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Sample records for anti microbial activity

  1. Anti-microbial activities of sulfonamides using disc diffusion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saba; Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar

    2012-10-01

    Sulfonamides, being the member of the oldest anti-microbial group of compounds possess wide anti-microbial activities and are effective against pathogenic strains of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. They are widely used in the treatment of various infectious diseases e.g. malaria, urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections etc. Based on their effectiveness against most of the bacteria, two novel sulfonamides (N-(2-methoxy phenyl)-4-methylbenzenesulfonamide and N-ethyl-4-methyl-N-(3-methyl phenyl)benzenesulfonamide) were synthesized. The compounds were characterized by FT-IR and elemental analyzer. Their anti-microbial activity was assessed and observed against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria using disc diffusion method. They showed good anti-microbial activities.

  2. Anti-microbial activity of Leucas clarkei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Narayan Das

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial potency of the whole plant of Leucas clarkei have been studied using the soxhlet extracts of petroleum ether, benzene, chloroform and ethanol extract against Gram-positive bacteria (two strains, Gram-negative bacteria (two strains and two fungi strains by disc diffusion method. Micro-dilution methods, for the determination of minimal inhibition concentration (MIC and the minimal bactericidal and fungicidal concentration (MBC, MFC. The ethanol extract at a concentration of 30 to 60 µg/disc and chloroform extract at a concentration 60 µg/disc showed significant activity against all the bacteria and fungus. All the extracts of L. clarkei have got moderate action but chloroform and ethanol extracts have got significant activity against Candida krusei, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. This may be due to phytochemicals such as phytosterols, alkaloid, tannins, phenolic compounds and flavonoids present in the extracts.

  3. ANTI-MICROBIAL AND ANTI-AMOEBIC ACTIVITY SOME AZOMETHINES - POTENTIAL TEXTILE DYESTUFFS

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    DJORDJEVIC Dragan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new synthesized three azomethine derivatives applied in dyeing textiles checking the anti-microbial properties of active components, at the same time [1-3]. The emphasis is thrown on the verification of anti-microbial properties that are important for obtaining textile with significantly improved performance. All compounds were characterized and evaluated for their anti-microbial activity against 7 pathogenic bacteria, 1 parasitic protozoan and 1 fungus. It estimated anti-bacterial activity in vitro against the following microorganisms Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, Streptococcus faecalis, Enterobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, and Candida albicans. The anti-amoebic activity in vitro was evaluated against the HM1: IMSS strain of Entamoeba histolytica and the results were compared with the standard drug, metronidazole. The synthesized azomethines, showed very good substantivity for wool fibers, gave fine coloring, with good degree of exhaustion after dyeing. The combination of extended synthetic analogues of natural molecules leads to discovery of chemical entities which might be excellent anti-microbial and anti-amoebic compounds as depicted in our results. Being highly the effects this compound can be explored in future as an option for decreasing pathogenic potential of infecting from different sources. Azomethines containing hydrazone (dyestuff 1 and phenylhydrazone (dyestuff 2 as moiety show average yield and moderate inhibition activity while azomethines containing thiosemicarbazone (dyestuff 3 as moiety show higher yield and greater inhibition activity towards gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria as well as a fungus.

  4. Secapin, a bee venom peptide, exhibits anti-fibrinolytic, anti-elastolytic, and anti-microbial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Choi, Yong Soo; Jin, Byung Rae

    2016-10-01

    Bee venom contains a variety of peptide constituents that have various biological, toxicological, and pharmacological actions. However, the biological actions of secapin, a venom peptide in bee venom, remain largely unknown. Here, we provide the evidence that Asiatic honeybee (Apis cerana) secapin (AcSecapin-1) exhibits anti-fibrinolytic, anti-elastolytic, and anti-microbial activities. The recombinant mature AcSecapin-1 peptide was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells. AcSecapin-1 functions as a serine protease inhibitor-like peptide that has inhibitory effects against plasmin, elastases, microbial serine proteases, trypsin, and chymotrypsin. Consistent with these functions, AcSecapin-1 inhibited the plasmin-mediated degradation of fibrin to fibrin degradation products, thus indicating the role of AcSecapin-1 as an anti-fibrinolytic agent. AcSecapin-1 also inhibited both human neutrophil and porcine pancreatic elastases. Furthermore, AcSecapin-1 bound to bacterial and fungal surfaces and exhibited anti-microbial activity against fungi and gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the bee venom peptide secapin has multifunctional roles as an anti-fibrinolytic agent during fibrinolysis and an anti-microbial agent in the innate immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro evaluation of cytotoxic, anti-proliferative, anti-oxidant, apoptotic, and anti-microbial activities of Cladonia pocillum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoz, M; Coskun, Z M; Acikgoz, B; Karalti, I; Cobanoglu, G; Cesal, C

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-proliferative, apoptotic, cytotoxic, and anti-oxidant effects of extracts from the lichen Cladonia pocillumon human breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and to characterize the anti-microbial features.  MCF-7 cells were treated with methanolic C. pocillum extract for 24h. The cytotoxicity of the extract was tested with MTT. Moreover, its anti-proliferative effects were examined with immunocytochemical method. Apoptosis and biochemical parameters were detected in MCF-7. The methanol and chloroform extracts of the lichen were tested for anti-microbial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans using the disc diffusion method and calculation of minimal inhibitory concentrations. Although BrdU incorporation was not observed in MCF-7 cells treated with methanol extract at a concentration above 0.2 mg/mL, a significant decrease was observed int he percentage of PCNA immunoreactive cells in groups treated with 0.2, 0.4, 06, and 0.8 mg/mL methanol extracts of C.pocillum (49±6.3, 44±5.2, 23±2.5, 0, respectively) compared to that of control (85±4.5). The percentage of apoptotic cells significantly increased in groups treated with 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mg/mL extracts of the C.pocillum (54±3.5, 76±2.6, 77±1.8, 82±4.2, respectively) compared with that of control group (3.9±1.5).The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of the methanol extract against MCF-7 cells was 0.802 mg/mL .Although the chloroform extract showed more effective anti-microbial activity overall, the methanol extract showed higher anti-fungal activity. Collectively, the results of our study indicate that C.pocillum extracts have strong anti-microbial and apoptotic effects. This lichen therefore shows potential for development as a natural anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, and apoptotic agent.

  6. Anti-allergic and anti-microbial activities of some Thai crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supinya Tewtrakul

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen Thai crops including banana, okra, jackfruit, germinated rice, rambutan, durian, jampadah, huasa potato,tamarind, coconut, mango, fan palm fruit and dioscorea tuber were tested for anti-allergic effect using RBL-2H3 cells andanti-microbial activity. These 13 crops, some of which included different parts, e.g. skin, flesh, and seed, were extracted withfour solvents separately [(95% ethanol (EtOH, 50% EtOH, water (W and hot water (HW], respectively, to obtain 112extracts. Among these extracts, mango seed in 50% EtOH possessed the highest anti-allergic activity against antigen-inducedb-hexosaminidase release as a marker of degranulation in RBL-2H3 cells with an IC50 value of 7.5±0.8 mg/ml, followed bybanana (W, IC50 = 13.5±2.4 mg/ml, okra (W, IC50 = 13.6±3.1 mg/ml, jampadah skin (HW, IC50 = 13.8±3.9 mg/ml, tamarindseed coat (HW, IC50 = 14.2±3.1 mg/ml, jampadah flesh (W, IC50 = 14.6±3.1 mg/ml; whereas other crops possessed IC50values from 21.5->100 mg/ml. Moreover, the plants showing high anti-allergic effects were also possessed marked antibacterialactivity. Rambutan peel, mango peel, mango seed and tamarind seed coat exhibited appropriate anti-bacterialactivity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC values ranging from 250-2,000 mg/ml, but did not show any effect towards Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. This study indicates that these Thaicrops may have potential as functional foods and neutraceuticals for treatment of allergy, allergy-related diseases and somebacterial infections.

  7. Formosins A-F: Diterpenoids with Anti-microbial Activities from Excoecaria formosana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing-Dong; Zhou, Bin; Dong, Lei; Wu, Yan; Yue, Jian-Min

    2016-02-01

    Three new halimane-type diterpenoids formosins A-C (1-3), and three clerodane-type diterpenoids formosins D-F (4-6), were isolated from the twigs of Excoecaria formosana. Their structures were assigned on the basis of spectroscopic data analysis. Compounds 1 and 4 showed moderate anti-microbial activities against Bacillus subtilis (MIC = 50 and 50 μg/mL, respectively). Compound 6 exhibited moderate anti-microbial activities against two strains of Helicobacter pylori (Hp-SS1 and ATCC 43504) with MIC values of 50 and 50 μg/mL, respectively.

  8. Natural and synthetic cathelicidin peptides with anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic, infected wounds typically contain multiple genera of bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, many of which are strong biofilm formers. Bacterial biofilms are thought to be a direct impediment to wound healing. New therapies that focus on a biofilm approach may improve the recovery and healing rate for infected wounds. In this study, cathelicidins and related short, synthetic peptides were tested for their anti-microbial effectiveness as well as their ability to inhibit the ability of S. aureus to form biofilms. Results The helical human cathelicidin LL-37 was tested against S. aureus, and was found to exhibit effective anti-microbial, anti-attachment as well as anti-biofilm activity at concentrations in the low μg/ml range. The effect of peptide chirality and associated protease-resistance was explored through the use of an all-D amino acid peptide, D-LL-37, and in turn compared to scrambled LL-37. Helical cathelicidins have been identified in other animals such as the Chinese cobra, Naja atra (NA-CATH). We previously identified an 11-residue imperfectly repeated pattern (ATRA motif) within the sequence of NA-CATH. A series of short peptides (ATRA-1, -2, -1A), as well as a synthetic peptide, NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1, were designed to explore the significance of the conserved residues within the ATRA motif for anti-microbial activity. The CD spectrum of NA-CATH and NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1 revealed the structural properties of these peptides and suggested that helicity may factor into their anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activities. Conclusions The NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1 peptide inhibits the production of biofilm by S. aureus in the presence of salt, exhibiting anti-biofilm activity at lower peptide concentrations than NA-CATH, LL-37 and D-LL-37; and demonstrates low cytoxicity against host cells but does not affect bacterial attachment. The peptides utilized in this anti-biofilm approach may provide templates for a new group of anti-microbials and

  9. Imidazolium tagged acridines: Synthesis, characterization and applications in DNA binding and anti-microbial activities

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    Raju, Gembali; Vishwanath, S.; Prasad, Archana; Patel, Basant K.; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2016-03-01

    New water soluble 4,5-bis imidazolium tagged acridines have been synthesized and structurally characterized by multinuclear NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The DNA binding and anti-microbial activities of these acridine derivatives were investigated by fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism studies.

  10. Evaluation of anti-microbial activities of ZnO, citric acid and a mixture of both against Propionibacterium acnes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, J Y; Park, S N

    2016-12-01

    In this study, anti-microbial activities of ZnO of three different particle sizes of citric acid (CA) and of mixtures of ZnO and CA were confirmed against Propionibacterium acnes. ZnO with the smallest particle size showed relatively high anti-microbial activity by disc diffusion assay and broth macrodilution assay. The mixtures of ZnO and CA also showed relatively high anti-microbial activity when the particle size of ZnO was the smallest. Furthermore, anti-microbial activities of ZnO, CA and the mixtures of ZnO and CA were compared through the checkerboard assay. The results indicated that a 1 : 1 ratio of ZnO and CA resulted in the highest anti-microbial activity. The substances were confirmed to have synergic anti-microbial effects. With the time-kill curve assay, the mixture of ZnO-containing CA reduced the surviving microbial content the most after 24 h. The results of our study suggest that ZnO may not only be an anti-microbial ingredient for the prevention of and treatment of acne. The results of our study suggest that ZnO may be an anti-microbial ingredient for the prevention of and treatment of acne when mixed with CA. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. Anti-oxidative and Anti-microbial Activities of Purified MPN-1-1 from Persicaria nepalensis (Meisn.) Miyabe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Woong-Suk; Yang, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Yong; Jang, Seong-Ho; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Hwnag, Cher-Won

    2017-01-01

    Persicaria is a genus of flowering plants generally used for traditional medicine and nutritional supplements in tropical and subtropical East Asian countries. Previous studies have shown that Persicaria extracts alleviate lipid peroxidation, hypertension, and inflammation. We investigated the anti-oxidative and anti-microbial effects of ethanol extracts of Persicaria nepalensis (Meisn.) Miyabe, and isolated and identified an active compound, MPN-1-1 from the ethanol extracts. Anti-oxidative values, as indicated by the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay, were enhanced by treatment with Persicaria nepalensis (Meisn.) Miyabe ethanol extracts, and bacterial growth was inhibited. The active compound (MPN-1-1), which was further isolated and purified from a Persicaria nepalensis (Meisn.) Miyabe ethanol extract by medium pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC), also had strong anti-oxidative and anti-microbial activity. 1H-NMR spectroscopy identified MPN-1-1 as a 1-ethenyl-4,8-dimethoxy-9H-pyrido(3,4-β) indole compound, which is an alkaloid. Our results provide evidence that Persicaria nepalensis (Meisn.) Miyabe extract has strong physiological activity without any toxic effects, and furthermore, MPN-1-1 can be potentially utilized as a natural dietary supplement as well as an anti-oxidant. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Anti-fibrinolytic and anti-microbial activities of a serine protease inhibitor from honeybee (Apis cerana) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Choi, Yong Soo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia, Jingming; Jin, Byung Rae

    2017-10-01

    Bee venom contains a variety of peptide constituents, including low-molecular-weight protease inhibitors. While the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6 containing a trypsin inhibitor-like cysteine-rich domain was identified from honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom, no anti-fibrinolytic or anti-microbial roles for this inhibitor have been elucidated. In this study, we identified an Asiatic honeybee (A. cerana) venom serine protease inhibitor (AcVSPI) that was shown to act as a microbial serine protease inhibitor and plasmin inhibitor. AcVSPI was found to consist of a trypsin inhibitor-like domain that displays ten cysteine residues. Interestingly, the AcVSPI peptide sequence exhibited high similarity to the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6, which suggests that AcVSPI is an allergen Api m 6-like peptide. Recombinant AcVSPI was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, and it demonstrated inhibitory activity against trypsin, but not chymotrypsin. Additionally, AcVSPI has inhibitory effects against plasmin and microbial serine proteases; however, it does not have any detectable inhibitory effects on thrombin or elastase. Consistent with these inhibitory effects, AcVSPI inhibited the plasmin-mediated degradation of fibrin to fibrin degradation products. AcVSPI also bound to bacterial and fungal surfaces and exhibited anti-microbial activity against fungi as well as gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. These findings demonstrate the anti-fibrinolytic and anti-microbial roles of AcVSPI as a serine protease inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis, anti-microbial activity and molecular docking studies on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    inflammatory,6 anti-coagulant7 and as inhibitors of lipoxygenase8 and cyclooxygenase.9. Click chemistry10–12 has emerged as a reliable approach for the stereo selective synthesis of 1,2,3- triazole with desired properties. Cycloaddition of azide to alkyne in the presence of copper sulphate and sodium ascorbate to give 1 ...

  14. Toxicity of essential oil of Satureja khuzistanica: in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefzadi, Morteza; Riahi-Madvar, Ali; Hadian, Javad; Rezaee, Fatemeh; Rafiee, Roya; Biniaz, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    In nature, essential oils play an important role in the protection of the plants by exerting anti-bacterial, -viral, -fungal, -oxidative, -genotoxic, and free radical scavenging properties, as well as in some cases acting as insecticides. Several Satureja species are used in traditional medicine due to recognized therapeutic properties, namely anti-microbial and cytotoxic activities. The purpose of the present work was to determine the biologic activity of the essential oil of S. khuzistanica Jamzad (Lamiaceae) against four human cancer cell lines, as well as its inhibitory effects against a wide array (i.e. n = 11) of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The essential oil was isolated by hydro-distillation and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Carvacrol (92.87%) and limonene (1.2%) were found to be the main components of the isolated oil. Anti-microbial activity of the essential oil was assessed using a disc diffusion method; an MTT cytotoxicity assay was employed to test effects of the oil on each cancer cell line. The oil exhibited considerable anti-microbial activity against the majority of the tested bacteria and fungi. The test oil also significantly reduced cell viability of Vero, SW480, MCF7, and JET 3 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with the IC50 values calculated for each cell type being, respectively, 31.2, 62.5, 125, and 125 μg/ml. Based on the findings, it is concluded that the essential oil of S. khuzistanica and its major constituents have a potential for further use in anti-bacterial and anti-cancer applications, pending far more extensive testing of toxicities in normal (i.e. primary) cells.

  15. Phytochemical and anti-microbial activity of methanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial activity of leaf extracts of Moringa oleifera Lam, Azadirachta indica, Aspilia Africana (Pers) C. D. Adams against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus saphrophyticus were determined using agar diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ...

  16. Phytochemical and anti-microbial activity of methanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial activity of leaf extracts of Moringa oleifera Lam, Azadirachta indica, Aspilia africana (Pers) C. D. Adams against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus saphrophyticus were determined using agar diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ...

  17. Anti-microbial Activity of Urine after Ingestion of Cranberry: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Lean Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the anti-microbial activity of urine specimens after the ingestion of a commercial cranberry preparation. Twenty subjects without urinary infection, off antibiotics and all supplements or vitamins were recruited. The study was conducted in two phases: in phase 1, subjects collected the first morning urine prior to ingesting 900 mg of cranberry and then at 2, 4 and 6 h. In phase 2, subjects collected urine on 2 consecutive days: on Day 1 no cranberry was ingested (control specimens, on Day 2, cranberry was ingested. The pH of all urine specimens were adjusted to the same pH as that of the first morning urine specimen. Aliquots of each specimen were independently inoculated with Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Candida albicans. After incubation, colony forming units/ml (CFU ml−1 in the control specimen was compared with CFU ml−1 in specimens collected 2, 4 and 6 h later. Specimens showing ≥50% reduction in CFU ml−1 were considered as having ‘activity’ against the strains tested. In phase 1, 7/20 (35% subjects had anti-microbial activity against E. coli, 13/20 (65% against K. pneumoniae and 9/20 (45% against C. albicans in specimens collected 2–6 h after ingestion of cranberry. In phase 2, 6/9 (67% of the subjects had activity against K. pneumoniae. This pilot study demonstrates weak anti-microbial activity in urine specimens after ingestion of a single dose of commercial cranberry. Anti-microbial activity was noted only against K. pneumoniae 2–6 h after ingestion of the cranberry preparation.

  18. Anti-microbial Activity of Urine after Ingestion of Cranberry: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Lean; Owens, John; Thrupp, Laurie; Baron, Sheryl; Shanbrom, Edward; Cesario, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We explore the anti-microbial activity of urine specimens after the ingestion of a commercial cranberry preparation. Twenty subjects without urinary infection, off antibiotics and all supplements or vitamins were recruited. The study was conducted in two phases: in phase 1, subjects collected the first morning urine prior to ingesting 900 mg of cranberry and then at 2, 4 and 6 h. In phase 2, subjects collected urine on 2 consecutive days: on Day 1 no cranberry was ingested (control specimens), on Day 2, cranberry was ingested. The pH of all urine specimens were adjusted to the same pH as that of the first morning urine specimen. Aliquots of each specimen were independently inoculated with Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Candida albicans. After incubation, colony forming units/ml (CFU ml−1) in the control specimen was compared with CFU ml−1 in specimens collected 2, 4 and 6 h later. Specimens showing ≥50% reduction in CFU ml−1 were considered as having ‘activity’ against the strains tested. In phase 1, 7/20 (35%) subjects had anti-microbial activity against E. coli, 13/20 (65%) against K. pneumoniae and 9/20 (45%) against C. albicans in specimens collected 2–6 h after ingestion of cranberry. In phase 2, 6/9 (67%) of the subjects had activity against K. pneumoniae. This pilot study demonstrates weak anti-microbial activity in urine specimens after ingestion of a single dose of commercial cranberry. Anti-microbial activity was noted only against K. pneumoniae 2–6 h after ingestion of the cranberry preparation. PMID:18955308

  19. Anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities of plant extracts used against hematological tumors in traditional medicine of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Areej M; Haddadin, Randa N; Aldouri, Nedhal A; Alabbassi, Reem; Mashallah, Sundus; Mohammad, Mohammad; Bustanji, Yasser

    2013-02-13

    Mercurialis annua L., Bongardia chrysogonum L., and Viscum cruciatum Sieb have been traditionally used by local herbalists in Jordan for the treatment of hematopoietic neoplasms. To determine the anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial potentials of the three extracts against two of the most common hematopoietic malignancies in the Jordanian populations; Burkitt's lymphoma and Multiple myeloma. The anti-cancer activity was tested against the two cell lines (BJAB Burkitt's lymphoma and U266 multiple myeloma) using the MTT and trypan blue assays. The agar dilution assay was used to study the anti-microbial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, anaerobic bacteria and yeast. The pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL) -1β, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured in the pretreated cell lines using ELISA assay to determine the anti-inflammatory activity of Viscum cruciatum Sieb against the two cell lines. The results show no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three extracts comprising cell lines from hematological malignancies, but Viscum cruciatum Sieb showed a selective anticancer activity against BJAB cells, with IC(50) value of 14.21μg/ml. The antimicrobial effect was only noticed with Viscum cruciatum extract by inhibiting Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Propionibacterium acne, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa at MIC of 1.25, 1.25, 0.625 and anti-microbial potentials. They also had an anti-inflammatory effect. These observations raise the prospects of using Viscum cruciatum Sieb for treatment of diseases associated with some bacterial and fungal infections, for imbalanced cytokine production and for enhancing cancer and other immunotherapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The preliminary assessment of anti-microbial activity of HPLC separated components of Kirkia wilmsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigayo, K; Mojapelo, P E L; Bessong, P; Gumbo, J R

    2014-01-01

    Most communities in developing countries rely on traditional medicines for the treatment of diseases. In South Africa, the Limpopo province, within the Lebowakgomo district, uses tuberous roots of Kirkia wilmsii, after infusion in water for the treatment of a wide range of diseases by Sotho communities. The main objective of the study was to assess the anti-microbial activity of separated aqueous components of the Kirkia wilmsii tuberous roots. The clear aqueous extracts that were obtained after a 0.45 µm membrane filtration (Millipore Millex-HV Hydrophillic PVDF filter), were then injected into a preparative high performance liquid chromatography instrument in which pure components, as shown by peaks, were collected and evaluated for anti-microbial activity against a range of microorganisms. The eight separated components were obtained, out of which four components showed anti-microbial activity (AMA). The freeze dried components were re-dissolved in deionised water and then evaluated for AMA against Vibrio cholerae, Shigella dysenteriae, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Salmonella typhi Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Enterobacter aerogenes. Component one exhibited antimicrobial activity against Shigella dysenteriae, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Salmonella typhi, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of 3.445 mg/ml. Component five was only active against Proteus mirabilis with a MIC of 0.08 mg/ml. Component 7, was active against Shigella dysenteriae, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with a MIC of 0.365 mg/ml against both Shigella dysenteriae and Staphylococcus aureus and 0.091 mg/ml against Escherichia coli. Component 8, was active against Shigella, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Salmonella, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli with a MIC of 155 mg/ml. Only four out of eight aqueous extracts showed AMA against both gram negative and positive bacteria and

  1. Anti-Mycobacterium activity of microbial peptides in a silkworm infection model with Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Akiho; Uchida, Ryuji; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kimura, Ken-Ichi; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    An in vivo-mimic silkworm infection model with Mycobacterium smegmatis was established. When silkworms were raised at 37 °C following an injection of M. smegmatis cells (1.25 × 10 7 CFU larva -1  g -1 ) into the silkworm hemolymph, they died within 48 h. Under these conditions, four microbial peptides with anti-M. smegmatis activity, lariatin A, calpinactam, lysocin E and propeptin, exerted therapeutic effects in a dose-dependent manner, and these are also clinically used agents that are active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These results indicate that the silkworm infection model with M. smegmatis is practically useful for the screening of therapeutically effective anti-M. tuberculosis antibiotics.

  2. Silver nanoparticles: green synthesis using Phoenix dactylifera fruit extract, characterization, and anti-oxidant and anti-microbial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Anas Ejaz; Satardekar, Kshitij Vasant; Khan, Rummana Rehman; Tarte, Nanda Amit; Barve, Siddhivinayak Satyasandha

    2018-03-01

    Hydro-alcoholic (2:8 v/v) extract of the pulp of Phoenix dactylifera fruit pulp obtained using Soxhlet extraction (70 °C, 6 h) was found to contain alkaloids, sterols, tannins, flavonoids, cardiac glycosides, proteins, and carbohydrates. An aqueous solution (20% v/v) of the extract led to the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from 0.01 M AgNO3 solution as confirmed by the surface plasmon resonance at 445 nm determined using UV-visible spectroscopy after 24 h. The synthesized AgNPs were found to be mostly spherical and complexed with phytochemicals from the extract. The size of AgNPs ranged from 12.2-140.2 nm with mean diameter of 47.0 nm as characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The elemental composition of the AgNPs complexed with the phytochemicals was found to be 80.49% silver (Ag), 15.21% carbon (C), and 4.30% oxygen (O) on a weight basis by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Using the α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, an anti-oxidant activity of 89.15% for 1 µg L-1 ultrasonically homogenized ethanolic solution of complexed AgNPs was obtained (equivalent to 0.20 mg mL-1 gallic acid solution), while methanolic solution of plant extract possessed an EC50 value of 3.45% (v/v) (equivalent to 0.11 mg mL-1 gallic acid solution). The plant-nanosilver broth was also found to possess effective anti-microbial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 as assessed by the disc diffusion assay. However, the plant extract showed negligible anti-microbial activity.

  3. Regioselective synthesis of 3-benzyl substituted pyrimidino chromen-2-ones and evaluation of anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmadi, Narender Reddy; Atmakur, Krishnaiah; Bingi, Chiranjeevi; Godumagadda, Narender Reddy; Chityal, Ganesh Kumar; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu

    2014-01-15

    Regioselective synthesis of a number of highly functionalized 3-benzylpyrimidino chromen-2-ones (4) were accomplished in a one pot three component reaction in acetic acid and determined their anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activities. Compounds 4o and 4p showed an excellent anti-microbial activity against Micrococcus luteus MTCC 2470 at a par with standard control (Ciprofloxacin) and exhibited best activity against Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96 and Bacillus subtilis MTCC 121. Further, compounds 4h, 4i, 4m, 4n and 4q showed promising activity against Micrococcus luteus MTCC 2470, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96 and Bacillus subtilis MTCC 121. Whereas, compounds 4m showed very promising biofilm inhibition activity against Staphylococcus aureus MLS 16 MTCC 2940 and 4o, 4p showed very potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96 at a par with Ciprofloxacin used as standard control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of anti-oxidant and anti-microbial activity of various essential oils in fresh chicken sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Heena; Mendiratta, S K; Agarwal, Ravi Kant; Kumar, Sudheer; Soni, Arvind

    2017-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate antimicrobial and antioxidant effect of essential oils on the quality of fresh (raw, ready to cook) chicken sausages. Several preliminary trials were carried out to optimize the level of four essential oils viz., clove oil, holybasil oil, thyme oil and cassia oil and these essential oils were incorporated at 0.25, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.125%, respectively in fresh chicken sausages. Quality evaluation and detailed storage stability studies were carried out for fresh chicken sausages for 20 days at refrigeration temperature (4 ± 1 °C). Refrigerated storage studies revealed that TBARS of control was significantly higher than treatment products whereas, total phenolics and DPPH activity was significantly lower in control. Among treatments, clove oil products had significantly lower TBARS but higher total phenolic content and DPPH activity followed by cassia oil, thyme oil and holybasil oil products. Microbial count of essential oil incorporated products were significantly lower than control and remained well below the permissible limit of fresh meat products (log 10 7 cfu/g). Cassia oil products were observed with better anti-microbial characteristics than clove oil products at 0.25% level of incorporation, whereas, thyme oil products were better than holy basil oil products at 0.125% level. Storage studies revealed that clove oil (0.25%), holy basil oil (0.125%), cassia oil (0.25%) and thyme oil (0.125%) incorporated aerobically packaged and refrigerated fresh chicken sausages had approx. 4-5, 2-3, 5-6 and 2-3 days longer shelf life than control, respectively.

  5. Anti-diarrhoeal and anti-microbial activity of Flos populi (male inflorescence of Populus tomentosa Carrière) aqueous extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qianqian; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yubo; Guo, Shijin; Li, Feng; Wang, Yanping; Zhou, Chunfeng

    2013-07-09

    Flos populi (male inflorescence of Populus tomentosa Carrière) has been traditionally used in East Asian countries for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, strengthening the spleen and stomach, anti-rheumatic, anti-tumor and anti-diarrhoeal. To evaluate the in vivo or in vitro anti-diarrhoeal and anti-microbial activity of Flos populi aqueous extract. Acute toxicity of Flos populi aqueous extract (FPAE) was investigated. Castor oil-induced diarrhoea method was used to evaluate the anti-diarrhoeal activity, inhibition of defecation and diarrhoea were determined in mice, effects on castor oil-induced enteropooling, intestinal transit and intestinal fluid secretion in rats or mice. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of FPAE against strains of three clinical bacterial isolates and one reference strain were used to test the anti-microbial activity. The FPAE reduced the frequency of diarrhoea episodes and decreased the propulsion of charcoal meal through the gastrointestinal tract in a dose dependent manner. FPAE (100-500 mg/kg, p.o.) produced dose-dependent and significant (Panti-microbial effects to three species of bacteria in anti-microbial test. The findings of this study indicate that FPAE possesses anti-diarrhoeal property in rats and mice and confirm the ethnomedicinal use of Flos Populi as a valuable natural remedy for the treatment, management and/or control of diarrhoea. These results may support the fact that this plant is traditionally used to cure diarrhoea. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The anti-microbial activity of titania-nickel ferrite composite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, S.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2005-12-01

    A novel approach to synthesize a new generation of composite nanoparticles consisting of a photocatalytic shell of anatase-titania and a magnetic core of nickel ferrite has been adopted combining reverse micelle and chemical hydrolysis techniques. Titania is an effective anti-microbial agent that can be directly sprayed on infected areas of the human body or environment. Unfortunately, titania is an electrical insulator and is difficult to extract from the sprayed surface after treatment. The titania photocatalytic shell provides good antimicrobial capability that renders the bacteria inactive and removes the organic pollutants, while the nickel ferrite magnetic core enables controlled delivery of composite nanoparticles through the application of a small magnetic field, encouraging their application as removable anti-microbial photocatalyst nanoparticles.

  7. A novel dual-functioning ruthenium(II)-arene complex of an anti-microbial ciprofloxacin derivative - Anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Ziga; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Twamley, Brendan; Fitzgerald Hughes, Deirdre; Sadler, Peter J; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-07-01

    7-(4-(Decanoyl)piperazin-1-yl)-ciprofloxacin, CipA, (1) which is an analogue of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, and its ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)(CipA-H)Cl], (2) have been synthesised and the x-ray crystal structures of 1·1.3H2O·0.6CH3OH and 2·CH3OH·0.5H2O determined. The complex adopts a typical pseudo-octahedral 'piano-stool' geometry, with Ru(II) π-bonded to the p-cymene ring and σ-bonded to a chloride and two oxygen atoms of the chelated fluoroquinolone ligand. The complex is highly cytotoxic in the low μM range and is as potent as the clinical drug cisplatin against the human cancer cell lines A2780, A549, HCT116, and PC3. It is also highly cytotoxic against cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant cell lines suggesting a different mechanism of action. The complex also retained low μM cytotoxicity against the human colon cancer cell line HCT116p53 in which the tumour suppressor p53 had been knocked out, suggesting that the potent anti-proliferative properties associated with this complex are independent of the status of p53 (in contrast to cisplatin). The complex also retained moderate anti-bacterial activity in two Escherichia coli, a laboratory strain and a clinical isolate resistant to first, second and third generation β-lactam antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Silver nanoparticles directly formed on natural macroporous matrix and their anti-microbial activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Fang [Research Institute of Materials Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Hou Chao [Research Institute of Materials Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wu Shuizhu [Research Institute of Materials Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu Xinxing [Research Institute of Materials Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tong Zhen [Research Institute of Materials Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yu Shuning [Guangdong Detection Center for Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China)

    2007-02-07

    In this study, silver nanoparticles were formed on a natural macroporous matrix, the stem of rice-paper plant, by reducing Ag{sup +} in aqueous solution through in situ processing without using any other stabilizers. The pores of the matrix, with their size of about 100 {mu}m, were thought to act as reaction compartments for the nucleation and growth of silver nanoparticles, and the control of nucleation of silver crystal during the reduction reaction was found to be important to the successful formation of nanosized silver particles onto the matrix. The diameter and amount of resultant silver particles can be controlled by changing the reaction conditions. Under optimized conditions, the content of silver particles in the matrix can reach as high as 1.8 wt% with the particle diameters being kept below 100 nm. The anti-microbial activities in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the silver nanoparticle composites against Escherichia coli and Candida albicans were assayed in agar gel, and the results show that MIC values for silver nanoparticle composites are 14.1 mg(Ag) l{sup -1} and 28.1 mg(Ag) l{sup -1} for Escherichia coli and Candida albicans respectively, which are comparable to the value for colloidal nanosilver.

  9. Silver nanoparticles directly formed on natural macroporous matrix and their anti-microbial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang; Hou, Chao; Wu, Shuizhu; Liu, Xinxing; Tong, Zhen; Yu, Shuning

    2007-02-01

    In this study, silver nanoparticles were formed on a natural macroporous matrix, the stem of rice-paper plant, by reducing Ag+ in aqueous solution through in situ processing without using any other stabilizers. The pores of the matrix, with their size of about 100 µm, were thought to act as reaction compartments for the nucleation and growth of silver nanoparticles, and the control of nucleation of silver crystal during the reduction reaction was found to be important to the successful formation of nanosized silver particles onto the matrix. The diameter and amount of resultant silver particles can be controlled by changing the reaction conditions. Under optimized conditions, the content of silver particles in the matrix can reach as high as 1.8 wt% with the particle diameters being kept below 100 nm. The anti-microbial activities in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the silver nanoparticle composites against Escherichia coli and Candida albicans were assayed in agar gel, and the results show that MIC values for silver nanoparticle composites are 14.1 mg(Ag) l-1 and 28.1 mg(Ag) l-1 for Escherichia coli and Candida albicans respectively, which are comparable to the value for colloidal nanosilver.

  10. Study on chemical composition, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities of extracts from Chinese pear fruit (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Junying; Gao, Wenyuan; Wang, Haiyang

    2012-10-01

    Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd. belongs to the genus Pyrus, a member of Rosaceae family. It is a routine edible fruit, and also used as a folk medicine to treat cough, eliminate constipation, and relieve alcoholism. In order to clarify the active compounds of P. bretschneideri, the phytochemical study were performed. Five compounds were isolated and identified as 2β,19α-dihydroxy ursolic acid, quercitrin, dibutyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate and α-amyrin. Additionally, we investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of the fractions of P. bretschneideri partitioned with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, respectively. In the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema test, the EtOAc fraction showed the strongest inhibition of edema formation 0.5-5 h after edema induction, followed by n-butanol. EtOAc also displayed potent anti-inflammatory activity against xylene-induced ear edema (22.03% and 43.69%, respectively) and acetic acid-induced extravasation of Evan's blue dye (39.58% and 49.92%, respectively) at the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg. While, the anti-microbial results showed that ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions exhibited strong activity against the bacteria strains. Moreover, 2β,19α-dihydroxy ursolic acid, α-amyrin and quercitrin could significantly inhibit the ear edema induced by xylene at the dose of 20 mg/kg, and exhibited moderate anti-microbial activities against the bacteria strains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficient synthesis, structural characterization and anti-microbial activity of chiral aryl boronate esters of 1,2-O-isopropylidene-α-D-xylofuranose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Rajiv; Rami Reddy, E; Kiran Kumar, Ch; Sridhar, B; Pranay Kumar, K; Srinivasa Rao, M

    2011-07-01

    A simple and efficient synthetic approach toward a series of chiral aryl boronate esters, starting from D-xylose, as anti-microbial agents, is described herein. Minimum inhibitory concentration and zone of inhibition revealed that these derivatives exhibit potent anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. Herein, we report the first anti-microbial activity of this class of compounds. All products have been characterized by NMR ((1)H, (13)C and (11)B), IR, elemental and mass spectral study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis and anti-microbial activity evaluation of some new 1-benzoyl-isothiosemicarbazides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumitallo, A; Cardia, M C; Distinto, S; DeLogu, A; Maccioni, E

    2004-12-01

    The synthesis of some aroylisothiosemicarbazides was accomplished and their biological activity against bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria was investigated. Different synthetic pathways were followed according to the kind of substituents that were introduced on both the aroyl ring and the sulfur atom. Anti-bacterial activity was measured against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae and S. faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhi, while antifungal activity was evaluated against C. albicans. Two species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RV and Mycobacterium avium ATCC19421, were employed to evaluate antimycobacterial activity.

  13. Study of Phytochemical, Anti-Microbial, Anti-Oxidant, Phytotoxic, and Immunomodulatory Activity Properties of Bauhinia variegata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Bhandari

    2017-04-01

    In the phytochemical screening, we observed the presence of different phytochemicals like steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, reducing sugars and glycosides. In case of Antimicrobial assay, the plant was found to be most effective against B.cereus with the highest zone of inhibition (ZOI of 12mm and against Rhizopus with ZOI of 11mm. During the antioxidant assay in comparison to Ascorbic acid; at highest concentration, the scavenging activity shown by the plant Bauhinia variegata are 43.38% as compared to ascorbic acid 89.25%. In the Immunomodulatory assay at the highest concentration i.e. 250 µg/ml, the plant showed 75.1% effect, which showed that the plant has potential anti-inflammatory potential. In phytotoxicity assay, Bauhinia variegata showed 20% phytotoxicity. Bauhinia variegata has thus been proven to be an important candidate to be used as an antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, phytotoxic and anticancer agent. Separation of pure compounds with bioassay guided extraction, spectrometric analysis and subsequent cytotoxicity assay of the pure bioactive compounds from Bauhinia variegate is highly recommended as crude extract itself showed promising phytotoxicity and other pharmaceutical potential.

  14. Four new carbazole alkaloids from Murraya koenigii that display anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalli, Yedukondalu; Khajuria, Vidushi; Gupta, Shilpa; Arora, Palak; Riyaz-Ul-Hassan, Syed; Ahmed, Zabeer; Ali, Asif

    2016-03-28

    In our present study, four new, designated as murrayakonine A-D (), along with 18 known carbazole alkaloids were isolated from CHCl3 : MeOH (1 : 1) crude extracts of the stems and leaves of Murraya koenigii (Linn.) Spreng. The structures of the all isolated compounds were characterized by analysis of HR-ESI-MS and NMR (1D and 2D spectroscopy) results, and comparison of their data with the literature data. For the first time, all the isolates were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activities, using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, against the key inflammatory mediators TNF-α and IL-6. The new compound murrayakonine A (), O-methylmurrayamine A () and mukolidine () were proven to be the most active, efficiently inhibiting TNF-α and IL-6 release in a dose-dependent manner and showing decreased LPS induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in human PBMCs. Furthermore, all the isolates were screened for their antimicrobial potential, and the compounds girinimbine () (IC50 3.4 μM) and 1-hydroxy-7-methoxy-8-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)-9H-carbazole-3-carbaldehyde () (IC50 10.9 μM) displayed potent inhibitory effects against Bacillus cereus. Furthermore, compounds murrayamine J () (IC50 11.7 μM) and koenimbine () (IC50 17.0 μM) were active against Staphylococcus aureus. However, none of the compounds were found to be active against Escherichia coli or Candida albicans.

  15. Anti-microbial and anti-biofilm compounds from Indonesian medicinal plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pratiwi, Sylvia U.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms causing elevated resistance to both most anti-microbial drugs and the host defense systems, which often results in persistent and difficult-to-treat infections. The discovery of anti-infective agents which are active against planktonic and biofilm microorganisms are therefore

  16. In-vitro bio-fabrication of silver nanoparticle using Adhathoda vasica leaf extract and its anti-microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeruddin, G. M.; Prasad, N. R.; Prasad, S. R.; Garadkar, K. M.; Nayak, Arpan Kumar

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that on treating the metallic salt solution with some plant extracts, a rapid reduction occurs leading to the formation of highly stable metal nanoparticles. Extracellular synthesis of metal nanoparticles using extracts of plants like Azadirachta indica (Neem), and Zingiber officinale (Ginger) has been reported to be successfully carried out. In this study we have developed a novel method to synthesize silver nanoparticles by mixing silver salt solution with leaf extract of Adhathoda vasica (Adulsa) without using any surfactant or external energy. By this method physiologically stable, bio-compatible Ag nanoparticles were formed which could be used for a variety of applications such as targeted drug delivery which ensures enhanced therapeutic efficacy and minimal side effects. With this method rapid synthesis of nanoparticles was observed to occur; i.e. reaction time was 1-2 h as compared to 2-4 days required by microorganisms. These nanoparticles were analyzed by various characterization techniques to reveal their morphology, chemical composition, and antimicrobial activity. TEM image of these NPs indicated the formation of spherical, non-uniform, poly-dispersed nanoparticles. A detailed study of anti-microbial activity of nanoparticles was carried out.

  17. Rational design of anti-microbial peptides with enhanced activity and low cytotoxicity based on the structure of the arginine/histidine-rich peptide, chensinin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, D; Sun, Y; Wang, C; Ma, L; Li, J; Wang, X

    2012-09-01

    To understand the structure-activity relationship of chensinin-1, a anti-microbial peptide (AMP) with an unusual structure, and to develop novel AMPs as therapeutic agents. A series of chensinin-1 analogues were designed and synthesized by one to three replacement of glycines with leucines at the hydrophilic face of chensinin-1 or rearrangement of some of the residues in its sequence. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the analogues adopted α-helical-type conformations in 50% trifluoroethanol/water but adopted β-strand-type conformations in 30 mmol l(-1) sodium dodecyl sulphate. The anti-microbial activities of the peptides against Gram-positive bacteria increased 5- to 30-fold, and these increases paralleled the increases in the peptides' hydrophobicities. Their haemolytic activities also increased. Amphipathicities had little influence on the bactericidal activity of chensinin-1. All peptides caused leakage of calcein entrapped in negatively charged liposomes although with different efficiencies. The peptides did not induce leakage of calcein from uncharged liposomes. Peptide adopted an aperiodic structure can improve the anti-microbial potency by increasing peptide hydrophobicity. Its target is bacteria plasma membrane. Chensinin-1 can act as a new lead molecule for the study of AMPs with atypical structures. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. In vitro anti-microbial activity of extracts from the callus cultures of some Nigella species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landa, P.; Maršík, Petr; Vaněk, Tomáš; Rada, V.; Kokoška, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2006), s. 285-288 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA525/02/0257; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04OC926.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Nigella * callus culture * antimicrobial activity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.213, year: 2006

  19. Anti-microbial activity and composition of manuka and portobello honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Monika; Coyle, Shirley; Warnock, Mary; Gow, Iain; Fyfe, Lorna

    2013-08-01

    Recently renewed interest in the therapeutic properties of honey has led to the search for new antimicrobial honeys. This study was undertaken to assess the antimicrobial activity and composition of a locally produced Portobello honey (PBH) on three bacteria known to infect wounds. Manuka honey (MH) was used for comparative purposes. Broth culture and agar disc diffusion assays were used to investigate the antimicrobial properties of honey. The honeys were tested at four concentrations: 75%, 50%, 10% and 1% (v/v) and compared with an untreated control. The composition of honey was determined by measuring: polyphenol content by Folin Ciocalteau method, antioxidant capacity by ferric ion reducing power assay, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) by catalase test, pH and sugar content by pH strips and refractometer, respectively. Both honeys at 75% and 50% inhibited the majority of the three bacteria tested. 10% PBH exhibited antimicrobial activity to the lesser extent than 10% MH. The difference was very significant (p ≤ 0.001). Both honeys were acidic with pH 4, and both produced H2 O2 . The sugar content of PBH was higher than MH, but the difference was not significant. The MH had significantly higher levels of the polyphenols and antioxidant activity than PBH. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Immunomodulatory effects of anti-microbial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otvos, Laszlo

    2016-09-01

    Anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) were originally thought to exert protecting actions against bacterial infection by disintegrating bacterial membranes. Upon identification of internal bacterial targets, the view changed and moved toward inhibition of prokaryote-specific biochemical processes. However, the level of none of these activities can explain the robust efficacy of some of these peptides in animal models of systemic and cutaneous infections. A rapidly growing panel of reports suggests that AMPs, now called host-defense peptides (HDPs), act through activating the immune system of the host. This includes recruitment and activation of macrophages and mast cells, inducing chemokine production and altering NF-κB signaling processes. As a result, both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses are elevated together with activation of innate and adaptive immunity mechanisms, wound healing, and apoptosis. HDPs sterilize the systemic circulation and local injury sites significantly more efficiently than pure single-endpoint in vitro microbiological or biochemical data would suggest and actively aid recovering from tissue damage after or even without bacterial infections. However, the multiple and, often opposing, immunomodulatory functions of HDPs require exceptional care in therapeutic considerations.

  1. Anti-microbial and anti-biofilm compounds from Indonesian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiwi, Sylvia U.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms causing elevated resistance to both most anti-microbial drugs and the host defense systems, which often results in persistent and difficult-to-treat infections. The discovery of anti-infective agents which are active against planktonic and biofilm microorganisms are therefore urgently required to deal with these biofilm-mediated infections. Plants are a rich source of new molecules with pharmacological properties for the development of new drugs. Indonesia is one of the cou...

  2. Phytochemical screening and study of anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of extracts from stem wood of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxburgh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Raj Pant

    2017-06-01

    Results: The results of study revealed that P. marsupium is a source of various phytoconstituents such as alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, tannins, proteins, carbohydrates, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids and terpinoids. Both the acetone & IPA extract and ethanol extract of stem wood of Pterocarpus marsupium, exhibited the dose dependent antioxidant activity. Acetone & IPA extract showed antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria, while the ethanolic extract was found to possess anti-diabetic activity. The anti-diabetic activity of the extract was found to be time and dose dependent. Similarly, the acetone & IPA extract was found to have anti-inflammatory activity, which was also time and dose dependent. Further, the ethanolic extract showed analgesic activity, which was dose dependent. The ethanolic extract was found to be non-toxic. Conclusions: Thus this study laid sufficient background for the further research on extracts from stem wood of Pterocarpus marsupium for identification, subsequent purification and isolation of compounds having anti-bacterial, anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. [J Complement Med Res 2017; 6(2.000: 170-176

  3. Anti-microbial Activity of Tulsi {Ocimum Sanctum (Linn.)} Extract on a Periodontal Pathogen in Human Dental Plaque: An Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswar, Pranati; Devaraj, C G; Agarwal, Payal

    2016-03-01

    Tulsi is a popular healing herb in Ayurvedic medicine. It is widely used in the treatment of several systemic diseases because of its anti-microbial property. However, studies documenting the effect of Tulsi on oral disease causing organisms are rare. Hence, an attempt was made to determine the effect of Tulsi on a periodontal microorganism in human dental plaque. To determine if Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) has an anti-microbial activity (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and zone of inhibition) against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human dental plaque and to compare the antimicrobial activity of Ocimum sanctum(Linn.) extract with 0.2% chlorhexidine as the positive control and dimethyl sulfoxide as the negative control. A lab based invitro experimental study design was adopted. Ethanolic extract of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) was prepared by the cold extraction method. The extract was diluted with an inert solvent, dimethyl sulfoxide, to obtain ten different concentrations (1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%, 6%, 7%, 8%, 9%, 10%) of extract. Plaque sample was collected from 05 subjects diagnosed with periodontal disease. Isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from plaque samples was done using Tryptic Soy Serum Bacitracin Vancomycin agar (TSBV) medium. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was done based on cultural, microscopic, biochemical characterization and multiple drug resistance patterns. Anti-microbial activity of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) extract was tested by agar well-diffusion method against 0.2% chlorhexidine as a positive control and dimethyl sulfoxide as a negative control. The zone of inhibition was measured in millimeters using Vernier callipers. At the 6% w/v concentration of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) extract, a zone of inhibition of 22 mm was obtained. This was the widest zone of inhibition observed among all the 10 different concentrations tested. The zone of inhibition for positive control was 25mm and no zone of inhibition was observed

  4. Glucocorticoid augments lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the IκBζ-dependent genes encoding the anti-microbial glycoproteins lipocalin 2 and pentraxin 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Soh; Akira, Shizuo; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the most potent inducers of inflammation, activates the transcription factor NF-κB to induce expression of both proinflammatory mediators and anti-microbial glycoproteins such as lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) and pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in macrophages. Glucocorticoids are known to inhibit LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines via glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transrepression of NF-κB, whereas their effect on induction of anti-microbial effectors has remained to be elucidated. Here we show that the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) strongly enhances LPS-induced transcription of Lcn2 and Ptx3, although Dex by itself fails to trigger their transcription. In macrophages deficient in IκBζ (an inducible coactivator of NF-κB), Lcn2 and Ptx3 are not activated by LPS either alone or in combination with Dex. Association of GR as well as Brg1 (a subunit of the chromatin remodelling Swi/Snf complex) with a functional glucocorticoid response element in Lcn2 requires both the costimulation with LPS and the presence of IκBζ. Although Ptx3 does not contain the element, LPS induces recruitment of Dex-liganded GR to NF-κB-binding sites in regulatory regions of Ptx3, an event that does not occur in IκBζ-deficient macrophages. Thus glucocorticoids likely regulate infection-induced inflammation by increasing anti-microbial effectors in an IκBζ-dependent manner, while repressing proinflammatory genes. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of anti-microbial activity of spore powder of Ganoderma lucidum on clinical isolates of Prevotella intermedia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath N Nayak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed at evaluating the anti-microbial activity of spore powder of Ganoderma lucidum on Prevotella intermedia isolated from subgingival plaque from chronic periodontitis patients. Settings and Design: Written informed consent was obtained from each subject enrolled in the study. The Institutional Ethics Committee granted the ethical clearance for the study. Materials and Methods: This study included 20 patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were collected using sterile curettes from the deepest sites of periodontal pockets. The collected samples were then transported in 1 mL of reduced transport fluid. The organisms were cultured and confirmed. These organisms were then used for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC procedure. Statistical Analysis: Mean of the MIC value obtained was calculated. Results: Thirteen out of the 20 clinical samples were tested that showed sensitivity at various concentrations. Five samples showed sensitivity at all concentrations. Twelve samples showed sensitivity at 8 mcg/ml. Eleven samples showed sensitivity at 4 mcg/ml, 8 samples showed sensitivity at 2 mcg/ml, and 5 samples showed sensitivity even at 1 mcg/ml. Mean MIC value of G. lucidum spore powder for P. intermedia obtained was 3.62 mcg/ml. Conclusion: G. lucidum with its multipotential bioactivity could be used as an anti-microbial, in conjunction with conventional therapy in periodontal disease.

  6. Evaluation of anti-microbial activity of spore powder of Ganoderma lucidum on clinical isolates of Prevotella intermedia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ranganath N; Dixitraj, P T; Nayak, Aarati; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the anti-microbial activity of spore powder of Ganoderma lucidum on Prevotella intermedia isolated from subgingival plaque from chronic periodontitis patients. Written informed consent was obtained from each subject enrolled in the study. The Institutional Ethics Committee granted the ethical clearance for the study. This study included 20 patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were collected using sterile curettes from the deepest sites of periodontal pockets. The collected samples were then transported in 1 mL of reduced transport fluid. The organisms were cultured and confirmed. These organisms were then used for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) procedure. Mean of the MIC value obtained was calculated. Thirteen out of the 20 clinical samples were tested that showed sensitivity at various concentrations. Five samples showed sensitivity at all concentrations. Twelve samples showed sensitivity at 8 mcg/ml. Eleven samples showed sensitivity at 4 mcg/ml, 8 samples showed sensitivity at 2 mcg/ml, and 5 samples showed sensitivity even at 1 mcg/ml. Mean MIC value of G. lucidum spore powder for P. intermedia obtained was 3.62 mcg/ml. G. lucidum with its multipotential bioactivity could be used as an anti-microbial, in conjunction with conventional therapy in periodontal disease.

  7. Anti-microbial screening and cytotoxic activity of aerial part of Thymelaea hirsuta L. essential oil growing in south-west Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felhi, Samir; Chaaibia, Mouna; Bakari, Sana; Mansour, Riadh Ben; Békir, Ahmed; Gharsallah, Néji; Kadri, Adel

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of essential oil isolated by the hydro-distillation of aerial parts of Thymelaea hirsuta. The antimicrobial activity of the oil was evaluated against eight bacterial and three fungal pathogenic strains. The results revealed that the essential oil exhibited a moderate-to-potent anti-microbial activity against all the microorganisms tested. Gram-positive bacteria were noted to be more sensitive to the oil than gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation against HeLa cell lines showed that the essential oil exhibited moderate cytotoxicity on human tumor cells, with a high IC 50 value of 175μg/mL. To the author's knowledge, this is the first study reporting on the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of Thymelaea hirsuta essential oil. Overall, the results indicate that the T. hirsuta essential oil has a number of attractive properties that might open new promising opportunities for the control or prevention of a wide range of microbial infections and cancers and can facilitate the use of essential oils as natural preservatives against spoilage microorganisms in food systems.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 2-aminoimidazole/carbamate hybrid anti-biofilm and anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Steven A; Lindsey, Erick A; Whitehead, Daniel C; Mullikin, Trey; Melander, Christian

    2011-02-15

    The successful marriage of structural features from our 2-aminoimidazole and menthyl carbamate classes of anti-biofilm agents has resulted in the development of a novel hybrid scaffold of biofilm modulators. The compounds were evaluated against a panel of four bacterial strains for anti-biofilm and anti-microbial activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative Study of Microbial Activity and Chemical Properties of Soil by Implementing Anti-erosion Measure Vertical Mulching with Organic Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergana Slavova Kuncheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Water soil erosion is a phenomenon in which soil particles are separated transported and translocated by the action of rain water. Removal of topsoil by water flow leads to a decrease of humus in the soil, deterioration of soil structure, compaction, and reduction of microbial activity.Developed and tested have been number of methods and technologies for soil protection from the effects of water erosion. Such technology is vertical mulching, and straw or compost applied as mulching material.This work is a study of the changes that occur in some soil chemical properties and soil microbiological activity, as a result in the implementation of anti-erosion measure vertical mulching with different mulching materials for growing corn and wheat grain on carbonate chernozem, on sloping agricultural lands.

  10. Cathelicidin-like helminth defence molecules (HDMs: absence of cytotoxic, anti-microbial and anti-protozoan activities imply a specific adaptation to immune modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Thivierge

    Full Text Available Host defence peptides (HDPs are expressed throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. They have multifunctional roles in the defence against infectious agents of mammals, possessing both bactericidal and immune-modulatory activities. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by helminth parasites (helminth defence molecules; HDMs that exhibit similar structural and biochemical characteristics to the HDPs. Here, we have analyzed the functional activities of four HDMs derived from Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola hepatica and compared them to human, mouse, bovine and sheep HDPs. Unlike the mammalian HDPs the helminth-derived HDMs show no antimicrobial activity and are non-cytotoxic to mammalian cells (macrophages and red blood cells. However, both the mammalian- and helminth-derived peptides suppress the activation of macrophages by microbial stimuli and alter the response of B cells to cytokine stimulation. Therefore, we hypothesise that HDMs represent a novel family of HDPs that evolved to regulate the immune responses of their mammalian hosts by retaining potent immune modulatory properties without causing deleterious cytotoxic effects.

  11. IQ-motif peptides as novel anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Denise T F; Lundy, Fionnuala T; Timson, David J

    2013-04-01

    The IQ-motif is an amphipathic, often positively charged, α-helical, calmodulin binding sequence found in a number of eukaryote signalling, transport and cytoskeletal proteins. They share common biophysical characteristics with established, cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides, such as the human cathelicidin LL-37. Therefore, we tested eight peptides encoding the sequences of IQ-motifs derived from the human cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins IQGAP2 and IQGAP3. Some of these peptides were able to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) comparable to LL-37. In addition some IQ-motifs had activity against the fungus Candida albicans. This antimicrobial activity is combined with low haemolytic activity (comparable to, or lower than, that of LL-37). Those IQ-motifs with anti-microbial activity tended to be able to bind to lipopolysaccharide. Some of these were also able to permeabilise the cell membranes of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. These results demonstrate that IQ-motifs are viable lead sequences for the identification and optimisation of novel anti-microbial peptides. Thus, further investigation of the anti-microbial properties of this diverse group of sequences is merited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Phthalimide Derivatives as in Vitro Anti-Microbial, Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Lamie, P.F.; Philoppes, J.N.; El-Gendy, A.O.; Rárová, L. (Lucie); Grúz, J. (Jiří)

    2015-01-01

    Sixteen new phthalimide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro anti-microbial, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The cytotoxicity for all synthesized compounds was also determined in cancer cell lines and in normal human cells. None of the target derivatives had any cytotoxic activity. (ZE)-2-[4-(1-Hydrazono-ethyl) phenyl]isoindoline-1,3-dione (12) showed remarkable anti-microbial activity. Its activity against Bacillus subtilis was 133%, 106% and 88.8% wh...

