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Sample records for anti hiv-1 activity

  1. Anti - HIV-1 integrase activity of Thai Medicinal Plants

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    Kingkan Bunluepuech

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of discovering anti-HIV-1 agents from natural sources, the aqueous and EtOH extracts of eight Thaiplants including Clerodendron indicum (whole plant, Tiliacora triandra (stem, Capparis micracantha (wood, Harrissoniaperforata (wood, Ficus glomerata (wood, Diospyros decandra (wood, Dracaena loureiri (heartwood, and Tinospora crispa (stem were screened for their inhibitory activities against HIV-1 integrase (IN using the multiplate integration assay(MIA. Of the EtOH extracts, Ficus glomerata (wood was the most potent with an IC50 value of 7.8 g/ml; whereas the water extract of Harrisonia perforata (wood was the most potent aqueous extract with an IC50 value of 2.3 g/ml. The isolation of active principles against HIV-1 IN from Ficus glomerata is now actively pursued.

  2. Anti-HIV-1 Activities of 4 Telomerase Restrictors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xin; WANG Jinghui; de Giuli Morghen; Radaelli A; Zanotto C; Beggio P

    2007-01-01

    MTT Cell Proliferation Assay was used to optimize the concentration of Telomerase Restrictors(TRs) with minimum toxicity to the selected cells. FACSort flow cytometer and Innotest P24 HIV(Human immunodeficiency Virus) antigen mAb ELISA Kit were used to investigate the anti-HIV-1 activities of TRs. The results showed that TRs had low cytotoxicity to the PBMC (Peripheral Blood mononuclear cells) and CEM/GFP if the concentration of TRs was at 50 μmol/L or below, and the supernatant from PBMC pretreated with SHIV and TR1-001 /TR1-002 could not infect the PBMC, while can infect the C8166 with reduced infectivity, which suggested that the TRs may be one of the novel resources for screening anti-HIV-1 agents.

  3. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

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    Silvana Pasetto

    Full Text Available HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic, H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic, and the dual tropic (X4R5 HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  4. Anti-HIV-1 protease- and HIV-1 integrase activities of Thai medicinal plants known as Hua-Khao-Yen.

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    Tewtrakul, Supinya; Itharat, Arunporn; Rattanasuwan, Pranee

    2006-04-21

    Ethanolic- and water extracts from five species of Thai medicinal plants known as Hua-Khao-Yen were tested for their inhibitory effects against HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) and HIV-1 integrase (HIV-1 IN). The result revealed that the ethanolic (EtOH) extract of Smilax corbularia exhibited anti-HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 1.9 microg/ml, followed by the water extract of Dioscorea birmanica (IC50 = 4.5 microg/ml), the EtOH extract of Dioscorea birmanica (IC50 = 4.7 microg/ml), the water extract of Smilax corbularia (IC50 = 5.4 microg/ml), the EtOH extract of Smilax glabra (IC50 = 6.7 microg/ml) and the water extract of Smilax glabra (IC50 = 8.5 microg/ml). The extracts of Pygmaeopremna herbacea and Dioscorea membranacea were apparently inactive (IC50 > 100 microg/ml). Interestingly, only the EtOH extract of Dioscorea membranacea showed appreciable activity (IC50 = 48 microg/ml) against HIV-1 PR, while the other extracts possessed mild activity. This result strongly supported the basis for the use of Smilax corbularia and Dioscorea membranacea for AIDS treatment by Thai traditional doctors. PMID:16406414

  5. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity.

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    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2015-08-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell-cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery. PMID:26192705

  6. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

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    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:26472515

  7. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds.

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    Forthal, Donald N; Phan, Tran B; Slepenkin, Anatoly V; Landucci, Gary; Chu, Hencelyn; Elofsson, Mikael; Peterson, Ellena

    2012-10-01

    Salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds have been shown to inhibit bacterial pathogens, including Chlamydia and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. If such compounds could also target HIV-1, their potential use as topical microbicides to prevent sexually transmitted infections would be considerable. In this study, the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity, cytotoxicity and mechanism of action of several salicylidene acylhydrazides were determined. Inhibitory activity was assessed using TZM-bl cells and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as targets for HIV-1 infection. Antiviral activity was measured against cell-free and cell-associated virus and in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Since the antibacterial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazides is reversible by Fe(2+), the ability of Fe(2+) and other cations to reverse the anti-HIV-1 activity of the compounds was determined. Real-time PCR was also employed to determine the stage affected in the HIV-1 replication cycle. Four compounds with 50% inhibitory concentrations against HIV-1 of 1-7 μM were identified. In vitro toxicity varied but was generally limited. Activity was similar against three R5 clade B primary isolates and whether the target for virus replication was TZM-bl cells or PBMCs. Compounds inhibited cell-free and cell-associated virus and were active in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Fe(2+), but not other cations, reversed the anti-HIV-1 effect. Finally, the inhibitory effect of the compounds occurred at a post-integration step. In conclusion, salicylidene acylhydrazides were identified with in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity in the micromolar range. The activity of these compounds against other sexually transmitted pathogens makes them potential candidates to formulate for use as a broad-spectrum topical genital microbicide. PMID:22819150

  8. Role of seminal plasma in the anti-HIV-1 activity of candidate microbicides

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    Li Yun-Yao

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of microbicides for prevention of HIV-1 infection in macaque models for vaginal infection has indicated that the concentrations of active compounds needed for protection by far exceed levels sufficient for complete inhibition of infection in vitro. These experiments were done in the absence of seminal plasma (SP, a vehicle for sexual transmission of the virus. To gain insight into the possible effect of SP on the performance of selected microbicides, their anti-HIV-1 activity in the presence, and absence of SP, was determined. Methods The inhibitory activity of compounds against the X4 virus, HIV-1 IIIB, and the R5 virus, HIV-1 BaL was determined using TZM-bl indicator cells and quantitated by measuring β-galactosidase induced by infection. The virucidal properties of cellulose acetate 1,2-benzene-dicarboxylate (CAP, the only microbicide provided in water insoluble, micronized form, in the presence of SP was measured. Results The HIV-1 inhibitory activity of the polymeric microbicides, poly(naphthalene sulfonate, cellulose sulfate, carrageenan, CAP (in soluble form and polystyrene sulfonate, respectively, was considerably (range ≈ 4 to ≈ 73-fold diminished in the presence of SP (33.3%. Formulations of micronized CAP, providing an acidic buffering system even in the presence of an SP volume excess, effectively inactivated HIV-1 infectivity. Conclusion The data presented here suggest that the in vivo efficacy of polymeric microbicides, acting as HIV-1 entry inhibitors, might become at least partly compromised by the inevitable presence of SP. These possible disadvantages could be overcome by combining the respective polymers with acidic pH buffering systems (built-in for formulations of micronized CAP or with other anti-HIV-1 compounds, the activity of which is not affected by SP, e.g. reverse transcriptase and zinc finger inhibitors.

  9. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

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    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids.

  10. 7,8-secolignans from Schisandra neglecta and their anti-HIV-1 activities

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    Gao, Xuemei; Mu, Huaixue; Hu, Qiufen, E-mail: huqiufena@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemistry in Ethnic Medicinal Resources, State Ethnic Affairs Commission and Ministry of Education, Yunnan University of Nationalities (China); Wang, Ruirui; Yang, Liumeng; Zheng, Yongtang [Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Sun, Handong; Xiao, Weilie, E-mail: xwl@mail.kib.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China)

    2012-10-15

    Four new 7,8-secolignans (neglectahenols A-D), together with two known 7,8-secolignans, were isolated from leaves and stems of Schisandra neglecta. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive one and two dimension NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques. 7,8-Secolignans and neglectahenols A-D were also tested for their anti-HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) activities, and all of them showed modest activities. (author)

  11. Synthesis of zidovudine derivatives with anti-HIV-1 and antibacterial activities.

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    Senthilkumar, Palaniappan; Long, Jing; Swetha, Raparla; Shruthi, Vaidyanathan; Wang, Rui-Rui; Preethi, Srinivasan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2009-02-01

    Twelve novel zidovudine derivatives were prepared by modifying 5 '-hydroxyl group of sugar moiety (1-8) and 5-methyl group of thymidine nucleus (9-12) and characterized spectrally. The compounds were evaluated for anti-HIV-1, antitubercular and antibacterial activities. Compound (3-azido-tetrahydro-5- (3,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2,4-dioxopyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)furan-2-yl)methyl 7-(4-(2-phenylacetoyloxy)-3,5- dimethylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-(2-phenylacetoyloxyamino)-1-cyclopropyl-6,8-difluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate (5) was found to be the most potent anti-HIV-1 agent with EC(50) of 0.0012 microM against HIV-1(IIIB) and CC(50) of 34.05 microM against MT-4 with selectivity index of 28,375. Compound 5 inhibited Mycobacterium tuberculosis with MIC of 1.72 microM and inhibited four pathogenic bacteria with MIC of less than 1 microM. PMID:19219739

  12. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

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    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Song, Jia-Hao; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-07-18

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27469256

  13. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)

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    ZHANG, Xiao-Liang; SONG, Jia-Hao; PANG, Wei; ZHENG, Yong-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27469256

  14. QSAR study for anti-HIV-1 activities of HEPT derivatives using MLR and PLS

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    Ivan Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A QSAR study using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR and a Partial Least Squares (PLS methodology was performed for a series of 127 derivatives of 1-(2-hydroxy-ethoxymethyl]-6-(phenylthio-timine (HEPT, a potent inhibitor of the of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT. To explore the relationship between a pool of HEPT derivative descriptors (as independent variables and anti-HIV-1 activity expressed as log (1/EC50, as dependent variable MLR and PLS methods have been employed. Using Dragon descriptors, the present study aims to develop a predictive and robust QSAR model for predicting anti-HIV activity of the HEPT derivatives for better understanding the molecular features of these compounds important for their biological activity. According to the squared correlation coefficients, which had values between 0.826 and 0.809 for the MLR and PLS methods, the results demonstrate almost identical qualities and good predictive ability for both MLR and PLS models. After dividing the dataset into training and test sets, the model predictability was tested by several parameters, including the Golbraikh-Tropsha external criteria and the goodness of fit tested with the Y-randomization test. [Acknowledgements. This project was financially supported by Project 1.1 and 1.2 of the Institute of Chemistry of the Romanian Academy. STATISTICA, MobyDigs and SIMCA-P+ acquisition was funded by Ministerul Educatiei, Cercetarii si Tineretului - Autoritatea Nationala pentru Cercetare Stiintifica (MedC-ANCS, contract grant number: 71GR/2006

  15. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca

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    Behbahani, M.; Sayedipour, S.; Pourazar, A.; Shanehsazzadeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According t...

  16. Anti-HIV-1 activity and structure-activity relationship of pyranocoumarin analogs%吡喃香豆素衍生物对HIV-1的抑制作用及其构效关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董飚; 马涛; 章天; 周春梅; 刘刚; 王琳; 陶佩珍; 张兴权

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease (PR) activity and inhibition of virus replication in cell cultures of novel coumarin analogs and determine their structure-activity relationship. Coumarin derivatives have been demonstrated to inhibit the activity of HIV-1 RT/PR in cell free system. It also shows inhibition effects to HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Based on the Chinese traditional pharmacological characteristics and protein three dimension computer aided design, analogs of tetracyclic dipyranocoumarin were synthesized from natural leading compounds. We studied the relationship of antiviral effects and chemical structures via HIV-1 PR/RT enzyme models and cell culture model system. Seven compounds were designed and tested. Several compounds showed anti-HIV-1 activity in varying degrees, especially V0201 showed much higher anti-HIV-1 activity with 3.56 and 0.78 μmol·L-1 of IC50 against HIV-1 PR/RT and 0.036 μmol·L-1 against HIV-1 replication in PBMC cultures. V0201 with a novel structure may be a new leading compound. These new compounds are valuable for development of new anti-HIV drugs in the future.%研究香豆素衍生物对人类免疫缺陷病毒l型逆转录酶(HIV-1 RT)、蛋白酶(HIV-1 PR)和细胞内复制的抑制作用及其构效关系.不同香豆素衍生物具有抑制HIV-1 RT、HIV-1 PR活性,且在细胞内显示出抑制HIV-1复制的作用已见报道.本课题根据国内传统药学的特点,考察以天然产物为先导化合物、结合HIV-1蛋白酶三维结构计算机辅助药物设计、合成的四环双吡喃香豆素及其类似物.以HIV-1 RT及HIV-1 PR以及细胞内病毒复制为靶点,利用酶学模型和细胞培养模型进行药物筛选及其构效关系研究,设计合成的7个化合物的药效学实验结果显示.部分化合物显示了不同程度的抗HIV-1活性.其中V0201作用最强,它对HIV-1 PR和HIV-1 RT的IC50分别为3.56和0.78 μmol·L-1;

  17. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm. PMID:23144863

  18. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.

  19. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene S Dezzutti

    Full Text Available Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC aqueous- (n = 10, lipid- (n = 2, and silicone-based (n = 2 products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9, KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.

  20. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of resveratrol derivatives%白藜芦醇衍生物体外抗HIV-1活性的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宁; 杨柳萌; 王睿睿; 朱海亮; 郑永唐

    2012-01-01

    Objective; To study the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of resveratrol derivatives and the mechanisms. Methods; The cytotoxicities of compounds were tested by MTT assay. The anti-HIV activities of compounds in acute infection were evaluated by cytopathogenic effect (CPE) assay. The inhibition of HIV-lKm018 replication in PBMC was evaluated by p24 antigen expression. The fusion between of HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells was e-valuated by CPE. The inhibition of HIV-1 recombinant reverse transcriptase activity, HIV-1 recombinant protease activity and direct HIV-1 virus killing were used to determine the mechanism. Results; IFB-1 and IFB-9 from resveratrol derivatives markedly inhibited syncytium formation with selective indexes of 16. 16 and 230.27 , respectively. IFB-1 and IFB-9 suppressed HIV-1 p24 antigen production in acutely HIV-111IB-infected C8166 cells with EC50, of 14.57 and 0.23 μg·mL-1 , respectively. They also inhibited HIV-lKM018 replication in PBMC. IFB-1 and IFB-9 blocked the fusion between normal cells and chronically HIV-1-infected cells, but did not inhibit recombinant RT, PR activities and did not directly kill HIV-1. Conclusions; IFB-1 and IFB-9 show potential anti-HIV-1 activities and the mechanism might be associated with inhibition virus entry.%目的:检测白藜芦醇衍生物IFB-1和IFB-9的体外抗HIV-1活性,并对其进行抗HIV-1作用机制的初步研究.方法:采用MTT比色法检测白藜芦醇衍生物IFB-1和IFB-9的细胞毒性;细胞病变法检测化合物对HIV-1急性感染的抑制活性;采用HIV-1 p24抗原ELISA方法检测临床分离株HIV-1KM018在PBMC中复制的抑制实验;采用细胞病变法检测HIV-1感染和未感染细胞之间的融合;采用HIV-1重组逆转录酶活性抑制实验,HIV-1重组蛋白酶活性抑制实验以及直接杀病毒实验来研究化合物体外抗HIV-1机制.结果:白藜芦醇衍生物IFB-1和IFB-9对HIV-1 ⅢB诱导的合胞体形成抑制的选择指数分别为16

  1. Aaptamine Derivatives with Antifungal and Anti-HIV-1 Activities from the South China Sea Sponge Aaptos aaptos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Bing Yu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Five new alkaloids of aaptamine family, compounds (1–5 and three known derivatives (6–8, have been isolated from the South China Sea sponge Aaptos aaptos. The structures of all compounds were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, as well as by comparison with the literature data. Compounds 1–2 are characterized with triazapyrene lactam skeleton, whereas compounds 4–5 share an imidazole-fused aaptamine moiety. These compounds were evaluated in antifungal and anti-HIV-1 assays. Compounds 3, 7, and 8 showed antifungal activity against six fungi, with MIC values in the range of 4 to 64 μg/mL. Compounds 7–8 exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity, with inhibitory rates of 88.0% and 72.3%, respectively, at a concentration of 10 μM.

  2. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, M; Sayedipour, S; Pourazar, A; Shanehsazzadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments. PMID:26339261

  3. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of Qishile, a Chinese medicine effective fraction formula%中药有效部位复方奇士乐体外抗HIV-1活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柳萌; 王睿睿; 张高红; 张兴杰; 陈纪军; 郑永唐

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价有效部位复方奇士乐(QSL)的体外抗HIV-1药效学.方法 通过合胞体抑制、HIV-1感染细胞保护、HIV-1 p24抗原测定等方法检测急性感染中QSL对HIV-1实验株、临床分离株、耐药株的抑制作用和对慢性感染细胞中病毒复制的影响;通过ELISA方法和荧光法分别检测了QSL体外抑制HIV-1逆转录酶和蛋白酶活性作用.结果 有效部位复方制剂QSL能有效地抑制HIV-1ⅢB诱导淋巴细胞病变、保护HIV-1ⅢB感染MT-4细胞死亡、阻断HIV-1ⅢB慢性感染H9细胞与C8166细胞间融合的作用.QSL对HIV-1实验株HIV-1ⅢB、临床分离株HIV-1KM018、耐药株HIV-174V的病毒复制也有较好的抑制作用.QSL抑制HIV活性的作用机制可能为多靶点,主要是抑制HIV逆转录酶、蛋白酶和病毒进入细胞.结论 QSL是具有较好体外抗HIV-1活性的中药有效部位复方.%Aim To evaluate the anti-HIV-1 activities of Qishile ( QSL) in vitro , a Chinese medicine effective fraction formula. Methods The inhibition of syncytia formation induced by HIV -1 was determined under microscopy. The protection of HIV-1 induced MT-4 cell lytic effects was measured by MTT assay . The level of HIV-1 p24 antigen in acute and chronic HIV-1 infection was assayed by ELISA. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and protease activites in vitro were tested by ELISA and FRET, respectively. Results QSL markedly inhibited syncytium formation induced by HIV-1 ⅢB , protected HIV-1 ⅢB induced MT-4 cell lytic effects and blocked cell-to-cell fusion. It also showed obviously inhibitory effect on the clinical strain HIV-1KM018 ancl drug resistant strain HIV-174V replication.QSL maybe inhibited HIV-I replication through multiple targets, including reverse transcriptase , protease and virus entry. Conclusion QSL is a Chinese medicine effective fraction formula with potent anti-HIV-1 activities.

  4. Identification of a Small Molecular Anti - HIV - 1 Compound that Interferes with Formation of the Fusion - active gp41 Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV - 1 ) envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays a critical role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes. The gp41 extracellular domain, which contains fusion peptide (FP), N - and C - terminal hydrophobic heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions,designated N- and C- peptides, respectively, can interact with each other to form a six - stranded coiled - coil domain, representing the fusion-active gp41 core. Our previous studies demonstrated that the C- peptides have potent inhibitory activity against HIV- 1 infection.These peptides inhibit HIV- 1 -mediated membrane fusion by binding to NHR regions for preventing the formation of fusion- active gp41 core. One of the C - peptides, T - 20, which is in the phase Ⅲ clinical trails, is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion.Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non -peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having similar mechanism of action as the C- peptides. We have established an ELISA- based screening assay using a unique monoclonal antibody, NC- 1, which can specifically bind to a conformational epitope on the gp41 core domain. Using this screening assay, we have identified a small molecular anti- HIV- 1 compound,named ADS-Jl, which inhibits HIV- 1- mediated membrane fusion by blocking the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form the fusion - active gp41 core. This compound will be used as a lead to design and develop novel HIV fusion inhibitors as new drugs for the treatment of HIV infection and/or AIDS.

  5. A New Neolignan, and the Cytotoxic and Anti-HIV-1 Activities of Constituents from the Roots of Dasymaschalon sootepense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongthong, Sakchai; Kuhakarn, Chutima; Jaipetch, Thaworn; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Limthongkul, Jitra; Nuntasaen, Narong; Reutrakul, Vichai

    2016-06-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation from the ethyl acetate extract of Dasymaschalon sootepense roots led to the isolation of twelve compounds including a new dihydrobenzo-furan neolignan, (+)-(2S,3S)-2,3-dihydro-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-methylbenzofuran-5-carbaldehyde (5), and eleven known compounds (1-4, and 6-12). The chemical structures and stereochemistry of all the isolated compounds were established by spectroscopic techniques. The known compounds 4 and 6 have been fully characterized spectroscopically, including their absolute configurations. Cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) activities of compounds 1-3, 5 and 8-12 were determined. Among compounds screened, compounds 2, 3 and 10 displayed weak cytotoxic activity with ED50 values ranging from 9.6-47.5 μM and only compound 2 was found weakly active against HIV-1 RT with an IC50 value of 323.2 μM. PMID:27534123

  6. Lignosulfonic acid exhibits broadly anti-HIV-1 activity--potential as a microbicide candidate for the prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Qiu

    Full Text Available Some secondary metabolites from plants show to have potent inhibitory activities against microbial pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV, Treponema pallidum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, etc. Here we report that lignosulfonic acid (LSA, a polymeric lignin derivative, exhibits potent and broad activity against HIV-1 isolates of diverse subtypes including two North America strains and a number of Chinese clinical isolates values ranging from 21.4 to 633 nM. Distinct from other polyanions, LSA functions as an entry inhibitor with multiple targets on viral gp120 as well as on host receptor CD4 and co-receptors CCR5/CXCR4. LSA blocks viral entry as determined by time-of-drug addiction and cell-cell fusion assays. Moreover, LSA inhibits CD4-gp120 interaction by blocking the binding of antibodies specific for CD4-binding sites (CD4bs and for the V3 loop of gp120. Similarly, LSA interacts with CCR5 and CXCR4 via its inhibition of specific anti-CCR5 and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively. Interestingly, the combination of LSA with AZT and Nevirapine exhibits synergism in viral inhibition. For the purpose of microbicide development, LSA displays low in vitro cytotoxicity to human genital tract epithelial cells, does not stimulate NF-κB activation and has no significant up-regulation of IL-1α/β and IL-8 as compared with N-9. Lastly, LSA shows no adverse effect on the epithelial integrity and the junctional protein expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that LSA can be a potential candidate for tropical microbicide.

  7. Is Wetter Better? An Evaluation of Over-the-Counter Personal Lubricants for Safety and Anti-HIV-1 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Bernard Moncla; Julie Russo; Marilyn Cost; Lin Wang; Kevin Uranker; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P.; Kara Pryke; Jim Pickett; Marc-André Leblanc; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmo...

  8. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huang

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  9. The C-terminal sequence of IFITM1 regulates its anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Jia

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins inhibit a wide range of viruses. We previously reported the inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strain BH10 by human IFITM1, 2 and 3. It is unknown whether other HIV-1 strains are similarly inhibited by IFITMs and whether there exists viral countermeasure to overcome IFITM inhibition. We report here that the HIV-1 NL4-3 strain (HIV-1NL4-3 is not restricted by IFITM1 and its viral envelope glycoprotein is partly responsible for this insensitivity. However, HIV-1NL4-3 is profoundly inhibited by an IFITM1 mutant, known as Δ(117-125, which is deleted of 9 amino acids at the C-terminus. In contrast to the wild type IFITM1, which does not affect HIV-1 entry, the Δ(117-125 mutant diminishes HIV-1NL4-3 entry by 3-fold. This inhibition correlates with the predominant localization of Δ(117-125 to the plasma membrane where HIV-1 entry occurs. In spite of strong conservation of IFITM1 among most species, mouse IFITM1 is 19 amino acids shorter at its C-terminus as compared to human IFITM1 and, like the human IFITM1 mutant Δ(117-125, mouse IFITM1 also inhibits HIV-1 entry. This is the first report illustrating the role of viral envelope protein in overcoming IFITM1 restriction. The results also demonstrate the importance of the C-terminal region of IFITM1 in modulating the antiviral function through controlling protein subcellular localization.

  10. Novel Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of 2-Arylthio-6-benzyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrimidin-4-ones (Aryl S-DABOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aly, Youssef L.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.; La Colla, Paolo;

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis and the anti-HIV-1 activity of a series of 2-arylthio-6-benzyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrimidin-4-ones (aryl S-DABOs) are reported. These compounds were synthesized via a coupling reaction of the corresponding 6-benzyl-2-thiouracils with aryl iodides in the presence of neocuproine hydrate......, copper(I) iodide, and sodium tert-butoxide. Target compounds showed moderate activity against HIV-1....

  11. [HPLC enantioseparation, absolute configuration determination and anti-HIV-1 activity of (±)-F18 enantiomers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei-lei; Xue, Hai; Li, Li; Lu, Xiao-fan; Chen, Zhi-wei; Lu, Gang

    2015-06-01

    Racemic (±)-F18 (10-chloromethyl-11-demethyl-12-oxo-calanolide A), an analog of nature product (+)-calanolide A, is a new anti-HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcript inhibitor (NNRTI). A successful enantioseparation of (±)-F18 offering (R)-F18 and (S)-F18 was achieved by a chiral stationary phase prepared HPLC. Their absolute configurations were determined by measurement of their electronic circular dichroisms combined with modem quantum-chemical calculations. Further investigation revealed that (R)-F18 and (S)-F18 shared a similar anti-HIV activities, however, (R)-F18 was more potent than (S)-F18 against wild-type virus, K101E mutation and P225H mutation pseudoviruses. PMID:26521445

  12. Symmetrical 1-pyrrolidineacetamide showing anti-HIV activity through a new binding site on HIV-1 integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li DU; Ya-xue ZHAO; Liu-meng YANG; Yong-tang ZHENG; Yun TANG; Xu SHEN; Hua-liang JIANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To characterize the functional and pharmacological features of a symmetrical 1-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene) bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide,as a new anti-HIV compound which could competitively inhibit HIV-1 integrase (IN) binding to viral DNA.Methods:A surface plasma resonance (SPR)-based competitive assay was employed to determine the compound's inhibitory activity,and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell assay was used to qualify the antiviral activity.The potential binding sites were predicted by molecular modeling and determined by site-directed mutagenesis and a SPR binding assay.Results:l-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene) bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide could competitively inhibit IN binding to viral DNA with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 7.29±0.68 μmol/L as investigated by SPR-based investigation.Another antiretroviral activity assay showed that this compound exhibited inhibition against HⅣ-Ⅰ(ⅢB) replication with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) value of 40.54 μmol/L in C8166 cells,and cytotoxicity with a cytotoxic concentration value of 173.84 μmol/L in mock-infected C8166 cells.Molecular docking predicted 3 potential residues as 1-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene)bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide binding sites.The importance of 3 key amino acid residues (Lys103,Lys173,and Thr174) involved in the binding was further identified by site-directed mutagenesis and a SPR binding assay.Conclusion:This present work identified a new anti-HIV compound through a new IN-binding site which is expected to supply new potential drug-binding site information for HIV-1 integrase inhibitor discovery and development.

