under actual programme conditions. Cohort study involving 769 new and retreatment TB patients recruited from 45 randomly selected clinics. Patients were interviewed and subsequent follow-up was done through regular visits to the clinics to check progress through formal health records. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) between the treatment outcome of new patients (70% successful) and re-treatment patients (54% successful). Direct observation of treatment (DOT) was found to have no effect on the treatment outcome of new patients (P = 0.875), but re-treatment patients were found to fare better with than without DOT (OR 14.2, 95% CI 4.18-53.14, P < 0.001). The results obtained for new patients are similar to those of two recent randomised controlled trials on DOT. This study revealed that for new patients, undue emphasis on universal DOT might be unnecessary. It would perhaps be more beneficial to target supervision at those patients who are most likely to benefit from it (i.e., re-treatment patients). This is of particular relevance in high burden, resource-limited settings where universal DOT for all TB patients is generally unfeasible.

  18. Qualitative study of perceived causes of tuberculosis treatment default among health care workers in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizub, D; Ghali, I; Sabouni, R; Bourkadi, J E; Bennani, K; El Aouad, R; Dooley, K E

    2012-09-01

    In Morocco, tuberculosis (TB) treatment default is increasing in some urban areas. To provide a detailed description of factors that contribute to patient default and solutions from the point of view of health care professionals who participate in TB care. In-depth interviews were conducted with 62 physicians and nurses at nine regional public pulmonary clinics and local health clinics. Participants had a median of 24 years of experience in health care. Treatment default was seen as a result of multilevel factors related to the patient (lack of means, being a migrant worker, distance to treatment site, poor understanding of treatment, drug use, mental illness), medical team (high patient load, low motivation, lack of resources for tracking defaulters), treatment organization (poor communication between treatment sites, no systematic strategy for patient education or tracking, incomplete record keeping), and health care system and society. Tailored recommendations for low- and higher-cost interventions are provided. Interventions to enhance TB treatment completion should take into account the local context and multilevel factors that contribute to default. Qualitative studies involving health care workers directly involved in TB care can be powerful tools to identify contributing factors and define strategies to help reduce treatment default.

  19. Detection of Anti-Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antibodies in suspected tuberculosis patients = Detecção de anticorpos anti-Paracoccidioides brasiliensis em pacientes suspeitos de tuberculose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Dias Fraga Peron

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is an important systemic mycosis in LatinAmerica that occurs as active disease in 1-2% of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infected people. Like PCM, tuberculosis (TB affects mainly the lungs and the clinical and radiological aspects do notalways allow differentiation between them. The aim of this study was to carry out serological investigation for detecting anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies, by three serological methods, in patientswith symptoms suggestive of pulmonary TB. From August 2005 to September 2006, 76 patients with pulmonary symptoms suspected for TB were attended at the Regional Specialties Center Laboratory in the city of Paranavaí, Paraná, Brazil and submitted to microbiological TB research, ELISA, immunodiffusion and immunoblotting for PCM. Of all the individuals, 21 (27.63% were reactive to P. brasiliensis by ELISA and 11 (14.47% showed a laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary TB. Of all the individuals serologically reactive to P. brasiliensis, by ELISA, none had positive results by immunodiffusion and one reacted with antigen 43 kDa when Immunobloting was carried out. Our results lead us to reflect a necessity to obtain a more specific serologic test for diagnosis of PCM disease in patients with respiratory symptoms considering the high number of individuals reactive to P. brasiliensis especially in endemic areas.Paracoccidioidomicose (PCM é importante micose sistêmica na América Latina, que ocorre como doença ativa em 1-2% dos indivíduos infectados com Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Assim como a PCM, a tuberculose (TB afeta principalmente os pulmões, porém os aspectos clínicos e radiológicos nem sempre permitem a diferenciação entreessas doenças. O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar um inquérito sorológico para a detecção de anticorpos anti-P. brasiliensis, utilizando três métodos sorológicos, em pacientes com sintomassugestivos de tuberculose pulmonar. De agosto de 2005 a setembro de

  20. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhingra, V.K.; Arora, V.K.; Rajpal, S.

    2007-01-01

    This is a case report of 26 years old pregnant woman with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB), treated at outpatient department of New Delhi Tuberculosis (NDTB) Centre, India with second line agents. Before presentation at NDTB Centre, she had been treated with first line drugs for approximately one and-a-half-year, including category II re-treatment DOTS regimen under RNTCP. Patient conceived twice during her anti-TB treatment. The first one was during her category II treatment, when put on second line drugs. We describe congenital abnormalities documented in her second child exposed in-utero to second line anti-tubercular drugs with a brief review of treatment of MDR TB in pregnancy. (author)

  1. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogundele OA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Olukunle Ayodeji Ogundele,1 Deshendran Moodley,1 Anban W Pillay,1 Christopher J Seebregts1,2 1UKZN/CSIR Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Health Architecture Laboratory, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, 2Jembi Health Systems NPC, Cape Town, South Africa Purpose: Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA.Methods: An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion: The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is

  2. Patient adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Salla A; Lewin, Simon A; Smith, Helen J; Engel, Mark E; Fretheim, Atle; Volmink, Jimmy

    2007-07-24

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and has received considerable attention in recent years, particularly in low- and middle-income countries where it is closely associated with HIV/AIDS. Poor adherence to treatment is common despite various interventions aimed at improving treatment completion. Lack of a comprehensive and holistic understanding of barriers to and facilitators of, treatment adherence is currently a major obstacle to finding effective solutions. The aim of this systematic review of qualitative studies was to understand the factors considered important by patients, caregivers and health care providers in contributing to TB medication adherence. We searched 19 electronic databases (1966-February 2005) for qualitative studies on patients', caregivers', or health care providers' perceptions of adherence to preventive or curative TB treatment with the free text terms "Tuberculosis AND (adherence OR compliance OR concordance)". We supplemented our search with citation searches and by consulting experts. For included studies, study quality was assessed using a predetermined checklist and data were extracted independently onto a standard form. We then followed Noblit and Hare's method of meta-ethnography to synthesize the findings, using both reciprocal translation and line-of-argument synthesis. We screened 7,814 citations and selected 44 articles that met the prespecified inclusion criteria. The synthesis offers an overview of qualitative evidence derived from these multiple international studies. We identified eight major themes across the studies: organisation of treatment and care; interpretations of illness and wellness; the financial burden of treatment; knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about treatment; law and immigration; personal characteristics and adherence behaviour; side effects; and family, community, and household support. Our interpretation of the themes across all studies produced a line

  3. Patient adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla A Munro

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and has received considerable attention in recent years, particularly in low- and middle-income countries where it is closely associated with HIV/AIDS. Poor adherence to treatment is common despite various interventions aimed at improving treatment completion. Lack of a comprehensive and holistic understanding of barriers to and facilitators of, treatment adherence is currently a major obstacle to finding effective solutions. The aim of this systematic review of qualitative studies was to understand the factors considered important by patients, caregivers and health care providers in contributing to TB medication adherence. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched 19 electronic databases (1966-February 2005 for qualitative studies on patients', caregivers', or health care providers' perceptions of adherence to preventive or curative TB treatment with the free text terms "Tuberculosis AND (adherence OR compliance OR concordance". We supplemented our search with citation searches and by consulting experts. For included studies, study quality was assessed using a predetermined checklist and data were extracted independently onto a standard form. We then followed Noblit and Hare's method of meta-ethnography to synthesize the findings, using both reciprocal translation and line-of-argument synthesis. We screened 7,814 citations and selected 44 articles that met the prespecified inclusion criteria. The synthesis offers an overview of qualitative evidence derived from these multiple international studies. We identified eight major themes across the studies: organisation of treatment and care; interpretations of illness and wellness; the financial burden of treatment; knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about treatment; law and immigration; personal characteristics and adherence behaviour; side effects; and family, community, and household support. Our interpretation of the

  4. Successful Treatment in a Child with Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Coexistence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Baka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old girl was admitted to our department with a history of severe pain of her left axilla and fever. On physical examination, a block of lymph nodes in her left axilla, diffuse papular rash, and red-violet swelling of her supraclavicular and subclavian region were noted. Imaging investigations revealed left axillar and supraclavicular lymphadenopathy and a small nodular shade in the upper lobe of her left lung. A biopsy from an axillary lymph node established the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, whereas DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the same tissue biopsy. Patient was started on chemotherapy for ALCL and achieved remission of all initially involved fields. Nevertheless, two new nodular lesions were detected in the left lower lobe. Biopsy revealed granulomas, and PCR was positive for M. tuberculosis. Our patient received treatment with the combination of isoniazid and rifampin (12 months, pyrazinamide (the first 2 months, and maintenance chemotherapy for her ALCL for one year simultaneously. Four years later, she is disease free for both mycobacterial infection and lymphoma. We are reporting this successful management of mycobacterial infection in a patient with ALCL despite intensive chemotherapy that the patient received at the same time.

  5. Rituximab for the treatment of refractory simultaneous anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) and membranous nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandak, Ghassan; Jones, Bruce A; Li, Jian; Yee, Jerry; Umanath, Kausik

    2014-02-01

    Antibody-mediated anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease occurs rarely in the presence of another B-cell disorder, membranous nephropathy. The coexistence of these two autoimmune disorders would be anticipated to require differing, specific therapies targeted to each disease process. We describe a case of concomitant membranous nephropathy and anti-GBM disease in which conventional therapy, including steroids, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide, failed to attenuate the anti-GBM disease, yet responded to an alternative treatment of rituximab. This B-cell directed, monoclonal, chimeric antibody treatment substantially reduced anti-GBM antibody titers and led to discontinuation of plasmapheresis, while maintaining the remission of membranous nephropathy and anti-GBM disease.

  6. Intraocular manifestations of mycobacterium tuberculosis: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A. Dalvin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis: is most commonly associated with pulmonary infection. However, tuberculosis (TB can also affect the eye. TB can affect nearly any tissue in the eye, and a high index of suspicion is required for accurate diagnosis, as many of the intraocular manifestations of TB can mimic other, more common diseases. Correct diagnosis is critical because systemic anti-tuberculosis treatment may be required, and vision loss or even loss of the affected eye can occur without proper treatment. Thus, it is important for ophthalmologists and infectious disease specialists to work together to accurately diagnose and treat intraocular TB. This article reports the various known presentations of intraocular TB and reviews important elements of diagnosis and treatment. Keywords: Mycobacterium, Tuberculosis, Choroidal granuloma, Retinal vasculitis

  7. Smoking prolongs the infectivity of patients with tuberculosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Siddiqui, U A

    2010-10-01

    We sought to establish if smokers on anti-tuberculosis treatment are more likely to have a prolonged period of infectivity, compared to non-smoking tuberculosis patients, in a low tuberculosis prevalence country. We conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective study in Ireland that recruited 53 microbiologically confirmed cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). The age-sex adjusted odds ratios (AOR) suggest that the infectivity status of PTB on treatment was four times more likely to be prolonged beyond 6-8 weeks, if the cases had a smoking history (AOR: 4.42; 95% CI: 1.23; 15.9). Smoking was associated with delayed sputum smear conversion in PTB patients on treatment.