  13. Phyto-assisted synthesis of bio-functionalised silver nanoparticles and their potential anti-oxidant, anti-microbial and wound healing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Yugal Kishore; Biswas, Kunal; Panda, Sujogya Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Jaya; De, Debashis; Jayabalan, Rasu; Bastia, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanta, Tapan Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Bio- synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was made by using the aqueous leaf extract of Ardisia solanacea. Rapid formation of AgNPs was observed from silver nitrate upon treatment with the aqueous extract of A. solanacea leaf. The formation and stability of the AgNPs in the colloidal solution were monitored by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The mean particle diameter of AgNPs was calculated from the DLS with an average size ∼4 nm and ∼65 nm. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the presence of alcohols, aldehydes, flavonoids, phenols and nitro compounds in the leaf which act as the stabilizing agent. Antimicrobial activity of the synthesized AgNPs was performed using agar well diffusion and broth dilution method against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Further, robust anti-oxidative potential was evaluated by DPPH assay. The highest antimicrobial activity of synthesized AgNPs was found against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (28.2 ± 0.52 mm) whereas moderate activity was found against Bacillus subtilis (16.1 ± 0.76), Candida kruseii (13.0 ± 1.0), and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (12.6 ± 1.52). Moreover, the potential wound healing activity was observed against the BJ-5Ta normal fibroblast cell line. Current research revealed that A. solanacea was found to be a suitable source for the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of ceftaroline and other anti-infective agents against microbial pathogens recovered from the surgical intensive care patient population: a prevalence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Charles E; Krepel, Candace J; Leaper, David; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Mackey, Tami-Lea; Graham, Mary Beth; Lee, Cheong; Rossi, Peter J; Brown, Kellie R; Lewis, Brian D; Seabrook, Gary R

    2014-12-01

    Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin agent with excellent activity against methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Critically ill surgical patients are susceptible to infection, often by multi-drug-resistant pathogens. The activity of ceftaroline against such pathogens has not been described. Three hundred thirty-five consecutive microbial isolates were collected from surgical wounds or abscesses, respiratory, urine, and blood cultures from patients in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) of a major tertiary medical center. Using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standard methodology and published breakpoints, all aerobic, facultative anaerobic isolates were tested against ceftaroline and selected comparative antimicrobial agents. All staphylococcal isolates were susceptible to ceftaroline at a breakpoint of ≤1.0 mcg/mL. In addition, ceftaroline exhibited excellent activity against all streptococcal clinical isolates and non-ESBL-producing strains of Enterobacteriaceae (93.5%) recovered from SICU patients. Ceftaroline was inactive against ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and selective gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. At present, ceftaroline is the only cephalosporin agent that is active against community and healthcare-associated MRSA. Further studies are needed to validate the benefit of this novel broad-spectrum anti-infective agent for the treatment of susceptible serious infections in the SICU patient population.

  15. Study of phytochemical, anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, and anti-cancer properties of Allium wallichii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Jaya; Muhammad, BushraTaj; Thapa, Pratiksha; Shrestha, Bhupal Govinda

    2017-02-08

    There is growing interest in the use of plants for the treatment and prevention of cancer. Medicinal plants are currently being evaluated as source of promising anticancer agents. In this paper, we have investigated the anticancer potential of plant Allium wallichii, a plant native to Nepal and growing at elevations of 2300-4800 m. This is the first study of its kind for the plant mentioned. The dried plant was extracted in aqueous ethanol. Phytochemical screening, anti-microbial assay, anti-oxidant assay, cytotoxicity assay and the flow-cytometric analysis were done for analyzing different phytochemicals present, anti-microbial activity, anti-oxidant activity and anti-cancer properties of Allium wallichii. We observed the presence of steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, reducing sugars and glycosides in the plant extract and the plant showed moderate anti-microbial and anti-oxidant activity. The IC 50 values of Allium wallichii in different cancer cell lines are 69.69 μg/ml for Prostate cancer (PC3) cell line, 55.29 μg/ml for Breast Cancer (MCF-7) cell line and 46.51 μg/ml for cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line as compared to Doxorubicin (0.85 μg/ml). The cell viability assay using FACS showed that the IC 50 value of Allium wallichii for Burkitt's lymphoma (B-Lymphoma) cell line was 3.817 ± 1.99 mg/ml. Allium wallichii can be an important candidate to be used as an anticancer agent. Separation of pure compounds with bioassay guided extraction, spectrometric analysis and subsequent cytotoxicity assay of the pure bioactive compounds from Allium wallichii is highly recommended as the crude extract itself showed promising cytotoxicity.

  16. Anti-microbial screening of endophytic fungi from Hypericum perforatum Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Ying, Chen; Tang, Yifei

    2014-09-01

    Anti-microbial properties of 21 endophytic fungal strains from Hypericum perforatum Linn. were evaluated against three human pathogens, Staphyloccocus aureus, Escherichia coli and Rhodotorula glutinis, and two phytopathogens, Rhizoctonia cerealis and Pyricularia grisea. The results indicated that the ethyl acetate extracts of endophytic fermentation broth had stronger anti-microbial activities than their fermentation broth. And the inhibitory effect of the endophytic extracts on human pathogens was better than those on phytopathogens. Among these endophytic fungi, strains GYLQ-10, GYLQ-24 and GYLQ-22 respectively showed the strongest activities against S. aureu, E. coli, R. glutinis. GYLQ-14 and GYLQ-22 exhibited the most pronounced effect on P. Grisea while both GYLQ-06 and GYLQ-08 had the strongest anti-microbial activities against R. cerealis. Till now, this study is the first report on the isolation of endophytic fungi from H. perforatum Linn. and their anti-microbial evaluation.

  17. Comparative roles of free fatty acids with reactive nitrogen intermediates and reactive oxygen intermediates in expression of the anti-microbial activity of macrophages against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaki, T; Tomioka, H; Shimizu, T; Dekio, S; Sato, K

    2000-01-01

    We assessed the role of free fatty acids (FFA) in the expression of the activity of macrophages against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in relation to the roles of two major anti-microbial effectors, reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis residing inside macrophages was accelerated by treatments of macrophages with either quinacrine (phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor), arachidonyl trifuloromethylketone (type IV cytosolic PLA2 inhibitor), NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), and superoxide dismutase plus catalase (ROI scavengers). In addition, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages produced and/or secreted these effectors sequentially in the order ROI (0–3 h), FFA (0–48 h), and RNI (3 to at least 72 h). Notably, membranous FFA (arachidonic acid) of macrophages translocated to M. tuberculosis residing in the phagosomes of macrophages in phagocytic ability-and PLA2-dependent fashions during cultivation after M. tuberculosis infection. FFA, RNI and H2O2-mediated halogenation system (H2O2-halogenation system) displayed strong activity against M. tuberculosis in cell-free systems, while ROI alone exerted no such effects. Combinations of ‘FFA + RNI’ and ‘RNI + H2O2-halogenation system’ exhibited synergistic and additive effects against M. tuberculosis, respectively, while ‘FFA + H2O2-halogenation system’ had an antagonistic effect. Moreover, a sequential attack of FFA followed by RNI exerted synergistic activity against M. tuberculosis. Since M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages showed simultaneous production of RNI with FFA secretion for relatively long periods (approx. 45 h) and prolonged RNI production was seen thereafter, RNI in combination with FFA appear to play critical roles in the manifestation of the activity of macrophages against M. tuberculosis. PMID:10931146

  18. Nanostructured surfaces for anti-biofouling/anti-microbial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2009-05-01

    Recent nanotechnology revolutions have cast increased challenges to biotechnology including bio-adhesion of cells. Surface topography and chemistry tailored by the nanotechnology exert significant effects on such applications so that it is necessary to understand how cells migrate and adhere on three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures. However, the effects of the surface topography and chemistry on cell adhesions have not been studied systematically and interactively yet mostly due to the inability to create well-controlled nanostructures over a relatively large surface area. In this paper, we report on the bio-adhesions of varying cell types on well-ordered (post and grate patterns), dense-array (230 nm in pattern periodicity), and sharp-tip (less than 10 nm in tip radius) nanostructures with varying three-dimensionalities (50- 500 nm in structural height). Significantly lower cell proliferation and smaller cell size were measured on tall nanostructures. On a grate pattern, significant cell elongation and alignment along the grate pattern were observed. On tall nanostructures, it was shown that cells were levitated by sharp tips and easily peeled off, suggesting that cell adherence to the tall and sharp-tip nanostructures was relatively weak. The control of cell growth and adherence by the nanoscale surface topographies can benefit the micro- and nanotechnogies-based materials, devices, and systems, such as for anti-biofouling and anti-microbial surfaces. The obtained knowledge by this investigation will also be useful to deal with engineering problems associated with the contact with biological substances such as biomaterials and biosensors.

  19. Anti-Microbial Activity and Spectro-Chemical Investigation of Ink Extracts of Sepiella inermis (Van Hasselt 1835

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasal VASANTHARAJA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The crude petroleum ether and methanol ink extracts of Sepiella inermis were tested for their antimicrobial activity against human pathogenic fungi and bacteria by disc diffusion method. Spectral analysis was carried out by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, FT-IR, Raman IR and GC-MS. Of the two solvent extracts, only methanol extract was active and no activity was detected in petroleum ether extract. The human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans and bacterium Proteus vulgaris were found to be highly sensitive, with an inhibition zone of 20 and 19 mm respectively. GC-MS of methanol ink extract revealed sixteen compounds belonging to the derivatives of dihydroxy indole-2-carboxylic acid and dihydroxyindole. These investigations proved that methanol ink extract of Sepiella inermis possess significant antimicrobial property against both fungus and gram –ve bacteria. Since ink of sepia is available abundantly as a waste material, studies focused on isolation and characterization of bioactive substances pave the way for new antimicrobial compounds.

  20. Synthesis of coumarin-theophylline hybrids as a new class of anti-tubercular and anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangasuli, Sumitra N; Hosamani, Kallappa M; Devarajegowda, Hirihalli C; Kurjogi, Mahantesh M; Joshi, Shrinivas D

    2018-02-25

    A series of novel coumarin-theophylline hybrids were synthesized and examined for their anti-tubercular activity in vitro against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H 37 Rv, anti-microbial activity in vitro against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative bacterias (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi) as well as fungi (Candida albicans). The compound (3a) has shown excellent anti-tubercular activity with MIC of 0.12 μg/mL. Electron donating compounds (3a, 3f) have displayed significant anti-microbial activity. The compounds have also been precisely elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Molecular docking study has been performed against 4DQU enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed good binding interactions and is in agreement with the in vitro results. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. On the Functional Overlap between Complement and Anti-Microbial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Jana; Hobkirk, James; Mohamed, Fatima; Browning, Michael J; Stover, Cordula M

    2014-01-01

    Intriguingly, activated complement and anti-microbial peptides share certain functionalities; lytic, phagocytic, and chemo-attractant activities and each may, in addition, exert cell instructive roles. Each has been shown to have distinct LPS detoxifying activity and may play a role in the development of endotoxin tolerance. In search of the origin of complement, a functional homolog of complement C3 involved in opsonization has been identified in horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs possess anti-microbial peptides able to bind to acyl chains or phosphate groups/saccharides of endotoxin, LPS. Complement activity as a whole is detectable in marine invertebrates. These are also a source of anti-microbial peptides with potential pharmaceutical applicability. Investigating the locality for the production of complement pathway proteins and their role in modulating cellular immune responses are emerging fields. The significance of local synthesis of complement components is becoming clearer from in vivo studies of parenchymatous disease involving specifically generated, complement-deficient mouse lines. Complement C3 is a central component of complement activation. Its provision by cells of the myeloid lineage varies. Their effector functions in turn are increased in the presence of anti-microbial peptides. This may point to a potentiating range of activities, which should serve the maintenance of health but may also cause disease. Because of the therapeutic implications, this review will consider closely studies dealing with complement activation and anti-microbial peptide activity in acute inflammation (e.g., dialysis-related peritonitis, appendicitis, and ischemia).

  2. Anti-microbial and anti-oxidant activities of Illicium verum, Crataegus oxyacantha ssp monogyna and Allium cepa red and white varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmalek, Yamina; Yahia, Ouahiba Ait; Belkebir, Aicha; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-01-01

    Illicium verum (badiane or star anise), Crataegus oxyacantha ssp monogyna (hawthorn) and Allium cepa (onion), have traditionnally been used as medicinal plants in Algeria. This study showed that the outer layer of onion is rich in flavonols with contents of 103 ± 7.90 µg/g DW (red variety) and 17.3 ± 0.69 µg/gDW (white variety). We also determined flavonols contents of 14.3 ± 0.21 µg/g 1.65 ± 0.61 µg/g for Crataegus oxyacantha ssp monogyna leaves and berries and 2.37 ± 0.10 µg/g for Illicium verum. Quantitative analysis of anthocyanins showed highest content in Crataegus oxyacantha ssp monogyna berries (5.11 ± 0.266 mg/g), while, inner and outer layers of white onion had the lowest contents with 0.045 ± 0.003mg/g and 0.077 ± 0.001 mg/g respectively.   Flavonols extracts presented high antioxidant activity as compared with anthocyanins and standards antioxidants (ascorbic acid and quercetin). Allium cepa and Crataegus oxyacantha ssp monogyna exhibited the most effective antimicrobial activity.

  3. Graph Theoretical Analysis, In Silico Modeling, Synthesis, Anti-Microbial and Anti-TB Evaluation of Novel Quinoxaline Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Govindaraj; Selvam, Theivendren Panneer; Alagarsamy, Veerachamy; Kunjiappan, Selvaraj; Joshi, Shrinivas D; Indhumathy, Murugan; Kumar, Pandurangan Dinesh

    2017-10-24

    Background We designed to synthesize a number of 2-(2-(substituted benzylidene) hydrazinyl)-N-(4-((3-(phenyl imino)-3,4-dihydro quinoxalin-2(1 H)-ylidene)amino) phenyl) acetamide S1-S13 with the hope to obtain more active and less toxic anti-microbial and anti-TB agents. Methods A series of novel quinoxaline Schiff bases S1-S13 were synthesized from o-phenylenediamine and oxalic acid by a multistep synthesis. In present work, we are introducing graph theoretical analysis to identify drug target. In the connection of graph theoretical analysis, we utilised KEGG database and Cytoscape software. All the title compounds were evaluated for their in-vitro anti-microbial activity by using agar well diffusion method at three different concentration levels (50, 100 and 150 µg/ml). The MIC of the compounds was also determined by agar streak dilution method. Results The identified study report through graph theoretical analysis were highlights that the key virulence factor for pathogenic mycobacteria is a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein kinase, termed PknG. All compounds were found to display significant activity against entire tested bacteria and fungi. In addition the synthesized scaffolds were screened for their in vitro antituberculosis (anti-TB) activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H 37 Ra using standard drug Rifampicin. Conclusion A number of analogs found markedly potent anti-microbial and anti-TB activity. The relationship between the functional group variation and the biological activity of the evaluated compounds were well discussed. The observed study report was showing that the compound S6 (4-nitro substitution) exhibited most potent effective anti-microbial and anti-TB activity out of various tested compounds. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Cytotoxic, anti-cancer, and anti-microbial effects of different extracts obtained from Artemisia rupestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokerbek, Shamshabanu; Sakipova, Zuriyadda; Chalupová, Marta; Nejezchlebová, Marcela; Hošek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Artemisia rupestris is a part of traditional Kazakh folk medicine. Extracts obtained from this plant are used to treat various diseases, including cancer. This study evaluates the anti-microbial, cytotoxic, and anti-cancer effects of different extracts of the plant. Different extraction techniques were used and the resultant activities were compared. Extracts of A. rupestris were prepared from the flowers plus the leaves and from the stems. The antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus was quantified. Cell lines L1210 and THP-1 were used to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of these extracts in vitro. The anti-cancer effect was tested using L1210-induced tumorgenesis in mouse model. The aqueous extract of stems was the most active against C. albicans, whereas the methanolic extract of flowers plus leaves especially inhibited the growth of S. aureus. The aqueous extracts were found to be non-cytotoxic for both cell lines, whereas the lipophilic extracts showed cytotoxic effects. The extract obtained from flowers plus leaves was more cytotoxic than that from stems. The tested extracts showed no anti-cancer potential. The results obtained testify to the relatively safe consumption of aqueous extracts of A. rupestris, but lipophilic extracts showed toxic effects and their consumption should be considered more carefully.Key words: L1210 cell line THP-1 cell line microwave-assisted extraction ultrasonic-assisted extraction Candida albicans Staphylococcus aureus.

  5. Application of Nanoparticle Technologies in the Combat against Anti-Microbial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-microbial resistance is a growing problem that has impacted the world and brought about the beginning of the end for the old generation of antibiotics. Increasingly, more antibiotics are being prescribed unnecessarily and this reckless practice has resulted in increased resistance towards these drugs, rendering them useless against infection. Nanotechnology presents a potential answer to anti-microbial resistance, which could stimulate innovation and create a new generation of antibiotic treatments for future medicines. Preserving existing antibiotic activity through novel formulation into or onto nanotechnologies can increase clinical longevity of action against infection. Additionally, the unique physiochemical properties of nanoparticles can provide new anti-bacterial modes of action which can also be explored. Simply concentrating on antibiotic prescribing habits will not resolve the issue but rather mitigate it. Thus, new scientific approaches through the development of novel antibiotics and formulations is required in order to employ a new generation of therapies to combat anti-microbial resistance.

  6. Application of Nanoparticle Technologies in the Combat against Anti-Microbial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mayur; Curtis, Anthony; Hoskins, Clare

    2018-01-14

    Anti-microbial resistance is a growing problem that has impacted the world and brought about the beginning of the end for the old generation of antibiotics. Increasingly, more antibiotics are being prescribed unnecessarily and this reckless practice has resulted in increased resistance towards these drugs, rendering them useless against infection. Nanotechnology presents a potential answer to anti-microbial resistance, which could stimulate innovation and create a new generation of antibiotic treatments for future medicines. Preserving existing antibiotic activity through novel formulation into or onto nanotechnologies can increase clinical longevity of action against infection. Additionally, the unique physiochemical properties of nanoparticles can provide new anti-bacterial modes of action which can also be explored. Simply concentrating on antibiotic prescribing habits will not resolve the issue but rather mitigate it. Thus, new scientific approaches through the development of novel antibiotics and formulations is required in order to employ a new generation of therapies to combat anti-microbial resistance.

  7. Anti-oxidant and anti-microbial properties of some ethno-therapeutically important medicinal plants of Indian Himalayan Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Sandeep; Jugran, Arun K; Bahukhandi, Amit; Bahuguna, Asutosh; Bhatt, Indra D; Rawal, Ranbeer S; Dhar, Uppeandra

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic potential of medicinal plants as a source of noble natural anti-oxidants and anti-microbial agents has been well recognised all across the globe. In this study, phenolic compounds, in vitro anti-oxidant activity and anti-microbial properties have been investigated in five Himalayan medicinal plants, (e.g., Acorus calamus, Habenaria intermedia, Hedychium spicatum, Roscoea procera and Valeriana jatamansi) in different solvent systems. R. procera exhibited significantly (p anti-oxidant activity. Also, R. procera and H. spicatum were found rich in gallic acid; V. jatamansi in catechin, hydroxylbenzoic acid and caffeic acid and H. intermedia in hydroxyl benzoic acid. Solvent systems showed species specific response for extraction of total flavonoids and anti-oxidant activity. All the extracts were found effective against different bacterial and fungal strains in a dose dependent manner and maximum antimicrobial activity was found in R. procera as compared to other species. All the plant extracts showed greater activity against bacterial strains as compared to fungal strains. The results of this study suggest that extract of these species can be used as natural anti-oxidant to reduce free radical mediated disorders and as natural alternative for food preservation.

  8. Pharmacological interactions of anti-microbial agents in odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Cutando, Antonio; Calvo-Guirado, José-Luis

    2009-03-01

    In this third article we describe the pharmacological interactions resulting from the use of anti-microbial agents. Although the antimicrobials prescribed in odontology are generally safe they can produce interactions with other medicaments which can give rise to serious adverse reactions which are well documented in clinical studies. Antibiotics with grave and dangerous life threatening consequences are erythromycin, clarithromycin and metronidazol and the anti-fungal agents are ketoconazol and itraconazol. Regarding the capacity of the anti-microbials to reduce the efficacy of oral anti-contraceptives the clinical studies to date are inconclusive, however, it would be prudent for the oral cavity specialist to point out the risk of a possible interaction. Therefore the specialist should be aware of possible interactions as a consequence of administering an antibiotic together with other medicaments the patient may be taking.

  9. Anti-microbial antibodies in celiac disease: Trick or treat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Maria; Foldi, Ildiko; Altorjay, Istvan; Palyu, Eszter; Udvardy, Miklos; Tumpek, Judit; Sipka, Sandor; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma Rita; Nemes, Eva; Veres, Gabor; Dinya, Tamas; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Norman, Gary L; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of a new set of anti-glycan and anti-outer membrane protein (anti-OMP) antibodies in a Hungarian cohort of adult Celiac disease (CD) patients. METHODS: 190 consecutive CD patients [M/F: 71/119, age:39.9 (SD:14.1) years], 100 healthy, and 48 gastrointestinal controls were tested for glycan anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (gASCA), anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-chitobioside, anti-mannobioside, anti-OMP antibodies and major NOD2/CARD15 mutations. Thirty out of 82 CD patients enrolled at the time of diagnosis were re-evaluated for the same antibodies after longstanding gluten-free diet (GFD). RESULTS: 65.9% of the CD patients were positive for at least one of the tested antibodies at the time of the diagnosis. Except anti-OMP and ALCA, anti-microbial antibodies were exclusively seen in untreated CD; however, the overall sensitivity was low. Any glycan positivity (LR+: 3.13; 95% CI: 2.08-4.73) was associated with an increased likelihood ratio for diagnosing CD. Significant correlation was found between the levels of anti-glycan and anti-endomysial or anti-transglutaminase antibodies. Anti-glycan positivity was lost after longstanding GFD. Anti-glycan antibody titers were associated with symptoms at presentation, but not the presence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations. Patients with severe malabsorption more frequently had multiple antibodies at diagnosis (P = 0.019). CONCLUSION: The presence of anti-glycan antibodies in CD seems to be secondary to the impaired small bowel mucosa which can lead to increased antigen presentation. Furthermore, anti-glycan positivity may be considered an additional marker of CD and dietary adherence. PMID:19701969

  10. A Comparative Study Of The Phytochemical And Anti-Microbial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of the phytochemical and anti-microbial properties of leaves of Loranthus micranthus harvested from six host trees, namely, Irvingia gabonensis, Pentaclethra macrophylla, Kola acuminata, Baphia nitida, Persea americana and Azadirachta indica, was carried out using standard methods. The result ...

  11. Glycoconjugates and Glycomimetics as Microbial Anti-Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattin, Sara; Bernardi, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Microbial adhesion is an essential step in infection and is mediated primarily by protein-carbohydrate interactions. Antagonists of such interactions have become a promising target for anti-adhesive therapy in several infective diseases. Monovalent protein-sugar interactions are often weak, and most successful anti-adhesive materials consist of multivalent glycoconjugates. Although often very effective in hampering microbial adhesion, natural epitopes often show limited resistance to enzymatic degradation. The use of carbohydrate mimics (glycomimetics) as a replacement for natural sugars potentially allows higher metabolic stability and also higher selectivity towards the desired protein target. In this review we describe the state of the art in the design and synthesis of glycoconjugates and glycomimetics employed for the construction of anti-adhesive biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microwave assisted synthesis and structure-activity relationship of 4-hydroxy-N'-[1-phenylethylidene]-2H/2-methyl-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carbohydrazide 1,1-dioxides as anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Naveed; Zia-ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Hamid Latif; Ullah, Muhammad Fasih; Parvez, Masood

    2011-06-01

    A series of 4-hydroxy-N'-[1-phenylethylidene]-2H/2-methyl, 1,2-benzothiazine-3-carbohydrazide 1,1-dioxides was synthesized from commercially available sodium saccharin. Base catalyzed ring expansion of methyl (1,1-dioxido-3-oxo-1,2-benzisothiazol-2(3H)-yl)acetate followed by ultrasound mediated hydrazinolysis and subsequent reaction with 1-phenylethanones under the influence of microwaves yielded the title compounds. Besides, microwave assisted synthesis of 1,4-dihydropyrazolo[4,3-c][1,2]benzothiazin-3-ol 5,5-dioxide and 4-methyl-1,4-dihydropyrazolo[4,3-c][1,2]benzothiazin-3-ol 5,5-dioxide is also discussed. Most of the synthesized compounds were found to possess moderate to significant anti-microbial (anti-bacterial and anti-fungal) activities. It is found that compounds with greater lipophilicity (N-methyl analogues) possessed higher anti-bacterial activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Controlling Blown Pack Spoilage Using Anti-Microbial Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Rachael; Bolton, Declan; Tiuftin, Andrey A; Kerry, Joe P; Fanning, Séamus; Whyte, Paul

    2017-08-12

    Active (anti-microbial) packaging was prepared using three different formulations; Auranta FV; Inbac-MDA and sodium octanoate at two concentrations (2.5 and 3.5 times their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, the lowest concentration that will inhibit the visible growth of the organisms) against Clostridium estertheticum , DSMZ 8809). Inoculated beef samples were packaged using the active packaging and monitored for 100 days storage at 2 °C for blown pack spoilage. The time to the onset of blown pack spoilage was significantly ( p < 0.01) increased using Auranta FV and sodium octanoate (caprylic acid sodium salt) at both concentrations. Moreover, sodium octanoate packs had significantly ( p < 0.01) delayed blown pack spoilage as compared to Auranta FV. It was therefore concluded that Auranta FV or sodium octanoate, incorporated into the packaging materials used for vacuum packaged beef, would inhibit blown pack spoilage and in the case of the latter, well beyond the 42 days storage period currently required for beef primals.

  14. Anti-Microbial Resistance In Pakistan: A Public Health Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2017-01-01

    Anti-microbial or antibiotic resistance is a global public health problem, more dominant in the developing countries. Illiteracy and lack of awareness among the general population is a leading cause, compounded by lack of concern by the physicians and the pharmacists selling drugs over the counter. Another side of the phenomenon is attributed to profit making goals of pharmaceutical companies and weak regulation of the market. Nevertheless, misuse and overuse of antimicrobials accelerates this process. Besides, health issues, anti-microbial resistance also has economic implications on the health care system, where the simpler treatments are becoming difficult, day by day. Enforcement of standard treatment guidelines for the health providers and behavior changes at the patients’ end are likely to bring about a change in the situation.

  15. In Vitro Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Microbial Potentiality Investigation of Different Fractions of Caryota urens Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Shofiul; Mahmud, Md Kayes; Naquib, Md Hamza; Hossain, Saad Mosharraf; Alam, Mohammad Nazmul; Uddin, Md Josim; Sajid, Irfan; Hossain, Muhammad Sazzad; Karim, Md Salimul; Hasan, Md Ali

    2016-07-27

    Caryota urens is a member of the Arecaceae family and a common plant in the Southeast Asian region. This plant has been reported as an anti-microbial agent in recent years. Thus, we aimed to find out the MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) against different pathogenic microorganism. The leaves of C. urens were extracted and fractioned using different reagents (chloroform, n -hexane and carbon tetrachloride). Disc diffusion method was implemented for the assessment of in vitro anti-microbial potency (500 and 250 µg/disc). The entire fraction showed good effect (with the zone of inhibition 19-25 mm) against both gram positive ( Bacillus subtilis , Bacillus megaterium , Bacillus cereus , Sarina lutea ) and gram negative ( Vibrio mimicus , Shigella boydii , Escherichia coli , Pseudomonas aeruginosa ) bacterial pathogens and fungal strains ( Aspergillus niger , Saccharomyces cerevisiae ). The plants also possess effective free radical scavenging potency with an IC 50 of 130.32 µg/mL. This finding reflects a link between the presence of anti-oxidative material and a substantial anti-microbial activity, and substantiates all previous claims against C. urens .

  16. Systemic anti-microbial agents used in periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vishakha; Mali, Rohini; Mali, Amita

    2013-03-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease with marked inflammatory response, leading to destruction of underlying tissues. The aim of periodontal therapy is to eradicate the pathogens associated with the disease and attain periodontal health. This is achieved by non-surgical and surgical therapy; however, mechanical debridement and topical application of antiseptics may not be helpful in all cases. In such cases, adjunctive systemic antibiotic therapy remains the treatment of choice. It can reach micro-organisms at the base of the deep periodontal pockets and furcation areas via serum, and also affect organisms residing within gingival epithelium and connective tissue. Before advising any anti-microbial agent, it is necessary to have knowledge of that agent. The aim of this review article is to provide basic details of each systemic anti-microbial agent used in periodontal therapy. The points discussed are its mode of action, susceptible periodontal pathogens, dosage, its use in treatment of periodontal disease, and mechanism of bacterial resistance to each anti-microbial agent. It might be of some help while prescribing these drugs.

  17. [Mode of action of microbial anti-MRSA agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is known as a major nosocomial pathogen that has also developed resistance to many antibiotics. Moreover, MRSA resistance to a last-resort antibiotic, vancomycin, has been reported. Therefore, new anti-infectious agents to prevent and treat MRSA infection are needed. Based on this background, our group has focused on the discovery of new microbial agents active against MRSA infection. Viridicatumtoxin and spirohexaline, produced by Penicillium sp. FKI-3368, were isolated as inhibitors of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate (UPP) synthase of Staphylococcus aureus, which was involved in cell wall synthesis. Viridicatumtoxin and spirohexaline with a pentacyclic spiro skeleton inhibited UPP synthase activity with an IC(50) value of 4.0 and 9.0 µM, respectively. Actually, the growth of gram-positive bacteria including MRSA was strongly inhibited by the compounds. Our computational modeling experiments indicated that spirohexaline A was inserted into the substrate pocket of UPP synthase and interacted with Glu(88) via a carbamoyl group of the compound, with Ala(76), Met(54) and Asn(35) via three hydroxyl groups, and with certain hydrophobic amino acids via a spiro ring. Cyslabdan, produced by Streptomyces sp. K04-0144, was isolated as a potentiator of β-lactam imipenem activity against MRSA. The compound consisted of a labdan skeleton and an N-acetylcysteine. Cyslabdan potentiated imipenem activity by over 1000 fold, drastically reducing the MIC value of imipenem against MRSA from 16 to 0.03 µg/mL. The binding proteins of cyslabdan were investigated in the lysate of MRSA to identify FemA, which was involved in the formation of the pentaglycine interpeptide bridge in MRSA peptidoglycan.

  18. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Phthalimide Derivatives as in Vitro Anti-Microbial, Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamie, Phoebe F; Phillopes, John N; El-Gendy, Ahmed O; Rarova, Lucie; Gruz, Jiri

    2015-09-14

    Sixteen new phthalimide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro anti-microbial, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The cytotoxicity for all synthesized compounds was also determined in cancer cell lines and in normal human cells. None of the target derivatives had any cytotoxic activity. (ZE)-2-[4-(1-Hydrazono-ethyl) phenyl]isoindoline-1,3-dione (12) showed remarkable anti-microbial activity. Its activity against Bacillus subtilis was 133%, 106% and 88.8% when compared with the standard antibiotics ampicillin, cefotaxime and gentamicin, respectively. Compound 12 also showed its highest activities in Gram negative bacteria against Pseudomonas aeruginosa where the percentage activities were 75% and 57.6% when compared sequentially with the standard antibiotics cefotaxime and gentamicin. It was also found that the compounds 2-[4-(4-ethyl-3-methyl-5-thioxo-1,2,4-triazolidin-3-yl)phenyl]isoindoline-1,3-dione (13b) and 2-[4-(3-methyl-5-thioxo-4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazolidin-3-yl)phenyl]isoindoline-1,3-dione (13c) had anti-oxidant activity. 4-(N'-{1-[4-(1,3-Dioxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-phenyl]-ethylidene}-hydrazino)-benzenesulfonamide (17c) showed the highest in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of the tested compounds (a decrease of 32%). To determine the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory activity of 17c, a docking study was carried out on the COX-2 enzyme. The results confirmed that 17c had a higher binding energy score (-17.89 kcal/mol) than that of the ligand celecoxib (-17.27 kcal/mol).

  19. Highly active microbial phosphoantigen induces rapid yet sustained MEK/Erk- and PI-3K/Akt-mediated signal transduction in anti-tumor human gammadelta T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel V Correia

    efficient cancer immunotherapy strategies critically depends on our capacity to maximize anti-tumor effector T-cell responses. By characterizing the intracellular mechanisms of HMB-PP-mediated activation of the highly cytotoxic Vgamma9(+ T-cell subset, our data strongly support the usage of this microbial antigen in novel cancer clinical trials.

  20. A novel series of N-acyl substituted indole-linked benzimidazoles and naphthoimidazoles as potential anti inflammatory, anti biofilm and anti microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Rajan; Prakash, Periakaruppan; Mahendran, Karthikeyan; Ramanathan, Murugappan

    2018-01-01

    A novel N-acyl substituted indole-linked benzimidazoles and naphthoimidazoles were synthesized. Their chemical structures were confirmed using spectroscopic tools including 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR and CHN-elemental analyses. Anti inflammatory activity for all target compounds was evaluated in-vitro. The synthesized compounds hinder the biofilm formation and control the growth of the pathogen, Staphylococcus epidermis. Anti microbial activity of the compounds was evaluated against both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 2940), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC424), Escherchia coli (MTCC 443) and Enterococcus fecalis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and anti-microbial activity of pure, Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped organic NLO l-arginine trifluoroacetate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanyaa, T.; Haris, M.; Jayaramakrishnan, V.; Amgalan, M.; Mathivanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    Optically transparent Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped l-arginine trifluoroacetate (LATF) single crystals were grown from its aqueous solution using the slow solvent evaporation technique. The grown crystals were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction to confirm the monoclinic crystal structure. The percentage of transmittance measured using the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrophotometer was found to be more than 80% for doped crystals. The functional group analysis of the grown crystals has been made by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis was performed for the grown crystals. An atomic absorption study was carried out to determine the presence of Cu2+ and Cd2+. The hardness of the grown crystals was assessed and the results show a significant variation in the hardness value between the pure and doped LATF crystals. The second harmonic generation measurements show that Cu2+ doped LATF is 2.8 times greater and Cd2+ doped is 2.6 times greater than KDP. The anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities of the title compound were performed using the disc diffusion method against standard bacteria Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas oryzae and against the fungus Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Schiff base metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poomalai Jayaseelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel Schiff base ligand has been prepared by the condensation between butanedione monoxime with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR, 1H NMR, conductivity measurements, EPR and magnetic studies. The molar conductance studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Mn(II complexes showed non-electrolyte in nature. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N4-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The spectroscopic data of metal complexes indicated that the metal ions are complexed with azomethine nitrogen and oxyimino nitrogen atoms. The binuclear metal complexes exhibit octahedral arrangements. DNA binding properties of copper(II metal complex have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Results suggest that the copper(II complex bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. The nucleolytic cleavage activities of the ligand and their complexes were assayed on CT-DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of H2O2. The ligand showed increased nuclease activity when administered as copper complex and copper(II complex behave as efficient chemical nucleases with hydrogen peroxide activation. The anti-microbial activities and thermal studies have also been studied. In anti-microbial activity all complexes showed good anti-microbial activity higher than ligand against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  3. Experimental and In-Silico Investigation of Anti-Microbial Activity of 1-Chloro-2-Isocyanatoethane Derivatives of Thiomorpholine, Piperazine and Morpholine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles O Nwuche

    Full Text Available The Antibiogram properties of 1-chloro-2-isocyanatoethane derivatives of thiomorpholine (CTC, piperazine (CPC and morpholine (CMC were evaluated by the approved agar well diffusion, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and in silico techniques. A total of fourteen microbial cultures consisting of ten bacteria and four yeast strains were used in the biological study while affinity of the compounds for DNA gyrase, a validated antibacterial drug target, was investigated by docking method. Results indicate that both thiomorpholine and piperazine had zero activity against the Gram negative organisms tested. With morpholine, similar result was obtained except that cultures of Escherichia coli (ATCC 15442 and Salmonella typhi (ATCC 6539 presented with weak sensitivity (7-8 mm as shown by the inhibition zone diameter (IZD measurement. The Gram positive organisms were more sensitive to morpholine than the other compounds. The highest IZD values of 15-18 mm were achieved except for Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 49619 in which mobility of the compound stopped after 12 mm. S. pneumoniae was resistant to both thiomorpholine and piperazine. The yeast strains were not sensitive to any of the studied compounds investigated. The MIC tests evaluated against a reference antibiotic show that while morpholine was most active at 4 μg.ml-1 against both B. cereus ATCC (14579 and B. subtilis, the least active compound was thiomorpholine which inhibited S. aureus (ATCC 25923 at 64 μg.ml-1. The three compounds demonstrated high affinity for the target protein (DNA gyrase ranging from -4.63 to -5.64 Kcal/mol and even showed better ligand efficiencies than three known antibiotics; chlorobiocin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. This study identified the studied compounds as potential antibiotic leads with acceptable physicochemical properties and gave the molecular basis for the observed interactions between the compounds and the target protein which can be harnessed

  4. Experimental and In-Silico Investigation of Anti-Microbial Activity of 1-Chloro-2-Isocyanatoethane Derivatives of Thiomorpholine, Piperazine and Morpholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwuche, Charles O; Ujam, Oguejiofo T; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Ujam, Ifeoma B

    2017-01-01

    The Antibiogram properties of 1-chloro-2-isocyanatoethane derivatives of thiomorpholine (CTC), piperazine (CPC) and morpholine (CMC) were evaluated by the approved agar well diffusion, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and in silico techniques. A total of fourteen microbial cultures consisting of ten bacteria and four yeast strains were used in the biological study while affinity of the compounds for DNA gyrase, a validated antibacterial drug target, was investigated by docking method. Results indicate that both thiomorpholine and piperazine had zero activity against the Gram negative organisms tested. With morpholine, similar result was obtained except that cultures of Escherichia coli (ATCC 15442) and Salmonella typhi (ATCC 6539) presented with weak sensitivity (7-8 mm) as shown by the inhibition zone diameter (IZD) measurement. The Gram positive organisms were more sensitive to morpholine than the other compounds. The highest IZD values of 15-18 mm were achieved except for Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 49619) in which mobility of the compound stopped after 12 mm. S. pneumoniae was resistant to both thiomorpholine and piperazine. The yeast strains were not sensitive to any of the studied compounds investigated. The MIC tests evaluated against a reference antibiotic show that while morpholine was most active at 4 μg.ml-1 against both B. cereus ATCC (14579) and B. subtilis, the least active compound was thiomorpholine which inhibited S. aureus (ATCC 25923) at 64 μg.ml-1. The three compounds demonstrated high affinity for the target protein (DNA gyrase) ranging from -4.63 to -5.64 Kcal/mol and even showed better ligand efficiencies than three known antibiotics; chlorobiocin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. This study identified the studied compounds as potential antibiotic leads with acceptable physicochemical properties and gave the molecular basis for the observed interactions between the compounds and the target protein which can be harnessed in

  5. Discovery of anti-microbial and anti-tubercular molecules from Fusarium solani: an endophyte of Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A; Rather, M A; Hassan, Q P; Aga, M A; Mushtaq, S; Shah, A M; Hussain, A; Baba, S A; Ahmad, Z

    2017-05-01

    Glycyrrhiza glabra is a high-value medicinal plant thriving in biodiversity rich Kashmir Himalaya. The present study was designed to explore the fungal endophytes from G. glabra as a source of bioactive molecules. The extracts prepared from the isolated endophytes were evaluated for anti-microbial activities using broth micro-dilution assay. The endophytic strain coded as A2 exhibiting promising anti-bacterial as well as anti-tuberculosis activity was identified as Fusarium solani by ITS-5.8S ribosomal gene sequencing technique. This strain was subjected to large-scale fermentation followed by isolation of its bioactive compounds using column chromatography. From the results of spectral data analysis and comparison with literature, the molecules were identified as 3,6,9-trihydroxy-7-methoxy-4,4-dimethyl-3,4-dihydro-1H-benzo[g]isochromene-5,10-dione (1), fusarubin (2), 3-O-methylfusarubin (3) and javanicin (4). Compound 1 is reported for the first time from this strain. All the four compounds inhibited the growth of various tested bacterial strains with MIC values in the range of anti-microbial drug discovery programme. Due to the chemoprofile variation of same endophyte with respect to source plant and ecoregions, further studies are required to explore endophytes of medicinal plants of all unusual biodiversity rich ecoregions for important and or novel bioactive molecules. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. In vitro evaluation of anti-microbial of the leaf extracts of acacia modesta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulman, Z.; Khan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases caused by micro-organisms are transmissible and infect a large group of population. Investigations were carried out for studying the phytochemistry and biological potential of the leaves of Acacia modesta. Dried and finely ground leaves were extracted with ethanol. Different fractions were obtained by extracting the crude extract with n-hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate. Fractions of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, crude extract and the aqueous layer left behind were evaluated for their anti-microbial potential by determining the zone of inhibition against different bacterial strains. All fractions showed positive anti-bacterial activity except ethyl acetate fraction. However the aqueous layer showed activity which is significantly higher than the standard antibiotics used in this study. In conclusion the more active the compounds found in leaves, the more polar they were in nature. Bioassay guided isolation of these active compounds from aqueous fraction may lead to potential anti-bacterial metabolites from Acacia modesta. (author)

  7. Anti-oxidant studies and anti-microbial effect of Origanum vulgare Linn in combination with standard antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Veni; Vasudeva, Neeru; Kumar, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Origanum is one of the over 200 genera in the Lamiaceae (mint family), and this genus includes culinary, fragrant, and medicinal properties. The plant is reported to contain anti-microbial properties, but it lacks combination studies with that of synthetic antibiotics. To investigate the anti-oxidant and anti-microbial interaction studies of Origanum vulgare with standard drugs against Bacillus species of bacteria and Aspergillus niger. The anti-oxidant properties of phenolic, non-phenolic fractions of chloroform extract and volatile oil were evaluated by free radical-scavenging, hydrogen peroxide radical-scavenging assay, reducing power, and metal chelating assays. The minimum inhibitory concentration and fractional inhibitory concentration index were determined which demonstrates the behavior of volatile oil, phenolic, and non-phenolic fractions of volatile oil with that of ciprofloxacin and fluconazole. The IC50 value for volatile oil was found to be 15, 30, and 30 μg/ml and that of phenolic fraction was 60, 120, and 120 μg/ml for free radical-scavenging, hydrogen peroxide-scavenging, and metal chelating assays respectively. Non-phenolic fraction was found to act antagonistically along with ciprofloxacin against B. cereus and B. subtilis, while the phenolic fraction exhibited indifferent activity along with ciprofloxacin against both the bacterial strains. This combination of drug therapy will not only prove effective in antibiotic resistance, but these natural constituents will also help in preventing body from harmful radicals which lead to fatal diseases.

  8. In silico investigation of lactoferrin protein characterizations for the prediction of anti-microbial properties

    OpenAIRE

    Sohrabi, Seyyed Mohsen; Niazi, Ali; Chahardoli, Mahmood; Hortamani, Ali; Setoodeh, Payam

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding multi-functional glycoprotein which has numerous physiological functions such as iron transportation, anti-microbial activity and immune response. In this study, different in silico approaches were exploited to investigate Lf protein properties in a number of mammalian species. Results showed that the iron-binding site, DNA and RNA-binding sites, signal peptides and transferrin motifs in the Lf structure were highly conserved. Examined sequences showed thre...

  9. Tapioca starch: An efficient fuel in gel-combustion synthesis of photocatalytically and anti-microbially active ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasami, Alamelu K. [Centre for Nano and Material Sciences, Jain University, Jakkasandra, Kanakapura (T) (India); Raja Naika, H. [Dept. of Biotechnology, University College of Science, Tumkur University, Tumkur (India); Nagabhushana, H. [CNR Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur (India); Ramakrishnappa, T.; Balakrishna, Geetha R. [Centre for Nano and Material Sciences, Jain University, Jakkasandra, Kanakapura (T) (India); Nagaraju, G., E-mail: nagarajugn@rediffmail.com [Centre for Nano and Material Sciences, Jain University, Jakkasandra, Kanakapura (T) (India); Dept. of Chemistry, Siddaganga Institute of Technology, Tumkur (India)

    2015-01-15

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by gel-combustion method using novel bio-fuel tapioca starch pearls, derived from the tubers of Manihotesculenta. The product is characterized using various techniques. The X-ray diffraction pattern correspond to a hexagonal zincite structure. Fourier transform infrared spectrum showed main absorption peaks at 394 and 508 cm{sup −} {sup 1} due to stretching vibration of Zn–O. Ultravoilet–visible spectrum of zinc oxide nanoparticles showed absorption maximum at 373 nm whereas the maximum of the bulk zinc oxide was 377 nm. The morphology of the product was studied using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopic images showed that the products are agglomerated and porous in nature. The transmission electron microscopic images revealed spherical particles of 40–50 nm in diameter. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue was examined using zinc oxide nanoparticles and found more efficient in sunlight than ultra-violet light due to reduced band gap. The antibacterial properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles were investigated against four bacterial strains Klebsiella aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aereus, where Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aereus exhibited significant antibacterial activity in agar well diffusion method when compared to positive control. - Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles have been prepared from a new bio-fuel, tapioca starch by gel combustion method. • XRD pattern revealed hexagonal zincite crystal structure with crystallite size 33 nm. • ZnO nanoparticles exhibited a band gap of 2.70 eV. • The ZnO nanoparticles exhibited superior degradation in sunlight in comparison with UV light. • The product showed a good anti-bacterial activity against two bacterial strains.

  10. Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Fungal Activity of Xanthones Obtained via Semi-Synthetic Modification of α-Mangostin from Garcinia mangostana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Narasimhan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The microbial contamination in food packaging has been a major concern that has paved the way to search for novel, natural anti-microbial agents, such as modified α-mangostin. In the present study, twelve synthetic analogs were obtained through semi-synthetic modification of α-mangostin by Ritter reaction, reduction by palladium-carbon (Pd-C, alkylation, and acetylation. The evaluation of the anti-microbial potential of the synthetic analogs showed higher bactericidal activity than the parent molecule. The anti-microbial studies proved that I E showed high anti-bacterial activity whereas I I showed the highest anti-fungal activity. Due to their microbicidal potential, modified α-mangostin derivatives could be utilized as active anti-microbial agents in materials for the biomedical and food industry.

  11. Broad spectrum anti-microbial compounds producing bacteria from coast of Qingdao bays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Li, Meng; Mirani, Zulfiqar Ali; Wang, Jingxue; Lin, Hong; Buzdar, Muhammad Aslam

    2015-03-01

    Anti-microbial resistance burden and hazard associated with chemical treatment of infections demanded for new anti-microbial natural products. Marine associated microorganisms are the enormous source of bioactive compounds. In this study we have isolated 272 marine bacteria among them 136 (50%) were antagonistic to at least one of the four pathogenic strains Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio cholerae, E. coli and S. aureus. Only two strains exhibited antibacterial activity against all four test strains, which were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as Bacillus sp. DK1-SA11 and Vibrio sp. DK6-SH8. Marine isolate DK1-SA11 has potential to resist boiling temperature and pH 2-12. Furthermore cell free extract (CFE) inhibited all test organisms including superbug MRSA and pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Marine isolate Bacillus sp. DK1-SA11 could be a potential combatant for the battle of drugs and bugs.

  12. Experimental and In-Silico Investigation of Anti-Microbial Activity of 1-Chloro-2-Isocyanatoethane Derivatives of Thiomorpholine, Piperazine and Morpholine

    OpenAIRE

    Nwuche, Charles O.; Ujam, Oguejiofo T.; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Ujam, Ifeoma B.

    2017-01-01

    The Antibiogram properties of 1-chloro-2-isocyanatoethane derivatives of thiomorpholine (CTC), piperazine (CPC) and morpholine (CMC) were evaluated by the approved agar well diffusion, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and in silico techniques. A total of fourteen microbial cultures consisting of ten bacteria and four yeast strains were used in the biological study while affinity of the compounds for DNA gyrase, a validated antibacterial drug target, was investigated by docking metho...

  13. Synthesis and anti-microbial potencies of 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-alkylimidazolium chloride ionic liquids: microbial viabilities at different ionic liquids concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M Ismail; El-Harbawi, Mohanad; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Noaman, Yousr Abdulhadi; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Yin, Chun-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Three 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-alkylimidazolium chloride room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) [2OHimC(n)][Cl]; (n=0, 1, 4) have been synthesized from the appropriate imidazole precursors and characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopies and elemental analysis. Their anti-microbial activities were investigated using the well-diffusion method. The viabilities of Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica as a function of IL concentrations were studied. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and EC₅₀ values for the present ILs were within the concentration range from 60 to 125 mM and 23 to 73 mM. The anti-microbial potencies of the present ILs were compared to a standard antibiotic, gentamicin. The finding affords additional perspective on the level of ILs toxicity to aquatic lifeforms and yet, this characteristic can be readily harnessed to detect microbial growth and activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-food and anti-microbial IgG subclass antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Anke; Mandić, Ana D; Bennek, Eveline; Frehn, Lisa; Verdier, Julien; Tebrügge, Irene; Lutz, Holger; Streetz, Konrad; Trautwein, Christian; Sellge, Gernot

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly Crohn's disease (CD), is associated with increased microbial-specific IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas alterations of anti-food antibodies are still disputed. The knowledge about IgG subclass antibodies in IBD is limited. In this study we analysed IgG subclass antibodies specific for nutritional and commensal antigens in IBD patients and controls. Serum IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 specific for wheat and milk extracts, purified ovalbumin, Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis lysates and mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analysed by ELISA in patients with CD (n = 56), ulcerative colitis (UC; n = 29), acute gastroenteritis/colitis (n = 12) as well as non-inflammatory controls (n = 62). Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) of all IgG subclasses and anti-B. fragilis IgG1 levels were increased in CD patients compared to UC patients and controls. The discriminant validity of ASCA IgG2 and IgG4 was comparable with that of ASCA pan-IgG and IgA, whereas it was inferior for ASCA IgG1/IgG3 and anti-B. fragilis IgG1. Complicated CD defined by the presence of perianal, stricturing or penetrating disease phenotypes was associated with increased ASCA IgG1/IgG3/IgG4, anti-B. fragilis IgG1 and anti-E. coli IgG1 levels. Anti-food IgG subclass levels were not different between IBD patients and controls and did not correlate with food intolerance. In contrast to anti-microbial Abs, food-specific IgG responses were predominately of the IgG4 isotype and all food-specific IgG subclass levels correlated negatively with age. Our study supports the notion that the adaptive immune recognition of food and commensal antigens are differentially regulated.

  15. Synthesis, Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory and Antimicrobial Activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Microbial infections often produce pain and inflammation. Chemotherapeutic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed simultaneously in normal practice. The compound possessing all three activities is not common.The purpose of the present study was to examine whether molecular modification ...

  16. Contaminant immobilization via microbial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this study was to search the literature to identify biological techniques that could be applied to the restoration of contaminated groundwaters near uranium milling sites. Through bioremediation it was hypothesized that the hazardous heavy metals could be immobilized in a stable, low-solubility form, thereby halting their progress in the migrating groundwater. Three basic mechanisms were examined: reduction of heavy metals by microbially produced hydrogen sulfide; direct microbial mediated reduction; and biosorption

  17. Application Anti Microbial Activity Test and Direct Inoculation of Urinary Specimen Test to Increase the Quality of Results and Decrease the Production Cost in Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Sanglah General Hospital Hospital, Bali-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Sri-Budayanti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Urinary tract infection (UTI is the most common bacterial infection in general practice and in hospitals. Fast and accurate urine culture and sensitivity test are needed for adequate therapy. Anti Microbial Activity test (AMA test that is used to detect the presence of antibiotics in urine specimens is not commonly used in clinical microbiology laboratories. Some laboratories are still using indirect inoculation technique using enriched media before inoculating onto the agar media. The aim of this research is to compare results of urinary examination of direct inoculation technique with AMA test with indirect inoculation technique without AMA test.Methods: A number of 210 urine specimens were collected in Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Sanglah General Hospital within a time period between 16 June until 16 July 2009.Results: Antibiotics were detected in 40% of the urinary specimens; whereas 48.1% showed no evidence of UTI, that is negative AMA test and sterile urinary culture or colony growth < 105 CFU/ml. Only 11.9% of the specimens indicates urinary tract infections. The examination can be completed within 2-3 days which is shorter than indirect inoculation test which require 5-7 days. Direct inoculation technique can reduce the cost of production three-fold the costs require for an indirect inoculation test.Conclusions: Application of AMA test and direct inoculation technique can give results more rapidly, reliable and useful for clinicians. This also decrease the laboratory’s cost of production.

  18. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory and anti- nociceptive activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-06-15

    Jun 15, 2009 ... (1998) Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Sambucus ebulus rhizome extract in rats. J. Ethnopharmacol. 61: 229-235. Barros IMC, Lopes LDG, Borges MOR, Borges ACR, Ribeiro MNS,. Freire SMF (2006). Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Pluchea quitic (D.C) ethanolic extract.

  19. In vitro anti-microbial activity of the Cuban medicinal plants Simarouba glauca DC, Melaleuca leucadendron L and Artemisia absinthium L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymé Fernández-Calienes Valdés

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an extensive in vitro antimicrobial profiling was performed for three medicinal plants grown in Cuba, namely Simarouba glauca, Melaleuca leucadendron and Artemisia absinthium. Ethanol extracts were tested for their antiprotozoal potential against Trypanosoma b. brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania infantum and Plasmodium falciparum. Antifungal activities were evaluated against Microsporum canis and Candida albicans whereas Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were used as test organisms for antibacterial activity. Cytotoxicity was assessed against human MRC-5 cells. Only M. leucadendron extract showed selective activity against microorganisms tested. Although S. glauca exhibited strong activity against all protozoa, it must be considered non-specific. The value of integrated evaluation of extracts with particular reference to selectivity is discussed.

  20. Structural, spectroscopic and anti-microbial inspection of PEG capped ZnO nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, J. V.; Koli, V. B.; Kumbhar, S. G.; Borde, L. C.; Phadatare, M. R.; Pawar, S. H.

    2018-04-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have a wide range of biomedical applications. Present study demonstrates the new methodology in sol-gel technology for synthesizing Polyethylene glycol (PEG) capped ZnO NPs and its size effect on anti-microbial activity. The reaction time was increased from 1 h to 5 h for the synthesis of ZnO NPs at 130 °C. The size of PEG capped ZnO NPs is increased from 10 to 84 nm by increasing the reaction upto 5 h. The x-ray diffraction studies and transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals the phase purity and hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure with uniform PEG capping on the surface of ZnO NPs. UV–visible spectroscopy exhibits the peak at 366 nm which is attributed to ZnO NPs. No adverse effect is observed in case of absorbance spectroscopy. Further, Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis depicts the adsorption of PEG molecules on the ZnO NPs surface. The anti-microbial activities for both Gram-positive (S. aureus) and Gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria were studied by optical density (OD) mesurement. The remarkable anti-microbial activity was observed for PEG capped ZnO NPs synthesized at 1 h reaction time showing higher activity in comparison with that synthesized from 2 h to 5 h reaction time. The microbial growth was found to be inhibited after 10 h OD measurement for both the bacteria. The anti-microbial activity may be attributed to the generation of ROS and H2O2. However, these generated species plays a vital role in inhibition of microbial growth. Hence, PEG capped ZnO NPs has promising biomedical applications.

  1. Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Fungal Activity of Xanthones Obtained via Semi-Synthetic Modification of α-Mangostin from Garcinia mangostana

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan Narasimhan; Shanmugam Maheshwaran; Imad A. Abu-Yousef; Amin F. Majdalawieh; Janarthanam Rethavathi; Prince Edwin Das; Palmiro Poltronieri

    2017-01-01

    The microbial contamination in food packaging has been a major concern that has paved the way to search for novel, natural anti-microbial agents, such as modified α-mangostin. In the present study, twelve synthetic analogs were obtained through semi-synthetic modification of α-mangostin by Ritter reaction, reduction by palladium-carbon (Pd-C), alkylation, and acetylation. The evaluation of the anti-microbial potential of the synthetic analogs showed higher bactericidal activity than the paren...

  2. Natural product inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis: synthesis of the marine microbial metabolites pseudopyronines A and B and evaluation of their anti-infective activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giddens, Anna C.; Nielsen, Lone; Boshoff, Helena I.

    2007-01-01

    Total syntheses of the title natural products, pseudopyronines A (1) and B (2), have been achieved using methyl β-oxo carboxylic ester starting materials. The natural products and a small set of structurally related compounds were evaluated for growth inhibitory activity against a range...