  13. Anti-HIV-1 activities of the extracts from the medicinal plant Linum grandiflorum Desf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammed, Magdy M. D.; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Ibrahim, Nabaweya A.;

    2009-01-01

    As part of our screening of anti-AIDS agents from natural sources e.g. Ixora undulata, Paulownia tomentosa, Fortunella margarita, Aegle marmelos and Erythrina abyssinica, the different organic and aqueous extracts of Linum grandiflorum leaves and seeds were evaluated in vitro by the microculture ...

  14. Molecular Mechanisms in Activation of Latent HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Rafati (Haleh)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Finding a cure for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is extremely challenging. Development of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), transformed HIV-1 infection from an acute syndrome into chronic disease. Although using HAART results in suppressio

  15. 蕨麻提取物的体外抗HIV-1活性及毒性研究%Study on the anti-HIV-1 activity and toxicity of the potentilla anserine L.extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁军; 黄洋; 徐维四; 孙坚萍; 刘玉磊; 李灵芝; 马丽英

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the anti-HIV-1 activity and toxicity of the potenlilla anserine L. extract. Methods TZM-bl and MT-4 cell lines were infected with HIV-1 laboratory-adapted strain(SF33), two H1V-1 clinical i-solates(XJDC257,020100968)and four HIV-1 pseudotype viruses(9-14;18-36,74-2 and Z20-11). The activity of inhibiting replication of HIV-1 was observed respectively by using Luciferase assay system based on TZM bl cell line and P24 antigen expression detection based on MT-4 cell line.. The TZM-bl, MT-4 and PBMCs were co-cultured with polentilla anserine L. extract of different concentrations, then CCK-8 kit was used to detect the number of the living cells for evaluating the cytotoxicity of the extract. Results The IC50 and SI of the potentill anserine L. extract against SF33 was 6. 2 μg/mL. 26. 4 by using MT-4 cell line and 4. 7 μg/mL. 73. 5 by using TZM-bl cell line. The IC50 and TI of the extract against HIV-1 clinical isolates XJDC257 and 020100968 was 2.1 μg/mL. 70. 6 and 1. 9 μg/mL, 77. 6, respectively. The IC50 of the extract against the HIV-1 pseudotype viruses 9-14,18-36,74-2 and Z20-11 was 1. 8 μg/mL, 1. 0 μg/mL, 3. 4 μg/mL and 3. 5 μg/mL,respectively and therapeutic index(TI) was 81. 9, 147. 5,43. 4 and 42. 1, respectively. Conclusion: The potentilla anserine L. extract could inhibit the replication of HIV-1 in vitro.%目的 研究蕨麻提取物的抗艾滋病病毒Ⅰ型( HIV-1)活性及毒性.方法 用HIV-1实验室适应株SF33、临床分离株XJDC257和020100968、假病毒颗粒9-14,18-36,74-2和Z20-11分别感染TZM-b1、MT-4,利用基于TZM-b1细胞的荧光素酶检测体系和基于MT-4细胞的P24抗原检测方法,观察蕨麻提取物抑制HIV-1病毒复制的活性;用不同稀释度的蕨麻提取物与TZM-b1.MT-4.PBMCs共培养,使用Cell Counting Kit-8检测活细胞的数量,观察蕨麻提取物对相应细胞的毒性作用.结果 利用MT-4细胞和TZM-b1细胞测得蕨麻提取物对SF33的半数抑制浓度( IC50)

  16. HIV-1逆转录酶抑制剂的合成及活性评价%Synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity evaluation of N-1-alkyl-5-halogeno-6-alkylamino uracils as novel non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫寒; 王孝伟; 郭盈; 张志丽; 刘俊义

    2011-01-01

    N-1-alkyl-5-halogeno-6-alkylamino uracils, which are novel 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT)analogues, were synthesized as the selective and potent non-nucleoside human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Some of the compounds showed potent inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. For instance, compounds ld, lm and In exhibited potent anti-HIV-1 activity with the ICso values of 13.3, 11.7 and 3.15 gM, respectively,which are comparable to that of nevirapinc(IC5O 8.38 μM).%本研究以HIV-1逆转录酶为靶点,设计了一类具有HEPT类结构的化合物:1-乙氧基甲基/苄氧基甲基-5-卤代-6-脂肪胺尿嘧啶作为抑制剂,并对合成的目标化合物进行了生物活性测定,一些化合物显示出较强的抗HIV生物活性,与对照物奈韦拉平相比(IC50 8.30μM)化合物1d,1m和1n的IC50 值分别达到了13.3,11.7和3.15 μM.

  17. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity Evaluation for Novel 3a,6a-Dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazole-4,6-dione Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Nan Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for new molecular constructs that resemble the critical two-metal binding pharmacophore and the halo-substituted phenyl functionality required for HIV-1 integrase (IN inhibition represents a vibrant area of research within drug discovery. As reported herein, we have modified our recently disclosed 1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl]-pyrrole-2,5-dione scaffolds to design 35 novel compounds with improved biological activities against HIV-1. These new compounds show single-digit micromolar antiviral potencies against HIV-1 and low toxicity. Among of them, compound 9g and 15i had potent anti-HIV-1 activities (EC50 < 5 μM and excellent therapeutic index (TI, CC50/EC50 > 100. These two compounds have potential as lead compounds for further optimization into clinical anti-HIV-1 agents.

  18. Characterization of Antiviral Activity of Benzamide Derivative AH0109 against HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Liyu; Ao, Zhujun; Jayappa, Kallesh Danappa; Kobinger, Gary; Liu, ShuiPing; Wu, Guojun; Wainberg, Mark A.; Yao, Xiaojian

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 infection, anti-HIV-1 strategies play a major role in disease control. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance against all currently used anti-HIV-1 molecules necessitates the development of new antiviral molecules and/or strategies against HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have identified a benzamide derivative named AH0109 that exhibits potent anti-HIV-1 activity at an 50% effective concentration of 0.7 μM in HIV-1-susceptible CD...

  19. The anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin protects the genital mucosal epithelial barrier from disruption and blocks replication of HIV-1 and HSV-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H Ferreira

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a known mechanism that facilitates HIV acquisition and the spread of infection. In this study, we evaluated whether curcumin, a potent and safe anti-inflammatory compound, could be used to abrogate inflammatory processes that facilitate HIV-1 acquisition in the female genital tract (FGT and contribute to HIV amplification. Primary, human genital epithelial cells (GECs were pretreated with curcumin and exposed to HIV-1 or HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120, both of which have been shown to disrupt epithelial tight junction proteins, including ZO-1 and occludin. Pre-treatment with curcumin prevented disruption of the mucosal barrier by maintaining ZO-1 and occludin expression and maintained trans-epithelial electric resistance across the genital epithelium. Curcumin pre-treatment also abrogated the gp120-mediated upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL-6, which mediate barrier disruption, as well as the chemokines IL-8, RANTES and interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10, which are capable of recruiting HIV target cells to the FGT. GECs treated with curcumin and exposed to the sexually transmitted co-infecting microbes HSV-1, HSV-2 and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were unable to elicit innate inflammatory responses that indirectly induced activation of the HIV promoter and curcumin blocked Toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated induction of HIV replication in chronically infected T-cells. Finally, curcumin treatment resulted in significantly decreased HIV-1 and HSV-2 replication in chronically infected T-cells and primary GECs, respectively. All together, our results suggest that the use of anti-inflammatory compounds such as curcumin may offer a viable alternative for the prevention and/or control of HIV replication in the FGT.

  20. The anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin protects the genital mucosal epithelial barrier from disruption and blocks replication of HIV-1 and HSV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Victor H; Nazli, Aisha; Dizzell, Sara E; Mueller, Kristen; Kaushic, Charu

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a known mechanism that facilitates HIV acquisition and the spread of infection. In this study, we evaluated whether curcumin, a potent and safe anti-inflammatory compound, could be used to abrogate inflammatory processes that facilitate HIV-1 acquisition in the female genital tract (FGT) and contribute to HIV amplification. Primary, human genital epithelial cells (GECs) were pretreated with curcumin and exposed to HIV-1 or HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120), both of which have been shown to disrupt epithelial tight junction proteins, including ZO-1 and occludin. Pre-treatment with curcumin prevented disruption of the mucosal barrier by maintaining ZO-1 and occludin expression and maintained trans-epithelial electric resistance across the genital epithelium. Curcumin pre-treatment also abrogated the gp120-mediated upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6, which mediate barrier disruption, as well as the chemokines IL-8, RANTES and interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10), which are capable of recruiting HIV target cells to the FGT. GECs treated with curcumin and exposed to the sexually transmitted co-infecting microbes HSV-1, HSV-2 and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were unable to elicit innate inflammatory responses that indirectly induced activation of the HIV promoter and curcumin blocked Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated induction of HIV replication in chronically infected T-cells. Finally, curcumin treatment resulted in significantly decreased HIV-1 and HSV-2 replication in chronically infected T-cells and primary GECs, respectively. All together, our results suggest that the use of anti-inflammatory compounds such as curcumin may offer a viable alternative for the prevention and/or control of HIV replication in the FGT. PMID:25856395

  1. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... to CD4 and that post binding events may be common to the infection of lymphocytes. Anti HIV-1 sera showed neutralizing activity against heterologous and even autologous escape virus. This finding, together with the observation that monocytes and M phi s are infected in vivo, suggests that protection...

  2. Gnidimacrin, a Potent Anti-HIV Diterpene, Can Eliminate Latent HIV-1 Ex Vivo by Activation of Protein Kinase C β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Weihong; Huang, Li; Zhu, Lei; Ferrari, Guido; Chan, Cliburn; Li, Wei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2015-11-12

    HIV-1-latency-reversing agents, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), were ineffective in reducing latent HIV-1 reservoirs ex vivo using CD4 cells from patients as a model. This deficiency poses a challenge to current pharmacological approaches for HIV-1 eradication. The results of this study indicated that gnidimacrin (GM) was able to markedly reduce the latent HIV-1 DNA level and the frequency of latently infected cells in an ex vivo model using patients peripheral blood mononuclear cells. GM induced approximately 10-fold more HIV-1 production than the HDACI SAHA or romidepsin, which may be responsible for the effectiveness of GM in reducing latent HIV-1 levels. GM achieved these effects at low picomolar concentrations by selective activation of protein kinase C βI and βII. Notably, GM was able to reduce the frequency of HIV-1 latently infected cells at concentrations without global T cell activation or stimulating inflammatory cytokine production. GM merits further development as a clinical trial candidate for latent HIV-1 eradication.

  3. Aqueous extracts from peppermint, sage and lemon balm leaves display potent anti-HIV-1 activity by increasing the virion density

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann Ingo; Nolkemper Silke; Venzke Stephanie; Goffinet Christine; Geuenich Silvia; Plinkert Peter; Reichling Jürgen; Keppler Oliver T

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Aqueous extracts from leaves of well known species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their potency to inhibit infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Results Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.), and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) exhibited a high and concentration-dependent activity against the infection of HIV-1 in T-cell lines, primary macrophages, and in ex vivo tonsil histocultures with 50% inhibi...

  4. Rational design, synthesis, anti-HIV-1 RT and antimicrobial activity of novel 3-(6-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-1-(piperazin-1-yl)propan-1-one derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Subhash; Wang, Ping; Ashok, Penta; Yang, Liu-Meng; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Murugesan, Sankaranarayanan

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, fifteen novel 3-(6-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-1-(piperazin-1-yl)propan-1-one (6a-o) derivatives were designed as inhibitor of HIV-1 RT using ligand based drug design approach and in-silico evaluated for drug-likeness properties. Designed compounds were synthesized, characterized and in-vitro evaluated for RT inhibitory activity against wild HIV-1 RT strain. Among the tested compounds, four compounds (6a, 6b, 6j and 6o) exhibited significant inhibition of HIV-1 RT (IC50⩽10μg/ml). All synthesized compounds were also evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity as well as cytotoxicity on T lymphocytes, in which compounds 6b and 6l exhibited significant anti-HIV activity (EC50 values 4.72 and 5.45μg/ml respectively) with good safety index. Four compounds (6a, 6b, 6j and 6o) found significantly active against HIV-1 RT in the in-vitro assay were in-silico evaluated against two mutant RT strains as well as one wild strain. Further, titled compounds were evaluated for in-vitro antibacterial (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and antifungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger) activities.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and anti-HIV-1 efficacy of negatively charged human serum albumins in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, M.E; Swart, P.J; Schutten, M; Smit, C; Proost, Hans; Osterhaus, A.DME; Meijer, D.K F

    1997-01-01

    Negatively charged albumins (NCAs, with the prototypes succinylated human serum albumin (Suc-HSA) and aconitylated human serum albumin (Aco-HSA)), modified proteins with a potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) activity in vitro, were studied for their pharmacokinetic behaviour

  6. Aqueous extracts from peppermint, sage and lemon balm leaves display potent anti-HIV-1 activity by increasing the virion density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Ingo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aqueous extracts from leaves of well known species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their potency to inhibit infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. Results Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., and sage (Salvia officinalis L. exhibited a high and concentration-dependent activity against the infection of HIV-1 in T-cell lines, primary macrophages, and in ex vivo tonsil histocultures with 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.004%. The aqueous Lamiaceae extracts did not or only at very high concentrations interfere with cell viability. Mechanistically, extract exposure of free virions potently and rapidly inhibited infection, while exposure of surface-bound virions or target cells alone had virtually no antiviral effect. In line with this observation, a virion-fusion assay demonstrated that HIV-1 entry was drastically impaired following treatment of particles with Lamiaceae extracts, and the magnitude of this effect at the early stage of infection correlated with the inhibitory potency on HIV-1 replication. Extracts were active against virions carrying diverse envelopes (X4 and R5 HIV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, ecotropic murine leukemia virus, but not against a non-enveloped adenovirus. Following exposure to Lamiaceae extracts, the stability of virions as well as virion-associated levels of envelope glycoprotein and processed Gag protein were unaffected, while, surprisingly, sucrose-density equilibrium gradient analyses disclosed a marked increase of virion density. Conclusion Aqueous extracts from Lamiaceae can drastically and rapidly reduce the infectivity of HIV-1 virions at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An extract-induced enhancement of the virion's density prior to its surface engagement appears to be the most likely mode of action. By harbouring also a strong activity against herpes simplex virus type 2, these extracts may provide a basis

  7. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera...... on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...

  8. An important role for type Ⅲ interferon(IFN-lambda) in anti-HIV activity%新型干扰素——IFN-λ抗HIV-1感染

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵颖岚; 孙黎; 王旭; 侯炜; 霍文哲

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine whether IFN-λ has the ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection of blood monocyte-derived macrophages and its mechanism(s). Methods Macrophages were pretreated with IFN-λ/ IFN-λ2 for 24 h before infected by HIV-1 R5 strains (Bal, Jago, and JRFL). And then the culture supernatants were detected HIV-1 reverse transcription (RT) activity and p24 protein expression by HIV-1 BT assay and ELISA. The expressions of IFN-λ receptor, CD4, CCRS, CXCR4 were evaluated by real-time PCR. Results Both IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ2, when added to macrophage cultures, inhibited HIV-1 infection and replication. This IFN-λ-mediated anti-HIV-I activity is broad, as IFN-λ could inhibit infection by both laboratory-adapted and clinical strains of HIV-1. Investigations of mechanism(s) responsible for the IFN-λ action showed that although IFN-λ had little effect on HIV-1 entry receptor CD4 and co-receptor CCR5 and CXCR4 expression, IFN-λ inhibited HIV-I infection of macrophages through connecting with IFN-λ recep-tor. Conclusion IFN-λ could inhibit HIV-I replication in macrophages. These findings indicate that IFN-λ may have a therapeutic value in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.%目的 研究干扰素λ(IFN-λ)是否对HIV-1感染人臣噬细胞有抑制作用,并对可能介导IFN-λ抗HIV-1作用的受体和辅助受体表达水平进行研究,初步探讨其抗HIV-1感染的机制.方法 HIV-1毒株感染人巨噬细胞前用IFN-λ处理细胞24 h,感染后第4天、第8天以及第12天分别检测感染细胞上清中HIV-1逆转录酶(RT)活性和p24蛋白水平,并用实时定量PCR检测细胞上IFN-λ受体、CD4、CCR5、CXCR4的表达.结果 IFN-λ对HIV-1感染人巨噬细胞具有明显抑制作用,且此作用与其剂量及作用时间呈正相关.但IFN-λ对CD4、CCR5、CXCR4的表达影响无统计学意义.结论 IFN-λ能有效抑制HIV-1感染人口噬细胞,并证实这一作用是通过其受体发挥功能的.但IFN-λ介导的抗HIV-1

  9. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of New MKC-442 Analogues with an Alkynyl-Substituted 6-Benzyl Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aly, Youssef L.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.; La Colla, Paolo;

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis and antiviral activities are reported of a series of 6-(3-alkynyl benzyl)-substituted analogues of MKC-442 (6-benzyl-1-(ethoxymethyl)-5-isopropyluracil), a highly potent agent against HIV. The 3-alkynyl group is assumed to give a better stacking of the substituted benzyl group to revers...

  10. GACPAT HIV 1 + 2: a simple, inexpensive assay to screen for, and discriminate between, anti-HIV 1 and anti-HIV 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, J V; Connell, J A; Reinbott, P; Garcia, A B; Avillez, F; Mortimer, P P

    1995-01-01

    A simple and cheap assay suitable for screening for anti-HIV 1 and anti-HIV 2 and discriminating between them was evaluated. In it specimens are incubated in U-bottomed microplate wells coated with anti-human IgG for 30 min at room temperature. After washing, 100 microliters of a 1 in 50 dilution of HIV 1-coated gelatin particles (Serodia-HIV 1/2, Fujirebio) are added. Settling patterns are read on the second day: A positive reaction is indicated by adherence of the particles and a negative by a button. The HIV 1 particles are then washed away and HIV 2 particles added. Anti-HIV 2 reaction patterns are read on the third day. To assess the performance of the modified "GACPAT HIV 1 + 2" assay a panel of 1,621 serum/plasma specimens was used. It comprised validated anti-HIV 1 positive (n = 220), anti-HIV 2 positive (n = 214), dual anti-HIV 1/anti-HIV 2 positive (n = 11), and anti-HIV negative (n = 1,176) serum/plasma specimens. All 434 specimens that contained anti-HIV 1 or anti-HIV 2 reacted positively with the homologous particles. The 11 dually positive specimens reacted positively with both HIV 1 and HIV 2 particles. Five (2.3%) anti-HIV 1 and five (2.3%) anti-HIV 2 positive specimens gave positive reactions with both particle types, but none of the five cross-reactive anti-HIV 2 specimens were dually reactive when the order of particle addition was reversed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Anti-HIV-1 activities of the extracts from the medicinal plant Linum grandiflorum Desf.:In Proceedings of 4th Conference on Research and Development of Pharmaceutical Industries (Current Challenges)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Magdy M. D.; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Ibrahim, Nabaweya A.; Awad, Nagwa E.; Zeid, Ibrahim F.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard; Jensen, Kenneth Bendix; Colla, Paolo L.

    2009-01-01

    As part of our screening of anti-AIDS agents from natural sources e.g. Ixora undulata, Paulownia tomentosa, Fortunella margarita, Aegle marmelos and Erythrina abyssinica, the different organic and aqueous extracts of Linum grandiflorum leaves and seeds were evaluated in vitro by the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The activity of the tested extracts against multiplication of HIV-1 wild type IIIB, N119, A17, and EFVR in acutely infected cells was based on inhibition of virus-induced cyto...

  12. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni;

    2016-01-01

    The 'shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected...... individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4(+) T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing...... to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate...

  13. Anti-HIV-1 activity of salivary MUC5B and MUC7 mucins from HIV patients with different CD4 counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roux Paul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that MUC5B and MUC7 mucins from saliva of HIV negative individuals inhibit HIV-1 activity by 100% in an in vitro assay. The purpose of this subsequent study was to investigate whether MUC5B and MUC7 from saliva of HIV patients or with full blown AIDS had a similar inhibitory activity against the virus. Methods Salivary MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV patients with different CD4 counts ( 400 were incubated with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells. Cells were then cultured and viral replication was measured by a qualitative p24 antigen assay. The size, charge and immunoreactivity of mucins from HIV negative and positive individuals was also analysed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA respectively. Results It was shown that irrespective of their CD4 counts both MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV patients, unlike the MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV negative individuals, did not inhibit HIV-1 activity. Size, charge and immunoreactivity differences between the mucins from HIV negative and positive individuals and among the mucins from HIV patients of different CD4 count was observed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA. Conclusions Purified salivary mucins from HIV positive patients do not inhibit the AIDS virus in an in vitro assay. Although the reason for the inability of mucins from infected individuals to inhibit the virus is not known, it is likely that there is an alteration of the glycosylation pattern, and therefore of charge of mucin, in HIV positive patients. The ability to inhibit the virus by aggregation by sugar chains is thus diminished.

  14. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Yousfi, Rahima; Mohan, Viswaraman; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Moog, Christiane; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Clayette, Pascal; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1–7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS) as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b) directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1. PMID:27788205

  15. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  16. Microvirin, a Novel α(1,2)-Mannose-specific Lectin Isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa, Has Anti-HIV-1 Activity Comparable with That of Cyanovirin-N but a Much Higher Safety Profile*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskens, Dana; Férir, Geoffrey; Vermeire, Kurt; Kehr, Jan-Christoph; Balzarini, Jan; Dittmann, Elke; Schols, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Microvirin (MVN), a recently isolated lectin from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806, shares 33% identity with the potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protein cyanovirin-N (CV-N) isolated from Nostoc ellipsosporum, and both lectins bind to similar carbohydrate structures. MVN is able to inhibit infection by a wide variety of HIV-1 laboratory-adapted strains and clinical isolates of different tropisms and subtypes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. MVN also inhibits syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1-infected T cells and uninfected CD4+ T cells and inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 binding and transmission to CD4+ T cells. Long term passaging of HIV-1 exposed to dose-escalating concentrations of MVN resulted in the selection of a mutant virus with four deleted high mannose-type glycans in the envelope gp120. The MVN-resistant virus was still highly sensitive to various other carbohydrate binding lectins (e.g. CV-N, HHA, GNA, and UDA) but not anymore to the carbohydrate-specific 2G12 monoclonal antibody. Importantly, MVN is more than 50-fold less cytotoxic than CV-N. Also in sharp contrast to CV-N, MVN did not increase the level of the activation markers CD25, CD69, and HLA-DR in CD4+ T lymphocytes, and subsequently, MVN did not enhance viral replication in pretreated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Therefore, MVN may qualify as a useful lectin for potential microbicidal use based on its broad and potent antiviral activity and virtual lack of any stimulatory properties and cellular toxicity. PMID:20507987

  17. Alterations in HIV-1 LTR promoter activity during AIDS progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 variants evolving in AIDS patients frequently show increased replicative capacity compared to those present during early asymptomatic infection. It is known that late stage HIV-1 variants often show an expanded coreceptor tropism and altered Nef function. In the present study we investigated whether enhanced HIV-1 LTR promoter activity might also evolve during disease progression. Our results demonstrate increased LTR promoter activity after AIDS progression in 3 of 12 HIV-1-infected individuals studied. Further analysis revealed that multiple alterations in the U3 core-enhancer and in the transactivation-response (TAR) region seem to be responsible for the enhanced functional activity. Our findings show that in a subset of HIV-1-infected individuals enhanced LTR transcription contributes to the increased replicative potential of late stage virus isolates and might accelerate disease progression

  18. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamata, Masakazu, E-mail: masa3k@ucla.edu [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kim, Patrick Y. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ng, Hwee L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O' Connor, Sean [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, Otto O. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chen, Irvin S.Y. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  19. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8+ T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8+ T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8+ T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8+ T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24Gag in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8+ T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect

  20. Cloaked similarity between HIV-1 and SARS-CoV suggests an anti-SARS strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kliger Yossef

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a febrile respiratory illness. The disease has been etiologically linked to a novel coronavirus that has been named the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV, whose genome was recently sequenced. Since it is a member of the Coronaviridae, its spike protein (S2 is believed to play a central role in viral entry by facilitating fusion between the viral and host cell membranes. The protein responsible for viral-induced membrane fusion of HIV-1 (gp41 differs in length, and has no sequence homology with S2. Results Sequence analysis reveals that the two viral proteins share the sequence motifs that construct their active conformation. These include (1 an N-terminal leucine/isoleucine zipper-like sequence, and (2 a C-terminal heptad repeat located upstream of (3 an aromatic residue-rich region juxtaposed to the (4 transmembrane segment. Conclusions This study points to a similar mode of action for the two viral proteins, suggesting that anti-viral strategy that targets the viral-induced membrane fusion step can be adopted from HIV-1 to SARS-CoV. Recently the FDA approved Enfuvirtide, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat of HIV-1 gp41, as an anti-AIDS agent. Enfuvirtide and C34, another anti HIV-1 peptide, exert their inhibitory activity by binding to a leucine/isoleucine zipper-like sequence in gp41, thus inhibiting a conformational change of gp41 required for its activation. We suggest that peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat of the S2 protein may serve as inhibitors for SARS-CoV entry.