  8. A Study on the Role of Mobile Phone Communication in Tuberculosis DOTS Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, R; Arulchelvan, S

    2013-10-01

    Every year, a lot of Tuberculosis (TB) patients undergo Directly Observed Treatment Short-course (DOTS) in Salem city, one of the high TB districts in South India. Mobile phone usage among these patients and health workers is common. Mobile phone communication has a great potential in TB treatment. To analyze the mobile phone usage and its effectiveness in TB DOTS treatment. A cross-sectional survey with 150 TB patients was followed by a focus group discussion with treatment supervisors, DOTS providers, and health workers. Majority of patients use mobile phones to make calls to health workers to clarify their doubts on side effects, food, and symptoms of the disease. TB treatment supervisors effectively use mobile phones to counsel patients to adhere to the treatment regimen. Patients see mobile phones as a useful communication tool in TB treatment though they prefer direct interpersonal communication with health workers. Though the mobile ownership is 68% among the TB patients, many of them are not able to send text messages or read messages in English. Mobile phone possession and usage is high among the patients. Patients need to be trained to use mobile phone features such as alarm, voice mail, and interactive voice response. Incentives like free talk time and short message service (SMS) will encourage patients to communicate frequently with health workers, thereby, increasing the chances of better adherence to DOTS. SMS could be made available in the regional languages.

  9. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Claudia C; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Armour, Carol L

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB) physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI), focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explaining the concept of latency (in particular to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds) and providing guidance to patients while still framing treatment decisions as a choice. Tailored estimates of the risk of developing TB and the risk of developing an adverse effect from LTBI treatment were considered the most important information for decision making and discussion with patients. Physicians acknowledged that there is a significant amount of unwarranted treatment variation, which they attributed to the lack of evidence about the risk-benefit balance of LTBI treatment in certain scenarios and guidelines that refer to the need for case-by-case decision making in many instances. In order to successfully implement LTBI treatment at a clinical level, consideration should be given to research on how to best address communication challenges arising in clinical encounters.

  10. A study on the role of mobile phone communication in tuberculosis DOTS treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Elangovan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Every year, a lot of Tuberculosis (TB patients undergo Directly Observed Treatment Short-course (DOTS in Salem city, one of the high TB districts in South India. Mobile phone usage among these patients and health workers is common. Mobile phone communication has a great potential in TB treatment. Objectives: To analyze the mobile phone usage and its effectiveness in TB DOTS treatment. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey with 150 TB patients was followed by a focus group discussion with treatment supervisors, DOTS providers, and health workers. Results: Majority of patients use mobile phones to make calls to health workers to clarify their doubts on side effects, food, and symptoms of the disease. TB treatment supervisors effectively use mobile phones to counsel patients to adhere to the treatment regimen. Patients see mobile phones as a useful communication tool in TB treatment though they prefer direct interpersonal communication with health workers. Though the mobile ownership is 68% among the TB patients, many of them are not able to send text messages or read messages in English. Conclusion: Mobile phone possession and usage is high among the patients. Patients need to be trained to use mobile phone features such as alarm, voice mail, and interactive voice response. Incentives like free talk time and short message service (SMS will encourage patients to communicate frequently with health workers, thereby, increasing the chances of better adherence to DOTS. SMS could be made available in the regional languages.

  11. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia C. Dobler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI, focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explaining the concept of latency (in particular to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and providing guidance to patients while still framing treatment decisions as a choice. Tailored estimates of the risk of developing TB and the risk of developing an adverse effect from LTBI treatment were considered the most important information for decision making and discussion with patients. Physicians acknowledged that there is a significant amount of unwarranted treatment variation, which they attributed to the lack of evidence about the risk–benefit balance of LTBI treatment in certain scenarios and guidelines that refer to the need for case-by-case decision making in many instances. In order to successfully implement LTBI treatment at a clinical level, consideration should be given to research on how to best address communication challenges arising in clinical encounters.

  12. Identification of Mycobacterial Genes Involved in Antibiotic Sensitivity: Implications for the Treatment of Tuberculosis with β-Lactam-Containing Regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Yadav, Sangya

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant library screen, transposon mutants with insertions in fhaA, dprE2, rpsT, and parA displayed hypersusceptibility to antibiotics, including the β-lactams meropenem, ampicillin, amoxicillin, and cefotaxime. Sub-MIC levels of octoclothepin, a psychotic drug inhibiting ParA, phenocopied the parA insertion and enhanced the bactericidal activity of meropenem against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in combination with clavulanate. Our study identifies novel factors associated with antibiotic resistance, with implications in repurposing β-lactams for tuberculosis treatment. PMID:28438925

  13. The social determinants of tuberculosis treatment adherence in a remote region of Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Diefenbach-Elstob

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papua New Guinea (PNG is a diverse and culturally-rich country with severe infrastructural and health problems. Tuberculosis (TB is widespread, and the number of cases with drug resistance is rising. Treatment adherence is known to be important for both effective treatment and limiting the emergence of drug resistance. The aim of this study was to construct a matrix of the factors that act as facilitators or barriers to TB treatment adherence in a remote region of PNG. Methods The study was based in the Balimo region of the Western Province. People known to have undergone TB treatment, as well as staff involved in managing people with TB, were asked to participate in an in-depth interview about their experiences. Purposive sampling was used to identify a diverse range of participants, from different geographic locations, social backgrounds, and with successful and unsuccessful treatment outcomes. The interview data was analysed based on grounded theory methodology. Results The study identified a range of factors that influence TB treatment adherence, with these being classified as personal, systems, and sociocultural. These factors are presented along with suggested recommendations for adaptations to DOTS-based treatment in this region. Barriers included the challenges associated with travel to treatment sites, and the difficulties of undertaking treatment alongside the daily need to maintain subsistence food production. However, facilitators were also identified, including the positive influence of religious beliefs, and high confidence in the ability of DOTS-based treatment to cure TB. Conclusions Documenting the wide range of factors that influence treatment adherence in a severely affected remote population will assist in improving TB control. These results provide impetus for further community-based efforts aimed at improving access to TB diagnosis and treatment, and maintaining successful treatment outcomes in the face

  14. Patients’ perception regarding the influence of individual and social vulnerabilities on the adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane Davina da Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis remains an important disease which mainly affects the majority of vulnerable individuals in society, who are subjected to poor living conditions and difficulties to access the services of public health. Under these circumstances, the present study aims to understand patients’ perception in relation to the influence of individual and social vulnerabilities on the adherence to tuberculosis treatment. Methods A qualitative descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in one large municipality at the state of Paraíba, Northeast of Brazil. The study subjects, who were residents of the study site, covered all tuberculosis cases diagnosed between March and June 2015. The sample was defined by the criteria of response saturation. All interviews were audio recorded, and data analysis was developed through the hermeneutic dialectic method and the theory of Generative Route Sense. The project was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the University of São Paulo (USP. Results A total of 13 individuals were interviewed and the responses were identified into two analytical categories: the difficulties they had and the enabling factors they could mention during their tuberculosis treatment. Patients brought up social exclusion as an obstacle to treatment adherence, which, along with stigmatization, weakened their link with family members and health professionals. Moreover, economic precariousness was a major hindrance to the maintenance of a proper diet and transportation access to health centers. However, social support and directly observed treatment helped to break down barriers of prejudice and to promote individual and family empowerment. Finally, patients also reported that their will to live and faith gave them the strength to continue with the treatment. Conclusions According to patients in this study, social support and the strengthening of links with family members and health professionals may reduce

  15. Patients' perception regarding the influence of individual and social vulnerabilities on the adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rosiane Davina; de Luna, Fernanda Darliane Tavares; de Araújo, Aguinaldo José; Camêlo, Edwirde Luiz Silva; Bertolozzi, Maria Rita; Hino, Paula; Lacerda, Sheylla Nadjane Batista; Fook, Sayonara Maria Lia; de Figueiredo, Tânia Maria Ribeiro Monteiro

    2017-09-19

    Tuberculosis remains an important disease which mainly affects the majority of vulnerable individuals in society, who are subjected to poor living conditions and difficulties to access the services of public health. Under these circumstances, the present study aims to understand patients' perception in relation to the influence of individual and social vulnerabilities on the adherence to tuberculosis treatment. A qualitative descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in one large municipality at the state of Paraíba, Northeast of Brazil. The study subjects, who were residents of the study site, covered all tuberculosis cases diagnosed between March and June 2015. The sample was defined by the criteria of response saturation. All interviews were audio recorded, and data analysis was developed through the hermeneutic dialectic method and the theory of Generative Route Sense. The project was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the University of São Paulo (USP). A total of 13 individuals were interviewed and the responses were identified into two analytical categories: the difficulties they had and the enabling factors they could mention during their tuberculosis treatment. Patients brought up social exclusion as an obstacle to treatment adherence, which, along with stigmatization, weakened their link with family members and health professionals. Moreover, economic precariousness was a major hindrance to the maintenance of a proper diet and transportation access to health centers. However, social support and directly observed treatment helped to break down barriers of prejudice and to promote individual and family empowerment. Finally, patients also reported that their will to live and faith gave them the strength to continue with the treatment. According to patients in this study, social support and the strengthening of links with family members and health professionals may reduce social exclusion and other difficulties they face, thus encouraging them

  16. Rib Tuberculosis Treatment By Steel Greft which has Fractured after a Thoracic Trauma: 10-year Follow up Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Oncel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rib tuberculosis is an uncommon form of osteoarticular tuberculosis. The physical and radiological examination can often mimic other conditions ,including primary and metastatic chest wall tumors . A 60 year-old male patient had a mass in the chest wall. Surgery aiming diagnosis and treatment based on physical and radiological findings were performed. Histopathological examination of the mass specimen revealed tuberculosis. The chest wall defect was supported with a stell greft after the six month . The patient had fallen from stairs and hit his chest six year after . The case had a significant fracture in the steel graft . This is unusual manifestation of chest wall grefts . This, chest wall, showing a softer steel materials should be used in grafts that would break a long-term follow-up is presented [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 295-298

  17. [Application of near infrared spectroscopy in rapid and simultaneous determination of essential components in five varieties of anti-tuberculosis tablets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Le-sheng; Wang, Di; Song, Jia; Zhang, Yi-bo; Guo, Wei-liang; Teng, Li-rong

    2008-08-01

    Since 1980s, tuberculosis has become increasingly serious. Rifampicin tablets, isoniazide tablets, pyrazinamide tablets, rifampicin and isoniazide tablets and rifampicin isoniazide and pyrazinamide tablets are currently relatively efficacious antituberculosis drugs. In the present paper, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with partial least squares (PLS) was applied to the simultaneous determination of rifampicin (RMP), isoniazide (INH) and pyrazinamide (PZA) contents in 5 varieties of anti-tuberculosis tablets. As the results showed, all of the models for the determination of RMP, INH and PZA contents applied the original NIR spectra. The most efficacious wavelength range for the determination of RMP contents was 1981-2195 nm, it was 1540-1717 nm and 2086-2197 nm for the determination of INH contents, and it was 1460-1537 nm, 1956-2022 nm and 2268-2393 nm for determination of PZA contents. The root mean square error of the calibration set obtained by cross-validation (RMSECV) of the optimum models for the quantitative analysis of RMP, INH and PZA contents was 0.0494, 0.0257 and 0.0307, respectively. Using these optimum models for the determination of RMP, INH and PZA contents in prediction set, the root mean square error of prediction set (RMSEP) was 0.0182, 0.0166 and 0.0134, respectively. The correlation coefficient (r(p)) between the predicted values and actual values was 0.9864, 0.9989 and 0.9993, respectively. These results demonstrated that this method was precise and reliable, and is significative for in situ measurement and the on-line quality control for anti-tuberculosis tablets production.