  3. Synthesis and anti-microbial activity of some 1- substituted amino-4,6-dimethyl-2-oxo-pyridine-3-carbonitrile derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidre, Rizk E; Abu-Hashem, Ameen A; El-Shazly, Mohamed

    2011-10-01

    A new series of 1- substituted amino-4,6-dimethyl-2-oxo-pyridine-3-carbonitrile such as hydrazide hydrazones 3a-h; ethane-1,2-diaminopyridine 6; phthalimidopyridines 8a,b; hydrazides 10a,b; urea 11a and thiourea 11b were synthesized in a good to excellent yield in step efficient process, using 1-amino-4,6-dimethyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile (1) as a key intermediate. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized compounds were evaluated. The obtained data indicated that the majority of the tested compounds exhibited both antibacterial and antifungal activities, particularly compounds 8a and 8b showed a comparable effect to a well known antibacterial and antifungal agents. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Intercropping Between Achillea millefolium L. and Rosmarinus officinalis L. and its effects on essential oil yield, biomass and anti-microbial activity

    OpenAIRE

    Arashiro, Munique Polito; Centro Universitário de Maringá - CESUMAR; Ziroldo, Débora Fernanda; Centro Universitário de Maringá - CESUMAR; Yamaguchi, Mirian Ueda; Centro Universitário de Maringá - CESUMAR; Sartor, Claudenice Francisca Providelo; Centro Universitário de Maringá - CESUMAR; Patroni, Sandra Sanches; Centro Universitário de Maringá - CESUMAR; Oliveira, Pérsio Sandir D'; EMBRAPA; Cortez, Lúcia Elaine Elaine Ranieri; Centro Universitário de Maringá - CESUMAR

    2011-01-01

    The rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and the yarrow (Achillea millefolium) are medicinal aromatic herbs and produce essential oil. Current experiment evaluated the effect of intercropping between two species in biomass and essential oil yield and the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of rosemary. After the plants’ culture and harvest, the biomass and the essential oil yields of the dry leaves and flowers were obtained by steam water distillation. Data of biomass and essential oil y...

  5. Synthesis, characterization and anti-microbial activity of phenylurea-formaldehyde resin (PUF) and its polymer metal complexes (PUF-Mn(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.

    2012-10-01

    Phenylurea-formaldehyde polymer (PUF) was synthesized via polycondensation of phenylurea and formaldehyde in basic medium, its polymer-metal complexes [PUF-M(II)] were prepared with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) ions. PUF and PUF-M(II) were characterized with magnetic moment measurements, elemental and spectral (UV-visible, FTIR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESR) analysis. The thermal behaviors of all the synthesized polymers were carried out using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The thermal data revealed that all of the PUF-M(II) showed higher thermal stabilities than the PUF and also ascribed that the PUF-Cu(II) showed better thermal stability than the other PUF-M(II). The kinetic parameters such as activation energy, pre-exponential factor etc., were evaluated for these polymer metal complexes using Coats-Redfern equation. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of the synthesized polymers was tested against several microorganisms using agar well diffusion methods. Among all of the PUF-M(II), the antimicrobial activity of the PUF-Cu(II) showed the highest zone of inhibition because of its higher stability constant and may be used in biomedical applications.

  6. Vitamin D as an anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory therapy for Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herscovitch, K; Dauletbaev, N; Lands, Larry C

    2014-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by chronic infection and inflammation in the airways that lead to progressive lung damage and early death. Current anti-inflammatory therapies are limited by extensive adverse effects or insufficient efficacy. There is a large body of studies indicating beneficial anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties of vitamin D. Since most patients with CF present with vitamin D deficiency, and serum vitamin D levels demonstrate a positive correlation with lung function and negative correlation with airway inflammation and infection, correcting vitamin D deficiency may be an attractive therapeutic strategy in CF. The function of vitamin D is intricately tied to its metabolism, which may be impaired at multiple steps in patients with CF, with a potential to limit the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation. It is likely that the aforementioned beneficial properties of vitamin D require supplementation with doses of vitamin D markedly higher than those recommended to maintain proper bone function. This review will illustrate the potential for supplementation with vitamin D or its metabolites to modulate inflammation and improve defence against chronic infection in CF lung, as well as appropriate vitamin D supplementation strategies for improving lung function in CF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbial activity at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J.M.; Meike, A.

    1995-09-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the containment and storage of commercially generated spent fuel and defense high-level nuclear waste. There is growing recognition of the role that biotic factors could play in this repository, either directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC), or indirectly by altering the chemical environment or contributing to the transport of radionuclides. As a first step toward describing and predicting these processes, a workshop was held on April 10-12, 1995, in Lafayette, California. The immediate aims of the workshop were: (1) To identify microbially related processes relevant to the design of a radioactive waste repository under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. (2) To determine parameters that are critical to the evaluation of a disturbed subterranean environment. (3) To define the most effective means of investigating the factors thus identified.

  8. Microbial activity at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J.M.; Meike, A.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the containment and storage of commercially generated spent fuel and defense high-level nuclear waste. There is growing recognition of the role that biotic factors could play in this repository, either directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC), or indirectly by altering the chemical environment or contributing to the transport of radionuclides. As a first step toward describing and predicting these processes, a workshop was held on April 10-12, 1995, in Lafayette, California. The immediate aims of the workshop were: (1) To identify microbially related processes relevant to the design of a radioactive waste repository under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. (2) To determine parameters that are critical to the evaluation of a disturbed subterranean environment. (3) To define the most effective means of investigating the factors thus identified

  9. Performance evaluation of nanoclay enriched anti-microbial hydrogels for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Karnik, Sonali; Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu M.; Tappa, Karthik K.; Giorno, Rebecca; Mills, David K.

    2016-01-01

    A major factor contributing to the failure of orthopedic and orthodontic implants is post-surgical infection. Coating metallic implant surfaces with anti-microbial agents has shown promise but does not always prevent the formation of bacterial biofilms. Furthermore, breakdown of these coatings within the human body can cause release of the anti-microbial drugs in an uncontrolled or unpredictable fashion. In this study, we used a calcium alginate and calcium phosphate cement (CPC) hydrogel com...

  10. Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, J

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used in preventive and curative medicine in animals. Benefits from curative use are clear - it allows sick animals to be healthy with a gain in human welfare. The case for preventive use of antimicrobials is less clear cut with debates on the value of antimicrobials as growth promoters in the intensive livestock industries. The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals. The study examines the importance of animals in society and how the role and management of animals is changing including the use of antimicrobials. It proposes an economic framework to assess the trade-offs of anti-microbial use and examines the current level of data collection and analysis of these trade-offs. An exploratory review identifies a number of weaknesses. Rarely are we consistent in the frameworks applied to the economic assessment anti-microbial use in animals, which may well be due to gaps in data or the prejudices of the analysts. There is a need for more careful data collection that would allow information on (i) which species and production systems antimicrobials are used in, (ii) what active substance of antimicrobials and the application method and (iii) what dosage rates. The species need to include companion animals as well as the farmed animals as it is still not known how important direct versus indirect spread of resistance to humans is. In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence. Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems. © 2015 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Ethyl Pyruvate: An Anti-Microbial Agent that Selectively Targets Pathobionts and Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debebe, Tewodros; Krüger, Monika; Huse, Klaus; Kacza, Johannes; Mühlberg, Katja; König, Brigitte; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    The microbiota has a strong influence on health and disease in humans. A causative shift favoring pathobionts is strongly linked to diseases. Therefore, anti-microbial agents selectively targeting potential pathogens as well as their biofilms are urgently demanded. Here we demonstrate the impact of ethyl pyruvate, so far known as ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory agent, on planktonic microbes and biofilms. Ethyl pyruvate combats preferably the growth of pathobionts belonging to bacteria and fungi independent of the genera and prevailing drug resistance. Surprisingly, this anti-microbial agent preserves symbionts like Lactobacillus species. Moreover, ethyl pyruvate prevents the formation of biofilms and promotes matured biofilms dissolution. This potentially new anti-microbial and anti-biofilm agent could have a tremendous positive impact on human, veterinary medicine and technical industry as well.

  12. Ethyl Pyruvate: An Anti-Microbial Agent that Selectively Targets Pathobionts and Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tewodros Debebe

    Full Text Available The microbiota has a strong influence on health and disease in humans. A causative shift favoring pathobionts is strongly linked to diseases. Therefore, anti-microbial agents selectively targeting potential pathogens as well as their biofilms are urgently demanded. Here we demonstrate the impact of ethyl pyruvate, so far known as ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory agent, on planktonic microbes and biofilms. Ethyl pyruvate combats preferably the growth of pathobionts belonging to bacteria and fungi independent of the genera and prevailing drug resistance. Surprisingly, this anti-microbial agent preserves symbionts like Lactobacillus species. Moreover, ethyl pyruvate prevents the formation of biofilms and promotes matured biofilms dissolution. This potentially new anti-microbial and anti-biofilm agent could have a tremendous positive impact on human, veterinary medicine and technical industry as well.

  13. Physical and anti-microbial characteristics of carbon nanoparticles prepared from lamp soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Verma, Anita K.; Claesson, P.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2007-11-01

    Soot originating from the burning of butter and mustard oil in a lamp with a cotton wick was collected on a brass plate and dispersed in water and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) as naked, and as Gum Arabic (GA, a anionic polyelectrolyte)-coated nanoparticles in water. They were physically characterized, and their anti-bacterial activities were probed on gram positive and negative bacterial colonies. TEM data revealed the presence of 35-55 nm diameter spherical carbon nanoparticles in water and CCl4. The dynamic light scattering determined the average hydrodynamic diameter for the same samples, which was found to be ≈100 nm (in CCl4) and ≈240 nm (in water), implying the packing of these nanoparticles into clusters. GA-coated particles yielded stable suspensions in water, but the clusters were almost the same in size (≈250 nm). The zeta potential distributions of the naked and the GA-coated nanoparticles were found to be unimodal and bimodal, respectively, with both yielding mean zeta potential values nearly equal to zero. Results of energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX) confirmed the absence of toxic metallic elements inside the specimen. X-ray diffraction study confirmed the presence of amorphous as well as graphitized carbon in these nanostructures. The anti-microbial activities in terms of growth inhibition for the carbon nanoparticles against Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC 13709 (native strain) and Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 29655 (native strain) were assayed in agar gel. In vitro testing revealed significant anti-microbial activity against Klebsiella pneumonia, but carbon nanoparticles were unable to kill Staphylococcus aureus.

  14. Physical and anti-microbial characteristics of carbon nanoparticles prepared from lamp soot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, B [Polymer and Biophysics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Verma, Anita K [Nano-Biotech Laboratory, Department of Zoology, K M College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Claesson, P [Department of Chemistry, Surface Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 51, Stockholm, SE-10044 (Sweden); Bohidar, H B [Polymer and Biophysics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2007-11-07

    Soot originating from the burning of butter and mustard oil in a lamp with a cotton wick was collected on a brass plate and dispersed in water and carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) as naked, and as Gum Arabic (GA, a anionic polyelectrolyte)-coated nanoparticles in water. They were physically characterized, and their anti-bacterial activities were probed on gram positive and negative bacterial colonies. TEM data revealed the presence of 35-55 nm diameter spherical carbon nanoparticles in water and CCl{sub 4}. The dynamic light scattering determined the average hydrodynamic diameter for the same samples, which was found to be {approx}100 nm (in CCl{sub 4}) and {approx}240 nm (in water), implying the packing of these nanoparticles into clusters. GA-coated particles yielded stable suspensions in water, but the clusters were almost the same in size ({approx}250 nm). The zeta potential distributions of the naked and the GA-coated nanoparticles were found to be unimodal and bimodal, respectively, with both yielding mean zeta potential values nearly equal to zero. Results of energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX) confirmed the absence of toxic metallic elements inside the specimen. X-ray diffraction study confirmed the presence of amorphous as well as graphitized carbon in these nanostructures. The anti-microbial activities in terms of growth inhibition for the carbon nanoparticles against Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC 13709 (native strain) and Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 29655 (native strain) were assayed in agar gel. In vitro testing revealed significant anti-microbial activity against Klebsiella pneumonia, but carbon nanoparticles were unable to kill Staphylococcus aureus.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs as anti-cancer and anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Sayed; Nam, Young-Joo; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, a series of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs were synthesized and then evaluated in terms of their cytotoxic activities against four human cancer cell lines, e.g. lung cancer (A549), ovarian cancer (SK-OV-3), skin cancer (SK-MEL-2), and colon cancer (HCT15), as well as anti-microbial activities against three microbes, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, and Aspergillus niger. The title compounds were synthesized by Knoevenagel condensation reaction of benzyl cyanide or p-nitrobenzyl cyanide with substituted benzaldehydes in good yields. Most of the compounds exhibited significant suppressive activities against the growth of all cancer cell lines. Compound 3c was most active in inhibiting the growth of A549, SK-OV-3, SK-MEL-2, and HCT15 cells lines with IC50 values of 0.57, 0.14, 0.65, and 0.34 mg/mL, respectively, followed by compounds 3f, 3i, and 3h. Compound 3c exhibited 2.4 times greater cytotoxic activity against HCT15 cells, whereas it showed similar potency against SK-OV-3 cells to that of the standard anti-cancer agent doxorubicin. Structure-activity relationship study revealed that electron-donating groups at the para-position of phenyl ring B were more favorable for improved cytotoxic activity, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups was unfavorable compare to unsubstituted acrylonitrile. An optimal electron density on phenyl ring A of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs was crucial for their cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines used in the present study. Qualitative structure-cytotoxic activity relationships were studied using physicochemical parameters; a good correlation between calculated polar surface area (PSA), a lipophobic parameter, and cytotoxic activity was found. Moreover, all compounds showed significant anti-bacterial activities against S. typhi, whereas compound 3k showed potent inhibition against both S. aureus and S. typhi bacterial strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  16. Performance evaluation of nanoclay enriched anti-microbial hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Sonali; Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu M; Tappa, Karthik K; Giorno, Rebecca; Mills, David K

    2016-02-01

    A major factor contributing to the failure of orthopedic and orthodontic implants is post-surgical infection. Coating metallic implant surfaces with anti-microbial agents has shown promise but does not always prevent the formation of bacterial biofilms. Furthermore, breakdown of these coatings within the human body can cause release of the anti-microbial drugs in an uncontrolled or unpredictable fashion. In this study, we used a calcium alginate and calcium phosphate cement (CPC) hydrogel composite as the base material and enriched these hydrogels with the anti-microbial drug, gentamicin sulfate, loaded within a halloysite nanotubes (HNTs). Our results demonstrate a sustained and extended release of gentamicin from hydrogels enriched with the gentamicin-loaded HNTs. When tested against the gram-negative bacteria, the hydrogel/nanoclay composites showed a pronounced zone of inhibition suggesting that anti-microbial doped nanoclay enriched hydrogels can prevent the growth of bacteria. The release of gentamicin sulfate for a period of five days from the nanoclay-enriched hydrogels would supply anti-microbial agents in a sustained and controlled manner and assist in preventing microbial growth and biofilm formation on the titanium implant surface. A pilot study, using mouse osteoblasts, confirmed that the nanoclay enriched surfaces are also cell supportive as osteoblasts readily, proliferated and produced a type I collagen and proteoglycan matrix.

  17. Shape and size engineered cellulosic nanomaterials as broad spectrum anti-microbial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka R; Kamble, Sunil; Sarkar, Dhiman; Anand, Amitesh; Varma, Anjani J

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized celluloses have been used for decades as antimicrobial wound gauzes and surgical cotton. We now report the successful synthesis of a next generation narrow size range (25-35nm) spherical shaped nanoparticles of 2,3,6-tricarboxycellulose based on cellulose I structural features, for applications as new antimicrobial materials. This study adds to our previous study of 6-carboxycellulose. A wide range of bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Staphloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (non-pathogenic as well as pathogenic strains) were affected by these polymers in in vitro studies. Activity against Mycobacteria were noted at high concentrations (MIC99 values 250-1000μg/ml, as compared to anti-TB drug Isoniazid 0.3μg/ml). However, the broad spectrum activity of oxidized celluloses and their nanoparticles against a wide range of bacteria, including Mycobacteria, show that these materials are promising new biocompatible and biodegradable drug delivery vehicles wherein they can play the dual role of being a drug encapsulant as well as a broad spectrum anti-microbial and anti-TB drug. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, M.; Itavaara, M.

    2012-07-01

    The proposed disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes involves storing the wastes underground in copper-iron containers embedded in buffer material of compacted bentonite. Hydrogen sulphide production by sulphate-reducing prokaryotes is a potential mechanism that could cause corrosion of waste containers in repository conditions. The prevailing conditions in compacted bentonite buffer will be harsh. The swelling pressure is 7-8 MPa, the amount of free water is low and the average pore and pore throat diameters are small. This literature study aims to assess the potential of microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature on the environmental limits of microbial life in extreme conditions and the occurrence of sulphatereducing prokaryotes in extreme environments is reviewed briefly and the results of published studies characterizing microbes and microbial processes in repository conditions or in relevant subsurface environments are presented. The presence of bacteria, including SRBs, has been confirmed in deep groundwater and bentonite-based materials. Sulphate reducers have been detected in various high-pressure environments, and sulphate-reduction based on hydrogen as an energy source is considered a major microbial process in deep subsurface environments. In bentonite, microbial activity is strongly suppressed, mainly due to the low amount of free water and small pores, which limit the transport of microbes and nutrients. Spore-forming bacteria have been shown to survive in compacted bentonite as dormant spores, and they are able to resume a metabolically active state after decompaction. Thus, microbial sulphide production may increase in repository conditions if the dry density of the bentonite buffer is locally reduced. (orig.)

  19. Evidence of an association between use of anti-microbial agents in food animals and anti-microbial resistance among bacteria isolated from humans and the human health consequences of such resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, F J; Nargund, V N; Chiller, T C

    2004-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the use of anti-microbial agents in food animals is associated with anti-microbial resistance among bacteria isolated from humans. The use of anti-microbial agents in food animals is most clearly associated with anti-microbial resistance among Salmonella and Campylobacter isolated from humans, but also appears likely among enterococci, Escherichia coli and other bacteria. Evidence is also accumulating that the anti-microbial resistance among bacteria isolated from humans could be the result of using anti-microbial agents in food animals and is leading to human health consequences. These human health consequences include: (i) infections that would not have otherwise occurred and (ii) increased frequency of treatment failures and increased severity of infection. Increased severity of infection includes longer duration of illness, increased frequency of bloodstream infections, increased hospitalization and increased mortality. Continued work and research efforts will provide more evidence to explain the connection between the use of anti-microbial agents in food animals and anti-microbial-resistant infections in humans. One particular focus, which would solidify this connection, is to understand the factors that dictate spread of resistance determinants, especially resistant genes. With continued efforts on the part of the medical, veterinary and public health community, such research may contribute to more precise guidelines on the use of anti-microbials in food animals.

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Plants as Anti-Microbials for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramar Perumal Samy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The uses of traditional medicinal plants for primary health care have steadily increased worldwide in recent years. Scientists are in search of new phytochemicals that could be developed as useful anti-microbials for treatment of infectious diseases. Currently, out of 80% of pharmaceuticals derived from plants, very few are now being used as anti-microbials. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites that have found anti-microbial properties. This review highlights the current status of traditional medicine, its contribution to modern medicine, recent trends in the evaluation of anti-microbials with a special emphasis upon some tribal medicine, in vitro and in vivo experimental design for screening, and therapeutic efficacy in safety and human clinical trails for commercial outlet. Many of these commercially available compounds are crude preparations administered without performing human clinical trials. Recent methods are useful to standardize the extraction for scientific investigation of new phytochemicals and anti-microbials of traditionally used plants. It is concluded that once the local ethnomedical preparations of traditional sources are scientifically evaluated before dispensing they should replace existing drugs commonly used for the therapeutic treatment of infection. This method should be put into practice for future investigations in the field of ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, ethnobotany and other biological fields for drug discovery.

  1. Phosphorus fractions, microbial biomass and enzyme activities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potohar, northern Punjab, Pakistan in September, 2008 and analysed for P fractions and microbial parameters including microbial biomass C, microbial biomass N, microbial biomass P, and activities of dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase enzymes. The average size of different P fractions (% of total P) in the soils ...

  2. Studies on some Physicochemical properties and anti-microbial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physical, chemical and antimicrobial properties of Luffa cyclindrica seed oil used in the traditional treatment of microbial infection were investigated. The seed oil was extracted by steam distillation. The percentage yield, toxicological profile as well as the physical and chemical properties of the oil was determined by ...

  3. Associations between anti-microbial resistance phenotypes, anti-microbial resistance genotypes and virulence genes of Escherichia coli isolates from Pakistan and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, M; Wang, L P; Wang, S; Hussain, S; Memon, J; Kashif, J; Lu, C-P

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between phenotypic resistance, genotypic resistance and virulence genes of Escherichia coli isolates in Jiangsu province, China and Punjab province Pakistan. A total of 62 E. coli isolates were characterized for phenotypic resistance, genotypic resistance and virulence factor genes. The anti-microbial resistance phenotype and genotypes in relation to virulence factor genes were assessed by statistical analysis. Of 20 tested virulence genes, twelve were found and eight were not found in any isolates. sitA and TspE4C2 were the most prevalent virulence genes. Of the 13 anti-microbial agents tested, resistance to ampicillin, sulphonamide and tetracycline was the most frequent. All isolates were multiresistant, and 74% were resistant to trimethoprim and sulphamethaxazole. Phenotypically, tetracycline-, cefotaxime- and trimethoprim-resistant isolates had increased virulence factors as compared with susceptible isolates. Genotypically, resistant genes Tem, ctx-M, Tet, Sul 1, dhfr1, Cat2 and flo-R showed the association with the virulence genes. Almost all classes of anti-microbial-resistant genes have a high association with virulence. Resistant isolates have more virulent genes than the susceptible isolates. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Metalliferous Biosignatures for Deep Subsurface Microbial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Parnell, John; Brolly, Connor; Spinks, Sam; Bowden, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of microbes and metals is widely assumed to have occurred in surface or very shallow subsurface environments. However new evidence suggests that much microbial activity occurs in the deep subsurface. Fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian ?red beds? contain widespread centimetre-scale reduction spheroids in which a pale reduced spheroid in otherwise red rocks contains a metalliferous core. Most of the reduction of Fe (III) in sediments is caused by Fe (III) reducing bacteria. They ha...

  5. Anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities of Caesalpinia pulcherrima leaves. U Bose, V Bala, AK Shill, AA Rahman. Abstract. The crude methanolic extracts of leaves of Caesalpinia pulcherrima were evaluated for its anti-inflammatory and neuropharmacological activities. When given orally to rats at dose of ...

  6. Rechargeable microbial anti-adhesive polymethyl methacrylate incorporating silver sulfadiazine-loaded mesoporous silica nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jeong-Ki; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ae; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2017-10-01

    Even though polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin is widely used as a dental material, it has poor microbial anti-adhesive properties, which accelerates oral infections. In this investigation, silver-sulfadiazine (AgSD)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Ag-MSNs) were incorporated into PMMA to introduce long-term microbial anti-adhesive effects and to make PMMA a rechargeable resin. After characterization of the Ag-MSNs in terms of their mesoporous characteristics and drug loading capacity, the 3 point flexural test and hardness were evaluated in PMMA incorporating Ag-MSNs (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5%). Anti-adhesive effects were observed for Candida albicans and Streptococcus oralis with experimental specimens for up to 28days and after recharging with AgSD. A typical spherical morphology and high mesoporosity were observed for the MSNs used for loading AgSD. Incorporation of Ag-MSNs into PMMA (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5%) sustained its flexural strength but increased its surface hardness. Anti-adhesive effects were observed after 1h of exposure to both microbial species, and the effects accelerated with increasing Ag-MSN incorporation into PMMA. Long-term microbial anti-adhesive effects were observed for up to 14 days, and further long-term (7 days) anti-adhesive effects were observed after reloading the Ag-MSN-incorporated PMMA (aged for 28 days) with AgSD; these effects were largely caused by released silver ions and partially by changes in surface hydrophilicity. No cytotoxicity to keratinocytes was observed. The improved mechanical properties and the prolonged microbial anti-adhesive effects, which lasted after reloading of the drug, suggest the potential usefulness of Ag-MSN-incorporated PMMA as a microbial anti-adhesive dental material. Ag-MSN-incorporated PMMA can be used as a microbial anti-adhesive dental material for dentures, orthodontic devices and provisional restorative materials. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of yacon leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane B. Oliveira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. H. Rob. , Asteraceae, known as yacon, is an herb that is traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in folk medicine. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this plant has other interesting properties such as anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory actions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the topical anti-inflammatory property of different extracts prepared from yacon leaves and analyze the role of different chemical classes in this activity. Three yacon leaf extracts were obtained: aqueous extract, where chlorogenic acid derivatives and sesquiterpene lactones were detected; leaf rinse extract, rich in sesquiterpene lactones; and polar extract, rich in chlorogenic acid derivatives. All the extracts exhibited anti-edematogenic activity in vivo (aqueous extract: 25.9% edema inhibition at 0.50 mg/ear; polar extract: 42.7% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear; and leaf rinse extract: 44.1% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear. The leaf rinse extract furnished the best results regarding neutrophil migration inhibition, and NO, TNF-α and PGE2 inhibition. These data indicate that both sesquiterpene lactones and chlorogenic acid derivatives contribute to the anti-inflammatory action, although sesquiterpene lactones seem to have more pronounced effects. In conclusion, yacon leaf extracts, particularly the sesquiterpene lactone-rich extract, has potential use as topical anti-inflammatory agent.

  8. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of yacon leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane B. Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. H. Rob. , Asteraceae, known as yacon, is an herb that is traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in folk medicine. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this plant has other interesting properties such as anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory actions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the topical anti-inflammatory property of different extracts prepared from yacon leaves and analyze the role of different chemical classes in this activity. Three yacon leaf extracts were obtained: aqueous extract, where chlorogenic acid derivatives and sesquiterpene lactones were detected; leaf rinse extract, rich in sesquiterpene lactones; and polar extract, rich in chlorogenic acid derivatives. All the extracts exhibited anti-edematogenic activity in vivo (aqueous extract: 25.9% edema inhibition at 0.50 mg/ear; polar extract: 42.7% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear; and leaf rinse extract: 44.1% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear. The leaf rinse extract furnished the best results regarding neutrophil migration inhibition, and NO, TNF-α and PGE2 inhibition. These data indicate that both sesquiterpene lactones and chlorogenic acid derivatives contribute to the anti-inflammatory action, although sesquiterpene lactones seem to have more pronounced effects. In conclusion, yacon leaf extracts, particularly the sesquiterpene lactone-rich extract, has potential use as topical anti-inflammatory agent.

  9. Anti-allergic, anti-pruritic, and anti-inflammatory activities of Centella asiatica extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mathew; Joseph, Lincy; Ramaswamy

    2009-07-03

    This study investigated antipruritic and anti-inflammatory effect of Centella asiatica extract in rats and anti-allergic in vitro using sheep (Capra hircus) serum method and compound 48/80 induced mast cell degranulation method, compared with standard drug ketotifen fumarate. In rats, extract of Centella asiatica administered orally was examined for anti-pruritic study and chlorpheniramine maleate was used as standard drug while carageenan paw induced inflammatory method was used for the antiinfammatory study. The results show that the extracts of Centella asiatica exhibited antiallergic, anti-pruritic and anti-inflammatory activities.

  10. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Phthalimide Derivatives as in Vitro Anti-Microbial, Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lamie, P.F.; Philoppes, J.N.; El-Gendy, A.O.; Rárová, Lucie; Grúz, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 9 (2015), s. 16620-16642 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : synthesis * phthalimides * anti-microbial Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.465, year: 2015

  11. Ethyl Pyruvate: An Anti-Microbial Agent that Selectively Targets Pathobionts and Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Debebe, Tewodros; Kr?ger, Monika; Huse, Klaus; Kacza, Johannes; M?hlberg, Katja; K?nig, Brigitte; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota has a strong influence on health and disease in humans. A causative shift favoring pathobionts is strongly linked to diseases. Therefore, anti-microbial agents selectively targeting potential pathogens as well as their biofilms are urgently demanded. Here we demonstrate the impact of ethyl pyruvate, so far known as ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory agent, on planktonic microbes and biofilms. Ethyl pyruvate combats preferably the growth of pathobionts belonging to bacteria and...

  12. Metalliferous Biosignatures for Deep Subsurface Microbial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Brolly, Connor; Spinks, Sam; Bowden, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of microbes and metals is widely assumed to have occurred in surface or very shallow subsurface environments. However new evidence suggests that much microbial activity occurs in the deep subsurface. Fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian `red beds' contain widespread centimetre-scale reduction spheroids in which a pale reduced spheroid in otherwise red rocks contains a metalliferous core. Most of the reduction of Fe (III) in sediments is caused by Fe (III) reducing bacteria. They have the potential to reduce a range of metals and metalloids, including V, Cu, Mo, U and Se, by substituting them for Fe (III) as electron acceptors, which are all elements common in reduction spheroids. The spheroidal morphology indicates that they were formed at depth, after compaction, which is consistent with a microbial formation. Given that the consequences of Fe (III) reduction have a visual expression, they are potential biosignatures during exploration of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological record. There is debate about the energy available from Fe (III) reduction on Mars, but the abundance of iron in Martian soils makes it one of the most valuable prospects for life there. Entrapment of the microbes themselves as fossils is possible, but a more realistic target during the exploration of Mars would be the colour contrasts reflecting selective reduction or oxidation. This can be achieved by analysing quartz grains across a reduction spheroid using Raman spectroscopy, which demonstrates its suitability for life detection in subsurface environments. Microbial action is the most suitable explanation for the formation of reduction spheroids and may act as metalliferous biosignatures for deep subsurface microbial activity.

  13. Metalliferous Biosignatures for Deep Subsurface Microbial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Brolly, Connor; Spinks, Sam; Bowden, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of microbes and metals is widely assumed to have occurred in surface or very shallow subsurface environments. However new evidence suggests that much microbial activity occurs in the deep subsurface. Fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian 'red beds' contain widespread centimetre-scale reduction spheroids in which a pale reduced spheroid in otherwise red rocks contains a metalliferous core. Most of the reduction of Fe (III) in sediments is caused by Fe (III) reducing bacteria. They have the potential to reduce a range of metals and metalloids, including V, Cu, Mo, U and Se, by substituting them for Fe (III) as electron acceptors, which are all elements common in reduction spheroids. The spheroidal morphology indicates that they were formed at depth, after compaction, which is consistent with a microbial formation. Given that the consequences of Fe (III) reduction have a visual expression, they are potential biosignatures during exploration of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological record. There is debate about the energy available from Fe (III) reduction on Mars, but the abundance of iron in Martian soils makes it one of the most valuable prospects for life there. Entrapment of the microbes themselves as fossils is possible, but a more realistic target during the exploration of Mars would be the colour contrasts reflecting selective reduction or oxidation. This can be achieved by analysing quartz grains across a reduction spheroid using Raman spectroscopy, which demonstrates its suitability for life detection in subsurface environments. Microbial action is the most suitable explanation for the formation of reduction spheroids and may act as metalliferous biosignatures for deep subsurface microbial activity.

  14. The Diversity of Anti-Microbial Secondary Metabolites Produced by Fungal Endophytes: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mousa, Walaa Kamel; Raizada, Manish N.

    2013-01-01

    Endophytes are microbes that inhabit host plants without causing disease and are reported to be reservoirs of metabolites that combat microbes and other pathogens. Here we review diverse classes of secondary metabolites, focusing on anti-microbial compounds, synthesized by fungal endophytes including terpenoids, alkaloids, phenylpropanoids, aliphatic compounds, polyketides, and peptides from the interdisciplinary perspectives of biochemistry, genetics, fungal biology, host plant biology, huma...

  15. In vitro efficacy of an anti-microbial solution in prevention of micro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To evaluate the In vitro efficacy of a new biologically acceptable Anti Microbial-Solution (AMS) for prevention of colonization of polymeric denture base materials. Materials and methods: Sample discs of 6.25mm in diameter and 2mm thick were sectioned from molded rods using two types of Poly Methylmethacrylate ...

  16. In-vitro anti-microbial and brine-shrimp lethality potential of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ethno-medicinal therapies ranging form oral, skin, gastro-intestinal to respiratory problems. The effects of this plant on the sensitivity of microorganisms need verification and its potential for cytotoxicity needs to be investigated. Thus, the anti-microbial and brine–shrimp lethality studies on the leaves and stem were carried ...

  17. The diversity of anti-microbial secondary metabolites produced by fungal endophytes: an interdisciplinary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Walaa Kamel; Raizada, Manish N

    2013-01-01

    Endophytes are microbes that inhabit host plants without causing disease and are reported to be reservoirs of metabolites that combat microbes and other pathogens. Here we review diverse classes of secondary metabolites, focusing on anti-microbial compounds, synthesized by fungal endophytes including terpenoids, alkaloids, phenylpropanoids, aliphatic compounds, polyketides, and peptides from the interdisciplinary perspectives of biochemistry, genetics, fungal biology, host plant biology, human and plant pathology. Several trends were apparent. First, host plants are often investigated for endophytes when there is prior indigenous knowledge concerning human medicinal uses (e.g., Chinese herbs). However, within their native ecosystems, and where investigated, endophytes were shown to produce compounds that target pathogens of the host plant. In a few examples, both fungal endophytes and their hosts were reported to produce the same compounds. Terpenoids and polyketides are the most purified anti-microbial secondary metabolites from endophytes, while flavonoids and lignans are rare. Examples are provided where fungal genes encoding anti-microbial compounds are clustered on chromosomes. As different genera of fungi can produce the same metabolite, genetic clustering may facilitate sharing of anti-microbial secondary metabolites between fungi. We discuss gaps in the literature and how more interdisciplinary research may lead to new opportunities to develop bio-based commercial products to combat global crop and human pathogens.

  18. Triclosan Alters Anti-microbial and Inflammatory Responses of Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallet, Mark A.; Calderon, Nadia L.; Alonso, Tess R.; Choe, Christina S.; Catalfamo, Dana L.; Lalane, Charles J.; Neiva, Kathleen G.; Panagakos, Foti; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are a class of pathologies wherein oral microbes induce harmful immune responses in a susceptible host. Therefore, an agent which can both reduce microbial burden and lessen pathogenesis of localized inflammation would have beneficial effects in periodontal disease. 2,4,4-trichloro-2-hydroxydiphenyl-ether [triclosan] is currently used in oral care products due to broad spectrum anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. Objective To determine effects of triclosan on the response of oral epithelial cells to stimulation with the inflammatory microbial product lipopolysaccharide [LPS], a ligand for toll-like receptor 4 [TLR4]. Materials/Methods Primary human oral epithelial cells were stimulated with LPS in the presence and/or absence of triclosan after which expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, β-defensins, micro-RNAs [miRNAs] or TLR signaling pathway proteins were evaluated. Results Here we demonstrate that triclosan is a potent inhibitor of oral epithelial cell LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by inducing miRNA regulation of the TLR-signaling pathway. Triclosan was not a pan-suppresser of oral epithelial cell responses as β-defensin 2 [βD2] and βD3 were upregulated by triclosan following LPS-stimulation. Conclusions These data demonstrate both a novel anti-microbial mechanism by which triclosan improves plaque control and an additional anti-inflammatory property which could have beneficial effects in periodontal disease resolution. PMID:24079913

  19. Food Fight: Role of Itaconate and Other Metabolites in Anti-Microbial Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Harding H.; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Itaconate is a newly discovered mammalian metabolite bearing significant implications for our understanding of cellular immunometabolism and anti-microbial defense. Here, we explore recent findings regarding the role of itaconate in the innate immune response and highlight the emerging principle that metabolites can have distinct immunological functions independent of bioenergetics. PMID:27626199

  20. Anti-microbial resistance of non-clinical E. coli isolates from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-microbial resistance profiles of non-clinical E. coli isolates were studied in an 8 years old commercial layer poultry farm in Imo state, Nigeria currently stocking about 6000 birds of different strains and ages, housed in 4 separate buildings. Isolates were screened against 12 antibiotics using the disc diffusion method.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of (E)-1-(substituted)-3-phenylprop-2-en-1-ones bearing rhodanines as potent anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ming-Xia; Deng, Xian-Qing; Li, Ya-Ru; Zheng, Chang-Ji; Hong, Lan; Piao, Hu-Ri

    2014-10-01

    Herein, we report the design, syntheses and in vitro anti-microbial activity of two series of rhodanines with chalcone moiety. Anti-microbial tests showed that some of the synthesized compounds exhibited good inhibition (MIC = 1-8 µg/mL) against multi-drug-resistant Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin resistant and quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in which the compound 4g was found to be the most potent with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1 µg/mL against two methicillin-resistant S. aureus.

  2. Human β-Defensin-2: A natural anti-microbial peptide present in amniotic fluid participates in the host response to microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Eleazar; Espinoza, Jimmy; Nien, Jyh Kae; Kusanovic, Juan; Erez, Offer; Richani, Karina; Santolaya-Forgas, Joaquin; Romero, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) is a potent anti-microbial peptide that is part of the innate immune response. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HBD-2 is present in amniotic fluid and if its concentration changes with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and labor. STUDY DESIGN Amniotic fluid was retrieved by amniocentesis from 318 patients in the following groups: 1) mid-trimester (n=75); 2) term not in labor (n=28) and in labor (n=51); 3) preterm labor and intact membranes without MIAC who delivered at term (n=36), who delivered preterm without MIAC (n=52), and preterm labor with MIAC who delivered preterm (n=25); and 4) preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) with (n=25) and without MIAC (n=26). MIAC was defined as a positive amniotic fluid culture for microorganisms. Amniotic fluid HBD-2 concentrations were determined using a sensitive and specific ELISA. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. RESULTS 1) HBD-2 was detected in all amniotic fluid samples; 2) the concentration of HBD-2 did not change with gestational age from midtrimester to term (p=0.8); 3) Intra-amniotic infection was associated with a significant increase in amniotic fluid concentrations of HBD-2 in both women with preterm labor and intact membranes, and women with preterm PROM (p100 cell per ml) had a higher median amniotic fluid concentration of HBD-2 than those without this condition (panti-microbial peptide, and this may account for some of the anti-microbial activity of amniotic fluid; 2) Amniotic fluid HBD-2 concentrations are increased in women with MIAC, regardless of the membrane status (intact membranes or PROM); and 3) We propose that amniotic fluid HBD-2 is part of the innate immune system within the amniotic cavity. PMID:17437194

  3. Anti-diarrheal, anti-secretory, anti-spasmodic and antiulcer activities of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In isolated tissue (rabbit jejunum), Am.Cr concentration-dependently (0.01 - 3.0 mg/mL) produced relaxation of K+ (80 mM)-induced and spontaneous contractions at ... anti-secretory, antispasmodic and anti-ulcer activities, probably mediated through dual mechanisms, including Ca2+ influx and PDE enzyme(s) inhibition.

  4. Anti-microbial effect of Nigella sativa seed extract against staphylococcal skin Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, Shiva; Niakan, Mohammad; Naseri, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    The development of microbial resistance to the existing anti-microbial agents has become a real challenge and a serious problem facing patients suffering from skin infections. Seeds of Nigella sativa have been used for a long time in folk medicine for the treatment of skin infections. Production of new potent agents is urgently needed, especially for hospitals and health care centers. This study is designed to explore anti-microbial effect of extract from the Nigella sativa seeds against skin pustules infection. The in vivo anti-microbial effect of the Nigella sativa seeds extract at a concentration of 33% on pustules staphylococcal Skin Infections was assessed and compared with standard drug mupirocin on 40 neonates .All neonates were divided and examined into two experimental and control groups randomly. Recovery times were compared between two groups. The mean of recovery time in experimental group was 75/1 with SD= ± 12, and the mean of recovery time in control group was 69/4 with SD = ± 8/7.There was no significant difference in recovery time between two groups (p value = 0/131). In clinical practice, the agent of Nigella Sativa recovered as pustular from tissues of all patients. While the extract was as nearly effective as the standard drug, mupirocin, no side effect was observed.

  5. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  6. Development of an anti-microbial peptide-mediated liposomal delivery system: a novel approach towards pH-responsive anti-microbial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianyu; Tang, Jie; Ran, Rui; Liu, Yayuan; Zhang, Zhirong; Gao, Huile; He, Qin

    2016-05-01

    On one hand, the application of anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) in the construction of AMPs-mediated drug delivery system has not yet been fully exploited; on the other hand, its non-selectivity in vivo has also limited its clinical application. In this work, we chose one pH-responsive peptide, [D]-H6L9, and functionalized it onto the surface of liposomes (D-Lip). The protonation of histidines in the sequence of [D]-H6L9 under pH 6.3 could switch the surface charge of D-Lip from negative (under pH 7.4) to positive (under pH 6.3), and the cellular uptake and tumor spheroids uptake were increased accordingly. Lysosome co-localization assay suggested that there was only little overlap of D-Lip with lysosomes in 12 h, which indicated that D-Lip could escape lysosomes effectively. In vivo biodistribution assay on C26 tumor-bearing BALB/C mice showed that DiR-labeled D-Lip could reach tumors as much as PEG-Lip, and both tumor slices and quantitative measurement of dispersed cells of in vivo tumors by flow cytometry demonstrated that D-Lip could be taken up by tumors more efficiently. Therefore, we have established an anti-microbial peptide-mediated liposomal delivery system for tumor delivery.

  7. Functional marine metagenomic screening for anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Karin; Golberg, Karina; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Marks, Robert; Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication process, entails the production of signaling molecules that enable synchronized gene expression in microbial communities to regulate myriad microbial functions, including biofilm formation. QS disruption may constitute an innovative approach to the design of novel antifouling and anti-biofilm agents. To identify novel quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI), 2,500 environmental bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from uncultured marine planktonic bacteria were screened for QSI activity using soft agar overlaid with wild type Chromobacterium violaceum as an indicator. Of the BAC library clones, 7% showed high QSI activity (>40%) against the indicator bacterium, suggesting that QSI is common in the marine environment. The most active compound, eluted from BAC clone 14-A5, disrupted QS signaling pathways and reduced biofilm formation in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. The mass spectra of the active BAC clone (14-A5) that had been visualized by thin layer chromatography was dominated by a m/z peak of 362.1.

  8. Comparative anti-microbial efficacy of Azadirachta indica irrigant with standard endodontic irrigants: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arindam; Kundabala, Mala

    2014-03-01

    The anti-microbial efficacy of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (SHC) and 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate were compared with an experimental irrigant formulated from the Neem tree, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. A sample of 36 single rooted anterior teeth with periapical radiolucency and absence of response to vitality tests that required root canal treatment were selected for this study. The test irrigants and their combinations were assigned to five different groups and saline served as the control. Access cavities were prepared using an aseptic technique and samples collected for both anaerobic culture and Gram stained smears, followed by irrigation and sample collection again. The number of organisms were expressed in colony forming units/ml after 72 h of incubation; the smears were analyzed for their microbial loads and tissue clearance and assessed as per defined criteria. Our results found the maximum reduction in microbial loads, when analyzed by culture method, with a combination of SHC and the experimental neem irrigant. Maximum tissue clearance on the Gram Stained smears was also found with the same combination. Neem irrigant has anti-microbial efficacy and can be considered for endodontic use.

  9. Relationship between microbial activity and microbial community structure in six full-scale anaerobic digesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regueiro, L.; Veiga, P.; Figueroa, M.; Alonso-Gutierrez, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lema, J.M.; Carballa, M.

    2012-01-01

    High activity levels and balanced anaerobic microbial communities are necessary to attain proper anaerobic digestion performance. Therefore, this work was focused on the kinetic performance and the microbial community structure of six full-scale anaerobic digesters and one lab-scale co-digester.

  10. Role of toxicogenomics in the development of safe, efficacious and novel anti-microbial therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Jamal S M; Abu-Zinadah, Osama A; Bora, Roop S; Ahmed, Mohamed M M; Saini, Kulvinder S

    2013-06-01

    Over the last two decades, occurrence of bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics has necessitated the development of safer and more potent anti-microbial drugs. However, the development of novel antibiotics is severely hampered by adverse side effects, such as drug-induced liver toxicity. Several antibacterial drugs are known to have the potential to cause severe liver damage. The major challenge in developing novel anti-microbial drugs is to predict, with certain amount of probability, the drug-induced toxicity during the pre-clinical stages, thus optimizing and reducing the time and cost of drug development. Toxicogenomics approach is generally used to harness the potential of genomic tools and to understand the physiological basis of drug-induced toxicity based on the in-depth analysis of Metagenomic data sets, i.e., transcriptional, translational or metabolomic profiles. Toxicogenomics, therefore, represents a new paradigm in the drug development process, and is anticipated to play an invaluable role in future to develop safe and efficacious medicines, by predicting the toxic potential of a new chemical entity (NCE) in early stages of drug discovery. This review examines the toxicogenomic approach in predicting the safety/toxicity of novel anti-microbial drugs, and analyses the promises, pitfalls and challenges of applying this powerful technology to the drug development process.

  11. Evaluation of the anti microbial properties of themethanol extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity of the methanol extract of Mitracarpus scarber, a species used in folk medicine by West Africa native people was investigated against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coil, Klebsiella pneumonia, Streptococcus pyogenes, Nesseria gonorrhea, Candida albican, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ...

  12. Phytochemical, trypanocidal and anti-microbial studies of Enantia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity was also investigated, in a screening conducted using seven strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus lutens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis) and the yeasts, Candida albicans and Aspergillus ...

  13. Synthesis, Anti-microbial and Molecular Docking Studies of Quinazolin-4(3H-one Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahia Nasser Mabkhot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, synthesis, antimicrobial activities and molecular docking studies of some new series of substituted quinazolinone 2a–h and 3a–d were described. Starting form 2-aminobenzamide derivatives 1, a new series of quinazolinone derivatives has been synthesized, in high yields, assisted by microwave and classical methods. Some of these substituted quinazolinones were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Esherichia coli and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis, and anti-fungal activity against (Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cervevisiae, and Candida albicans using agar well diffusion method. Among the prepared products, 3-benzyl-2-(4-chlorophenylquinazolin-4(3H-one (3a was found to exhibits the most potent in vitro anti-microbial activity with MICs of 25.6 ± 0.5, 24.3 ± 0.4, 30.1 ± 0.6, and 25.1 ± 0.5 µg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Esherichia coli, respectively. Compound 3a was found to exhibits the most potent in vitro anti-fungal activity with MICs of 18.3 ± 0.6, 23.1 ± 0.4, and 26.1 ± 0. 5 µg/mL against Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cervevisiae, and Candidaal bicans, respectively.

  14. Anti-inflammatory, Anti-estrogenic, and Anti-implantation Activity of Bergia suffruticosa (Delile) Fenzl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bind, Sandeep Kumar; Jivrajani, Mehul; Anandjiwala, Sheetal; Nivsarkar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bergia suffruticosa (Delile) Fenzl (Syn. Bergia odorata Edgew) (Elatinaceae family) is used traditionally to repair bones and is applied as a poultice on sores. It is also used for stomach troubles and as an antidote to scorpion stings. So far, very little scientific work has been reported to validate its ethnomedical uses in the alleviation of pain, bone repair, etc., Objective: This study was designed to explore the anti-inflammatory and anti-implantation potential of n-hexane extract of B. suffruticosa whole plant in mice along with identification of its chemical constituents. Materials and Methods: n-Hexane extract of B. suffruticosa whole plant was screened for acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity followed by an anti-estrogenic activity. Eventually, n-hexane extract was tested for anti-implantation activity by exploiting markers of uterine receptivity, lipid peroxidation, and superoxide enzyme activity. The extract was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight in each study. Results: Thin layer chromatography fingerprint profile of n-hexane extract revealed the presence of lupeol and β-sitosterol. The n-hexane extract reduced the edema by 80% in acute inflammation, whereas it reduced edema to 75% on the 5th day in chronic inflammation. The n-hexane extract reduced elevated malonaldehyde level from 6 to 2.5 nmol/g × 10−5 and increased superoxide dismutase enzyme activity from 0 to 350 units/g in treated animals on the 5th day of pregnancy. Moreover, extract decreased uterine weight from 0.33 to 0.2 g in estradiol treated animals. Conclusion: These results indicate that n-hexane extract of B. suffruticosa is having potent anti-inflammatory, anti-estrogenic, and anti-implantation activity. This is the first report of all the pharmacological activities of B. suffruticosa mentioned above. SUMMARY TLC fingerprint profile of n-hexane extract of Bergia suffruticosa whole plant revealed the presence of lupeol and

  15. Anti-bacterial activity of Guizotia scabra L. and Maesa lanceolata L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicinal plants roots, barks, leaves and flowers were collected from the Institute of Higher Education (called INES-Ruhengeri) botanical garden established near Volcanoes of Rwanda. Dried crude extracts were prepared in the laboratory for anti-microbial activity assay on identified Erwinia carotovora from infected ...

  16. Conformational solution studies of the anti-microbial temporin A retro-analogues by using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamysz, Wojciech; Mickiewicz, Beata; Greber, Katarzyna; Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia

    2007-05-01

    Temporin A (TA) is a small, basic and highly hydrophobic peptide, isolated from the skin of the European red frog, Rana temporaria. The TA (FLPLIGRVLSGIL-NH2) displays a broad spectrum of anti-microbial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi Candida albicans. In this study we investigate the solution structure of two TA retro-analogues, (6-1)(7-13)-TA (GILPLFRVLSGIL-NH2) and retro-TA (LIGSLVRGILPLF-NH2) by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The 3D solution structure of the analogues was established by using inter-proton distances and vicinal coupling constants in the Simulated Annealing (SA) calculations (XPLOR program). The NMR conformational studies show the existence of the helical structure in the middle part of the (6-1)(7-13)-TA peptide and an unordered structure of the retro-TA analogue under the D3-TFE/H2O (3:7, v/v) conditions. Our investigations have shown that the hydrophobic cluster at N-terminus with the Pro amino acid residue in position 3 or 4, the helical structure and the amphipathic character of the peptide are responsible for the anti-microbial activity of the TA analogues. Copyright (c) 2007 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hye-Jin; Kang, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Hyun-Joo; Kang, Young-Sook; Lim, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Myeong; Park, Eun-Hee

    2008-01-04

    Taraxacum officinale has been widely used as a folkloric medicine for the treatment of diverse diseases. The dried plant was extracted with 70% ethanol to generate its ethanol extract (TEE). For some experiments, ethyl acetate (EA), n-butanol (BuOH) and aqueous (Aq) fractions were prepared in succession from TEE. TEE showed a scavenging activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a diminishing effect on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and an anti-angiogenic activity in the chicken chorioallantoic (CAM) assay. In the carrageenan-induced air pouch model, TEE inhibited production of exudate, and significantly diminished nitric oxide (NO) and leukocyte levels in the exudate. It also possessed an inhibitory effect on acetic acid-induced vascular permeability and caused a dose-dependent inhibition on acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing in mice. Suppressive effects of TEE on the production of NO and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages were also assessed. Among the fractions, the n-butanol fraction (BuOH) was identified to be most effective in the CAM assay. Collectively, Taraxacum officinale contains anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities through its inhibition of NO production and COX-2 expression and/or its antioxidative activity.

  18. Platinum compounds with anti-tumour activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plooy, A.C.M.; Lohman, P.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    Ten platinum (Pt) coordination complexes with different ligands, comprising both Pt(II) and Pt(IV) complexes of which the cis-compounds all possessed at least some anti-tumour activity and the trans-compounds were inactive, were tested as to their effect on cell survival and the induction and repair

  19. NOVEL ANTI-MICROBIAL PEPTIDE, NK-LYSIN, IS PRODUCED LOCALLY IN THE GUT OF EIMERIA-INFECTED HOST

    Science.gov (United States)

    NK-lysin is an anti-microbial and anti-tumor protein produced by NK cells and T lymphocytes in mammals and is considered to be an important component of the local innate immune response to pathogens. Chicken NK-lysin consists of an 868 bp DNA sequence with an ORF of 140 amino acids with a predicted ...

  20. Low Stress Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Treated Cotton Fabric Subjected to Zinc Oxide-Anti-Microbial Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Yin-Ling

    2013-01-22

    Cotton fabrics are highly popular because of their excellent properties such as regeneration, bio-degradation, softness, affinity to skin and hygroscopic properties. When in contact with the human body, cotton fabrics offer an ideal environment for microbial growth due to their ability to retain oxygen, moisture and warmth, as well as nutrients from spillages and body sweat. Therefore, an anti-microbial coating formulation (Microfresh and Microban together with zinc oxide as catalyst) was developed for cotton fabrics to improve treatment effectiveness. In addition, plasma technology was employed in the study which roughened the surface of the materials, improving the loading of zinc oxides on the surface. In this study, the low stress mechanical properties of plasma pre-treated and/or anti-microbial-treated cotton fabric were studied. The overall results show that the specimens had improved bending properties when zinc oxides were added in the anti-microbial coating recipe. Also, without plasma pre-treatment, anti-microbial-treatment of cotton fabric had a positive effect only on tensile resilience, shear stress at 0.5° and compressional energy, while plasma-treated specimens had better overall tensile properties even after anti-microbial treatment.

  1. Low Stress Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Treated Cotton Fabric Subjected to Zinc Oxide-Anti-Microbial Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wai Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton fabrics are highly popular because of their excellent properties such as regeneration, bio-degradation, softness, affinity to skin and hygroscopic properties. When in contact with the human body, cotton fabrics offer an ideal environment for microbial growth due to their ability to retain oxygen, moisture and warmth, as well as nutrients from spillages and body sweat. Therefore, an anti-microbial coating formulation (Microfresh and Microban together with zinc oxide as catalyst was developed for cotton fabrics to improve treatment effectiveness. In addition, plasma technology was employed in the study which roughened the surface of the materials, improving the loading of zinc oxides on the surface. In this study, the low stress mechanical properties of plasma pre-treated and/or anti-microbial-treated cotton fabric were studied. The overall results show that the specimens had improved bending properties when zinc oxides were added in the anti-microbial coating recipe. Also, without plasma pre-treatment, anti-microbial-treatment of cotton fabric had a positive effect only on tensile resilience, shear stress at 0.5° and compressional energy, while plasma-treated specimens had better overall tensile properties even after anti-microbial treatment.

  2. The effect of glyphosate application on soil microbial activities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... can be concluded that glyphosate application may alter (increase) soil microbial activity and population. Increased microbial ... indicators than physical and chemical parameters as they are able to respond ..... microbiological and biochemical processes in soil, in: Burns RG, Dick. RP (Eds.), Enzymes in the ...

  3. The effect of glyphosate application on soil microbial activities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... In recent years, intensive use of herbicides has increasingly become a matter of environmental concern partially because of the ... can be concluded that glyphosate application may alter (increase) soil microbial activity and population. ..... in microbial biomass, decrease crop growth and yields, and increase ...

  4. Anti-corrosive and anti-microbial properties of nanocrystalline Ni-Ag coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghupathy, Y.; Natarajan, K.A.; Srivastava, Chandan, E-mail: csrivastava@materials.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Electrodeposition yielded phase-segregated, nanocrystalline Ni-Ag coatings. • Ni-Ag alloys exhibited smaller Ni crystals compared to pure Ni. • Ultra fine Ni grains of size 12–14 nm favoured Ni-Ag solid solution. • Nanocrystalline Ag resisted bio-fouling by Sulphate Reducing bacteria. • Ni-Ag outperformed pure Ni in corrosion and bio-corrosion tests. - Abstract: Anti-corrosive and anti-bacterial properties of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-Ag coatings are illustrated. Pure Ni, Ni-7 at.% Ag, & Ni-14 at.% Ag coatings were electrodeposited on Cu substrate. Coating consisted of Ni-rich and Ag-rich solid solution phases. With increase in the Ag content, the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ag coating initially increased and then decreased. The initial increase was due to the Ni-Ag solid solution. The subsequent decrease was due to the increased galvanic coupling between the Ag-rich and Ni-rich phases. For all Ag contents, the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ag coating was higher than the pure Ni coating. Exposure to Sulphate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) revealed that the extent of bio-fouling decreased with increase in the Ag content. After 2 month exposure to SRB, the Ni-Ag coatings demonstrated less loss in corrosion resistance (58% for Ni-7 at.% Ag and 20% for Ni-14 at.% Ag) when compared pure Ni coating (115%).

  5. Anti-corrosive and anti-microbial properties of nanocrystalline Ni-Ag coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghupathy, Y.; Natarajan, K.A.; Srivastava, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Electrodeposition yielded phase-segregated, nanocrystalline Ni-Ag coatings. • Ni-Ag alloys exhibited smaller Ni crystals compared to pure Ni. • Ultra fine Ni grains of size 12–14 nm favoured Ni-Ag solid solution. • Nanocrystalline Ag resisted bio-fouling by Sulphate Reducing bacteria. • Ni-Ag outperformed pure Ni in corrosion and bio-corrosion tests. - Abstract: Anti-corrosive and anti-bacterial properties of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-Ag coatings are illustrated. Pure Ni, Ni-7 at.% Ag, & Ni-14 at.% Ag coatings were electrodeposited on Cu substrate. Coating consisted of Ni-rich and Ag-rich solid solution phases. With increase in the Ag content, the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ag coating initially increased and then decreased. The initial increase was due to the Ni-Ag solid solution. The subsequent decrease was due to the increased galvanic coupling between the Ag-rich and Ni-rich phases. For all Ag contents, the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ag coating was higher than the pure Ni coating. Exposure to Sulphate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) revealed that the extent of bio-fouling decreased with increase in the Ag content. After 2 month exposure to SRB, the Ni-Ag coatings demonstrated less loss in corrosion resistance (58% for Ni-7 at.% Ag and 20% for Ni-14 at.% Ag) when compared pure Ni coating (115%).