  1. Development and identification of a novel anti-HIV-1 peptide derived by modification of the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 integrase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eSala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The viral enzyme integrase (IN is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD, which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1-50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18, which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 M. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25, that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 µM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1.

  2. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C.; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1–50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  3. Assessment on depressive status and the therapeutic effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy among anti-HIV-1 (+) population%高效抗反转录病毒治疗对HIV-1感染者抑郁情绪的影响及其评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俐; 杨涤; 赵红心; 韩宁; 肖江; 陈玉芳; 韩筑; 李彦媚; 魏凯

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the depressive status and its influence on Chinese HIV-1 (+) population,and how it was influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and the CD4+ T cell count.Methods Anti-HIV-1 (+) patients (age between 18 and 65 years old) who had met the criteria to commence the anti-HIV treatment but had not yet started,were selected from the Beijing Ditan Hospital between March 2011 and June 2012.BDI-Ⅱ (Beck Depression Inventory) and a self-designed questionnaire were used to evaluate the baseline and the status of 48 weeks post the HAART treatment.Statistically,t test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare the BDI scores under different conditions and before/after the HAART.Results (1) Of 100 subjects:male to female ratio was 99:1 ; the average age was 31.37 ± 5.58 years; the average education background was of 13.13 ± 3.51 years; the unemployed percentage was 4% ; time before being identified as anti-HIV-1 (+) was 5.0 (1.0-21.0)months; the percentage being infected through homosexual contact was 83%.The baseline BDI score was 6.0 (3-10.25).(2) There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in BDI score between those subjects having had education less or more than 12 years; the BDI score of patients whose anti-HIV-1 (+)was significantly higher (P<0.05) among those discovered within the past 6 months than those more than 6 months.The BDI score of patients whose baseline CD4+T cell count below 200 cells/μ1 was significantly higher (P<0.05) than those with baseline CD4+ T cell count greater than 200 cells/μl.The CD4+ T cell count was significantly high (P<0.001) after 48 weeks of anti-viral treatment,but the BDI score was not significantly different (P>0.05).There was no significant change (P> 0.05) in the proportion of patients with different degrees of BDI score before and after 48 weeks of antiviral treatment.Conclusion Depression in HIV patients was most overt in the first six months when they were aware of

  4. Testing anti-HIV activity of antiretroviral agents in vitro using flow cytometry analysis of CEM-GFP cells infected with transfection-derived HIV-1 NL4-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezza, Caterina; Grelli, Sandro; Federico, Maurizio; Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Mastino, Antonio; Macchi, Beatrice

    2016-06-01

    An assay, specifically optimized to evaluate the anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals by flow cytometry analysis, is described. As widely used anti-HIV agents, zidovudine (AZT), abacavir (ABC), 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (DDI), lamivudine (3TC), nevirapine (NVP), and efavirenz (EFV), and as drugs of recent approval raltegravir (RAL), etravirine (ETR), and rilpivirine (RPV), were utilized as reference drugs. HIV-1 NL4-3 virus was prepared by transfection of HEK293T cells with purified plasmid DNA and quantified by p24 antigen-capture assay. For infection, CEM-GFP cells were exposed to vehicle or to several concentrations of the drugs for 2 hr at 37 °C before HIV-1 NL4-3 was added to each sample. The adsorption was prolonged for 3 hr at 37 °C. After 72 hr of incubation, HIV-induced GFP expression in infected CEM-GFP cells was assessed by flow cytometry analysis and expressed as % positive cells. For comparison, p24 production in supernatants was assessed by a commercial ELISA kit. On the basis of IC50 values, the anti-HIV activity, as assayed by this method, was EFV > 3TC > AZT > NVP > DDI > ABC and ETR > RPV > RAL. The comparison between the IC50 values calculated through flow cytometry and p24 production revealed overlapping results, showing that the optimized protocol of CEM-GFP infection with HIV NL4-3 is a suitable method to perform quantitative, rapid and low-expensive screening tests to evaluate the in vitro effect of new candidate anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26519867

  5. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Chaves Valadão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine’s potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V. Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine.

  6. Synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of 1-substiuted 6-(3-cyanobenzoyl) and [(3-cyanophenyl)fluoromethyl]-5-ethyl-uracils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta;

    2009-01-01

    1-Substiuted 6-(3-cyanobenzoyl) and [(3-cyanophenyl)fluoromethyl]-5-ethyl-uracils were synthesized and evaluated in cell-based assays against HIV-1 wild-type and its clinically relevant non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant mutants. Some of the synthesized compounds sho...

  7. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-03-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:26607397

  8. Anti-HIV activities of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor racemic 11-demethyl-calanolide A%HIV-1逆转录酶抑制剂消旋11-去甲胡桐素A的抗HIV-1活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭宗根; 陈鸿珊; 王琳; 刘刚

    2008-01-01

    本文比较研究消旋11*去甲胡桐素A[(±)-11-demethyl-calauolide A]和其母体消旋胡桐素A[(±)-calanolide A]在体外、细胞培养内和小鼠体内给药后血清的抗HIV+1(human immunodeficiency virus type 1)活性.二者在体外对HIV-1逆转录酶(reverse transcriptase,RT)的半数抑制浓度(IC50)分别为(3.028±2.514)μmol·L-1和(3.965±5.235)μmol·L-1.在HIV-1感染的MT-4细胞培养内抑制HIV-1细胞病变的IC50和选择指数分别为(1.081±0.337)μmol·L-1和26及(1.297±0.076)μmol·L-1和21.腹腔注射小鼠1次(100 mg·L-1)后30 min和60 min的血清对HIV-1 RT的抑制率前者分别为(42.7±1.5)%和(32.2±6.1)%,后者分别为(40.7±6.3)%和(29.2±6.7)%,说明消旋11-去甲胡桐素A为新非核苷类HIV-1逆转录酶抑制剂,比其母体消旋胡桐素A的抗HIV-1活性略高,值得进一步研究.

  9. Oxaliplatin antagonizes HIV-1 latency by activating NF-κB without causing global T cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Pengfei; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Hanxian [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, Huabiao [Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhu, Huanzhang, E-mail: hzzhu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 in this cell line model of HIV-1 latency. • Reactivation is synergized when oxaliplatin is used in combination with valproic acid. • Oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 through activation of NF-kB and does not induce T cell activation. - Abstract: Reactivation of latent HIV-1 is a promising strategy for the clearance of the viral reservoirs. Because of the limitations of current agents, identification of new latency activators is urgently required. Using an established model of HIV-1 latency, we examined the effect of Oxaliplatin on latent HIV-1 reactivation. We showed that Oxaliplatin, alone or in combination with valproic acid (VPA), was able to reactivate HIV-1 without inducing global T cell activation. We also provided evidence that Oxaliplatin reactivated HIV-1 expression by inducing nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Our results indicated that Oxaliplatin could be a potential drug candidate for anti-latency therapies.

  10. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  11. Anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by hyperimmune bovine colostrum IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramski, Marit; Lichtfuss, Gregor F; Navis, Marjon; Isitman, Gamze; Wren, Leia; Rawlin, Grant; Center, Rob J; Jaworowski, Anthony; Kent, Stephen J; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity play an important role in protection against HIV-1 infection, but generating sufficient amounts of antibodies to study their protective efficacy is difficult. HIV-specific IgG can be easily and inexpensively produced in large quantities using bovine colostrum. We previously vaccinated cows with HIV-1 envelope gp140 and elicited high titers of anti-gp140-binding IgG in colostrum. In the present study, we determined whether bovine antibodies would also demonstrate specific cytotoxic activity. We found that bovine IgG bind to Fcγ-receptors (FcγRs) on human neutrophils, monocytes, and NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antibody-dependent killing was observed in the presence of anti-HIV-1 colostrum IgG but not nonimmune colostrum IgG. Killing was dependent on Fc and FcγR interaction since ADDC activity was not seen with F(ab')(2) fragments. ADCC activity was primarily mediated by CD14(+) monocytes with FcγRIIa (CD32a) as the major receptor responsible for monocyte-mediated ADCC in response to bovine IgG. In conclusion, we demonstrate that bovine anti-HIV colostrum IgG have robust HIV-1-specific ADCC activity and therefore offer a useful source of antibodies able to provide a rapid and potent response against HIV-1 infection. This could assist the development of novel Ab-mediated approaches for prevention of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:22730083

  12. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Di...

  13. Evaluation of the effect of pyrimethamine, an anti-malarial drug, on HIV-1 replication

    OpenAIRE

    Oguariri, Raphael M.; Joseph W Adelsberger; Michael W Baseler; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2010-01-01

    Co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with malaria is one of the pandemic problems in Africa and parts of Asia. Here we investigated the impact of PYR and two other clinical anti-malarial drugs (chloroquine [CQ] or artemisinin [ART]) on HIV-1 replication. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or MT-2 cells were infected with HIVNL4.3 strain and treated with different concentrations of the anti-malarial drugs. HIV-1 replication was measured using p24 ELISA. We show that 10 μM...

  14. Ligand-Based Virtual Screening in a Search for Novel Anti-HIV-1 Chemotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurczyk, Agata; Warszycki, Dawid; Musiol, Robert; Kafel, Rafał; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2015-10-26

    In a search for new anti-HIV-1 chemotypes, we developed a multistep ligand-based virtual screening (VS) protocol combining machine learning (ML) methods with the privileged structures (PS) concept. In its learning step, the VS protocol was based on HIV integrase (IN) inhibitors fetched from the ChEMBL database. The performances of various ML methods and PS weighting scheme were evaluated and applied as VS filtering criteria. Finally, a database of 1.5 million commercially available compounds was virtually screened using a multistep ligand-based cascade, and 13 selected unique structures were tested by measuring the inhibition of HIV replication in infected cells. This approach resulted in the discovery of two novel chemotypes with moderate antiretroviral activity, that, together with their topological diversity, make them good candidates as lead structures for future optimization.

  15. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of New Sonogashira-Modified Emivirine (MKC-442) Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danel, Krzystof; Jørgensen, Per Trolle; La Colla, Paolo;

    2009-01-01

    with higher activity against HIV-1-resistant mutants. The syntheses involved Pd-catalyzed C,C-coupling reactions, addition of disulfides, and click chemistry on the terminal C C bond as well as addition of bromine to the so formed internal C C bonds. Sonogashira coupling were performed with silyl......The MKC-442 analogue 6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-ethyluracil substituted with a (propargyloxo)methyl group at N(1) has previously been found highly active against HIV-1. The C C bond in the substituent at N(1) is here utilized in a series of chemical reactions in order to develop new agents...... effective compound against problematic HIV-1 mutants. The general observation in the present work is that a combination of alkyne and aryl in the substituent at N(1) leads to highly active compounds against HIV-1...

  16. Particle agglutination test "Serodia HIV-1/2" as a novel anti-HIV-1/2 screening test: comparative study on 3311 serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, M; Zener, N; Seme, K; Kristancic, L

    1997-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays are most widely used screening tests for antibodies to human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV). Nevertheless, the need of simpler, noninstrumented tests is evident in many parts of the world, where laboratory facilities and trained personnel are limited, and HIV incidence is high. A recently developed variant of gelatin-particle agglutination tests, Serodia HIV-1/2 (Fujirebio Inc., Tokyo, Japan), is one of such simple and noninstrumented tests. To evaluate its utility, 3311 serum samples (281 anti-HIV-1 positive, 8 anti-HIV-2 positive and 3022 anti-HIV-1/2 negative) obtained from 2632 individuals from Slovenia, other parts of former Yugoslavia and Senegal were investigated. No false-negative results and only one false-positive result were obtained during the procedures, giving overall sensitivity and specificity of the particle agglutination test of 100% and 99.97%, respectively. We have concluded that Serodia HIV-1/2 test is highly specific and sensitive for detection of anti-HIV-1/2 antibodies, suitable for small blood banks and for epidemiological surveys.

  17. New anti-HIV-1, antimalarial, and antifungal compounds from Terminalia bellerica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsaraj, R; Pushpangadan, P; Smitt, U W;

    1997-01-01

    A bioactivity-guided fractionation of an extract of Terminalia bellerica fruit rind led to the isolation of two new lignans named termilignan (1) and thannilignan (2), together with 7-hydroxy-3',4'-(methylenedioxy)flavan (3) and anolignan B (4). All four compounds possessed demonstrable anti-HIV-1...

  18. Frequency of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Regina Manzolli Leite

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1 and relate it with the different clinical courses of the disease. Blood samples were collected in EDTA tubes from 145 individuals. HIV-1 infection was confirmed by ELISA test. The presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies and HLA allele's were determined. Clinical evolution was set as fast (3 years. Class I anti-HLA alloantibodies presence was lower in healthy individuals than in those infected by HIV-1 (4.2% against 32.4%. However, an equal distribution of these alloantibodies was found among the individuals infected, independent on the clinical evolution. Thus, class I anti-HLA alloantibodies was not a determinant factor for patient worsening.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1 e relacioná-la aos diferentes cursos clínicos da doença. Amostras de sangue de 145 indivíduos HIV positivo foram coletadas em tubos com EDTA. A infecção pelo HIV-1 foi confirmada por teste ELISA e a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I determinada em seguida. A evolução clínica foi definida como rápida (3 anos. A presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I foi menor em indivíduos saudáveis em relação aos infectados pelo HIV-1 (4,2% contra 32,4%. Porém, a distribuição destes aloanticorpos entre os indivíduos infectados foi igual, independente da evolução clínica. Deste modo, a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I não é um fator determinante na piora clínica do paciente.

  19. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED)

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  20. Anti-gp120 minibody gene transfer to female genital epithelial cells protects against HIV-1 virus challenge in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussama M Abdel-Motal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cervico-vaginal epithelial cells of the female lower genital tract provide the initial defense system against HIV-1 infection, the protection is sometimes incomplete. Thus, enhancing anti-HIV-1 humoral immunity at the mucosal cell surface by local expression of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAb that block HIV-1 entry would provide an important new intervention that could slow the spread of HIV/AIDS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This study tested the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV-BnAb gene transfer to cervico-vaginal epithelial cells will lead to protection against HIV-1. Accordingly, a recombinant AAV vector that encodes human b12 anti-HIV gp120 BnAb as a single-chain variable fragment Fc fusion (scFvFc, or "minibody" was constructed. The secreted b12 minibody was shown to be biologically functional in binding to virus envelope protein, neutralizing HIV-1 and importantly, blocking transfer and infectivity of HIV-1(bal in an organotypic human vaginal epithelial cell (VEC model. Furthermore, cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells were found to be efficiently transduced by the optimal AAV serotype mediated expression of GFP. CONCLUSION: This study provides the foundation for a novel microbicide strategy to protect against sexual transmission of HIV-1 by AAV transfer of broadly neutralizing antibody genes to cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells that could replenish b12 BnAb secreting cells through multiple menstrual cycles.

  1. Production and characterization of human anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies from the cells of HIV-1 infected Indian donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrabi Raiees

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs developed from HIV-1 infected donors have enormously contributed to the identification of neutralization sensitive epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The third variable region (V3 is a crucial target on gp120, primarily due to its involvement in co-receptor (CXCR4 or CCR5 binding and presence of epitopes recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Methods Thirty-three HIV-1 seropositive drug naive patients (18 males and 15 females within the age range of 20–57 years (median = 33 years were recruited in this study for mAb production. The mAbs were selected from EBV transformed cultures with conformationally constrained Cholera-toxin-B containing V3C (V3C-CTB fusion protein. We tested the mAbs for their binding with HIV-1 derived proteins and peptides by ELISA and for neutralization against HIV-1 viruses by TZM-bl assays. Results We isolated three anti-V3 mAbs, 277, 903 and 904 from the cells of different individuals. The ELISA binding revealed a subtype-C and subtype-A specific binding of antibody 277 and 903 while mAb 904 exhibited cross reactivity also with subtype-B V3. Epitope mapping of mAbs with overlapping V3 peptides showed exclusive binding to V3 crown. The antibodies displayed high and low neutralizing activity against 2/5 tier 1 and 1/6 tier 2 viruses respectively. Overall, we observed a resistance of the tier 2 viruses to neutralization by the anti-V3 mAbs, despite the exposure of the epitopes recognized by these antibodies on two representative native viruses (Du156.12 and JRFL, suggesting that the affinity of mAb might equally be crucial for neutralization, as the epitope recognition. Conclusions Our study suggests that the anti-V3 antibodies derived from subtype-C infected Indian patients display neutralization potential against tier 1 viruses while such activity may be limited against more resistant tier 2 viruses. Defining the fine epitope

  2. 基于RNA的抗HIV-1基因治疗方法研究进展%Current Development on RNA-based Anti-HIV-1 Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丰; 杨怡姝; 曾毅

    2012-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a high-risk disease which spreads rapidly all over the world since it has been discovered. Although the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that are widely used in present can improve the quality of life of HIV-1 infected patient dramatically, treatment interruptions have often occurred because of the high cost, drug resistance and side effects. As a result, the new antiretroviral drugs and approaches are demanded for sustained antiretrovial effects. With the development of molecular biology, stem cell, nanotechnology and other related technology, gene therapy for HIV-1 infection has attracted considerable attention in recent years. RNA-based gene therapy for treatment of HIV-1 infection, including antisense RNA, ribozymes, RNA decoys and the RNA interference are focused on. These studies demonstrated that the RNA-based anti-HIV-1 gene therapy may serve as an effective adjuvant to traditional treatments.%艾滋病自发现以来在全球范围内迅速蔓延,危害性极高,目前广泛采用的高效抗逆转录病毒疗法(HAART)虽能够显著提高HIV-1感染者生活质量,但存在着价格昂贵,耐药和副作用的问题经常会导致HAART治疗的中断.要获得长期持续的抗病毒治疗效果还有待于研发新的抗病毒药物和治疗方法.近年来随着分子生物技术、干细胞研究、纳米技术等相关技术的发展,关于抗HIV-1基因治疗方法的研究受到了广泛关注.主要针对基于RNA的抗HIV-1基因治疗方法,包括反义RNA、核酶、RNA诱饵以及RNA干扰技术在抗HIV-1基因治疗方面进行综述.研究表明,以RNA为基础的抗HIV-1基因治疗方法有望成为传统治疗方法的一种有效辅助手段.

  3. The Presence and Anti-HIV-1 Function of Tenascin C in Breast Milk and Genital Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Frederick; McGuire, Erin; Fouda, Genevieve; Amos, Joshua; Barbas, Kimberly; Ohashi, Tomoo; Alam, S. Munir; Erickson, Harold; Permar, Sallie R.

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC) is a newly identified innate HIV-1-neutralizing protein present in breast milk, yet its presence and potential HIV-inhibitory function in other mucosal fluids is unknown. In this study, we identified TNC as a component of semen and cervical fluid of HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, although it is present at a significantly lower concentration and frequency compared to that of colostrum and mature breast milk, potentially due to genital fluid protease degradation. However, TNC was able to neutralize HIV-1 after exposure to low pH, suggesting that TNC could be active at low pH in the vaginal compartment. As mucosal fluids are complex and contain a number of proteins known to interact with the HIV-1 envelope, we further studied the relationship between the concentration of TNC and neutralizing activity in breast milk. The amount of TNC correlated only weakly with the overall innate HIV-1-neutralizing activity of breast milk of uninfected women and negatively correlated with neutralizing activity in milk of HIV-1 infected women, indicating that the amount of TNC in mucosal fluids is not adequate to impede HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, the presence of polyclonal IgG from milk of HIV-1 infected women, but not other HIV-1 envelope-binding milk proteins or monoclonal antibodies, blocked the neutralizing activity of TNC. Finally, as exogenous administration of TNC would be necessary for it to mediate measurable HIV-1 neutralizing activity in mucosal compartments, we established that recombinantly produced TNC has neutralizing activity against transmitted/founder HIV-1 strains that mimic that of purified TNC. Thus, we conclude that endogenous TNC concentration in mucosal fluids is likely inadequate to block HIV-1 transmission to uninfected individuals. PMID:27182834

  4. The Presence and Anti-HIV-1 Function of Tenascin C in Breast Milk and Genital Fluids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin G Mansour

    Full Text Available Tenascin-C (TNC is a newly identified innate HIV-1-neutralizing protein present in breast milk, yet its presence and potential HIV-inhibitory function in other mucosal fluids is unknown. In this study, we identified TNC as a component of semen and cervical fluid of HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, although it is present at a significantly lower concentration and frequency compared to that of colostrum and mature breast milk, potentially due to genital fluid protease degradation. However, TNC was able to neutralize HIV-1 after exposure to low pH, suggesting that TNC could be active at low pH in the vaginal compartment. As mucosal fluids are complex and contain a number of proteins known to interact with the HIV-1 envelope, we further studied the relationship between the concentration of TNC and neutralizing activity in breast milk. The amount of TNC correlated only weakly with the overall innate HIV-1-neutralizing activity of breast milk of uninfected women and negatively correlated with neutralizing activity in milk of HIV-1 infected women, indicating that the amount of TNC in mucosal fluids is not adequate to impede HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, the presence of polyclonal IgG from milk of HIV-1 infected women, but not other HIV-1 envelope-binding milk proteins or monoclonal antibodies, blocked the neutralizing activity of TNC. Finally, as exogenous administration of TNC would be necessary for it to mediate measurable HIV-1 neutralizing activity in mucosal compartments, we established that recombinantly produced TNC has neutralizing activity against transmitted/founder HIV-1 strains that mimic that of purified TNC. Thus, we conclude that endogenous TNC concentration in mucosal fluids is likely inadequate to block HIV-1 transmission to uninfected individuals.

  5. Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity contributes to perturbation of lymphocyte miRNA by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lianbo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA-mediated RNA silencing is integral to virtually every cellular process including cell cycle progression and response to virus infection. The interplay between RNA silencing and HIV-1 is multifaceted, and accumulating evidence posits a strike-counterstrike interface that alters the cellular environment to favor virus replication. For instance, miRNA-mediated RNA silencing of HIV-1 translation is antagonized by HIV-1 Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity. The activity of HIV-1 accessory proteins Vpr/Vif delays cell cycle progression, which is a process prominently modulated by miRNA. The expression profile of cellular miRNA is altered by HIV-1 infection in both cultured cells and clinical samples. The open question stands of what, if any, is the contribution of Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity or Vpr/Vif activity to the perturbation of cellular miRNA by HIV-1. Results Herein, we compared the perturbation of miRNA expression profiles of lymphocytes infected with HIV-1NL4-3 or derivative strains that are deficient in Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity (Tat K51A substitution or ablated of the vpr/vif open reading frames. Microarrays recapitulated the perturbation of the cellular miRNA profile by HIV-1 infection. The miRNA expression trends overlapped ~50% with published microarray results on clinical samples from HIV-1 infected patients. Moreover, the number of miRNA perturbed by HIV-1 was largely similar despite ablation of Tat RSS activity and Vpr/Vif; however, the Tat RSS mutation lessened HIV-1 downregulation of twenty-two miRNAs. Conclusions Our study identified miRNA expression changes attributable to Tat RSS activity in HIV-1NL4-3. The results accomplish a necessary step in the process to understand the interface of HIV-1 with host RNA silencing activity. The overlap in miRNA expression trends observed between HIV-1 infected CEMx174 lymphocytes and primary cells supports the utility of cultured

  6. A Simplifed and Efficient Synthesis of 7-Hydroxymethyl-6,7- Dihydropyrro- [ 1,2- c ]-Pyrimidine-1,3-Dione as a Potent Anti- HIV-1 Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Wei; ZHANG Zhi-Li; HAN Peng; MA Xiao-Yan; LIU Jun-Yi

    2003-01-01

    @@ The reverse transcriptase of HIV provides a key target for the development of anti-AIDS drugs. The discovery of 1-[ 2-hydroxyethoxymethyl]-6-phenylthio-thymine (HEPT) as a compound with potent and selective in vivo activity against HIV-1[1] has led to the synthesis many new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.[2

  7. Monitoring of the lactonase activity of paraoxonase-1 enzyme in HIV-1-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Clara; Marinho, Aline; Morello, Judit; Almeida, Gabriela; Caixas, Umbelina; Soto, Karina; Monteiro, Emilia; Pereira, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated enzyme known as a free radical scavenging system (1). PON-1 has three main activities, responsible for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential: paraoxonase, arylesterase and lactonase (LACase), the latest to be discovered and pointed out to be its native activity (2). Among other physiological roles, the LACase might minimize the deleterious effects of hyperhomocysteinaemia in infection, by detoxifying the highly reactive metabolite homocysteine-thiolactone (HcyTL) (3),4. In the present work, we have developed and applied a method to quantify LACase activity and to explore the role of this enzyme in HIV-infection and virological response. The LACase activity was monitored in a cohort of HIV-1-infected patients, through the titration of 3-(o-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid, formed upon the LACase-mediated hydrolysis of the substrate dihydrocoumarin. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central and Hospital Prof. Doutor Fernando Fonseca. All patients gave their written informed consent and were adults with documented HIV-1-infection, regardless of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) use. Naïve patients and patients who had received continuous antiretroviral treatment for more than one month were included. A total of 179 HIV-1-infected patients were included on this study (51% Men, 39% non-Caucasian, 45±13 years old). Patients with non-suppressed viraemia, either from the non-cART (n=89, 12±4 kU/L, pviral load (n=11, 10±5 kU/L, pviral load (> 31,500 cps/mL, Spearman r=-0.535, p=0.003) and lower CD4+ T-cells count (< 500 cell/mm(3), Pearson r=0.326, p=0.024) were associated with the LACase activity. The present study suggests that lower LACase activity is associated with uncontrolled HIV-1-infection, particularly with non-suppressed viraemia, despite of cART. This data seems to point to LACase role in HIV-infection, probably reflecting an

  8. Potent Intratype Neutralizing Activity Distinguishes Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) from HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Månsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Sören; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter; Jansson, Marianne; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2012-01-01

    HIV-2 has a lower pathogenicity and transmission rate than HIV-1. Neutralizing antibodies could be contributing to these observations. Here we explored side by side the potency and breadth of intratype and intertype neutralizing activity (NAc) in plasma of 20 HIV-1-, 20 HIV-2-, and 11 dually HIV-1/2 (HIV-D)-seropositive individuals from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Panels of primary isolates, five HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates, were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4-CCR5 cells a...