  18. Depressive disorders and anti-parkinson drug treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt-Christensen, M; Lopez, A G; Nilsson, F M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the rate of treatment with anti-parkinson drugs (APD) among patients with depression. METHOD: In a nationwide case register linkage study, all persons with a main diagnosis of depression during 5 years were identified. A control group of persons with diagnoses of osteoarthr...... that prescription of APD reflects the presence of Parkinson's disease, results support a positive statistical association between depressive disorders and Parkinson's disease.......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the rate of treatment with anti-parkinson drugs (APD) among patients with depression. METHOD: In a nationwide case register linkage study, all persons with a main diagnosis of depression during 5 years were identified. A control group of persons with diagnoses...... of osteoarthritis was included. The subsequent risk of getting treatment with APD was estimated for the two groups. Statistical analyses involved Poisson's regression and competing risk models. RESULTS: A total of 14 991 persons were included. The rate of getting APD was 2.57 (95% CI: 1.46-4.52) times higher...

  19. Minimally invasive surgical treatment of patients with bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with pleural empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korpusenko I.V

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective of our study was to increase the effectiveness of surgical treatment of bilateral destructive pulmonary tuberculosis complicated by pleural empyema by using VTS-technologies. The study was done in Dnepropetrovsk regional clinical therapeutic and prophylactic association "Phthisiology" in the period from 2008 to 2013. A retrospective analysis of 43 cases of bilateral destructive pulmonary tuberculosis complicated by pleural empyema on one side and dissemination focus or limited destructive process on contralateral side has been performed. Selected cases were divided into 2 groups: main (eighteen cases where the following procedures were done: performed transsternal occlusion of the main bronchus, sanation of empyema cavity using videothoracosopy, in 30-45 days followed by pleuropneumectomy with usage of minithoracothomy and control (nineteen cases who had undergone drainage of the empyema cavity, sanation, in 45-60 days followed by pleuropmeumectomy with usage of anterolateral access. The distribution of main and control groups for analyzed parameters was representative. Sanation of pleural cavity with videothoracosopy usage compared with Bulau’s drainage provides better antibacterial effect, effective sanitation of the pleural cavity as evidenced by following changes: significant decrease in the number of microbial cells; normalization of total white blood cells count and rod-shaped granulocytes in the peripheral blood 10 days after treatment; normalization of leukocyte intoxication index. The use of minimally invasive surgical treatment allowed to reduce intraoperative complications by 2 times, amount of intraoperative blood loss and hemotrasfusions by 1.5 times, postoperative mortality by 2.5 times. Pleural cavity sanation with videothoracoscopy usage with following pneumoectomy leads to reduce in the incidence and severity of postoperative complications. The most promising is stage-by-stage surgical approach with consecutive use

  20. Spanish Compliance With Guidelines for Prescribing Four Drugs in the Intensive Phase of Standard Tuberculosis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, José-María; Rodrigo, Teresa; Casals, Martí; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Pascual-Pascual, Teresa; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-05-01

    International and Spanish guidelines recommend a 4-drug regimen in the intensive treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of our study was to determine if these recommendations are followed in Spain, and the factors associated with the use of 3 drugs (standard regimen without ethambutol). Observational, multicenter, retrospective analysis of data from patients diagnosed with TB in practically all Spanish Autonomous Communities between 2007 and 2102. Factors associated with the use of 3 drugs were analyzed using logistic regression, and odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A total of 3,189 patients were included, 1,413 (44.3%) of whom received 3 drugs. The percentage of 3-drug users among patients with positive sputum smear was 41.2%; among patients with resistance to at least 1 drug, 36.1%; among HIV-infected patients, 31.4%; and among immigrants, 24.8%. Factors associated with the use of 3 drugs were: female sex (OR=1.18; CI: 1.00-1.39); native Spanish (OR=3.09; CI: 2.58-3.70); retired (OR=1.42; CI: 1.14-1.77); homeless (OR=3.10; CI: 1.52-6.43); living alone (OR=1.62; CI: 1.11-2.36); living in a family (OR=1.97; CI: 1.48-2.65); seen by specialists in the region (OR=1.37; CI: 1.10;1.70); no HIV infection (OR=1.63; CI: 1.09-2.48); and negative sputum smear with positive culture (OR=1.59; CI: 1.25-2.02). A large proportion of TB patients receive intensive treatment with 3 drugs. TB treatment recommendations should be followed, both in routine clinical practice and by the National Plan for Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Spain. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors associated with delays in treatment initiation after tuberculosis diagnosis in two districts of India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durba Paul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive time between diagnosis and initiation of tuberculosis (TB treatment contributes to ongoing TB transmission and should be minimized. In India, Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP focuses on indicator start of treatment within 7 days of diagnosis for patients with sputum smear-positive PTB for monitoring DOTS implementation. OBJECTIVES: To determine length of time between diagnosis and initiation of treatment and factors associated with delays of more than 7 days in smear-positive pulmonary TB. METHODS: Using existing programme records such as the TB Register, treatment cards, and the laboratory register, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB registered from July-September 2010 in two districts in India. A random sample of patients with pulmonary TB who experienced treatment delay of more than 7 days was interviewed using structured questionnaire. RESULTS: 2027 of 3411 patients registered with pulmonary TB were smear-positive. 711(35% patients had >7 days between diagnosis and treatment and 262(13% had delays >15 days. Mean duration between TB diagnosis and treatment initiation was 8 days (range = 0-128 days. Odds of treatment delay >7 days was 1.8 times more likely among those who had been previously treated (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-2.3 and 1.6 (95% CI 1.3-1.8 times more likely among those diagnosed in health facilities without microscopy centers. The main factors associated with a delay >7 days were: patient reluctance to start a re-treatment regimen, patients seeking second opinions, delay in transportation of drugs to the DOT centers and delay in initial home visits. To conclude, treatment delay >7 days was associated with a number of factors that included history of previous treatment and absence of TB diagnostic services in the local health facility. Decentralized diagnostic facilities and improved referral procedures may reduce such treatment

  2. [Tuberculosis and drug-resistance tuberculosis in prisoners. Colombia, 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Ingrid T; Llerena, Claudia R; Zabaleta, Angie P

    2015-01-01

    To characterize tuberculosis drug-resistance using anti-tuberculosis drug-sensitivity tests in Colombian prisoners. Descriptive-retrospective analyses were performed on cases of tuberculosis in prisoners. Samples were evaluated by the National Reference Laboratory. Conditions like gender, TB/VIH co-infection and drug-resistance were evaluated. Anti-tuberculosis drug-sensitivity tests were carried out on 72 prisoners. Results showed a distribution of 90.7 % of cases in males and 9.3 % of cases in females. 12 % of cases were TB/VIH co-infections, 94 % of the cases had not received any anti-tuberculosis treatment before, six isolates were drug-resistant corresponding to 8.8 % of total cases, and two cases were multi drug-resistant representing 1.3 % of the cases. Of the drug-resistant cases, 83.3 % were TB/VIH co-infected. Previously treated cases corresponded to 5.6 % of the total cases analyzed. One case with TB/VIH co-infection and rifampicin resistance was observed, representing 1.3 % of the total cases. The government must create a clear policy for prisoners in Colombia, because a high rate of disease in prisoners was observed. In addition, the results showed an association between drug-resistance and TB/VIH co-infection. Overcrowding and low quality of life in penitentiaries could become an important public health problem.

  3. Clinics of ocular tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishali; Shoughy, Samir S; Mahajan, Sarakshi; Khairallah, Moncef; Rosenbaum, James T; Curi, Andre; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2015-02-01

    Ocular tuberculosis is an extrapulmonary tuberculous condition and has variable manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of ocular tuberculosis affecting the anterior and posterior segments of the eye in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Review of literature using Pubmed database. Mycobacterium tuberculosis may lead to formation of conjunctival granuloma, nodular scleritis, and interstitial keratitis. Lacrimal gland and orbital caseating granulomas are rare but may occur. The intraocular structures are also a target of insult by M. tuberculosis and may cause anterior granulomatous uveitis, anterior and posterior synechiae, secondary glaucoma, and cataract. The bacillus may involve the ciliary body, resulting in the formation of a localized caseating granuloma. Posterior segment manifestations include vitritis, retinal vasculitis, optic neuritis, serpiginous-like choroiditis, choroidal tubercules, subretinal neovascularization, and, rarely, endophthalmitis. The recognition of clinical signs of ocular tuberculosis is of utmost importance as it can provide clinical pathway toward tailored investigations and decision making for initiating anti-tuberculosis therapy.

  4. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages with Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles Drives NFκB and Autophagy Dependent Bacillary Killing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has pushed our available repertoire of anti-TB therapies to the limit of effectiveness. This has increased the urgency to develop novel treatment modalities, and inhalable microparticle (MP) formulations are a promising option to target the site of infection. We have engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) MPs which can carry a payload of anti-TB agents, and are successfully taken up by human alveolar macrophages. Even without a drug cargo, MPs can be potent immunogens; yet little is known about how they influence macrophage function in the setting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To address this issue we infected THP-1 macrophages with Mtb H37Ra or H37Rv and treated with MPs. In controlled experiments we saw a reproducible reduction in bacillary viability when THP-1 macrophages were treated with drug-free MPs. NFκB activity was increased in MP-treated macrophages, although cytokine secretion was unaltered. Confocal microscopy of immortalized murine bone marrow-derived macrophages expressing GFP-tagged LC3 demonstrated induction of autophagy. Inhibition of caspases did not influence the MP-induced restriction of bacillary growth, however, blockade of NFκB or autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors reversed this MP effect on macrophage function. These data support harnessing inhaled PLGA MP-drug delivery systems as an immunotherapeutic in addition to serving as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. Such "added value" could be exploited in the generation of inhaled vaccines as well as inhaled MDR-TB therapeutics when used as an adjunct to existing treatments.

  5. Treatment outcomes of fixed-dose combination versus separate tablet regimens in pulmonary tuberculosis patients with or without diabetes in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaer, Mohammad H; Mansour, Hanine; Elewa, Hazem; Salameh, Pascale; Iqbal, Fatima

    2017-02-02

    Tuberculosis is considered the second most common cause of death due to infectious agent. The currently preferred regimen for treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, which has been used either as separate tablets (ST) or as fixed-dose combination (FDC). To date, no studies have compared both regimens in Qatar. We aim to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of FDC and ST regimen for treating PTB, in addition to comparing safety and efficacy of FDC and ST regimens in patients with diabetes treated for TB. A retrospective observational study was conducted in two general hospitals in Qatar. Patients diagnosed with PTB received anti-tuberculosis medications (either as FDC or ST) administered by the nurse. Sputum smears were tested weekly. We assessed the time to negative sputum smear and incidence of adverse events among FDC and ST groups. The study included 148 patients. FDC was used in 90 patients (61%). Effectiveness was not different between FDC and ST regimens as shown by mean time to sputum conversion (29.9 ± 18.3 vs. 35.6 ± 23 days, p = 0.12). Similarly, there was no difference in the incidence of adverse events, except for visual one that was higher in ST group. Among the 33 diabetic patients, 19 received the FDC and had faster sputum conversion compared to those who received ST (31 ± 12 vs. 49.4 ± 30.9 days, p = 0.05). Overall, diabetic patients needed longer time for sputum conversion and had more hepatotoxic and gastric adverse events compared to non-diabetics. ST group had higher visual side effects compared to FDC. FDC may be more effective in diabetic patients; however, further studies are required to confirm such finding.