  6. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  7. Anti-secretory, anti-inflammatory and anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of several fractions isolated from Piper carpunya Ruiz & Pav.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quílez, A; Berenguer, B; Gilardoni, G; Souccar, C; de Mendonça, S; Oliveira, L F S; Martín-Calero, M J; Vidari, G

    2010-04-21

    The leaves of Piper carpunya Ruiz & Pav. (syn Piper lenticellosum C.D.C.) (Piperaceae), are widely used in folk medicine in tropical and subtropical countries of South America as an anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer, anti-diarrheal and anti-parasitical remedy as well as an ailment for skin irritations. To study the anti-inflammatory, anti-secretory and anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of different fractions isolated from an ethanolic extract of the leaves of Piper carpunya, in order to provide evidence for the use of this plant as an anti-ulcer remedy. Moreover, to isolate the main compounds of the extract and relate their biological activity to the experimental results obtained with the fractions. Sixteen fractions were obtained from the ethanolic extract (F I-XVI) and 16 pure compounds were isolated and identified from these fractions. We studied the effects of the fractions (0.1-400microg/mL) on the release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzyme from rat peritoneal leukocytes, on rabbit gastric microsomal H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity and anti-Helicobacter pylori anti-microbial activity using the microdilution method (MM). The main compounds contained in the fractions were isolated and identified by (1)H- and (13)C NMR spectra analysis and comparison with the literature data. Eight fractions showed inhibition of MPO enzyme (F I-IV, X, XII, XIV and XV). The highest inhibition was observed with F XIV (50microg/mL, 60.9%, p<0.001). F X and XII were the most active ones, inhibiting the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity with IC(50) values equal to 22.3microg/mL and 28.1microg/mL, respectively. All fractions, except F XV, presented detectable anti-Helicobacter pylori activity, with a diameter of inhibition zones ranging from 11mm up to 50mm. The best anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was obtained with F III and V. Both fractions killed Helicobacter pylori with lowest concentration values, about 6.25mug/mL. Sixteen pure compounds were isolated, five of them are flavonoids that

  8. The use of nanoparticles in anti-microbial materials and their characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Emma; Lawlor, Antoin; Whelan, Aine; Regan, Fiona

    2008-07-01

    Anti-microbial materials have multiple applications in medicine, industry and commercial products. Recent research has proposed the use of nanoparticles in a range of materials, as some metal nanoparticles are known to possess antibacterial properties. The development of such materials presents both the chemist and the biologist with the challenge to effectively choose analytical methods that provide relevant information regarding these materials. Herein, we describe techniques for the characterization of the nanoparticle-doped materials and methods for the determination of their efficacy against biofilm formation.

  9. A new isoquinoline alkaloid with anti-microbial properties from Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid. var. jaeschkeana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamzeb, Muhammad; Khan, M Rafiullah; Mamoon-Ur-Rashid; Ali, Saqib; Khan, Ashfaq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    One new isoquinoline alkaloid named berberidione (1) along with four new source alkaloids berberine (2), palmatine (3), jatrorrhizine (4) and chondrofoline (5) and three new source non-alkaloids syringic acid (6), β-sitosterol (7) and stigmasterol (8) was isolated and characterised from different fractions of Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid var. jaeschkeana. All the structures were determined from 1D and 2D spectroscopic data. Crude extract, sub-fractions and isolated compounds showed excellent anti-microbial properties. The toxicity level for the alkaloids was found to be very low on THP-1 cells.

  10. Anti- Sporothrix spp. activity of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Bressan Waller

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cases of sporotrichosis in humans and animals without satisfactory clinical response have increased, a warning sign of strains resistant to conventional antifungal agents. The urgent search for alternative therapies was an incentive for research on medicinal plants with anti-Sporothrix spp. properties. A bibliographic survey was performed based on scientific papers about in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of essential oils and extracts of plants in differents solvents against the fungal of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. The study methodology consisted of a literature review in Google Scholar, Science Direct, Pubmed, Bireme and Springer link with papers from 1986 to 2015. We found 141 species of plants that were investigated, of which 100 species were concentrated in 39 botanical families that had confirmed anti-Sporothrix activity. Combretaceae, Asteraceae and Lamiaceae represented the botanical families with the greatest number of plants species with antifungal potential, using different methodologies. However, there are few studies with medicinal plants in experimental infection in animals that prove their activity in the treatment of sporotrichosis. It reinforces the need for further research related to standardization of in vitro methodologies and in vivo studies related to safety and to toxicity potential of these plants with anti-Sporothrix spp. activity.

  11. Microbial ecology of terrestrial Antarctica: Are microbial systems at risk from human activities?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    Many of the ecological systems found in continental Antarctica are comprised entirely of microbial species. Concerns have arisen that these microbial systems might be at risk either directly through the actions of humans or indirectly through increased competition from introduced species. Although protection of native biota is covered by the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, strict measures for preventing the introduction on non-native species or for protecting microbial habitats may be impractical. This report summarizes the research conducted to date on microbial ecosystems in continental Antarctica and discusses the need for protecting these ecosystems. The focus is on communities inhabiting soil and rock surfaces in non-coastal areas of continental Antarctica. Although current polices regarding waste management and other operations in Antarctic research stations serve to reduce the introduction on non- native microbial species, importation cannot be eliminated entirely. Increased awareness of microbial habitats by field personnel and protection of certain unique habitats from physical destruction by humans may be necessary. At present, small-scale impacts from human activities are occurring in certain areas both in terms of introduced species and destruction of habitat. On a large scale, however, it is questionable whether the introduction of non-native microbial species to terrestrial Antarctica merits concern.

  12. Natural products and anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Gaofeng; Wahlqvist, Mark L; He, Guoqing; Yang, Min; Li, Duo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review paper was to summarise some commonly available natural products and their anti-inflammatory activity. We have collected data from MEDLINE, Current Contents and scientific journals, which included 92 publications. There are numerous natural products detailed in this literature; however we have summarized a few of the most commonly available and potent ones. In this paper, the natural products with anti-inflammatory activity including curcumin, parthenolide, cucurbitacins, 1,8-cineole, pseudopterosins, lyprinol, bromelain, flavonoids, saponins, marine sponge natural products and Boswellia serrata gum resin were reviewed. Natural products play a significant role in human health in relation to the prevention and treatment of inflammatory conditions. Further studies are being conducted to investigate the mechanism of action, metabolism, safety and long term side effect of these natural products, as well as interactions between these natural products with food and drug components.

  13. Deregulation of intestinal anti-microbial defense by the dietary additive, maltodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Kourtney P; Chanin, Rachael; McDonald, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex, multi-factorial disease thought to arise from an inappropriate immune response to commensal bacteria in a genetically susceptible person that results in chronic, cyclical, intestinal inflammation. Dietary and environmental factors are implicated in the initiation and perpetuation of IBD; however, a singular causative agent has not been identified. As of now, the role of environmental priming or triggers in IBD onset and pathogenesis are not well understood, but these factors appear to synergize with other disease susceptibility factors. In previous work, we determined that the polysaccharide dietary additive, maltodextrin (MDX), impairs cellular anti-bacterial responses and suppresses intestinal anti-microbial defense mechanisms. In this addendum, we review potential mechanisms for dietary deregulation of intestinal homeostasis, postulate how dietary and genetic risk factors may combine to result in disease pathogenesis, and discuss these ideas in the context of recent findings related to dietary interventions for IBD.

  14. Microbial solar cells: applying photosynthetic and electrochemically active organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Timmers, R.A.; Helder, M.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial solar cells (MSCs) are recently developed technologies that utilize solar energy to produce electricity or chemicals. MSCs use photoautotrophic microorganisms or higher plants to harvest solar energy, and use electrochemically active microorganisms in the bioelectrochemical system to

  15. A LIXISOL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY UNDER URBAN WASTES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    31 déc. 2014 ... friendly composts adoption could improve soil organic carbon content for sustainable microbial process. ... microbienne (à travers la biomasse microbienne et la respiration du sol) et à identifier la formule ...... Cambisols and Vertisols by Acacia spp. in eastern Burkina Faso: Relation to soil respiration and.

  16. Anti-biofilm activity as a health issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie eMiquel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and persistence of surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, are responsible for 75% of human microbial infections (National Institutes of Health. Biofilm lifestyle confers several advantages to the pathogens, notably during the colonization process of medical devices and/or patients’ organs. In addition, sessile bacteria have a high tolerance to exogenous stress including anti-infectious agents. Biofilms are highly competitive communities and some microorganisms exhibit anti-biofilm capacities such as bacterial growth inhibition, exclusion or competition, which enable them to acquire advantages and become dominant. The deciphering and control of anti-biofilm properties represent future challenges in human infection control. The aim of this review is to compare and discuss the mechanisms of natural bacterial anti-biofilm strategies/mechanisms recently identified in pathogenic, commensal and probiotic bacteria and the main synthetic strategies used in clinical practice, particularly for catheter-related infections.

  17. Anti-microbial locks increase the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic-resistant Enterobacter: observational retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, John J; Steele, Maggi; Makanjuola, A David

    2012-09-01

    Anti-microbial lock solutions (AML), in conjunction with systemic antibiotics, may successfully treat tunnelled haemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI). It is unknown whether AML promote anti-microbial resistance. This is a retrospective cohort study of all CR-BSI (2003-2006) in our dialysis unit. Controls (n = 265) were treated with systemic vancomycin and gentamicin. In addition to the systemic antibiotics, the study group (n = 662) received AML containing vancomycin and gentamicin during inter-dialytic periods. Antibiotic sensitivity/resistance profiles of all organisms were analysed. Changes in the incidence of infection (chi-square test) and resistant organisms (Fisher's exact test) were calculated. The incidence of CR-BSI decreased from 8.50/1000 catheter days (controls) to 3.80 (study group; P 15.29; P anti-microbial-resistant Enterobacter are increased.

  18. Low Stress Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Treated Cotton Fabric Subjected to Zinc Oxide-Anti-Microbial Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Yin-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fabrics are highly popular because of their excellent properties such as regeneration, bio-degradation, softness, affinity to skin and hygroscopic properties. When in contact with the human body, cotton fabrics offer an ideal environment for microbial growth due to their ability to retain oxygen, moisture and warmth, as well as nutrients from spillages and body sweat. Therefore, an anti-microbial coating formulation (Microfresh and Microban together with zinc oxide as catalyst) was dev...

  19. A differential concentration-dependent effect of IVIg on neutrophil functions: relevance for anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Casulli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN play a key role in host defences against invading microorganisms but can also potentiate detrimental inflammatory reactions in case of excessive or misdirected responses. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg are used to treat patients with immune deficiencies and, at higher doses, in autoimmune, allergic and systemic inflammatory disorders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used flow cytometry to examine the effects of IVIg on PMN functions and survival, using whole-blood conditions in order to avoid artifacts due to isolation procedures. IVIg at low concentrations induced PMN activation, as reflected by decreased L-selectin and increased CD11b expression at the PMN surface, oxidative burst enhancement, and prolonged cell survival. In contrast, IVIg at higher concentrations inhibited LPS-induced CD11b degranulation and oxidative burst priming, and counteracted LPS-induced PMN lifespan prolongation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IVIg appears to have differential, concentration-dependent effects on PMN, possibly supporting the use of IVIg as either an anti-microbial or an anti-inflammatory agent.

  20. Novel High Efficient Coatings for Anti-Microbial Surgical Sutures Using Chlorhexidine in Fatty Acid Slow-Release Carrier Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Andreas; Schneider, Jochen; Wehner, Steffen; Matl, Florian Dominik; Schieker, Matthias; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Stemberger, Axel; Burgkart, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Sutures can cause challenging surgical site infections, due to capillary effects resulting in bacteria permeating wounds. Anti-microbial sutures may avoid these complications by inhibiting bacterial pathogens. Recently, first triclosan-resistances were reported and therefore alternative substances are becoming clinically relevant. As triclosan alternative chlorhexidine, the “gold standard” in oral antiseptics was used. The aim of the study was to optimize novel slow release chlorhexidine coatings based on fatty acids in surgical sutures, to reach a high anti-microbial efficacy and simultaneously high biocompatibility. Sutures were coated with chlorhexidine laurate and chlorhexidine palmitate solutions leading to 11, 22 or 33 µg/cm drug concentration per length. Drug release profiles were determined in aqueous elutions. Antibacterial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus was assessed in agar diffusion tests. Biocompatibility was evaluated via established cytotoxicity assay (WST-1). A commercially triclosan-containing suture (Vicryl Plus), was used as anti-microbial reference. All coated sutures fulfilled European Pharmacopoeia required tensile strength and proved continuous slow drug release over 96 hours without complete wash out of the coated drug. High anti-microbial efficacy for up to 5 days was observed. Regarding biocompatibility, sutures using 11 µg/cm drug content displayed acceptable cytotoxic levels according to ISO 10993-5. The highest potential for human application were shown by the 11 µg/cm chlorhexidine coated sutures with palmitic acid. These novel coated sutures might be alternatives to already established anti-microbial sutures such as Vicryl Plus in case of triclosan-resistance. Chlorhexidine is already an established oral antiseptic, safety and efficacy should be proven for clinical applications in anti-microbial sutures. PMID:24983633

  1. Novel high efficient coatings for anti-microbial surgical sutures using chlorhexidine in fatty acid slow-release carrier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Andreas; Schneider, Jochen; Wehner, Steffen; Matl, Florian Dominik; Schieker, Matthias; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Stemberger, Axel; Burgkart, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Sutures can cause challenging surgical site infections, due to capillary effects resulting in bacteria permeating wounds. Anti-microbial sutures may avoid these complications by inhibiting bacterial pathogens. Recently, first triclosan-resistances were reported and therefore alternative substances are becoming clinically relevant. As triclosan alternative chlorhexidine, the "gold standard" in oral antiseptics was used. The aim of the study was to optimize novel slow release chlorhexidine coatings based on fatty acids in surgical sutures, to reach a high anti-microbial efficacy and simultaneously high biocompatibility. Sutures were coated with chlorhexidine laurate and chlorhexidine palmitate solutions leading to 11, 22 or 33 µg/cm drug concentration per length. Drug release profiles were determined in aqueous elutions. Antibacterial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus was assessed in agar diffusion tests. Biocompatibility was evaluated via established cytotoxicity assay (WST-1). A commercially triclosan-containing suture (Vicryl Plus), was used as anti-microbial reference. All coated sutures fulfilled European Pharmacopoeia required tensile strength and proved continuous slow drug release over 96 hours without complete wash out of the coated drug. High anti-microbial efficacy for up to 5 days was observed. Regarding biocompatibility, sutures using 11 µg/cm drug content displayed acceptable cytotoxic levels according to ISO 10993-5. The highest potential for human application were shown by the 11 µg/cm chlorhexidine coated sutures with palmitic acid. These novel coated sutures might be alternatives to already established anti-microbial sutures such as Vicryl Plus in case of triclosan-resistance. Chlorhexidine is already an established oral antiseptic, safety and efficacy should be proven for clinical applications in anti-microbial sutures.

  2. Anti-microbial resistance profile of Citrobacter species in a tertiary care hospital of Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metri, Basavaraj C; Jyothi, P; Peerapur, Basavaraj V

    2011-10-01

    Recently, the isolation of this pathogen in hospital settings is increasing and multidrug-resistant strains are emerging; these strains present a challenge for clinician and the clinical microbiologist because of their increased occurrence in nosocomial infection. The current study was done to find out the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Citrobacter species from various clinical specimens. Samples were collected from patients in accordance with standard protocols. Citrobacter species were identified by conventional biochemical tests. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates was done by disc diffusion method according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) recommendations. Out of 563 isolates of Citrobacter, majority were from pus (48.1%), followed by urine (24.3%), sputum (20.3%), body fluids (05.2%), blood (02.1%). C. koseri was the predominant species [391 (70%)] isolated. Infection was nosocomialy acquired in 493 (87.4%) patients. The mean age was 39.5 years. Anti-biograms of Citrobacter isolates revealed that effective agent against Citrobacter isolates was imipenem (91.8% sensitive), followed by piperacillin/tazobactam (58.3%) and amikacin (53.4%). Citrobacter isolates resistant to multiple anti-microbial agents have emerged, including strains resistant to imipenem, making it an emerging nosocomial pathogen. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that surveillance of anti-microbial resistance in Citrobacter is necessary. Antibiotic policy should be formulated in the hospital. Depending on the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the Citrobacter isolates, antibiotics should be used, and proper infection control measures should be strictly followed to prevent spread of this pathogen.

  3. Beyond anti-microbial properties: The role of cathelicidin in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, F; Gultepe, B; Ozkaya, E; Yazici, M; Gedik, A H; Cakir, E

    2016-01-01

    Cathelicidin, an anti-microbial peptide, is a component of the innate immune system. Cathelicidin has anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory functions. Knowledge about the role of the innate immune system in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases has expanded in recent years. We measured levels of the LL-37 peptide in the nasal fluids of children with allergic rhinitis (AR) and investigated the possible role of this peptide in the pathogenesis of AR. The study population included 46 children who were newly diagnosed with AR and not taking any medication. Thirty-three healthy control subjects were also enrolled. Nasal secretions were collected from the study and control groups using a polyurethane sponge nasal secretion collector, and nasal fluid LL-37 levels were determined using the ELISA method. The levels of LL-37 in the nasal fluid of the AR patients were lower than those of the control group (median of 2.3ng/ml [minimum-maximum, 2.1-3.2] vs. 2.6ng/ml [2.1-5.4], respectively; p<0.001), and they were significantly reduced in patients with moderate/severe AR compared with those of patients with mild AR (2.2ng/ml [2.1-2.4] vs. 2.5ng/ml [2.1-3.1], respectively; p<0.001). Our results show that children with AR have reduced nasal fluid LL-37 levels compared with healthy controls. Additionally, children with moderate/severe AR have decreased nasal fluid LL-37 levels compared with children with mild AR. These findings highlight the role of cathelicidin in the pathogenesis of AR. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Bactericidal activity of the food color additive Phloxine B against Staphylococcus aureus and other food borne microbial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spread of antibiotic resistance among Staphylococcus aureus strains requires the development of new anti S. aureus agents. The objective of this study was evaluating the antimicrobial activity of the food color additive Phloxine B against S. aureus and other food microbial pathogens. Our result ...

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of Lippia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, S; Meckes, M; Pérez, C; Susunaga, A; Zavala, M A

    2005-10-31

    Lippia dulcis hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in several animal models. Hexane extract showed to be inactive, but the ethanol extract at doses of 400 mg/kg produced significant inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw oedema and reduced the weight of cotton pellet-induced granuloma, moreover, the topical application of 0.5 mg/ear of this extract inhibited the edema induced with TPA by 49.13%, an effect which is of less intensity than that produced by indomethacine at the same dose.

  6. By passing microbial resistance: xylitol controls microorganisms growth by means of its anti-adherence property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aline S; Silva-Paes-Leme, Annelisa F; Raposo, Nádia R B; da Silva, Sílvio S

    2015-01-01

    Xylitol is an important polyalcohol suitable for use in odontological, medical and pharmaceutical products and as an additive in food. The first studies on the efficacy of xylitol in the control and treatment of infections started in the late 1970s and it is still applied for this purpose, with safety and very little contribution to resistance. Xylitol seems to act against microorganisms exerting an anti-adherence effect. Some research studies have demonstrated its action against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. However, a clear explanation of how xylitol is effective has not been completely established yet. Some evidence shows that xylitol acts on gene expression, down-regulating the ones which are involved in the microorganisms' virulence, such as capsule formation. Another possible clarification is that xylitol blocks lectin-like receptors. The most important aspect is that, over time, xylitol bypasses microbial resistance and succeeds in controlling infection, either alone or combined with another compound. In this review, the effect of xylitol in inhibiting the growth of a different microorganism is described, focusing on studies in which such an anti-adherent property was highlighted. This is the first mini-review to describe xylitol as an anti-adherent compound and take into consideration how it exerts such action.

  7. Charcoal Increases Microbial Activity in Eastern Sierra Nevada Forest Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary W. Carter

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fire is an important component of forests in the western United States. Not only are forests subjected to wildfires, but fire is also an important management tool to reduce fuels loads. Charcoal, a product of fire, can have major impacts on carbon (C and nitrogen (N cycling in forest soils, but it is unclear how these effects vary by dominant vegetation. In this study, soils collected from Jeffrey pine (JP or lodgepole pine (LP dominated areas and amended with charcoal derived from JP or LP were incubated to assess the importance of charcoal on microbial respiration and potential nitrification. In addition, polyphenol sorption was measured in unamended and charcoal-amended soils. In general, microbial respiration was highest at the 1% and 2.5% charcoal additions, but charcoal amendment had limited effects on potential nitrification rates throughout the incubation. Microbial respiration rates decreased but potential nitrification rates increased over time across most treatments. Increased microbial respiration may have been caused by priming of native organic matter rather than the decomposition of charcoal itself. Charcoal had a larger stimulatory effect on microbial respiration in LP soils than JP soils. Charcoal type had little effect on microbial processes, but polyphenol sorption was higher on LP-derived than JP-derived charcoal at higher amendment levels despite surface area being similar for both charcoal types. The results from our study suggest that the presence of charcoal can increase microbial activity in soils, but the exact mechanisms are still unclear.

  8. Bioassay guided isolation and identification of anti-inflammatory and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study describes the anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity and lipophilic profile with acute toxicological studies of Urtica dioica. Successive extraction of the leaves with organic solvents of increasing polarity and their screening for anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activity was assessed. Hexane extract ...

  9. Microbial activities and communities in oil sands tailings ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, Lisa; Ramos, Esther; Clothier, Lindsay; Bordenave, Sylvain; Lin, Shiping; Voordouw, Gerrit; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph [University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper discusses how the microbial communities and their activity play a vital role in tailings ponds. The ponds contain microorganisms along with metals, hydrocarbon diluent, naphthenic acid and others. The ponds play an important role in mining operations because they store bitumen extraction waste and also allow water to be re-used in the bitumen extraction process. Pond management presents a few challenges that include, among others, gas emissions and the presence of toxic and corrosive acids. Microbial activities and communities help in managing these ponds. Microbial activity measurement in active and inactive ponds is described and analyzed and the results are presented. The conditions for reducing sulfate, nitrate and iron are also presented. From the results it can be concluded that naphthenic acids can potentially serve as substrates for anaerobic populations in tailings ponds.

  10. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Milena B P; Silva, Cinara V; Bastos, Tanira M; Guimarães, Elisalva T; Figueira, Claudio P; Smirlis, Despina; Azevedo, Walter F

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp. sirtuins has shown promising antiparasitic activity, indicating that these enzymes may be used as targets for drug discovery against trypanosomatid infections. In the present work we carried out a virtual screening focused on the C pocket of Sir2 from Trypanosoma cruzi. Using this approach, the best ligand found was nicotinamide. In vitro tests confirmed the anti-T. cruzi activity of nicotinamide on epimastigote and trypomastigote forms. Moreover, treatment of T. cruzi-infected macrophages with nicotinamide caused a significant reduction in the number of amastigotes. In addition, alterations in the mitochondria and an increase in the vacuolization in the cytoplasm were observed in epimastigotes treated with nicotinamide. Analysis of the complex of Sir2 and nicotinamide revealed the details of the possible ligand-target interaction. Our data reveal a potential use of TcSir2 as a target for anti-T. cruzi drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer activities of Sida acuta in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer properties was also studied in mice and rats using the tail immersion, mouse ear oedema and acetylsalicylic acid induced ulceration models. The crude extracts exhibited significant (p< 0.001) analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in mice as well as a marked protection ...

  12. NASA FACTS: E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite (EcAMSat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spremo, Stevan; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Tomko, David

    2013-01-01

    The E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite(EcAMSat) mission will investigate space microgravity affects on the antibiotic resistance of E. coli, a bacterial pathogen responsible for urinary tract infection in humans and animals. EcAMSat is being developed through a partnership between NASAs Ames Research Center and the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. A.C. Matin is the Stanford University Principal Investigator. EcAMSat will investigate spaceflight effects on bacterial antibiotic resistance and its genetic basis. Bacterial antibiotic resistance may pose a danger to astronauts in microgravity, where the immune response is weakened. Scientists believe that the results of this experiment could help design effective countermeasures to protect astronauts health during long duration human space missions.

  13. Feedbacks Between Soil Structure and Microbial Activities in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, V. L.; Smith, A. P.; Fansler, S.; Varga, T.; Kemner, K. M.; McCue, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Soil structure provides the physical framework for soil microbial habitats. The connectivity and size distribution of soil pores controls the microbial access to nutrient resources for growth and metabolism. Thus, a crucial component of soil research is how a soil's three-dimensional structure and organization influences its biological potential on a multitude of spatial and temporal scales. In an effort to understand microbial processes at scale more consistent with a microbial community, we have used soil aggregates as discrete units of soil microbial habitats. Our research has shown that mean pore diameter (x-ray computed tomography) of soil aggregates varies with the aggregate diameter itself. Analyzing both the bacterial composition (16S) and enzyme activities of individual aggregates showed significant differences in the relative abundances of key members the microbial communities associated with high enzyme activities compared to those with low activities, even though we observed no differences in the size of the biomass, nor in the overall richness or diversity of these communities. We hypothesize that resources and substrates have stimulated key populations in the aggregates identified as highly active, and as such, we conducted further research that explored how such key populations (i.e. fungal or bacterial dominated populations) alter pathways of C accumulation in aggregate size domains and microbial C utilization. Fungi support and stabilize soil structure through both physical and chemical effects of their hyphal networks. In contrast, bacterial-dominated communities are purported to facilitate micro- and fine aggregate stabilization. Here we quantify the direct effects fungal versus bacterial dominated communities on aggregate formation (both the rate of aggregation and the quality, quantity and distribution of SOC contained within aggregates). A quantitative understanding of the different mechanisms through which fungi or bacteria shape aggregate

  14. Biodiversity of genes encoding anti-microbial traits within plant associated microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Kamel Mousa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The plant is an attractive versatile home for diverse associated microbes. A subset of these microbes produce a diversity of anti-microbial natural products including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, heterocylic nitrogenous compounds, volatile compounds, bacteriocins and lytic enzymes. In recent years, detailed molecular analysis has led to a better understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. New genomic and bioinformatic tools have permitted comparisons of orthologous genes between species, leading to predictions of the associated evolutionary mechanisms responsible for diversification at the genetic and corresponding biochemical levels. The purpose of this review is to describe the biodiversity of biosynthetic genes of plant-associated bacteria and fungi that encode selected examples of antimicrobial natural products. For each compound, the target pathogen and biochemical mode of action are described, in order to draw attention to the complexity of these phenomena. We review recent information of the underlying molecular diversity and draw lessons through comparative genomic analysis of the orthologous genes. We conclude by discussing emerging themes and gaps, discuss the metabolic pathways in the context of the phylogeny and ecology of their microbial hosts, and discuss potential evolutionary mechanisms that led to the diversification of biosynthetic gene clusters.

  15. Biodiversity of genes encoding anti-microbial traits within plant associated microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Walaa K.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    The plant is an attractive versatile home for diverse associated microbes. A subset of these microbes produces a diversity of anti-microbial natural products including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, heterocylic nitrogenous compounds, volatile compounds, bacteriocins, and lytic enzymes. In recent years, detailed molecular analysis has led to a better understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. New genomic and bioinformatic tools have permitted comparisons of orthologous genes between species, leading to predictions of the associated evolutionary mechanisms responsible for diversification at the genetic and corresponding biochemical levels. The purpose of this review is to describe the biodiversity of biosynthetic genes of plant-associated bacteria and fungi that encode selected examples of antimicrobial natural products. For each compound, the target pathogen and biochemical mode of action are described, in order to draw attention to the complexity of these phenomena. We review recent information of the underlying molecular diversity and draw lessons through comparative genomic analysis of the orthologous coding sequences (CDS). We conclude by discussing emerging themes and gaps, discuss the metabolic pathways in the context of the phylogeny and ecology of their microbial hosts, and discuss potential evolutionary mechanisms that led to the diversification of biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:25914708

  16. Response of soil microbial activities and microbial community structure to vanadium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xi-Yuan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Zhu, Hui-Wen; Guo, Zhao-Hui; Han, Xiao-Qing; Zeng, Peng

    2017-08-01

    High levels of vanadium (V) have long-term, hazardous impacts on soil ecosystems and biological processes. In the present study, the effects of V on soil enzymatic activities, basal respiration (BR), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and the microbial community structure were investigated through 12-week greenhouse incubation experiments. The results showed that V content affected soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA), BR, and MBC, while urease activity (UA) was less sensitive to V stress. The average median effective concentration (EC 50 ) thresholds of V were predicted using a log-logistic dose-response model, and they were 362mgV/kg soil for BR and 417mgV/kg soil for DHA. BR and DHA were more sensitive to V addition and could be used as biological indicators for soil V pollution. According to a polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis, the structural diversity of the microbial community decreased for soil V contents ranged between 254 and 1104mg/kg after 1 week of incubation. As the incubation time increased, the diversity of the soil microbial community structure increased for V contents ranged between 354 and 1104mg/kg, indicating that some new V-tolerant bacterial species might have replicated under these conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Design, Synthesis and In Vitro Anti-microbial Evaluation of Ethylene/ Propylene-1H-1,2,3-Triazole-4-Methylene-tethered Isatin-coumarin Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaohong; Xu, Yan; Yang, Xuhong; Chen, Xiuling; Wu, Minghu; Guan, Jianguo; Feng, Lianshun

    2017-01-01

    A new class of ethylene/propylene-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-methylene-tethered isatincoumarin hybrids 8a-j, integrating three anti-tuberculosis pharmacophores coumarin, isatin and 1,2,3- triazole was designed and synthesized. These hybrids were assessed for their in vitro anti-TB activity against MTB H37Rv and MDRTB, as well as anti-bacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains, and cytotoxicity in VERO cell line. The results showed that all hybrids with acceptable cytotoxicity (CC50: 64-512 µg/mL) exhibited weak to moderate anti-microbial activity. The most active hybrid 8i with MIC of 50 µg/mL against MTB H37Rv and MDR-TB, also has excellent cytotoxicity profile (CC50: 128 µg/mL). The resistance index of hybrid 8i was 1, indicating that hybrid 8i has no cross-resistance with the first-line anti-TB agent. Thus, hybrid 8i could act as a lead for further optimization. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Starch encapsulation of microbial pesticides for sustained activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, M.R.; Shasha, B.S.

    1994-01-01

    Many environmental and biological factors act to reduce the insecticidal potential of microbial pesticides. Each of these factors can be addressed through formulation. Over the past five years, we have investigated formulation of microbial insecticides within starch matrices. While chemical pesticides have been encapsulated in starch for many years, the biological nature of microbial insecticides has prohibited the use of the harsh chemicals or extreme pH necessary to ensure gelatinization of the starch and subsequent entrapment of active ingredient. Pregelatinized starches and flours have facilitated formulation of microbial pesticides. Three distinct types of starch formulations have been developed: a sprayable and two granular baits. Bioassays of cotton or cabbage leaf tissue treated with the sprayable formulations demonstrated increased residual activity of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki (Btk) after simulated (greenhouse) or actual (field) rainfall. Similarly, experiments with small field plots of cabbage treated with the sprayable formulations demonstrated efficacy similar to that of conventional chemical insecticides. The granular formulations have been tested extensively against European corn borer in whorl stage corn. Sunlight screens incorporated within the granules significantly increased residual activity of Btk when granules were exposed to direct sunlight. Under field conditions, feeding stimulants allowed a decrease in Btk concentration without significant loss of inset control. Work with these formulations is continuing with the addition of viruses and fungi to our research program. Clearly, improvements to formulations of microbial pesticides will enhance the acceptance and reliability of these important pest control tools. 22 refs, 5 figs, 8 tabs

  19. Anti-fungal activity of irradiated chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham ThiLe Ha; Tran Thi Thuy; Nguyen Quoc Hien [Nuclear Research Inst., No.1 Nguyen Tu Luc, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gunma (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Anti-fungal activity of chitosan induced by irradiation has been investigated. Commercial chitosan samples of 8B (80% deacetylation) and l0B (99% deacetylation) were irradiated by {gamma}-ray in dry condition. Highly deacethylated chitosan (10B) at low dose irradiation (75 kGy) was effective for inhibition of fungal growth. The sensitivities of Exobasidium vexans, Septoria chrysanthemum and Gibberella fujikuroi for the irradiated chitosan were different and the necessary concentrations of chitosan were 550, 350 and 250 {mu}g/ml, respectively. For the plant growth, low deacethylation (chitosan 8B) and high dose (500 kGy) was effective and the growth of chrysanthemum was promoted by spraying the irradiated chitosan. (author)

  20. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieu Anh Kim Ta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS. As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented.

  1. Antioxidant and Anti-Fatigue Activities of Flavonoids from Puerariae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the antioxidant and anti-fatigue activities of flavonoids from Puerariae radix (FPR). In vitro antioxidant activities of FPR were investigated through hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging activities. In vivo anti-fatigue activity of FPR was investigated through loaded swimming exercise of mice. Results ...

  2. Anti-Plasmodium activity of ceramide analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatt Shimon

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingolipids are key molecules regulating many essential functions in eukaryotic cells and ceramide plays a central role in sphingolipid metabolism. A sphingolipid metabolism occurs in the intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum and is associated with essential biological processes. It constitutes an attractive and potential target for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Methods The anti-Plasmodium activity of a series of ceramide analogs containing different linkages (amide, methylene or thiourea linkages between the fatty acid part of ceramide and the sphingoid core was investigated in culture and compared to the sphingolipid analog PPMP (d,1-threo-1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol. This analog is known to inhibit the parasite sphingomyelin synthase activity and block parasite development by preventing the formation of the tubovesicular network that extends from the parasitophorous vacuole to the red cell membrane and delivers essential extracellular nutrients to the parasite. Results Analogs containing methylene linkage showed a considerably higher anti-Plasmodium activity (IC50 in the low nanomolar range than PPMP and their counterparts with a natural amide linkage (IC50 in the micromolar range. The methylene analogs blocked irreversibly P. falciparum development leading to parasite eradication in contrast to PPMP whose effect is cytostatic. A high sensitivity of action towards the parasite was observed when compared to their effect on the human MRC-5 cell growth. The toxicity towards parasites did not correlate with the inhibition by methylene analogs of the parasite sphingomyelin synthase activity and the tubovesicular network formation, indicating that this enzyme is not their primary target. Conclusions It has been shown that ceramide analogs were potent inhibitors of P. falciparum growth in culture. Interestingly, the nature of the linkage between the fatty acid part and the

  3. Synthesis and anti-microbial activity of new (1-alkyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-ylmethyl-2H-chromene-3-carboxylates: A click chemistry approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koteswara Reddy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 1,4 disubstituted (1-alkyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-ylmethyl-2H-chromene-3-carboxylates (4ai–4eiii have been efficiently synthesized in moderate to excellent yields by the 1,3 dipolar cycloaddition between 2-propynyl-2H-chromene-3-carboxylates 3a–e and various alkyl azides under Cu(I catalyzed conditions. The structures of the synthesized compounds are established based on IR, NMR, MASS Spectrometric methods and elemental analyses. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of synthesized compounds were evaluated. Compounds 4biii, 4ei, 4dii, 4ai, 4aii, 4bii showed good activity against bacterial strains and the compounds 4bi, 4eii against fungal strains.

  4. Synthesis, anti-microbial activity, cytotoxicity of some novel substituted (5-(3-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-4-hydroxybenzyl)benzofuran-2-yl)(phenyl)methanone analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Bhookya; Jalapathi, Pochampally; Saikrishna, Balabadra; Perugu, Shaym; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2018-01-09

    There is a dire need for the discovery and development of new antimicrobial agents after several experiments for a better resistance of microorganisms towards antimicrobial agents become a serious health problem for a few years in the past. As benzimidazole possess various types of biological activities, it has been synthesized, in the present study, a new series of (5-(3-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-4-hydroxybenzyl)benzofuran-2-yl)(phenyl)methanone analogs by using the condensation and screened for its in vitro antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity. The synthesized (5-(3-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-4-hydroxybenzyl) benzofuran-2-yl)(phenyl)methanone analogs were confirmed by IR, 1 H and 13 C-NMR, MS spectra and HRMS spectral data. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial potential against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Staph aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacter aerogenes) bacterial and fungal (Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani) strains by disc diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in which it has been recorded in microgram per milliliter in comparison to the reference drugs, ciprofloxacin (antibacterial) and nystatin (antifungal). Further, the cytotoxicity (IC 50 value) has also been assessed on human cervical (HeLa), Supt1 cancer cell lines by using MTT assay. The following screened compounds (4d), (4f), (4g), (4k), (4l), (4o) and (4u) were found to be the best active against all the tested bacterial and fungal strains among all the demonstrated compounds of biological study. The MIC determination was also carried out against bacteria and fungi, the compounds (4f) and (4u) are found to be exhibited excellent potent against bacteria and fungi respectively. The compounds (4f) and (4u) were shown non-toxic in nature after screened for cytotoxicity against the

  5. The effect of glyphosate application on soil microbial activities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, glyphosate effects as N, P and C nutrient sources on microbial population and the effect of different concentration of it on dehydrogenease activity and soil respiration were investigated. The results show that in a soil with a long historical use of glyphosate (soil 1), the hetrotrophic bacterial population was ...

  6. Seasonality of fibrolytic enzyme activity in herbivore microbial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibre (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature and is hydrolysed by gut micro-organisms of herbivores because they can produce a set of extracellular enzymes. This study examined seasonal changes in the fibrolytic enzyme activity of microbial ecosystems of five herbivores ...

  7. Multinationals and Anti-sweatshop Activism

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Ann; Scorse, Jason

    2010-01-01

    During the 1990s, anti-sweatshop activists campaigned to improve conditions for workers in developing countries. This paper analyzes the impact of anti-sweatshop campaigns in Indonesia on wages and employment. Identification is based on comparing the wage growth of workers in foreign-owned and exporting firms in targeted regions or sectors before and after the initiation of anti-sweatshop campaigns. We find the campaigns led to large real wage increases for targeted enterprises. There were so...

  8. Investigation of antibacterial and anti-cancer activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of antibacterial and anti-cancer activities of Streptomyces sp SRF1 culture filtrate. Kusavadee Sangdee, Benjaporn Buranrat, Prapairat Seephonkai, Nilawan Surapong, Aphidech Sangdee ...

  9. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities: Chemical constituents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities: Chemical constituents of essential oils of Ocimum gratissimum , Eucalyptus citriodora and Cymbopogon giganteus inhibited lipoxygenase L-1 and cyclooxygenase of PGHS.

  10. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activities of Methanol Extracts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activities of Methanol Extracts and Alkaloid Fractions of four Mexican Medicinal Plants of Solanaceae. ... equivalents/g of extract), the best antioxidant activity (94.80% inhibition of DPPH and 97.57% of ABTS) and the highest anti-inflammatory activity (81.93% inhibition of the inflammation).

  11. Synthesis of new piperazine derived Cu(II)/Zn(II) metal complexes, their DNA binding studies, electrochemistry and anti-microbial activity: Validation for specific recognition of Zn(II) complex to DNA helix by interaction with thymine base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Irshad-ul-Haq; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2009-06-01

    New 3,4:9,10-dibenzo-2,11-dihydroxy-1,12-bispiperazine-5,8-dioxododecane complexes [C 24H 36N 4O 6Cu] ( 1), [C 24H 32N 4O 4Zn] ( 2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, Mass, EPR, UV-vis spectroscopy and molar conductance measurements. The complexes are non-ionic in nature and possess octahedral geometry around Cu 2+, Zn 2+ central metal ions. The binding studies of 1 and 2 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated by UV-vis, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetery and viscosity measurements. The calculated binding constant Kb for 1 and 2 obtained from UV-vis absorption studies was 7.6 × 10 3 M -1, 80.8 × 10 4 M -1, respectively. The intrinsic binding constants were also estimated to be 7.0 × 10 4 M -1 and 7.53 × 10 5 M -1 for 1 and 2, respectively by using emission titrations. These experimental results suggest that complexes are groove binders and interact to CT-DNA with different affinities. Both the complexes in presence and absence of CT-DNA show quasireversible wave corresponding to Cu II/Cu I and Zn II/Zn I redox couple. The changes in E1/2, Δ E, Ipa/ Ipc ascertain the interaction of 1 and 2 with CT-DNA. Further, decrease in viscosity of CT-DNA with increasing concentration of complexes was observed. In vitro, antimicrobial activity against fungi A. brassicicola, A. niger and bacteria E. coli, P. aeruginosa of complexes were carried out, which indicate that complex 2 is more active against both fungal and bacterial strains as shown by % inhibition data.

  12. Soil microbial activities and its relationship with soil chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fields assessed are organically managed Soils (OMS), Inorganically Managed Soils (IMS) and an Uncultivated Land having grass coverage (ULS). Soil Microbial Respiration (SMR), Microbial Biomass Carbon (MBC), Microbial Biomass Nitrogen (MBN) and Microbial Biomass Phosphorus (MBP) were analyzed.

  13. Anti-microbial and cytotoxic 1,6-dihydroxyphenazine-5,10-dioxide (iodinin) produced by Streptosporangium sp. DSM 45942 isolated from the fjord sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sletta, Håvard; Degnes, Kristin F; Herfindal, Lars; Klinkenberg, Geir; Fjærvik, Espen; Zahlsen, Kolbjørn; Brunsvik, Anders; Nygaard, Gyrid; Aachmann, Finn L; Ellingsen, Trond E; Døskeland, Stein O; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2014-01-01

    Phenazine natural products/compounds possess a range of biological activities, including anti-microbial and cytotoxic, making them valuable starting materials for drug development in several therapeutic areas. These compounds are biosynthesized almost exclusively by eubacteria of both terrestrial and marine origins from erythrose 4-phosphate and phosphoenol pyruvate via the shikimate pathway. In this paper, we report isolation of actinomycete bacteria from marine sediment collected in the Trondheimfjord, Norway. Screening of the isolates for biological activity produced several "hits", one of which was followed up by identification and purification of the active compound from the actinomycete bacterium Streptosporangium sp. The purified compound, identified as 1,6-dihydroxyphenazine-5,10-dioxide (iodinin), was subjected to extended tests for biological activity against bacteria, fungi and mammalian cells. In these tests, the iodinin demonstrated high anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity, and was particularly potent against leukaemia cell lines. This is the first report on the isolation of iodinin from a marine-derived Streptosporangium.

  14. The potential significance of microbial activity in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, A.M.

    1987-12-01

    The aim of this report is to assess the potential significance of microbial activity in radioactive waste disposal. It outlines the major factors which need to be considered in order to evaluate the importance of microbiological action. These include water and nutritional sources (particularly carbon) hostile conditions (particularly the effects of radiation and pH), the establishment of pH micro-environments and the degradative effect of microbial metabolic by-products on the disposed waste forms. Before an active microbial population can develop there are certain basic requirements for life. These are outlined and the possibility of colonisation occurring within the chemical, radiological and nutritional constraints of a repository are considered. Once colonisation is assumed, the effect of microbial activity is discussed under five headings, i.e. (i) direct attack, (ii) physical disruption (which includes consideration of fissuring processes and void formation), (iii) gas generation (which may be of particular importance), (iv) radionuclide uptake and finally (v) alteration of groundwater chemistry. Particular attention is paid to the possibility of environments becoming established both within the waste form itself (allowing microbes to attack from the inside of the repository outward) or attack on the encapsulant materials (microbes attacking from the outside inward). (author)

  15. Microbial activity in the marine deep biosphere: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, Beth N; Larowe, Douglas E; Biddle, Jennifer F; Colwell, Frederick S; Glazer, Brian T; Reese, Brandi Kiel; Kirkpatrick, John B; Lapham, Laura L; Mills, Heath J; Sylvan, Jason B; Wankel, Scott D; Wheat, C Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The vast marine deep biosphere consists of microbial habitats within sediment, pore waters, upper basaltic crust and the fluids that circulate throughout it. A wide range of temperature, pressure, pH, and electron donor and acceptor conditions exists-all of which can combine to affect carbon and nutrient cycling and result in gradients on spatial scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. Diverse and mostly uncharacterized microorganisms live in these habitats, and potentially play a role in mediating global scale biogeochemical processes. Quantifying the rates at which microbial activity in the subsurface occurs is a challenging endeavor, yet developing an understanding of these rates is essential to determine the impact of subsurface life on Earth's global biogeochemical cycles, and for understanding how microorganisms in these "extreme" environments survive (or even thrive). Here, we synthesize recent advances and discoveries pertaining to microbial activity in the marine deep subsurface, and we highlight topics about which there is still little understanding and suggest potential paths forward to address them. This publication is the result of a workshop held in August 2012 by the NSF-funded Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) "theme team" on microbial activity (www.darkenergybiosphere.org).

  16. Anti-microbial peptide gene expression during oral vaccination: analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simuyandi, M; Kapulu, M; Kelly, P

    2016-11-01

    We have observed previously that micronutrient supplementation ameliorated suppression of α-defensin expression during diarrhoea. However, how interactions between anti-microbial peptide (AMP) expression and diarrhoeal disease are altered by micronutrient supplementation remain unclear. Using oral vaccination as a model of intestinal infection, we measured changes in AMP expression during multiple micronutrient supplementation. In the first part, volunteers underwent duodenal jejunal biopsy before and at 1, 2, 4 or 7 days after administration of one of three live, attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus, typhoid and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. In the second part, participants were randomized to receive a multiple micronutrient supplement or placebo for 6 weeks before undergoing intestinal biopsy, vaccination against typhoid and rebiopsy after 14 days. Expression of human alpha-defensin (HD)5, HD6, hBD1, hBD2 and LL-37 was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, the bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, reduced HD5 expression (P = 0·02, signed-rank test) and reduced LL-37 expression in seven of the eight individuals whose biopsies had expression prevaccination (P = 0·03). hBD2 was not detected. In the controlled trial, HD5 and HD6 expression after vaccination was lower [median ratio 0·5, interquartile range (IQR) = 0·07-2·2 and 0·58, IQR = 0·13-2·3, respectively] than before vaccination. There was no significant effect detected of micronutrient supplementation on expression of HD5, HD6, hBD1 or LL-37. We conclude that live attenuated bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, can reduce intestinal α-defensins, and typhoid vaccine reduced LL-37 expression. We found no evidence that micronutrient supplementation in the short term had any impact on anti-microbial peptide expression. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  17. Anti-microbial coating innovations to prevent infectious diseases (AMiCI): Cost action ca15114.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Colum P; Keinänen-Toivola, Minna M; Kahru, Anne; Teunissen, Birgit; Olmez, Hulya; Gouveia, Isabel; Melo, Luis; Murzyn, Kazimierz; Modic, Martina; Ahonen, Merja; Askew, Pete; Papadopoulos, Theofilos; Adlhart, Christian; Crijns, Francy R L

    2017-11-02

    Worldwide, millions of patients are affected annually by healthcare-associated infection (HCAI), impacting up to 80,000 patients in European Hospitals on any given day. This represents not only public health risk, but also an economic burden. Complementing routine hand hygiene practices, cleaning and disinfection, antimicrobial coatings hold promise based, in essence, on the application of materials and chemicals with persistent bactericidal or -static properties onto surfaces or in textiles used in healthcare environments. The focus of considerable commercial investment and academic research energies, such antimicrobial coating-based approaches are widely believed to have potential in reduction of microbial numbers on surfaces in clinical settings. This belief exists despite definitive evidence as to their efficacy and is based somewhat on positive studies involving, for example, copper, silver or gold ions, titanium or organosilane, albeit under laboratory conditions. The literature describes successful delay and/or prevention of recontamination following conventional cleaning and disinfection by problematic microbes such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE), among others. However, there is a scarcity of studies assessing antimicrobial surfaces other than copper in the clinical environment, and a complete lack of published data regarding the successful implementation of these materials on clinically significant outcomes (including HCAI). Through its Cooperation in Science and Technology program (COST), the European Commission has funded a 4-year initiative to establish a network of stakeholders involved in development, regulation and use of novel anti-microbial coatings for prevention of HCAI. The network (AMiCI) comprises participants of more than 60 universities, research institutes and companies across 29 European countries and, to-date, represents the most comprehensive consortium targeting use of

  18. Lectins with Anti-HIV Activity: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouafae Akkouh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus. The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Assessment of herbal drugs for promising anti-Candida activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Sameh S M; Semreen, Mohammad H; El-Keblawy, Ali A; Abdullah, Arbab; Uppuluri, Priya; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2017-05-08

    Microbial infections are diverse and cause serious human diseases. Candida albicans infections are serious healthcare-related infections that are complicated by its morphological switching from yeast to hyphae, resistant biofilm formation and mixed infections with bacteria. Due to the increase in drug resistance to currently used antimicrobial agents and the presence of undesirable side effects, the need for safe and effective novel therapies is important. Compounds derived from plants are known for their medicinal properties including antimicrobial activities. The purpose of the study was to compare and evaluate the anti-Candida activities of several medicinal plants in order for the selection of a herbal drug for human use as effective antimicrobial. The selection was taking into considerations two important parameters; parameters related to the selected drug including activity, stability, solubility and toxicity and parameters related to the pathogen including its different dynamic growth and its accompanied secondary bacterial infections. Seven different plants including Avicennia marina (Qurm), Fagonia indica (Shoka'a), Lawsania inermis (Henna), Portulaca oleracea (Baq'lah), Salvadora persica (Souwak), Ziziphus spina- Christi (Sidr) and Asphodelus tenuifolius (Kufer) were ground and extracted with ethanol. The ethanol extracts were evaporated and the residual extract dissolved in water prior to testing against Candida albicans in its different morphologies. The antibacterial and cytotoxic effects of the plants extracts were also tested. Out of the seven tested plants, L. inermis and P. oleracea showed significant anti-Candida activity with MIC ~10 μg/mL. Furthermore, both plant extracts were able to inhibit C. albicans growth at its dynamic growth phases including biofilm formation and age resistance. Accompanied secondary bacterial infections can complicate Candida pathogenesis. L. inermis and P. oleracea extracts showed effective antibacterial activities

  20. Strong linkage between active microbial communities and microbial carbon usage in a deglaciated terrain of the High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.; Gyeong, H. R.; Lee, Y. K.

    2017-12-01

    Soil microorganisms play pivotal roles in ecosystem development and carbon cycling in newly exposed glacier forelands. However, little is known about carbon utilization pattern by metabolically active microbes over the course of ecosystem succession in these nutrient-poor environments. We investigated RNA-based microbial community dynamics and its relation to microbial carbon usage along the chronosequence of a High Arctic glacier foreland. Among microbial taxa surveyed (bacteria, archaea and fungi), bacteria are among the most metabolically active taxa with a dominance of Cyanobacteria and Actinobacteria. There was a strong association between microbial carbon usage and active Actinobacterial communities, suggesting that member of Actinobacteria are actively involved in organic carbon degradation in glacier forelands. Both bacterial community and microbial carbon usage are converged towards later stage of succession, indicating that the composition of soil organic carbon plays important roles in structuring bacterial decomposer communities during ecosystem development.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Ulcerogenic Activities of Chantaleela ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic activity of Chantaleela recipe may act via mechanism at peripheral and partly central nervous system. In antipyretic test, Chantaleela recipe significantly decreased rectal temperature of brewer's yeast-induced hyperthermia rats, probably by inhibiting synthesis and/or release of prostaglandin E2 in the ...

  2. Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phophatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.; Martial Taillefert

    2006-06-01

    The following is a summary of progress in our project ''Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phosphatases'' during the second year of the project. (1). Assignment of microbial phosphatases to molecular classes. One objective of this project is to determine the relationship of phosphatase activity to metal resistance in subsurface strains and possible contributions of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to the dissemination of nonspecific acid phosphatase genes. Non-specific acid phosphohydrolases are a broad group of secreted microbial phosphatases that function in acidic-to-neutral pH ranges and utilize a wide range of organophosphate substrates. To address this objective we have designed a collection of PCR primer sets based on known microbial acid phosphatase sequences. Genomic DNA is extracted from subsurface FRC isolates and amplicons of the expected sizes are sequenced and searched for conserved signature motifs. During this reporting period we have successfully designed and tested a suite of PCR primers for gram-positive and gram-negative groups of the following phosphatase classes: (1) Class A; (2) Class B; and (3) Class C (gram negative). We have obtained specific PCR products for each of the classes using the primers we have designed using control strains as well as with subsurface isolates.

  3. Anti-allergic, anti-pruritic, and anti-inflammatory activities of Centella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated antipruritic and anti-inflammatory effect of Centella asiatica extract in rats and anti-allergic in vitro using sheep (Capra hircus) serum method and compound 48/80 induced mast cell degranulation method, compared with standard drug ketotifen fumarate. In rats, extract of Centella asiatica administered ...

  4. Enhancing anti-microbial properties of wood-plastic composites produced from timber and plastic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi Sun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2017-05-01

    Considering the resource waste and environmental burden for timber and plastic materials ending up at landfills, this study proposed upcycling wood and plastic waste into value-added wood-plastic composites (WPCs), complying with the standard requirements of flexural strength, thickness swelling, water absorption and thermal insulation. Biological deterioration is a major concern of WPCs. Bacterial survival, fungal attack and algal growth of bactericide-treated WPCs were holistically analysed. Melamine resin was adopted for impregnating anti-microbial agents on the surface. All the agents showed excellent bactericidal rate (Escherichia coli), yet poly-diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride (PolyDADMAC) and silver had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations. In terms of weight loss and strength reduction due to fungal decay (Coriolus versicolor), PolyDADMAC, silver and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) imparted the highest resistance on the WPCs. Moreover, PolyDADMAC and copper provided the most protection against algal growth (Chlorella vulgaris), and the former presented durable inhibitory effect. This study presents a value-added solution to wood/plastic waste recycling.

  5. Participatory Policy Making by Dairy Producers to Reduce Anti-Microbial use on Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, L; Hayton, A; Main, D C J; Booth, A; King, A; Barrett, D C; Buller, H J; Reyher, K K

    2017-09-01

    Pressures for more responsible use of anti-microbial (AM) medicines in food animals are likely to increase from policymakers and the food industry, including retailers. To address this challenge, participatory approaches to welfare interventions and disease prevention may also be necessary alongside more conventional regulatory measures. This article describes the process of enabling groups of dairy producers to use a participatory policy making approach to develop an AM stewardship policy. The policy includes measures agreed to by all producers for more responsible use of AMs, whilst maintaining or improving dairy herd health and welfare. This process provided a unique opportunity for collaboration and dialogue between producers, veterinarians, industry and researchers. Its participatory nature encouraged comprehensive learning for all involved. This integration of science with producers' knowledge and experience led to credible and practical recommendations designed to deliver real and lasting change in AM use. The multidisciplinary nature of this research marks a significant contribution to embedding social science skills and approaches into the veterinary sphere. As an initial step in creating better understanding of how participatory approaches with farmers can be applied in a UK context and more widely, this work serves as a pilot for promoting more responsible use of veterinary medicines in other livestock species. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Microbiological problems in turbine oils - detection on-site, anti-microbial strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, E.C. [ECHA Microbiology Ltd., Cardiff (United Kingdom). Unit M210 Cardiff Bay Business Centre

    2008-04-15

    Some microbes can gain access to wet turbine oil systems, and if they find the chemical and physical environment conducive, they will proliferate wherever there is free water. This infected water can be considered as the factory which produces these slimy, sticky, corrosive organisms; their surfactancy allows them to spread into the oil causing operational problems and to colonize other niches. Many will die when they are in dry or hot oil, but they still have the ability to cause fouling. A variety of anti-microbial strategies can be deployed to minimize the risk of operational problems. Considerable care must be used when implementing them, particularly the use of biocides. It is much easier to kill a few microbes than many microbes, and it is sensible to do this before operational problems occur. On-site microbiological test kits are now being used by power station chemists to monitor turbine oils and detect early growth, and to check the efficacy of any remedial measures implemented. (orig.)

  7. Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Amorphophallus bulbifer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the Amorphophallus Bulbifer in Wistar rats and mice. Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of the hydroalcohol extract of A. bulbifer whole plant at dose levels of 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. in rats was determined with a plethysmograph paw volume ...

  8. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance infructescence (Liquidambaris fructus, ELF) in vivo, and clarify its underlying mechanisms. Methods: The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of ELF was examined by xylene-induced ear swelling test in mice as well as carrageenan-induced ...