  9. Synthesis and antiviral activity of new dimeric inhibitors against HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danel, Krzysztof; Larsen, Louise M.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.;

    2008-01-01

    by Sonogashira reaction, ‘click' chemistry or Pd-catalyzed oxidative coupling. The iodo precursor 5 turned out as a potent compound against wild type and mutated HIV-1 virus. All dimeric compounds showed lower activity against HIV-1 than MKC-442, except the asymmetric dimer of AZT and 1a which showed an activity...

  10. A study of the topoisomerase II activity in HIV-1 replication using the ferrocene derivatives as probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondapi, Anand K; Satyanarayana, Nathamu; Saikrishna, A D

    2006-06-15

    Human Topoisomerase II is present in two isoforms, 170KDa alpha and 180KDa beta. Both the isoforms play a crucial role in maintenance of topological changes during DNA replication and recombination. It has been shown that Topoisomerase II activity is required for HIV-1 replication and the enzyme is phosphorylated during early time points of HIV-1 replication. In the present study, we have studied the molecular action of Topoisomerase II inhibitors, azalactone ferrocene (AzaFecp), Thiomorpholide amido methyl ferrocene (ThioFecp), and Ruthenium benzene amino pyridine (Ru(ben)Apy) on cell proliferation and also on various events of HIV-1 replication cycle. The Topoisomerase II beta over-expressing neuroblastoma cell line shows a higher sensitivity to these compounds compared to the Sup-T1 cell line. All the three Topoisomerase II inhibitors show significant anti-HIV activity at nanomolar concentrations against an Indian isolate of HIV-1(93IN101) in Sup-T1 cell line. An analysis of action of these compounds on proviral DNA synthesis at 5h of post-infection shows that they inhibit proviral DNA synthesis as well as the formation of pre-integration complexes completely. Further analysis, using polymerase chain reaction and western blot, showed that both the Topoisomerase II alpha and beta isoforms are present in the pre-integration complexes, suggesting their significant role in HIV-1 replication. PMID:16712776

  11. Design, synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of 4,6-dibenzyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile%4,6-二苄基-3-氰基-2(1H)-吡啶酮的合成及抗HIV-1活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李阿敏; 刘香宜; 王孝伟; 刘俊义

    2011-01-01

    An effective synthesis method for preparing 4,6-disubstituted pyridinones was reported.Ethyl 3-oxo-4-phenylbutyrate was an important intermediate,by which 6-substituted pyridinones could be prepared.The decarboxylation condition was optimized for compound 4.After protected with a methoxy group,the compound was reacted with BnBr to form the target compound 11.The structures were characterized by 1H NMR,13C NMR and HRMS,and its enzyme inhibition activity was also determined.%本文报道了4,6-二苄基-3-氰基-2(1H)-吡啶酮的合成方法.合成了重要中间体3-氧代-4-苯基丁酸乙酯,为合成不同的6位取代的吡啶酮类化合物提供方法.对合环产物的脱羧条件进行了优化,经过甲氧基保护,以n-BuLi作为强碱,与溴苄反应得到目标化合物11.其结构经1H NMR.,13C NMR和高分辨质谱分析确证,并对该化合物的抗HIV-1活性进行了测定.

  12. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisné, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55Gag, reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNALys3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  13. A novel strategy for efficient production of anti-V3 human scFvs against HIV-1 clade C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Production of human monoclonal antibodies that exhibit broadly neutralizing activity is needed for preventing HIV-1 infection, however only a few such antibodies have been generated till date. Isolation of antibodies by the hybridoma technology is a cumbersome process with fewer yields. Further, the loss of unstable or slowly growing clones which may have unique binding specificities often occurs during cloning and propagation and the strongly positive clones are often lost. This has been avoided by the process described in this paper, wherein, by combining the strategy of EBV transformation and recombinant DNA technology, we constructed human single chain variable fragments (scFvs against the third variable region (V3 of the clade C HIV-1 envelope. Results An antigen specific phage library of 7000 clones was constructed from the enriched V3- positive antibody secreting EBV transformed cells. By ligation of the digested scFv DNA into phagemid vector and bio panning against the HIV-1 consensus C and B V3 peptides followed by random selection of 40 clones, we identified 15 clones that showed V3 reactivity in phage ELISA. DNA fingerprinting analysis and sequencing showed that 13 out of the 15 clones were distinct. Expression of the positive clones was tested by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. All the 13 anti-V3 scFvs showed cross-reactivity against both the clade C and B V3 peptides and did not show any reactivity against other unrelated peptides in ELISA. Preliminary neutralization assays indicated varying degrees of neutralization of clade C and B viruses. EBV transformation, followed by antigen selection of lines to identify specific binders, enabled the selection of phage from un-cloned lines for scFv generation, thus avoiding the problems of hybridoma technology. Moreover, as the clones were pretested for antigen binding, a comparatively small library sufficed for the selection of a considerable number of unique antigen binding

  14. Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship of TIBO HIV-1 Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Hong; ZHANG Rui-Zhou; CHENG Xin-Lu; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to calculate a set of molecular descriptors (properties) for 14 TIBO derivatives with anti-HIV activity. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were employed in order to reduce dimensionality and investigate which subset of variables should be more effective for classifying TIBO derivatives according to their degree of anti-HIV activity. The PCA showed that the EHOMO, μ, LogP, QA, QB and MR variables are responsible for the separation between compounds with higher and lower anti-HIV activity. The HCA results are similar to those obtained with PCA. By using the chemometric results, four synthetic compounds were analyzed through PCA and HCA and three of them are proposed as active molecules against HIV, which is consistent with the results of clinic experiments. The methodologies of PCA and HCA provide a reliable rule for classifying new TIBO derivatives with anti-HIV activity. The model obtained showed not only statistical significance but also predictive ability.

  15. First Membrane Proximal External Region-Specific Anti-HIV1 Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal IgA1 Presenting Short CDRH3 and Low Somatic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjelloun, Fahd; Oruc, Zeliha; Thielens, Nicole; Verrier, Bernard; Champier, Gael; Vincent, Nadine; Rochereau, Nicolas; Girard, Alexandre; Jospin, Fabienne; Chanut, Blandine; Genin, Christian; Cogné, Michel; Paul, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Mucosal HIV-1-specific IgA have been described as being able to neutralize HIV-1 and to block viral transcytosis. In serum and saliva, the anti-HIV IgA response is predominantly raised against the envelope of HIV-1. In this work, we describe the in vivo generation of gp41-specific IgA1 in humanized α1KI mice to produce chimeric IgA1. Mice were immunized with a conformational immunogenic gp41-transfected cell line. Among 2300 clones screened by immunofluorescence microscopy, six different gp41-specific IgA with strong recognition of gp41 were identified. Two of them have strong neutralizing activity against primary HIV-1 tier 1, 2, and 3 strains and present a low rate of somatic mutations and autoreactivity, unlike what was described for classical gp41-specific IgG. Epitopes were identified and located in the hepted repeat 2/membrane proximal external region. These Abs could be of interest in prophylactic treatment to block HIV-1 penetration in mucosa or in chronically infected patients in combination with antiretroviral therapy to reduce viral load and reservoir. PMID:27481846

  16. Inhibitory activity of 9-phenylcyclohepta[d]pyrimidinedione derivatives against different strains of HIV-1 as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Yiming

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI, as a major component of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART to HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients, required the development of new NNRTIs with improved resistance profile and decreased toxicity. Therefore, a series of novel compounds, 9-phenylcyclohepta[d]pyrimidinedione derivatives (PCPs, were designed based on the chemical structure of TNK-651, to detect anti-HIV-1 activity. Results 1-[(benzyloxymethyl]-9-phenyl-cyclohepta[d] pyrimidinedione (BmPCP among four PCPs has antiviral activity on laboratory-adapted HIV strains (HIV-1 SF33. The results showed 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50s of BmPCP were 0.34 μM, 1.72 μM and 1.96 μM on TZM-bl, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and MT4, respectively. It was also effective against infection by the predominant HIV-1 isolates in China, with IC50s at low μM levels. Its selectivity index (SI ranged from 67 to 266 in different cells. The results of time-of-addition assay demonstrated that BmPCP inhibited HIV-1 infection by targeting the post entry of the HIV-1 replication cycle. For inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity, the IC50 values of BmPCP and NVP were 1.51 and 3.67 μM, respectively. Conclusions BmPCP with a novel structure acts as a NNRTI to inhibit HIV-1 replication and can serve as a lead compound for further development of new anti-HIV-1 drugs.

  17. Evaluation of the potency of the anti-idiotypic antibody Ab2/3H6 mimicking gp41 as an HIV-1 vaccine in a rabbit prime/boost study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mader

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope protein harbors several conserved epitopes that are recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. One of these neutralizing sites, the MPER region of gp41, is targeted by one of the most potent and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody, 2F5. Different vaccination strategies and a lot of efforts have been undertaken to induce MPER neutralizing antibodies but little success has been achieved so far. We tried to consider the alternative anti-idiotypic vaccination approach for induction of 2F5-like antibodies. The previously developed and characterized anti-idiotypic antibody Ab2/3H6 was expressed as antibody fragment fusion protein with C-terminally attached immune-modulators and used for immunization of rabbits to induce antibodies specific for HIV-1. Only those rabbits immunized with immunogens fused with the immune-modulators developed HIV-1 specific antibodies. Anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies were affinity purified using a two-step affinity purification protocol which revealed that only little amount of the total rabbit IgG fraction contained HIV-1 specific antibodies. The characterization of the induced anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies showed specificity for the linear epitope of 2F5 GGGELDKWASL and the HIV-1 envelope protein gp140. Despite specificity for the linear epitope and the truncated HIV-1 envelope protein these antibodies were not able to exhibit virus neutralization activities. These results suggest that Ab2/3H6 alone might not be suitable as a vaccine.

  18. Antiviral activity of α-helical stapled peptides designed from the HIV-1 capsid dimerization domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowburn David

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C-terminal domain (CTD of HIV-1 capsid (CA, like full-length CA, forms dimers in solution and CTD dimerization is a major driving force in Gag assembly and maturation. Mutations of the residues at the CTD dimer interface impair virus assembly and render the virus non-infectious. Therefore, the CTD represents a potential target for designing anti-HIV-1 drugs. Results Due to the pivotal role of the dimer interface, we reasoned that peptides from the α-helical region of the dimer interface might be effective as decoys to prevent CTD dimer formation. However, these small peptides do not have any structure in solution and they do not penetrate cells. Therefore, we used the hydrocarbon stapling technique to stabilize the α-helical structure and confirmed by confocal microscopy that this modification also made these peptides cell-penetrating. We also confirmed by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, sedimentation equilibrium and NMR that these peptides indeed disrupt dimer formation. In in vitro assembly assays, the peptides inhibited mature-like virus particle formation and specifically inhibited HIV-1 production in cell-based assays. These peptides also showed potent antiviral activity against a large panel of laboratory-adapted and primary isolates, including viral strains resistant to inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease. Conclusions These preliminary data serve as the foundation for designing small, stable, α-helical peptides and small-molecule inhibitors targeted against the CTD dimer interface. The observation that relatively weak CA binders, such as NYAD-201 and NYAD-202, showed specificity and are able to disrupt the CTD dimer is encouraging for further exploration of a much broader class of antiviral compounds targeting CA. We cannot exclude the possibility that the CA-based peptides described here could elicit additional effects on virus replication not directly linked to their ability to bind

  19. Novel 3′-Processing Integrase Activity Assay by Real-Time PCR for Screening and Identification of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Sakkhachornphop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3′-end processing (3′P of each viral long terminal repeat (LTR during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 integration is a vital step in the HIV life cycle. Blocking the 3′P using 3′P inhibitor has recently become an attractive strategy for HIV-1 therapeutic intervention. Recently, we have developed a novel real-time PCR based assay for the detection of 3′P activity in vitro. The methodology usually involves biotinylated HIV-1 LTR, HIV-1 integrase (IN, and specific primers and probe. In this novel assay, we designed the HIV-1 LTR substrate based on a sequence with a homology to HIV-1 LTR labeled at its 3′ end with biotin on the sense strand. Two nucleotides at the 3′ end were subsequently removed by IN activity. Only two nucleotides labeled biotin were captured on an avidin-coated tube; therefore, inhibiting the binding of primers and probe results in late signals in the real-time PCR. This novel assay has successfully detected both the 3′P activity of HIV-1 IN and the anti-IN activity by Raltegravir and sodium azide agent. This real-time PCR assay has been shown to be effective and inexpensive for a high-throughput screening of novel IN inhibitors.

  20. Fluorine Substituted 1,2,4-Triazinones as Potential Anti-HIV-1 and CDK2 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. I. Makki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine substituted 1,2,4-triazinones have been synthesized via alkylation, amination, and/or oxidation of 6-(2-amino-5-fluorophenyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H-one 1 and 4-fluoro-N-(4-fluoro-2-(5-oxo-3-thioxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,2,4-triazin-6-ylphenylbenzamide 5 as possible anti-HIV-1 and CDK2 inhibitors. Alkylation on positions 2 and 4 in 1,2,4-triazinone gave compounds 6–8. Further modification was performed by selective alkylation and amination on position 3 to form compounds 9–15. However oxidation of 5 yielded compounds 16–18. Structures of the target compounds have been established by spectral analysis data. Five compounds (5, 11, 14, 16, and 17 have shown very good anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cells. Similarly, five compounds (1, 3, and 14–16 have exhibited very significant CDK2 inhibition activity. Compounds 14 and 16 were found to have dual anti-HIV and anticancer activities.

  1. Sequential Immunization Elicits Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies in Ig Knockin Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolano, Amelia; Steichen, Jon M; Dosenovic, Pia; Kulp, Daniel W; Golijanin, Jovana; Sok, Devin; Freund, Natalia T; Gitlin, Alexander D; Oliveira, Thiago; Araki, Tatsuya; Lowe, Sarina; Chen, Spencer T; Heinemann, Jennifer; Yao, Kai-Hui; Georgeson, Erik; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Gazumyan, Anna; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-09-01

    A vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 is likely to be protective, but this has not been achieved. To explore immunization regimens that might elicit bNAbs, we produced and immunized mice expressing the predicted germline PGT121, a bNAb specific for the V3-loop and surrounding glycans on the HIV-1 spike. Priming with an epitope-modified immunogen designed to activate germline antibody-expressing B cells, followed by ELISA-guided boosting with a sequence of directional immunogens, native-like trimers with decreasing epitope modification, elicited heterologous tier-2-neutralizing responses. In contrast, repeated immunization with the priming immunogen did not. Antibody cloning confirmed elicitation of high levels of somatic mutation and tier-2-neutralizing antibodies resembling the authentic human bNAb. Our data establish that sequential immunization with specifically designed immunogens can induce high levels of somatic mutation and shepherd antibody maturation to produce bNAbs from their inferred germline precursors. PMID:27610569

  2. Resistance of Subtype C HIV-1 Strains to Anti-V3 Loop Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Almond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1’s subtype C V3 loop consensus sequence exhibits increased resistance to anti-V3 antibody-mediated neutralization as compared to the subtype B consensus sequence. The dynamic 3D structure of the consensus C V3 loop crown, visualized by ab initio folding, suggested that the resistance derives from structural rigidity and non-β-strand secondary protein structure in the N-terminal strand of the β-hairpin of the V3 loop crown, which is where most known anti-V3 loop antibodies bind. The observation of either rigidity or non-β-strand structure in this region correlated with observed resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization in a series of chimeric pseudovirus (psV mutants. The results suggest the presence of an epitope-independent, neutralization-relevant structural difference in the antibody-targeted region of the V3 loop crown between subtype C and subtype B, a difference that we hypothesize may contribute to the divergent pattern of global spread between these subtypes. As antibodies to a variable loop were recently identified as an inverse correlate of risk for HIV infection, the structure-function relationships discussed in this study may have relevance to HIV vaccine research.

  3. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Pantazis, Nikos; Martin, Genevieve E; Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-07-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count approaches. PMID:27415828

  4. Epigenetic modulations in activated cells early after HIV-1 infection and their possible functional consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana T Maricato

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications refer to a number of biological processes which alter the structure of chromatin and its transcriptional activity such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational processing. Studies have tried to elucidate how the viral genome and its products are affected by epigenetic modifications imposed by cell machinery and how it affects the ability of the virus to either, replicate and produce a viable progeny or be driven to latency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate epigenetic modifications in PBMCs and CD4+ cells after HIV-1 infection analyzing three approaches: (i global DNA- methylation; (ii qPCR array and (iii western blot. HIV-1 infection led to methylation increases in the cellular DNA regardless the activation status of PBMCs. The analysis of H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 suggested a trend towards transcriptional repression in activated cells after HIV-1 infection. Using a qPCR array, we detected genes related to epigenetic processes highly modulated in activated HIV-1 infected cells. SETDB2 and RSK2 transcripts showed highest up-regulation levels. SETDB2 signaling is related to transcriptional silencing while RSK2 is related to either silencing or activation of gene expression depending on the signaling pathway triggered down-stream. In addition, activated cells infected by HIV-1 showed lower CD69 expression and a decrease of IL-2, IFN-γ and metabolism-related factors transcripts indicating a possible functional consequence towards global transcriptional repression found in HIV-1 infected cells. Conversely, based on epigenetic markers studied here, non-stimulated cells infected by HIV-1, showed signs of global transcriptional activation. Our results suggest that HIV-1 infection exerts epigenetic modulations in activated cells that may lead these cells to transcriptional repression with important functional consequences. Moreover, non-stimulated cells seem to increase gene transcription after HIV-1 infection

  5. Treatment of primary HIV-1 infection with cyclosporin A coupled with highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzardi, G. Paolo; Harari, Alexandre; Capiluppi, Brunella; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Ellefsen, Kim; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Champagne, Patrick; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Chave, Jean-Philippe; Lazzarin, Adriano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    Primary HIV-1 infection causes extensive immune activation, during which CD4+ T cell activation supports massive HIV-1 production. We tested the safety and the immune-modulating effects of combining cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during primary HIV-1 infection. Nine adults with primary HIV-1 infection were treated with CsA along with HAART. At week 8, all patients discontinued CsA but maintained HAART. Viral replication was suppressed to a comparable extent in the CsA + HAART cohort and in 29 control patients whose primary infection was treated with HAART alone. CsA restored normal CD4+ T cell levels, both in terms of percentage and absolute numbers. The increase in CD4+ T cells was apparent within a week and persisted throughout the study period. CsA was not detrimental to virus-specific CD8+ or CD4+ T cell responses. At week 48, the proportion of IFN-γ–secreting CD4+ and CD4+CCR7– T cells was significantly higher in the CsA + HAART cohort than in the HAART-alone cohort. In conclusion, rapid shutdown of T cell activation in the early phases of primary HIV-1 infection can have long-term beneficial effects and establish a more favorable immunologic set-point. Appropriate, immune-based therapeutic interventions may represent a valuable complement to HAART for treating HIV infection. PMID:11877476

  6. Inhibition of ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Julieta; Delgado, Kelly Valcárcel; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides are secreted into extracellular media at different concentrations as a consequence of different physiologic and pathological conditions. Ecto-nucleotidases, enzymes present on the surface of most cells, hydrolyze these extracellular nucleotides and reduce the concentration of them, thus affecting the activation of different nucleotide and nucleoside receptors. Also, ecto-nucleotidases are present in a number of microorganisms and play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we characterized the ecto-ATPase activities present on the surface of HIV-1 particle and human macrophages as well. We found that the kinetic properties of HIV-1 and macrophage ecto-ATPases are similar, suggesting that the enzyme is the same. This ecto-ATPase activity was increased in macrophages infected in vitro with HIV-1. Using three different non-related ecto-ATPase inhibitors-POM-1, ARL67156 and BG0-we showed that the inhibition of these macrophage and viral ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection. In addition, we also found that elevated extracellular concentrations of ATP inhibit HIV-1 production by infected macrophages.

  7. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein: Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail

    OpenAIRE

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisné, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interac...

  8. Activity of superior interferon α against HIV-1 in severe combined immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; TONG Xiao; Tadashi Nakasone; YUE Xue-tian; Naoki Yamamoto; LIU Xin-yuan; YANG Rong-ge

    2011-01-01

    Background Interferon (IFN) can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro and in clinic.However, IFN therapy for HIV infection was limited by its moderate antiviral efficacy and its frequent adverse effects. In the present study we evaluated the anti-HIV efficacy of a novel synthesized superior interferon α (slFNα).Methods We performed in vitro experiments with HIV-1 IIB infected MT4 cells, and evaluated in vivo anti-HIV efficacy of slFNα in severe combined immunodeficient (SClD) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes (hu-PBL-SClD mice).Results We found that the 50% effective concentrations (EC5o) of slFNα against the replication of HIV-1 in MT4 cells was 0.06 ng/ml, representing stronger antiviral activity than interferon-α in vitro. In the hu-PBL-SCID mice, a dose-dependent protection pattern was observed: with 0.45 μg and 1.35 μg slFNα daily treatments, parts of SCID mice were protected from HIV infection, whereas 2.25 μg sIFNα daily treatments resulted in a terminally complete protection.Conclusions slFNα shows good anti-HIV activity both in vitro and in SCID mice, may be a promising anti-HIV agent deserving clinical investigation, especially considering the potential of IFN-α to inhibit HIV replication in patients infected with drug-resistant variants or co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  9. HIV-1 Tat protein increases microglial outward K(+ current and resultant neurotoxic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianuo Liu

    Full Text Available Microglia plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Increasing evidence indicates the voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels are involved in the regulation of microglia function, prompting us to hypothesize Kv channels may also be involved in microglia-mediated neurotoxic activity in HIV-1-infected brain. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the involvement of Kv channels in the response of microglia to HIV-1 Tat protein. Treatment of rat microglia with HIV-1 Tat protein (200 ng/ml resulted in pro-inflammatory microglial activation, as indicated by increases in TNF-α, IL-1β, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide, which were accompanied by enhanced outward K(+ current and Kv1.3 channel expression. Suppression of microglial Kv1.3 channel activity, either with Kv1.3 channel blockers Margatoxin, 5-(4-Phenoxybutoxypsoralen, or broad-spectrum K(+ channel blocker 4-Aminopyridine, or by knockdown of Kv1.3 expression via transfection of microglia with Kv1.3 siRNA, was found to abrogate the neurotoxic activity of microglia resulting from HIV-1 Tat exposure. Furthermore, HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal apoptosis was attenuated with the application of supernatant collected from K(+ channel blocker-treated microglia. Lastly, the intracellular signaling pathways associated with Kv1.3 were investigated and enhancement of microglial Kv1.3 was found to correspond with an increase in Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. These data suggest targeting microglial Kv1.3 channels may be a potential new avenue of therapy for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders.