  6. Predictors of Default from Treatment for Tuberculosis: a Single Center Case-Control Study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol-Kyu; Shin, Hong-Joon; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Yoon, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Young-Su; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    Default from tuberculosis (TB) treatment could exacerbate the disease and result in the emergence of drug resistance. This study identified the risk factors for default from TB treatment in Korea. This single-center case-control study analyzed 46 default cases and 100 controls. Default was defined as interrupting treatment for 2 or more consecutive months. The reasons for default were mainly incorrect perception or information about TB (41.3%) and experience of adverse events due to TB drugs (41.3%). In univariate analysis, low income (defaulter (15.2% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.005), and combined extrapulmonary TB (54.3% vs. 34.0%, P = 0.020) were significant risk factors for default. In multivariate analysis, the absence of TB stigma (adjusted odd ratio [aOR]: 46.299, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.078-265.365, P defaulters (aOR: 33.226, 95% CI: 2.658-415.309, P = 0.007), and low income (aOR: 5.246, 95% CI: 1.249-22.029, P = 0.024) were independent predictors of default from TB treatment. In conclusion, patients with absence of disease stigma, treated by a non-pulmonologist, who were former defaulters, and with low income should be carefully monitored during TB treatment in Korea to avoid treatment default.

  7. Predictors of Default from Treatment for Tuberculosis: a Single Center Case–Control Study in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Default from tuberculosis (TB) treatment could exacerbate the disease and result in the emergence of drug resistance. This study identified the risk factors for default from TB treatment in Korea. This single-center case–control study analyzed 46 default cases and 100 controls. Default was defined as interrupting treatment for 2 or more consecutive months. The reasons for default were mainly incorrect perception or information about TB (41.3%) and experience of adverse events due to TB drugs (41.3%). In univariate analysis, low income (defaulter (15.2% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.005), and combined extrapulmonary TB (54.3% vs. 34.0%, P = 0.020) were significant risk factors for default. In multivariate analysis, the absence of TB stigma (adjusted odd ratio [aOR]: 46.299, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.078–265.365, P defaulters (aOR: 33.226, 95% CI: 2.658–415.309, P = 0.007), and low income (aOR: 5.246, 95% CI: 1.249–22.029, P = 0.024) were independent predictors of default from TB treatment. In conclusion, patients with absence of disease stigma, treated by a non-pulmonologist, who were former defaulters, and with low income should be carefully monitored during TB treatment in Korea to avoid treatment default. PMID:26839480

  8. Time to unsuccessful tuberculosis treatment outcome, Cambodia, China, and Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, N B; Sokun, C; Wei, C; Lauritsen, J M; Rieder, H L

    2012-03-21

    To determine the frequency and characteristics of patients with unsuccessful tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Random selection of TB case registers among all treatment units in Cambodia, two provinces in China, and Viet Nam. The data of two calendar years were analyzed to assess unsuccessful outcomes and their time of occurrence. Among the 33 309 TB patients, treatment was unsuccessful in respectively 10.1%, 3.0% and 9.1% of patients in Cambodia, China and Viet Nam. The risk of death was highest in Cambodia, higher among males than females, increased with age, and was more common among retreatment cases than new cases, and among patients with a high than a low sputum smear microscopy grade. Half of all deaths occurred in the first 2 months in Cambodia and within 11 weeks in China and Viet Nam. Median time to default was 3 months in Cambodia and Viet Nam, and about 2 months in China. Treatment was highly successful in the three study countries, with a low proportion of death and default. As the majority of defaulting occurs at the beginning of treatment, all countries should critically review their current policy of treatment support in this period.

  9. Clinical management of carbamazepine intoxication during anti-tubercular treatment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Calderazzo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 67-year-old man with medical history of focal post-stroke seizure and type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with carbamazepine, clobazam, gliclazide, insulin glargine, and omeprazole we visited for the onset in the last 7 days of asthenia, cough with mucus, breathing difficulty, chest pain, and weight loss. After clinical and laboratory tests, pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed, and a treatment with isoniazid, ethambutol, pyrazinamide rifampicin, and pyridoxine was started. Therapeutic drug monitoring of tuberculosis treatment documented that all drugs were in normal therapeutic range. Four days after the beginning of the treatment, we documented the improvement of fever, and three days later the patient showed sleepiness, visual disorder and asthenia. Clinical and pharmacological evaluation suggested a carbamazepine toxicity probably related to a drug interaction (Drug Interaction Probability Scale score = 6. The impossibility to switch carbamazepine for another antiepileptic drug, due to a resistant form of seizure, induced the discontinuation of tuberculosis treatment, resulting in the normalization of serum carbamazepine levels in one day (10 µg/ml and in the worsening of fever, requiring a new clinical and pharmacological evaluation. The titration dosage of carbamazepine and its therapeutic drug monitoring allowed to continue the treatment with both antitubercular drugs and carbamazepine, without the development of adverse drug reactions. To date, tuberculosis treatment was stopped and clinical evaluation, radiology and microbiology assays documented the absence of tubercular infection and no seizures appeared (carbamazepine dosage 800 mg/bid; serum levels 9.5 µg/ml.

  10. Disseminated tuberculosis presenting as mesenteric and cerebral abscess in HIV infection: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Pandit

    Full Text Available Disseminated tuberculosis in HIV infection involves multiple organs. Pulmonary and lymph node involvement are the commonest form of tuberculosis in HIV infection [1, 2]. Other forms of tuberculosis in the absence of lung and lymph node involvement are rare. Various forms of abdominal [3, 4] and neurological [5, 6] tubercular involvement in HIV infection have been reported. But tuberculosis presenting simultaneously with mesenteric and brain abscess has not been reported yet. We report a case of disseminated tuberculosis presenting as mesenteric and cerebral abscess in a HIV case without involving lung and lymph nodes. Bone marrow smears and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC from mesenteric lesion were positive for acid fast bacilli (AFB and the diagnosis of tuberculosis was confirmed by positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR. He responded well to treatment with anti tubercular drugs.

  11. Adverse events and treatment completion for latent tuberculosis in jail inmates and homeless persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Mark N; Reves, Randall R; Jasmer, Robert M; Grabau, John C; Bock, Naomi N; Shang, Nong

    2005-04-01

    Recently, a short-course treatment using 60 daily doses of rifampin and pyrazinamide was recommended for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI). To determine the acceptability, tolerability, and completion of treatment. Observational cohort study. Five county jails and TB outreach clinics for homeless populations in three cities. Study staff enrolled 1,211 patients (844 inmates and 367 homeless persons). Sites used 60 daily doses of rifampin and pyrazinamide, an approved treatment regimen for LTBI. Types and frequency of drug-related adverse events and outcomes of treatment. Prior to treatment, 25 of 1,178 patients (2.1%) had a serum aminotransferase measurement at least 2.5 times the upper limit of normal. Patients who reported excess alcohol use in the past 12 months were more likely than other patients to have an elevated pretreatment serum aminotransferase level (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 6.1; p = 0.03). Treatment was stopped in 66 of 162 patients (13.4%) who had a drug-related adverse event. Among 715 patients who had serum aminotransferase measured during treatment, 43 patients (6.0%) had an elevation > 5 times the upper limits of normal, including one patient who died of liver failure attributed to treatment. In multivariate analyses, increasing age, an abnormal baseline aspartate aminotransferase level, and unemployment within the past 24 months were independent risk factors for hepatotoxicity. Completion rates were similar in jail inmates (47.5%) and homeless persons (43.6%). This study detected the first treatment-associated fatality with the rifampin and pyrazinamide regimen, prompting surveillance that detected unacceptable levels of hepatotoxicity and retraction of recommendations for its routine use. Completion rates for LTBI treatment using a short-course regimen exceeds historical rates using isoniazid. Efforts to identify an effective short-course treatment for LTBI should be given a high priority.

  12. Treatment outcomes for isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis under program conditions in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Kamila; Chiang, Leslie Y; Roth, David Z; Krajden, Mel; Tang, Patrick; Cook, Victoria J; Johnston, James C

    2017-09-04

    Every year, over 1 million people develop isoniazid (INH) resistant tuberculosis (TB). Yet, the optimal treatment regimen remains unclear. Given increasing prevalence, the clinical efficacy of regimens used by physicians is of interest. This study aims to examine treatment outcomes of INH resistant TB patients, treated under programmatic conditions in British Columbia, Canada. Medical charts were retrospectively reviewed for cases of culture-confirmed INH mono-resistant TB reported to the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) from 2002 to 2014. Treatment regimens, patient and strain characteristics, and clinical outcomes were analysed. One hundred sixty five cases of INH mono-resistant TB were included in analysis and over 30 different treatment regimens were prescribed. Median treatment duration was 10.5 months (IQR 9-12 months) and treatment was extended beyond 12 months for 26 patients (15.8%). Fifty six patients (22.6%) experienced an adverse event that resulted in a drug regimen modification. Overall, 140 patients (84.8%) had a successful treatment outcome while 12 (7.2%) had an unsuccessful treatment outcome of failure (n = 2; 1.2%), relapse (n = 4; 2.4%) or all cause mortality (n = 6; 3.6%). Our treatment outcomes, while consistent with findings reported from other studies in high resource settings, raise concerns about current recommendations for INH resistant TB treatment. Only a small proportion of patients completed the recommended treatment regimens. High quality studies to confirm the effectiveness of standardized regimens are urgently needed, with special consideration given to trials utilizing fluoroquinolones.

  13. The potential role of vitamin D for prevention and treatment of tuberculosis and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Catia; Bianchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is a common condition among several populations in the world. VDD is associated with higher incidence of immune system disorders and faster progression of some infectious diseases. Vitamin D is known to be of physiological importance, it is considered an essential micronutrient for the bone health and plays a beneficial role in the prevention and/or treatment of a number of chronic diseases. Vitamin D has a complex action on the immune system. Evidence that vitamin D protects against tuberculosis has been supported by in vitro, epidemiological and some preliminary clinical studies. Vitamin D has a potential effect on HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and plays a crucial role in the defence against respiratory infections. Vitamin D supplementation could be a low-cost, practical method to protect groups of people with high incidence of those diseases. Public health education should stress the need for adequate dietary intake of vitamin D in those vulnerable groups.

  14. Risk factors and mortality associated with default from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Molly F; Appleton, Sasha C; Bayona, Jaime; Arteaga, Fernando; Palacios, Eda; Llaro, Karim; Shin, Sonya S; Becerra, Mercedes C; Murray, Megan B; Mitnick, Carole D

    2008-06-15

    Completing treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) may be more challenging than completing first-line TB therapy, especially in resource-poor settings. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify risk factors for default from MDR TB therapy (defined as prolonged treatment interruption), (2) quantify mortality among patients who default from treatment, and (3) identify risk factors for death after default from treatment. We performed a retrospective chart review to identify risk factors for default from MDR TB therapy and conducted home visits to assess mortality among patients who defaulted from such therapy. Sixty-seven (10.0%) of 671 patients defaulted from MDR TB therapy. The median time to treatment default was 438 days (interquartile range, 152-710 days), and 27 (40.3%) of the 67 patients who defaulted from treatment had culture-positive sputum at the time of default. Substance use (hazard ratio, 2.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.56-5.62; P = .001), substandard housing conditions (hazard ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-3.11; P = .03), later year of enrollment (hazard ratio, 1.62, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.41; P = .02), and health district (P = .02) predicted default from therapy in a multivariable analysis. Severe adverse events did not predict default from therapy. Forty-seven (70.1%) of 67 patients who defaulted from therapy were successfully traced; of these, 25 (53.2%) had died. Poor bacteriologic response, default, low education level, and diagnosis with a psychiatric disorder significantly predicted death after default in a multivariable analysis. The proportion of patients who defaulted from MDR TB treatment was relatively low. The large proportion of patients who had culture-positive sputum at the time of treatment default underscores the public health importance of minimizing treatment default. Prognosis for patients who defaulted from therapy was poor. Interventions aimed at preventing treatment default may

  15. Direct costs of managing adverse drug reactions during rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnippel, K; Firnhaber, C; Berhanu, R; Page-Shipp, L; Sinanovic, E

    2018-04-01

    To estimate the provider costs of managing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to standard long-course treatment for multidrug- and rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/RR-TB) according to South African guidelines. We parameterised a published Markov health state model for MDR/RR-TB with guidelines-based, bottom-up public-sector provider costing of ADR management. Frequency of ADR occurrence was extracted from the literature. Costs were estimated over 10 years, discounted 3% annually and tested using probabilistic sensitivity analysis. On average, guidelines-based costing of moderate ADRs weighted by the frequency of occurrence was US$135.76 (standard deviation [SD] US$17.18) and the cost of serious ADRs was US$521.29 (SD US$55.99). We estimated that the incremental costs of ADR management were US$380.17 annually per patient initiating MDR/RR-TB treatment. The incremental costs of ADR management for the public health sector in South Africa was US$4.76 million, 8.3% of the estimated cohort costs of MDR/RR-TB treatment ($57.55 million) for the 2015 cohort of 12 527 patients. Management of multiple ADRs and serious ADRs, which are common during the first 6 months of standard, long-course MDR/RR-TB treatment, substantially increases provider treatment costs. These results need to be taken into account when comparing regimen costs, and highlight the urgent need to identify drug regimens with improved safety profiles.