  9. Synthesis and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Some Novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Some Novel Trisubstituted Thiophene Analogues. ... Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Journal ... analogues (IVa-IVf) were designed, synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenin-induced rat hind paw oedema model at 10 mg/kg dose.

  10. Evaluation Of Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Diospyros ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation Of Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Diospyros Cordifolia Extract. S Das, PK Haldar, G Pramanik, SP Panda, S Bera. Abstract. In this study we evaluated the analgesic and anti- inflammatory activities of the methanol extract of stem bark of Diospyros cordifolia (MEDC) Roxb. The analgesic effects of the ...

  11. Synthesis, anti-microbial activity and molecular docking studies on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025, Tamilnadu, India; Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746, Republic of Korea; Centre for Advanced Studies in Botany, Fungal Biotechnology, Natural Products and Plant Tissue Culture Lab, ...

  12. The Preliminary Assessment of Anti-Microbial Activity of Hplc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The freeze dried components were re-dissolved in deionised water and then evaluated for AMA against Vibrio cholerae, Shigella dysenteriae, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Salmonella typhi Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Enterobacter aerogenes. Component one exhibited ...

  13. Synthesis, anti-microbial activity and molecular docking studies on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    100, where I = Zone of inhibition. 2.6 Docking studies. The protein in complex with simocyclinone (PDB ID: 2Y3P) was used as the template for molecular docking studies. GLIDE 9.5 and IFD script from Schrödinger,. LLC (New York) was employed as our primary docking engine.20 A hierarchical search protocol was utilized ...

  14. Biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant) of fractions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bryophytes like other lower plants (non-vascular plants) are not traditionally employed for therapeutic purposes. Hence this study evaluated the in vitro anti-oxidant potentials and anti-inflammatory activities of the fractions and methanolic extract of Moss (Philonotis hastata, Duby) with a view to studying its ...

  15. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities of Secamone afzelii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . This study re-ports the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of S. afzelii. The anti-inflammatory activity was determined by the carrageenan-induced paw oedema method in 7 day old chicks and antioxi-dant property by the 2 ...

  16. The anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Patrinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explores the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Patrinia villosa, a Chinese medicinal plant, and to explore its effects on the proinflammatory cytokines of the rats with pelvic inflammation model. The animals were randomly divided into Patrinia villosa group (PV group), dexamethasone group (DEX ...

  17. Targeted Proteomics Approaches To Monitor Microbial Activity In Basalt Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszczynski, A. J.; Paidisetti, R.

    2007-12-01

    Microorganisms play a major role in biogeochemical cycles of the Earth. Information regarding microbial community composition can be very useful for environmental monitoring since the short generation times of microorganisms allows them to respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Microbial mediated attenuation of toxic chemicals offers great potential for the restoration of contaminated environments in an ecologically acceptable manner. Current knowledge regarding the structure and functional activities of microbial communities is limited, but more information is being acquired every day through many genomic- and proteomic- based methods. As of today, only a small fraction of the Earth's microorganisms has been cultured, and so most of the information regarding the biodegradation and therapeutic potentials of these uncultured microorganisms remains unknown. Sequence analysis of DNA and/or RNA has been used for identifying specific microorganisms, to study the community composition, and to monitor gene expression providing limited information about metabolic state of given microbial system. Proteomic studies can reveal information regarding the real-time metabolic state of the microbial communities thereby aiding in understanding their interaction with the environment. In research described here the involvement of microbial communities in the degradation of anthropogenic contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The co- metabolic degradation of TCE in the groundwater of the Snake River Plain Aquifer at the Test Area North (TAN) site of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was monitored by the characterization of peptide sequences of enzymes such as methane monooxygenases (MMOs). MMOs, expressed by methanotrophic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of methane and non-specific co-metabolic oxidation of TCE. We developed a time- course cell lysis method to release proteins from complex microbial

  18. Anti hyperglycemic activities of Annona muricata (Linn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, David Olawale; Komolafe, Omobola Aderibigbe; Adewole, Olarinde Stephen; Obuotor, Efere Martins; Adenowo, Thomas Kehinde

    2008-10-25

    This study was designed to determine the effects of methanolic extracts of Annona muricata (Linn) on the blood glucose level of streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Thirty adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups (A, B and C) of ten rats each. Group A was the control, Group B was untreated hyperglycemic group and group C was A. muricata-treated group. Hyperglycemia was induced in groups B and C by a single intraperitoneal injection of 80 mg/kg streptozotocin dissolved in 0.1 M citrate buffer. The control group was intraperitoneally injected with equivalent volume of citrate buffer and all the animals were monitored for four weeks. Daily intra peritoneal injection of 100 mg/kg A. muricata was administered to group C rats for two weeks and the animals were monitored for another two weeks. The data obtained were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics. The result showed a mean body weight of 206 +/- 7.74 g, 173.29+/-5.13 g and 197 +/- 5.62 g respectively for the control, untreated diabetic and A. muricata-treated diabetic group, and a mean blood glucose concentration of 3.78 +/- 0.190 mmol/L, 21.64 +/- 2.229 mmol/L and 4.22 +/- 0.151 mmol/L for the control, untreated diabetic and treated diabetic groups respectively. A significant difference exists between the blood glucose concentrations of treated and untreated hyperglycemic groups of rats. The result of this study demonstrated that A. muricata possesses anti-hyperglycemic activities.

  19. The impact of delayed biliary decompression and anti-microbial therapy in 260 patients with cholangitis-associated septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvellas, C J; Abraldes, J G; Zepeda-Gomez, S; Moffat, D C; Mirzanejad, Y; Vazquez-Grande, G; Esfahani, E K; Kumar, A

    2016-10-01

    Cholangitis-associated septic shock carries significant mortality. There is uncertainty regarding the most appropriate time to achieve biliary decompression. To determine whether the timing of biliary decompression and anti-microbial therapy affect the survival in cholangitis patients with septic shock. Nested retrospective cohort study of all cholangitis-associated septic shock patients (hypotension requiring vasopressors) from an international, multi-centre database between 1996 and 2011. Among 260 patients (mean age 69 years, 57% male), overall mortality was 37%. Compared to nonsurvivors (n = 96), survivors (n = 164) had lower mean admission Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II (22 vs. 28, P shock, P 12 h [OR 3.40 (1.12-10.31)] were all significantly associated with increased mortality (P septic shock secondary to acute cholangitis have significant mortality. Endoscopic biliary decompression >12 h after the onset of shock and delayed receipt of appropriate anti-microbial therapy were both significantly associated with adverse hospital outcome. This might suggest that early initiation of anti-microbial therapy and urgent biliary decompression (within 12 h) could potentially improve outcomes in this high-risk patient population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Metaproteogenomic Profiling of Microbial Communities Colonizing Actively Venting Hydrothermal Chimneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Pjevac

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available At hydrothermal vent sites, chimneys consisting of sulfides, sulfates, and oxides are formed upon contact of reduced hydrothermal fluids with oxygenated seawater. The walls and surfaces of these chimneys are an important habitat for vent-associated microorganisms. We used community proteogenomics to investigate and compare the composition, metabolic potential and relative in situ protein abundance of microbial communities colonizing two actively venting hydrothermal chimneys from the Manus Basin back-arc spreading center (Papua New Guinea. We identified overlaps in the in situ functional profiles of both chimneys, despite differences in microbial community composition and venting regime. Carbon fixation on both chimneys seems to have been primarily mediated through the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle and fueled by sulfur-oxidation, while the abundant metabolic potential for hydrogen oxidation and carbon fixation via the Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle was hardly utilized. Notably, the highly diverse microbial community colonizing the analyzed black smoker chimney had a highly redundant metabolic potential. In contrast, the considerably less diverse community colonizing the diffusely venting chimney displayed a higher metabolic versatility. An increased diversity on the phylogenetic level is thus not directly linked to an increased metabolic diversity in microbial communities that colonize hydrothermal chimneys.

  1. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefert, Martial [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  2. Oil sands cokes affect microbial activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip M. Fedorak; Debora L. Coy [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Department of Biological Sciences

    2006-09-15

    The upgrading of bitumen extracted from oil sands in Alberta, Canada is producing vast quantities of coke that must be stored in a manner that will not harm the environment. It has been assumed that these cokes are inert, and therefore should not affect any biological processes. Coke samples were incubated in two microbiological tests to determine if they are inert. One was a methanogenic bioassay, which showed that higher coke dosages led to lower methanogenic activity. In the second test, coke was incubated with heterotrophic, aerobic bacteria that are known to extract organic sulfur from coal yielding sulfate in the medium. Sulfate production was observed with one of the coke samples. Thus, the cokes are not inert. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Synthesis of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole derivatives as potential anti-microbial and cytotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Kallappa M; Shingalapur, Ramya V

    2011-05-01

    A series of novel 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-ylsulfanyl)-N-(4-oxo-2-phenyl-thiazolidin-3yl)-acetamide 5a-j have been synthesized from various aldehydes and 2-(5-phenyl-[1,3,4]-oxadiazol-2-ylmethylsulfanyl)-1H-benzimidazole 6a-j from various benzoic acids. These compounds were screened for their in-vitro anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis as Gram positive, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli as Gram negative bacterial strains and for in-vitro anti-fungal activity against Asperigillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. The in vitro cytotoxic properties were studied using brine shrimp bioassay. Results revealed that, compounds 5b, 5d, 5g, 5i, 6b, 6e, 6f, and 6i showed excellent activity against a panel of microorganisms. The cytotoxic activities of 5b, 5g, 5i, 6b, 6f, 6h, and 6i were found to be good. All the newly synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and MS. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Screening of anti-bacterial activity of medicinal plants from Belize (Central America).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporese, A; Balick, M J; Arvigo, R; Esposito, R G; Morsellino, N; De Simone, F; Tubaro, A

    2003-07-01

    Twenty-one extracts from seven herbal drugs, Aristolochia trilobata (Aristolochiaceae) leaves and bark, Bursera simaruba (Burseraceae) bark, Guazuma ulmifolia (Sterculiaceae) bark, Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) leaves and Syngonium podophyllum (Araceae) leaves and bark, used in traditional medicine of Belize (Central America) as deep and superficial wound healers, were evaluated for their anti-bacterial properties. Activity was tested against standard strains of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. Almost all the extracts were able to inhibit the growth of one or more of the bacterial strains, except that of Enterococcus faecalis. For the first time an anti-microbial activity is reported for Aristolochia trilobata as well as for Syngonium podophyllum. The hexane extracts of Aristolochia trilobata leaves and bark were the most active extracts against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=0.31 and 0.625mg/ml, respectively).

  5. The efficacy of different anti-microbial metals at preventing the formation of, and eradicating bacterial biofilms of pathogenic indicator strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugala, Natalie; Lemire, Joe A; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the prevalence of biofilm-related infections have generated a demand for alternative anti-microbial therapies. Metals have not been explored in adequate detail for their capacity to combat infectious disease. Metal compounds can now be found in textiles, medical devices and disinfectants-yet, we know little about their efficacy against specific pathogens. To help fill this knowledge gap, we report on the anti-microbial and antibiofilm activity of seven metals: silver, copper, titanium, gallium, nickel, aluminum and zinc against three bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To evaluate the capacity of metal ions to prevent the growth of, and eradicate biofilms and planktonic cells, bacterial cultures were inoculated in the Calgary Biofilm Device (minimal biofilm eradication concentration) in the presence of the metal salts. Copper, gallium and titanium were capable of preventing planktonic and biofilm growth, and eradicating established biofilms of all tested strains. Further, we observed that the efficacies of the other tested metal salts displayed variable efficacy against the tested strains. Further, contrary to the enhanced resistance anticipated from bacterial biofilms, particular metal salts were observed to be more effective against biofilm communities versus planktonic cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that the identity of the bacterial strain must be considered before treatment with a particular metal ion. Consequent to the use of metal ions as anti-microbial agents to fight multidrug-resistant and biofilm-related infections increases, we must aim for more selective deployment in a given infectious setting.

  6. The effect of the herbicide diuron on soil microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, A G; Airoldi, C

    2001-07-01

    The inhibitory effect of the herbicide diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] on microbial activity in red Latosol soil was followed using microcalorimetry. The activity of the micro-organisms in 1.50 g of soil sample was stimulated by addition of 6.0 mg of glucose and 6.0 mg of ammonium sulfate under 35% controlled humidity at 298.15 (+/- 0.02) K. This activity was determined by power-time curves that were recorded for increasing amounts of diuron, varying from zero to 333.33 micrograms g-1 soil. An increase in the amount of diuron in soil caused a decrease of the original thermal effect, to reach a null value above 333.33 micrograms g-1 of herbicide. The power-time curve showed that the lag-phase period and peak time increased with added herbicide. The decrease of the thermal effect evolved by micro-organisms and the increase of the lag-phase period are associated with the death of microbial populations caused by diuron, which strongly affects soil microbial communities.

  7. Comparative screening of the anti-oxidant and antimicrobial activities of Sempervivum marmoreum L. extracts obtained by various extraction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SASA S. STOJICEVIC

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study of the anti-oxidant and anti-microbial activities, total phenolic compounds and total flavonoids in extracts obtained from houseleek (Sempervivum marmoreum L. leaves by the classical (maceration, ultrasonic and Soxhlet extraction (CE, UE and SE, respectively. The extract obtained by the CE contained higher amounts of phenolic and flavonoid compounds and showed a better antioxidant activity than those obtained using other two techniques. All the extracts, independent of the extraction technique applied, showed antimicrobial activities against Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans only but not against the tested bacteria.

  8. Antagonistic activities of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria against microbial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Alain L

    2004-10-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a complex ecosystem that associates a resident microbiota and cells of various phenotypes lining the epithelial wall expressing complex metabolic activities. The resident microbiota in the digestive tract is a heterogeneous microbial ecosystem containing up to 1 x 10(14) colony-forming units (CFUs) of bacteria. The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in normal gut function and maintaining host health. The host is protected from attack by potentially harmful microbial microorganisms by the physical and chemical barriers created by the gastrointestinal epithelium. The cells lining the gastrointestinal epithelium and the resident microbiota are two partners that properly and/or synergistically function to promote an efficient host system of defence. The gastrointestinal cells that make up the epithelium, provide a physical barrier that protects the host against the unwanted intrusion of microorganisms into the gastrointestinal microbiota, and against the penetration of harmful microorganisms which usurp the cellular molecules and signalling pathways of the host to become pathogenic. One of the basic physiological functions of the resident microbiota is that it functions as a microbial barrier against microbial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the species of the microbiota exert this barrier effect remain largely to be determined. There is increasing evidence that lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, which inhabit the gastrointestinal microbiota, develop antimicrobial activities that participate in the host's gastrointestinal system of defence. The objective of this review is to analyze the in vitro and in vivo experimental and clinical studies in which the antimicrobial activities of selected lactobacilli and bifidobacteria strains have been documented.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Raw and Ripe Fruits of Forsythia suspensa by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS Analysis and Anti-Microbial Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jialin; Yan, Xinjia; Li, Chunyan; Wen, Jing; Lu, Chongning; Ren, Jungang; Peng, Ying; Song, Shaojiang

    2017-04-01

    A multi-component quantification fingerprint based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry technique has been established for the comparative analysis of raw and ripe fruits of Forsythia suspensa originated from different provinces. Eighteen bioactive constituents including three phenylethanoid glycosides derivatives, six phenolic acids, three flavonoids, four phenylpropanoids, one fatty acid and one terpenoid were identified and quantified. Total contents of phenylethanoid glycosides, phenylpropanoids and flavonoids from raw samples were found much higher than those from ripe samples, while total content of phenolic acids showed a contrary tendency. Moreover, the anti-microbial activities were comparatively assayed for the first time using five different bacterial strains. Results revealed a positive relationship between contents of total phenolic and anti-microbial activity. The results obtained in the present study may provide useful information for future utilization of F. suspensa. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extracts and fractions of Mangifera indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, C G; Deepak, M; Viswanatha, G L; Savinay, G; Hanumantharaju, V; Rajendra, C E; Halemani, Praveen D

    2013-04-13

    To evaluate the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extracts and fractions of Mangifera indica in in vitro conditions. In vitro DPPH radical scavenging activity and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibition assays were used to evaluate the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities respectively. Methanolic extract (MEMI), successive water extract (SWMI) and ethyl acetate fraction (EMEMI), n-butanol fraction (BMEMI) and water soluble fraction (WMEMI) of methanolic extract were evaluated along with respective reference standards. In in vitro DPPH radical scavenging activity, the MEMI, EMEMI and BMEMI have offered significant antioxidant activity with IC(50) values of 13.37, 3.55 and 14.19 μg/mL respectively. Gallic acid, a reference standard showed significant antioxidant activity with IC(50) value of 1.88 and found to be more potent compared to all the extracts and fractions. In in vitro LOX inhibition assay, the MEMI, EMEMI and BMEMI have showed significant inhibition of LOX enzyme activity with IC(50) values of 96.71, 63.21 and 107.44 μg/mL respectively. While, reference drug Indomethacin also offered significant inhibition against LOX enzyme activity with IC(50) of 57.75. Furthermore, MEMI was found to more potent than SWMI and among the fractions EMEMI was found to possess more potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. These findings suggest that the MEMI and EMEMI possess potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in in vitro conditions. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Curcumin-mediated anti-microbial photodynamic therapy against Candida dubliniensis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanitá, Paula Volpato; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Dovigo, Lívia Nordi; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Andrade, Mariana Carvalho; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira

    2017-11-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-microbial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) mediated by curcumin (Cur) associated with LED light against biofilms of Candida dubliniensis, and further, investigate cellular uptake and drug penetration through the biofilms under confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Four C. dubliniensis strains were tested: three clinical isolates from HIV-positive patients and one reference strain (CBS 7987). Biofilms were treated with three Cur concentrations (20.0, 30.0, and 40.0 μM). All samples were incubated in the dark for 20 min and exposed to a 5.28 J/cm 2 of LED light fluence. Additional samples of each strain were treated either with Cur or LED light only. Control samples had neither Cur nor light. After aPDT, results were read using the XTT salt reduction method. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Games-Howell post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to verify both the uptake of Cur by yeast cells and its penetration through the biofilm. The results showed that aPDT promoted significant reduction on the metabolism of the biofilm-organized cells of C. dubliniensis. Further, while Cur was rapidly taken up by C. dubliniensis cells, a longer time interval was required to allow Cur penetration into biofilm cells. Based on these results, aPDT associating LED and Cur presents promising potential on fungal control of biofilms of C. dubliniensis.

  12. Presence of Anti-Microbial Antibodies in Liver Cirrhosis – A Tell-Tale Sign of Compromised Immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Maria; Norman, Gary L.; Vitalis, Zsuzsanna; Tornai, Istvan; Altorjay, Istvan; Foldi, Ildiko; Udvardy, Miklos; Shums, Zakera; Dinya, Tamas; Orosz, Peter; Lombay, Bela; Par, Gabriella; Par, Alajos; Veres, Gabor; Csak, Timea; Osztovits, Janos; Szalay, Ferenc; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacterial translocation plays important role in the complications of liver cirrhosis. Antibody formation against various microbial antigens is common in Crohn's disease and considered to be caused by sustained exposure to gut microflora constituents. We hypothesized that anti-microbial antibodies are present in patients with liver cirrhosis and may be associated with the development of bacterial infections. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera of 676 patients with various chronic liver diseases (autoimmune diseases:266, viral hepatitis C:124, and liver cirrhosis of different etiology:286) and 100 controls were assayed for antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae(ASCA) and to antigens derived from two intestinal bacterial isolates (one gram positive, one gram negative, neither is Escherichia coli). In patients with liver cirrhosis, we also prospectively recorded the development of severe episodes of bacterial infection. ASCA and anti-OMP Plus™ antibodies were present in 38.5% and 62.6% of patients with cirrhosis and in 16% and 20% of controls, respectively (pAnti-microbial antibody titers (p = 0.003), as well as multiple seroreactivity (p = 0.036), was associated with infectious events. In logistic regression analysis, the presence of ascites (OR:1.62, 95%CI:1.16–2.25), co-morbidities (OR:2.22, 95%CI:1.27–3.86), and ASCA positivity (OR:1.59, 95%CI:1.07–2.36) were independent risk factors for severe infections. A shorter time period until the first infection was associated with the presence of ASCA (p = 0.03) and multiple seropositivity (p = 0.037) by Kaplan-Meier analysis, and with Child-Pugh stage (p = 0.018, OR:1.85) and co-morbidities (panti-microbial antibodies. PMID:20886039

  13. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of the root extract of Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Burch.) Skeels (Fabaceae) were investigated using wistar rats. The extract was administered intraperitoneally (i.p) to rats at graded doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg BWt. Carrageenan and. Histamine were injected into rat ...

  14. Growth inhibitory, apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mice. Collectively, these results suggest that CEMB is a very potent anti-tumour compound. [Ravanan P, Singh SK, Subba Rao GSR and Kondaiah P 2011 Growth inhibitory, apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities displayed by a novel modified triterpenoid, cyano enone of methyl boswellates. J. Biosci. 36 297–307] DOI ...

  15. Anti-inflammatroy activity of the mehanolic extract of Acanthus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... extract did not inhibit egg albumin-induced oedema. On the basis of the study, it may be inferred that Acanthus montanus may be a useful anti-inflammatory agent, which inhibits cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways at the level of phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Keywords: Acanthus montanus, anti-inflammatory activity, ...

  16. Anti-leishmanial and cytotoxic activities of extracts from three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-leishmanial and cytotoxic activities of extracts of different parts of Lawsonia Inermis, Morus nigra and Ziziphus mauritiana. Methods: The methanol extracts of all three plant materials at concentrations of 10 - 100 μg/mL were tested for their in vitro anti-leishmanial effects on L.

  17. Observations on microbial activity in acidified pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Nielsen, Daniel Aagren

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of pig slurry to pH 5.5 is used as a measure to reduce ammonia emission from pits and storages. The slurry is acidified with sulphuric acid in a process tank and pumped back to the slurry pits or to a storage tank. We investigated the effect of acidification on microbial activity. O...... acidification are greatly reduced production rates and loss of sulphide and methane, and eliminated loss of ammonia. On the other hand, increased volatilization and loss of smelly fatty acids is to be expected.......Acidification of pig slurry to pH 5.5 is used as a measure to reduce ammonia emission from pits and storages. The slurry is acidified with sulphuric acid in a process tank and pumped back to the slurry pits or to a storage tank. We investigated the effect of acidification on microbial activity....... Oxygen consumption rate, methanogenesis and sulphate reduction were all reduced by more than 98% in the stored acidified slurry compared to untreated slurry. Despite higher sulphate concentration, the microbial metabolism was greatly compromised or absent in the acidified slurry. This could be explained...

  18. Microbial biomass and activity in subsurface sediments from Vejen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Winding, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Subsurface sediment samples were collected from 4 to 31 m below landsurface in glacio-fluvial sediments from the Quaternary period. The samples were described in terms of pH, electrical conductivity, chloride concentration, organic matter content, and grain size distribution. Viable counts...... for mineralization of 14C-labelled compounds varied from 0.2 to 2.3 × 10−3 ml/(dpm · day) for acetate, and from 0 to 2.0 × 10−3 ml/(dpm · day) for phenol. Sediment texture influenced the total number of bacteria and potential for mineralization; with increasing content of clay and silt and decreasing content of sand...... a single abiotic parameter that could explain the variation of size and activity of the microbial population. The microbial data obtained in these geologically young sediments were compared to literature data from older sediments, and this comparison showed that age and type of geological formation might...

  19. Microbial biomass and activity in subsurface sediments from Vejen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Winding, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Subsurface sediment samples were collected from 4 to 31 m below landsurface in glacio-fluvial sediments from the Quaternary period. The samples were described in terms of pH, electrical conductivity, chloride concentration, organic matter content, and grain size distribution. Viable counts......, AODC increased and the mineralization rate declined. Intrinsic permeability calculated from grain size correlated positively with mineralization rate for acetate. Statistical correlation analysis showed high correlations between some of the abiotic parameters, but it was not possible to point out...... a single abiotic parameter that could explain the variation of size and activity of the microbial population. The microbial data obtained in these geologically young sediments were compared to literature data from older sediments, and this comparison showed that age and type of geological formation might...

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity of some copper chelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorenson, J.R.J.

    1974-01-01

    With the observation that cupric acetate had anti-inflammatory activity in the foot edema model of inflammation, it was felt that copper may play a role as a component of the active metabolite of anti-inflammatory agents used clinically. To test this hypothesis, various Cu chelates were made and tested in the foot edema, cotton-wad granuloma and polyarthritis models of inflammation. A marked increase in anti-inflammatory activity has been observed for the Cu chelates of chelating agents that had no anti-inflammatory activity as well as those that have been used clinically. Since ulcers may be viewed as inflammatory processes and often associated with the arthritic disease syndrome, the Cu chelates were evaluated as anti-ulcer agents. These compounds were demonstrated to have anti-ulcer activity in the Shay as well as the corticoid and stress induced rat ulcer models. Mechanistic considerations relevant to lysosomal and digestive proteolytic enzyme inhibition, anti-cholinergic activity, prostaglandin synthesis and wound healing are discussed. 9 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Casein hydrolysate diet controls intestinal T cell activation, free radical production and microbial colonisation in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, R; Asghar, M N; Toivonen, R; Lauren, L; Söderström, M; Toivola, D M; van Tol, E A F; Hänninen, A

    2013-08-01

    Dietary and microbial factors and the gut immune system are important in autoimmune diabetes. We evaluated inflammatory activity in the whole gut in prediabetic NOD mice using ex vivo imaging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), and correlated this with the above-mentioned factors. NOD mice were fed a normal diet or an anti-diabetogenic casein hydrolysate (CH) diet. RONS activity was detected by chemiluminescence imaging of the whole gut. Proinflammatory and T cell cytokines were studied in the gut and islets, and dietary effects on gut microbiota and short-chain fatty acids were determined. Prediabetic NOD mice displayed high RONS activity in the epithelial cells of the distal small intestine, in conjunction with a proinflammatory cytokine profile. RONS production was effectively reduced by the CH diet, which also controlled (1) the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and colonisation-dependent RegIIIγ (also known as Reg3g) in ileum; (2) intestinal T cell activation; and (3) islet cytokines. The CH diet diminished microbial colonisation, increased the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio, and reduced lactic acid and butyric acid production in the gut. Epithelial RONS production and proinflammatory T cell activation appears in the ileum of NOD mice after weaning to normal laboratory chow, but not after weaning to an anti-diabetogenic CH diet. Our data suggest a link between dietary factors, microbial colonisation and mucosal immune activation in NOD mice.

  2. Sericins exhibit ROS-scavenging, anti-tyrosinase, anti-elastase, and in vitro immunomodulatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlapanidas, Theodora; Faragò, Silvio; Lucconi, Giulia; Perteghella, Sara; Galuzzi, Marta; Mantelli, Melissa; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Tosca, Marta Cecilia; Marazzi, Mario; Vigo, Daniele; Torre, Maria Luisa; Faustini, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    Some biological properties of Bombyx mori sericins from twenty strains were investigated, fourteen fed with artificial diet, two with fresh mulberry leaves and four with both diets. Sericin exhibited ROS-scavenging, anti-tyrosinase and anti-elastase properties, the strain significantly influenced these properties, while diet only influenced the anti-tyrosinase activity. Sericins were clustered into 5 groups and one sericin from each group was further studied: sericins showed anti-proliferative activity on in vitro stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells; some strains decreased in vitro secretion of IFNγ, while no effects were observed on TNFα and IL10 release. Therefore, a mixture of sericins extracted from the most promising strains may be useful for dermatological and cosmetic use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-inflammatory activities of enzymatic (alcalase) hydrolysate of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-inflammatory activities of enzymatic (alcalase) hydrolysate of a whey protein concentrate. LB de Carvalho-Silva, MTB Pacheco, R Bertoldo, C de Carvalho Veloso, LC Teodoro, A Giusti-Paiva, PCB Lollo, R Soncini ...

  4. anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities: chemical constituents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    *Corresponding author. E-mail: bedisag@yahoo.fr. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES: CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF OCIMUM GRATISSIMUM,. EUCALYPTUS CITRIODORA AND CYMBOPOGON GIGANTEUS INHIBITED. LIPOXYGENASE L-1 AND CYCLOOXYGENASE OF ...

  5. In vivo anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Lippia alba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagnik Haldar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Lippia alba (Mill. N.E. Brown (Verbenaceae leaves. Methods: Soxhlet extraction method was used to obtain extracts using petroleum ether extracts (PELA; chloroform extracts (CELA; ethanol extracts (EELA and aqueous extract (AELA. Antinociceptive activity was assessed on rats by tail flick latency using tail immersion method and anti-inflammatory activity was estimated by carrageenan induced paw edema method. PELA, CELA and AELA at a dose of 500 mg /kg.b.wt. and EELA at a dose of 460 mg /kg.b.wt were administered orally. Result: Competing to control AELA was found to have a higher range of anti-nociceptive activity and showing maximum (79.66% response at 60 min, where as CELA and EELA were found to have a maximum range of anti-inflammatory activity and CELA exhibit maximum (19.5% response at 240 min. Conclusion: The results suggest that the extracts of Lippia alba possess ant-inociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, and its help to authenticates the use of the plant in the traditional treatment of ailments associated with pain and inflammation.

  6. Anti-microbial surfaces: An approach for deposition of ZnO nanoparticles on PVA-Gelatin composite film by screen printing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, J V; Koli, V B; Phadatare, M R; Pawar, S H

    2017-04-01

    Initially micro-organisms get exposed to the surfaces, this demands development of anti-microbial surfaces to inhibit their proliferation. Therefore, herein, we attempt screen printing technique for development of PVA-GE/ZnO nanocomposite (PG/ZnO) films. The synthesis of PG/ZnO nanocomposite includes two steps as: (i) Coating of Zinc Oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) by poly ethylene glycol in order to be compatible with organic counterparts. (ii) Deposition of coated nanoparticles on the PG film surface. The results suggest the enhancement in anti-microbial activity of PG/ZnO nanocomposite over pure ZnO NPs against both Gram positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram negative Escherichia coli from zone of inhibition. The uniformity in deposition is further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The phase identification of ZnO NPs and formation of PG/ZnO nanocomposite has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and UV-vis spectroscopy (UV-vis). The Attenuated total reflection Spectroscopy (ATR) analysis indicates the ester bond between PVA and gelatin molecules. The thermal stability of nanocomposite is studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealing increase in crystallinity due to ZnO NPs which could be utilized to inhibit the growth of micro-organisms. The tensile strength is found to be higher and percent elongation is double of PG/ZnO nanocomposite than PG composite film. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Moles, Juan; Torrent, Anna; Alcaraz, M. José; Ruhí, Ramon; Avila, Conxita

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to obtain extracts that were soluble at an innocuous ethanol concentration (0.2%) for cell culture, and further test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From t...

  8. Anti-ulcer activity of essential oil constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Francisco de Assis; Andrade, Luciana Nalone; de Sousa, Elida Batista Vieira; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2014-05-05

    Essential oils have attracted considerable worldwide attention over the last few decades. These natural products have wide-ranging pharmacological activities and biotechnological applications. Faced with the need to find new anti-ulcer agents and the great effort on the development of drugs for the treatment of ulcers, in this review, the anti-ulcer activities of 21 bioactive compounds found in essential oils are discussed.

  9. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  10. Anti-Microbial Dendrimers against Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Enhance the Angiogenic Effect of Biological Burn-wound Bandages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Sayed, Philippe; Kaeppeli, Ariane; Kaeppli, Ariane; Siriwardena, Thissa; Darbre, Tamis; Perron, Karl; Jafari, Paris; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Pioletti, Dominique P; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2016-02-25

    Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has increased progressively and impedes further regression in mortality in burn patients. Such wound infections serve as bacterial reservoir for nosocomial infections and are associated with significant morbidity and costs. Anti-microbial polycationic dendrimers G3KL and G3RL, able to kill multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa, have been previously developed. The combination of these dendrimers with a class of biological bandages made of progenitor skin cells, which secrete growth factors, could positively impact wound-healing processes. However, polycations are known to be used as anti-angiogenic agents for tumor suppression. Since, neovascularization is pivotal in the healing of deep burn-wounds, the use of anti-microbial dendrimers may thus hinder the healing processes. Surprisingly, we have seen in this study that G3KL and G3RL dendrimers can have angiogenic effects. Moreover, we have shown that a dendrimer concentration ranging between 50 and 100 μg/mL in combination with the biological bandages can suppress bacterial growth without altering cell viability up to 5 days. These results show that antimicrobial dendrimers can be used in combination with biological bandages and could potentially improve the healing process with an enhanced angiogenesis.

  11. Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wang

    2004-11-18

    ''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs.

  12. Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Wang

    2004-01-01

    ''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs

  13. The antiSMASH database, a comprehensive database of microbial secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blin, Kai; Medema, Marnix H.; Kottmann, Renzo

    2017-01-01

    . Therefore, we developed the antiSMASH database, a simple but highly useful new resource to browse antiSMASH-annotated BGCs in the currently 3907 bacterial genomes in the database and perform advanced search queries combining multiple search criteria. antiSMASH-DB is available at http://antismash-db.secondarymetabolites.org/....

  14. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Melanthera scandens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okokon, Jude E; Udoh, Anwanga E; Frank, Samuel G; Amazu, Louis U

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of leaf extract of Melanthera scandens (M. scandens). Methods The crude leaf extract (39–111 mg/kg) of M. scandens was investigated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using various experimental models. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carragenin, egg-albumin induced oedema models, while acetic acid, formalin-induced paw licking and thermal-induced pain models were used to evaluate the antinociceptive property. Results The extract caused a significant (P<0.05 – 0.001) dose-dependent reduction of inflammation and pains induced by different agents used. Conclusions The leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects which may be mediated through the phytochemical constituents of the plant. PMID:23569885

  15. Linking the Effect of Antibiotics on Partial-Nitritation Biofilters: Performance, Microbial Communities and Microbial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Gonzalez-Martinez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of antibiotics resistance in wastewater treatment systems have been pointed as a major environmental health problem. Nevertheless, research about adaptation and antibiotics resistance gain in wastewater treatment systems subjected to antibiotics has not been successfully developed considering bioreactor performance, microbial community dynamics and microbial activity dynamics at the same time. To observe this in autotrophic nitrogen removal systems, a partial-nitritation biofilter was subjected to a continuous loading of antibiotics mix of azithromycin, norfloxacin, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole. The effect of the antibiotics mix over the performance, bacterial communities and bacterial activity in the system was evaluated. The addition of antibiotics caused a drop of ammonium oxidation efficiency (from 50 to 5% and of biomass concentration in the bioreactor, which was coupled to the loss of ammonium oxidizing bacteria Nitrosomonas in the bacterial community from 40 to 3%. Biomass in the partial nitritation biofilter experienced a sharp decrease of about 80% due to antibiotics loading, but the biomass adapted and experienced a growth by stabilization under antibiotics feeding. During the experiment several bacterial genera appeared, such as Alcaligenes, Paracoccus, and Acidovorax, clearly dominating the bacterial community with >20% relative abundance. The system reached around 30% ammonium oxidation efficiency after adaptation to antibiotics, but no effluent nitrite was found, suggesting that dominant antibiotics-resistant phylotypes could be involved in nitrification–denitrification metabolisms. The activity of ammonium oxidation measured as amoA and hao gene expression dropped a 98.25% and 99.21%, respectively, comparing the system before and after the addition of antibiotics. On the other hand, denitrifying activity increased as observed by higher expression of nir and nos genes (83.14% and 252

  16. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobecky, Patricia A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  17. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  18. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Anti-neuroinflammatory Activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion: HFE can be considered as a useful therapeutic and preventive approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress-related diseases. Keywords: Hizikia fusiforme, Antioxidant activity, Anti-neuroinflammation activity, Inducible nitric oxide ...

  19. Periodic sediment shift in migrating ripples influences benthic microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatanović, Sanja; Fabian, Jenny; Mendoza-Lera, Clara; Woodward, K. Benjamin; Premke, Katrin; Mutz, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Migrating bedforms have high levels of particulate organic matter and high rates of pore water exchange, causing them to be proposed as hot spots of carbon turnover in rivers. Yet, the shifting of sediments and associated mechanical disturbance within migrating bedforms, such as ripples, may stress and abrade microbial communities, reducing their activity. In a microcosm experiment, we replicated the mechanical disturbances caused by the periodic sediment shift within ripples under oligotrophic conditions. We assessed the effects on fungal and bacterial biomass ratio (F:B), microbial community respiration (CR), and bacterial production (BCP) and compared with stable undisturbed sediments. Interactions between periodic mechanical disturbance and sediment-associated particulate organic matter (POM) were tested by enriching sediments collected from migrating ripples with different qualities of POM (fish feces, leaf litter fragments and no addition treatments). F:B and BCP were affected by an interaction between mechanical disturbance and POM quality. Fish feces enriched sediments showed increased F:B and BCP compared to sediments with lower POM quality and responded with a decrease of F:B and BCP to sediment disturbance. In the other POM treatments F:B and BCP were not affected by disturbance. Microbial respiration was however reduced by mechanical disturbance to similar low activity levels regardless of POM qualities added, whereas fish feces enriched sediment showed short temporary boost of CR. With the worldwide proliferation of migrating sand ripples due to massive catchment erosion, suppressed mineralization of POM will increasingly affect stream metabolism, downstream transport of POM and carbon cycling from reach to catchment scale.

  20. Effects of Conservation Agriculture and Fertilization on Soil Microbial Diversity and Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Habig

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial communities perform critical functions in ecosystem processes. These functions can be used to assess the impact of agricultural practices on sustainable crop production. In this five-year study, the effect of various agricultural practices on soil microbial diversity and activity was investigated in a summer rainfall area under South African dryland conditions. Microbial diversity and activity were measured in the 0–15 cm layer of a field trial consisting of two fertilizer levels, three cropping systems, and two tillage systems. Using the Shannon–Weaver and Evenness diversity indices, soil microbial species richness and abundance were measured. Microbial enzymatic activities: β-glucosidase, phosphatase and urease, were used to evaluate ecosystem functioning. Cluster analysis revealed a shift in soil microbial community diversity and activity over time. Microbial diversity and activity were higher under no-till than conventional tillage. Fertilizer levels seemed to play a minor role in determining microbial diversity and activity, whereas the cropping systems played a more important role in determining the activity of soil microbial communities. Conservation agriculture yielded the highest soil microbial diversity and activity in diversified cropping systems under no-till.

  1. Synthesis of New Nitrofluoroquinolone Derivatives with Novel Anti-Microbial Properties against Metronidazole Resistant H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qatouseh, Luay; Abu-Sini, Mohammad; Mayyas, Amal; Al-Hiari, Yusuf; Darwish, Rula; Aburjai, Talal

    2017-01-04

    One of the major therapeutic approaches to preventing relapse and accelerating the healing of duodenal and gastric ulcers is the eradication of Helicobacter pylori . Due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance among clinical strains of H. pylori , alternative approaches using newly discovered antimicrobial agents in combination with the standard regimens for the treatment of H. pylori are increasingly needed. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of newly synthesized 8-nitroflouroqunolone derivatives when used either alone or when combined with metronidazole against metronidazole-resistant H. pylori . Based on the standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and checkerboard titration assay, all of the tested compounds showed interesting antimicrobial activity against 12 clinical strains of H. pylori , with the best in vitro effect for compound 3c . In addition, synergistic and additive activities of some of the tested compounds were observed when combined with metronidazole. Furthermore, among the tested nitroflouroquinolone derivatives, compound 3b showed significant urease inhibition activity with IC 50 of 62.5 µg/mL. These results suggest that 8-nitroflouroquinolone derivatives may have a useful role in combination with anti- H. pylori drugs in the management of H. pylori -associated diseases.

  2. Anti-inflammatory, anti-hyperalgesic, antiplatelet and antiulcer activities of Byrsonima japurensis A. Juss. (Malpighiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhon-Simplicio, Fernanda; Pinheiro, Carlos Cleomir de Souza; Conrado, Gabrielly Galdino; Barbosa, Gleyce Dos Santos; Santos, Pierre Alexandre Dos; Pereira, Maria de Meneses; Lima, Emerson Silva

    2012-03-27

    Decoctions or infusions of the stem bark of Byrsonima japurensis A. Juss. (Malpighiaceae) are widely used as an anti-inflammatory drug in folk medicine of Amazonas State (Brazil). To evaluate the pharmacological potential of an aqueous extract of the stem bark of Byrsonima japurensis (BJEA) to scientifically verify of its traditional use. Anti-inflammatory, antihyperalgesic and antiulcer activities were evaluated in Wistar rats, a Hippocratic screening was performed in Swiss mice to evaluate the toxic effects, and antiplatelet evaluation was performed in human platelet rich plasma assay. Additionally, antioxidant activity was evaluated by superoxide radical scavenging method and β-carotene bleaching test. Anti-inflammatory, antihyperalgesic and gastroprotective activities were observed in rats treated orally with different doses of BJEA. While signals of toxicity were observed in the mice treated with a very high dose of extract (5000mg/kg), no death occurred. BJEA also showed expressive antiplatelet and antioxidant activities in vitro. According to our results, it was concluded that stem bark of Byrsonima japurensis has significant and safe anti-inflammatory activity, which is closely related with their potent antioxidant activity, supporting the folk medicinal use of this species. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Uncharted Microbial World: Microbes and Their Activities in the Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwood, Caroline; Buckley, Merry

    2007-12-31

    Microbes are the foundation for all of life. From the air we breathe to the soil we rely on for farming to the water we drink, everything humans need to survive is intimately coupled with the activities of microbes. Major advances have been made in the understanding of disease and the use of microorganisms in the industrial production of drugs, food products and wastewater treatment. However, our understanding of many complicated microbial environments (the gut and teeth), soil fertility, and biogeochemical cycles of the elements is lagging behind due to their enormous complexity. Inadequate technology and limited resources have stymied many lines of investigation. Today, most environmental microorganisms have yet to be isolated and identified, let alone rigorously studied. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium in Seattle, Washington, in February 2007, to deliberate the way forward in the study of microorganisms and microbial activities in the environment. Researchers in microbiology, marine science, pathobiology, evolutionary biology, medicine, engineering, and other fields discussed ways to build on and extend recent successes in microbiology. The participants made specific recommendations for targeting future research, improving methodologies and techniques, and enhancing training and collaboration in the field. Microbiology has made a great deal of progress in the past 100 years, and the useful applications for these new discoveries are numerous. Microorganisms and microbial products are now used in industrial capacities ranging from bioremediation of toxic chemicals to probiotic therapies for humans and livestock. On the medical front, studies of microbial communities have revealed, among other things, new ways for controlling human pathogens. The immediate future for research in this field is extremely promising. In order to optimize the effectiveness of community research efforts in the future, scientists should include manageable

  4. Bioactivity screening of microalgae for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, anti-diabetes and antibacterial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLauritano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine microalgae are considered a potentially new and valuable source of biologically active molecules for applications in the food industry as well as in the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic sectors. They can be easily cultured, have short generation times and enable an environmentally-friendly approach to drug discovery by overcoming problems associated with the over-utilization of marine resources and the use of destructive collection practices. In this study, 21 diatoms, 7 dinoflagellates and 4 flagellate species were grown in three different culturing conditions and the corresponding extracts were tested for possible antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, anti-diabetes, antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities. In addition, for two diatoms we also tested two different clones to disclose diversity in clone bioactivity. Six diatom species displayed specific anti-inflammatory, anticancer (blocking human melanoma cell proliferation and anti-biofilm (against the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis activities whereas, none of the other microalgae were bioactive against the conditions tested for. Furthermore, none of the 6 diatom species tested were toxic on normal human cells. Culturing conditions (i.e. nutrient starvation conditions greatly influenced bioactivity of the majority of the clones/species tested. This study denotes the potential of diatoms as sources of promising bioactives for the treatment of human pathologies.

  5. Anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives and analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-09-01

    Natural products have played a vital role in drug discovery and development process for cancer. Diospyrin, a plant based bisnaphthoquinonoid, has been used as a lead molecule in an effort to develop anti-cancer drugs. Several derivatives/analogues have been synthesized and screened for their pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities so far. Our review is focused on the pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives/analogues and the different mechanisms potentially involved in the bioactivity of these compounds. Particular focus has been placed on the different mechanisms (both chemical and molecular) thought to underlie the bioactivity of these compounds. A brief bioinformatics analysis at the end of the article provides novel insights into the new potential mechanisms and pathways by which these compounds might exert their effects and lead to a better realization of the full therapeutic potential of these compounds as anti-cancer drugs. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Antioxidant and Anti-Protease Activities of Diazepinomicin from the Sponge-Associated Micromonospora Strain RV115

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Szesny, Matthias; Othman, Eman Maher; Schirmeister, Tanja; Grond, Stephanie; Stopper, Helga; Hentschel, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Diazepinomicin is a dibenzodiazepine alkaloid with an unusual structure among the known microbial metabolites discovered so far. Diazepinomicin was isolated from the marine sponge-associated strain Micromonospora sp. RV115 and was identified by spectroscopic analysis and by comparison to literature data. In addition to its interesting preclinical broad-spectrum antitumor potential, we report here new antioxidant and anti-protease activities for this compound. Using the ferric reducing antioxi...

  7. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Piper nigrum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasleem, Farhana; Azhar, Iqbal; Ali, Syed Nawazish; Perveen, Shaista; Mahmood, Zafar Alam

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of pure compound, piperine along with hexane and ethanol extracts of Piper nigrum L. fruit in mice and rats. The analgesic activity was determined by tail immersion method, analgesy-meter, hot plate and acetic acid induced writhing test. While the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw inflammation in rats. Piperine at a dose of 5 mg/kg and ethanol extract at a dose of 15 mg/kg after 120 min and hexane extract at a dose of 10 mg/kg after 60 min exhibited significant (PPiper nigrum L possesses potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gamma-irradiated bacterial preparation having anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.; Terzaghi-Howe, P.

    1999-01-01

    This application describes a bacterial preparation from Pseudomonas species isolated number s ign15 ATCC 55638 that has been exposed to gamma radiation exhibits cytotoxicity that is specific for neoplastic carcinoma cells. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having antitumor activity consists of suspending a bacterial isolate in media and exposing the suspension to gamma radiation. A bacterial preparation of an aged culture of an amoeba-associated bacteria exhibits anti-reverse transcriptase activity. A method for obtaining a bacterial preparation having anti-reverse transcriptase activity from an amoeba-associated bacterial isolate grown to stationary phase is disclosed

  9. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of Thymus linearis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Parveen, Amna; Abbas, Khizar; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous methanolic and n-hexane extract of Thymus linearis. For measuring analgesic activity, writhing test, hot plate method and formalin test were performed and abdominal writhing was induced by intra-peritoneal injection of 0.2 ml of 3% acetic acid. While in formalin test, pain was experimentally induced by injecting 25 μl of 2.5% formalin in left hind paw. In hot plate method, pain was induced thermally by keeping the animals on a hot plate with temperature of about 51°C. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by carrageenan induced mice paw edema. For determination of antipyretic activity, pyrexia was induced by subcutaneous injection of 15% yeast. The results showed that both the extracts had significant analgesic activity (pThymus linearis may be used against pain, pyrexia and inflammation.

  10. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirender Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models.

  11. Histochemical analyses of anti-microbial substances in canine perianal skin with special reference to glandular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, T; Yasui, T; Fujimori, O; Meyer, W; Tsukise, A

    2013-04-01

    Circumanal glands are prominent features of the canine perianal skin, which are often located near to the sebaceous glands and apocrine glands. As the functional relevance of circumanal glands is yet unknown, we studied the localisation of sialic acids and anti-microbial substances (lysozyme, immunoglobulin A, lactoferrin, β-defensin) in these glandular structures by lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. The glands exhibited a number of sialic acids that were linked to α2-6Gal/GalNAc and α2-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc. Additionally, lysozyme, lactoferrin and β-defensin could be demonstrated in the three types of skin glands, whereas IgA was only detectable in the apocrine glands. The results of the study suggest the specific significance of the circumanal glands. Independent of a certain endocrine role, their products may mainly function as protective agents to preserve the integrity of the anal region, considering that sialic acids and anti-microbial substances are important in defence mechanisms. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Cytocompatible Anti-microbial Dressings of Syzygium cumini Cellulose Nanocrystals Decorated with Silver Nanoparticles Accelerate Acute and Diabetic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Rubbel; Soni, Sourabh; Patial, Vikram; Kulurkar, Pankaj Markand; Kumari, Avnesh; S, Mahesh; Padwad, Yogendra S; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2017-09-05

    The ever increasing incidences of non-healing skin wounds have paved way for many efforts on the convoluted process of wound healing. Unfortunately, the lack of relevance and success of modern wound dressings in healing of acute and diabetic wounds still remains a matter of huge concern. Here, an in situ three step approach was embraced for the development of nanocomposite (NCs) dressings by impregnating silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) onto a matrix of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) isolated from Syzygium cumini leaves using an environmental friendly approach. Topical application of NCs (ointments and strips) on acute and diabetic wounds of mice documented enhanced tissue repair (~99% wound closure) via decrease in inflammation; increase in angiogenesis, collagen deposition, and rate of neo-epithelialization that ultimately led to formation of aesthetically sound skin in lesser time than controls. Due to the synergistic action of CNCs (having high water uptake capacity) and AgNPs (anti-microbial agents), NCs tend to increase the expression of essential growth factors (FGF, PDGF and VEGF) and collagen while decreasing the pro-inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) at the same time, thus accelerating healing. The results suggested the potential of these developed anti-microbial, cytocompatible and nanoporous NCs having optimized AgNPs concentration as ideal dressings for effective wound management.

  13. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, R.; Wu, C. H.; Beazley, M. J.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Taillefert, M.; Sobecky, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides remain a legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons development. Due to the scale of environmental contamination, in situ sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides remain the most cost-effective strategy for remediation. We are currently investigating a remediation approach that utilizes periplasmic and extracellular microbial phosphatase activity of soil bacteria capable promoting in situ uranium phosphate sequestration. Our studies focus on the contaminated soils from the DOE Field Research Center (ORFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. We have previously demonstrated that ORFRC strains with phosphatase-positive phenotypes were capable of promoting the precpitation of >95% U(VI) as a low solubility phosphate mineral during growth on glycerol phosphate as a sole carbon and phosphorus source. Here we present culture-independent soil slurry studies aimed at understanding microbial community dynamics resulting from exogenous organophosphate additions. Soil slurries containing glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) or glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and nitrate as the sole C, P and N sources were incubated under oxic growth conditions at pH 5.5 or pH 6.8. Following treatments, total DNA was extracted and prokaryotic diversity was assessed using high-density 16S oligonucleotide microarray (PhyloChip) analysis. Treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G2P required 36 days to accumulate 4.8mM and 2.2 mM phosphate, respectively. In contrast, treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G3P accumulated 8.9 mM and 8.7 mM phosphate, respectively, after 20 days. A total of 2120 unique taxa representing 46 phyla, 66 classes, 110 orders, and 186 families were detected among all treatment conditions. The phyla that significantly (P<0.05) increased in abundance relative to incubations lacking organophosphate amendments included: Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Members from the classes Bacteroidetes

  14. Anti-tuberculosis activity of -lactam antibiotics: prospects for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review is prepared to show results on the anti-TB activity of -lactam antibiotics. -Lactams are among the oldest drugs with little or no side effects. Both in vitro studies and clinical data indicate that -lactams have a promising activity for use in the management of MDR-TB. More studies are required to define the interaction ...

  15. Acute toxicity studies, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extracts of the stem bark of Enantia chlorantha and Nauclea latifolia were investigated in rats and mice for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. The activities of the extracts were tested on egg white-induced oedema, acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate models. Methanolic extract of Nauclea latifolia ...

  16. anti-inflammatory activity of selected nigerian medicinal plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracts of nineteen plant species from an inventory of Nigerian medicinal plants were screened for activity in two in vitro anti-inflammatory model test systems, inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis and PAF-induced elastase release from neutrophilis. Anacardium occidentale and Acalipha hispida were active in both test ...

  17. Evaluation of Anti-Fatigue Activity of Flavonoids from Tartary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Flavonoids are the major biological activities components of tartary buckwheat which has multifunctional bioactivities. However, there are a limited number of studies on the effect of flavonoids from tartary buckwheat (TBF) on physical fatigue at present. This study aimed to investigate the anti-fatigue activity of ...

  18. Anti-proliferative activity of recombinant melittin expressed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recombinant melittin was then successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The activity of affinity-purified recombinant melittin was determined in human leukemic U937 cells. Results show that the recombinant melittin had the same anti-proliferative activity in human leukemic U937 cells in vitro as natural one. This shows the ...

  19. Antioxidant, hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant, hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of Ziziphus spina-christi (L) Willd (Rhamnacae) leaf extract. Amal AM Al-Ghamdi, Abdelaaty A Shahat. Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the antioxidant, hypoglycemic and antidiabetic activities as well as the phenolic composition of Ziziphus spina-christi (ZSC) Methods: ...

  20. Anti-inflammation activity and chemical composition of flower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... essential oil in vitro (DPPH reduction assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay) and the anti- inflammatory activity in ... produced significant inhibition of paw oedema, but showed poor antioxidant activity (with the DPPH. IC50 value of ... regions, such as Japan, India, Brazil, South China,. Southeast ...

  1. Cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of four different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of four different solvent extracts obtained from the aerial parts of Galega officinalis L. Methods: The hexane, DCM, methanol and water extracts of G. officinalis were successively obtained by soxhlet extraction method. The cytotoxic activity of the ...

  2. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of water extract from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was done to evaluate the antiinflammatory and analgesic activities of the water extract of the plant in experimental animal models (anti-inflammatory action by carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, the analgesic activity by acetic acid-induced writhing response method. The water extract of I. asarifolia in doses of ...

  3. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of the aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous extract of Hippobromus pauciflorus (L.f) Radlk leaves at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight were evaluated for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in male rats. Antiinflammatory activity was studied by using carrageenan and histamine induced oedema right hind paw volume while the ...

  4. ANTI BACTERIAL ACTIVITY AND MEDICINAL PROPERTIES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    Streptococcus viridans. 1.00. 5.0. 5.6. 7.0. -. 0.50. 3.0. 4.0. 4.5. -. 0.25. 0.125. DISCUSSION. The results for the antibacterial screening have shown that all the extracts except the water extract have antibacterial activity. The results of the inhibition of bacterial growth have shown that the extracts are active at high concentration ...

  5. Biological Characterization of Cynara cardunculus L. Methanolic Extracts: Antioxidant, Anti-proliferative, Anti-migratory and Anti-angiogenic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Duarte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cynara cardunculus (Cc is a multipurpose species; beyond its use in southwestern European cuisine, it is also used for the production of solid biofuel, seed oil, biodiesel, paper pulp and cheese, as well as animal feed. In addition, Cc has a long tradition of use in folk medicine as a diuretic and liver protector. The value of this species as a source of bioactive compounds is known; however, pharmacological use would further increase its cultivation. The main goal of the current work was to evaluate the potential of Cc as source of anti-carcinogenic phytochemicals. Different methanolic extracts obtained from wild and cultivated plants were tested for antioxidant activity and effect on breast tumor cell viability. The most effective extract, both as antioxidant and inhibition of tumor cell viability, was tested for effects on angiogenesis and tumor cell migration capacity. All the extracts tested had high antioxidant activity; however, only green leaves and dry head extracts exhibit anti-proliferative activity. Green cultivated leaves (GCL were the most effective extract both as antioxidant and inhibiting the proliferation of tumor cells; it is equally active inhibiting tumor cell migration and in vivo angiogenesis. GCL extract is an effective inhibitor of several key points in tumor development and thus a promising source of anti-carcinogenic phytochemicals.

  6. Anti-leishmanial and Anti-cancer Activities of a Pentacyclic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Terminalia arjuna Roxb (Combretaceae) is commonly known as Arjjhan and Arjun in Bengal, India. The anti-leishmanial and anticancer activities of a pentacyclic triterpenoid isolated from its leaves were evaluated. Methods: Dried and crushed leaves of Terminalia arjuna were de-fatted with petroleum ether ...