  10. 含双环哌啶结构HIV-1抑制剂的设计合成及生物活性研究%Design, synthesis and biological activity of bicyclic piperidine-based HIV-1 inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛文祥; 董铭心; 朱卫国; 姜世勃; 戴秋云

    2011-01-01

    目的 设计合成一系列具有新型结构特征的双环哌啶类C-C族趋化因子受体5(CCR5)抑制剂并测定其抗HIV-1活性.方法 以HIV-1辅助受体CCR5抑制剂Vicriviroc的结构为模板,通过改变左侧哌嗪结构、取代基位置等方法设计并合成一系列新化合物.并利用MS及1H-NMR谱对这些化合物进行结构表征.结果 与结论合成了15个新结构化合物,活性测试结果表明,该系列化合物具有较强的抗HIV-1 R5病毒株的活性(IC50=1.20~66.24μmol·L-1).当R1为芳基结构且两个氮原子满足标准的丙二胺结构时,化合物的活性更好.%CCR5 is a major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into human cells and is also a good target for antiHIV-1 drug design. Based on the chemical structure of Vicriviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, a series of new compounds were designed by changing its piperazine loop and other group substitutions. In the present study,15 bicyclic piperidine-based compounds were synthesized using a convergent synthetic route, and the structures of the target compounds were confirmed by MS and 1H-NMR. The synthetic routes were as follows:N-Bocpiperidine-4-carboxylic acid, N-Boc-pyrro-3-carboxylic acid and N-Boc-ethylenediamine were coupled with theamine derivatives to give the corresponding compounds 1a- 1d,2a- 2c,3a- 3c,4-piperidinone hydrochloride reacted with 2,6-dimethylbenzoyl chloride,2,6-dichlorobenzoyl chloride and 2,4,6-trimethyl-5-pyrimidine carbonyl chloride to obtain the compounds 4a -4c. Then 4a -4c was reacted with 1a - 1d,2a -2c ,3a - 3c to give the target compounds I 1 - I 15. Furthermore, the antiviral activity and cell cytotoxicity of these compounds were evaluated with HIV-1 R5 strain in vitro. The results showed that all the target compounds exhibited potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 R5 strain( IC50 = 1.20 -66. 24 μmol· L-1 ). Preliminary analysis of the structure-activity relationship showed that some compounds with an aryl group and the 1,3-diamino

  11. The NRTIs Lamivudine, Stavudine and Zidovudine Have Reduced HIV-1 Inhibitory Activity in Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Tachedjian, Gilda; Ellett, Anne M.; Roche, Michael J.; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Brew, Bruce J.; Turville, Stuart G.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 establishes infection in astrocytes and macroage-lineage cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Certain antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) can penetrate the CNS, and are therefore often used in neurologically active combined antiretroviral therapy (Neuro-cART) regimens, but their relative activity in the different susceptible CNS cell populations is unknown. Here, we determined the HIV-1 inhibitory activity of CNS-penetrating ARVs in astrocytes and macrophage-lineage cells. Primary human fetal astrocytes (PFA) and the SVG human astrocyte cell line were used as in vitro models for astrocyte infection, and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were used as an in vitro model for infection of macrophage-lineage cells. The CNS-penetrating ARVs tested were the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) abacavir (ABC), lamivudine (3TC), stavudine (d4T) and zidovudine (ZDV), the non-NRTIs efavirenz (EFV), etravirine (ETR) and nevirapine (NVP), and the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL). Drug inhibition assays were performed using single-round HIV-1 entry assays with luciferase viruses pseudotyped with HIV-1 YU-2 envelope or vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G). All the ARVs tested could effectively inhibit HIV-1 infection in macrophages, with EC90s below concentrations known to be achievable in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Most of the ARVs had similar potency in astrocytes, however the NRTIs 3TC, d4T and ZDV had insufficient HIV-1 inhibitory activity in astrocytes, with EC90s 12-, 187- and 110-fold greater than achievable CSF concentrations, respectively. Our data suggest that 3TC, d4T and ZDV may not adequately target astrocyte infection in vivo, which has potential implications for their inclusion in Neuro-cART regimens. PMID:23614033

  12. Structure-activity relationship studies on clinically relevant HIV-1 NNRTIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, R K; Murugesan, V; Katti, S B

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have contributed significantly in the treatment of HIV-1 infections. More than 60 structurally different classes of compounds have been identified as NNRTIs, which are specifically inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Five NNRTIs (nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine and rilpivirine) have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. The NNRTIs bind with a specific 'pocket' site of HIV-1 RT (allosteric site) that is closely associated with the NRTI binding site. Due to mutations of the amino acid residues surrounding the NNRTI-binding site, NNRTIs are notorious for rapidly eliciting resistance. Though, the emergence of resistant HIV strains can be circumvented if the NNRTIs are used either alone or in combination with NRTIs (AZT, 3TC, ddI, ddC, TVD or d4T) and PIs (Indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, ritonavir and lopinavir etc.) as shown by both a decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and increased CD4 T-cells. Here we are going to discuss recent advances in structure activity relationship studies on nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine, rilpivirine and 4-thiazolidinones (privileged scaffold) HIV-1 NNRTIs. PMID:22998569

  13. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRuffin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is characterized by continuous antigenic stimulation, chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells has previously been reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for mounting and maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development which are impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  14. Three-dimensional Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship Models of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors of DKAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mei-Qing; ZHAO Wen-Na; LU Shao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    As one of the three viral encoded enzymes of HIV-1 infection, HIV-1 integrase has become an attractive drug target for the treatment. Diketoacid compounds (DKAs) are one kind of potent and selective inhibitors of HIV-1 IN. In the present work, two three-dimensional QSAR techniques (CoMFA and CoMSIA) were employed to correlate the molecular structure with the activity of inhibiting the strand transfer for 147 DKAs. The all-oritation search (AOS) and all-placement search (APS) were used to optimize the CoMFA model. The diketo and keto-enol tautomers of DKAs were also used to establish the CoMFA models. The results indicated that the enol was the dominant conformation in the HIV-1 IN and DKAs complexes. It can provide a new method and reference to identify the bioactive conformation of drugs by using QSAR analysis. The best CoMSIA model, with five fields combined, implied that the hydrophobic field is very important as well as the steric and electrostatic fields. All models indicated favorable internal validation. A comparative analysis with the three models demonstrated that the CoMFA model seems to be more predictive. The contour maps could afford steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and H-bond information about the interaction of ligand-receptor complex visually. The models would give some useful guidelines for designing novel and potent HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  15. Structure-activity relationship studies on clinically relevant HIV-1 NNRTIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, R K; Murugesan, V; Katti, S B

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have contributed significantly in the treatment of HIV-1 infections. More than 60 structurally different classes of compounds have been identified as NNRTIs, which are specifically inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Five NNRTIs (nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine and rilpivirine) have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. The NNRTIs bind with a specific 'pocket' site of HIV-1 RT (allosteric site) that is closely associated with the NRTI binding site. Due to mutations of the amino acid residues surrounding the NNRTI-binding site, NNRTIs are notorious for rapidly eliciting resistance. Though, the emergence of resistant HIV strains can be circumvented if the NNRTIs are used either alone or in combination with NRTIs (AZT, 3TC, ddI, ddC, TVD or d4T) and PIs (Indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, ritonavir and lopinavir etc.) as shown by both a decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and increased CD4 T-cells. Here we are going to discuss recent advances in structure activity relationship studies on nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine, rilpivirine and 4-thiazolidinones (privileged scaffold) HIV-1 NNRTIs.

  16. Immune Activation, Viral Gene Product Expression and Neurotoxicity in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Royal, Walter; Zhang, Li; Guo, Ming; Jones, Odell; Davis, Harry; Bryant, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 transgenic (TG) rat has been shown to be a useful model of nervous system disease that occurs in human HIV-1 infection. Studies were, therefore, performed to examine characteristics of the immune response in the periphery and brain of the animals and expression of factors in the nervous system that might be associated with neurotoxicity. Activated splenocytes from wild-type (WT) and TG rats were stimulated with either CD3/CD28 or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and examined for prolif...

  17. Topical gel formulation of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody VRC01 confers protection against HIV-1 vaginal challenge in a humanized mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Veselinovic, Milena; C Preston Neff; Mulder, Leila R.; Akkina, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    The new generation broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 shows great potential as a topically administered microbicide to prevent sexual transmission. We evaluated its efficacy in a RAG-hu humanized mouse model of vaginal HIV-1 transmission. Mice were challenged vaginally with R5 tropic HIV-1 BaL an hour after intravaginal application of the VRC01 (1mg/ml concentration.) gel. A combination of four first generation bNAbs, namely b12, 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12, was used as a positive effic...

  18. Brief Report: Macrophage Activation in HIV-2-Infected Patients Is Less Affected by Antiretroviral Treatment-sCD163 in HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 Dually Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hønge, Bo L; Andersen, Morten N; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida; Correira, Faustino G; Jakobsen, Martin R; Laursen, Alex; Erikstrup, Christian; Møller, Holger J; Wejse, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The course of disease among HIV-2, HIV-1, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients is different. We investigated the macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163) dynamics in 212 HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. There were no differences in sCD163 levels at baseline or during follow-up without antiretroviral therapy (ART). At follow-up on ART, median sCD163 levels were decreased for HIV-1-infected patients (P < 0.001), but not among HIV-2 (P = 0.093) or HIV-1/2 dually infected patients (P = 0.145). The larger decrease in sCD163 levels among HIV-1-infected patients during ART may indicate an HIV type-dependent differential effect of ART on macrophage activation during HIV infection. PMID:26825178

  19. Selective histonedeacetylase inhibitor M344 intervenes in HIV-1 latency through increasing histone acetylation and activation of NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors present an exciting new approach to activate HIV production from latently infected cells to potentially enhance elimination of these cells and achieve a cure. M344, a novel HDAC inhibitor, shows robust activity in a variety of cancer cells and relatively low toxicity compared to trichostatin A (TSA. However, little is known about the effects and action mechanism of M344 in inducing HIV expression in latently infected cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Jurkat T cell model of HIV latency, we demonstrate that M344 effectively reactivates HIV-1 gene expression in latently infected cells. Moreover, M344-mediated activation of the latent HIV LTR can be strongly inhibited by a NF-κB inhibitor aspirin. We further show that M344 acts by increasing the acetylation of histone H3 and histone H4 at the nucleosome 1 (nuc-1 site of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR and by inducing NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and direct RelA DNA binding at the nuc-1 region of the HIV-1 LTR. We also found that M344 synergized with prostratin to activate the HIV-1 LTR promoter in latently infected cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest the potential of M344 in anti-latency therapies and an important role for histone modifications and NF-κB transcription factors in regulating HIV-1 LTR gene expression.

  20. Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1 ⅢB) Activity of Lectin from Sea Mussel Crenomytilus Grayanus%贻贝凝集素抗-HIV活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 熊川男; 王建华; 郑永唐; 金桥; 佟长青; 曲敏; 刘洪伟; 汪秋宽

    2007-01-01

    分离提取海洋无脊椎动物贻贝(Crenomytilus grayanus)凝集素,考察其抗HIV活性.采用半乳糖-Sepharose 6B亲和层析和Sephacryl S-200层析分离提取贻贝凝集素(Crenomytilus grayanus lectin,CGL),以光镜检查合胞体抑制试验,以ELSA测定HIVp24抗原表达水平.从海洋无脊椎动物贻贝中分离出的凝集素(CGL),为N-乙酰半乳糖胺/半乳糖(GalNAc/Gal)特异性的凝集素.CGL在27.88mg·L-1浓度时,对HIV诱导细胞病变的抑制达50%;在45.70mg·L-1时,对HIV-1复制的抑制达50%;同时在35.12mg·L-1浓度时,对HIV感染细胞融合的阻断达50%.

  1. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells suppress HIV-1 replication but contribute to HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis in humanized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were depleted prior to HIV-1 infection, the induction of IFN-I and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs were abolished during acute HIV-1 infection with either a highly pathogenic CCR5/CXCR4-dual tropic HIV-1 or a standard CCR5-tropic HIV-1 isolate. Consistent with the anti-viral role of IFN-I, HIV-1 replication was significantly up-regulated in pDC-depleted mice. Interestingly, the cell death induced by the highly pathogenic HIV-1 isolate was severely reduced in pDC-depleted mice. During chronic HIV-1 infection, depletion of pDC also severely reduced the induction of IFN-I and ISGs, associated with elevated HIV-1 replication. Surprisingly, HIV-1 induced depletion of human immune cells including T cells in lymphoid organs, but not the blood, was reduced in spite of the increased viral replication. The increased cell number in lymphoid organs was associated with a reduced level of HIV-induced cell death in human leukocytes including CD4 T cells. We conclude that pDC play opposing roles in suppressing HIV-1 replication and in promoting HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis. These findings suggest that pDC-depletion and IFN-I blockade will provide novel strategies for treating those HIV-1 immune non-responsive patients with persistent immune activation despite effective anti-retrovirus treatment.

  2. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Dong, Z; Hecht, D K; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; Wilson, C C

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T-cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T-cell activation, inflammation, and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1-infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared with uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1-infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation, and blood T-cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  3. Association between active GB virus-C (hepatitis G) infection and HIV-1 disease in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yirrell, D L; Wright, E; Shafer, L A; Campbell, E; Van der Paal, L; Kaleebu, P; Grosskurth, H; Whitworth, J A

    2007-04-01

    Although not linked to a disease, GB virus-C viraemia has been associated with an improved prognosis in HIV-1-co-infected individuals. Most studies have been conducted on men (men who have sex with men or injection drug users) infected with HIV-1 subtype B, whereas here we report on both male and female subjects from rural Uganda, predominantly infected via the heterosexual route with HIV-1 subtypes A and D. In a longitudinal study of 272 participants, 47 were GBV-C positive and 181 negative, as determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, in both of two plasma samples taken a median of 5.0 years apart. The remainder either acquired (25) or cleared (19) infection. Multilevel regression analyses and Cox survival analyses revealed that participants chronically infected with GBV-C had a slower decline in CD4(+) T cells (P<0.001) and increased survival time (P=0.041) compared with GBV-C RNA-negative, HIV-positive adults. We show that the association between active GBV-C co-infection and improved survival of HIV-1-infected adults is not restricted to HIV subtype B, but is also observed in both males and females infected with HIV subtypes A and D. PMID:17509174

  4. Rationally designed interfacial peptides are efficient in vitro inhibitors of HIV-1 capsid assembly with antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Bocanegra

    Full Text Available Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces involved in formation of the mature HIV-1 capsid through polymerization of the capsid protein CA were targeted. We had previously designed a peptide, CAC1, that represents CA helix 9 (a major part of the dimerization interface and binds the CA C-terminal domain in solution. Here we have mapped the binding site of CAC1, and shown that it substantially overlaps with the CA dimerization interface. We have also rationally modified CAC1 to increase its solubility and CA-binding affinity, and designed four additional peptides that represent CA helical segments involved in other CA interfaces. We found that peptides CAC1, its derivative CAC1M, and H8 (representing CA helix 8 were able to efficiently inhibit the in vitro assembly of the mature HIV-1 capsid. Cocktails of several peptides, including CAC1 or CAC1M plus H8 or CAI (a previously discovered inhibitor of CA polymerization, or CAC1M+H8+CAI, also abolished capsid assembly, even when every peptide was used at lower, sub-inhibitory doses. To provide a preliminary proof that these designed capsid assembly inhibitors could eventually serve as lead compounds for development of anti-HIV-1 agents, they were transported into cultured cells using a cell-penetrating peptide, and tested for antiviral activity. Peptide cocktails that drastically inhibited capsid assembly in vitro were also able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 infection ex vivo. This study validates a novel, entirely rational approach for the design of capsid

  5. Patient-adapted, specific activation of HIV-1 by customized TAL effectors (TALEs), a proof of principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Rene; Hauber, Ilona; Funk, Nancy; Richter, Annekatrin; Behrens, Martina; Renner, Ivonne; Chemnitz, Jan; Hofmann-Sieber, Helga; Baum, Heidi; van Lunzen, Jan; Boch, Jens; Hauber, Joachim; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2015-12-01

    The major obstacle to cure infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is integrated proviral genomes, which are not eliminated by antiretroviral therapies (ART). Treatment approaches with latency-reversing agents (LRAs) aim at inducing provirus expression to tag latently-infected cells for clearance through viral cytopathic effects or cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses. However, the currently tested LRAs reveal evident drawbacks as gene expression is globally induced and viral outgrowth is insecure. Here, we present transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins as potent tools to activate HIV-1 specifically. The large variety of circulating HIV-1 strains and, accordingly, integrated proviruses was addressed by the programmable DNA-specificity of TALEs. Using customized engineered TALEs, a substantial transcription activation and viral outgrowth was achieved with cells obtained from different HIV-1 patients. Our data suggest that TALEs may be useful tools in future strategies aimed at removing HIV-1 reservoirs. PMID:26474371

  6. HIV-1 subtypes and mutations associated to antiretroviral drug resistance in human isolates from Central Brazil Subtipos e mutações associadas à resistência aos anti-retrovirais em isolados de HIV-1 do Distrito Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marreco Cerqueira

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The detection of polymorphisms associated to HIV-1 drug-resistance and genetic subtypes is important for the control and treatment of HIV-1 disease. Drug pressure selects resistant variants that carry mutations in the viral reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR genes. For a contribution to the public health authorities in planning the availability of therapeutic treatment, we therefore described the genetic variability, the prevalence of mutations associated to drug resistance and the antiretroviral resistance profile in HIV-1 isolates from infected individuals in Central Brazil. Nineteen HIV-1 RNA samples from a Public Health Laboratory of the Federal District were reversely transcribed and cDNAs were amplified by nested PCR. One fragment of 297 bp coding the entire protease gene, and another of 647 bp, corresponding to the partial RT gene (codons 19-234, were obtained. Automated sequencing and BLAST analysis revealed the presence of 17 B and 2 F1 HIV-1 subtypes. The amino acid sequences were analyzed for the presence of resistance-associated mutations. A total of 6 PR mutations, 2 major and 4 accessory, and 8 RT mutations related to drug resistance were found. Our data suggest a high prevalence of HIV-1 B subtype in the studied population of Federal District as well as the presence of genetically-resistant strains in individuals failing treatment.A detecção de polimorfismos do HIV-1 que estejam associados à resistência às drogas anti-retrovirais e aos subtipos genéticos é importante para o controle e tratamento da infecção pelo HIV-1. A pressão exercida pela terapia anti-retroviral seleciona variantes resistentes com mutações nos genes virais da transcriptase reversa (RT e da protease (PR. Assim, visando contribuir com as autoridades de saúde pública na perspectiva de planejar a disponibilidade de um tratamento terapêutico, nós descrevemos a variabilidade genética e a prevalência de mutações associadas à resist

  7. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein. Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisne, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55(Gag), reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNA(Lys) 3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  8. An assay to monitor HIV-1 protease activity for the identification of novel inhibitors in T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett J Hilton

    Full Text Available The emergence of resistant HIV strains, together with the severe side-effects of existing drugs and lack of development of effective anti-HIV vaccines highlight the need for novel antivirals, as well as innovative methods to facilitate their discovery. Here, we have developed an assay in T-cells to monitor the proteolytic activity of the HIV-1 protease (PR. The assay is based on the inducible expression of HIV-1 PR fused within the Gal4 DNA-binding and transactivation domains. The fusion protein binds to the Gal4 responsive element and activates the downstream reporter, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene only in the presence of an effective PR Inhibitor (PI. Thus, in this assay, eGFP acts as a biosensor of PR activity, making it ideal for flow cytometry based screening. Furthermore, the assay was developed using retroviral technology in T-cells, thus providing an ideal environment for the screening of potential novel PIs in a cell-type that represents the natural milieu of HIV infection. Clones with the highest sensitivity, and robust, reliable and reproducible reporter activity, were selected. The assay is easily adaptable to other PR variants, a multiplex platform, as well as to high-throughput plate reader based assays and will greatly facilitate the search for novel peptide and chemical compound based PIs in T-cells.

  9. Oocyte activation and latent HIV-1 reactivation: AMPK as a common mechanism of action linking the beginnings of life and the potential eradication of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2016-08-01

    In all mammalian species studied to date, the initiation of oocyte activation is orchestrated through alterations in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling. Upon sperm binding to the oocyte plasma membrane, a sperm-associated phospholipase C (PLC) isoform, PLC zeta (PLCζ), is released into the oocyte cytoplasm. PLCζ hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to produce diacylglycerol (DAG), which activates protein kinase C (PKC), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), which induces the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores. Subsequent Ca(2+) oscillations are generated that drive oocyte activation to completion. Ca(2+) ionophores such as ionomycin have been successfully used to induce artificial human oocyte activation, facilitating fertilization during intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedures. Early studies have also demonstrated that the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) acts synergistically with Ca(2+) ionophores to induce parthenogenetic activation of mouse oocytes. Interestingly, the Ca(2+)-induced signaling cascade characterizing sperm or chemically-induced oocyte activation, i.e. the "shock and live" approach, bears a striking resemblance to the reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs via the so called "shock and kill" approach, a method currently being pursued to eradicate HIV-1 from infected individuals. PMA and ionomycin combined, used as positive controls in HIV-1 latency reversal studies, have been shown to be extremely efficient in reactivating latent HIV-1 in CD4(+) memory T cells by inducing T cell activation. Similar to oocyte activation, T cell activation by PMA and ionomycin induces an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and activation of DAG, PKC, and downstream Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways necessary for proviral transcription. Interestingly, AMPK, a master regulator of cell metabolism that is activated thorough the induction of cellular

  10. Predefined GPGRAFY-Epitope-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies with Different Activities for Recognizing Native HIV-1 gp120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝灿辉; 田海军; 陈应华

    2004-01-01

    A seven-amino acid epitope GPGRAFY at the tip of the V3 loop in HIV-1 gp120 is the principal neutralizing epitope,and a subset of anti-V3 antibodies specific for this epitope shows a broad range of neutralizing activity.GPGRAFY-epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies were produced using predefined GPGRAFY-epitope-specific peptides instead of a natural or recombinant gp120 bearing this epitope.All six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) could recognize the GPGRAFY-epitope on peptides and two of the antibodies,9D8 and 2D7,could recognize recombinant gp120 in enzymelinked immunosorkentassy (ELISA) assays.In the flow cytometry analysis,the mAbs 9D8 and 2D7 could bind to HIV-Env+ CHO-WT cells and the specific bindings could be inhibited by the GPGRAFY-epitope peptide,which suggests that these two mAbs could recognize the native envelope protein gp120 expressed on the cell membrane.However,in syncytium assays,none of the mAbs was capable of inhibiting HIV-Env-mediated cell membrane fusion.The different activities for recognizing native HIV-1 gp120 might be associated with different antibody affinities against the epitopes.The development of conformational mimics of the neutralization epitope in the gp120 V3 loop could elicit neutralizing mAbs with high affinity.

  11. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  12. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  13. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wen

    Full Text Available Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  14. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

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    Zachary Klase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  15. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

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    Matthias Hoffmann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122 recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL and CD4 T cell count and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy. To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

  16. Role of endolysosomes in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity

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    Liang Hui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Combined anti-retroviral therapeutic drugs effectively increase the lifespan of HIV-1-infected individuals who then have a higher prevalence of HAND (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder. Soluble factors including HIV-1 proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, and particular attention has been paid to the HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription protein because of its ability to directly excite neurons and cause neuronal cell death. Since HIV-1 Tat enters cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and since endolysosomes play an important role in neuronal cell life and death, we tested here the hypothesis that HIV-1 Tat neurotoxicity is associated with changes in the endolysosome structure and function and also autophagy. Following the treatment of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons with HIV-1 Tat or as controls mutant-Tat or PBS, neuronal viability was determined using a triple staining method. Preceding observations of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death, we observed statistically significant changes in the structure and membrane integrity of endolysosomes, endolysosome pH and autophagy. As early as 24 h after HIV-1 Tat was applied to neurons, HIV-1 Tat accumulated in endolysosomes, endolysosome morphology was affected and their size increased, endolysosome membrane integrity was disrupted, endolysosome pH increased, specific activities of endolysosome enzymes decreased and autophagy was inhibited, as indicated by the significant changes in three markers for autophagy. In contrast, statistically significant levels of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death were observed only after 48 h of HIV-1 Tat treatment. Our findings suggest that endolysosomes are involved in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention against HAND.

  17. Discordance between Frequency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Specific Gamma Interferon-Producing CD4+ T Cells and HIV-1-Specific Lymphoproliferation in HIV-1-Infected Subjects with Active Viral Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, B. E.; Boritz, E; Blyveis, N.; Wilson, C C

    2002-01-01

    One hallmark of uncontrolled, chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is the absence of strong HIV-1-specific, CD4+ T-cell-proliferative responses, yet the mechanism underlying this T helper (Th)-cell defect remains controversial. To better understand the impact of HIV-1 replication on Th-cell function, we compared the frequency of CD4+ Th-cell responses based on production of gamma interferon to lymphoproliferative responses directed against HIV-1 proteins in HIV-1-infe...

  18. Characteristics of HIV-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses and their role in loss of viremia in children chronically infected with HIV-1 undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zheng; ZHAO Qing-xia; FU Jun-liang; YAO Jin-xia; HE Yun; JIN Lei; WANG Fu-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epitope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in children. To address this issue, we characterized epitope-specific CTL responses and analyzed the determinants that may affect CTL responses before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in children with HIV-1 infection.Methods A total of 22 HIV-1-infected children and 23 uninfected healthy children as control were enrolled in the study. Circulating CD4 T cells and HIV-1 RNA load in plasma were routinely measured. Peripheral HIV-1-specific CTL frequency and HIV-1 epitope-specific, interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing T lymphocytes were measured using tetramer staining and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, respectively.Circulating dendritic cell (DC) subsets were monitored with FACS analysis.Results More than 80% of the children with HIV-1 infection exhibited a positive HIV-1-epitope-specific CTL response at baseline, but HIV-specific CTLs and IFN-γ-producing lymphocytes decreased in patients who responded to HAART in comparison with non-responders and HAART-naive children. The duration of virus suppression resulted from HAART was inversely correlated with CTL frequency. While in HAART-naive children, HIV-1-specific CTL frequency was positively correlated with myeloid DC (mDC) frequency,although the cause and effect relationship between the DCs and CTLs remains unknown.Conclusions HIV-1-epitope-specific CTL responses are dependent on antigenic stimulation. The impaired DC subsets in blood might result in a defect in DC-mediated T cell responses. These findings may provide insight into understanding the factors and related mechanisms that influence the outcome of HIV-1 carriers to HAART or future antiviral therapies.

  19. Analysis of HIV- type 1 protease and reverse transcriptase in Brazilian children failing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART Análise da protease e transcriptase reversa do HIV-1 em crianças com falha terapêutica em uso de terapia anti-retroviral altamente eficaz (HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Maria Machado

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotypic resistance profiles of HIV-1 in children failing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Forty-one children (median age = 67 months receiving HAART were submitted to genotypic testing when virological failure was detected. cDNA was extracted from PBMCs and amplified by nested PCR for the reverse transcriptase and protease regions of the pol gene. Drug resistance genotypes were determined from DNA sequencing. According to the genotypic analysis, 12/36 (33.3% and 6/36 (16.6% children showed resistance and possible resistance, respectively, to ZDV; 5/36 (14% and 4/36 (11.1%, respectively, showed resistance and possible resistance to ddI; 4/36 (11.1% showed resistance to 3TC and D4T; and 3/36 (8.3% showed resistance to Abacavir. A high percentage (54% of children exhibited mutations conferring resistance to NNRTI class drugs. Respective rates of resistance and possible resistance to PIs were: RTV (12.2%, 7.3%; APV (2.4%, 12.1%; SQV(0%, 12.1%; IDV (14.6%, 4.9%, NFV (22%, 4.9%, LPV/RTV (2.4%, 12.1%. Overall, 37/41 (90% children exhibited virus with mutations related to drug resistance, while 9% exhibited resistance to all three antiretroviral drug classes.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o perfil de resistência genotípica do HIV-1 em crianças com falha terapêutica ao tratamento anti-retroviral (HAART. Quarenta e uma crianças (idade mediana = 67 meses em uso de HAART foram submetidas ao teste de genotipagem no momento da detecção de falha ao tratamento. Foi realizada extração de cDNA de células periféricas mononucleares e amplificação do mesmo (regiões da transcriptase reversa e protease do gene pol através de PCR-nested. O perfil genotípico foi determinado através do seqüenciamnto de nucleotídeos. De acordo com a análise genotípica, 12/36 (33,3% e 6/36 (16,6% crianças apresentaram, respectivamente, resistência e possível resistência ao AZT; 5/36 (14% e 4/36 (11

  20. Complement lysis activity in autologous plasma is associated with lower viral loads during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection.