  16. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment failure detection depends on monitoring interval and microbiological method

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard A.; Lu, Chunling; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Bayona, Jaime; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Burgos, Marcos; Centis, Rosella; Cohen, Theodore; Cox, Helen; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Danilovitz, Manfred; Falzon, Dennis; Gelmanova, Irina Y.; Gler, Maria T.; Grinsdale, Jennifer A.; Holtz, Timothy H.; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Leimane, Vaira; Menzies, Dick; Milstein, Meredith B.; Mishustin, Sergey P.; Pagano, Marcello; Quelapio, Maria I.; Shean, Karen; Shin, Sonya S.; Tolman, Arielle W.; van der Walt, Martha L.; Van Deun, Armand; Viiklepp, Piret

    2016-01-01

    Debate persists about monitoring method (culture or smear) and interval (monthly or less frequently) during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). We analysed existing data and estimated the effect of monitoring strategies on timing of failure detection. We identified studies reporting microbiological response to MDR-TB treatment and solicited individual patient data from authors. Frailty survival models were used to estimate pooled relative risk of failure detection in the last 12 months of treatment; hazard of failure using monthly culture was the reference. Data were obtained for 5410 patients across 12 observational studies. During the last 12 months of treatment, failure detection occurred in a median of 3 months by monthly culture; failure detection was delayed by 2, 7, and 9 months relying on bimonthly culture, monthly smear and bimonthly smear, respectively. Risk (95% CI) of failure detection delay resulting from monthly smear relative to culture is 0.38 (0.34–0.42) for all patients and 0.33 (0.25–0.42) for HIV-co-infected patients. Failure detection is delayed by reducing the sensitivity and frequency of the monitoring method. Monthly monitoring of sputum cultures from patients receiving MDR-TB treatment is recommended. Expanded laboratory capacity is needed for high-quality culture, and for smear microscopy and rapid molecular tests. PMID:27587552

  17. Vitamin D as supplementary treatment for tuberculosis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wejse, Christian; Gomes, Victor F; Rabna, Paulo; Gustafson, Per; Aaby, Peter; Lisse, Ida M; Andersen, Paul L; Glerup, Henning; Sodemann, Morten

    2009-05-01

    Vitamin D has been shown to be involved in the host immune response toward Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To test whether vitamin D supplementation of patients with tuberculosis (TB) improved clinical outcome and reduced mortality. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in TB clinics at a demographic surveillance site in Guinea-Bissau. We included 365 adult patients with TB starting antituberculosis treatment; 281 completed the 12-month follow-up. The intervention was 100,000 IU of cholecalciferol or placebo at inclusion and again 5 and 8 months after the start of treatment. The primary outcome was reduction in a clinical severity score (TBscore) for all patients with pulmonary TB. The secondary outcome was 12-month mortality. No serious adverse effects were reported; mild hypercalcemia was rare and present in both arms. Reduction in TBscore and sputum smear conversion rates did not differ among patients treated with vitamin D or placebo. Overall mortality was 15% (54 of 365) at 1 year of follow-up and similar in both arms (30 of 187 for vitamin D treated and 24 of 178 for placebo; relative risk, 1.19 [0.58-1.95]). HIV infection was seen in 36% (131 of 359): 21% (76 of 359) HIV-1, 10% (36 of 359) HIV-2, and 5% (19 of 357) HIV-1+2. Vitamin D does not improve clinical outcome among patients with TB and the trial showed no overall effect on mortality in patients with TB; it is possible that the dose used was insufficient. Clinical trial registered with www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn (ISRCTN35212132).

  18. Drug development against tuberculosis: Impact of alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shardendu K; Tripathi, Garima; Kishore, Navneet; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Archana; Tiwari, Vinod K

    2017-09-08

    Despite of the advances made in the treatment and management, tuberculosis (TB) still remains one of main public health problem. The contrary effects of first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs have generated extended research interest in natural products in the hope of devising new antitubercular leads. Interestingly, plethoras of natural products have been discovered to exhibit activity towards various resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Extensive applications of alkaloids in the field of therapeutics is well-established and nowday's researches being pursued to develop new potent drugs from natural sources for tuberculosis. Alkaloids are categorized in quite a few groups according to their structures and isolation from both terrestrial and marine sources. These new drugs might be a watershed in the battle against tuberculosis. This review summarizes alkaloids, which were found active against Mycobacteria since last ten years with special attention on the study of structure-activity relationship (SAR) and mode of action with their impact in drug discovery and development against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Frequency of tuberculosis in haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Badsha; Raza, S.; Ahmed, P.; Ullah, K.; Hussain, C.A.; Hussain, I.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess magnitude of tuberculosis (TB) in patients suffering from various haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients. Patients and Methods: Patients suffering from various haematological malignancies treated between July 2001 and December 2002 were included in the study. The hospital records and out-patient follow-up charts were reviewed for demographic information, diagnosis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigations, radiological and pathological examinations, sites involved in TB, methods of diagnosis, number and type of anti-tuberculosis drugs given and response to treatment. Results: During the study period a total of 213 (including 25 allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients) patients with different haematological disorders were treated. Out of these, 34, including 4 SCT recipients developed tuberculosis. Overall frequency of TB was 16 %. Median age of TB patients was 33.5 years (range 8-80 years). Median time between diagnosis of haematological disorders and tuberculosis was 21 weeks. Sites of involvement by TB were lung (18), disseminated (6), lymph node (5), pleura (2), spine (2) and pericardium (1). Three of the patients died of TB; one undiagnosed, second with multi-drug resistant TB and the third soon after the start of anti-tuberculosis treatment while remaining 31 cases responded to anti-tuberculosis treatment. Conclusion: Tuberculosis is a major problem in immunocompromised patients and there is need to establish guidelines for TB chemoprophylaxis in our setup. (author)

  20. Effects of diabetes mellitus on the clinical presentation and treatment response in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chi C; Yew, Wing W; Mok, Thomas Y W; Lau, Kam S; Wong, Chi F; Chau, Chi H; Chan, Chi K; Chang, Kwok C; Tam, Greta; Tam, Cheuk M

    2017-08-01

    With the colliding global epidemics of diabetes mellitus (DM) and tuberculosis (TB), we studied the effects of DM on the presentation of TB and its response to treatment. Consecutive TB patients from 2006 to 2010 in a territory-wide treatment programme offering 9-month extended treatment for TB patients with DM were examined and followed up prospectively to assess their treatment response. Successful treatment completers were tracked through the TB registry and death registry for relapse, death or till 31 December 2014, whichever was the earliest. DM was independently associated with more chest symptoms (adjusted OR (AOR): 1.13) and systemic symptoms (AOR: 1.30) but less with other site-specific symptoms (AOR: 0.58) at TB presentation. There was more frequent pulmonary involvement (AOR: 1.69), with more extensive lung lesion (AOR: 1.25), lung cavity (AOR: 2.00) and positive sputum smear (AOR: 1.83) and culture (AOR: 1.38), but no difference in the proportion of retreatment cases or isoniazid and/or rifampicin resistance. After treatment initiation, there was higher overall incidence (AOR: 1.38) of adverse effects (mainly gastrointestinal symptoms, renal impairment and peripheral neuropathy but less fever and skin hypersensitivity reactions), more smear non-conversion (AOR: 1.59) and culture non-conversion (AOR: 1.40) at 2 months, and lower combined cure/treatment completion rate at 12 months (AOR: 0.79), but no difference in the relapse rate after having successfully completed treatment. DM adversely affected the clinical presentation and treatment response of TB, but there was no difference in the drug resistance and relapse rates. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  1. Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection: An Updated Network Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Dominik; Beer, Netta; Harris, Ross J; Lipman, Marc C; Stagg, Helen R; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2017-08-15

    Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is an important component of tuberculosis (TB) control, and this study updates a previous network meta-analysis of the best LTBI treatment options to inform public health action and programmatic management of LTBI. To evaluate the comparative efficacy and harms of LTBI treatment regimens aimed at preventing active TB among adults and children. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science from indexing to 8 May 2017; clinical trial registries; and conference abstracts. No language restrictions were applied. Randomized controlled trials that evaluated human LTBI treatments and recorded at least 1 of 2 prespecified end points (hepatotoxicity and prevention of active TB). 2 investigators independently extracted data from eligible studies and assessed study quality according to a standard protocol. The network meta-analysis of 8 new and 53 previously included studies showed that isoniazid regimens of 6 months (odds ratio [OR], 0.65 [95% credible interval {CrI}, 0.50 to 0.83]) or 12 to 72 months (OR, 0.50 [CrI, 0.41 to 0.62]), rifampicin-only regimens (OR, 0.41 [CrI, 0.19 to 0.85]), rifampicin-isoniazid regimens of 3 to 4 months (OR, 0.53 [CrI, 0.36 to 0.78]), rifampicin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide regimens (OR, 0.35 [CrI, 0.19 to 0.61]), and rifampicin-pyrazinamide regimens (OR, 0.53 [CrI, 0.33 to 0.84]) were efficacious compared with placebo. Evidence existed for efficacy of weekly rifapentine-isoniazid regimens compared with no treatment (OR, 0.36 [CrI, 0.18 to 0.73]). No conclusive evidence showed that HIV status altered treatment efficacy. Evidence was sparse for many comparisons and hepatotoxicity outcomes, and risk of bias was high or unknown for many studies. Evidence exists for the efficacy and safety of 6-month isoniazid monotherapy, rifampicin monotherapy, and combination therapies with 3 to 4 months of isoniazid and rifampicin. U.K. National Institute for Health Research. (PROSPERO: CRD42016037871).

  2. Definition of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antituberculosis drugs in patients with multidrugresistant tuberculosis and TB with extremely drug resistant depending on the case of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryzhanovsky D.G.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the profile of drug resistance to the main (I line and reserve (II line antituberculosis drugs in patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, depending of the case of the disease. According to the randomized retrospective research 200 patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, who received treatment in the clinic of hospital Municipal institution «Dnipropetrovsk rigional clinical association «Phthisiology» Dnipropetrovsk regional Council» during the period 2010 – 2012 were involved. Data about patients contained the data on a case of the disease and the results of the test of drug sensitivity to MBT. XDR – TB was revealed in 7.5% of patients with MDR tuberculosis. In patients with MDR tuberculosis as compared with patients with XDR tuberculosis «new cases» were diagnosed in 19.5% against 18.5% (p <0.05. In patients with MDR tuberculosis and with XDR tuberculosis resistance to the antituberculosis drug more commonly developed to S - 88.5%, E - 55% and Z - 24%. The presence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB prevails in patients, who underwent previous courses of treatment with anti-TB drugs in case history as compared with patients with «new cases» of treatment. The development of resistance to anti-TB drugs depends on the availability of these drugs in the previous treatment regimens.