  7. Microbial activity measurements by means of tritium-labelled substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    Two improved methods to determine microbial activity at nearly in situ conditions are reported. The first is valid for the identification of active bacteria metabolizing on easily degradable organic compounds by means of 3 H-micro-autoradiography. The second method provides reliable uptake rates of 3 H-substrates with one substrate concentration added to the sample. Uptake velocities were calculated from the Lineweaver-Burke equation. Measurements of active bacterial numbers and biomass as well as heterotrophic activities obtained by applying these methods to a brackish water environment are discussed. A correlation matrix between bacterial variables and ecological relevant parameters is established. An average annual number of 970x10 3 ml -1 active bacteria were found in the research area, that is 41% of the total number of bacteria. Active bacterial biomass averaged 10.3 μg C1 -1 in comparison with 19.3 μg C1 -1 total bacterial biomass. Turnover times of substrates ranged between 7 and 147 h for amino acids. Uptake velocities (Vsub(m)) of four 3 H-substrates (amino-acid mixture, leucine, glucose, acetate) exhibited a close relationship with chlorophyll a concentrations and water temperature. The similarity of Vsub(m) plots indicates the presence of uptake properties for different substrates in bacteria living in areas with insufficient nutrient supply. (author)

  8. Microbial stasis of Leishmania enriettii in activated guinea pig macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groocock, C.M.; Soulsby, E.J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from Leishmania-sensitized guinea pigs were cultured in vitro in the presence (activated) or absence (non-activated) of leishmanial antigen for 24 or 48 hours. These were then labelled with 51 Cr and challenged with 125 I-labelled promastigotes. The changing relationship between the macrophage and the parasite was monitored by observing changes in the ratio of the cell-associated isotopes. Highly significant differences in the ratio change developed during culture. These differences were a result of the activated cultures showing a higher release of 51 Cr and a lower release of 125 I when compared with the non-activated cells, at 12 hours the percentage release of 125 I from the parasite within the activated macrophage was fourfold less than that released by parasites within non-activated cells (9.2% versus 38.3%) and tenfold less than that released from glutaraldehyde-killed organisms phagocytosed by activated macrophages (91.6%). These studies indicate that stasis rather than killing of leishmaniae occurs in the activated macrophage in vitro. Parallel experiments evaluated by the visual counting of leishmaniae within the macrophages support these data. PEC from tuberculin-sensitized guinea pigs activated in vitro by purified protein derivative showed little or no activity against leishmaniae, indicating a specific requirement for this microbial stasis by activated macrophages. As a corollary of this, peritoneal exudate lymphocytes separated from the same preparations of PEC were shown to be specifically reactive to leishmanial antigen by transformation and incorporation of 3 H-thymidine. (author)

  9. Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-16

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

  10. Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyoung Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish from 2006 to the present.

  11. ANALGESIC, ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-ULCER ACTIVITY OF ETHANOL AND ETHYL ACETATE EXTRACTS OF TECOMARIA CAPENSIS LEAVES

    OpenAIRE

    E. Tamil Jothi; G. Vimala Devi; Ch. Vamsi Anil Krishna; V. Suba

    2013-01-01

    In the present study ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of leaves of Tecomaria capensis were screened for analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer activity. The analgesic activity was performed by two thermal models. One is hot plate method and another one is tail flick method. The two extracts of Tecomaria capensis leaves have showed analgesic activity in both methods. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated by two methods. One is carrageenan induced paw edema method (in-vivo) and...

  12. Bactericidal Effect of Different Anti-Microbial Agents on Fusobacterium Nucleatum Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Rupa; Ganesh, Arathi; Deivanayagam, Kandaswamy

    2017-06-11

    The root canal anatomy of the teeth is very complex. Complete debridement of the root canals is a challenge and is very important for the success of the root canal treatment. Hence, this study was done to find an effective irrigant which can be used during root canal treatment. The bactericidal effect of a potential root canal irrigant was compared with two commonly used root canal irrigants against monoculture biofilm of a commercially available isolate of Fusobacterium nucleatum. A monoculture biofilm of Fusobacterium nucleatum was grown on glass slides. The glass slides containing the biofilm were immersed in centrifuge tubes containing 5% sodium hypochlorite, 2% Chlorhexidine, 6% turmeric solution, 9% turmeric solution and distilled water for a time span of one minute. A wire loop was used to scrape off the biofilms onto sterile brain heart infusion agar plates. This was further subjected to an incubation period of 96 hours at 37° C. Colony forming units were quantified by statistical analysis and results were obtained. The anti-bacterial activity of 6% and 9% turmeric solution was statistically significant against Fusobacterium nucleatum when compared to 2% Chlorhexidine and 5% sodium hypochlorite. In endodontic treatment, turmeric solution may be considered as an effective irrigant.

  13. Human Neutrophil Clearance of Bacterial Pathogens Triggers Anti-Microbial γδ T Cell Responses in Early Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth W.; Heuston, Sinéad; Brown, Amanda C.; Chess, James A.; Toleman, Mark A.; Gahan, Cormac G. M.; Hill, Colin; Parish, Tanya; Williams, John D.; Davies, Simon J.; Johnson, David W.; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Human blood Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells, monocytes and neutrophils share a responsiveness toward inflammatory chemokines and are rapidly recruited to sites of infection. Studying their interaction in vitro and relating these findings to in vivo observations in patients may therefore provide crucial insight into inflammatory events. Our present data demonstrate that Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells provide potent survival signals resulting in neutrophil activation and the release of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL8 (IL-8). In turn, Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells readily respond to neutrophils harboring phagocytosed bacteria, as evidenced by expression of CD69, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. This response is dependent on the ability of these bacteria to produce the microbial metabolite (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP), requires cell-cell contact of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with accessory monocytes through lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and results in a TNF-α dependent proliferation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells. The antibiotic fosmidomycin, which targets the HMB-PP biosynthesis pathway, not only has a direct antibacterial effect on most HMB-PP producing bacteria but also possesses rapid anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting γδ T cell responses in vitro. Patients with acute peritoneal-dialysis (PD)-associated bacterial peritonitis – characterized by an excessive influx of neutrophils and monocytes into the peritoneal cavity – show a selective activation of local Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells by HMB-PP producing but not by HMB-PP deficient bacterial pathogens. The γδ T cell-driven perpetuation of inflammatory responses during acute peritonitis is associated with elevated peritoneal levels of γδ T cells and TNF-α and detrimental clinical outcomes in infections caused by HMB-PP positive microorganisms. Taken together, our findings indicate a direct link between invading pathogens, neutrophils, monocytes and microbe-responsive γδ T cells in early

  14. Anti-tumor activity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: Cyclooxygenase-independent targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggett, Jason L.; Zhang, Xiaobo; Eling, Thomas E.; Baek, Seung Joon

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used extensively for analgesic and antipyretic treatments. In addition, NSAIDs reduce the risk and mortality to several cancers. Their mechanisms in anti-tumorigenesis are not fully understood, but both cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and -independent pathways play a role. We and others have been interested in elucidating molecular targets of NSAID-induced apoptosis. In this review, we summarize updated literature regarding cellular and molecular targets modulated by NSAIDs. Among those NSAIDs, sulindac sulfide and tolfenamic acid are emphasized in this review because these two drugs have been well investigated for their anti-tumorigenic activity in many different types of cancer. PMID:24486220

  15. Development and evaluation of electroless Ag-PTFE composite coatings with anti-microbial and anti-corrosion properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.

    2005-12-01

    Electroless Ag-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite coatings were prepared on stainless steel sheets. The existence and distribution of PTFE in the coatings were analysed with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The contact angle values and surface energies of the Ag-PTFE coatings, silver coating, stainless steel, titanium and E. coli Rosetta were measured. The experimental results showed that stainless steel surfaces coated with Ag-PTFE reduced E. coli attachment by 94-98%, compared with silver coating, stainless steel or titanium surfaces. The anti-bacterial mechanism of the Ag-PTFE composite coatings was explained with the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The anticorrosion properties of the Ag-PTFE composite coatings in 0.9% NaCl solution were studied. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of the Ag-PTFE composite coatings was superior to that of stainless steel 316L.

  16. Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phophatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-06-01

    The first objective of this project is to determine the relationship of phosphatase activity to metal resistance in subsurface strains and the role of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in dissemination of nonspecific acid phosphatase genes. Nonspecific acid phosphohydrolases are a broad group of secreted microbial phosphatases that function in acidic-to-neutral pH ranges and utilize a wide range of organophosphate substrates. We have previously shown that PO43- accumulation during growth on a model organophosphorus compound was attributable to the overproduction of alkaline phosphatase by genetically modified subsurface pseudomonads [Powers et al. (2002) FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 41:115-123]. During this report period, we have extended these results to include indigenous metal resistant subsurface microorganisms cultivated from the Field Research Center (FRC), in Oak Ridge Tennessee.

  17. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions between calcineurin inhibitors and proliferation signal inhibitors with anti-microbial agents: implications for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robert L; Mueller, Scott W; Levi, Marilyn E; Lindenfeld, Joann

    2011-02-01

    Infections account for 15% to 20% of deaths in transplant recipients; thus, rapid and appropriate therapeutic intervention is required. However, many anti-microbial agents can interact significantly with a transplant recipient's immunosuppressive regimen, placing them at risk for a potential adverse drug reaction and prolonged hospitalization. This investigation highlights the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions between the calcineurin inhibitors and proliferation signal inhibitors with commonly used anti-microbial agents, specifically addressing mechanism, management, onset of action, magnitude of effect and strength of evidence for each interaction. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Which Members of the Microbial Communities Are Active? Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brandon E. L.

    only at the early stages of understanding the microbial processes that occur in petroliferous formations and the surrounding subterranean environment. Important first steps in characterising the microbiology of oilfield systems involve identifying the microbial community structure and determining how population diversity changes are affected by the overall geochemical and biological parameters of the system. This is relatively easy to do today by using general 16S rRNA primers for PCR and building clone libraries. For example, previous studies using molecular methods characterised many dominant prokaryotes in petroleum reservoirs (Orphan et al., 2000) and in two Alaskan North Slope oil facilities (Duncan et al., 2009; Pham et al., 2009). However, the problem is that more traditional molecular biology approaches, such as 16S clone libraries, fail to detect large portions of the community perhaps missing up to half of the biodiversity (see Hong et al., 2009) and require significant laboratory time to construct large libraries necessary to increase the probability of detecting the majority of even bacterial biodiversity. In the energy sector, the overarching desire would be to quickly assess the extent of in situ hydrocarbon biodegradation or to disrupt detrimental processes such as biofouling, and in these cases it may not be necessary to identify specific microbial species. Rather, it would be more critical to evaluate metabolic processes or monitor gene products that are implicated in the specific activity of interest. Research goals such as these are well suited for a tailored application of microarray technology.

  19. Anti-nucleosome antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: Relation to anti-double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid and disease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayada Ali Abdalla

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Anti-NCS antibodies could play a role in the pathogenesis of SLE and is related to disease activity. Its association with anti-dsDNA antibodies and its presence in those with negative anti-ds DNA may aid in the diagnosis of SLE.

  20. Antioxidant, Anti-Glycation and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Phenolic Constituents from Cordia sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nasir

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine compounds have been isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of C. sinensis, namely protocatechuic acid (1, trans-caffeic acid (2, methyl rosmarinate (3, rosmarinic acid (4, kaempferide-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6, quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7, kaempferide-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1→6-β-D-glucopyranoside (8 and kaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamno-pyranosyl (1→6-β-D-glucopyranoside (9, all reported for the first time from this species. The structures of these compounds were deduced on the basis of spectroscopic studies, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1–9 were investigated for biological activity and showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageen induced rat paw edema test. The antioxidant activities of isolated compounds 1–9 were evaluated by the DPPH radical scavenging test, and compounds 1, 2, 4 and 7–9 exhibited marked scavenging activity compared to the standard BHA. These compounds were further studied for their anti-glycation properties and some compounds showed significant anti-glycation inhibitory activity. The purity of compounds 2–5, 8 and 9 was confirmed by HPLC. The implications of these results for the chemotaxonomic studies of the genus Cordia have also been discussed.

  1. Tree species composition influences enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere: a rhizobox approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shengzuo; Liu, Dong; Tian, Ye; Deng, Shiping; Shang, Xulan

    2013-01-01

    Monoculture causes nutrient losses and leads to declines in soil fertility and biomass production over successive cultivation. The rhizosphere, a zone of usually high microbial activities and clearly distinct from bulk soil, is defined as the volume of soil around living roots and influenced by root activities. Here we investigated enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere under different tree compositions. Six treatments with poplar, willow, and alder mono- or mixed seedlings were grown in rhizoboxes. Enzyme activities associated with nitrogen cycling and microbial biomass were measured in all rhizosphere and bulk soils. Both enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere differed significantly tree compositions. Microbial biomass contents were more sensitive to the changes of the rhizosphere environment than enzyme activities. Tree species coexistence did not consistently increase tested enzyme activities and microbial biomass, but varied depending on the complementarities of species traits. In general, impacts of tree species and coexistence were more pronounced on microbial composition than total biomass, evidenced by differences in microbial biomass C/N ratios stratified across the rhizosphere soils. Compared to poplar clone monoculture, other tree species addition obviously increased rhizosphere urease activity, but greatly reduced rhizosphere L-asparaginase activity. Poplar growth was enhanced only when coexisted with alder. Our results suggested that a highly productive or keystone plant species in a community had greater influence over soil functions than the contribution of diversity.

  2. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet activities of Buddleja crispa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Ishfaq A; Gilani, Anwar H; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Saeed, Anjum

    2016-02-25

    Buddleja crispa Benth (Buddlejaceae) is a dense shrub; several species of genus Buddleja have been used in the management of various health conditions including pain and inflammation. The present study was aimed to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet properties of B. crispa. Male rats (220-270 gm,) and mice (25-30 gm) were randomly divided into different groups (n = 6). Various doses of plant extract of B. crispa, its fractions and pure compounds isolated from the plant were administered intraperitoneally (i.p). The analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet activities were assessed using acetic acid and formalin-induced nociception in mice, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and arachidonic acid-induced platelets aggregation tests. The intraperitoneal administration of the methanolic extract (50 and 100 mg/kg), hexane fraction (10 and 25 mg/kg i.p) exhibited significant inhibition (P < 0.01) of the acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and attenuated formalin-induced reaction time of animals in second phase of the test. Pure compounds BdI-2, BdI-H3 and BH-3 isolated from B. crispa produced significant (P < 0.01) analgesic activity in acetic acid-induced and formalin tests. The crude extract of B. crispa (50-200 mg/kg i.p.) and its hexane fraction inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw edema with maximum inhibition of 65 and 71% respectively (P < 0.01). The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect of the plant extract and isolated pure compounds were comparable to diclofenac sodium. B. crispa plant extract (0.5-2.5 mg/mL) produced significant anti-platelet effect (P < 0.01) with maximum inhibition of 78% at 2.5 mg/ml. The findings from our present study suggest that B. crispa possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet properties. B. crispa could serve a potential novel source of compounds effective in pain and inflammatory conditions.

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of six Iranian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariman, Farahnaz; Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Habibi, Zohreh; Falsafi, Tahereh

    2004-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastrointestinal infections in adults and children. Antibiotic therapy and a combination of two or three drugs have been widely used to eradicate these infections. However, development of drug resistance in bacteria calls for new sources of drugs, and plants seem to be a logical source of new antibacterial compounds. The anti-H. pylori activities of six native Iranian plants (Glycyrrhiza aspera, Juglans regia, Ligustrum vulgare, Thymus kotschyanus, Trachyspermum copticum and Xanthium brasilicum) and seven antibiotics were determined against 70 clinical isolates from children using the disk susceptibility assay. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were also measured for the biologically active extracts. One extract with the best anti-H. pylori activity was fractionated by silica gel and thin layer chromatography and the active compounds were identified by hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR) spectroscopy. All plant extracts showed anti-H. pylori activity by the disk sensitivity method, but the most active extracts were those from X. brasilicum and T. copticum. In fact, the anti-H. pylori activities of the two extracts were superior to the disk antibiotic susceptibility profile. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were within the range of 31.25-250 micro g/ml. Fractionation and chemical identification of the extract from X. brasilicum showed the presence of two substances, a flavonoid and a xanthanolide. Due to the rise in antibiotic resistance, new sources of anti-H. pylori drugs are needed. The use of medicinal plants and/or their chemical components may have potential benefit in eradicating such problems.

  4. Anti-tetherin activities in Vpu-expressing primate lentiviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haworth Kevin G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-viral activity of the cellular restriction factor, BST-2/tetherin, was first observed as an ability to block the release of Vpu-minus HIV-1 from the surface of infected cells. However, tetherin restriction is also counteracted by primate lentiviruses that do not express a Vpu protein, where anti-tetherin functions are provided by either the Env protein (HIV-2, SIVtan or the Nef protein (SIVsm/mac and SIVagm. Within the primate lentiviruses, Vpu is also present in the genomes of SIVcpz and certain SIVsyk viruses. We asked whether, in these viruses, anti-tetherin activity was always a property of Vpu, or if it had selectively evolved in HIV-1 to perform this function. Results We found that despite the close relatedness of HIV-1 and SIVcpz, the chimpanzee viruses use Nef instead of Vpu to counteract tetherin. Furthermore, SIVcpz Nef proteins had activity against chimpanzee but not human tetherin. This specificity mapped to a short sequence that is present in the cytoplasmic tail of primate but not human tetherins, and this also accounts for the specificity of SIVsm/mac Nef for primate but not human tetherins. In contrast, Vpu proteins from four diverse members of the SIVsyk lineage all displayed an anti-tetherin activity that was active against macaque tetherin. Interestingly, Vpu from a SIVgsn isolate was also found to have activity against human tetherin. Conclusions Primate lentiviruses show a high degree of flexibility in their use of anti-tetherin factors, indicating a strong selective pressure to counteract tetherin restriction. The identification of an activity against human tetherin in SIVgsn Vpu suggests that the presence of Vpu in the ancestral SIVmus/mon/gsn virus believed to have contributed the 3' half of the HIV-1 genome may have played a role in the evolution of viruses that could counteract human tetherin and infect humans.

  5. Anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta essential oil in activated macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Parastoo; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta (T. minuta) essential oil. Methods In the present study T. minuta essential oil was obtained from leaves of T. minuta via hydro-distillation and then was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The anti-oxidant capacity of T. minuta essential oil was examined by measuring reactive oxygen, reactive nitrogen species and hydrogen peroxide scavenging. The anti-inflammatory activity of T. minuta essential oil was determined through measuring NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α mRNA expression in lipopolysacharide-stimulated murine macrophages using real-time PCR. Results Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the main components in the T. minuta essential oil were dihydrotagetone (33.86%), E-ocimene (19.92%), tagetone (16.15%), cis-β-ocimene (7.94%), Z-ocimene (5.27%), limonene (3.1%) and epoxyocimene (2.03%). The T. minuta essential oil had the ability to scavenge all reactive oxygen/reactive nitrogen species radicals with IC50 12-15 µg/mL, which indicated a potent radical scavenging activity. In addition, T. minuta essential oil significantly reduced NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthaseand TNF-α mRNA expression in the cells at concentrations of 50 µg/mL, indicating a capacity of this product to potentially modulate/diminish immune responses. Conclusions T. minuta essential oil has radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities and could potentially be used as a safe effective source of natural anti-oxidants in therapy against oxidative damage and stress associated with some inflammatory conditions. PMID:25182441

  6. Anti-granuloma activity of Coriandrum sativum in experimental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vinod; Singh, Surender; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coriandrum sativum has been used in the traditional systems of medicine for management of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. Objectives: In this study, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activities of Coriandrum sativum hydroalcoholic extract (CSHE) in experimental models. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of CSHE was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema model and the anti-granuloma activity of CSHE was evaluated using the subcutaneous cotton pellet implantation-induced granuloma formation and stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with complete Freund's adjuvant. Serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-1 β levels, and peritoneal macrophage expression of TNF-R1 were evaluated as markers of global inflammation. Results: CSHE at the highest dose tested (32 mg/kg) produced a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in paw edema after carrageenan administration. CSHE treatment also reduced dry granuloma weight in all treated animals. Serum IL-6 and IL-1 β levels were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the CSHE (32 mg/kg)-treated group as compared to control. Although there was an increase in serum TNF-α level in the CSHE-treated group as compared to control, TNF-R1 expression on peritoneal macrophages was found to be reduced. Conclusion: Thus, the result of this study demonstrates the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activities of CSHE in experimental models, and validates its traditional use for the management of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:23741156

  7. Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal,...

  8. SHORT COMMUNICATION ANTI-FUNGAL ACTIVITIES OF m ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    of these metals complexes as food preservatives may only be fungi-static and not fungi-toxic, their use in bread preparation might extend the shelf life of bread from 24 hours to 96 hours. KEY WORDS: Anti-fungal activities, Alkali metal iodobenzoates, Alkaline earth metal iodobenzoates, m-Iodobenzoic acid, Bread mucor.

  9. Anti-hyperglycaemic Activity of Tribulus terrestris L Aerial Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    62.8 and 59.16 %), and 3 h (64.6 and 57.1 %) with ... from this plant are required. Keywords: Tribulus terrestris L., Zygophyllaceae, Anti-hyperglycaemic activity, Fasting blood glucose, ... Extraction and fractionation. The air dried and powdered ...

  10. Anti-bacterial activities and phytochemical screening of extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-bacterial activity tests were carried out using disc diffusion assay and tube dilution technique, and phytochemical screening was carried out through Thin Layer Chromatography. The crude extracts showed antibacterial effects on M. vaccae, P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis. M. vaccae was most sensitive, particularly to the ...

  11. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Methanoilc and Ethanolic Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: Aqueous ethanoic and methanolic extracts of Citrus Sinensis Peel were investigated for anti- inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw oedema in wistar rats, and compared to a positive control drug,. Indomethacin. These extracts were given(IP) in a concentration of 20, and 70mg/kg with extract with a ...

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity of Syzygium cumini seed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... The Syzygium cumini (Myrtaceae) is a popular traditional medicinal plant in India. This study was intended to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of S. cumini seed in carrageenan induced paw oedema in wistar rats at the dose level of 200 and 400 mg/kg.

  13. Anti-inflammatory Activities of Extracts of Some Traditionally Used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydroalcoholic extracts of some traditional medicinal plants used in Ethiopia for the treatment of skin diseases, were investigated for their anti-inflammatory activities in carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema at doses of 300 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight. The extracts were obtained from the leaves of Bidens pilosa ...

  14. Evaluation of anti-leishmanial and antibacterial activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-leishmanial and antibacterial activities of a relatively unexplored whole plant of Waldheimia tomentosa (Asteraceae) and the chemical profiling of its most bioactive fraction. Methods: The whole plant material was extracted with methanol - water (9 : 1) and fractionated into nhexane (C6H14 or ...

  15. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of Triphala recipe were studied in animal models. Triphala recipe (4 mg/ear) significantly exhibited an inhibitory effect on the ear edema formation induced by ethyl phenylpropiolateinduced, but not on the arachidonic acid -induced ear edema in rats. Furthermore, Triphala ...

  16. analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-30

    Apr 30, 2015 ... The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanolic extract of Rheumatic Tea Formula ... Salix alba were studied in mice and rats using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate method, ... albino mice, while the phytochemical screening showed the presence of alkaloids, tannins and glycosides.

  17. Flavonoids, anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity of Macfadyena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kaempferol, 7-O, 8-C diglucoside and vicenin II were isolated, while 6, methoxy, acacetin 7-O glucoside; and quercitrin were isolated from ethanol extract. These compounds were characterized and identified by their physicochemical and spectral data. The crude ethanol extract exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity ...

  18. In vitro Anti-proliferative and Apoptotic Activities of Eurycoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-proliferative, apoptotic and differentiating activities of Eurycoma longifolia root extracts on HL-60 leukemic cells. Methods: HL-60 cells were treated with different partially purified sub-fractions (F1 – F3) derived from the resin chromatography of the crude methanol root extract of E. longifolia ...

  19. Phytochemical Analysis and Anti-Inflammatory activity of Methanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study investigated the phytochemistry and anti-inflammatory activity of methanolic root extract of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta against paw edema induced by egg albumin and carrageenan in rats. Phytochemical analysis and acute toxicity test (LD50) of the methanol extract was also carried out. Results show that ...

  20. Anti-androgenic activity of Xylopic acid in orchidectomerized rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To characterize anti-androgenic properties of xylopic acid (XA) and to elucidate the possible mech-anism of the antifertility activity of XA, XA was administered to orchidectomized rats following the Hershberger assay protocol. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were orchidectomized or sham oper-ated at 42 days of age.

  1. Anti-submarine warfare with continuously active sonar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, R. van; Beerens, S.P.; Spek, E. van der

    2011-01-01

    Existing surveillance sonar systems for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) use a pulsed sonar deployed at a low duty cycle. Continuously active sonar (CAS) is of special interest since the technique could provide better detection performance than conventional pulsed sonar, and it will provide the operator

  2. Lipid fraction constituents and evaluation of anti-anaphylactic activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lipid fraction constituents as well as evaluation of anti-anaphylactic activity of Prunus mahaleb L. Kernels were studied. Prunus mahaleb L. kernels were obtained from the local market in Cairo, Egypt. Investigation of the fatty acids revealed that oleic and linoleic acids are the major constituents. 12 compounds were ...

  3. TOPICAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF COSTUS AFER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bioactivity-monitored extraction and chromatographic fractionation of different morphological parts of Costus afer using the croton aldehyde-induced mouse ear oedema model resulted in the location of significant anti-inflammatory activity in the chloroform-soluble fraction (CSE, 64% oedema inhibition 50 mg/200μl, ...

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of bark of Xeromphis spinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswa Nath Das

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The bark of Xeromphis spinosa extracted by a mixture of equal proportions of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol at an oral dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity when compared with control.

  5. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanolic extract of Rheumatic Tea Formula (RTF) a polyherbal tea consisting the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus, Albizia chevalieri and bark of Salix alba were studied in mice and rats using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate method, formalin induced pain and ...

  6. Anti-Inflamatory and Analgesic Activities of Securidaca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Securidaca longepedunculata Fers (Polygalaceae) is commonly used in many parts of Africa for the treatment of rheumatic conditions, fever, headache and various other inflammatory based diseases. The present study was carried out to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of Securidaca longepedunculata ...

  7. Evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bovine mastitis is one of the most relevant and problematic diseases to treat and control in practice. Puxing Yinyang San (PYS) is a compound of herbs to treat bovine mastitis in China. This study was performed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of PYS in mice and rats. Materials and ...

  8. Anti- toxoplasma gondii activity of constituents from Balsamocitrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation, characterization and anti-Toxoplasma gondii activity of constituents from the CH2Cl2/MeOH (1/1) extract of the roots of the cameroonian plant Balsamocitrus camerunensis L. were investigated in this study. Four known coumarins derivatives were isolated, namely, marmin (1), imperatorin (2), xanthoxyletin (3), ...

  9. Evaluation of anti-adenovirus activity of some plants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... Evaluation of anti-adenovirus activity of some plants from Lamiaceae family grown in Iran in cell culture. Horieh Saderi1 and Maryam Abbasi2*. 1Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran. 2Student Research Center, School of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

  10. Antioxidant and Anti-proliferative Activities of Flavonoids from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the chemical composition of Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata. Sch Bip. (BP), as well as its antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. Methods: The whole herb of BP was extracted with 95 % ethanol, which was then partitioned sequentially with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butyl alcohol to obtain ...

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Compounds Isolated from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Perez G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This review shows over 300 compounds isolated and identified from plants that previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity. They have been classified in appropriate chemical groups and data are reported on their pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and other properties.

  12. Syntheses, characterization, and anti-cancer activities of pyridine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Syntheses, characterization, and anti-cancer activities of pyridine-amide based compounds containing appended phenol or catechol groups. AFSAR ALIa, DEEPAK BANSALa, NAGENDRA K KAUSHIKb, NEHA KAUSHIKb,. EUN HA CHOIb and RAJEEV GUPTAa,∗. aDepartment of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 ...

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of Eucalyptus spp. and Pistascia lentiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenolic Acids of the Two Major Blueberry Species in the US Market and Their. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Activities. Plant Food Hum Nutr. 70(1): 56-62. 11. Landau, S.; Muklada, H.; Markovics, A.; Azaizeh, H. (2014). Traditional Uses of Pistacia lentiscus in Veterinary and Human Medicine. In: Yaniv, Z.; Dudai, ...

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 μg/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases.

  15. Psychological distress and adherence to highly active anti-retroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mental health related risk factors for non-adherence to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) have not been investigated in Uganda and yet adherence is critical to the success of the current scale up in the provision of HAART to HIV positive individuals in rural areas of Uganda. Objective: To determine ...

  16. Essential Oil Composition and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Salvia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Sage, Salvia officinalis L (Lamiaceae), is widely cultivated medicinal plant for its economic importance and large content of bioactive components; therefore, in the present study, the active components (volatile compounds) and the anti-inflammatory effect of S. officinalis have been investigated. Methods: Salvia ...

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of Ruta graveolens Linn on carrageenan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aqueous, ethanolic and methanolic extracts of Ruta graveolens were investigated for anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw edema in wistar male rats, and compared to a positive control drug, Voveran. These extracts were given (ip) in a concentration of 20 and 50 mg/kg b.w. before carrageenan injection.

  18. Anti-Streptococcus pyogenes Activity of Selected Medicinal Plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Anti-Streptococcus pyogenes Activity of Selected. Medicinal Plant Extracts Used in Thai Traditional Medicine. Surasak Limsuwan1 and Supayang P Voravuthikunchai2*. 1Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine and Natural Products Research Center of Excellence, 2Department of Microbiology and.

  19. Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Anacardium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    displaying a significantly (P<0.05) higher activity compared to the leaves extract. The results of this study therefore justify the use of this plant in the treatment of inflammation and bacterial infections. Key words: Antibacterial, Anti inflammatory, Anacardium occidentale. INTRODUCTION. Medicinal plants represent a rich ...

  20. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background of study: Plants used for traditional medicine contain a wide range of substances which can be used to treat various infectious diseases. Aim: The study evaluated the in vitro antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Justicia secunda Vahl leaf. Methods: The acute ...

  1. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of the volatile oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the qualitative methods used for the control of the antimicrobial activity, the method of diffusion on filter paper discs proved to be the most efficient, the results correlating well with the MIC. Our studies have demonstrated the efficiency of the natural compounds' of T. majus L. in anti-inflammatory treatments in animals.

  2. Anti-hyperglycaemic Activity of Tribulus terrestris L Aerial Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-hyperglycaemic activity of methanol extract of Tribulus terrestris L. Zygophyllaceae in glucose-loaded normal rabbits. Methods: The animals were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 5) and treated with a single oral dose. Group 1 served as normal control group and received distilled water; ...

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of Wigandia urens and Acalypha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Alexandre-Moreira MS, Piuvezam MR, Araujo CC, Thomas G (1999). Studies on the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of Curatella americana L. J. Ethnopharmacol. 67: 171-177. Argueta VA (1994). Atlas de las Plantas de la Medicina Tradicional. Mexicana II. Instituto Nacional Indigenista, México City ...

  4. Anti inflammatory and antipyretic activities of the methanol leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acacia ataxacantha (Leguminosae) has been reported to be used in traditional medicine for management of pain and inflammation. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti inflammatory and antipyretic activities of methanol leaf extract of Acacia ataxacantha in rats. The acute toxicity study was carried out using ...

  5. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Nothospondias staudtii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous (AENS), methanolic (MENS) and chloroform (CENS) extracts of the leaves of Nothospondias staudtii Engl (Anacardianceae) were screened for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in mice and rats. Pain responses were studied in mice using the tail immersion and acetic acid induced writing while ...

  6. Utilization of IκB–EGFP Chimeric Gene as an Indicator to Identify Microbial Metabolites with NF-κB Inhibitor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu-Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract NF-κB regulates several important expressions, such as cytokine release, anti-apoptosis, adhesion molecule expression, and cell cycle processing. Several NF-κB inhibitors have been discovered as an anti-tumor or anti-inflammatory drug. The activity of NF-κB transcription factor is negatively regulated by IκB binding. In this study, IκB assay system was established and IκB–EGFP fusion protein was used as an indicator to monitor the effects of substances on the IκB degradation. The results indicated that the chosen hydroquinone could inhibit the IκB degradation and cause the cell de-attachment from the bottom of culture plate. In addition, this system could also monitor the IκB degradation of microbial metabolite of natural mixtures of propolis. Thus, the IκB assay system may be a good system for drug discovery related to microbial metabolite.

  7. Utilization of IκB–EGFP Chimeric Gene as an Indicator to Identify Microbial Metabolites with NF-κB Inhibitor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yen-Shun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract NF-κB regulates several important expressions, such as cytokine release, anti-apoptosis, adhesion molecule expression, and cell cycle processing. Several NF-κB inhibitors have been discovered as an anti-tumor or anti-inflammatory drug. The activity of NF-κB transcription factor is negatively regulated by IκB binding. In this study, IκB assay system was established and IκB–EGFP fusion protein was used as an indicator to monitor the effects of substances on the IκB degradation. The results indicated that the chosen hydroquinone could inhibit the IκB degradation and cause the cell de-attachment from the bottom of culture plate. In addition, this system could also monitor the IκB degradation of microbial metabolite of natural mixtures of propolis. Thus, the IκB assay system may be a good system for drug discovery related to microbial metabolite.

  8. Anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies as disease activity markers in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In spite of the growing number of reports on the study of anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies, there are still controversies on their significance as disease activity markers in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and their use in everyday clinical practice. Objective. Our aim was to assess the presence of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies in SLE patients, as well as to establish their sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and their correlation with SLE and lupus nephritis clinical activity. Methods. The study enrolled 85 patients aged 45.3±9.7 years on the average, with SLE of average duration 10.37±7.99 years, hospitalized at the Institute „Niška Banja“ during 2011, and 30 healthy individuals as controls. Disease activity was assessed using Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI. In all examinees the levels of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies were measured using the ELISA method with Alegria Test Strips Orgentec (Germany. Results. Patients with active lupus nephritis had a higher presence of anti-C1q antibodies and higher co-positivity of anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome, and anti-C1q antibodies compared to those with inactive lupus nephritis (77.77% vs. 21.74%; p<0.01. SLE patients with SLEDAI ≥11 had a higher presence of antinucleosome (93.75% vs. 64.15%; p<0.01 and anti-C1q antibodies (46.87% vs. 22.64%; p<0.05, as well as a higher mean level of anti-nucleosome antibodies (107.79±83.46 U/ml vs. 57.81±63.15 U/ml; p<0.05, compared to those with SLEDAI of 0-10. There was a positive correlation between the SLEDAI and the level of anti-dsDNA (r=0.290; p<0.01, anti-nucleosome (r=0.443; p<0.001, and anti-C1q antibodies (r=0.382; p<0.001. Only anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated correlation with proteinuria (r=0.445; p<0.001. Conclusion. Anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated association with SLE and lupus nephritis

  9. Anti-microbial efficacy of Allium sativum extract against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and its penetration into the root dentin: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birring, Ourvind J S; Viloria, Iluminada L; Nunez, Phides

    2015-01-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has long been the most preferred root canal irrigant in endodontic treatment, but besides being an effective anti-microbial agent, it is highly cytotoxic. Thus, a search for an alternative herbal irrigant which would be more biocompatible but equally effective led to this study. To assess the anti-microbial efficacy of garlic extract (GE) against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and its ability to penetrate into root dentin. E. faecalis was cultured and treated with the test agents--normal saline, 5.25% of NaOCl, and the three different concentrations of GE (10%, 40%, and 70%). The experiment was done in four groups namely, 24-h Co-treatment group, 24-h biofilm treatment group, 1-week biofilm group, and 3-week biofilm group. These groups were subjected to microbial viability assay and fluorescence microscopic analysis. The most effective concentration of garlic (70%) was further tested and compared with 5.25% NaOCl for its dentin penetration property using 0.2% alizarin red under a fluorescence microscope. The findings revealed that GE was able to disrupt as well as prevent the formation of biofilm produced by E. faecalis. All the concentrations of GE displayed considerable anti-microbial efficacy where 70% concentration was most effective and exhibited similar anti-microbial efficacy as 5.25% NaOCl. In terms of dentin penetration, no significant difference was found between GE and NaOCl. The results indicate that GE has a potential to serve as an alternative herbal root canal irrigant being an effective and biocompatible anti-microbial agent with good dentinal penetration property.

  10. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterisation of novel bioactive molecule of 3-(2-substituted)-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-(thiophen-2yl)prop-2-en-1-one chalcone derivatives as effective anti-oxidant and anti-microbial agents

    OpenAIRE

    Gopi, Chandravadivelu; Sastry, Vedula Girija; Dhanaraju, Magharla Dasaratha

    2016-01-01

    The chief purpose of this work was to synthesise and find out the anti-oxidant and anti-microbial activities of novel 3-(2-substituted)-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-(thiophen-2yl)prop-2-en-1-one chalcone derivatives. These derivatives were prepared by performing Claisen–Schmidt condensation reaction of 1-(thiophen-2yl)ethanone and 2 substituted 1H-indole-3-carbaldehyde with constant stirring (approximately for 3 hours) in the presence of ethanol and potassium hydroxide. The newly synthesised compounds' a...

  11. Anti-fibrogenic effects of the anti-microbial peptide cathelicidin in murine colitis-associated fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jun Hwan; Ho, Samantha; Tran, Deanna Hoang-Yen; Cheng, Michelle; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Kukota, Yuzu; Ichikawa, Ryan; Su, Bowei; Tran, Diana Hoang-Ngoc; Hing, Tressia C; Chang, Irene; Shih, David Q; Issacson, Richard E; Gallo, Richard L; Fiocchi, Claudio; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    Cathelicidin (LL-37 in human and mCRAMP in mice) represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial peptides with anti-inflammatory effects. LL-37 also suppresses collagen synthesis, an important fibrotic response, in dermal fibroblasts. Here we determined whether exogenous cathelicidin administration modulates intestinal fibrosis in two animal models of intestinal inflammation and in human colonic fibroblasts. C57BL/6J mice (n=6 per group) were administered intracolonically with a trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) enema to induce chronic (6-7 weeks) colitis with fibrosis. mCRAMP peptide (5 mg/kg every 3 day, week 5-7) or cathelicidin gene ( Camp )-expressing lentivirus (10 7 infectious units week 4) were administered intracolonically or intravenously, respectively. 129Sv/J mice were infected with Salmonella typhimurium orally to induce cecal inflammation with fibrosis. Camp expressing lentivirus (10 7 infectious units day 11) was administered intravenously. TNBS-induced chronic colitis was associated with increased colonic collagen (col1a2) mRNA expression. Intracolonic cathelicidin (mCRAMP peptide) administration or intravenous delivery of lentivirus-overexpressing cathelicidin gene significantly reduced colonic col1a2 mRNA expression in TNBS-exposed mice, compared to vehicle administration. Salmonella infection also caused increased cecal inflammation associated with collagen (col1a2) mRNA expression that was prevented by intravenous delivery of Camp -expressing lentivirus. Exposure of human primary intestinal fibroblasts and human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts to transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and/or insulin-like growth factor 1 induced collagen protein and mRNA expression, that was reduced by LL-37 (3-5 µM) through a MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. Cathelicidin can reverse intestinal fibrosis by directly inhibiting collagen synthesis in colonic fibroblasts.

  12. Innovative biofilm inhibition and anti-microbial behavior of molybdenum sulfide nanostructures generated by microwave-assisted solvothermal route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nilam; Patil, Rajendra; Shinde, Manish; Umarji, Govind; Causin, Valerio; Gade, Wasudev; Mulik, Uttam; Bhalerao, Anand; Amalnerkar, Dinesh P.

    2015-03-01

    The incessant use of antibiotics against infectious diseases has translated into a vicious circle of developing new antibiotic drug and its resistant strains in short period of time due to inherent nature of micro-organisms to alter their genes. Many researchers have been trying to formulate inorganic nanoparticles-based antiseptics that may be linked to broad-spectrum activity and far lower propensity to induce microbial resistance than antibiotics. The way-out approaches in this direction are nanomaterials based (1) bactericidal and (2) bacteriostatic activities. We, herein, present hitherto unreported observations on microbial abatement using non-cytotoxic molybdenum disulfide nanostructures (MSNs) which are synthesized using microwave assisted solvothermal route. Inhibition of biofilm formation using MSNs is a unique feature of our study. Furthermore, this study evinces antimicrobial mechanism of MSNs by reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent generation of superoxide anion radical via disruption of cellular functions.

  13. Anti-bacterial activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; de Souza Luna, Josiane; dos Santos, Aldenir Feitosa; de Andrade, Maria Cristina Caño; Sant'Ana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Marquez, Béatrice; Neuville, Luc; Moreau, Nicole

    2006-04-21

    Extracts from various organs of 25 plants of Brazilian traditional medicine were assayed with respect to their anti-bacterial activities against Escherichia coli, a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus and two resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus harbouring the efflux pumps NorA and MsrA. Amongst the 49 extracts studied, 14 presented anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including the ethanolic extracts from the rhizome of Jatropha elliptica, from the stem barks of Schinus terebinthifolius and Erythrina mulungu, from the stems and leaves of Caesalpinia pyramidalis and Serjania lethalis, and from the stem bark and leaves of Lafoensia pacari. The classes of compounds present in the active extracts were determined as a preliminary step towards their bioactivity-guided separation. No extracts were active against Escherichia coli.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Sipunculus nudus L. extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen-Xiao; Dai, Zi-Ru; Cai, Qiu-Xing

    2011-10-11

    Sipunculus nudus has long been employed as traditional Chinese medicine in folk remedies for the treatment of carbuncles, tuberculosis and nocturia, regulating the functions of stomach and spleen, as well as for the restoration to health in debilities caused by various pathogens and aging. Decoction of Sipunculus nudus has traditionally been used to remedy sternalgia in folk medicine. This study aimed to assess the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity of the water extract from Sipunculus nudus. The water extract from the body wall of Sipunculus nudus was obtained with the yield of 14.1%. The anti-inflammatory effect in six animal models and anti-nociceptive effect in two animal models of the water extract were evaluated by oral for the study. Pretreatment with the extract (at the dose of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) produced significant dose-dependent anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects. At 200 mg/kg dose, the inhibition ratio of the extract on carrageenan-induced rat hind paw oedema, dextran-induced rat paw oedema, cotton pellet granuloma in rats, carrageenan-induced peritonitis and acetic acid-induced vascular permeability were 59.2%, 51.0%, 53.1%, 42.5%, 50.8%, better than that of indomethacin (5 mg/kg) 49.5%, 50%, 44.4%, 37.6%, 46.8%, respectively. The inhibition ratio of the extract (200 mg/kg dose) on xylene-induced mouse ear oedema was 61.5%, lower than 63.7% for indomethacin (5 mg/kg). At 200mg/kg, the extract decreased number of writhing 52.3% in acetic acid-induced writhing model and increased the response latency 25.24% in hot plate test. The water extract from the body wall of Sipunculus nudus possesses excellent anti-inflammatory activity as well as peripheral and central analgesic properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways.

  16. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of Bursera copallifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columba-Palomares, M F María C; Villareal, Dra María L; Acevedo Quiroz, M C Macdiel E; Marquina Bahena, M C Silvia; Álvarez Berber, Dra Laura P; Rodríguez-López, Dra Verónica

    2015-10-01

    The plant species Bursera copallifera (DC) bullock is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation. The leaves of this plant can be prepared as an infusion to treat migraines, bronchitis, and dental pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of organic extracts from the stems, stem bark, and leaves of B. copallifera, which was selected based on the knowledge of its traditional use. We evaluated the ability of extracts to inhibit mouse ear inflammation in response to topical application of 12-O tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The extracts with anti-inflammatory activity were evaluated for their inhibition of pro-inflammatory enzymes. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxic activities of the organic extracts were evaluated using the sulforhodamine B assay. The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems (HAS) exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity of 54.3% (0.5 mg/ear), whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the dichloromethane-methanol extract from the leaves (DMeL) was 55.4% at a dose of 0.1 mg/ear. Methanol extract from the leaves (MeL) showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity (IC50 = 4.4 μg/mL), hydroalcoholic extract of leaves, and DMeL also reduce the enzyme activity, (IC50 = 6.5 μg/mL, IC50 = 5.7 μg/mL), respectively, from stems HAS exhibit activity at the evaluated concentrations (IC50 =6.4 μg/mL). The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity against a breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7, IC50 = 0.90 μg/mL), whereas DMeL exhibited an IC50 value of 19.9 μg/mL. In conclusion, extracts from leaves and stems inhibited cyclooxygenase-1, which is the target enzyme for nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs, and some of these extracts demonstrated substantial antiproliferative effects against the MCF7 cell line. These results validate the traditional use of B. copallifera.

  17. Microbial activity in district cooling nets; Mikrobiell Aktivitet i Fjaerrkylenaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    results point out the risk of only analysing the water instead of also neglecting to expose coupons and analysing the presence of biofilms on the coupons. Also made clear when using exposure containers is the advantage of having the possibility of withdrawal of coupons at different occasions, thereby being able to investigate the increase with time in concentration of micro-organisms in the biofilm. The Swedish Corrosion Institute has developed such an exposure container, and used it during phase two. It has proved to be both easy to handle and in good working order, at service for supervision of microbial activity in district cooling nets in general. Finally, recommendations for reducing the risk for biofilm formation and microbial corrosion can be stated as follows: Only water of DH quality should be used, both as basic water and feed water; Avoid additives, especially if organic; Only connect district cooling tubes which are clean on the inside; Watch over the system regarding micro-organism related problems, preferably by using exposure containers.

  18. Sector- and economy-wide effects of terminating the use of anti-microbial growth promoters in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars-Bo; Jensen, Hans Grinsted; Lawson, Lartey

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark the poultry industry and the National Committee for Pig Production, together with the feedstuff industry, decided to voluntarily abolish the use of all Anti-microbial Growth Promoters (AGP). The poultry industry abolished the use of AGP 15th of February 1998 and the pig industry followed...... 1st of March 1998 (for pigs over 35 kg) and 1st of January 2000 (for pigs under 35 kg). To evaluate the effects of the removal of AGP, data from both the poultry and pig industries were collected prior to and after the removal of AGP from animal feed. Utilizing these production data, this paper...... calculates economy-wide effects of the removal of AGP using the Agricultural Applied General Equilibrium (AAGE) model of the Danish economy. The results show that the long-term effects are a moderate decline in the production and export of pig meat, and a positive indirect effect on other industries...

  19. Antioxidant, Anti-Tyrosinase and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Oil Production Residues from Camellia tenuifloria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Shu-Yuan; Ha, Choi-Lan; Wu, Pei-Shan; Yeh, Chiu-Ling; Su, Ying-Shan; Li, Man-Po; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2015-01-01

    Camellia tenuifloria is an indigenous Camellia species used for the production of camellia oil in Taiwan. This study investigated for the first time the potential antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities of oil production byproducts, specifically those of the fruit shell, seed shell, and seed pomace from C. tenuifloria. It was found that the crude ethanol extract of the seed shell had the strongest DPPH scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activities, followed by the fruit shell, while seed pomace was the weakest. The IC50 values of crude extracts and fractions on monophenolase were smaller than diphenolase. The phenolic-rich methanol fraction of seed shell (SM) reduced nitric oxide (NO) production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. It also repressed the expression of IL-1β, and secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-6 in response to LPS. SM strongly stimulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression and addition of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reversed the inhibition of NO production, indicating the involvement of HO-1 in its anti-inflammatory activity. The effects observed in this study provide evidence for the reuse of residues from C. tenuifloria in the food additive, medicine and cosmetic industries. PMID:26690417

  20. Antioxidant, Anti-Tyrosinase and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Oil Production Residues from Camellia tenuifloria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yuan Chiou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Camellia tenuifloria is an indigenous Camellia species used for the production of camellia oil in Taiwan. This study investigated for the first time the potential antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities of oil production byproducts, specifically those of the fruit shell, seed shell, and seed pomace from C. tenuifloria. It was found that the crude ethanol extract of the seed shell had the strongest DPPH scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activities, followed by the fruit shell, while seed pomace was the weakest. The IC50 values of crude extracts and fractions on monophenolase were smaller than diphenolase. The phenolic-rich methanol fraction of seed shell (SM reduced nitric oxide (NO production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. It also repressed the expression of IL-1β, and secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and IL-6 in response to LPS. SM strongly stimulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 expression and addition of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reversed the inhibition of NO production, indicating the involvement of HO-1 in its anti-inflammatory activity. The effects observed in this study provide evidence for the reuse of residues from C. tenuifloria in the food additive, medicine and cosmetic industries.

  1. Effect of different fertilizers on the microbial activity and productivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the application of different rates of mineral nitrogen, well rotten farmyard manure and Klebsiella planticola SL09- based microbial biofertilizer (enteroplantin) on the count of soil microorganisms (total microbial count, counts of Azotobacter, oligonitrophilic bacteria, fungi and ...

  2. Anti-microbial Efficacy of Soursop Leaf Extract (Annona muricata) on Oral Pathogens: An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Bh Mithun; Rajesh, Gururagavendra; Shenoy, Ramya; Rao, Ashwini

    2016-11-01

    Annona muricata also called as Soursop is a, flowering evergreen tree native to Mexico, Cuba, Central America and parts of India. The miracle tree as it is widely known as a natural cancer killer that is 10,000 times stronger than chemotherapy. Based on these miraculous claims, the leaves of these plants were used as an extract at varying concentrations as an antibacterial agent against oral pathogens. The aim of the study was to assess antimicrobial efficacy of Soursop leaf extarct ( Annona muricata ) on Streptococcus mutans , Streptococcus mitis , Porphyromonas gingivalis , Prevotella intermedia and Candida albicans using disc diffusion method. Extracts of Annona muricata leaves of concentrations of 1%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% were prepared. The anti-microbial efficacy was evaluated using disc diffusion method against Streptococcus mutans , Streptococcus mitis , Porphyromonas gingivalis , Prevotella intermedia and Candida albicans on agar plates. All concentrations of extracts were effective on the microbiota except for the P. Intermedia . The Soursop extract was highly effective on Candida species, with all concentrations exhibiting bactericidal and fungicidal property. The extracts at different concentration were effective when compared to the gold standard controls and the effect was statistically significant (p<0.05). Data obtained was analysed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc test. The Soursop extracts were efficient for all test organisms expect P. intermedia . The present study demonstrated the in-vitro efficacy of Soursop was highest against S. mutans followed by C. albicans and least on P. intermedia . Hence, this study proves to an extent that the Soursop extract when used against oral microbiota has sufficient anti-microbial and fungicidal property.

  3. Effect of salinity on nitrogenase activity and composition of the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Stal, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial mats are often found in intertidal areas experiencing a large range of salinities. This study investigated the effect of changing salinities on nitrogenase activity and on the composition of the active diazotrophic community ( transcript libraries) of three types of microbial mats situated

  4. Anti hypoxic and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus esculentus seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimzadeh, M. A.; Nabavi, S. F.; Nabavi, S. M.; Eslami, B.

    2010-07-01

    The anti hypoxic and antioxidant activities of Hibiscus esculentus seeds were investigated employing eight in vitro assay systems. Anti hypoxic activity was investigated in two models, haemic and circulatory. The effects were pronounced in both models of hypoxia. The anti hypoxic effects were dose-dependent. The results indicated that the extracts have a protective effect against hypoxia induced lethality in mice. The extracts showed antioxidant activity in some models. IC{sub 5}0 for DPPH radical-scavenging activity was 234 {+-} 8.9 {mu}g ml{sup 1}. The extracts showed weak nitric oxide-scavenging activity between 0.1 and 1.6 mg ml{sup -}1. The extracts showed weak Fe{sup 2}+ chelating ability. IC{sub 5}0 were 150 {+-} 13 {mu}g ml{sup -}1. The extracts also exhibited low antioxidant activity in the linoleic acid model but were capable of scavenging hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. The total amount of phenolic compounds in each extract was determined as gallic acid equivalents and total flavonoid contents were calculated as quercetin equivalents from a calibration curve. Pharmacological effects may be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of phenols and flavonoids in the extracts. (Author) 40 refs.

  5. Chlorogenic Acid and Its Microbial Metabolites Exert Anti-Proliferative Effects, S-Phase Cell-Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Ekbatan, Shima; Li, Xiu-Qing; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Azadi, Behnam; Kubow, Stan

    2018-03-03

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) decreases colon cancer-cell proliferation but the combined anti-cancer effects of CGA with its major colonic microbial metabolites, caffeic acid (CA), 3-phenylpropionic acid (3-PPA) and benzoic acid (BA), needs elucidation as they occur together in colonic digesta. Caco-2 cancer cells were treated for 24 h with the four compounds individually (50-1000 µM) and as an equimolar ratio (1:1:1:1; MIX). The effective concentration to decrease cell proliferation by 50% (EC 50 ) was lower for MIX (431 ± 51.84 µM) and CA (460 ± 21.88) versus CGA (758 ± 19.09 µM). The EC 50 for cytotoxicity measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in MIX (527 ± 75.34 µM) showed more potency than CA (740 ± 38.68 µM). Cell proliferation was decreased by 3-PPA and BA at 1000 µM with no cytotoxicity. Cell-cycle arrest was induced at the S-phase by CA (100 µM), MIX (100 µM), CGA (250 µM) and 3-PPA (500 µM) with activation of caspase-3 by CGA, CA, MIX (500 and 1000 µM). Mitochondrial DNA content was reduced by 3-PPA (1000 µM). The anti-cancer effects occurred at markedly lower concentrations of each compound within MIX than when provided singly, indicating that they function together to enhance anti-colon cancer activities.

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of root of Alpinia galanga willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Kumar Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate the acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activities of root extract of Alpinia galanga in rodents. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out using albino rats of either sex (150-200 g. An extract of the root of A. galanga was prepared using absolute alcohol and distillation in a Soxhlet apparatus. The acute anti-inflammatory effects of this extract were evaluated using carrageenan-, bradykinin-, and 5-HT-induced rat paw edema. The chronic anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated using formaldehyde-induced rat paw edema. Results and Analysis: Inhibition of inflammation was seen to be 32.22% in carrageenan-induced, 37.70% in 5-HT-induced, and 35.21% in bradykinin-induced anti-inflammatory models. In chronic inflammatory model, a progressive inhibition of 34.73% (3 rd day, 37.50% (5 th day, 38.83% (7 th day, 44.66% (9 th day, 49.59% (11 th day, and 55.75% (13 th day was observed with study compound. The efficacy was comparable with the standard drugs. Conclusion: It can be thus concluded that A. galanga has anti-inflammatory properties and probably acts by blocking histaminic and serotonin pathways. It may be an effective alternative to NASAIDs and corticosteroid in inflammatory disorders.

  7. Active microbial soil communities in different agricultural managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, S.; Pastorelli, R.

    2009-04-01

    We studied the composition of active eubacterial microflora by RNA extraction from soil (bulk and rhizosphere) under different environmental impact managements, in a hilly basin in Gallura (Sardinia). We contrasted grassy vineyard, in which the soil had been in continuous contact with plant roots for a long period of time, with traditional tilled vineyard. Moreover, we examined permanent grassland, in which plants had been present for some years, with temporary grassland, in which varying plants had been present only during the respective growing seasons. Molecular analysis of total population was carried out by electrophoretic separation by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplified cDNA fragments obtained from 16S rRNA. In vineyards UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group Mathematical Average) analysis made up separate clusters depending on soil management. In spring both clusters showed similarity over 70%, while in autumn the similarity increased, 84% and 90% for grassy and conventional tilled vineyard respectively. Permanent and temporary grassland joined in a single cluster in spring, while in autumn a partial separation was evidenced. The grassy vineyard, permanent and temporary grassland showed higher richness and diversity Shannon-Weiner index values than vineyard with conventional tillage although no significant. In conclusion the expected effect of the rhizosphere was visible: the grass cover influenced positively the diversity of active microbial population.

  8. Surveillance study of bacterial contamination of the parent's cell phone in the NICU and the effectiveness of an anti-microbial gel in reducing transmission to the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstrom, A C; Cleman, P E; Cassis-Ghavami, F L; Kamitsuka, M D

    2013-12-01

    To determine the bacterial contamination rate of the parent's cell phone and the effectiveness of anti-microbial gel in reducing transmission of bacteria from cell phone to hands. Cross-sectional study of cultures from the cell phone and hands before and after applying anti-microbial gel (n=50). All cell phones demonstrated bacterial contamination. Ninety percent had the same bacteria on the cell phone and their cleaned hands. Twenty two percent had no growth on their hands after applying anti-microbial gel after they had the same bacteria on the cell phone and hands. Ninety-two percent of parents were aware that cell phones carried bacteria, but only 38% cleaned their cell phones at least weekly. Bacterial contamination of cell phones may serve as vectors for nosocomial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit. Bacteria transmitted from cell phone to hands may not be eliminated using anti-microbial gel. Development of hand hygiene and cell phone cleaning guidelines are needed regarding bedside cell phone use.

  9. Anti-biofilm activities from marine cold adapted bacteria against staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna ePapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules.The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules.The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules

  10. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of aqueous ethanolic extract of Tamarix aphylla L. (Saltcedar) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Abbas, Khizar; Hamayun, Rahma; Ali, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activity of aqueous ethanolic extracts of Tamarix aphylla. The powdered plant was extracted by the method of cold maceration using aqueous ethanol (70:30) as solvents. Analgesic activity was assessed by Eddy's hot plate method, formalin-induced paw licking and acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carageenan-induced mice paw edema. The anti-pyretic activity was determined by yeast-induced pyrexia in mice. The aqueous ethanolic extract of Tamarix aphylla showed 42% inhibition (pTamarix aphylla exhibit analgesic and antipyretic activity but lacks anti-inflammatory activity.