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    Michael Huber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the possibility that antibody-mediated complement lysis contributes to viremia control in HIV-1 infection, we measured the activity of patient plasma in mediating complement lysis of autologous primary virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sera from two groups of patients-25 with acute HIV-1 infection and 31 with chronic infection-were used in this study. We developed a novel real-time PCR-based assay strategy that allows reliable and sensitive quantification of virus lysis by complement. Plasma derived at the time of virus isolation induced complement lysis of the autologous virus isolate in the majority of patients. Overall lysis activity against the autologous virus and the heterologous primary virus strain JR-FL was higher at chronic disease stages than during the acute phase. Most strikingly, we found that plasma virus load levels during the acute but not the chronic infection phase correlated inversely with the autologous complement lysis activity. Antibody reactivity to the envelope (Env proteins gp120 and gp41 were positively correlated with the lysis activity against JR-FL, indicating that anti-Env responses mediated complement lysis. Neutralization and complement lysis activity against autologous viruses were not associated, suggesting that complement lysis is predominantly caused by non-neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data provide evidence that antibody-mediated complement virion lysis develops rapidly and is effective early in the course of infection; thus it should be considered a parameter that, in concert with other immune functions, steers viremia control in vivo.

  1. HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription substitutes for oxidative signaling in activation-induced T cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülow, Karsten; Kaminski, Marcin; Darvas, Katalin; Süss, Dorothee; Li-Weber, Min; Krammer, Peter H

    2005-05-01

    Termination of an immune response requires elimination of activated T lymphocytes by activation-induced cell death (AICD). In AICD, CD95 (Apo-1/Fas) ligand (L) triggers apoptosis of CD95-positive activated T lymphocytes. In AIDS patients, AICD is strongly enhanced and accelerated. We and others have previously shown that HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (HIV-1 Tat) sensitizes T cells toward CD95-mediated apoptosis and up-regulates CD95L expression by affecting the cellular redox balance. In this study, we show that it is hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) that functions as an essential second messenger in TCR signaling. The H(2)O(2) signal combined with simultaneous calcium (Ca(2+)) influx into the cytosol constitutes the minimal requirement for induction of CD95L expression. Either signal alone is insufficient. We further show that HIV-1 Tat interferes with TCR signaling and induces a H(2)O(2) signal. H(2)O(2) generated by HIV-1 Tat combines with CD4-dependent calcium influx and causes massive T cell apoptosis. Thus, our data provide an explanation for CD4(+) T lymphocyte depletion during progression of AIDS.

  2. The HEPT Analogue WPR-6 Is Active against a Broad Spectrum of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains of Different Serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weisi; Zhao, Jianxiong; Sun, Jianping; Yin, Qianqian; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Junyi; Jiang, Shibo; Shao, Yiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Ma, Liying

    2015-08-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are important components of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) used to treat human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1). However, because of the emergence of drug resistance and the adverse effects of current anti-HIV drugs, it is essential to develop novel NNRTIs with an excellent safety profile, improved activity against NNRTI-resistant viruses, and enhanced activity against clinical isolates of different subtypes. Here, we have identified 1-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-iodopyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (WPR-6), a novel NNRTI with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2 to 4 nM against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 and an EC50 of 7 to 14 nM against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain 7391 with a therapeutic index of >1 × 10(4). A panel of five representative clinical virus isolates of different subtypes circulating predominantly in China was highly sensitive to WPR-6, with EC50s ranging from 1 to 6 nM. In addition, WPR-6 showed excellent antiviral potency against the most prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses containing the K103N and Y181C mutations. To determine whether WPR-6 selects for novel resistant mutants, in vitro resistance selection was conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 on MT-4 cells. The results demonstrated that V106I and Y188L were the two dominant NNRTI-associated resistance mutations detected in the breakthrough viruses. Taken together, these in vitro data indicate that WPR-6 has greater efficacy than the reference HEPT analogue TNK651 and the marketed drug nevirapine against HIV-1. However, to develop it as a new NNRTI, further improvement of its pharmacological properties is warranted. PMID:26055365

  3. Systemic Immune Activation Profiles of HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Children and Their Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinyiko G. Makhubele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about immune activation profiles of children infected with HIV-1 subtype C. The current study compared levels of selected circulating biomarkers of immune activation in HIV-1 subtype C-infected untreated mothers and their children with those of healthy controls. Multiplex bead array, ELISA, and immunonephelometric procedures were used to measure soluble CD14 (sCD14, beta-2 microglobulin (β2M, CRP, MIG, IP-10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1. Levels of all 6 biomarkers were significantly elevated in the HIV-infected mothers and, with the exception of MIG, in their children (P<0.01–P<0.0001. The effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART and maternal smoking on these biomarkers were also assessed. With the exception of TGF-β1, which was unchanged in the children 12 months after therapy, initiation of ART was accompanied by decreases in the other biomarkers. Regression analysis revealed that although most biomarkers were apparently unaffected by smoking, exposure of children to maternal smoking was associated with a significant increase in IP-10. These findings demonstrate that biomarkers of immune activation are elevated in HIV-infected children pre-ART and decline, with the exception of TGF-β1, after therapy. Although preliminary, elevation of IP-10 in smoke-exposed infants is consistent with a higher level of immune activation in this group.

  4. A Conserved GPG-Motif in the HIV-1 Nef Core Is Required for Principal Nef-Activities.

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    Marta Martínez-Bonet

    Full Text Available To find out new determinants required for Nef activity we performed a functional alanine scanning analysis along a discrete but highly conserved region at the core of HIV-1 Nef. We identified the GPG-motif, located at the 121-137 region of HIV-1 NL4.3 Nef, as a novel protein signature strictly required for the p56Lck dependent Nef-induced CD4-downregulation in T-cells. Since the Nef-GPG motif was dispensable for CD4-downregulation in HeLa-CD4 cells, Nef/AP-1 interaction and Nef-dependent effects on Tf-R trafficking, the observed effects on CD4 downregulation cannot be attributed to structure constraints or to alterations on general protein trafficking. Besides, we found that the GPG-motif was also required for Nef-dependent inhibition of ring actin re-organization upon TCR triggering and MHCI downregulation, suggesting that the GPG-motif could actively cooperate with the Nef PxxP motif for these HIV-1 Nef-related effects. Finally, we observed that the Nef-GPG motif was required for optimal infectivity of those viruses produced in T-cells. According to these findings, we propose the conserved GPG-motif in HIV-1 Nef as functional region required for HIV-1 infectivity and therefore with a potential interest for the interference of Nef activity during HIV-1 infection.

  5. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study: a phase-II randomized clinical trial

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    Montoya Carlos J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy produces a significant decrease in HIV-1 replication and allows an increase in the CD4 T-cell count, leading to a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and mortality. However, the cost, side effects and complexity of antiretroviral regimens have underscored the immediate need for additional therapeutic approaches. Statins exert pleiotropic effects through a variety of mechanisms, among which there are several immunoregulatory effects, related and unrelated to their cholesterol-lowering activity that can be useful to control HIV-1 infection. Methods/design Randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled, single-center, phase-II clinical trial. One hundred and ten chronically HIV-1-infected patients, older than 18 years and naïve for antirretroviral therapy (i.e., without prior or current management with antiretroviral drugs will be enrolled at the outpatient services from the most important centres for health insurance care in Medellin-Colombia. The interventions will be lovastatin (40 mg/day, orally, for 12 months; 55 patients or placebo (55 patients. Our primary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on viral replication. The secondary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on CD4+ T-cell count in peripheral blood. As tertiary aims we will explore differences in CD8+ T-cell count, expression of activation markers (CD38 and HLA-DR on CD4 and CD8 T cells, cholesterol metabolism, LFA-1/ICAM-1 function, Rho GTPases function and clinical evolution between treated and not treated HIV-1-infected individuals. Discussion Preliminary descriptive studies have suggested that statins (lovastatin may have anti HIV-1 activity and that their administration is safe, with the potential effect of controlling HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals who had not received antiretroviral medications. Considering that there is limited clinical data available on

  6. Natural mannosylation of HIV-1 gp120 imposes no immunoregulatory effects in primary human plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sondergaard, J.N.; Vinner, L.; Brix, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a vital role in activation of anti-HIV-1 immunity, and suppression of pDCs might mitigate immune responses against HIV-1. HIV-1 gp120 high-mannose has been attributed immunosuppressive roles in human myeloid DCs, but no receptors for high-mannose have so far

  7. Phenyl-1-Pyridin-2yl-Ethanone-Based Iron Chelators Increase IκB-α Expression, Modulate CDK2 and CDK9 Activities, and Inhibit HIV-1 Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Namita; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Breuer, Denitra; Niu, Xiaomei; Lin, Xionghao; Xu, Min; Gavrilenko, Konstantin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein, which recruits CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. CDK9 is phosphorylated by CDK2, which facilitates formation of the high-molecular-weight positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex. We previously showed that chelation of intracellular iron inhibits CDK2 and CDK9 activities and suppresses HIV-1 transcription, but the mechanism of the inhibition was not understood. In the present study, we tested a set of novel iron chelators for the ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription and elucidated their mechanism of action. Novel phenyl-1-pyridin-2yl-ethanone (PPY)-based iron chelators were synthesized and examined for their effects on cellular iron, HIV-1 inhibition, and cytotoxicity. Activities of CDK2 and CDK9, expression of CDK9-dependent and CDK2-inhibitory mRNAs, NF-κB expression, and HIV-1- and NF-κB-dependent transcription were determined. PPY-based iron chelators significantly inhibited HIV-1, with minimal cytotoxicity, in cultured and primary cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 subtype B, but they had less of an effect on HIV-1 subtype C. Iron chelators upregulated the expression of IκB-α, with increased accumulation of cytoplasmic NF-κB. The iron chelators inhibited CDK2 activity and reduced the amount of CDK9/cyclin T1 in the large P-TEFb complex. Iron chelators reduced HIV-1 Gag and Env mRNA synthesis but had no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcription. In addition, iron chelators moderately inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, equally affecting HIV-1 and Sp1- or NF-κB-driven transcription. By virtue of their involvement in targeting several key steps in HIV-1 transcription, these novel iron chelators have the potential for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25155598

  8. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented. PMID:22728817

  9. Impact of gender on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all heterosex......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all...... counts (adjusted p=0.21). We observed no delay in time to initiation of HAART in women compared to men (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). There were no gender differences in risk of treatment modification of the original HAART regimen during the first year of therapy for either toxicity (IRR 0.97 95% CI 0.......66-1.44) or other/unknown reasons (IRR 1.18 95% CI 0.76-1.82). Finally, CD4 counts and the risk of having a detectable viral load at 1, 3 and 6 years did not differ between genders. CONCLUSIONS: In a setting with free access to healthcare and HAART, gender does neither affect time from eligibility to HAART...

  10. Developing strategies for HIV-1 eradication

    OpenAIRE

    Durand, Christine M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, transforming the outlook for infected patients. However, reservoirs of replication-competent forms of the virus persist during HAART, and when treatment is stopped, high rates of HIV-1 replication return. Recent insights into HIV-1 latency, as well as a report that HIV-1 infection was eradicated in one individual, have renewed interest in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Strategies for HIV-1 eradication include gene...

  11. Hyperimmune bovine colostrum as a low-cost, large-scale source of antibodies with broad neutralizing activity for HIV-1 envelope with potential use in microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramski, Marit; Center, Rob J; Wheatley, Adam K; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Alexander, Marina R; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-08-01

    Bovine colostrum (first milk) contains very high concentrations of IgG, and on average 1 kg (500 g/liter) of IgG can be harvested from each immunized cow immediately after calving. We used a modified vaccination strategy together with established production systems from the dairy food industry for the large-scale manufacture of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 IgG. This approach provides a low-cost mucosal HIV preventive agent potentially suitable for a topical microbicide. Four cows were vaccinated pre- and/or postconception with recombinant HIV-1 gp140 envelope (Env) oligomers of clade B or A, B, and C. Colostrum and purified colostrum IgG were assessed for cross-clade binding and neutralization against a panel of 27 Env-pseudotyped reporter viruses. Vaccination elicited high anti-gp140 IgG titers in serum and colostrum with reciprocal endpoint titers of up to 1 × 10(5). While nonimmune colostrum showed some intrinsic neutralizing activity, colostrum from 2 cows receiving a longer-duration vaccination regimen demonstrated broad HIV-1-neutralizing activity. Colostrum-purified polyclonal IgG retained gp140 reactivity and neutralization activity and blocked the binding of the b12 monoclonal antibody to gp140, showing specificity for the CD4 binding site. Colostrum-derived anti-HIV antibodies offer a cost-effective option for preparing the substantial quantities of broadly neutralizing antibodies that would be needed in a low-cost topical combination HIV-1 microbicide. PMID:22664963

  12. The role of G protein gene GNB3 C825T Polymorphism in HIV-1 acquisition, progression and immune activation

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    Juno Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GNB3 C825T polymorphism is associated with increased G protein-mediated signal transduction, SDF-1α-mediated lymphocyte chemotaxis, accelerated HIV-1 progression, and altered responses to antiretroviral therapy among Caucasian subjects. The GNB3 825T allele is highly prevalent in African populations, and as such any impact on HIV-1 acquisition or progression rates could have a dramatic impact. This study examines the association of the 825T polymorphism with HIV-1 acquisition, disease progression and immune activation in two African cohorts. GNB3 825 genotyping was performed for enrolees in both a commercial sex worker cohort and a perinatal HIV transmission (PHT cohort in Nairobi, Kenya. Ex vivo immune activation was quantified by flow cytometry, and plasma chemokine levels were assessed by cytokine bead array. Results GNB3 genotype was not associated with sexual or vertical HIV-1 acquisition within these cohorts. Within the Pumwani cohort, GNB3 genotype did not affect HIV-1 disease progression among seroconverters or among HIV-1-positive individuals after adjustment for baseline CD4 count. Maternal CD4 decline and viral load increase in the PHT cohort did not differ between genotypes. Multi-parametric flow cytometry assessment of T cell activation (CD69, HLA-DR, CD38 and Treg frequency (CD25+FOXP3+ found no differences between genotype groups. Plasma SDF-1α, MIP-1β and TRAIL levels quantified by cytokine bead array were also similar between groups. Conclusions In contrast to previous reports, we were unable to provide evidence to suggest that the GNB3 C825T polymorphism affects HIV-1 acquisition or disease progression within African populations. Ex vivo immune activation and plasma chemokine levels were similarly unaffected by GNB3 genotype in both HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive individuals. The paucity of studies investigating the impact of GNB3 polymorphism among African populations and the lack of mechanistic

  13. Longitudinal comparison between plasma and seminal HIV-1 viral loads during antiretroviral treatment Comparação longitudinal entre cargas virais seminais e plasmáticas do HIV-1 durante terapia anti-retroviral

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    Lauro Ferreira da Silva Pinto Neto

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the impact of anti-retroviral therapy on both plasma and seminal HIV-1 viral loads and the correlation between viral loads in these compartments after treatment. Viral load, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts were evaluated in paired plasma and semen samples from 36 antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients at baseline and on days 45, 90, and 180 of treatment. Slopes for blood and seminal viral loads in all treated patients were similar (p = 0.21. Median HIV-1 RNA titers in plasma and semen at baseline were 4.95 log10 and 4.48 log10 copies/ml, respectively. After 180 days of therapy, the median viral load declined to 3.15 log10 copies/ml (plasma and 3.2 log10 copies/ml (semen. At this timepoint 22 patients presented HIV-1 viral load below 400 copies/ml in either plasma or semen, but only 9 had viral loads below 400 copies/ml in both compartments.Este estudo foi desenhado para investigar o impacto do tratamento com anti-retrovirais na evolução das cargas virais plasmáticas e seminais do HIV-1. A carga viral do HIV-1 e a contagem de linfócitos T CD4+ e CD8+ foi determinada em amostras pareadas de sangue e sêmen de 36 pacientes virgem de tratamento nos dias 0, 45, 90 e 180 após o início da terapia. As curvas de declínio das cargas virais plasmática e seminal foram semelhantes (p= 0.21. As medianas da carga viral plasmática e seminal no pré-tratamento (dia 0 foram 4.95 e 4.48 log10 cópias/ml, respectivamente. Seis meses após o início da terapia, a mediana da carga viral plasmática era 3.15 log10 cópias/ml e a seminal 3.2 log10 cópias/ml. Neste mesmo periodo, 22 pacientes apresentavam carga viral abaixo de 400 cópias/ml no plasma e/ou sêmen, enquanto apenas 9 pacientes apresentavam carga viral abaixo do limite de detecção nos dois compartimentos.

  14. Activation and inflammation markers in HIV-1-infected patients in dependency of treatment strategies

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    R Ehret

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: HIV-1-infected patients have elevated levels of immune activation and systemic inflammatory markers which are partially strong predictors of disease progression or are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The dependency of anti-retroviral treatment (ART, the usage of NNRTI or PI-based and the application of non-nuc regimens is analysed here on the basis of a dataset (Chronic Inflammation Dependency on TREatment: CIDRE cohort from 1500 patients in Berlin. Methods: In a retrospective analysis we compared relative CD4+ cell counts, viral load, relative CD8+CD38+DR-and CD3+DR+cells, concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in therapy-naïve or treated patients dependent on usage or non-usage of NUCs, PI or NNRTI. Statistics were performed with R (R Core Team; 2012; R: A language and environment for statistical computing using Wilcoxon rank sum test in two-sided analysis. Summary of results: As to expect, ART-naïve patients (n=190 had significantly higher viral loads and lower CD4+cell counts (p: both<0.05 and showed higher activation levels than treated patient (CD8+CD38+DR- and CD3+DR+both<0.05. But no significant difference was calculated for hsCRP or IL-6. Nuc-sparing regimen (n=46 did not show any distinction compared to nuc-containing therapies (n=1249 for the analysed parameters. Significant differences were detected for PI-regimen (n=711 with lower CD4+ cell counts and higher activation (CD8+38+DR-, CD3+DR+ and IL-6 (p: all<0.05 but not for hsCRP (p=0.39. The opposite was true for NNRTI-based therapies (n=445 with higher CD4+ cell percentages and lower activation and inflammation markers (p: all<0.05 and as well no difference in hsCRP (p=0.97 compared with all other treated patients. Conclusions: The lack of differences between therapy-naïve patients and patients on ART for inflammation markers may be due to the relative good immunological state of the first group

  15. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of HIV-1 NC Proteins Investigated by Single Molecule DNA Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Bloomfield, Victor A.

    2002-03-01

    HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that is responsible for facilitating numerous nucleic acid rearrangements throughout the reverse transcription cycle of HIV-1. To understand the mechanism of NC’s chaperone function, we carried out single molecule DNA stretching studies in the presence of NC and mutant forms of NC. Using an optical tweezers instrument, we stretch single DNA molecules from the double-stranded helical state to the single-stranded (coil) state. Based on the observed cooperativity of DNA force-induced melting, we find that the fraction of melted base pairs at room temperature is increased dramatically in the presence of NC. Thus, upon NC binding, increased thermal fluctuations cause continuous melting and reannealing of base pairs so that DNA strands are able to rapidly sample configurations in order to find the lowest energy state. While NC destabilizes the double-stranded form of DNA, a mutant form of NC that lacks the zinc finger structures does not. DNA stretching experiments carried out in the presence of NC variants containing more subtle changes in the zinc finger structures were conducted to elucidate the contribution of each individual finger to NC’s chaperone activity, and these results will be reported.

  16. Lysine methylation of HIV-1 Tat regulates transcriptional activity of the viral LTR

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    Flynn Elizabeth K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of transcription of the HIV-1 viral genome is mediated by the interaction of the viral protein Tat with the LTR and other transcriptional machinery. These specific interactions can be affected by the state of post-translational modifications on Tat. Previously, we have shown that Tat can be phosphorylated and acetylated in vivo resulting in an increase in the rate of transcription. In the present study, we investigated whether Tat could be methylated on lysine residues, specifically on lysine 50 and 51, and whether this modification resulted in a decrease of viral transcription from the LTR. Results We analyzed the association of Tat with histone methyltransferases of the SUV39-family of SET domain containing proteins in vitro. Tat was found to associate with both SETDB1 and SETDB2, two enzymes which exhibit methyltransferase activity. siRNA against SETDB1 transfected into cell systems with both transient and integrated LTR reporter genes resulted in an increase in transcription of the HIV-LTR in the presence of suboptimal levels of Tat. In vitro methylation assays with Tat peptides containing point mutations at lysines 50 and 51 showed an increased incorporation of methyl groups on lysine 51, however, both residues indicated susceptibility for methylation. Conclusion The association of Tat with histone methyltransferases and the ability for Tat to be methylated suggests an interesting mechanism of transcriptional regulation through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling proteins to the HIV-1 promoter.

  17. Distinct determinants in HIV-1 Vif and human APOBEC3 proteins are required for the suppression of diverse host anti-viral proteins.

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    Wenyan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: APOBEC3G (A3G and related cytidine deaminases of the APOBEC3 family of proteins are potent inhibitors of many retroviruses, including HIV-1. Formation of infectious HIV-1 requires the suppression of multiple cytidine deaminases by Vif. HIV-1 Vif suppresses various APOBEC3 proteins through the common mechanism of recruiting the Cullin5-ElonginB-ElonginC E3 ubiquitin ligase to induce target protein polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. The domains in Vif and various APOBEC3 proteins required for APOBEC3 recognition and degradation have not been fully characterized. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study, we have demonstrated that the regions of APOBEC3F (A3F that are required for its HIV-1-mediated binding and degradation are distinct from those reported for A3G. We found that the C-terminal cytidine deaminase domain (C-CDD of A3F alone is sufficient for its interaction with HIV-1 Vif and its Vif-mediated degradation. We also observed that the domains of HIV-1 Vif that are uniquely required for its functional interaction with full-length A3F are also required for the degradation of the C-CDD of A3F; in contrast, those Vif domains that are uniquely required for functional interaction with A3G are not required for the degradation of the C-CDD of A3F. Interestingly, the HIV-1 Vif domains required for the degradation of A3F are also required for the degradation of A3C and A3DE. On the other hand, the Vif domains uniquely required for the degradation of A3G are dispensable for the degradation of cytidine deaminases A3C and A3DE. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that distinct regions of A3F and A3G are targeted by HIV-1 Vif molecules. However, HIV-1 Vif suppresses A3F, A3C, and A3DE through similar recognition determinants, which are conserved among Vif molecules from diverse HIV-1 strains. Mapping these determinants may be useful for the design of novel anti-HIV inhibitors.

  18. RNAP II processivity is a limiting step for HIV-1 transcription independent of orientation to and activity of endogenous neighboring promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek Michaels, Katarzyna; Wolschendorf, Frank; Schiralli Lester, Gillian M; Natarajan, Malini; Kutsch, Olaf; Henderson, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Since HIV-1 has a propensity to integrate into actively expressed genes, transcriptional interference from neighboring host promoters has been proposed to contribute to the establishment and maintenance HIV-1 latency. To gain insights into how endogenous promoters influence HIV-1 transcription we utilized a set of inducible T cell lines and characterized whether there were correlations between expression of endogenous genes, provirus and long terminal repeat architecture. We show that neighboring promoters are active but have minimal impact on HIV-1 transcription, in particular, expression of the endogenous gene did not prevent expression of HIV-1 following induction of latent provirus. We also demonstrate that releasing paused RNAP II by diminishing negative elongation factor (NELF) is sufficient to reactivate transcriptionally repressed HIV-1 provirus regardless of the integration site and orientation of the provirus suggesting that NELF-mediated RNAP II pausing is a common mechanism of maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  19. Serum neutralizing activities from a Beijing homosexual male cohort infected with different subtypes of HIV-1 in China.

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    Mingshun Zhang

    Full Text Available Protective antibodies play a critical role in an effective HIV vaccine; however, eliciting antibodies to block infection by viruses from diverse genetic subtypes remains a major challenge. As the world's most populous country, China has been under the threat of at least three major subtypes of circulating HIV-1 viruses. Understanding the cross reactivity and specificities of serum antibody responses that mediate broad neutralization of the virus in HIV-1 infected Chinese patients will provide valuable information for the design of vaccines to prevent HIV-1 transmission in China. Sera from a cohort of homosexual men, who have been managed by a major HIV clinical center in Beijing, China, were analyzed for cross-sectional neutralizing activities against pseudotyped viruses expressing Env antigens of the major subtype viruses (AE, BC and B subtypes circulating in China. Neutralizing activities in infected patients' blood were most capable of neutralizing viruses in the homologous subtype; however, a subset of blood samples was able to achieve broad neutralizing activities across different subtypes. Such cross neutralizing activity took 1-2 years to develop and CD4 binding site antibodies were critical components in these blood samples. Our study confirmed the presence of broadly neutralizing sera in China's HIV-1 patient population. Understanding the specificity and breadth of these neutralizing activities can guide efforts for the development of HIV vaccines against major HIV-1 viruses in China.