  3. Knowledge-Management-Based-Nursing Care Model Improves Patient Adherence to Tuberculosis Treatment

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    Ninuk Dian Kurniawati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary tuberculosis remains prominent as one of public health problems in the world. Patients’ non-compliance to treatment is a significant contributor to drug resistance. This study aimed to develop and to test the efficacy of a nursing care model to prevent non-compliance. Method This study consisted of two phases: phase one, model development, used a descriptive analytic, and phase two, model testing, employed a quasi-experimental design. Participants, comprised both patients and nurses at two health care centres in Surabaya, were recruited by consecutive sampling. Data were collected by interview, self-administered-questionnaires, check-list and focused group discussion. Data analyses were performed using both partial least squares and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results. The model was statistically effective to improve nearly all aspects of patients’ compliance to TB treatment (knowledge, discipline in taking medications regularity of controls, and abilities to monitor the results of treatment with p < 0.05, except for abilities to cope with drug adverse effects (p = 1.000. This is possible because seldom do patients aware of the medication side effects, so their experiences were probably limited. Conclusion. This study concludes that the KM nursing care model was proven effective to improve patients’ adherence to treatment. Future study is suggested to evaluate the impact of the KM nursing care model in bigger population.

  4. Costs of providing tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment services in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, H V; Mai, V Q; Nhung, N V; Hoi, L V; Giang, K B; Chung, L H; Kien, V D; Duyen, N T; Ngoc, N B; Anh, T T; Phuong, T B; Ngan, T T; Khanh, P H

    2017-09-01

    To estimate the cost of providing tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and treatment packages at different levels of health facilities in Viet Nam. This was a retrospective costing study from the providers' perspective using a standard costing approach. We included typical services for TB diagnosis and treatment based on standard protocols. The least expensive TB service was the 6-month isoniazid preventive therapy regimen for latent tuberculous infection provided by district health centres (US$7.20-14.30, accounting for 0.3-0.7% of Viet Nam's per capita gross domestic product [GDP] of US$2052.30 in 2014). The cost of diagnosing and treating a patient with drug-susceptible TB (the most common type of TB) ranged between US$51.20 and US$180.70, and represented 2.5-8.8% of Viet Nam's per capita GDP in 2014. The most expensive TB service was the diagnosis and treatment of a multidrug-resistant TB case (US$1568.20-2391.20), accounting for 76.4-116.5% of Viet Nam's per capita GDP in 2014). The cost of TB diagnosis and treatment services in Viet Nam varied according to level of health facility, type of TB, different costing options, and different staff cost scenarios.

  5. Lipoarabinomannan in urine during tuberculosis treatment: association with host and pathogen factors and mycobacteriuria

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    Wood Robin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of lipoarabinomannan (LAM, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb cell wall antigen, is a potentially attractive diagnostic. However, the LAM-ELISA assay has demonstrated variable sensitivity in diagnosing TB in diverse clinical populations. We therefore explored pathogen and host factors potentially impacting LAM detection. Methods LAM-ELISA assay testing, sputum smear and culture status, HIV status, CD4 cell count, proteinuria and TB outcomes were prospectively determined in adults diagnosed with TB and commencing TB treatment at a South African township TB clinic. Sputum TB isolates were characterised by IS61110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and urines were tested for mycobacteriuria by Xpert® MTB/RIF assay. Results 32/199 (16.1% of patients tested LAM-ELISA positive. Median optical density and proportion testing LAM positive remained unchanged during 2 weeks of treatment and then declined over 24 weeks. LAM was associated with positive sputum smear and culture status, HIV infection and low CD4 cell counts but not proteinuria, RFLP strain or TB treatment outcome. The sensitivity of LAM for TB in HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts of ≥ 200, 100-199, 50-99, and Conclusions Urinary LAM was related to host immune factors, was unrelated to Mtb strain and declined steadily after an initial 2 weeks of TB treatment. The strong association of urine LAM with mycobacteriuria is a new finding, indicating frequent TB involvement of the renal tract in advanced HIV infection.

  6. Tuberculosis Treatment Completion in a United States/Mexico Binational Context

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    Celina I. Valencia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTuberculosis (TB remains a salient public health issue along the U.S./Mexico border. This study seeks to identify the social and structural factors, which are associated with TB disease burden in the binational geographic region. Identification of barriers of treatment completion provides the necessary framework for developing evidence-based interventions that are culturally relevant and context specific for the U.S./Mexico border region.MethodsRetrospective study of data extracted from medical charts (n = 439 from Yuma County Health Department (YCHD (n = 160 and Centro de Salud San Luis Río Colorado (n = 279. Patients currently accessing TB treatment at either facility were excluded from the study. Chi-square, unadjusted odds ratios, and logistic regression were utilized to identify characteristics associated with successful TB treatment in this population.FindingsThe study population was predominantly male (n = 327. Females were more likely to complete TB treatment (OR = 3.71. The absence of drug use and/or the absence of an HIV positive diagnosis were found to be predictors of TB treatment completion across both clinical sites. Forty-four percent (43.59% (n = 85 TB patients treated at CDS San Luis did not complete treatment versus 40.35% (n = 49 of TB patients who did not complete treatment at YCHD. Moving from the area or being deported was the highest category (20.78% for incomplete TB treatment in the population (n = 64 across both clinical sites.

  7. Low prevalence of hepatitis B and C among tuberculosis patients in Duhok Province, Kurdistan: Are HBsAg and anti-HCV prerequisite screening parameters in tuberculosis control program?

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    Muayad A Merza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective/background: Viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, infections and tuberculosis (TB are a global public health concern. Co-infection with HBV or HCV among TB patients may potentiate the risk of hepatotoxicity induced by anti-TB drugs. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of HBV and HCV among TB patients included in the Duhok National Tuberculosis Program (NTP. Methods: The Duhok NTP Center is a specialized institution in Duhok City, Iraq, concerned with management and follow-up of TB patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the center between June 2015 and May 2016. All documented TB patients were analyzed on the basis of socio-demographic and other characteristics. Thereafter, all patients underwent screening for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The results obtained were analyzed by entering the data in binary format into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. A p value of <.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Two-hundred fourteen documented TB patients were recruited in this study, with 127 (59.3% males and 87 (40.7% females. The mean age of the patients was 40.34 years (±20.29. Of the total number of patients, four cases (1.8% were HBsAg-positive and one case (0.9% was positive for anti-HCV. The variables significantly associated with HBV were history of surgical dental procedure [odds ratio (OR, 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI, −0.01 to 0.04; p = .03], and nationality (OR, 13.67; 95% CI, 0.46–210.85; p = .007. Conclusion: The prevalence of HBV and HCV co-infection among TB patients in this study was low. This may be explained by the low rate of blood transfusion among the patients, the very low prevalence of HIV infections in Kurdistan, the negative history of injection drug use, and adherence to universal infection-control measures, including vaccination for HBV

  8. Isoniazid Mono-Resistant Tuberculosis: Impact on Treatment Outcome and Survival of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Southern Mexico 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Montesinos-Castillo, Marlene; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Bobadilla-Del-Valle, Miriam; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Yanes-Lane, Mercedes; Mongua-Rodriguez, Norma; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Isoniazid mono-resistance (IMR) is the most common form of mono-resistance; its world prevalence is estimated to range between 0.0 to 9.5% globally. There is no consensus on how these patients should be treated. To describe the impact of IMR tuberculosis (TB) on treatment outcome and survival among pulmonary TB patients treated under programmatic conditions in Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico. We conducted a prospective cohort study of pulmonary TB patients in Southern Mexico. From 1995 to 2010 patients with acid-fast bacilli or culture proven Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples underwent epidemiological, clinical and microbiological evaluation. We included patients who harbored isoniazid mono-resistant (IMR) strains and patients with strains susceptible to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin. All patients were treated following Mexican TB Program guidelines. We performed annual follow-up to ascertain treatment outcome, recurrence, relapse and mortality. Between 1995 and 2010 1,243 patients with pulmonary TB were recruited; 902/1,243 (72.57%) had drug susceptibility testing; 716 (79.38%) harbored pan-susceptible and 88 (9.75%) IMR strains. Having any contact with a person with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)) 1.85, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.96) and homelessness (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.76, 95% CI 1.08-6.99) were associated with IMR. IMR patients had a higher probability of failure (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 12.35, 95% CI 3.38-45.15) and death due to TB among HIV negative patients (aHR 3.30. 95% CI 1.00-10.84). All the models were adjusted for socio-demographic and clinical variables. The results from our study provide evidence that the standardized treatment schedule with first line drugs in new and previously treated cases with pulmonary TB and IMR produces a high frequency of treatment failure and death due to tuberculosis. We recommend re-evaluating the optimal schedule for patients harboring IMR. It is necessary to strengthen

  9. Risk factors associated with default from multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis treatment, Uzbekistan: a retrospective cohort analysis.

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    Lalor, Maeve K; Greig, Jane; Allamuratova, Sholpan; Althomsons, Sandy; Tigay, Zinaida; Khaemraev, Atadjan; Braker, Kai; Telnov, Oleksander; du Cros, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    The Médecins Sans Frontières project of Uzbekistan has provided multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment in the Karakalpakstan region since 2003. Rates of default from treatment have been high, despite psychosocial support, increasing particularly since programme scale-up in 2007. We aimed to determine factors associated with default in multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis patients who started treatment between 2003 and 2008 and thus had finished approximately 2 years of treatment by the end of 2010. A retrospective cohort analysis of multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis patients enrolled in treatment between 2003 and 2008 compared baseline demographic characteristics and possible risk factors for default. Default was defined as missing ≥60 consecutive days of treatment (all drugs). Data were routinely collected during treatment and entered in a database. Potential risk factors for default were assessed in univariate analysis using chi-square test and in multivariate analysis with logistic regression. 20% (142/710) of patients defaulted after a median of 6 months treatment (IQR 2.6-9.9). Factors associated with default included severity of resistance patterns (pre-extensively drug-resistant/extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis adjusted odds ratio 0.52, 95%CI: 0.31-0.86), previous default (2.38, 1.09-5.24) and age >45 years (1.77, 1.10-2.87). The default rate was 14% (42/294) for patients enrolled 2003-2006 and 24% (100/416) for 2007-2008 enrolments (p = 0.001). Default from treatment was high and increased with programme scale-up. It is essential to ensure scale-up of treatment is accompanied with scale-up of staff and patient support. A successful first course of tuberculosis treatment is important; patients who had previously defaulted were at increased risk of default and death. The protective effect of severe resistance profiles suggests that understanding disease severity or fear may motivate against default. Targeted

  10. Anti-dentine antibodies with root resorption during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Solange de Paula; Ortolan, Geórgia Oliveira; Dos Santos, Lívia Marques; Tobouti, Priscila Lie; Hidalgo, Miriam Marubayashi; Consolaro, Alberto; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse serum IgG levels and salivary secretory IgA (sIgA) levels in human dentine extract (HDE) before (T0) and 6 months after (T6) orthodontic treatment and to correlate anti-HDE autoantibodies to root resorption. Fifty orthodontic patients were selected, 19 males (15.6 ± 8.5 years) and 31 females (21.4 ± 11.2 years), 19 in the mixed dentition (10.3 ± 1.9 years) and 31 in the permanent dentition (24.6 ± 9.9 years). Fifty individuals not undergoing orthodontic treatment matched by gender and age were selected as the controls. Periapical radiographs of the upper central incisors and saliva sampling were obtained of all patients at T0 and T6. Serum samples were collected from the permanent dentition patients (n = 31). Antibody levels were determined by means of immunoenzyme assay. At T6, root resorption was classified as grade 0 (no resorption), grade 1 (slight resorption), and grade 2 (moderate to severe resorption). Differences between antibody levels at T0 and T6 and among different grades of resorption were determined by paired t- and Kruskal-Wallis tests, respectively. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to detect correlation between sIgA and IgG levels, and logistic regression to determine the association of root resorption grade and the studied variables. Differences were considered significant at P root resorption patients during treatment and was not correlated to salivary sIgA levels or other variables. Patients who had grade 2 root resorption at T6 showed higher levels of anti-HDE sIgA (P root shape were the main factors associated with the degree of root resorption. The results suggest that variations to systemic and local humoural immune response to dentine antigens may occur during orthodontic treatment. High levels of salivary sIgA before treatment were associated with more advanced lesions after 6 months of treatment.