  11. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H.J. Kao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides being widely known as the major active ingredients, the different biological pathways by which they exert their anti-cancer effect remain poorly defined. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of action may lead to more widespread use of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.The aim of this paper is to summarise the various bioactive mechanisms that have been proposed for the anti-cancer properties of triterpenes and polysaccharides extracted from G. lucidum. A literature search of published papers on NCBI with keywords “Ganoderma” and “cancer” was performed. Among those, studies which specifically examined the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides were selected to be included in this paper.We have found five potential mechanisms which are associated with the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and three potential mechanisms for Ganoderma polysaccharides. In addition, G. lucidum has been used in combination with known anti-cancer agents to improve the anti-cancer efficacies. This suggests Ganoderma’s bioactive pathways may compliment that of anti-cancer agents. In this paper we present several potential anti-cancer mechanisms of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides which can be used for the development of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.

  12. Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of methanolic leaf extract of Indigofera cassioides Rottl. Ex. DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Senthil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All the results obtained revealed that the extract MEIC showed potent anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity against all the tested models and the results obtained were comparable with the standards used. The activity of the extract may be due to the presence of terpenoids, flavonoids and other phytochemicals.

  13. Antibacterial, anti-swarming and anti-biofilm formation activities of Chamaemelum nobile against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemian, Hossein; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Heidari, Hamid; Amiri, Pouya; Yamchi, Jalil Kardan; Shavalipour, Aref; Houri, Hamidreza; Maleki, Abbas; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda

    2015-01-01

    Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) is widely used throughout the world, and has anti-inflammatory, deodorant, bacteriostatic, antimicrobial, carminative, sedative, antiseptic, anti-catarrhal, and spasmolytic properties. Because of the increasing incidence of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of natural antibacterial sources such as medical herbs for the treatment of infectious diseases is necessary. Extracts from different plant parts such as the leaves, flowers, fruit, and bark of Combretum albiflorum, Laurus nobilis , and Sonchus oleraceus were found to possess anti-quorum sensing (QS) activities. In this study, we evaluated the effect of C. nobile against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from patients with different types of infection, including wound infection, septicemia, and urinary tract infection. The flowers of C. nobile were dried and the extract was removed using a rotary device and then dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at pH 7.4. The microdilution method was used to evaluate the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of this extract on P. aeruginosa , and biofilm inhibition was assayed. Eighty percent of the isolated samples (16/20) could form a biofilm, and most of these were isolated from wound infections. The biofilm inhibitory concentration of the C. nobile extract was 6.25-25mg/ml, whereas the MIC was 12.5-50mg/ml. The anti-QS property of C. nobile may play an important role in its antibacterial activity, thus offering an additional strategy in the fight against bacterial infections. However, molecular investigation is required to explore the exact mechanisms of the antibacterial action and functions of this phytocompound.

  14. Anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity of fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio-; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Ronquillo de Jesús, Elba

    2015-05-01

    Produced worldwide at 1.2m tons per year, fibrous clays are used in the production of pet litter, animal feed stuff to roof parcels, construction and rheological additives, and other applications needing to replace long-fiber length asbestos. To the authors' knowledge, however, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity by sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejon El Rubio, Spain). The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) methods. Histological cuts were obtained for quantifying leukocytes found in the epidermis. Palygorkite and sepiolite caused edema inhibition and migration of neutrophils ca. 68.64 and 45.54%, and 80 and 65%, respectively. Fibrous clays yielded high rates of infiltration, explained by cleavage of polysomes and exposure of silanol groups. Also, fibrous clays showed high inhibition of myeloperoxidase contents shortly after exposure, but decreased sharply afterwards. In contrast, tubular clays caused an increasing inhibition of myeloperoxidase with time. Thus, clay structure restricted the kinetics and mechanism of myeloperoxidase inhibition. Fibrous clays were screened in vitro against human cancer cell lines. Cytotoxicity was determined using the protein-binding dye sulforhodamine B (SRB). Exposing cancer human cells to sepiolite or palygorskite showed growth inhibition varying with cell line. This study shows that fibrous clays served as an effective anti-inflammatory, limited by chemical transfer and cellular-level signals responding exclusively to an early exposure to clay, and cell viability decreasing significantly only after exposure to high concentrations of sepiolite. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibacterial, anti-swarming and anti-biofilm formation activities of Chamaemelum nobile against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kazemian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractINTRODUCTION:Chamomile ( Chamaemelum nobile is widely used throughout the world, and has anti-inflammatory, deodorant, bacteriostatic, antimicrobial, carminative, sedative, antiseptic, anti-catarrhal, and spasmolytic properties. Because of the increasing incidence of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of natural antibacterial sources such as medical herbs for the treatment of infectious diseases is necessary. Extracts from different plant parts such as the leaves, flowers, fruit, and bark of Combretum albiflorum, Laurus nobilis , and Sonchus oleraceus were found to possess anti-quorum sensing (QS activities. In this study, we evaluated the effect of C. nobile against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formationMETHODS:The P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from patients with different types of infection, including wound infection, septicemia, and urinary tract infection. The flowers of C. nobile were dried and the extract was removed using a rotary device and then dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at pH 7.4. The microdilution method was used to evaluate the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of this extract on P. aeruginosa , and biofilm inhibition was assayed.RESULTS:Eighty percent of the isolated samples (16/20 could form a biofilm, and most of these were isolated from wound infections. The biofilm inhibitory concentration of the C. nobile extract was 6.25-25mg/ml, whereas the MIC was 12.5-50mg/ml.CONCLUSIONS:The anti-QS property of C. nobile may play an important role in its antibacterial activity, thus offering an additional strategy in the fight against bacterial infections. However, molecular investigation is required to explore the exact mechanisms of the antibacterial action and functions of this phytocompound.

  16. The effect of metal ions on the microbial attachment ability of flocculent activate sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wen; Lv, Junping; Li, Yaochen; Chen, Lisha; Zhu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    As a kind of biofilm structure, microbial attachment was believed to play an important role in the aggregation and stability of flocculent activated sludge (FAS), and also its translation to aerobic granular activated sludge (AGAS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Ca2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Zn2+, K+, and Na+, which were frequently found in the biological wastewater-treatment systems on the microbial attachment of FAS, in order to provide a new strategy for the cultivation of FAS and AGAS. The results showed that different metal ions had different effects on the process of microbial attachment of FAS; in particular, Cu2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ could increase the microbial attachment ability of FAS at appropriate concentrations, and disrupted the process at higher concentrations. Mg2+ would greatly enhance the microbial attachment of FAS at lower concentrations but then the biomass of attachment was fallen down to a level close to that of the control. However, Ca2+), K+, and Na+ always exhibited a positive impact on the microbial attachment of FAS. Besides, the concentration of FAS suspension and the culture time both had an effect on the microbial attachment of FAS. Moreover, the acyl-homoserine-lactones-based quorum-sensing system, the content of EPS, and the relative hydrophobicity of FAS had been greatly influenced by metal ions. As all these parameters had close relationships with microbial attachment process, changes in these parameters may affect the microbial attachment of FAS.

  17. Microbial activity influences pore water recovery from oil sands mature fine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foght, J.; Bressier, D.; Cardenas, M.; Fedorak, P.; Guigard, S.; Gupta, R.; Siddique, T. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Studies have shown that natural anaerobic microbial activity in mature fine tailings (MFT) produces methane and accelerates settling of fines, accompanied by release of pore water. However, the microbial activity is limited by low concentrations of microbial substrates in the MFT. In this study, MFT was amended with additional substrates such as agricultural waste streams or microbial products such as carbon dioxide. The objective was to increase the densification rate and accelerate pore water recovery compared to unamended or inactivated control conditions. This biological phenomenon was observed using MFT from different oil sand operators. An overview of the research results was presented and the potential for accelerating microbial activity to increase water recovery from MFT was discussed. Dewatering of oil sands tailings deposited into settling basins was shown to be important from both an environmental and industrial standpoint. figs.

  18. The impact of synthetic pyrethroid and organophosphate sheep dip formulations on microbial activity in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucard, Tatiana K.; McNeill, Charles [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Bardgett, Richard D. [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Paynter, Christopher D. [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T. [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.uk

    2008-05-15

    Sheep dip formulations containing organophosphates (OPs) or synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) have been widely used in UK, and their spreading onto land has been identified as the most practical disposal method. In this study, the impact of two sheep dip formulations on the microbial activity of a soil was investigated over a 35-d incubation. Microbial utilisation of [1-{sup 14}C] glucose, uptake of {sup 14}C-activity into the microbial biomass and microbial numbers (CFUs g{sup -1} soil) were investigated. In control soils and soils amended with 0.01% sheep dip, after 7 d a larger proportion of added glucose was allocated to microbial biomass rather than respired to CO{sub 2}. No clear temporal trends were found in soils amended with 0.1% and 1% sheep dips. Both sheep dip formulations at 0.1% and 1% concentrations resulted in a significant increase in CFUs g{sup -1} soil and [1-{sup 14}C] glucose mineralisation rates, as well as a decline in microbial uptake of [1-{sup 14}C] glucose, compared to control and 0.01% SP- or OP-amended soils. This study suggests that the growth, activity, physiological status and/or structure of soil microbial community may be affected by sheep dips. - The application of sheep dip formulations can have a profound impact upon microbial activity and substrate utilisation in soil.

  19. Effect of citric acid and microbial phytase on serum enzyme activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of citric acid and microbial phytase on serum enzyme activities and plasma minerals retention in broiler chicks. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... An experiment was conducted to study the effect of microbial phytase supplementation and citric acid in broiler chicks fed corn-soybean meal base diets on enzyme ...

  20. Microbial activity and community structure in two drained fen soils in the Ljubljana Marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraigher, Barbara; Stres, Blaz; Hacin, Janez; Ausec, Luka; Mahne, Ivan; van Elsas, Jan D.; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    Fen peatlands are specific wetland ecosystems containing high soil organic carbon (SOC). There is a general lack of knowledge about the microbial communities that abound in these systems. We examined the microbial activity and community structure in two fen soils differing in SOC content sampled

  1. Continuous enzyme-coupled assay for microbial transglutaminase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteng-Pabi, Samuel K; Keillor, Jeffrey W

    2013-10-15

    Transglutaminases (protein-glutamine:amine γ-glutamyltransferase, EC 2.3.2.13) are a family of calcium-dependent enzymes that catalyze an acyl transfer between glutamine residues and a wide variety of primary amines. When a lysine residue acts as the acyl-acceptor substrate, a γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine isopeptide bond is formed. This isopeptide bond formation represents protein cross-linking, which is critical to several biological processes. Microbial transglutaminase (mTG) is a bacterial variant of the transglutaminase family, distinct by virtue of its calcium-independent catalysis of the isopeptidic bond formation. Furthermore, mTG's promiscuity in acyl-acceptor substrate preference highlights its biocatalytic potential. The acyl-donor substrate, however, is limited in its scope; the amino acid sequences flanking glutamine residues dramatically affect substrate specificity and activity. Here, we have developed and optimized a modified glutamate dehydrogenase assay with the intention of analyzing potential high-affinity peptides. This direct continuous assay presents significant advantages over the commonly used hydroxamate assay, including generality, sensitivity, and ease of manipulation. Furthermore, we identified 7M48 (WALQRPH), a high-affinity peptide that shows greater affinity with mTG (K(M)=3 mM) than the commonly used Cbz-Gln-Gly (K(M)=58 mM), attesting to its potential for application in biocatalysis and bioconjugation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of polysaccharide from Pholiota nameko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiping; Lu, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Shuhai; Lu, Meijun; Liu, Hongmei

    2008-06-01

    Pholiota nameko polysaccharide (PNPS-1) has been isolated and purified by enzymatic hydrolysis, hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation, and ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The anti-inflammatory activity of PNPS-1 was evaluated in rodents using xylene-induced ear edema, egg albumin-, carrageenin-, and formaldehyde-induced paw edema, cotton pellet granuloma test, adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes in vitro, and ulcerogenic activity. The results showed that PNPS-1 (5 mg/ear) inhibited topical edema in the mouse ear and at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg (intraperitoneally) it significantly suppressed the development of egg albumin-, carrageenin-, and formaldehyde-induced paw edema in the animals. PNPS-1 (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, per oral) significantly inhibited the growth of granuloma tissues induced by subcutaneously implanted cotton pellets in rats by 10.96, 18.07, and 43.75%, respectively. PNPS-1 also inhibited spontaneous and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-activated adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes in vitro. Further, both acute as well as chronic administration of PNPS-1 (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, per oral) did not produce any gastric lesion in rats. In conclusion, these data indicated that PNPS-1 possesses significant anti-inflammatory activity suggesting its potential as an anti-inflammatory agent for use in the treatment of various inflammatory-related diseases.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Composition of Senecio salignus Kunth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuauhtemoc Pérez González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA- induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36±4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%. The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9±2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h.

  4. Camellia sinensis L. Extract and Its Potential Beneficial Effects in Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Hepatotoxic, and Anti-Tyrosinase Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitimuta, Surached; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Nithitanakool, Saruth; Bavovada, Rapepol; Leanpolchareanchai, Jiraporn; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart

    2017-03-04

    The aims of this study were to investigate the potential benefits of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxic, and anti-tyrosinase activities of a methanolic extract of fresh tea leaves (FTE) ( Camellia sinensis L.). The antioxidant capacity was investigated using three different methods at different temperatures. The anti-inflammatory activity was studied in vitro by the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase assay. The anti-hepatotoxic effect was investigated in CCl₄-induced liver injury in rats. The anti-tyrosinase activities of the FTE and its principal phenolic compounds were investigated in l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) oxidation by a mushroom tyrosinase. A molecular docking study was conducted to determine how the FTE's principal catechins interact with the tyrosinase. The FTE exhibited the best shelf life at low temperatures and demonstrated concentration-dependent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxic, and anti-tyrosinase effects compared to positive references. Treatment of rats with the FTE at 2000 mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days reversed CCl₄-induced oxidative damage in hepatic tissues by lowering the levels of alanine aminotransferase by 69% and malondialdehyde by 90%. Our findings suggest that the FTE has the capacity to scavenge free radicals and can protect against oxidative stress induced by CCl₄ intoxication. The docking results were consistent with our in vitro data, indicating the anti-tyrosinase potency of the principal catechins.

  5. Camellia sinensis L. Extract and Its Potential Beneficial Effects in Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Hepatotoxic, and Anti-Tyrosinase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surached Thitimuta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to investigate the potential benefits of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxic, and anti-tyrosinase activities of a methanolic extract of fresh tea leaves (FTE (Camellia sinensis L.. The antioxidant capacity was investigated using three different methods at different temperatures. The anti-inflammatory activity was studied in vitro by the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase assay. The anti-hepatotoxic effect was investigated in CCl4-induced liver injury in rats. The anti-tyrosinase activities of the FTE and its principal phenolic compounds were investigated in l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA oxidation by a mushroom tyrosinase. A molecular docking study was conducted to determine how the FTE’s principal catechins interact with the tyrosinase. The FTE exhibited the best shelf life at low temperatures and demonstrated concentration-dependent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxic, and anti-tyrosinase effects compared to positive references. Treatment of rats with the FTE at 2000 mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days reversed CCl4-induced oxidative damage in hepatic tissues by lowering the levels of alanine aminotransferase by 69% and malondialdehyde by 90%. Our findings suggest that the FTE has the capacity to scavenge free radicals and can protect against oxidative stress induced by CCl4 intoxication. The docking results were consistent with our in vitro data, indicating the anti-tyrosinase potency of the principal catechins.

  6. Evaluation of minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration of nano-silver base inorganic anti-microbial agent (Novaron(®)) against streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla, Goda; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2012-07-01

    We attempted to find the possibility of determining the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration needed for nano-silver base inorganic anti-microbial agent (Novaron(®) AG 300, AG 1100) against Streptococcus mutans in vitro using broth dilution assay. An ampoule of freeze-dried S. mutans NCTC reference strain was revived, and the colony-forming units (CFU) were calculated. The MIC and MBC was determined by broth dilution assay using different concentrations of Novaron(®) AG 300 and Novaron(®) AG 1100 against 1 × 10(5) CFU/ml of S. mutans. The MIC and MBC of Novaron(®) AG 300 and Novaron(®) AG 1100 against S. mutans were found to be 40 μg/ml. Novaron(®) has anti-bacterial effect against S. mutans. Further studies are needed to explore the applicability of these silver-supported anti- microbial agents in clinical dentistry.

  7. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Andrade de Prince

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib. B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae, cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties.

  8. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of five Veronica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, U Sebnem; Saracoglu, Iclal; Inoue, Makoto; Ogihara, Yukio

    2002-04-01

    Biological activities of five Veronica species (Scrophulariaceae), V. cymbalaria, V. hederifolia, V. pectinata var. glandulosa, V. persica and V. polita were studied for their anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. Their methanol extracts showed both the inhibitory activity of nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and cytotoxic activity against KB epidermoid carcinoma and B16 melanoma. When the methanol extracts were fractionated between water and chloroform, water fractions significantly inhibited NO production without any cytotoxicity, while chloroform fractions showed cytotoxicity dose-dependently. When the radical scavenging activity was determined using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), water fractions of the five Veronica species scavenged free radicals effectively, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of this species on NO production was due to their radical scavenging activity. On the other hand, chloroform fractions of Veronica species except for V. cymbalaria showed similar cytotoxic activity against KB and B16 melanoma cells.

  9. Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Inonotus obliquus and Germinated Brown Rice Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beong Ou Lim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Inonotus obliquus (IO is parasitic mushroom that grows on birch and other trees in Russia, Korea, Europe and United States. However, IO is not readily available for consumption due to its high cost and difficult growth. In this regard, IO was inoculated on germinated brown rice (GBR in the present study and the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the IO grown on germinated brown rice (IOGBR extracts were evaluated extensively and compared with those for IO and GBR. IOGBR showed highest antioxidant activities with scavenging total intracellular ROS and MDA levels as well as increasing the antioxidant enzymes activity in the H2O2-stimulated mice liver. It also exhibited best inflammatory activities by suppressing the proinflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE2, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in an LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cell line. This study provides a comparative approach to find out an excellent natural source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agent as a dietary supplement.

  10. Anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Inonotus obliquus and germinated brown rice extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Trishna; Park, Sa Ra; Kim, Da Hye; Jo, Jeong Eun; Lim, Beong Ou

    2013-08-02

    Inonotus obliquus (IO) is parasitic mushroom that grows on birch and other trees in Russia, Korea, Europe and United States. However, IO is not readily available for consumption due to its high cost and difficult growth. In this regard, IO was inoculated on germinated brown rice (GBR) in the present study and the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the IO grown on germinated brown rice (IOGBR) extracts were evaluated extensively and compared with those for IO and GBR. IOGBR showed highest antioxidant activities with scavenging total intracellular ROS and MDA levels as well as increasing the antioxidant enzymes activity in the H₂O₂-stimulated mice liver. It also exhibited best inflammatory activities by suppressing the proinflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE₂, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in an LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cell line. This study provides a comparative approach to find out an excellent natural source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agent as a dietary supplement.

  11. Synthesis of biogenic Ag@Pd Core-shell nanoparticles having anti-cancer/anti-microbial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Eid, M M; Abd El-Moez, Sh I; Mohamed, E; Ali, Ghareib W

    2017-08-15

    Biogenic Ag@Pd core-shell nanoparticles were greenly synthesized within two plant extracts aiming at enhanced anticancer/bactericidal functions. These functions were verified for the two Pd@Ag biogenic core-shell nanoparticles (BCSnp) with constant Pd to several Ag contents. BCSnp were synthesized within two extracts of Almond nuts and Black Berry fruits, four samples each, through simple, low cost and echo friendly microwave route. The BCSnp Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) was detected via UV/visible spectrophotometer. Their morphology was assessed using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope supplemented with EDAX. Particle size/zeta potential of the achieved nanoparticles was measured. The active reducing groups were depicted by FTIR while XRD assessed nanoparticles crystallinity. The enhanced particle size distribution as proved by UV and band gap energies, imparted better functionality by the Almond extract compared to the berry one due to its protein content. Cytotoxicity against human breast cancer (MCF7) and liver cancer (HEPG2) cell lines were followed and compared to the normal Wish cells. The antimicrobial impact against gram-negative (G - veo) E. coli, gram-positive (G + ve) S. aureus bacteria and mycotic strain C. albicans species were verified and compared to antibiotics. A significant inhibition of cancer cell growth of MCF 7 and HEPG2 compared to Wish normal cells and doxorubicin is assessed. A discriminative effect was recorded for G - ve compared to G + ve, along with Mycotic strain C. albicans is achieved. The obtained BCSnp are proposed for cancer therapy and bactericidal applications with improved efficiency applying the nanomedicine approach. Tailorable properties can be obtained by tuning the individual structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Chemical Constituents with Anti-hypoxia Activity from Saussurea involucrata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin-lin; He, Lei; Fan, Peng-cheng; Jia, Zheng-ping; Ma, Hui-ping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents with anti-hypoxia activity from Saussurea involucrata. The chemical constituents, isolated and purified by column chromatography from Saussurea involucrata, were identified by several spectroscopic methods. The anti-hypoxic activities of these compounds were examined using the normobaric hypoxic model of mice. Twelve compounds were isolated from petroleum ether extract of Saussurea involucrata and identified as n-octacosane (1), 1-undecanol (2), heptadecan-l-ol(3), heptacosan-1-ol(4), myristicin (5), apiol(6), β-sitosterol(7), lupeol(8), moslosooflavone (9), mosloflavone (10), negletein(11), and 5, 6-dihydroxy-7, 8-dimethoxyflavone(12). All compounds except 7 and 8 are isolated from this plant for the first time. Compound 1, 5 and 8 - 12 can significantly prolong the survival time of hypoxic mice.

  13. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Phenolic Compounds against Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Sabrina; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; P. Vasantha Rupasinghe, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, Streptococcus pyogenes is the leading cause of bacterial pharyngitis. To reduce the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial phytochemical-containing remedies, which have long been in use in traditional medicine, may provide new approaches for management of streptococcal pharyngitis....... The objective of this study was to assess the inhibitory activities of 25 natural phenolic compounds against three strains of S. pyogenes. Methods: After an initial screening, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the nine most effective phenolic compounds...... were determined. The effect of four compounds with the lowest MIC and MBC on streptococcal growth and biofilm formation was also studied. Results: 1,2-Naphthoquinone and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone elicited the greatest anti-S. pyogenes activities with MICs ranging from 0.39 to 6.25 µg mL−1 and MBCs...

  14. Unraveling the relationship between microbial translocation and systemic immune activation in HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic immune activation is a key factor in HIV-1 disease progression. The translocation of microbial products from the intestinal lumen into the systemic circulation occurs during HIV-1 infection and is associated closely with immune activation; however, it has not been determined conclusively whether microbial translocation drives immune activation or occurs as a consequence of HIV-1 infection. In an important study in this issue of the JCI, Kristoff and colleagues describe the role of microbial translocation in producing immune activation in an animal model of HIV-1 infection, SIV infection of pigtailed macaques. Blocking translocation of intestinal bacterial LPS into the circulation dramatically reduced T cell activation and proliferation, production of proinflammatory cytokines, and plasma SIV RNA levels. This study directly demonstrates that microbial translocation promotes the systemic immune activation associated with HIV-1/SIV infection. PMID:24837427

  15. Hepatoprotective and anti-inflammatory activities of Plantago major L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türel, Idris; Ozbek, Hanefi; Erten, Remzi; Oner, Ahmet Cihat; Cengiz, Nureddin; Yilmaz, Orhan

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities of Plantago major L. (PM). Anti-inflammatory activity: Control and reference groups were administered isotonic saline solution (ISS) and indomethacin, respectively. Plantago major groups were injected PM in doses of 5 mg/kg (PM-I), 10 mg/kg (PM-II), 20 mg/kg (PM-III) and 25 mg/kg (PM-IV). Before and three hours after the injections, the volume of right hind-paw of rats was measured using a plethysmometer. HEPATOPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY: The hepatotoxicity was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) administration. Control, CCl4 and reference groups received isotonic saline solution, CCl4 and silibinin, respectively. Plantago major groups received CCl4 (0.8 ml/kg) and PM in doses of 10, 20 and 25 mg/kg, respectively for seven days. Blood samples and liver were collected on the 8th day after the animals were killed. Plantago major had an anti-inflammatory effect matching to that of control group at doses of 20 and 25 mg/kg. It was found that reduction in the inflammation was 90.01% with indomethacin, 3.10% with PM-I, 41.56% with PM-II, 45.87% with PM-III and 49.76% with PM-IV. Median effective dose (ED50) value of PM was found to be 7.507 mg/kg. Plantago major (25 mg/kg) significantly reduced the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels when compared to the CCl4 group. The histopathological findings showed a significant difference between the PM (25 mg/kg) and CCl4 groups. The results showed that PM had a considerable anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMoles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From these, ethanol extracts of ten species from five different phyla resulted suitable to be studied in cell macrophage cultures (RAW 264.7. Cytotoxicity (MTT method and production of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin-1 were determined at three extract concentrations (50, 125, 250 g/mL. Bioassays resulted in four different species showing anti-inflammatory activity corresponding to three sponges: Mycale (Oxymycale acerata, Isodictya erinacea, and I. toxophila; and one hemichordate: Cephalodiscus sp. These results show that Antarctic sessile invertebrates may have great value as a source of lead compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  17. Synthesis, in-vitro antibacterial, antifungal, and molecular modeling of potent anti-microbial agents with a combined pyrazole and thiophene pharmacophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Kaal, Nahed Ahmed; Alterary, Seham; Al-Showiman, Salim S; Barakat, Assem; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Frey, Wolfgang

    2015-05-14

    Ethyl 5-acetyl-4-methyl-2-(phenylamino)thiophene-3-carboxylate (2) and there derivatives 3a-c, 4, 6a-c and 9a-f were synthesized. The structure of compound 2 was deduced by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, MS, microanalysis, and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The compound crystallized in the monoclinic system, with space group P21/c and cell coordinates a = 8.5752(16) Å, b = 21.046(4) Å, c = 8.2941(12) Å, β = 101.131(6)°, V = 1468.7(4) Å3, and Z = 4. Compounds 2, 3a-c, 4, 5a-c and 9a-f were subjected into in vitro antimicrobial activity tests. Compounds 3a and 3c were more potent than standard drug amphotericin B, showing MIC values of 23.8 ± 0.42 and 24.3 ± 0.68, respectively, against Aspergillus fumigatus while the standard drug MIC was 23.7 ± 0.1. Compound 3c was also more potent (MIC 24.8 ± 0.64) than the standard drug amphotericin B (MIC 19.7 ± 0.2) against Syncephalastrum racemosum. Compounds 4 and 9f also showed promising anti-microbial activity. Molecular modeling was performed for the most active compounds.

  18. Limited recovery of soil microbial activity after transient exposure to gasoline vapors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrzyński, Jakub J.; Christensen, Jan H.; Mayer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    During gasoline spills complex mixtures of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released to terrestrial environments. Gasoline VOCs exert baseline toxicity (narcosis) and may thus broadly affect soil biota. We assessed the functional resilience (i.e. resistance and recovery of microbial...... functions) in soil microbial communities transiently exposed to gasoline vapors by passive dosing via headspace for 40 days followed by a recovery phase of 84 days. Chemical exposure was characterized with GC-MS, whereas microbial activity was monitored as soil respiration (CO2 release) and soil bacterial...... microbial activity indicating residual soil toxicity, which could not be attributed to BTEX, but rather to mixture toxicity of more persistent gasoline constituents or degradation products. Our results indicate a limited potential for functional recovery of soil microbial communities after transient...

  19. Anti-oxidative and anti-ulcerogenic activity of Ipomoea imperati

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina M. Miyahara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ipomoea imperati (Vahl Griseb., Convolvulaceae, is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammation, swelling and wounds, as well as to treat pains and stomach problems. This work evaluates the anti-oxidative activity by ESR (Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy and the preventive and curative actions of I. imperati in gastric ulcer animal model. Ipomoea imperati (200 mg/kg, p.o. prevented the formation of gastric lesions in 78% (p<0.05 when compared with the negative control tween 80. Lanzoprazole, prevented in 85% the gastric lesions formation induced by ethanol (p<0.05. Therefore, the oral administration of I. imperati one hour before the ulcerogenic agent prevented the ulcer formation, conserving the citoprotection characteristics of the gastric mucosa and assuring the integrity of gastric glands and gastric fossets. The healing activity of I. imperati (200 mg/kg, p.o. evaluated in chronic ulcer experiments induced by the acetic acid, was 72% (p<0.05. The positive control, ranitidine, healed 78% of the gastric lesions (p<0.05. The histological analysis confirmed the recovery of the mucosal layer and the muscle mucosal layer harmed by the acetic acid. Experiments in vitro with DPPH (2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl of anti-oxidative activity demonstrated that I. imperati presents an IC50 of 0.73±0.01 mg/mL.

  20. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities of Phlogacanthus thyrsiflorus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biplab Kumar; Al-Amin, Md Mamun; Chowdhury, Nusrat Nabila; Majumder, Md Fakhar Uddin; Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Pavel, Md Adit Muktadir

    2015-03-01

    Our present study was carried out to explore the potential role of the methanol extract from the leavesof Phlogocanthus thyrsiflorus (PT) Nees. in central and peripheral analgesic activities using hot plate and acetic acid-induced writhing methods. We also tested the antiinflammatory effects and anti-oxidant activity using carrageenan-induced paw edema and the DPPH method, respectively. Methanol extracts of PT leaves were prepared using 500 g powder in 1.8 L methanol by percolation method, followed by evaporation in a rotary evaporator under controlled temperature and pressure. The crude methanol extract was dried by freeze drier and preserved at 4 °C. Oral administration of PT significantly (p methanol extract which could be correlated with its observed biological activities.

  1. Anti-allergy activities of Kuji amber extract and kujigamberol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Miku; Kobayashi, Miki; Uchida, Takeshi; Shimizu, Eisaku; Higashio, Hironori; Ohno, Misa; Uesugi, Shota; Kimura, Ken-Ichi

    2018-03-05

    Amber is fossilized tree resin and several biologically active compounds were isolated from ambers using the growth-restoring activity of the mutant yeast [Saccharomyces cerevisiae (zds1∆ erg3∆ pdr1∆ pdr3∆)] involving Ca 2+ -signal transduction. The aim of this study is to investigate the anti-allergic effect of both the methanol extract of Kuji amber (MEKA) and its main biologically active constituent, kujigamberol (15,20-dinor-5,7,9-labdatrien-18-ol) having activity against the mutant yeast. Both MEKA and kujigamberol inhibited the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells by stimulation of thapsigargin (Tg) (IC 50  = 15.0 μg/ml and 29.1 μM) and A23187 (IC 50  = 19.6 μg/ml and 24.9 μM) without cytotoxicity, but not by stimulation of IgE + DNP-BSA (Ag) (IC 50  > 50.0 μg/ml and 50.0 μM). However, both inhibited Ca 2+ -influx in RBL-2H3 cells by all three stimulations in a dose dependent manner. Leukotriene C 4 production in RBL-2H3 cells stimulated by A23187 was also inhibited by both through the inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In an ovalbumin-induced rhinitis model of guinea pigs, nasal administration of MEKA and kujigamberol inhibited nasal blockade in a dose-dependent manner and the effect was about 5 times potent than that of a steroid clinical drug, mometasone furoate. The growth-restoring activity of MEKA and kujigamberol against the mutant yeast is involved in the anti-allergic activities against cells and animals, and both are expected to be candidates for the development new anti-allergy agents. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Antioxidant, Immunomodulating, and Microbial-Modulating Activities of the Sustainable and Ecofriendly Spirulina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Finamore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The highly nutritional and ecofriendly Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis has hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, and antihypertensive properties. Spirulina contains functional compounds, such as phenolics, phycocyanins, and polysaccharides, with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulating effects. Studies conducted on Spirulina suggest that it is safe in healthy subjects, but attitude to eating probably affects the acceptability of Spirulina containing foods. Although the antioxidant effect of Spirulina is confirmed by the intervention studies, the concerted modulation of antioxidant and inflammatory responses, suggested by in vitro and animal studies, requires more confirmation in humans. Spirulina supplements seem to affect more effectively the innate immunity, promoting the activity of natural killer cells. The effects on cytokines and on lymphocytes’ proliferation depend on age, gender, and body weight differences. In this context, ageing and obesity are both associated with chronic low grade inflammation, immune impairment, and intestinal dysbiosis. Microbial-modulating activities have been reported in vitro, suggesting that the association of Spirulina and probiotics could represent a new strategy to improve the growth of beneficial intestinal microbiota. Although Spirulina might represent a functional food with potential beneficial effects on human health, the human interventions used only supplements. Therefore, the effect of food containing Spirulina should be evaluated in the future.

  3. Antioxidant, Immunomodulating, and Microbial-Modulating Activities of the Sustainable and Ecofriendly Spirulina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finamore, Alberto; Bensehaila, Sarra

    2017-01-01

    The highly nutritional and ecofriendly Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) has hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, and antihypertensive properties. Spirulina contains functional compounds, such as phenolics, phycocyanins, and polysaccharides, with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulating effects. Studies conducted on Spirulina suggest that it is safe in healthy subjects, but attitude to eating probably affects the acceptability of Spirulina containing foods. Although the antioxidant effect of Spirulina is confirmed by the intervention studies, the concerted modulation of antioxidant and inflammatory responses, suggested by in vitro and animal studies, requires more confirmation in humans. Spirulina supplements seem to affect more effectively the innate immunity, promoting the activity of natural killer cells. The effects on cytokines and on lymphocytes' proliferation depend on age, gender, and body weight differences. In this context, ageing and obesity are both associated with chronic low grade inflammation, immune impairment, and intestinal dysbiosis. Microbial-modulating activities have been reported in vitro, suggesting that the association of Spirulina and probiotics could represent a new strategy to improve the growth of beneficial intestinal microbiota. Although Spirulina might represent a functional food with potential beneficial effects on human health, the human interventions used only supplements. Therefore, the effect of food containing Spirulina should be evaluated in the future. PMID:28182098

  4. Anti-microbial efficiency of silver diamine fluoride as an endodontic medicament - An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod B Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Antisepsis achieved through appropriate use of irrigants is essential for endodontic success. Identification of newer anti-bacterial agents gives alternatives to clean the canal as eradication of the infection prior to obturation does affect prognosis. Objective: Comparison of the anti-bacterial action of 3.8% silver diamine fluoride and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate against Enterococcus faecalis in root canals. Materials and Methods: Forty-four single-rooted teeth were decoronated, and the root section was enlarged with peeso-reamer (No: 3 to standardize length and diameter. The samples were then autoclaved and divided into two study groups and two control groups. Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was inoculated into all test samples for 72 hours. The samples were enlarged with peeso-reamer (No: 5 after placement of respective medicament for 24 hours. Shavings were collected and inoculated on Brain Heart Infusion agar for 24 hrs to measure the colony forming units. Results: Both 3.8% silver diamine fluoride and 2% chlorhexidine showed a superior capacity to sterilize the root canals than control groups. Conclusion: The use of silver diamine fluoride as an endodontic irrigant is feasible as it can effectively remove the microbes present in the canal and circumpulpal dentin.

  5. Fibroblast activation protein is dispensable in the anti-influenza immune response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sioh-Yang Tan

    Full Text Available Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP is a unique dual peptidase of the S9B serine protease family, being capable of both dipeptidyl peptidase and endopeptidase activities. FAP is expressed at low level in healthy adult organs including the pancreas, cervix, uterus, submaxillary gland and the skin, and highly upregulated in embryogenesis, chronic inflammation and tissue remodelling. It is also expressed by cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts in more than 90% of epithelial tumours. FAP has enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions in the growth, immunosuppression, invasion and cell signalling of tumour cells. FAP deficient mice are fertile and viable with no gross abnormality, but little data exist on the role of FAP in the immune system. FAP is upregulated in association with microbial stimulation and chronic inflammation, but its function in infection remains unknown. We showed that major populations of immune cells including CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and neutrophils are generated and maintained normally in FAP knockout mice. Upon intranasal challenge with influenza virus, FAP mRNA was increased in the lungs and lung-draining lymph nodes. Nonetheless, FAP deficient mice showed similar pathologic kinetics to wildtype controls, and were capable of supporting normal anti-influenza T and B cell responses. There was no evidence of compensatory upregulation of other DPP4 family members in influenza-infected FAP-deficient mice. FAP appears to be dispensable in anti-influenza adaptive immunity.

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus: molecular mimicry between anti-dsDNA CDR3 idiotype, microbial and self peptides as antigens for Th cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin eAas-Hanssen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is marked by a T helper (Th cell dependent B cell hyperresponsiveness, with frequent germinal center reactions, and gammaglobulinemia. A hallmark of SLE is the finding of IgG autoantibodies specific for dsDNA. The specificity of the Th cells that drive the expansion of anti-dsDNA B cells is unresolved. However, anti-microbial, anti-histone and anti-idiotype Th cell responses have been hypothesized to play a role. It has been entirely unclear if these seemingly disparate Th cell responses and hypotheses could be related or unified. Here we describe that H chain CDR3 idiotypes from IgG+ B cells of lupus mice have sequence similarities with both microbial and other self peptides, matched sequences were increased within the mutated CDR3 repertoire and when sequences were derived from lupus mice with expanded anti-dsDNA B cells. Analyses of histone sequences showed that particular histone peptides were similar to VDJ junctions. Moreover, lupus mice had Th cell responses towards histone peptides similar to anti-dsDNA CDR3 sequences. The results suggest that Th cell in lupus may have multiple cross-reactive specificities linked to the IgVH CDR3 Id-peptide sequences as well as similar DNA-associated protein motifs.

  7. The anti-dermatophyte activity of Zataria multiflora essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, M; HeidaryTabar, R; Mahdizadeh, E

    2017-06-01

    Dermtophytes are a group of pathogenic fungi and the major cause of dermatophytosis in humans and animals. Fighting dermatophytes by natural essential oils is one important issue in new researches. In this investigation, we evaluated the anti-dermatophyte activities of three samples of Z. multiflora essential oils against dermatophytes along with analysis of chemical compositions of the essential oils and their anti-elastase activities on elastase production in dermatophytes. Carvacrol (1.5-34.4%), thymol (25.8-41.2%), carvacrol methyl ether (1.9-28.3%) and p-cymene (2.3-8.3%) were the main components of Z. multiflora essential oils. Z. multiflora essential oils (100ppm) inhibited the mycelium growth of dermatophytes (6±1.7-47.0±1.4%) and had the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of 0.03-0.25μl/ml against dermatophytes. Essential oils inhibited elastase produced in dermatophytes and pure porcine elastase. Z. multiflora essential oils can be used as natural anti-dermatophyte agent for fighting dermatophytes in further preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities of sub fraction 18 of Melastoma malabathricum towards Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohazila M., H.; Nazlina, I.; Yaacob W., A.

    2014-09-01

    A study was carried out to isolate and identify the active compounds from Melastoma malabathricum stem bark that exhibit anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities against Streptococcus mutans. Purification of the active compounds from the stem bark extract was performed via silica gel chromatography to produce 12 fractions. Further fractionation of fraction 9 by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) produced 21 sub fractions. All the sub fractions were subjected to thin layer chromatography (TLC) bioautography as preliminary screening to determine anti bacterial activity. TLC-bioautography showed that sub fraction 18 (SF18) demonstrated large inhibited zone against S. mutans. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) was used to identify the active compounds in SF18. Fraction SF18 revealed 27 compounds such as hexanoic acid, 8-methyl-1-undecene, propanenitrile, and 1-decene. Anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities were determined using crystal violet and glass surface assays respectively. The concentrations that produced 50% reduction in anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities were 1.88 mg/ml and 3.75 mg/ml respectively.

  9. Synthesis, Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities of 3- Ethyl-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inflammatory activities. Results: ... series, and compared well with the reference standard, diclofenac sodium, which exbited analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of 62.04 ... and anti-inflammatory properties. The present work is an extension of ...

  10. Prokaryotic Selectivity, Anti-endotoxic Activity and Protease Stability of Diastereomeric and Enantiomeric Analogs of Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Lee, Bongju; Shin, Song Yub

    2012-01-01

    LL-37 is the only antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the human cathelicidin family. In addition to potent antimicrobial activity, LL-37 is known to have the potential to inhibit lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic effects. To provide the stability to proteolytic digestion and increase prokaryotic selectivity and/or anti-endotoxic activity of two Lys/Trp-substituted 19-meric anti-microbial peptides (a4-W1 and a4-W2) designed from IG-19 (residues 13-31 of LL-37), we synthesized the diastereomeric peptides (a4-W1-D and a4-W2-D) with D-amino acid substitution at positions 3, 7, 10, 13 and 17 of a4-W1 and a4-W2, respectively and the enantiomeric peptides (a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E) composed D-amino acids. The diastereomeric peptides exhibited the best prokaryotic selectivity and effective protease stability, but no or less anti-endotoxic activity. In contrast, the enantiomeric peptides had not only prokaryotic selectivity and anti-endotoxic activity but also protease stability. Our results suggest that the hydrophobicity and α-helicity of the peptide is important for anti-endotoxic activity. In particular, the enantiomeric peptides showed potent anti-endotoxic and LPS-neutralizing activities comparable to that of LL-37. Taken together, both a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E holds promise as a template for the development of peptide antibiotics for the treatment of endotoxic shock and sepsis

  11. Prokaryotic Selectivity, Anti-endotoxic Activity and Protease Stability of Diastereomeric and Enantiomeric Analogs of Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Lee, Bongju; Shin, Song Yub [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    LL-37 is the only antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the human cathelicidin family. In addition to potent antimicrobial activity, LL-37 is known to have the potential to inhibit lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic effects. To provide the stability to proteolytic digestion and increase prokaryotic selectivity and/or anti-endotoxic activity of two Lys/Trp-substituted 19-meric anti-microbial peptides (a4-W1 and a4-W2) designed from IG-19 (residues 13-31 of LL-37), we synthesized the diastereomeric peptides (a4-W1-D and a4-W2-D) with D-amino acid substitution at positions 3, 7, 10, 13 and 17 of a4-W1 and a4-W2, respectively and the enantiomeric peptides (a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E) composed D-amino acids. The diastereomeric peptides exhibited the best prokaryotic selectivity and effective protease stability, but no or less anti-endotoxic activity. In contrast, the enantiomeric peptides had not only prokaryotic selectivity and anti-endotoxic activity but also protease stability. Our results suggest that the hydrophobicity and α-helicity of the peptide is important for anti-endotoxic activity. In particular, the enantiomeric peptides showed potent anti-endotoxic and LPS-neutralizing activities comparable to that of LL-37. Taken together, both a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E holds promise as a template for the development of peptide antibiotics for the treatment of endotoxic shock and sepsis.

  12. ANTIOXIDANT, ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF GEORGIAN LEGUMINOUS CROPS CULTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhikvishvili, I; Mamniashvili, T; Gogia, N; Enukidze, M; Machavariani, M; Sanikidze, T

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the common in Georgia leguminous crops culture with pronounced antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activity. The primary evaluation of the antiinflammatory effects of beans was performed on the experimental models of MDCK and Jurkat cells model systems. Extracts of various varieties of legumes (Beans "Kidney", Meadow beans, Beans Shulavera, Batumian beans, Beans "Udelebi", green peas, peas Shulavera, lentils Lens Culinaris, Soy) were added to the intact or incubated under oxidative stress conditions Jurkat and MDCK cells. Cells' vitality was determined by MTT test. On the basis of analysis of the obtained results, we concluded that: - Meadow beans extract (low doses) revealed cytoprotective effect on the intact and incubated under oxidative stress conditions immune (Jurkat) and epithelial (MDCK) cells. High antioxidant, cytoprotective activity of this extract correlates with high polyphenols content in it. - The extract of Shulavera beans did affect the intact Jurkat and MDCK cells, but showed pronounced cytoprotective activity on these cells incubated under the oxidative stress conditions. High antioxidant, cytoprotective activity of this extract correlates with high content of polyphenols in it. - Low dose of lentils Lens Culinaris extracts revealed cytoprotective activity on the incubated under oxidative stress conditions MDCK cells, but was inactive in case of intact MDCK and incubated in different conditions immune Jurkat cells. The selective antioxidant activity of this extract is related with its other constituent components, but not polyphenols. - Despite high polyphenols content and high antioxidant activity in vivo, Batumian beans revealed moderate cytoprotective activity on intact and incubated under oxidative stress conditions Jurkat cells, suppressive activity on the intact MDCK cells and was inactive in relation to the incubated under oxidative stress conditions MDCK cells. Based on these findings, we can identify

  13. Benefits of Anti-Aging Actives in Sunscreens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Lintner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sunscreens are functional, utilitarian, cosmetic products. The criteria of purchase are different from those for skin care and make-up. Companies are trying to add glamour and value to basic sunscreens by incorporating “active” ingredients (other than UV filters into these formulas and by communicating about the additional benefits, be they anti-aging, moisturizing, firming, anti-wrinkle, etc. While some of these ideas of additional ingredients make sense as supplementary skin protection, some others do not afford much benefit in view of the infrequent application and short period of usage. The present article reviews some of these ideas and presents a few active ingredients that might be of value in such a context, even if substantiation of such additional claims in sunscreens is often lacking.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activity of Ouabain in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Ingrid Bezerra de Vasconcelos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase pump, was identified as an endogenous substance of human plasma. Ouabain has been studied for its ability to interfere with various regulatory mechanisms. Despite the studies portraying the ability of ouabain to modulate the immune response, little is known about the effect of this substance on the inflammatory process. The aim of this work was to study the effects triggered by ouabain on inflammation and nociceptive models. Ouabain produced a reduction in the mouse paw edema induced by carrageenan, compound 48/80 and zymosan. This anti-inflammatory potential might be related to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2, bradykinin, and mast-cell degranulation but not to histamine. Ouabain also modulated the inflammation induced by concanavalin A by inhibiting cell migration. Besides that, ouabain presented antinociceptive activity. Taken these data together, this work demonstrated, for the first time, that ouabain presented in vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  15. Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2012-11-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was investigated as an alternative to Nafion as an air cathode catalyst binder in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Cathodes were constructed around either stainless steel (SS) mesh or copper mesh using PDMS as both catalyst binder and diffusion layer, and compared to cathodes of the same structure having a Nafion binder. With PDMS binder, copper mesh cathodes produced a maximum power of 1710 ± 1 mW m -2, while SS mesh had a slightly lower power of 1680 ± 12 mW m -2, with both values comparable to those obtained with Nafion binder. Cathodes with PDMS binder had stable power production of 1510 ± 22 mW m -2 (copper) and 1480 ± 56 mW m -2 (SS) over 15 days at cycle 15, compared to a 40% decrease in power with the Nafion binder. Cathodes with the PDMS binder had lower total cathode impedance than those with Nafion. This is due to a large decrease in diffusion resistance, because hydrophobic PDMS effectively prevented catalyst sites from filling up with water, improving oxygen mass transfer. The cost of PDMS is only 0.23% of that of Nafion. These results showed that PDMS is a very effective and low-cost alternative to Nafion binder that will be useful for large scale construction of these cathodes for MFC applications. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Low doses of imatinib induce myelopoiesis and enhance host anti-microbial immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth J Napier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec inhibits Abl1, c-Kit, and related protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs and serves as a therapeutic for chronic myelogenous leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Imatinib also has efficacy against various pathogens, including pathogenic mycobacteria, where it decreases bacterial load in mice, albeit at doses below those used for treating cancer. We report that imatinib at such low doses unexpectedly induces differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors in the bone marrow, augments myelopoiesis but not lymphopoiesis, and increases numbers of myeloid cells in blood and spleen. Whereas progenitor differentiation relies on partial inhibition of c-Kit by imatinib, lineage commitment depends upon inhibition of other PTKs. Thus, imatinib mimics "emergency hematopoiesis," a physiological innate immune response to infection. Increasing neutrophil numbers by adoptive transfer sufficed to reduce mycobacterial load, and imatinib reduced bacterial load of Franciscella spp., which do not utilize imatinib-sensitive PTKs for pathogenesis. Thus, potentiation of the immune response by imatinib at low doses may facilitate clearance of diverse microbial pathogens.

  17. Low Doses of Imatinib Induce Myelopoiesis and Enhance Host Anti-microbial Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimm, Alyson; Giver, Cynthia R.; Harris, Wayne A. C.; Laval, Julie; Napier, Brooke A.; Patel, Gopi; Crump, Ryan; Peng, Zhenghong; Bornmann, William; Pulendran, Bali; Buller, R. Mark; Weiss, David S.; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Waller, Edmund K.; Kalman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) inhibits Abl1, c-Kit, and related protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and serves as a therapeutic for chronic myelogenous leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Imatinib also has efficacy against various pathogens, including pathogenic mycobacteria, where it decreases bacterial load in mice, albeit at doses below those used for treating cancer. We report that imatinib at such low doses unexpectedly induces differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors in the bone marrow, augments myelopoiesis but not lymphopoiesis, and increases numbers of myeloid cells in blood and spleen. Whereas progenitor differentiation relies on partial inhibition of c-Kit by imatinib, lineage commitment depends upon inhibition of other PTKs. Thus, imatinib mimics “emergency hematopoiesis,” a physiological innate immune response to infection. Increasing neutrophil numbers by adoptive transfer sufficed to reduce mycobacterial load, and imatinib reduced bacterial load of Franciscella spp., which do not utilize imatinib-sensitive PTKs for pathogenesis. Thus, potentiation of the immune response by imatinib at low doses may facilitate clearance of diverse microbial pathogens. PMID:25822986

  18. Chemical Profiling and Evaluation of Antioxidant and Anti-Microbial Properties of Selected Commercial Essential Oils: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo Luís

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The last decades have seen an increased awareness by the scientific community of the extent of resistance to conventional antibiotics, particularly with respect to the emerging multidrug-resistant pathogenic microbes. Additionally, natural antioxidants have received significant attention among food professionals and consumers because of their assumed safety and potential therapeutic value. The aim of this work was to assess the antioxidant activities of eight selected commercial essential oils (EOs, together with the evaluation of their antibacterial and anti-quorum sensing properties. Methods: The chemical profiling of the EOs was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. The antioxidant properties of the EOs were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging assay and by β-carotene bleaching test. Disc diffusion assays were employed to evaluate the anti-bacterial and anti-quorum sensing activities of the EOs. Results: It was observed that EOs from three Eucalyptus species are rich in eucalyptol. Generally, linalool is abundant in EOs from four Lavandula species. The oil of Cymbopogon citratus is the one with the best capacity to scavenge the DPPH free radicals and presented great antibacterial activity. Conclusions: The geographical origins of the plant species are determinant factors in the EO composition and in the corresponding biological activities.

  19. Synthesis and biological application of a new heterodinucleotide with both anti-HSV and anti-HIV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, P; Abu Sheikha, G; Cappellacci, L; Grifantini, M; Balestra, E; Perno, C F; Brandi, G; Rossi, L; Magnani, M

    1999-01-01

    A new antiviral drug with both anti-HSV and anti-HIV activity was synthesized by coupling Acyclovir and the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate (R)PMPA. The heterodinucleotide ACVpPMPA encapsulated into autologous erythrocytes was added to human macrophages providing an effective in vitro protection from HSV-1 and HIV-1 replication.

  20. Anti-Infective Activities of Lactobacillus Strains in the Human Intestinal Microbiota: from Probiotics to Gastrointestinal Anti-Infectious Biotherapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24696432

  1. Anti-infective activities of lactobacillus strains in the human intestinal microbiota: from probiotics to gastrointestinal anti-infectious biotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L

    2014-04-01

    A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract.

  2. [Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic activities of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate, in experimental animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Imazu, C; Ishii, K; Yokoyama, Y; Seto, Y; Kadokawa, T; Shimizu, M

    1982-08-01

    Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities of orally administered etofenamate, the diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, were investigated in experimental animals. Against acetic acid-induced vascular permeability in mice and ultra-violet light-induced erythema in guinea pigs, etofenamate produced a dose related inhibition at doses of 40--320 mg/kg and 5--20 mg/kg, respectively. In rats, felt-pellet-induced granuloma formation and adjuvant-induced arthritis were significantly inhibited by repeated administration of etofenamate at doses of 20 mg/kg/day for 5 days and 40 mg/kg/day for 21 days, respectively. Etofenamate showed an inhibitory activity on the squeak response caused by flexing and extending the silver nitrate-induced arthritic joint in rats; and it produced a dose related anti-writhing activity at doses of 50--300 mg/kg and 10--80 mg/kg in mice and rats, respectively, in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Etofenamate showed a significant anti-pyretic activity at doses of 0.2 mg/kg or more. These potencies of etofenamate were 0.5 to 1.6 times those of flufenamic acid. In particular, the anti-erythema, anti-arthritis, and anti-pyretic activities of etofenamate were approximately equivalent to or superior to those of flufenamic acid. From these results, it was suggested that etofenamate given orally, like other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, showed anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities in experimental animals.

  3. Spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity in an aged creosote-contaminated site

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Juottonen, Heli; Siivonen, Pauli; Lloret Quesada, Cosme; Tuomi, Pirjo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of polluted sites via in situ bioremediation relies heavily on the indigenous microbes and their activities. Spatial heterogeneity of microbial populations, contaminants and soil chemical parameters on such sites is a major hurdle in optimizing and implementing an appropriate bioremediation regime. We performed a grid-based sampling of an aged creosote-contaminated site followed by geostatistical modelling to illustrate the spatial patterns of microbial diversity and activity and ...

  4. Investigations on abundance and activity of microbial sponge symbionts using quantitative real - time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumala, Lars; Hentschel, Ute; Bayer, Kristina

    Marine sponges are hosts to dense and diverse microbial consortia that are likely to play a key role in the metabolic processes of the host sponge due to their enormous abundance. Common symbioses between nitrogen transforming microorganisms and sponges indicate complex nitrogen cycling within...... the host. Of particular interest is determining the community structure and function of microbial symbionts in order to gain deeper insight into host-symbiont interactions. We investigated the abundance and activity of microbial symbionts in two Mediterranean sponge species using quantitative real-time PCR....... An absolute quantification of functional genes and transcripts in archaeal and bacterial symbionts was conducted to determine their involvement in nitrification and denitrification, comparing the low microbial abundance (LMA) sponge Dysidea avara with the high microbial abundance (HMA) representative Aplysina...

  5. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Barettin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond Ø. Jørgensen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present novel bioactivity for barettin isolated from the marine sponge Geodia barretti. We found that barettin showed strong antioxidant activity in biochemical assays as well as in a lipid peroxidation cell assay. A de-brominated synthetic analogue of barettin did not show the same activity in the antioxidant cell assay, indicating that bromine is important for cellular activity. Barettin was also able to inhibit the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα from LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. This combination of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities could indicate that barettin has an atheroprotective effect and may therefore be an interesting product to prevent development of atherosclerosis.

  6. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of barettin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Karianne F; Hansen, Espen; Østerud, Bjarne; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik; Bayer, Annette; Engqvist, Magnus; Leszczak, Kinga; Jørgensen, Trond Ø; Andersen, Jeanette H

    2013-07-22

    In this paper, we present novel bioactivity for barettin isolated from the marine sponge Geodia barretti. We found that barettin showed strong antioxidant activity in biochemical assays as well as in a lipid peroxidation cell assay. A de-brominated synthetic analogue of barettin did not show the same activity in the antioxidant cell assay, indicating that bromine is important for cellular activity. Barettin was also able to inhibit the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα from LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. This combination of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities could indicate that barettin has an atheroprotective effect and may therefore be an interesting product to prevent development of atherosclerosis.

  7. Mild salinization stimulated glyphosate degradation and microbial activities in a riparian soil from Chongming Island, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changming; Shen, Shuo; Wang, Mengmeng; Li, Jianhua

    2013-04-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of simulated saltwater treatment with different percentages of artificial seawater on degradation dynamics of herbicide glyphosate and microbial activities in a riparian soil in Chongming Island, China. The results showed that 10% seawater treatment showed significantly enhancing effects on degradation efficiency of glyphosate with the lowest residual concentration among all the treatments. However, glyphosate degradation was markedly decreased in the riparian soil with 20% and 50% seawater treatments. The half-lives for 20% and 50% seawater treatments were prolonged by 12.1 and 39.0%, respectively, as compared to control. Microbial investigation indicated that 10% seawater treatment significantly stimulated microbial activities in the glyphosate-spiked riparian soil throughout the incubation period. At 42 day of incubation experiment, flourescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis rate, microbial adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and basal soil respiration (BSR) in the glyphosate-spiked riparian soil with 10% seawater were 59.2, 42.5 and 31.8% higher than those with no saltwater treatment, respectively. In contrast, saltwater treatment with 50% seawater significantly inhibited microbial activities. Especially, FDA hydrolysis rate, microbial ATP and BSR were decreased by 66.4, 58.6 and 66.8%, respectively, as compared to control. The results indicate that levels of simulated saltwater can exert variable effects on herbicide degradation dynamics and microbial parameters in the riparian soil.