  20. Single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations can broaden the antibody response against the variable V3 domain of HIV-1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, F; Keller, H; Kieny, M P; Thèze, J

    1995-05-01

    The third variable (V3) domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein gp120 is a major target of neutralizing antibodies in infected persons and in experimental immunized animals. Given the high degree of sequence variability of V3, the humoral response toward this region is very type-specific. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a single peptide and an anti-idiotypic antibody to broaden the anti-V3 antibody specificity in BALB/c mice. We show that a synthetic peptide derived from the V3 determinant of HIV-1 MN isolate (V3MN), when used as an immunogen, was able to induce an antibody response to multiple (up to six) HIV-1 strains. The extent of this cross-reactivity, which tended to enlarge as the injections increased, appeared to be inversely correlated with the binding affinity to V3MN peptide. These data thus present evidence that, despite its great sequence heterogeneity, the V3 loop encompasses conserved amino-acid positions and/or stretches which may be less immunogenic than their variable counterparts. We additionally demonstrate that a rabbit anti-idiotype (Ab2), recognizing a binding site related idiotype on a V3-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (Ab1), could mount a broadened humoral response (Ab3) in mice. Unlike nominal antibody Ab1 which strictly reacted with the European HIV-1 LAI isolate, elicited Ab3 recognized the two divergent HIV-1 strains SF2 and 1286, originating respectively from North America and Central Africa, in addition to LAI. The reasons accounting for this Ab2-induced enlargement of the V3 antibody response are discussed. Our findings suggest that single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations may provide viable approaches to overcome, at least in part, HIV epitope variability. PMID:7783749

  1. The MSHA strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa activated TLR pathway and enhanced HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunoreactivity.

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    Jue Hou

    Full Text Available The mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA has been shown to trigger naïve immune responses through the activation of monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells (NK cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs. Based on the hypothesis that PA-MSHA activates natural immunity through the Toll-like receptor (TLR pathway, we scanned several critical TLR pathway molecules in mouse splenocytes using high-throughput real-time QRT-PCR and co-stimulatory molecule in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs following in vitro stimulation by PA-MSHA. PA-MSHA enabled activation of the TLR pathway mediated by NF-κB and JNK signaling in splenocytes, and the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 was up-regulated in BMDCs. We then assessed the adjuvant effect of PA-MSHA for HIV-1 DNA vaccines. In comparison to DNA inoculation alone, co-inoculation with low dosage of PA-MSHA enhanced specific immunoreactivity against HIV-1 Env in both cellular and humoral responses, and promoted antibody avidity maturation. However, high doses of adjuvant resulted in an immunosuppressive effect; a two- or three-inoculation regimen yielded low antibody responses and the two-inoculation regimen exhibited only a slight cellular immunity response. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the utility of PA-MSHA as an adjuvant to a DNA vaccine. Further research is needed to investigate the exact mechanisms through which PA-MSHA achieves its adjuvant effects on innate immune responses, especially on dendritic cells.

  2. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; Sarma, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    between the anti HIV-1 gag ribozyme and its abortive DNA substrate manifests in the detection of a continuous track of A.T base pairs; this suggests that the interaction between the ribozyme and its DNA substrate is stronger than the one observed in the case of the free ribozyme where the bases in stem I and stem III regions interact strongly with the ribozyme core region (Sarma, R. H., et al. FEBS Letters 375, 317-23, 1995). The complex formation provides certain guidelines in the design of suitable therapeutic ribozymes. If the residues in the ribozyme stem regions interact with the conserved core, it may either prevent or interfere with the formation of a catalytically active tertiary structure.

  3. Synthesis and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity of Non-Nucleoside Phthalimide Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    UNGWITAYATORN Jiraporn; WIWAT Chanpen; MATAYATSUK Chutima; PIMTHON Jutarat; PIYAVIRIYAKUL Suratsawadee

    2008-01-01

    A new type of non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors in phthalimide series has been synthesized from either the reaction of N-carboethoxyphthalimide with amines or phthalimide with appropriate alkyl halides.The in vitro inhibitory activity of the synthesized compounds was studied by a radiometric assay at a concentration of 200 μg/mL using poly(rA)-oligo(dT) as a template-primer and methyl-[3H]dTTP as a substrate.The three most potent compounds, N-(m,p-dihydroxybenzyl)phthalimide (11), N-[2-(a-furyl)ethyl]phthalimide (29) and N-(5-methylpyrazin-2-ylmethyl)phthalimide (25) exhibited IC50 values of 60.90, 98.10 and 120.75 μg/mL, respecas a substrate).

  4. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Zadeh, Mohammad Asad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART.

  5. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K Bialek

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs, act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5' long terminal repeat (LTR, for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination.

  6. Similar Neutralizing Activity in the HIV-1 Infected Long Term Non-progressors(LTNPs) and Typical Progressors(TPs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wang; Si-yang Liu; Lin Li; Tian-yi Li; Jing-yun Li; Li-li Chen; Yong-jian Liu; Han-ping Li; Zuo-yi Bao; Xiao-lin Wang; Dao-min Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are considered to be an important protective parameter used in HIV-l vaccine evaluation.However,the exact role that neutralizing antibodies plays in controlling the disease progression of HIV-1 infected peoples is still undetermined.In this paper,we compared the protective function of the neutralizing antibody response in the plasma from LTNP and TP against clade B and clade C pseudoviruses.No difference in the neutralizing activities between the plasma from LTNP and TP was found,which was consistent with the most recent reports.In addition,no correlations between the titer or breadth and CD4+ or viral load in HIV-1 infected individuals were found.The protective roles played by neutralizing antibodies in controlling disease progression of HIV-1 infected people need to be considered in a new viewpoint.

  7. HIV-1 Nef enhances dendritic cell-mediated viral transmission to CD4+ T cells and promotes T-cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corine St Gelais

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Nef enhances dendritic cell (DC-mediated viral transmission to CD4(+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. It is also unknown whether HIV-1 infected DCs play a role in activating CD4(+ T cells and enhancing DC-mediated viral transmission. Here we investigated the role of HIV-1 Nef in DC-mediated viral transmission and HIV-1 infection of primary CD4(+ T cells using wild-type HIV-1 and Nef-mutated viruses. We show that HIV-1 Nef facilitated DC-mediated viral transmission to activated CD4(+ T cells. HIV-1 expressing wild-type Nef enhanced the activation and proliferation of primary resting CD4(+ T cells. However, when co-cultured with HIV-1-infected autologous DCs, there was no significant trend for infection- or Nef-dependent proliferation of resting CD4(+ T cells. Our results suggest an important role of Nef in DC-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to activated CD4(+ T cells and in the activation and proliferation of resting CD4(+ T cells, which likely contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  8. L-Selectin and P-Selectin Are Novel Biomarkers of Cervicovaginal Inflammation for Preclinical Mucosal Safety Assessment of Anti-HIV-1 Microbicide

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Maohua; He, Benxia; Yang, Jingyi; Bao, Rong; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Dihan; Chen, Yaoqing; Li, Liangzhu; Han, Chen; Yang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yaoming; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Shibo

    2012-01-01

    A major obstacle thwarting preclinical development of microbicides is the lack of a validated biomarker of cervicovaginal inflammation. Therefore, the present study aims to identify novel noninvasive soluble markers in a murine model for assessment of microbicide mucosal safety. By performing cytokine antibody array analysis, we identified two adhesion molecules, L-selectin and P-selectin, which significantly increased when mucosal inflammation was triggered by nonoxynol-9 (N9), an anti-HIV-1...

  9. HIV-1 TAR RNA-binding proteins control TAT activation of translation in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, M; Powell, R; Blanchard, A D; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1993-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) gene expression is activated by the viral TAT protein that interacts with an RNA sequence, TAR, located at the 5' end of all viral mRNAs. TAT functions primarily as a transcriptional activator in mammalian cells. However, in Xenopus oocytes TAT functions primarily as a translational activator. TAR is an RNA structure comprising a partially base-paired stem, a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem, and an unpaired six-nucleotide loop. In vitro, TAT binds directly to the bulge with no requirement for the loop. In vivo, however, mutations in the loop abolish TAT activation of transcription and translation, implying a requirement for TAR-binding cellular factors. We now provide genetic evidence for the presence of two TAR-specific cellular factors in Xenopus oocytes. These factors display independent and mutually exclusive interactions with either the loop or the bulge region of TAR. Furthermore, by using in vivo RNA competition assays we show that the cellular factors regulate the accessibility of the TAT binding site. The fact that Xenopus oocytes contain factors that specifically interact with a human viral RNA sequence might indicate that the TAT/TAR interaction is subverting a conserved pathway in the cell. PMID:8422967

  10. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5' leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES' function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES' activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3' nucleotides added by alternative splicing. PMID:23661682

  11. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5′ leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M.; Whitehurst, James T.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES’ function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES’ activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3′ nucleotides added by alternative splicing. PMID:23661682

  12. Limited patient adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection in an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwkerk, PT; Sprangers, MAG; Burger, DM; Hoetelmans, RMW; Hugen, PWH; Danner, SA; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Schneider, MME; Schrey, G; Meenhorst, PL; Sprenger, HG; Kauffmann, RH; Jambroes, M; Chesney, MA; de Wolf, F; Lange, JMA

    2001-01-01

    Background: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency syndrome type 1 (HIV-1) infection is essential to sustain viral suppression and prevent drug resistance. We investigated adherence to HAART among patients in a clinical cohort study. Methods: Patients re

  13. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 predicts myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Katzenstein, Terese L; Benfield, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    (PAI-1) were measured using a Luminex assay in plasma samples from routine visits both 12 and 2 months prior to the case patient's MI. RESULTS: The two groups had similar HIV characteristics and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. In univariate analysis, PAI-1 levels were associated with MI......OBJECTIVES: Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and coagulation are associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, but their association and possible predictive value remain controversial among HIV-1-infected individuals. We sought to investigate the association of...... seven biomarkers with first-time myocardial infarction (MI) in an HIV-1-infected population. DESIGN: A matched case-control study of 54 cases and 54 controls. METHODS: We compared 54 HIV-1-infected patients with verified first-time MI and 54 HIV-1-infected controls matched for age, duration of...

  14. HIV-1 protease inhibitory substances from the rhizomes of Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt.

    OpenAIRE

    Tassanee Panphadung; Jindaporn Puripattanavong; Sanan Subhadhirasakul; Supinya Tewtrakul

    2003-01-01

    Four flavonoids (pinostrobin, pinocembrin, cardamonin and alpinetin) isolated from the ethanol extract of Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt. (yellow rhizome) were tested for their activities against HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR). The result showed that cardamonin exhibited an appreciable anti-HIV-1 PR activity with an IC50 value of 31 μg/ml.

  15. HIV-1 protease inhibitory substances from the rhizomes of Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassanee Panphadung

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Four flavonoids (pinostrobin, pinocembrin, cardamonin and alpinetin isolated from the ethanol extract of Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt. (yellow rhizome were tested for their activities against HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR. The result showed that cardamonin exhibited an appreciable anti-HIV-1 PR activity with an IC50 value of 31 μg/ml.

  16. Identification of Env-specific Monoclonal Antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 Infected Person by B cell Activation and RT-PCR Cloning%利用B细胞培养和RT-PCR技术从我国HIV-1感染者中筛选膜蛋白特异性单克隆抗体的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪慧敏; 管永军; 曾毅; 徐柯; 余双庆; 丁林林; 罗海艳; Robin Flinko; George K lewis; 冯霞; 邵继荣

    2012-01-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were screened by ELISA after 1~2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vκ or VX genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and κ or γ expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vk or VX were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and V κ/γ pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded.%本研究通过采集1型人类免疫缺陷病毒(Human immunodeficiency virus-1,HIV-1)感染者抗凝全血,分离出外周血单个核细胞,然后用磁珠分选纯化记忆性B细胞和体外活化记忆性B细胞,促使其分泌抗体,用ELISA法识别阳性B细胞克隆,并提取阳性B细胞

  17. HIV-1 Tat Inhibits Autotaxin Lysophospholipase D Activity and Modulates Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Natalie A.; Fuss, Babette; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2016-01-01

    White matter injury has been frequently reported in HIV+ patients. Previous studies showed that HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription), a viral protein that is produced and secreted by HIV-infected cells, is toxic to young, immature oligodendrocytes (OLGs). Adding Tat to the culture medium reduced the viability of immature OLGs, and the surviving OLGs exhibited reduced process networks. OLGs produce and secrete autotaxin (ATX), an ecto-enzyme containing a lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity that converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid signaling molecule that stimulates OLG differentiation. We hypothesized that Tat affects OLG development by interfering with the ATX-LPA signaling pathway. Our data show that Tat treatment leads to changes in the expression of OLG differentiation genes and the area of OLG process networks, both of which can be rescued by LPA. Tat-treated OLGs showed no change in LPA receptor expression but significantly decreased extracellular ATX levels and lysoPLD activity. In Tat transgenic mice, expression of Tat in vivo leads to decreased OLG ATX secretion. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a potential physical interaction between Tat and ATX. Together, these data strongly suggest two functional implications of Tat blocking ATX’s lysoPLD activity. On one hand, it attenuates OLG differentiation, and on the other hand it interferes with the protective effects of LPA on OLG process morphology. PMID:27659560

  18. Requirement for HIV-1 TAR sequences for Tat activation in rodent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, J A; Braddock, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1995-01-10

    HIV-1 gene expression is activated via an interaction between the virally encoded Tat protein and a target RNA, TAR. TAR is located at the immediate 5' end of all viral mRNAs and comprises a partially base-paired stem with a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem and a hexanucleotide loop. In vitro, Tat binds specifically to the bulge and upper stem region with no requirement for the loop. In contrast, when Tat activation is analyzed in primate cells, mutations in the loop abolish activation, suggesting a critical role for loop binding cellular factors. However, in rodent cells the reverse is true. Messages with a mutation in the TAR loop are activated whereas messages harboring a wild-type TAR sequence are not activated. By testing the effect of mutations in the bulge and stem in the context of mutation in the loop we now show that this loop-independent activation by Tat in rodent cells requires the critical bulge-stem sequences needed for Tat binding in vitro. These data suggest that in rodent cells, as in vitro, Tat does not require a loop binding cofactor. In rodent cells containing human chromosome 12 (CHO12), however, Tat activation is both bulge and loop dependent. It appears that rodent cells, but not CHO12 cells, are refractory to the normal Tat/TAR activation pathway not by virtue of lacking a loop binding cofactor, but rather by the presence of a loop binding inhibitor of either Tat binding or the activation process. PMID:7530399

  19. Acute plasma biomarkers of T cell activation set-point levels and of disease progression in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Liovat

    Full Text Available T cell activation levels, viral load and CD4(+ T cell counts at early stages of HIV-1 infection are predictive of the rate of progression towards AIDS. We evaluated whether the inflammatory profile during primary HIV-1 infection is predictive of the virological and immunological set-points and of disease progression. We quantified 28 plasma proteins during acute and post-acute HIV-1 infection in individuals with known disease progression profiles. Forty-six untreated patients, enrolled during primary HIV-1 infection, were categorized into rapid progressors, progressors and slow progressors according to their spontaneous progression profile over 42 months of follow-up. Already during primary infection, rapid progressors showed a higher number of increased plasma proteins than progressors or slow progressors. The plasma levels of TGF-β1 and IL-18 in primary HIV-1 infection were both positively associated with T cell activation level at set-point (6 months after acute infection and together able to predict 74% of the T cell activation variation at set-point. Plasma IP-10 was positively and negatively associated with, respectively, T cell activation and CD4(+ T cell counts at set-point and capable to predict 30% of the CD4(+ T cell count variation at set-point. Moreover, plasma IP-10 levels during primary infection were predictive of rapid progression. In primary infection, IP-10 was an even better predictor of rapid disease progression than viremia or CD4(+ T cell levels at this time point. The superior predictive capacity of IP-10 was confirmed in an independent group of 88 HIV-1 infected individuals. Altogether, this study shows that the inflammatory profile in primary HIV-1 infection is associated with T cell activation levels and CD4(+ T cell counts at set-point. Plasma IP-10 levels were of strong predictive value for rapid disease progression. The data suggest IP-10 being an earlier marker of disease progression than CD4(+ T cell counts or

  20. Novel 3′-Processing Integrase Activity Assay by Real-Time PCR for Screening and Identification of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Supachai Sakkhachornphop; Weeraya Thongkum; Chatchai Tayapiwatana

    2015-01-01

    The 3′-end processing (3′P) of each viral long terminal repeat (LTR) during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integration is a vital step in the HIV life cycle. Blocking the 3′P using 3′P inhibitor has recently become an attractive strategy for HIV-1 therapeutic intervention. Recently, we have developed a novel real-time PCR based assay for the detection of 3′P activity in vitro. The methodology usually involves biotinylated HIV-1 LTR, HIV-1 integrase (IN), and specific primers and ...

  1. Effect of antiretroviral drugs on maternal CD4 lymphocyte counts, HIV-1 RNA levels, and anthropometric parameters of their neonates Efeito das drogas anti-retrovirais sobre os valores dos linfócitos TCD4, RNA do HIV-1 e parâmetros antropométricos de neonatos de gestantes portadoras do HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia El Beitune

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the effect of antiretroviral drugs administered during pregnancy on CD4 lymphocyte counts and HIV-1 RNA levels of pregnant women and on the anthropometric parameters of their neonates. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted on 57 pregnant women and their neonates divided into 3 groups: ZDV Group, HIV-infected mothers taking zidovudine (n = 20; triple therapy (TT Group, mothers taking zidovudine + lamivudine + nelfinavir (n = 25, and Control Group, normal women (n = 12. CD4 lymphocyte counts and HIV-1 RNA levels of pregnant women were analyzed during two periods of pregnancy. The perinatal prognosis took into account preterm rates, birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction, perinatal death, and vertical transmission of HIV-1. Data were analyzed statistically using the nonparametric chi-square, Mann-Whitney, Friedman, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon matched pairs tests, with the level of significance set at P OBJETIVOS: Estudar o efeito das drogas anti-retrovirais sobre a quantificação dos linfócitos TCD4 e RNA do HIV-1 de gestantes portadoras do HIV-1 e parâmetros antropométricos de seus neonatos. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo avaliando 57 gestantes e seus neonatos em três grupos: Grupo AZT, gestantes portadoras do HIV utilizando zidovudina (n=20; Grupo TT, mães utilizando zidovudina+lamivudina+nelfinavir (n=25, e Grupo Controle, mulheres saudáveis (n=12. A quantificação dos linfócitos TCD4 e RNA do HIV-1 de gestantes portadoras do HIV foi analisada em dois períodos durante a gestação. O prognóstico perinatal levou em consideração as taxas de pré-termos, restrição de crescimento intra-útero, mortalidade perinatal e transmissão vertical do HIV-1. Os dados foram analisados utilizando-se testes não paramétricos de qui-quadrado, Mann-Whitney, Friedman, Kruskal-Wallys e Wilcoxon para amostras pareadas, considerando-se significativos valores associados a p<0,05. RESULTADOS: Observou-se homogeneidade entre

  2. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  3. HIV-1 Tat activates neuronal ryanodine receptors with rapid induction of the unfolded protein response and mitochondrial hyperpolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Norman

    Full Text Available Neurologic disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is ultimately refractory to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART because of failure of complete virus eradication in the central nervous system (CNS, and disruption of normal neural signaling events by virally induced chronic neuroinflammation. We have previously reported that HIV-1 Tat can induce mitochondrial hyperpolarization in cortical neurons, thus compromising the ability of the neuron to buffer calcium and sustain energy production for normal synaptic communication. In this report, we demonstrate that Tat induces rapid loss of ER calcium mediated by the ryanodine receptor (RyR, followed by the unfolded protein response (UPR and pathologic dilatation of the ER in cortical neurons in vitro. RyR antagonism attenuated both Tat-mediated mitochondrial hyperpolarization and UPR induction. Delivery of Tat to murine CNS in vivo also leads to long-lasting pathologic ER dilatation and mitochondrial morphologic abnormalities. Finally, we performed ultrastructural studies that demonstrated mitochondria with abnormal morphology and dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER in brain tissue of patients with HIV-1 inflammation and neurodegeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that abnormal RyR signaling mediates the neuronal UPR with failure of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and is a critical locus for the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 in the CNS.

  4. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); El-Hage, Nazira [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah [George Mason University, Manassas, VA (United States); Ochem, Alex [ICGEB, Wernher and Beit Building, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa); Simon, Gary L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Karn, Jonathan [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hauser, Kurt F. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Tyagi, Mudit, E-mail: tmudit@email.gwu.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR.

  5. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR

  6. High levels of T lymphocyte activation in Leishmania-HIV-1 co-infected individuals despite low HIV viral load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grinsztejn Beatriz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concomitant infections may influence HIV progression by causing chronic activation leading to decline in T-cell function. In the Americas, visceral (AVL and tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL have emerged as important opportunistic infections in HIV-AIDS patients and both of those diseases have been implicated as potentially important co-factors in disease progression. We investigated whether leishmaniasis increases lymphocyte activation in HIV-1 co-infected patients. This might contribute to impaired cellular immune function. Methods To address this issue we analyzed CD4+ T absolute counts and the proportion of CD8+ T cells expressing CD38 in Leishmania/HIV co-infected patients that recovered after anti-leishmanial therapy. Results We found that, despite clinical remission of leishmaniasis, AVL co-infected patients presented a more severe immunossupression as suggested by CD4+ T cell counts under 200 cells/mm3, differing from ATL/HIV-AIDS cases that tends to show higher lymphocytes levels (over 350 cells/mm3. Furthermore, five out of nine, AVL/HIV-AIDS presented low CD4+ T cell counts in spite of low or undetectable viral load. Expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in AVL or ATL/HIV-AIDS cases compared to HIV/AIDS patients without leishmaniasis or healthy subjects. Conclusions Leishmania infection can increase the degree of immune system activation in individuals concomitantly infected with HIV. In addition, AVL/HIV-AIDS patients can present low CD4+ T cell counts and higher proportion of activated T lymphocytes even when HIV viral load is suppressed under HAART. This fact can cause a misinterpretation of these laboratorial markers in co-infected patients.

  7. Programming of neurotoxic cofactor CXCL-10 in HIV-1-associated dementia: abrogation of CXCL-10-induced neuro-glial toxicity in vitro by PKC activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehla Rajeev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 50% of patients undergoing lifelong suppressive antiviral treatment for HIV-1 infection develop minor HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Neurological complications during HIV-1 infection are the result of direct neuronal damage by proinflammatory products released from HIV-1-infected or -uninfected activated lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, microglia and astrocytes. The specific pro-inflammatory products and their roles in neurotoxicity are far from clear. We investigated proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of HIV-demented (HIV-D and HIV-nondemented (HIV-ND patients and studied their affect on neuroglial toxicity. Methods and results Bioplex array showed elevated levels of signatory chemokines or cytokines (IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, MCP-1 and PDGF in the CSF of HIV-D patients (n = 7 but not in that of HIV-ND patients (n = 7. Among the signatory cytokines and chemokines, CXCL10 was distinctly upregulated in-vitro in HIV-1 (NLENG1-activated human fetal astrocytes, HIV-1 (Ba-L-infected macrophages, and HIV-1 (NLENG1-infected lymphocytes. Virus-infected macrophages also had increased levels of TNF-α. Consistently, human fetal astrocytes treated with HIV-1 and TNF-α induced the signatory molecules. CXCL10 in combination with HIV-1 synergistically enhanced neuronal toxicity and showed chemotactic activity (~ 40 fold for activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, suggesting the intersection of signaling events imparted by HIV-1 and CXCL10 after binding to their respective surface receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR3, on neurons. Blocking CXCR3 and its downstream MAP kinase (MAPK signaling pathway suppressed combined CXCL10 and HIV-1-induced neurotoxicity. Bryostatin, a PKC modulator and suppressor of CXCR4, conferred neuroprotection against combined insult with HIV-1 and CXCL10. Bryostatin also suppressed HIV-1 and CXCL10-induced PBMC chemotaxis. Although, therapeutic targeting

  8. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornber Carol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme, which at 8 μg/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 μg. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4 and CCR5 (R5 tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 μg/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development.

  9. Subunit-selective mutagenesis indicates minimal polymerase activity in heterodimer-associated p51 HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Grice, S F; Naas, T; Wohlgensinger, B; Schatz, O.

    1991-01-01

    We have purified and determined functional parameters of reconstituted, recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) heterodimers within which either the p66 or p51 polypeptide was selectively mutated in one or both aspartic acid residues constituting the proposed polymerase active site (-Y-M-D-D-). Heterodimers containing a mutated p51 polypeptide retain almost wild type levels of both RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNaseH) activity. In contrast, heterodimers whose p66 poly...

  10. Structure-Activity Relationships of Synthetic Coumarins as HIV-1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV/AIDS pandemics is a serious threat to health and development of mankind, and searching for effective anti-HIV agents remains actual. Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the field of drug development against HIV. A lot of structurally different coumarins were found to display potent anti-HIV activity. The current review demonstrates the variety of synthetic coumarins having unique mechanism of action referring to the different stages of HIV replication. Recent studies based on the account of various synthetic coumarins seem to indicate that some of them serve as potent non-nucleoside RT-inhibitors, another as inhibitors of HIV-integrase or HIV-protease. The merits of selecting potential anti-HIV agents to be used in rational combination drugs design and structure-activity relationships are discussed.The scientific community is looking actively for new drugs and combinations for treatment of HIV infection effective for first-line treatment, as well as against resistant mutants. The investigation on chemical anti-HIV agents gives hope and optimism about it. This review article describes recent progress in the discovery, structure modification, and structure-activity relationship studies of potent anti-HIV coumarin derivatives.