  11. Acceptance of anti-retroviral therapy among patients infected with HIV and tuberculosis in rural Malawi is low and associated with cost of transport.

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    Rony Zachariah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A study was conducted among newly registered HIV-positive tuberculosis (TB patients systematically offered anti-retroviral treatment (ART in a district hospital in rural Malawi in order to a determine the acceptance of ART b conduct a geographic mapping of those placed on ART and c examine the association between "cost of transport" and ART acceptance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was performed on routine program data for the period of February 2003 to July 2004. Standardized registers and patient cards were used to gather data. The place of residence was used to determine road distances to the Thyolo district hospital. Cost of transport from different parts of the district was based on the known cost for public transport to the road-stop closest to the patient's residence. Of 1,290 newly registered TB patients, 1,003(78% underwent HIV-testing of whom 770 (77% were HIV-positive. 742 of these individuals (pulmonary TB = 607; extra-pulmonary TB = 135 were considered eligible for ART of whom only 101(13.6% accepted ART. Cost of transport to the hospital ART site was significantly associated with ART acceptance and there was a linear trend in association between cost and ART acceptance (chi(2 for trend = 25.4, P<0.001. Individuals who had to pay 50 Malawi Kwacha (1 United States Dollar = 100 Malawi Kwacha, MW or less for a one-way trip to the Thyolo hospital were four times more likely to accept ART than those who had to pay over 100 MW (Adjusted Odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval: 2.0-8.1, P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ART acceptance among TB patients in a rural district in Malawi is low and associated with cost of transport to the centralized hospital based ART site. Decentralizing the ART offer from the hospital to health centers that are closer to home communities would be an essential step towards reducing the overall cost and burden of travel.

  12. Impact of diabetes on treatment outcomes and long-term survival in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young Ae; Kim, Song Yee; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Kim, Hee Jin; Park, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Ki Man; Lee, Sung Soon; Park, Jae Seuk; Koh, Won-Jung; Kim, Dae Yun; Shim, Tae Sun

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM), a globally increasing metabolic disease, on treatment outcomes and long-term survival in patients with multidrug-resistant forms of tuberculosis (MDR-TB). We analyzed outcomes in a large cohort to assess the impact of DM on treatment outcomes of patients with MDR-TB. MDR-TB patients newly diagnosed or retreated between 2000 and 2002 and followed for 8-11 years were retrospectively analyzed with respect to the effect of DM as a comorbidity on their treatment outcome and long-term survival. Of 1,407 patients with MDR-TB, 239 (17.0%) had coexisting DM. The mean age and body mass index were higher in MDR-TB patients with DM [MDR-TBDM(+)] than in those without DM [MDR-TBDM(-)]. Patients with MDR-TB and a comorbidity of DM had a significantly lower treatment success rate than those without a history of DM (36.0 vs. 47.2%, p = 0.002). In addition, DM was the negative predictor for MDR-TB treatment success in multivariate analyses [odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26-0.99]. Mean survival times were also lower in MDR-TBDM(+) than in MDR-TBDM(-) patients (102 vs. 114 months, p = 0.001), with DM as a significant predictor of poor long-term survival in multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 1.59, 95% CI 1.01-2.50). Among MDR-TB patients, DM was a relatively common comorbidity. In patients undergoing treatment for MDR-TB and followed for 8-11 years, it was found to be independently associated with an increased risk of both treatment failure and death. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Tuberculosis treatment outcome and predictors in northern Ethiopian prisons: a five-year retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adane, Kelemework; Spigt, Mark; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2018-02-20

    The prison situations are notorious for causing interruptions of tuberculosis (TB) treatment and occurrence of unfavorable outcomes. In Ethiopian prisons, though TB treatment programs exist, treatment outcome results and factors contributing to unsuccessful outcome are not well documented. In this study, we assessed the treatment outcome of TB cases and identified risk factors for unsuccessful outcome in northern Ethiopian prisons. A retrospective record review was conducted for all prisoners diagnosed with TB between September 2011 and August 2015. Outcome variables were defined following WHO guidelines. Out of the 496 patients, 11.5% were cured, 68% completed treatment, 2.5% were lost to follow-up, 1.6% were with a treatment failure, 1.4% died, and 15% were transferred out. All transferred out or released prisoners were not appropriately linked to health facilities and might be lost to treatment follow-up. The overall treatment success rate (TSR) of the 5 years was 94% among the patients who were not transferred out. The odds of unsuccessful outcome were 4.68 times greater among re-treatment cases compared to the newly treated cases. The year of treatment was also associated with variations in TSR; those treated during the earlier year were more likely to have unsuccessful outcome. Sputum non-conversion at the second-month check-up was strongly associated with unsuccessful outcome among the smear-positive cases. The mean TSR of the prisoners in the study prisons was quite satisfactory when gauged against the target level set by the End TB Strategy. However, the lack of appropriate linkage and tracking systems for those prisoners transferred or released before their treatment completion would have a negative implication for the national TB control program as such patients might interrupt their treatment and develop drug-resistant TB. Being in a re-treatment regimen and sputum non-conversion at the second-month check-up were significantly associated with

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Childhood Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Cross-Sectional Study of Practices among Paediatricians in Private Sector, Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Carolyn Kavita; Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Majority of children with tuberculosis are treated in private sector in India with no available data on management practices. The study assessed diagnostic and treatment practices related to childhood pulmonary tuberculosis among paediatricians in Mumbai's private sector in comparison with International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC) 2009. In this cross-sectional study, 64 paediatricians from private sector filled self-administered questionnaires. Cough was reported as a symptom of childhood TB by 77.8% of respondents. 38.1% request sputum smear or culture for diagnosis and fewer (32.8%) use it for patients positive on chest radiographs and 32.8% induce sputum for those unable to produce it. Sputum negative TB suspect is always tested with X-ray or tuberculin skin test. 61.4% prescribe regimen as recommended in ISTC and all monitor progress to treatment clinically. Drug-resistance at beginning of treatment is suspected for child in contact with a drug-resistant patient (67.7%) and with prior history of antitubercular treatment (12.9%). About half of them (48%) request drug-resistance test for rifampicin in case of nonresponse after two to three months of therapy and regimen prescribed by 41.7% for multidrug-resistant TB was as per ISTC. The study highlights inappropriate diagnostic and treatment practices for managing childhood pulmonary TB among paediatricians in private sector.

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Childhood Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Cross-Sectional Study of Practices among Paediatricians in Private Sector, Mumbai

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    Carolyn Kavita Tauro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of children with tuberculosis are treated in private sector in India with no available data on management practices. The study assessed diagnostic and treatment practices related to childhood pulmonary tuberculosis among paediatricians in Mumbai’s private sector in comparison with International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC 2009. In this cross-sectional study, 64 paediatricians from private sector filled self-administered questionnaires. Cough was reported as a symptom of childhood TB by 77.8% of respondents. 38.1% request sputum smear or culture for diagnosis and fewer (32.8% use it for patients positive on chest radiographs and 32.8% induce sputum for those unable to produce it. Sputum negative TB suspect is always tested with X-ray or tuberculin skin test. 61.4% prescribe regimen as recommended in ISTC and all monitor progress to treatment clinically. Drug-resistance at beginning of treatment is suspected for child in contact with a drug-resistant patient (67.7% and with prior history of antitubercular treatment (12.9%. About half of them (48% request drug-resistance test for rifampicin in case of nonresponse after two to three months of therapy and regimen prescribed by 41.7% for multidrug-resistant TB was as per ISTC. The study highlights inappropriate diagnostic and treatment practices for managing childhood pulmonary TB among paediatricians in private sector.

  16. Vitamin D as supplementary treatment for tuberculosis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejse, Christian; Gomes, Victor F; Rabna, Paulo

    2009-01-01

    RATIONALE: Vitamin D has been shown to be involved in the host immune response toward Mycobacterium tuberculosis. OBJECTIVES: To test whether vitamin D supplementation of patients with tuberculosis (TB) improved clinical outcome and reduced mortality. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind...

  17. Consolidation in a child from tuberculosis endemic area - thinking apart from tuberculosis

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    George P Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is endemic in South East Asian regions and hence a disease commonly over diagnosed in these parts of the country. Patients presenting with chest x ray shadows and vague symptoms are often started on Anti Tuberculosis Treatment - smear negative. However caution should be administered in prescribing ATT to patients who do not improve symptomatically, even after intensive phase. Congenital abnormalities such as sequestrated lung at times can also be rare causes of abnormal skiagram chest, especially in paediatric patients. A careful systematic approach with non invasive imaging such as CECT chest will often help to clinch the diagnosis in most cases.

  18. Estimation of the contribution of private providers in tuberculosis case notification and treatment outcome in Pakistan.

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    Chughtai, A A; Qadeer, E; Khan, W; Hadi, H; Memon, I A

    2013-03-01

    To improve involvement of the private sector in the national tuberculosis (TB) programme in Pakistan various public-private mix projects were set up between 2004 and 2009. A retrospective analysis of data was made to study 6 different public-private mix models for TB control in Pakistan and estimate the contribution of the various private providers to TB case notification and treatment outcome. The number of TB cases notified through the private sector increased significantly from 77 cases in 2004 to 37,656 in 2009. Among the models, the nongovernmental organization model made the greatest contribution to case notification (58.3%), followed by the hospital-based model (18.9%). Treatment success was highest for the district-led model (94.1%) and lowest for the hospital-based model (74.2%). The private sector made an important contribution to the national data through the various public-private mix projects. Issues of sustainability and the lack of treatment supporters are discussed as reasons for lack of success of some projects.

  19. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundele, Olukunle Ayodeji; Moodley, Deshendran; Pillay, Anban W; Seebregts, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB) treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is flexible and extendable and provides new insights into the nature of and interrelationship between factors that influence TB adherence.

  20. Anti-IgE Treatment for Disorders Other Than Asthma

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    Jeffrey Stokes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin E (IgE plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many allergic diseases. Thus, IgE-mediated immunologic pathways are an attractive target for intervention in allergic diseases. Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds IgE and has been used treat allergic asthma for over a decade. Currently, omalizumab is approved for the treatment of both allergic asthma and chronic spontaneous urticaria. Since IgE plays a critical role in other allergic diseases, anti-IgE therapy has been evaluated in other allergic diseases in small clinical trials and case reports. Omalizumab has demonstrated efficacy in treating allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, physical urticarias, mast cell disorders, food allergy, and other allergic diseases. In addition, the use of omalizumab with conventional allergen immunotherapy improves both safety and effectiveness.