  8. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiluo eCao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of ammonia oxidizing archaea in different habitats (water versus sediment potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep.

  9. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Huiluo

    2015-07-21

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep.

  10. Phosphorus fractions, microbial biomass and enzyme activities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... Hedley MJ, Stewart JWB, Chauhan BS (1982). Changes in inorganic and organic soil phosphorus fractions induced by cultivation practices and by laboratory incubations. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 46: 970-976. Joergensen RG, Kubler H, Meyer B, Wolters V (1995). Microbial biomass phosphorus in soils of beech ...

  11. Effect of different fertilizers on the microbial activity and productivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-18

    Jul 18, 2011 ... 34(3): 473-480. Anderson JPE, Domasch KH (1958). A physiological method for the quantitative measurement of microbial biomas in soil. Soil Boil. Biochem. 10: 215-221. Ayoola OT, Adeniyan ON (2006). Influence of poultry manure and NPK fertilizer on yield and yield components of crops under different.

  12. Production of microbial glycolipid biosurfactants and their antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial glycolipids produced by bacteria or yeast as secondary metabolites, such as sophorolipids (SLs), rhamnolipids (RLs) and mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are “green” biosurfactants desirable in a bioeconomy. High cost of production is a major hurdle toward widespread commercial use of bios...

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hsiung Pan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating epidemiological and clinical evidence shows that inflammation is an important risk factor for various human diseases. Thus, suppressing chronic inflammation has the potential to delay, prevent, and control various chronic diseases, including cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, joint, skin, pulmonary, blood, lymph, liver, pancreatic, and intestinal diseases. Various natural products from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM have been shown to safely suppress proinflammatory pathways and control inflammation-associated disease. In vivo and/or in vitro studies have demonstrated that anti-inflammatory effects of TCM occur by inhibition of the expression of master transcription factors (for example, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, pro-inflammatory cytokines (for example, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, chemokines (for example, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL-24, intercellular adhesion molecule expression and pro-inflammatory mediators (for example, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2. However, a handful of review articles have focused on the anti-inflammatory activities of TCM and explore their possible mechanisms of action. In this review, we summarize recent research attempting to identify the anti-inflammatory constituents of TCM and their molecular targets that may create new opportunities for innovation in modern pharmacology.

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of electron-deficient organometallics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwen; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Shang, Lijun; Barry, Nicolas P E

    2017-11-01

    We report an evaluation of the cytotoxicity of a series of electron-deficient (16-electron) half-sandwich precious metal complexes of ruthenium, osmium and iridium ([Os/Ru( η 6 - p -cymene)(1,2-dicarba- closo -dodecarborane-1,2-dithiolato)] ( 1/2 ), [Ir( η 5 -pentamethylcyclopentadiene)(1,2-dicarba- closo -dodecarborane-1,2-dithiolato)] ( 3 ), [Os/Ru( η 6 - p -cymene)(benzene-1,2-dithiolato)] ( 4/5 ) and [Ir( η 5 -pentamethylcyclopentadiene)(benzene-1,2-dithiolato)] ( 6 )) towards RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and MRC-5 fibroblast cells. Complexes 3 and 6 were found to be non-cytotoxic. The anti-inflammatory activity of 1-6 was evaluated in both cell lines after nitric oxide (NO) production and inflammation response induced by bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the stimulus. All metal complexes were shown to exhibit dose-dependent inhibitory effects on LPS-induced NO production on both cell lines. Remarkably, the two iridium complexes 3 and 6 trigger a full anti-inflammatory response against LPS-induced NO production, which opens up new avenues for the development of non-cytotoxic anti-inflammatory drug candidates with distinct structures and solution chemistry from that of organic drugs, and as such with potential novel mechanisms of action.

  15. Anti-Obesity Activity of the Marine Carotenoid Fucoxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the global tendency towards physical activity reduction and an augmented dietary intake of fats, sugars and calories is leading to a growing propagation of overweight, obesity and lifestyle-related diseases, such diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome. In particular, obesity, characterized as a state of low-level inflammation, is a powerful determinant both in the development of insulin resistance and in the progression to type 2 diabetes. A few molecular targets offer hope for anti-obesity therapeutics. One of the keys to success could be the induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 in abdominal white adipose tissue (WAT and the regulation of cytokine secretions from both abdominal adipose cells and macrophage cells infiltrated into adipose tissue. Anti-obesity effects of fucoxanthin, a characteristic carotenoid, exactly belonging to xanthophylls, have been reported. Nutrigenomic studies reveal that fucoxanthin induces UCP1 in abdominal WAT mitochondria, leading to the oxidation of fatty acids and heat production in WAT. Fucoxanthin improves insulin resistance and decreases blood glucose levels through the regulation of cytokine secretions from WAT. The key structure of anti-obesity effect is suggested to be the carotenoid end of the polyene chromophore, which contains an allenic bond and two hydroxyl groups. Fucoxanthin, which can be isolated from edible brown seaweeds, recently displayed its many physiological functions and biological properties. We reviewed recent studies and this article aims to explain essential background of fucoxanthin, focusing on its promising potential anti-obesity effects. In this respect, fucoxanthin can be developed into promising marine drugs and nutritional products, in order to become a helpful functional food.

  16. The PDB database is a rich source of alpha-helical anti-microbial peptides to combat disease causing pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Phu, My; de Morais, Tâmara Prado; Nascimento, Rafael; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Rao, Basuthkar J; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of α-helical anti-microbial peptides (AH-AMP) to combat pathogens is fast gaining prominence. Based on recently published open access software for characterizing α-helical peptides (PAGAL), we elucidate a search methodology (SCALPEL) that leverages the massive structural data pre-existing in the PDB database to obtain AH-AMPs belonging to the host proteome. We provide in vitro validation of SCALPEL on plant pathogens ( Xylella fastidiosa, Xanthomonas arboricola and Liberibacter crescens) by identifying AH-AMPs that mirror the function and properties of cecropin B, a well-studied AH-AMP. The identified peptides include a linear AH-AMP present within the existing structure of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC20), and an AH-AMP mimicing the properties of the two α-helices of cecropin B from chitinase (CHITI25). The minimum inhibitory concentration of these peptides are comparable to that of cecropin B, while anionic peptides used as control failed to show any inhibitory effect on these pathogens. Substitute therapies in place of conventional chemotherapies using membrane permeabilizing peptides like these might also prove effective to target cancer cells. The use of native structures from the same organism could possibly ensure that administration of such peptides will be better tolerated and not elicit an adverse immune response. We suggest a similar approach to target Ebola epitopes, enumerated using PAGAL recently, by selecting suitable peptides from the human proteome, especially in wake of recent reports of cationic amphiphiles inhibiting virus entry and infection.

  17. The anti-microbial peptide SR-0379 stimulates human endothelial progenitor cell-mediated repair of peripheral artery diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Wook; Heo, Soon Chul; Kwon, Yang Woo; Park, Gyu Tae; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Seung-Chul; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Jae Ho

    2017-10-01

    Ischemia is a serious disease, characterized by an inadequate blood supply to an organ or part of the body. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of the anti-microbial peptide SR-0379 on the stem cell-mediated therapy of ischemic diseases. The migratory and tube-forming abilities of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were enhanced by treatment with SR-0379 in vitro. Intramuscular administration of SR-0379 into a murine ischemic hindlimb significantly enhanced blood perfusion, decreased tissue necrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels in the ischemic muscle. Moreover, co-administration of SR-0379 with EPCs stimulated blood perfusion in an ischemic hindlimb more than intramuscular injection with either SR-0379 or EPCs alone. This enhanced blood perfusion was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of CD31- and α-SMApositive blood vessels in ischemic hindlimb. These results suggest that SR-0379 is a potential drug candidate for potentiating EPC-mediated therapy of ischemic diseases. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(10): 504-509].

  18. Involvement of Relish gene from Macrobrachium rosenbergii in the expression of anti-microbial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Ru; Jin, Min; Ma, Fu-Tong; Huang, Ying; Huang, Xin; Feng, Jin-Ling; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yi-Hong; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    Relish is an NF-kB transcription factor involved in immune-deficiency (IMD) signal pathway. In this study, a Relish gene (MrRelish) was identified from Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The full length of MrRelish comprises 5072 bp, including a 3510 bp open reading frame encoding a 1169 bp amino acid protein. MrRelish contains a Rel homology domain (RHD), a nucleus localization signal, an IκB-like domain (6 ankyrin repeats), and a death domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrRelish and other Relish from crustaceans belong to one group. MrRelish was expressed in all detected tissues, with the highest expression level in hemocytes and intestines. MrRelish was also upregulated in hepatopancreas at 6 h after Vibrio anguillarum challenge. The over-expression of MrRelish could induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), such as Drosophila Metchnikowin (Mtk), Attacin (Atta), Drosomycin (Drs), and Cecropin (CecA) and shrimp Penaeidin (Pen4). The RNAi of MrRelish in gills showed that the expression of crustin (cru) 2, Cru5, Cru8, lysozyme (Lyso) 1, and Lyso2 was inhibited. However, the expression of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) 1 and ALF3 did not change when MrRelish was knocked down. These results indicate that MrRelish may play an important role in innate immune defense against V. anguillarum in M. rosenbergii. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of wound healing, anti-microbial and antioxidant potential of Pongamia pinnata in wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Dwivedi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Increased wound contraction and tensile strength, augmented hydroxyproline and hexosamine content, antioxidative activity and moderate antimicrobial activity support the early wound healing exhibited by P. pinnata. Induction in cytokine production may be one of the mechanisms in accelerating the wound healing. Results suggest that P. pinnata may be useful in tropical management of wound healing.

  20. Differential sensitivity of total and active soil microbial communities to drought and forest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Felipe; Torres, Irene F; Andrés-Abellán, Manuela; Baldrian, Petr; López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Větrovský, Tomáš; Richnow, Hans H; Starke, Robert; Ondoño, Sara; García, Carlos; López-Serrano, Francisco R; Jehmlich, Nico

    2017-10-01

    Climate change will affect semiarid ecosystems through severe droughts that increase the competition for resources in plant and microbial communities. In these habitats, adaptations to climate change may consist of thinning-that reduces competition for resources through a decrease in tree density and the promotion of plant survival. We deciphered the functional and phylogenetic responses of the microbial community to 6 years of drought induced by rainfall exclusion and how forest management affects its resistance to drought, in a semiarid forest ecosystem dominated by Pinus halepensis Mill. A multiOMIC approach was applied to reveal novel, community-based strategies in the face of climate change. The diversity and the composition of the total and active soil microbiome were evaluated by 16S rRNA gene (bacteria) and ITS (fungal) sequencing, and by metaproteomics. The microbial biomass was analyzed by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), and the microbially mediated ecosystem multifunctionality was studied by the integration of soil enzyme activities related to the cycles of C, N, and P. The microbial biomass and ecosystem multifunctionality decreased in drought-plots, as a consequence of the lower soil moisture and poorer plant development, but this decrease was more notable in unthinned plots. The structure and diversity of the total bacterial community was unaffected by drought at phylum and order level, but did so at genus level, and was influenced by seasonality. However, the total fungal community and the active microbial community were more sensitive to drought and were related to ecosystem multifunctionality. Thinning in plots without drought increased the active diversity while the total diversity was not affected. Thinning promoted the resistance of ecosystem multifunctionality to drought through changes in the active microbial community. The integration of total and active microbiome analyses avoids misinterpretations of the links between the soil microbial

  1. Soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in sea-buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides plantation at different ages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the impact of forest age and season on the soil microbial community and enzyme activities in sea-buckthorn plantation system and to determine the relative contributions to soil microbial properties. Soil sampling was carried out in the dry season (April and wet season (September in four areas, including: abandoned farmland (NH, an 8-year- old plantation (young plantation, 8Y, a 13-year-old plantation (middle-aged plantation, 13Y, and an 18-year-old plantation (mature plantation, 18Y. The results showed that forest age and season have a significant effect on soil microbial community structure and enzyme activities. The total, bacterial, fungal, Gram-negative (G+, and Gram-positive (G- PLFAs increased gradually with forest age, with the highest values detected in 18Y. All the detected enzyme activities showed the trend as a consequence of forest age. The microbial PLFAs and soil enzyme activities were higher in the wet season than the dry season. However, there were no significant interactions between forest age and season. A Correlation analysis suggested that soil microbial communities and enzyme activities were significantly and positively correlated with pH, total nitrogen (TN and available phosphorus (AP. Season had a stronger influence on soil microbial communities than forest age. In general, sea-buckthorn plantations establishment might be a potential tool for maintaining and increasing soil fertility in arid and semi-arid regions.

  2. Pharmacological screening of plants recommended by folk medicine as anti-snake venom: I. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina M. Ruppelt

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available We have observed that several plants used popularly as anti-snake venom show anti-inflammatory activity. From the list prepared by Rizzini, Mors and Pereira some species have been selected and tested for analgesic activity (number of contortions and anti-inflammatory activity (Evans blue dye diffusion - 1% solution according to Whittle's technique (intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 N-acetic acid 0.1 ml/10 g in mice. Previous oral administration of a 10% infusion (dry plant or 20% (fresh plant corresponding to 1 or 2 g/Kg of Apuleia leiocarpa, Casearia sylvestris, Brunfelsia uniflora, Chiococca brachiata, Cynara scolymus, Dorstenia brasiliensis, Elephantopus scaber, Marsypianthes chamaedrys, Mikania glomerata and Trianosperma tayuya demonstrated analgesic and/or anti-inflammatory activities of varied intensity

  3. Effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles on nitrogen removal, microbial activity and microbial community of CANON process in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Nan; Fu, Haoqiang; Chen, Tao; Liu, Sa; Zheng, Shuhua; Zhang, Jie

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) was adopted for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) was step-wise increased to analyze the influence on nitrogen removal, microbial activity and microbial communities. Finally ZnO NPs was removed to study its recovery capability. The bioactivities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were detected by batch experiments. Results showed that the ZnO NPs with low concentration (≤5mgL -1 ) was profitable for nitrogen removal while the high concentration performed inhibition, and it lowered the abundance of both AOB and NOB while enhanced that of AAOB. ZnO NPs with high concentration (≥10mgL -1 ) suppressed both AOB and AAOB, and long-term exposure within ZnO NPs led to microbial diversity decrease. The inhibition threshold of ZnO NPs on CANON process was 10mgL -1 , and the profitable concentration was 1mgL -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of plasma-polymerized 4-vinyl pyridine with silver nanoparticies on poly(ethylene terephthalate) film for anti-microbial properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, J.; Winther-Jensen, Bjørn; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2006-01-01

    4-vinyl pyridine was polymerized on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film by using lower energy pulsed AC plasma under low pressure in Ar atmosphere. The plasma polymerized coating was characterized by ATR Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission...... scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Different thicknesses Of poly(4-vinyl pyridine) coating under different plasma polymerization conditions were studied. Silver nanoparticles with diameter around 50nm deposit were precipitated...... on the poly(4-vinyl pyridine) coating by UV irradiation in Silver nitride water solution, in order to enhance the anti-microbial properties. Different kinds of modified PET films were tested for anti-microbial properties against yeast (Debaryomyces hansenii) by using microbiological analyser mu-4200...

  5. Anti-implantation activity of some indigenous plants in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A O; Saxena, V; Shukla, S; Tewari, R K; Mathur, S; Gupta, A; Sharma, S; Mathur, R

    1985-01-01

    Various extracts of one hundred and eight medicinal plants were screened for their anti-implantation activity in female albino rats. Out of these, 50% ethanolic extract of Codonospis ovata Benth (PL); 50% ethanolic, acetone and benzene extracts of Puararia tuberosa DC (TUB); aqueous and methanolic extracts of Punica granatum Linn. (PX) and ethanolic and acetone extracts of Rubus ellipiticus Smith (PX) inhibited pregnancy in 70-90% of rats. Similarly ethanolic extract of Adhatoda vasica Nees (LF) and Kigelia pinnata DC (PL); ethanolic and acetone extracts of Acrostichum aureum Linn. (PL), Juniperus communis Linn. (SD), Lepidium capitatum H.f. & T. (PL); ethanolic and benzene extracts of Citrulus colocynthus Schrad (LF) and acetone extract of Codonopsis ovata Benth (PL) showed 60-70% anti-implantation activity. Extracts of a few plants VIZ. Dolichos biflorus Linn. (SD), Ferule orientalis Linn. (PL), Nerium odoratum Lamk (RT), Randia dumetorum Lamk (SD) and Ruta graveolens Linn. (PL) could inhibit pregnancy in 50-60% of rats. The rest of the plants were either inactive or showed insignificant antifertility activity.

  6. Effects of ozonation on disinfection and microbial activity in waste activated sludge for land application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Hong, Jun-Seok; Lim, Byung-Ran

    2003-07-01

    Effects of ozonation on microbial biomass activity and community structure in waste activated sludges from various treatment plants were investigated. The densities of viable cells and microbial community structure in the sludges treated with ozone at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 gO{sub 3}/gDS were measured on the basis of the respiratory quinone profile and LIVE/DEAD Backlight(TM). The results from the bacterial concentration and quinone profiles of the waste activated sludge showed that respiratory activities of microorganisms were detected at the ozone dose of 0.4 gO{sub 3}/gDS. However, fecal coliform, fecal streptococcus and Salmonella sp. in the ozonized sludge were not detected. This result implies that some microorganisms might be more tolerant to ozonation than the pathogenic indicators. The pathogens reduction requirements for Class A biosolids were still met by the ozonation at 0.4 gO{sub 3}/gDS.

  7. Anti-bacterial activity of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: comparative in vitro study of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, and azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mombo-Ngoma Ghyslain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Increasing drug resistance necessitates the urgent evaluation of alternative drugs. Currently, the most promising candidates in clinical development are mefloquine and azithromycin. Besides the anti-malarial activity, SP is also a potent antibiotic and incurs significant anti-microbial activity when given as IPTp - though systematic clinical evaluation of this action is still lacking. Methods In this study, the intrinsic anti-bacterial activity of mefloquine and azithromycin was assessed in comparison to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine against bacterial pathogens with clinical importance in pregnancy in a standard microdilution assay. Results SP was highly active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. All tested Gram-positive bacteria, except Enterococcus faecalis, were sensitive to azithromycin. Additionally, azithromycin was active against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Mefloquine showed good activity against pneumococci but lower in vitro action against all other tested pathogens. Conclusion These data indicate important differences in the spectrum of anti-bacterial activity for the evaluated anti-malarial drugs. Given the large scale use of IPTp in Africa, the need for prospective clinical trials evaluating the impact of antibiotic activity of anti-malarials on maternal and foetal health and on the risk of promoting specific drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  8. In vitro anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activity of leaf and fruit extracts from Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landa, Přemysl; Skálová, L.; Boušová, I.; Kutil, Zsófia; Langhansová, Lenka; Lou, J.D.; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2014), s. 103-106 ISSN 1011-601X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08070 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : anti-proliferative activity * anti-inflammatory activity * breast cancer Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.682, year: 2014 http://www.pjps.pk/wp- content /uploads/pdfs/27/1/Paper-15.pdf

  9. Extracellular enzyme activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Winding, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular enzyme activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity Niels Bohse Hendriksen, Anne Winding. Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark Soils provide numerous essential ecosystem services such as carbon cycling...... awareness of the threats to soil and the ecosystem services has fostered the need for a thorough understanding of soil functions and activities. Soils are very species-rich and show great functional heterogeneity. While molecular analysis of gene expression is developing, simple and inexpensive indicators......, recycling of nutrients and waste, soil remediation, plant growth support and regulation of above ground biodiversity, resilience, and soil suppressiveness. As such, soil ecosystem services are beneficial and vital for human life and at the same time threatened by anthropogenic activities. Increasing...

  10. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities of olmesartan medoxomil ameliorate experimental colitis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagib, Marwa M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Misr International University, Cairo (Egypt); Tadros, Mariane G., E-mail: mirogeogo@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); ELSayed, Moushira I. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Misr International University, Cairo (Egypt); Khalifa, Amani E. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-08-15

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) driven through altered immune responses with production of proinflammatory cytokines. Many therapies are used, but side effects and loss of response limit long-term effectiveness. New therapeutic strategies are thus needed for patients who don't respond to current treatments. Recently, there is suggested involvement of the proinflammatory hormone angiotensin II in inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM-M), an angiotensin II receptor blocker in ameliorating ulcerative colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in drinking water for 5 days. OLM-M (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) was administered orally during 21 days prior to the induction of colitis, and for 5 days after. Sulfasalazine (500 mg/kg) was used as reference drug. All animals were tested for changes in colon length, disease activity index (DAI) and microscopic damage. Colon tissue concentration/activity of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α), myeloperoxidase (MPO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed. Results showed that the OLM-M dose-dependently ameliorated the colonic histopathological and biochemical injuries, an effect that is comparable or even better than that of the standard sulfasalazine. These results suggest that olmesartan medoxomil may be effective in the treatment of UC through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. - Highlights: • Olmesartan medoximil reduced dextran sodium sulphate- induced colitis. • Mechanism involved anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects dose- dependently. • It suppressed malondialdehyde and restored reduced glutathione levels. • It reduced inflammatory markers levels and histological changes.

  11. Nutrient limitation of soil microbial activity during the earliest stages of ecosystem development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Sarah C; Sullivan, Benjamin W; Knelman, Joseph; Hood, Eran; Nemergut, Diana R; Schmidt, Steven K; Cleveland, Cory C

    2017-11-01

    A dominant paradigm in ecology is that plants are limited by nitrogen (N) during primary succession. Whether generalizable patterns of nutrient limitation are also applicable to metabolically and phylogenetically diverse soil microbial communities, however, is not well understood. We investigated if measures of N and phosphorus (P) pools inform our understanding of the nutrient(s) most limiting to soil microbial community activities during primary succession. We evaluated soil biogeochemical properties and microbial processes using two complementary methodological approaches-a nutrient addition microcosm experiment and extracellular enzyme assays-to assess microbial nutrient limitation across three actively retreating glacial chronosequences. Microbial respiratory responses in the microcosm experiment provided evidence for N, P and N/P co-limitation at Easton Glacier, Washington, USA, Puca Glacier, Peru, and Mendenhall Glacier, Alaska, USA, respectively, and patterns of nutrient limitation generally reflected site-level differences in soil nutrient availability. The activities of three key extracellular enzymes known to vary with soil N and P availability developed in broadly similar ways among sites, increasing with succession and consistently correlating with changes in soil total N pools. Together, our findings demonstrate that during the earliest stages of soil development, microbial nutrient limitation and activity generally reflect soil nutrient supply, a result that is broadly consistent with biogeochemical theory.

  12. Microbial activity of soil cultivated with corn in association with weeds under different fertility management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Melo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between weeds and soil microorganisms can give them a competitive advantage over crops. This study assessed the biomass and microbial activity of soil cultivated with weeds and corn (Zea mays L. in monoculture and in competition under different fertility management systems. The experiment considered four soil fertility management systems (calcium and magnesium silicate + fertilization; limestone + fertilization; no correction source + fertilization; no correction source + no fertilization and 12 crops (five competition arrangements between corn and weeds Urochloa brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich. R.D. Webster, lpomoea grandifolia (Dammer O'Donell, Conyza canadensis (L. Cronquist, Hyptis suaveolens (L. Poit., and Bidens pilosa L. plus the six species in monoculture and bare soil. After 60 d coexisting in a greenhouse, soil samples were collected to determine microbial biomass, respiration rate, and metabolic quotient. Soils cultivated with B. pilosa and Z. mays+U. brizantha showed higher microbial biomass. Cultivation of B. pilosa and Z. mays+H. suaveolens provided greater energy efficiency to maintain microbial cells. Biomass and microbial activity were altered by plant species, coexistence, and soil fertility management. Calcium and magnesium silicate, as well as limestone similarly influenced biomass and respiration rate of soil cultivated with most species. For some crops, the Si source was better than limestone to promote lower specific activity of the edaphic microbiota. The change in the microbial activity of soil can be a strategy used by the species to minimize the effects of competition.

  13. Qualitative screening of veterinary anti-microbial agents in tissues, milk, and eggs of food-producing animals using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Yu, Jie; Tao, Yanfei; Pan, Yuanhu; Xie, Shuyu; Huang, Lingli; Peng, Dapeng; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-04-01

    A method for the analysis of 120 drugs in animal derived food was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These analytes belong to 12 families of veterinary anti-microbial agents (quinolones, macrolides, β-lactams, nitroimidazoles, sulfonamides, lincomycines, chloramphenicols, quinoxalines, tetracyclines, polypeptides, and antibacterial synergists) as well as other compounds not assigned to a particular drug family. The animal derived food samples include muscle and liver of swine, bovine, sheep, and chicken, as well as hen eggs and dairy milk. The sample preparation included ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) with acetonitrile-water and a final clean-up with auto solid-phase extraction (SPE) on HLB cartridges. The detection and quantification of 120 anti-microbial agents was performed using LC-MS/MS in positive and negative ion mode. The chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid as the mobile phase. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of all drugs in food-producing animals were 0.5-3.0μg/kg and 1.5-10.0μg/kg, respectively. The developed method was successfully utilized to monitor real samples, which demonstrated that it is a simple, fast, and robust method, and could be used as a regulatory to screen for the presence of residues from veterinary anti-microbial drugs in animal-derived foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti - microbial resistance stratified by risk factor among Escherichia coli strains isolated from the urinary tract at a rural clinic in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The failure of empirical therapy is frequently observed, even in community-acquired urinary tract infections. We, therefore, conducted a prospective, clinic-based study in 2004-2005 to document anti-microbial resistance rates and correlate them with possible risk factors to assist empirical decision-making. Materials and Methods: Symptomatic patients with pyuria underwent urine culture. Isolates were identified using standard methods and anti-microbial resistance was determined by disk-diffusion. Ultrasonography was used to detect complicating factors. Patients were stratified by the presence of complicating factors and history of invasive procedures for comparison of resistance rates. Statistical Method Used: Chi-square or Fisher exact tests, as appropriate. Results: There were 156 E. coli isolates, of which 105 were community-acquired. Twenty-three community-acquired isolates were from patients with complicating factors while 82 were from patients without any. Fifty-one isolates were from patients who had recently undergone invasive procedures on the urinary tract. Thirty-two community-acquired isolates from reproductive-age women without apparent complicating factors had resistance rates of 50% or above against tetracyclines, Co-trimoxazole, aminopenicillins, Nalidixic acid, Ciprofloxacin and 1 st generation cephalosporins. Resistance rates were significantly higher among isolates from patients subjected to invasive procedures, except against Co-trimoxazole, tetracyclines and Amikacin. Conclusion: High rates of anti-microbial resistance in community-acquired uropathogens have made antimicrobial sensitivity testing necessary even in a rural, primary-care setting.

  15. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Chi H.J. Kao; Amalini C. Jesuthasan; Karen S. Bishop; Marcus P. Glucina; Lynnette R. Ferguson

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides bei...

  16. Metaproteomics: extracting and mining proteome information to characterize metabolic activities in microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Paul E [ORNL; Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Xiong, Weili [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary microbial ecology studies usually employ one or more omics approaches to investigate the structure and function of microbial communities. Among these, metaproteomics aims to characterize the metabolic activities of the microbial membership, providing a direct link between the genetic potential and functional metabolism. The successful deployment of metaproteomics research depends on the integration of high-quality experimental and bioinformatic techniques for uncovering the metabolic activities of a microbial community in a way that is complementary to other meta-omic approaches. The essential, quality-defining informatics steps in metaproteomics investigations are: (1) construction of the metagenome, (2) functional annotation of predicted protein-coding genes, (3) protein database searching, (4) protein inference, and (5) extraction of metabolic information. In this article, we provide an overview of current bioinformatic approaches and software implementations in metaproteome studies in order to highlight the key considerations needed for successful implementation of this powerful community-biology tool.

  17. Melatonin as an Anti-Inflammatory Agent Modulating Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Favero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation may be defined as the innate response to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, injury, and metabolic stress; its ultimate function is to restore the physiological homeostatic state. The exact aetiology leading to the development of inflammation is not known, but a combination of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of many inflammation-related clinical conditions. Recent studies suggest that the pathogenesis of different inflammatory diseases also involves the inflammasomes, intracellular multiprotein complexes that mediate activation of inflammatory caspases thereby inducing the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine, is considered an important multitasking molecule with fundamental clinical applications. It is involved in mood modulation, sexual behavior, vasomotor control, and immunomodulation and influences energy metabolism; moreover, it acts as an oncostatic and antiaging molecule. Melatonin is an important antioxidant and also a widespread anti-inflammatory molecule, modulating both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in different pathophysiological conditions. This review, first, gives an overview concerning the growing importance of melatonin in the inflammatory-mediated pathological conditions and, then, focuses on its roles and its protective effects against the activation of the inflammasomes and, in particular, of the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  18. In vitro anticancer activity of microbial isolates from diverse habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Treasa Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from natural products, especially microorganisms, have served as a valuable source of diverse molecules in many drug discovery efforts and led to the discovery of several important drugs. Identification of microbial strains having promising biological activities and purifying the bio-molecules responsible for the activities, have led to the discovery of many bioactive molecules. Extracellular, as well as intracellular, extracts of the metabolites of thirty-six bacterial and twenty-four fungal isolates, grown under unusual conditions such as high temperature, high salt and low sugar concentrations, were in vitro tested for their cytotoxic potential on various cancer cell lines. The extracts were screened on HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines to study the cytotoxic potential. Nuclear staining and flow cytometric studies were carried out to assess the potential of the extracts in arresting the cell cycle. The crude ethylacetate extract of isolate F-21 showed promising results by MTT assay with IC50 as low as 20.37±0.36 µg/mL on HeLa, and 44.75±0.81 µg/mL on MCF-7 cells, comparable with Cisplatin. The isolate F-21 was identified as Aspergillus sp. Promising results were also obtained with B-2C and B-4E strains. Morphological studies, biochemical tests and preliminary chemical investigation of the extracts were also carried out.Extratos de produtos naturais, especialmente de microrganismos, constituíram-se em fonte valiosa de diversas moléculas em muitas descobertas de fármacos e levaram à descoberta de fármacos importantes. A identificação de espécies microbianas que apresentam atividade biológica e a purificação de biomoléculas responsáveis pelas atividades levou à descoberta de muitas moléculas bioativas. Extratos extracelulares tanto quanto intracelulares de metabólitos de 36 isolados de bactérias e 24 isolados de fungos, que cresceram sob condições não usuais, como alta temperatura, alta concentração de sal e baixa

  19. 76 FR 69204 - Anti-Money Laundering Program and Suspicious Activity Reporting Requirements for Housing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... 1506-AB14 Anti-Money Laundering Program and Suspicious Activity Reporting Requirements for Housing... enterprises as financial institutions for the purpose of requiring them to establish anti-money laundering... organizations to establish anti-money laundering programs and report suspicious activities is intended to help...

  20. GC-MS analysis, evaluation of phytochemicals, anti-oxidant, thrombolytic and anti-inflammatory activities of Exacum bicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appaji Mahesh Ashwini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the GC-MS analysis, phytochemical screening, anti-oxidant, thrombolytic and anti-inflammatory activities of methanol extract of leaves of Exacum bicolor. FTIR analysis confirmed the presence of alcohol, phenols, alkanes, aromatic compounds, aldehyde and ethers. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of eight phyto-constituents. The total phenol, flavonoid and alkaloid contents were 18.0 ± 0.2 mg/GAE/g, 13.1 ± 0.4 mg QE/g and 108.0 ± 1.2 mg AE/g respectively. The DPPH assay exhibited potent anti-oxidant abilities with IC50 8.8 µg/mL. Significant thrombolytic activity was demonstrated by clot lysis method (45.1 ± 0.8%. The methanol extract showed significant membrane stabilization on human red blood cell with IC50 value of 37.4 µg/mL. There was a significant correlation (R2>0.98 with total phenolic content versus anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. The above results confirmed that E. bicolor could be a promising anti-oxidant, thrombolytic and anti-inflammatory agent.

  1. Vertical and horizontal distributions of microbial abundances and enzymatic activities in propylene-glycol-affected soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biró, Borbála; Toscano, Giuseppe; Horváth, Nikoletta; Matics, Heléna; Domonkos, Mónika; Scotti, Riccardo; Rao, Maria A; Wejden, Bente; French, Helen K

    2014-01-01

    The natural microbial activity in the unsaturated soil is vital for protecting groundwater in areas where high loads of biodegradable contaminants are supplied to the surface, which usually is the case for airports using aircraft de-icing fluids (ADF) in the cold season. Horizontal and vertical distributions of microbial abundance were assessed along the western runway of Oslo Airport (Gardermoen, Norway) to monitor the effect of ADF dispersion with special reference to the component with the highest chemical oxygen demand (COD), propylene glycol (PG). Microbial abundance was evaluated by several biondicators: colony-forming units (CFU) of some physiological groups (aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs and microscopic fungi), most probable numbers (MPN) of PG degraders, selected catabolic enzymatic activities (fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolase, dehydrogenase, and β-glucosidase). High correlations were found between the enzymatic activities and microbial counts in vertical soil profiles. All microbial abundance indicators showed a steep drop in the first meter of soil depth. The vertical distribution of microbial abundance can be correlated by a decreasing exponential function of depth. The horizontal trend of microbial abundance (evaluated as total aerobic CFU, MPN of PG-degraders, and FDA hydrolase activity) assessed in the surface soil at an increasing distance from the runway is correlated negatively with the PG and COD loads, suggesting the relevance of other chemicals in the modulation of microbial growth. The possible role of potassium formate, component of runway de-icers, has been tested in the laboratory by using mixed cultures of Pseudomonas spp., obtained by enrichment with a selective PG medium from soil samples taken at the most contaminated area near the runway. The inhibitory effect of formate on the growth of PG degraders is proven by the reduction of biomass yield on PG in the presence of formate.

  2. Soil microbial biomass, activity and community composition along altitudinal gradients in the High Arctic (Billefjorden, Svalbard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, Petr; Šantrůčková, Hana; Elster, Josef; Kaštovská, Eva

    2018-03-01

    The unique and fragile High Arctic ecosystems are vulnerable to global climate warming. The elucidation of factors driving microbial distribution and activity in arctic soils is essential for a comprehensive understanding of ecosystem functioning and its response to environmental change. The goals of this study were to investigate microbial biomass and activity, microbial community structure (MCS), and their environmental controls in soils along three elevational transects in the coastal mountains of Billefjorden, central Svalbard. Soils from four different altitudes (25, 275, 525 and 765 m above sea level) were analyzed for a suite of characteristics including temperature regimes, organic matter content, base cation availability, moisture, pH, potential respiration, and microbial biomass and community structure using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). We observed significant spatial heterogeneity of edaphic properties among transects, resulting in transect-specific effects of altitude on most soil parameters. We did not observe any clear elevation pattern in microbial biomass, and microbial activity revealed contrasting elevational patterns between transects. We found relatively large horizontal variability in MCS (i.e., between sites of corresponding elevation in different transects), mainly due to differences in the composition of bacterial PLFAs, but also a systematic altitudinal shift in MCS related to different habitat preferences of fungi and bacteria, which resulted in high fungi-to-bacteria ratios at the most elevated sites. The biological soil crusts on these most elevated, unvegetated sites can host microbial assemblages of a size and activity comparable to those of the arctic tundra ecosystem. The key environmental factors determining horizontal and vertical changes in soil microbial properties were soil pH, organic carbon content, soil moisture and Mg2+ availability.

  3. Soil microbial biomass, activity and community composition along altitudinal gradients in the High Arctic (Billefjorden, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kotas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The unique and fragile High Arctic ecosystems are vulnerable to global climate warming. The elucidation of factors driving microbial distribution and activity in arctic soils is essential for a comprehensive understanding of ecosystem functioning and its response to environmental change. The goals of this study were to investigate microbial biomass and activity, microbial community structure (MCS, and their environmental controls in soils along three elevational transects in the coastal mountains of Billefjorden, central Svalbard. Soils from four different altitudes (25, 275, 525 and 765 m above sea level were analyzed for a suite of characteristics including temperature regimes, organic matter content, base cation availability, moisture, pH, potential respiration, and microbial biomass and community structure using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs. We observed significant spatial heterogeneity of edaphic properties among transects, resulting in transect-specific effects of altitude on most soil parameters. We did not observe any clear elevation pattern in microbial biomass, and microbial activity revealed contrasting elevational patterns between transects. We found relatively large horizontal variability in MCS (i.e., between sites of corresponding elevation in different transects, mainly due to differences in the composition of bacterial PLFAs, but also a systematic altitudinal shift in MCS related to different habitat preferences of fungi and bacteria, which resulted in high fungi-to-bacteria ratios at the most elevated sites. The biological soil crusts on these most elevated, unvegetated sites can host microbial assemblages of a size and activity comparable to those of the arctic tundra ecosystem. The key environmental factors determining horizontal and vertical changes in soil microbial properties were soil pH, organic carbon content, soil moisture and Mg2+ availability.

  4. Microbiological analysis of common preservatives used in food items and demonstration of their in vitro anti-bacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohora Sultana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify the microorganisms contaminating the common preservatives used in food as well as to detect their in vitro anti-bacterial traits. Methods: A total of 9 preservatives were subjected to conventional cultural and biochemical methods for microbial enumeration. Anti-bacterial activities were demonstrated through the agar well diffusion method. Results: All samples were found to be contaminated with bacteria up to 105 CFU/g and with the fungal flora within a range of 1 01-1 02 CFU/g. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were demonstrated in most of the samples. Sodium sulfite and citric acid possessed the strongest anti-bacterial trait against all of the test bacteria. Acetic acid exhibited activity against 6 out of 8 test bacteria while vinegar exhibited the activity against 4 bacteria. Activity of salt was demonstrated only against Listeria spp. and Bacillus spp., while activity of sugar and honey was found only against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp., respectively. Conclusions: According to the current investigation, sodium sulfite and citric acid samples were found to be satisfactory preservatives both in terms of microbiological criteria and their antibacterial traits.

  5. Efavirenz Mannich bases: synthesis, anti-HIV and antitubercular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Dharmarajan; Banerjee, Debjani; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2009-02-01

    A series of efavirenz Mannich bases has been synthesized by reacting efavirenz, formaldehyde, and various aryl substituted piperazines using microwave irradiation (yield 35-88%). The synthesized compounds were evaluated for in-vitro anti-HIV and antimycobacterial activities. The in-vitro antiretroviral activities indicated that compound 7-(4-((6-chloro-4-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-oxo-2H-benzo[d] [1,3]oxazin-1 (4H)-yl)methyl)-3-methylpiperazin-l -yl)-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-l,4-dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (4i) was equipotent to efavirenz with EC(50) of 2.4 nM. Compound 4i also inhibited M. tuberculosis with minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.2 microg/mL.

  6. Crystal structures, in-silico study and anti-microbial potential of synthetic monocarbonyl curcuminoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud Din, Zia; Serrano, N. F. G.; Ademi, Kastriot; Sousa, C. P.; Deflon, Victor Marcelo; Maia, Pedro Ivo da Silva; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson

    2017-09-01

    In this work the screening of 20 unsymmetrical chalcone and curcuminoids analogues in regard of their antimicrobial properties was conducted. Electron donating groups in the aromatic rings in the chalcone and curcuminoid derivatives produced higher antimicrobial effect. Compounds 1, 9 and 15 exhibited good activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. These compounds were further evaluated against nine micro-organisms of pathological interest. Pharmmaper was used for target fishing of compounds against important bacterial targets. Molecular Docking helped to verify the results of these compounds against the selected bacterial target D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase (PDB ID: 1PW1). The crystal structure of ligand and docked conformers in the active site of 1PW1 were analyzed. As a result structure-activity relationships are proposed. Structures of compounds 14 and 16 were obtained through single crystals X-ray diffraction studies. Compound 14 crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c with unit cell dimensions a = 13.1293(3) Å, b = 17.5364(4) Å, c = 15.1433(3) Å, β = 95.6440(10), V = 3469.70(13) Å3 and Z = 8. Compound 16 crystallizes in triclinic space group Pī with unit cell dimensions a = 6.8226(4) Å, b = 7.2256(4) Å, c = 18.1235(12) Å, β = 87.322(4), V = 850.57(9) Å3 and Z = 2.

  7. The fatty acid synthase inhibitor triclosan: repurposing an anti-microbial agent for targeting prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Martin C; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Gunter, Jennifer H; Lubik, Amy A; Quinn, Ronald J; Nelson, Colleen C

    2014-10-15

    Inhibition of FASN has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, and numerous inhibitors have been investigated. However, severe pharmacological limitations have challenged their clinical testing. The synthetic FASN inhibitor triclosan, which was initially developed as a topical antibacterial agent, is merely affected by these pharmacological limitations. Yet, little is known about its mechanism in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Here we compared the cellular and molecular effects of triclosan in a panel of eight malignant and non-malignant prostate cell lines to the well-known FASN inhibitors C75 and orlistat, which target different partial catalytic activities of FASN. Triclosan displayed a superior cytotoxic profile with a several-fold lower IC50 than C75 or orlistat. Structure-function analysis revealed that alcohol functionality of the parent phenol is critical for inhibitory action. Rescue experiments confirmed that end product starvation was a major cause of cytotoxicity. Importantly, triclosan, C75 and orlistat induced distinct changes to morphology, cell cycle, lipid content and the expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism, demonstrating that inhibition of different partial catalytic activities of FASN activates different metabolic pathways. These finding combined with its well-documented pharmacological safety profile make triclosan a promising drug candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  8. Extracellular Enzyme Activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Winding, Anne

    2012-01-01

    and soil ecosystem services. The soil enzyme activity has been measured by the use of fluorogenic model substrates e.g. methylumbelliferyl (MUF) substrates for a number of enzymes involved in the degradation of polysaccharides as cellulose, hemicellulose and chitin, while degradation of proteins has been......Extracellular Enzyme Activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity Niels Bohse Hendriksen, Anne Winding. Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark Soil enzymes originate from a variety of organisms, notably fungi and bacteria......, experimental conditions of extraction of enzymes from soils, buffer and pH, substrate concentration, temperature and the necessary controls were optimized and standardized. This has resulted in an optimized standard operating procedure of EEA, which are being tested as an indicator of soil functional diversity...

  9. Anti-microbial and skin wound dressing application of molecular iodine nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kaliyaperumal; Bharathi Babu, Divya; Jayakumar, Gomathi; Dhinakar Raj, Gopal

    2017-10-01

    In this study, iodine nanoparticles were synthesized without use of any stabilizer by a new co-precipitation process using polyvinyl pyrolidone, calcium lactate, disodium hydrogen phosphate and iodine solution as precursor and the reaction was catalyzed by sodium hydroxide. Ten mg of the synthesized nanoparticles killed 95% of bacteria and inhibited 90% of bio film formation. Assays on membrane disintegration activities of the nanoparticles indicated that these nanoparticles destroyed the extracellular membrane of the bacteria. The wound healing application evaluated using mice model showed that it was hastened by iodine nanoparticles.

  10. Recent advances in synthetic lipopeptides as anti-microbial agents: designs and synthetic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jun-Jie; Lin, Shuimu; Beuerman, Roger W; Liu, Shouping

    2017-10-01

    Infectious diseases impose serious public health burdens and continue to be a global public health crisis. The treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens is challenging because only a few viable therapeutic options are clinically available. The emergence and risk of drug-resistant superbugs and the dearth of new classes of antibiotics have drawn increasing awareness that we may return to the pre-antibiotic era. To date, lipopeptides have been received considerable attention because of the following properties: They exhibit potent antimicrobial activities against a broad spectrum of pathogens, rapid bactericidal activity and have a different antimicrobial action compared with most of the conventional antibiotics used today and very slow development of drug resistance tendency. In general, lipopeptides can be structurally classified into two parts: a hydrophilic peptide moiety and a hydrophobic fatty acyl chain. To date, a significant amount of design and synthesis of lipopeptides have been done to improve the therapeutic potential of lipopeptides. This review will present the current knowledge and the recent research in design and synthesis of new lipopeptides and their derivatives in the last 5 years.

  11. Development and anti-microbial potential of topical formulations containing Cocos nucifera Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshala, Ravi; Ying, Ling Teck; Hui, Ling Shiau; Barua, Ankur; Dua, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In order to achieve better treatment for local wounds and bacterial infections, topical formulations containing Cocos nucifera Linn. were developed. These formulations were evaluated for their physicochemical properties and antimicrobial efficacy against various strains of microorganisms. Semisolid formulations containing 5% w/w of Cocos nucifera Linn. were prepared by employing different dermatological bases and were evaluated for their physical appearance, pH, rheological properties, FTIR-spectroscopic analysis, thermodynamic stability and stability studies. The antimicrobial activity of each prepared formulation was determined using disk-diffusion method against various strains of microorganisms. All the prepared formulations were found to be stable and exhibited suitable physicochemical characteristics including pH, viscosity and spreadability which are necessary for an ideal topical preparation, in addition to strong antimicrobial activity. Carbopol gel base was found to be the most suitable dermatological base for Cocos nucifera Linn. in comparsion to other bases. Cocos nucifera Linn. formulations showed great potential for wounds and local bacterial infections. Moreover, carbopol gel base with its aesthetic appeal was found to be a suitable dermatological base for Cocos nucifera Linn. semisolid formulation as it had demonstrated significant physicochemical properties and greater diffusion when assessed using disk- diffusion method.

  12. Transfer of Maternal Anti-Microbial Immunity to HIV-Exposed Uninfected Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahaa Abu Raya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of maternal immune factors to the newborn is critical for protection from infectious disease in early life. Maternally acquired passive immunity provides protection until the infant is beyond early life’s increased susceptibility to severe infections, or until active immunity is achieved following infant’s primary immunization. However, as reviewed here, HIV infection alters the transfer of immune factors from HIV-infected mothers to the HIV-exposed newborns and young infants. This may relate to the immune activation in HIV-infected pregnant women, associated with the production of inflammatory cytokines at the materno-fetal interface associated with inflammatory responses in the newborn. We also summarize mother-targeting interventions to improve the health of infants born to HIV-infected women such as immunization during pregnancy and reduction of maternal inflammation. Maternal immunization offers the potential to compensate for the decreased transplacentally transferred maternal antibodies observed in HIV-exposed infants. Current data suggest reduced immunogenicity of vaccines in HIV-infected pregnant women, possibly reducing the protective impact of maternal immunization for HIV-exposed infants. Fortunately, levels of antibodies appear preserved in the breast milk of HIV-infected women, which supports the recommendation to breastfeed during antiretroviral treatment to protect HIV-exposed infants.

  13. Anti-biofilm and cytotoxicity activity of impregnated dressings with silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velázquez-Velázquez, Jorge Luis [Laboratorio de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, UASLP (Mexico); Santos-Flores, Andrés; Araujo-Meléndez, Javier [Servicio de Epidemiología del Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto”, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Velasquillo, Cristina [Laboratorio de Biotecnología, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación (Mexico); González, Carmen [Laboratorio de Fisiología Celular, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, UASLP (Mexico); Martínez-Castañon, Gabriel [Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas Facultad de Estomatología, UASLP (Mexico); Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel, E-mail: fidel@uaslp.mx [Laboratorio de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, UASLP (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Infections arising from bacterial adhesion and colonization on chronic wounds are a significant healthcare problem. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) impregnated in dressing have attracted a great deal of attention as a potential solution. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the anti-biofilm activities of AgNPs impregnated in commercial dressings against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, bacteria isolated of chronic wounds from a hospital patient. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was tested within biofilms generated under slow fluid shear conditions using a standard bioreactor. A 2-log reduction in the number of colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa was recorded in the reactor on exposure to dressing impregnated with 250 ppm of AgNPs, diameter 9.3 ± 1.1 nm, and also showed compatibility to mammalian cells (human fibroblasts). Our study suggests that the use of dressings with AgNPs may either prevent or reduce microbial growth in the wound environment, and reducing wound bioburden may improve wound-healing outcomes. - Highlights: • Biological activities of silver nanoparticles for wound-healing purposes • Characterization of the silver nanoparticles impregnated in dressings • Reduction in the P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was statistically significant. • Compatibility to human dermal fibroblasts as the main cell type involved in the reparation • AgNPs covering the surfaces would provide great potential for prevention and treatment.

  14. Anti-biofilm and cytotoxicity activity of impregnated dressings with silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velázquez-Velázquez, Jorge Luis; Santos-Flores, Andrés; Araujo-Meléndez, Javier; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Velasquillo, Cristina; González, Carmen; Martínez-Castañon, Gabriel; Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel

    2015-01-01

    Infections arising from bacterial adhesion and colonization on chronic wounds are a significant healthcare problem. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) impregnated in dressing have attracted a great deal of attention as a potential solution. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the anti-biofilm activities of AgNPs impregnated in commercial dressings against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, bacteria isolated of chronic wounds from a hospital patient. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was tested within biofilms generated under slow fluid shear conditions using a standard bioreactor. A 2-log reduction in the number of colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa was recorded in the reactor on exposure to dressing impregnated with 250 ppm of AgNPs, diameter 9.3 ± 1.1 nm, and also showed compatibility to mammalian cells (human fibroblasts). Our study suggests that the use of dressings with AgNPs may either prevent or reduce microbial growth in the wound environment, and reducing wound bioburden may improve wound-healing outcomes. - Highlights: • Biological activities of silver nanoparticles for wound-healing purposes • Characterization of the silver nanoparticles impregnated in dressings • Reduction in the P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was statistically significant. • Compatibility to human dermal fibroblasts as the main cell type involved in the reparation • AgNPs covering the surfaces would provide great potential for prevention and treatment

  15. Increased resiliency and activity of microbial mediated carbon cycling enzymes in diversified bioenergy cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, R.; Bach, E.; Hofmockel, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    Microbes are mediators of soil carbon (C) and are influenced in membership and activity by nitrogen (N) fertilization and inter-annual abiotic factors. Microbial communities and their extracellular enzyme activities (EEA) are important parameters that influence ecosystem C cycling properties and are often included in microbial explicit C cycling models. In an effort to generate model relevant, empirical findings, we investigated how both microbial community structure and C degrading enzyme activity are influenced by inter-annual variability and N inputs in bioenergy crops. Our study was performed at the Comparison of Biofuel Systems field-site from 2011 to 2014, in three bioenergy cropping systems, continuous corn (CC) and two restored prairies, both fertilized (FP) and unfertilized (P). We hypothesized microbial community structure would diverge during the prairie restoration, leading to changes in C cycling enzymes over time. Using a sequencing approach (16S and ITS) we determined the bacterial and fungal community structure response to the cropping system, fertilization, and inter-annual variability. Additionally, we used EEA of β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, and β-xylosidase to determine inter-annual and ecosystem impacts on microbial activity. Our results show cropping system was a main effect for microbial community structure, with corn diverging from both prairies to be less diverse. Inter-annual changes showed that a drought occurring in 2012 significantly impacted microbial community structure in both the P and CC, decreasing microbial richness. However, FP increased in microbial richness, suggesting the application of N increased resiliency to drought. Similarly, the only year in which C cycling enzymes were impacted by ecosystem was 2012, with FP supporting higher potential enzymatic activity then CC and P. The highest EEA across all ecosystems occurred in 2014, suggesting the continued root biomass and litter build-up in this no till system

  16. Application of 1D and 2D MFR reactor technology for the isolation of insecticidal and anti-microbial properties from pyrolysis bio-oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad M; Scott, Ian M; Berruti, Franco; Briens, Cedric

    2016-12-01

    Valuable chemicals can be separated from agricultural residues by chemical or thermochemical processes. The application of pyrolysis has already been demonstrated as an efficient means to produce a liquid with a high concentration of desired product. The objective of this study was to apply an insect and microorganism bioassay-guided approach to separate and isolate pesticidal compounds from bio-oil produced through biomass pyrolysis. Tobacco leaf (Nicotianata bacum), tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum), and spent coffee (Coffea arabica) grounds were pyrolyzed at 10°C/min from ambient to 565°C using the mechanically fluidized reactor (MFR). With one-dimensional (1D) MFR pyrolysis, the composition of the product vapors varied as the reactor temperature was raised allowing for the selection of the temperature range that corresponds to vapors with a high concentration of pesticidal properties. Further product separation was performed in a fractional condensation train, or 2D MFR pyrolysis, thus allowing for the separation of vapor components according to their condensation temperature. The 300-400°C tobacco and tomato bio-oil cuts from the 1D MFR showed the highest insecticidal and anti-microbial activity compared to the other bio-oil cuts. The 300-350 and 350-400°C bio-oil cuts produced by 2D MFR had the highest insecticidal activity when the bio-oil was collected from the 210°C condenser. The tobacco and tomato bio-oil had similar insecticidal activity (LC 50 of 2.1 and 2.2 mg/mL) when the bio-oil was collected in the 210°C condenser from the 300-350°C reactor temperature gases. The 2D MFR does concentrate the pesticidal products compared to the 1D MFR and thus can reduce the need for further separation steps such as solvent extraction.

  17. Syntheses and anti-microbial evaluation of new quinoline scaffold derived pyrimidine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha S. Dave

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of diversely substituted chalcones derived from a quinoline scaffold, e.g. (E-3-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl prop-2-en-1-one and its pyrimidine analogues e.g. 2-[2-amino-6-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl-5,6-dihydropyrimidin-4-yl]phenols have been prepared by condensation of 2-chloro-3-formyl quinoline with differently substituted 2-hydroxy acetophenones and further treatment with guanidine carbonate. All the newly synthesized compounds have been evaluated for their in vitro growth inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus typhi, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Pseudomonas chrysogenum.

  18. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Mannich Bases of Isoxazoline Derivatives as Novel Anti-Microbial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of compounds were synthesized by condensation reaction of substituted acetophenone (1a-b with substituted aldehyde (2a-b in presence of alcoholic sodium hydroxide to get intermediate chalcones (3a-c, which were further treated with hydroxylamine hydrochloride in presence of sodium hydroxide to get isoxazolines derivatives (4a-c. The latter were refluxed with substituted primary amines and formaldehyde for 6-10 h to afford Mannich bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized on the basis of their spectral (IR, 1HNMR data and evaluated for the antimicrobial activity by using Zone of Inhibition by cup plate method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration by broth dilution method.

  19. Anti-biofilm activity of Fe heavy ion irradiated polycarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, R.P. [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Hareesh, K., E-mail: appi.2907@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Bankar, A. [Department of Microbiology, Waghire College, Pune 412301 (India); Sanjeev, Ganesh [Microtron Centre, Department of Studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalore 574166 (India); Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Arun Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Dahiwale, S.S.; Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-10-01

    Highlights: • PC films were irradiated by 60 and 120 MeV Fe ions. • Irradiated PC films showed changes in its physical and chemical properties. • Irradiated PC also showed more anti-biofilm activity compared to pristine PC. - Abstract: Polycarbonate (PC) polymers were investigated before and after high energy heavy ion irradiation for anti-bacterial properties. These PC films were irradiated by Fe heavy ions with two energies, viz, 60 and 120 MeV, at different fluences in the range from 1 × 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. UV-Visible spectroscopic results showed optical band gap decreased with increase in ion fluences due to chain scission mainly at carbonyl group of PC which is also corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic results. X-ray diffractogram results showed decrease in crystallinity of PC after irradiation which leads to decrease in molecular weight. This is confirmed by rheological studies and also by differential scanning calorimetric results. The irradiated PC samples showed modification in their surfaces prevents biofilm formation of human pathogen, Salmonella typhi.

  20. Sesquiterpene lactones from Gynoxys verrucosa and their anti-MRSA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, Paola E; Quave, Cassandra L; Reynolds, William F; Varughese, Kottayil I; Berry, Brian; Breen, Philip J; Malagón, Omar; Smeltzer, Mark S; Compadre, Cesar M

    2011-09-02

    Because of its virulence and antibiotic resistance, Staphylococcus aureus is a more formidable pathogen now than at any time since the pre-antibiotic era. In an effort to identify and develop novel antimicrobial agents with activity against this pathogen, we have examined Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd (Asteraceae), an herb used in traditional medicine in southern Ecuador for the treatment and healing of wounds. The sesquiterpene lactones leucodine (1) and dehydroleucodine (2) were extracted and purified from the aerial parts of Gynoxys verrucosa, and their structure was elucidated by spectroscopic methods and single-crystal X-ray analysis. The in vitro anti-microbial activity of Gynoxys verrucosa extracts and its purified constituents was determined against six clinical isolates including Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains with different drug-resistance profiles, using the microtiter broth method. Compound 1 has very low activity, while compound 2 has moderate activity with MIC(50)s between 49 and 195 μg/mL. The extract of Gynoxys verrucosa has weak activity with MIC(50)s between 908 and 3290 μg/mL. We are reporting the full assignment of the (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR of both compounds, and the crystal structure of compound 2, for the first time. Moreover, the fact that compound 2 has antimicrobial activity and compound 1 does not, demonstrates that the exocyclic conjugated methylene in the lactone ring is essential for the antimicrobial activity of these sesquiterpene lactones. However, the weak activity observed for the plant extracts, does not explain the use of Gynoxys verrucosa in traditional medicine for the treatment of wounds and skin infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.