  1. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with low- and high-concentration isoniazid-monoresistant tuberculosis.

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    Tsai-Yu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Isoniazid (INH resistance is now the most common type of tuberculosis (TB infection resistance worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with low- and high-concentration INH-monoresistant TB. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-four patients with culture-confirmed INH-monoresistant TB during 2006 January to 2007 December were retrospectively enrolled. INH resistance was classified as either low-concentration or high-concentration resistance according to the critical concentrations of 0.2 µg/mL or 1 µg/mL of INH, respectively. The patients' clinical outcomes, treatment regimens, and treatment duration were analyzed. RESULTS: The treatment success rates between low- and high-concentration INH-resistant TB were similar (81.8% vs. 86.7%. The treatment regimens and treatment duration were similar between both groups. Only a minor percentage of the patients in both groups received 6-month treatment regimens (low vs. high concentration resistance, 9.1% vs. 13.3%; respectively, p = 0.447 The most common reason for treatment duration longer than 6 months was pyrazinamide given for less than 6 months, followed by a delay in clinical response to treatment. Multivariable analysis showed that prior tuberculosis treatment (Odds ratio, 2.82, 95% C.I., 1.02-7.77, p = 0.045 was the only independent risk factor for unsuccessful treatment outcome. CONCLUSION: Different levels of INH resistance did not affect the treatment outcomes of patients with INH-monoresistant tuberculosis. Prolonged Rifampin-containing regimens may achieve those good outcomes in patients with low- and high-concentration INH-monoresistant TB.

  2. ADAPTIF CONSERVATION (ACM MODEL IN INCREASING FAMILY SUPPORT AND COMPLIANCE TREATMENT IN PATIENT WITH PULONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN SURABAYA CITY REGION

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    Siti Nur Kholifah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB in Indonesia is still health problem and the prevalence rate is high. Discontinuing medication and lack of family support are the causalities. Numbers of strategies to overcome are seemingly not succeeded. Roles and responsibilities of family nursing are crucial to improve participation, motivation of individual, family and community in prevention, including pulmonary tuberculosis. Unfortunately, models of pulmonary tuberculosis currently unavailable. The combination of adaptation and conservation in complementarily improving family support and compliance in medication is introduced in this study. Method: This research intended to analyze Adaptive Conservation Model (ACM in extending family support and treatment compliance. Modeling steps including model analysis, expert validation, field trial, implementation and recommending the output model. Research subject involves 15 families who implement family Assistance and supervision in Medication (ASM and other 15 families with ACM. Result: The study revealed ACM is better than ASM on the case of family support and medication compliances. It supports the role of environment as influential factor on individual health belief, values and decision making. Therefore, it is advised to apply ACM in enhancing family support and compliance of pulmonary TB patients. Discussion: Social and family supports to ACM group obtained by developing interaction through communication. Family interaction necessary to improve family support to pulmonary tuberculosis patients. And social support plays as motivator to maintain compliance on medication

  3. Patient medical costs for tuberculosis treatment and impact on adherence in China: a systematic review

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    Zhang Tuohong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Charging for tuberculosis (TB treatment could reduce completion rates, particularly in the poor. We identified and synthesised studies that measure costs of TB treatment, estimates of adherence and the potential impact of charging on treatment completion in China. Methods Inclusion criteria were primary research studies, including surveys and studies using qualitative methods, conducted in mainland China. We searched MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, Science Direct, HEED, CNKI to June 2010; and web pages of relevant Chinese and international organisations. Cost estimates were extracted, transformed, and expressed in absolute values and as a percentage of household income. Results Low income patients, defined at household or district level, pay a total of US$ 149 to 724 (RMB 1241 to 5228 for medical costs for a treatment course; as a percentage of annual household income, estimates range from 42% to 119%. One national survey showed 73% of TB patients at the time of the survey had interrupted or suspended treatment, and estimates from 9 smaller more recent studies showed that the proportion of patients at the time of the survey who had run out of drugs or were not taking them ranged from 3 to 25%. Synthesis of surveys and qualitative research indicate that cost is the most cited reason for default. Conclusions Despite a policy of free drug treatment for TB in China, health services charge all income groups, and costs are high. Adherence measured in cross sectional surveys is often low, and the cumulative failure to adhere is likely to be much higher. These findings may be relevant to those concerned with the development and spread of multi-drug resistant TB. New strategies need to take this into account and ensure patient adherence.

  4. Tuberculosis Notification: Issues and Challenges

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    Manisha Nagpal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a major public health problem. An emerging menace in India is drug resistant forms of TB. In order to ensure proper TB diagnosis and case management, reduce TB transmission and address the problems of emergence of spread of Drug Resistant-TB, it is essential to have complete information of all TB cases. Therefore, Govt. of India declared Tuberculosis a notifiable disease on 7th May 2012. This paper highlights the fact that notification of TB in the absence of regulation of diagnostic practices, rational use of anti-TB medicines and availability of diagnostic and treatment facilities for drug-resistant TB will pose more problems rather than provide solutions to this problem.

  5. A human type 5 adenovirus-based tuberculosis vaccine induces robust T cell responses in humans despite preexisting anti-adenovirus immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, Fiona; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Smieja, Marek; Medina, Maria Fe; Thanthrige-Don, Niroshan; Zganiacz, Anna; Yin, Cindy; Heriazon, Armando; Damjanovic, Daniela; Puri, Laura; Hamid, Jemila; Xie, Feng; Foley, Ronan; Bramson, Jonathan; Gauldie, Jack; Xing, Zhou

    2013-10-02

    There is an urgent need to develop new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines to safely and effectively boost Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-triggered T cell immunity in humans. AdHu5Ag85A is a recombinant human type 5 adenovirus (AdHu5)-based TB vaccine with demonstrated efficacy in a number of animal species, yet it remains to be translated to human applications. In this phase 1 study, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of AdHu5Ag85A in both BCG-naïve and previously BCG-immunized healthy adults. Intramuscular immunization of AdHu5Ag85A was safe and well tolerated in both trial volunteer groups. Moreover, although AdHu5Ag85A was immunogenic in both trial volunteer groups, it much more potently boosted polyfunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell immunity in previously BCG-vaccinated volunteers. Furthermore, despite prevalent preexisting anti-AdHu5 humoral immunity in most of the trial volunteers, we found little evidence that such preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity significantly dampened the potency of AdHu5Ag85A vaccine. This study supports further clinical investigations of the AdHu5Ag85A vaccine for human applications. It also suggests that the widely perceived negative effect of preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity may not be universally applied to all AdHu5-based vaccines against different types of human pathogens.

  6. Impact of underlying diabetes and presence of lung cavities on treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

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    Nakamura, A; Hagiwara, E; Hamai, J; Taguri, M; Terauchi, Y

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effects of diabetes and the presence of lung cavities on treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical records of all consecutive patients admitted to the Kanagawa Cardiovascular and Respiratory Centre with the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. The study outcomes examined were time to sputum culture conversion and percentage of patients with sputum culture conversion by the time 2 months of treatment, and these outcomes were compared between patients with and without diabetes. Of the 260 patients enrolled in the study, 69 were diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus, while the remaining 191 did not have diabetes. The percentage of patients with cavities was higher in the patients with diabetes (71.0%) than in those without (45.5%; P = 0.0003). The time to sputum culture conversion was significantly longer in the patients with diabetes than in those without (P = 0.0005), and the percentage of patients with a positive sputum culture at 2 months was higher in the patients with diabetes (43.5%) than in those without (18.8%; P = 0.0001). Multivariate analyses revealed that the presence/absence of lung cavities was a more important determinant of treatment outcomes than the presence/absence of diabetes. The presence of lung cavities was found to be a more important determinant of the treatment outcomes than that of diabetes per se in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  7. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibition combined with isoniazid treatment of rabbits with pulmonary tuberculosis reduces macrophage activation and lung pathology.

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    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Yang, Guibin; Koo, Mi-Sun; Peixoto, Blas; Fallows, Dorothy; Zeldis, Jerome B; Muller, George; Kaplan, Gilla

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Even after successful microbiological cure of TB, many patients are left with residual pulmonary damage that can lead to chronic respiratory impairment and greater risk of additional TB episodes due to reinfection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α and several other markers of inflammation, together with expression of matrix metalloproteinases, have been associated with increased risk of pulmonary fibrosis, tissue damage, and poor treatment outcomes in TB patients. In this study, we used a rabbit model of pulmonary TB to evaluate the impact of adjunctive immune modulation, using a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor that dampens the innate immune response, on the outcome of treatment with the antibiotic isoniazid. Our data show that cotreatment of M. tuberculosis infected rabbits with the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor CC-3052 plus isoniazid significantly reduced the extent of immune pathogenesis, compared with antibiotic alone, as determined by histologic analysis of infected tissues and the expression of genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis, and wound healing in the lungs. Combined treatment with an antibiotic and CC-3052 not only lessened disease but also improved bacterial clearance from the lungs. These findings support the potential for adjunctive immune modulation to improve the treatment of pulmonary TB and reduce the risk of chronic respiratory impairment. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High levels of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in new and treatment-failure patients from the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme in an urban metropolis (Mumbai in Western India

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    Nicol Mark

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background India, China and Russia account for more than 62% of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB globally. Within India, locations like urban metropolitan Mumbai with its burgeoning population and high incidence of TB are suspected to be a focus for MDRTB. However apart from sporadic surveys at watched sites in the country, there has been no systematic attempt by the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP of India to determine the extent of MDRTB in Mumbai that could feed into national estimates. Drug susceptibility testing (DST is not routinely performed as a part of programme policy and public health laboratory infrastructure, is limited and poorly equipped to cope with large scale testing. Methods From April 2004 to January 2007 we determined the extent of drug resistance in 724 {493 newly diagnosed, previously untreated and 231 first line treatment failures (sputum-smear positive at the fifth month after commencement of therapy} cases of pulmonary tuberculosis drawn from the RNTCP in four suboptimally performing municipal wards of Mumbai. The observations were obtained using a modified radiorespirometric Buddemeyer assay and validated by the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, a supranational reference laboratory. Data was analyzed utilizing SPSS 10.0 and Epi Info 2002. Results This study undertaken for the first time in RNTCP outpatients in Mumbai reveals a high proportion of MDRTB strains in both previously untreated (24% and treatment-failure cases (41%. Amongst new cases, resistance to 3 or 4 drug combinations (amplified drug resistance including isoniazid (H and rifampicin (R, was greater (20% than resistance to H and R alone (4% at any point in time during the study. The trend for monoresistance was similar in both groups remaining highest to H and lowest to R. External quality control revealed good agreement for H and R resistance (k = 0.77 and 0.76 respectively. Conclusion

  9. High levels of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in new and treatment-failure patients from the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme in an urban metropolis (Mumbai) in Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Desiree T B; Mistry, Nerges F; Vira, Tina S; Dholakia, Yatin; Hoffner, Sven; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Nicol, Mark; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2009-06-29

    India, China and Russia account for more than 62% of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) globally. Within India, locations like urban metropolitan Mumbai with its burgeoning population and high incidence of TB are suspected to be a focus for MDRTB. However apart from sporadic surveys at watched sites in the country, there has been no systematic attempt by the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) of India to determine the extent of MDRTB in Mumbai that could feed into national estimates. Drug susceptibi