  11. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor -thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, D.; Maegley, K; Pauly, T; Bauman, J; Das, K; Dharia, C; Clark, Jr., A; Ryan, K; Hickey, M; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, such as RNH, should be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 {angstrom} and 2.04 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, {beta}-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. {beta}-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that {beta}-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with noncompetitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate.

  12. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea. PMID:20946407

  13. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea.

  14. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M.; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  15. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  16. The Nucleoside Analog BMS-986001 Shows Greater In Vitro Activity against HIV-2 than against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A; Raugi, Dana N; Wu, Vincent H; Leong, Sally S; Parker, Kate M; Oakes, Mariah K; Sow, Papa Salif; Ba, Selly; Seydi, Moussa; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S

    2015-12-01

    Treatment options for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) are restricted by the intrinsic resistance of the virus to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and the reduced susceptibility of HIV-2 to several protease inhibitors (PIs) used in antiretroviral therapy (ART). In an effort to identify new antiretrovirals for HIV-2 treatment, we evaluated the in vitro activity of the investigational nucleoside analog BMS-986001 (2',3'-didehydro-3'-deoxy-4'-ethynylthymidine; also known as censavudine, festinavir, OBP-601, 4'-ethynyl stavudine, or 4'-ethynyl-d4T). In single-cycle assays, BMS-986001 inhibited HIV-2 isolates from treatment-naive individuals, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) ranging from 30 to 81 nM. In contrast, EC50s for group M and O isolates of HIV-1 ranged from 450 to 890 nM. Across all isolates tested, the average EC50 for HIV-2 was 9.5-fold lower than that for HIV-1 (64 ± 18 nM versus 610 ± 200 nM, respectively; mean ± standard deviation). BMS-986001 also exhibited full activity against HIV-2 variants whose genomes encoded the single amino acid changes K65R and Q151M in reverse transcriptase, whereas the M184V mutant was 15-fold more resistant to the drug than the parental HIV-2ROD9 strain. Taken together, our findings show that BMS-986001 is an effective inhibitor of HIV-2 replication. To our knowledge, BMS-986001 is the first nucleoside analog that, when tested against a diverse collection of HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, exhibits more potent activity against HIV-2 than against HIV-1 in culture. PMID:26392486

  17. Structures of HIV-1 RT-DNA complexes before and after incorporation of the anti-AIDS drug tenofovir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuske,S; Sarafianos,SG; Clark,AD; Ding,JP; Naeger,LK; White,KL; Miller,MD; Gibbs,CS; Boyer,PL; Clark,P; Wang,G; Gaffney,BL; Jones,RA; Jerina,DM; Hughes,SH; Arnold,E

    2005-01-01

    Tenofovir, also known as PMPA, R-9-(2-(phosphonomethoxypropyl)adenine, is a nucleotide reverse transcriptas e(RT) inhibitor. We have determined the crystal structures of two related complexes ofHIV-1 RT with template primer and tenofovir: (i) a ternary complex at a resolution of 3.0 Angstrom of RT crosslinked to a dideoxy-terminated DNA with tenofovir-diphosphate bound as the incoming substrate; and (ii) a RT DNA complex at a resolution of 3,1 Angstrom with tenofovir at the 3 primer terminus. The tenofovir nucleotide in the tenofovir-terminated structure seems to adopt multiple conformations. Some nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, including 3TC and AZT, have dements (handles) that project beyond the corresponding elements on normal dNTPs (the substrate envelope). HIV-1 RT resistance mechanisms to AZT and 3TC take advantage of these handles; tenofovir's structure lacks handles that could protrude through the substrate envelope to cause resistance.

  18. Soluble urokinase receptor levels in plasma during 5 years of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Piironen, Timo;

    2004-01-01

    High blood levels of the soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) strongly predict increased mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. This study investigated the plasma concentration of suPAR in 29 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients during 5 years treatment with highly...... active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Plasma suPAR decreased after introducing HAART, most pronounced during the first treatment year. The change in plasma suPAR was independent of changes in viral replication and CD4+ cells but it was strongly correlated with plasma levels of the soluble TNF receptor...... II. Compared with healthy individuals, plasma suPAR and sTN-FrII was increased in untreated patients. After initiating HAART, plasma sTNFrII remained increased whereas plasma suPAR decreased to a level comparable with healthy individuals. The present data indicate that the circulating suPAR level is...

  19. Pandemic HIV-1 Vpu overcomes intrinsic herd immunity mediated by tetherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Shingo; Sato, Kei; Morita, Satoru; Inaba, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Junko S; Kimura, Yuichi; Misawa, Naoko; Ren, Fengrong; Iwasa, Yoh; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-07-17

    Among the four groups of HIV-1 (M, N, O, and P), HIV-1M alone is pandemic and has rapidly expanded across the world. However, why HIV-1M has caused a devastating pandemic while the other groups remain contained is unclear. Interestingly, only HIV-1M Vpu, a viral protein, can robustly counteract human tetherin, which tethers budding virions. Therefore, we hypothesize that this property of HIV-1M Vpu facilitates human-to-human viral transmission. Adopting a multilayered experimental-mathematical approach, we demonstrate that HIV-1M Vpu confers a 2.38-fold increase in the prevalence of HIV-1 transmission. When Vpu activity is lost, protected human populations emerge (i.e., intrinsic herd immunity develops) through the anti-viral effect of tetherin. We also reveal that all Vpus of transmitted/founder HIV-1M viruses maintain anti-tetherin activity. These findings indicate that tetherin plays the role of a host restriction factor, providing 'intrinsic herd immunity', whereas Vpu has evolved in HIV-1M as a tetherin antagonist.

  20. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  1. Gut dendritic cell activation links an altered colonic microbiome to mucosal and systemic T-cell activation in untreated HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; McManus, M C; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; McCarter, M D; Wilson, C C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c(+) and CD1c(neg)) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percentage of CD83(+)CD1c(+) mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of interferon-γ-producing colon CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and Prevotella stercorea but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species, including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c(+) mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that, during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  2. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  3. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  4. The microvesicle component of HIV-1 inocula modulates dendritic cell infection and maturation and enhances adhesion to and activation of T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Mercier

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is taken up by immature monocyte derived dendritic cells (iMDDCs into tetraspanin rich caves from which the virus can either be transferred to T lymphocytes or enter into endosomes resulting in degradation. HIV-1 binding and fusion with the DC membrane results in low level de novo infection that can also be transferred to T lymphocytes at a later stage. We have previously reported that HIV-1 can induce partial maturation of iMDDCs at both stages of trafficking. Here we show that CD45⁺ microvesicles (MV which contaminate purified HIV-1 inocula due to similar size and density, affect DC maturation, de novo HIV-1 infection and transfer to T lymphocytes. Comparing iMDDCs infected with CD45-depleted HIV-1BaL or matched non-depleted preparations, the presence of CD45⁺ MVs was shown to enhance DC maturation and ICAM-1 (CD54 expression, which is involved in DC∶T lymphocyte interactions, while restricting HIV-1 infection of MDDCs. Furthermore, in the DC culture HIV-1 infected (p24⁺ MDDCs were more mature than bystander cells. Depletion of MVs from the HIV-1 inoculum markedly inhibited DC∶T lymphocyte clustering and the induction of alloproliferation as well as limiting HIV-1 transfer from DCs to T lymphocytes. The effects of MV depletion on these functions were reversed by the re-addition of purified MVs from activated but not non-activated SUPT1.CCR5-CL.30 or primary T cells. Analysis of the protein complement of these MVs and of these HIV-1 inocula before and after MV depletion showed that Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs and nef were the likely DC maturation candidates. Recombinant HSP90α and β and nef all induced DC maturation and ICAM-1 expression, greater when combined. These results suggest that MVs contaminating HIV-1 released from infected T lymphocytes may be biologically important, especially in enhancing T cell activation, during uptake by DCs in vitro and in vivo, particularly as MVs have been detected in the circulation of HIV-1

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of substituted 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters as potential anti-cancer agents and HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridoon; Edkins, Adrienne L; Isaacs, Michelle; Mnkandhla, Dumisani; Hoppe, Heinrich C; Kaye, Perry T

    2016-08-01

    Encouraging selectivity and low micromolar activity against HeLa cervical carcinoma (IC50⩾3.0μM) and the aggressive MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast carcinoma (IC50⩾9.6μM) cell lines has been exhibited by a number of readily accessible 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters. The potential of the ligands as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors has also been examined. PMID:27317645

  6. Anticancer molecule AS1411 exhibits low nanomolar antiviral activity against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Amrane, Samir; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Andreola, Marie-Line

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials, a number of fully characterized molecules are dropped along the way because they do not provide enough benefit for the patient. Some of them show limited side effects and might be of great use for other applications. AS1411 is a nucleolin-targeting aptamer that underwent phase II clinical trials as anticancer agent. Here, we show that AS1411 exhibits extremely potent antiviral activity and is therefore an attractive new lead as anti-HIV agent. PMID:26363100

  7. HIV-1 and IL-1β regulate astrocytic CD38 through mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB signaling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamik Manmeet K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 leads to some form of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND in approximately half of the cases. The mechanisms by which astrocytes contribute to HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD, the most severe form of HAND, still remain unresolved. HIV-1-encephalitis (HIVE, a pathological correlate of HAD, affects an estimated 9-11% of the HIV-1-infected population. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that HIVE brain tissues show significant upregulation of CD38, an enzyme involved in calcium signaling, in astrocytes. We also reported an increase in CD38 expression in interleukin (IL-1β-activated astrocytes. In the present investigation, we studied regulatory mechanisms of CD38 gene expression in astrocytes activated with HIV-1-relevant stimuli. We also investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and nuclear factor (NF-κB in astrocyte CD38 regulation. Methods Cultured human astrocytes were transfected with HIV-1YU-2 proviral clone and levels of CD38 mRNA and protein were measured by real-time PCR gene expression assay, western blot analysis and immunostaining. Astrocyte activation by viral transfection was determined by analyzing proinflammatory chemokine levels using ELISA. To evaluate the roles of MAPKs and NF-κB in CD38 regulation, astrocytes were treated with MAPK inhibitors (SB203580, SP600125, U0126, NF-κB interfering peptide (SN50 or transfected with dominant negative IκBα mutant (IκBαM prior to IL-1β activation. CD38 gene expression and CD38 ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity assays were performed to analyze alterations in CD38 levels and function, respectively. Results HIV-1YU-2-transfection significantly increased CD38 mRNA and protein expression in astrocytes (p YU-2-transfected astrocytes significantly increased HIV-1 gene expression (p Conclusion The present findings demonstrate a direct involvement of HIV-1 and virus

  8. Phosphoramidate derivatives of acyclovir: synthesis and antiviral activity in HIV-1 and HSV-1 models in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Natalia F; Shipitsyn, Alexander V; Jasko, Maxim V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Andronova, Valeria L; Galegov, Georgiy A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Kochetkov, Sergey N

    2012-10-01

    The antiviral activity against HIV and HSV and the chemical stability of ACV phosphoramidate derivatives were studied. The phosphoramidates of ACV demonstrated moderate activity. The best compound appeared to be 9-(2-hydroxymethyl)guanine phosphoromonomorpholidate (7), which inhibited virus replication in pseudo-HIV-1 particles by 50% at 50 μM. It also inhibited replication of wild-type HSV-1 (9.7 μM) as well as an acyclovir-resistant strain (25 μM). None of the synthesised compounds showed any cytotoxicity.

  9. The root extract of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides is a potent HIV-1 attachment inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Markus; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schneider, Martha; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Forcisi, Sara; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schindler, Michael; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs. PMID:24489923

  10. The root extract of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides is a potent HIV-1 attachment inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Helfer

    Full Text Available Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs.

  11. The root extract of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides is a potent HIV-1 attachment inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Markus; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schneider, Martha; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Forcisi, Sara; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schindler, Michael; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs.

  12. Systematic evaluation of methyl ester bioisosteres in the context of developing alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) for anti-HIV-1 chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Ayako; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Takayama, Jun; Xuan, Meiyan; Okazaki, Mari; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Pannecouque, Christophe; Cushman, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) are a class of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) targeting HIV-1. Four chemically and metabolically stabilized ADAMs incorporating N-methoxyimidoyl halide replacements of the methyl esters of the lead compound were previously reported. In this study, twenty-five new ADAMs were synthesized in order to investigate the biological consequences of installing nine different methyl ester bioisosteres at three different locations. Attempts to define a universal rank order of methyl ester bioisosteres and discover the 'best' one in terms of inhibitory activity versus HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) led to the realization that the potencies are critically dependent on the surrounding structure at each location, and therefore the definition of universal rank order is impossible. This investigation produced several new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in which all three of the three methyl esters of the lead compound were replaced by methyl ester bioisosteres, resulting in compounds that are more potent as HIV-1 RT inhibitors and antiviral agents than the lead compound itself and are expected to also be more metabolically stable than the lead compound. PMID:27234889

  13. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

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    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  14. Polyclonal B cell differentiation and loss of gastrointestinal tract germinal centers in the earliest stages of HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc C Levesque

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The antibody response to HIV-1 does not appear in the plasma until approximately 2-5 weeks after transmission, and neutralizing antibodies to autologous HIV-1 generally do not become detectable until 12 weeks or more after transmission. Moreover, levels of HIV-1-specific antibodies decline on antiretroviral treatment. The mechanisms of this delay in the appearance of anti-HIV-1 antibodies and of their subsequent rapid decline are not known. While the effect of HIV-1 on depletion of gut CD4(+ T cells in acute HIV-1 infection is well described, we studied blood and tissue B cells soon after infection to determine the effect of early HIV-1 on these cells.In human participants, we analyzed B cells in blood as early as 17 days after HIV-1 infection, and in terminal ileum inductive and effector microenvironments beginning at 47 days after infection. We found that HIV-1 infection rapidly induced polyclonal activation and terminal differentiation of B cells in blood and in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT B cells. The specificities of antibodies produced by GALT memory B cells in acute HIV-1 infection (AHI included not only HIV-1-specific antibodies, but also influenza-specific and autoreactive antibodies, indicating very early onset of HIV-1-induced polyclonal B cell activation. Follicular damage or germinal center loss in terminal ileum Peyer's patches was seen with 88% of follicles exhibiting B or T cell apoptosis and follicular lysis.Early induction of polyclonal B cell differentiation, coupled with follicular damage and germinal center loss soon after HIV-1 infection, may explain both the high rate of decline in HIV-1-induced antibody responses and the delay in plasma antibody responses to HIV-1. Please see later in the article for Editors' Summary.

  15. Matrix Domain Modulates HIV-1 Gag's Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity via Inositol Phosphate Binding ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Christopher P.; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Rein, Alan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses replicate by reverse transcribing their single-stranded RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA using specific cellular tRNAs to prime cDNA synthesis. In HIV-1, human tRNA3Lys serves as the primer and is packaged into virions during assembly. The viral Gag protein is believed to chaperone tRNA3Lys placement onto the genomic RNA primer binding site; however, the timing and possible regulation of this event are currently unknown. Composed of the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid ...

  16. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

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    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  17. Phospholipase D1 Couples CD4+ T Cell Activation to c-Myc-Dependent Deoxyribonucleotide Pool Expansion and HIV-1 Replication.

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    Harry E Taylor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quiescent CD4+ T cells restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection at early steps of virus replication. Low levels of both deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs and the biosynthetic enzymes required for their de novo synthesis provide one barrier to infection. CD4+ T cell activation induces metabolic reprogramming that reverses this block and facilitates HIV-1 replication. Here, we show that phospholipase D1 (PLD1 links T cell activation signals to increased HIV-1 permissivity by triggering a c-Myc-dependent transcriptional program that coordinates glucose uptake and nucleotide biosynthesis. Decreasing PLD1 activity pharmacologically or by RNA interference diminished c-Myc-dependent expression during T cell activation at the RNA and protein levels. PLD1 inhibition of HIV-1 infection was partially rescued by adding exogenous deoxyribonucleosides that bypass the need for de novo dNTP synthesis. Moreover, the data indicate that low dNTP levels that impact HIV-1 restriction involve decreased synthesis, and not only increased catabolism of these nucleotides. These findings uncover a unique mechanism of action for PLD1 inhibitors and support their further development as part of a therapeutic combination for HIV-1 and other viral infections dependent on host nucleotide biosynthesis.

  18. Immune responses of a designed HIV-1 DNA vaccine on rhesus monkeys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lishu; HONG Baoqing; LI Chang; JIN Ningyi; SONG Yingjin; SUN Yansong; WANG Hong; ZHAN Dawei; MA Hewen; SHANG Yupu; JIN Hongtao

    2006-01-01

    An effective HIV-1 vaccine will be the ultimate solution for the prevention of HIV/AIDS,though HAART plays important roles in treating the disease. In this study, a large-scale recombinant DNA plasmid containing a designed HIV-1 multi-epitopep24 chimeric gene was prepared and purified.Rhesus monkeys were then inoculated muscularly with the plasmid for four times in week 0, 4, 8 and 18.Whole blood was collected two weeks after the third and fourth inoculation, followed by serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) separation.The CTL activity and proliferation of PBMCs stimulated by macaque MHC-I-restricted HIV-1 CTL epitope peptide were analyzed by MTT and LDH release assay, respectively. Th1 cytokines in supernatant of cultured PBMC stimulated by HIV-1 CTL epitope peptide and anti-HIV-1 antibody in serum were assayed by ELISA. The results showed that increased CTL target-killing activity, higher secretion of Th1cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and promoted proliferative reaction of monkey PBMCs stimulated by HIV-1 CTL epitope peptide were detected in the immunization group inoculated by the recombinant DNA vaccine for three times, which were further enhanced by the fourth inoculation. At the same time, HIV-1 specific antibody in serum of immunized monkeys was higher than that in controls. We concluded that the designed HIV-1 DNA vaccine may induce HIV-1 specific cellular and humoral immunity on monkeys.

  19. Acquisition of HIV-1 resistance in T lymphocytes using an ACA-specific E. coli mRNA interferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Hideto; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Saito, Naoki; Lee, Karim; Kim, Sujeong; Shibata, Hiroaki; Ageyama, Naohide; Terao, Keiji; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Mineno, Junichi; Kim, Sunyoung; Inouye, Masayori; Kato, Ikunoshin

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of gene expression directed by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of HIV-1 requires both the transactivation response element (TAR) and Tat protein. HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional tat gene are not able to proliferate. Here we take a genetic approach to suppress HIV-1 replication based on Tat-dependent production of MazF, an ACA-specific endoribonuclease (mRNA interferase) from Escherichia coli. When induced, MazF is known to cause Bak- and NBK-dependent apoptotic cell death in mammalian cells. We first constructed a retroviral vector, in which the mazF (ACA-less) gene was inserted under the control of the HIV-1 LTR, which was then transduced into CD4+ T-lymphoid CEM-SS cells in such a way that, upon HIV-1 infection, the mazF gene is induced to destroy the infecting HIV-1 mRNA, preventing HIV-1 replication. Indeed, when the transduced cells were infected with HIV-1 IIIB, the viral replication was effectively inhibited, as HIV-1 IIIB p24 could not be detected in the culture medium. Consistently, not only cell growth but also the CD4 level was not affected by the infection. These results suggest that the HIV-1-LTR-regulated mazF gene was effectively induced upon HIV-1 IIIB infection, which is sufficient enough to destroy the viral mRNA from the infected HIV-1 IIIB to completely block viral proliferation in the cells, but not to affect normal cell growth. These results indicate that the T cells transduced with the HIV-1-LTR-regulated mazF gene acquire HIV-1 resistance, providing an intriguing potential for the use of the HIV-1-LTR-regulated mazF gene in anti-HIV gene therapy.

  20. Subunit-selective mutagenesis indicates minimal polymerase activity in heterodimer-associated p51 HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grice, S F; Naas, T; Wohlgensinger, B; Schatz, O

    1991-12-01

    We have purified and determined functional parameters of reconstituted, recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) heterodimers within which either the p66 or p51 polypeptide was selectively mutated in one or both aspartic acid residues constituting the proposed polymerase active site (-Y-M-D-D-). Heterodimers containing a mutated p51 polypeptide retain almost wild type levels of both RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNaseH) activity. In contrast, heterodimers whose p66 polypeptide was likewise mutated exhibit wild type RNaseH activity but are deficient in RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. These results indicate that in heterodimer RT, the p51 component cannot compensate for active site mutations eliminating the activity of p66, indirectly implying that solely the p66 aspartic acid residues of heterodimer are crucial for catalysis. PMID:1718745

  1. 新疆紫草提取物抗HIV-1体外活性研究(Ⅱ)%Activity of extracts from Arnebia Euchroma (Royle) Johnst. to HIV-1 key enzymes in vitro.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    买尔旦·马合木提; 古丽仙·胡加; 秦冬梅

    2009-01-01

    目的:研究新疆紫草水溶性组分Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅳ对HIV-1 3个关键酶的体外活性.方法: 分别选用HIV-1整合酶(HIV-1 ingrase,HIV-1 IN),HIV-1蛋白酶 (HIV-1 protease ,HIV-1 PR) ,HIV-1逆转录酶(HIV-1 reverse transcriptase,HIV-1 RT)体外药效筛选模型,观察组分Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ和Ⅳ对以上酶的抑制作用.结果: 新疆紫草水溶性组分Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ和Ⅳ对HIV-1 IN具有一定的抑制活性,50%有效浓度(EC50)分别为2.21、 14.71、5.71和66.08 μg/ml.组分Ⅰ对HIV-1 RT的抑制活性小,EC50为5.63 μg/ml.结论: 新疆紫草水溶性提取物对HIV-1 IN具有抑制活性,对HIV-1 PR均无抑制活性.

  2. A novel trifunctional IgG-like bispecific antibody to inhibit HIV-1 infection and enhance lysis of HIV by targeting activation of complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomlinson Stephen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system is not only a key component of innate immunity but also provides a first line of defense against invading pathogens, especially for viral pathogens. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, however, possesses several mechanisms to evade complement-mediated lysis (CoML and exploit the complement system to enhance viral infectivity. Responsible for this intrinsic resistance against complement-mediated virolysis are complement regulatory membrane proteins derived from the host cell that inherently downregulates complement activation at several stages of the cascade. In addition, HIV is protected from complement-mediated lysis by binding soluble factor H (fH through the viral envelope proteins, gp120 and gp41. Whereas inhibition of complement activity is the desired outcome in the vast majority of therapeutic approaches, there is a broader potential for complement-mediated inhibition of HIV by complement local stimulation. Presentation of the hypothesis Our previous studies have proven that the complement-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infection is mediated by the association of complement receptor type 2 bound to the C3 fragment and deposited on the surface of HIV virions. Thus, we hypothesize that another new activator of complement, consisting of two dsFv (against gp120 and against C3d respectively linked to a complement-activating human IgG1 Fc domain ((anti-gp120 × anti-C3d-Fc, can not only target and amplify complement activation on HIV virions for enhancing the efficiency of HIV lysis, but also reduce the infectivity of HIV through blocking the gp120 and C3d on the surface of HIV. Testing the hypothesis Our hypothesis was tested using cell-free HIV-1 virions cultivated in vitro and assessment of virus opsonization was performed by incubating appropriate dilutions of virus with medium containing normal human serum and purified (anti-gp120 × anti-C3d-Fc proteins. As a control group, viruses

  3. HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages induce astrocytic differentiation of human cortical neural progenitor cells via the STAT3 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    Full Text Available Diminished adult neurogenesis is considered a potential mechanism in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD. In HAD, HIV-1-infected and immune-activated brain mononuclear phagocytes (MP; perivascular macrophages and microglia drive central nervous system (CNS inflammation and may alter normal neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS activated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM inhibit human neural progenitor cell (NPC neurogenesis, while enhancing astrogliogenesis through the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, in vitro and in vivo. Here we further test the hypothesis that HIV-1-infected/activated MDM promote NPC astrogliogenesis via activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a critical factor for astrogliogenesis. Our results show that LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS-MCM and HIV-infected/LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS+HIV-MCM induced Janus kinase 1 (Jak1 and STAT3 activation. Induction of the Jak-STAT3 activation correlated with increased glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression, demonstrating an induction of astrogliogenesis. Moreover, STAT3-targeting siRNA (siSTAT3 decreased MCM-induced STAT3 activation and NPC astrogliogenesis. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines (including IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α produced by LPS-activated and/or HIV-1-infected MDM may contribute to MCM-induced STAT3 activation and astrocytic differentiation. These observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE. In HIVE mice, siRNA control (without target sequence, sicon pre-transfected NPCs injected with HIV-1-infected MDM showed more astrocytic differentiation and less neuronal differentiation of NPCs as compared to NPC injection alone. siSTAT3 abrogated HIV-1-infected MDM-induced astrogliogenesis of injected NPCs. Collectively, these

  4. Increased Intrathecal Immune Activation in Virally Suppressed HIV-1 Infected Patients with Neurocognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edén, Arvid; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Franklin, Donald; Price, Richard W.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Gisslén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remain prevalent, a correlation to neuronal injury has not been established in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between mild HAND and CSF neurofilament light protein (NFL), a biomarker of neuronal injury; and CSF neopterin, a biomarker of CNS immunoactivation, in virally suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design and Methods We selected 99 subjects on suppressive ART followed longitudinally from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Based on standardized comprehensive neurocognitive performance (NP) testing, subjects were classified as neurocognitively normal (NCN; n = 29) or impaired (NCI; n = 70). The NCI group included subjects with asymptomatic (ANI; n = 37) or mild (MND; n = 33) HAND. CSF biomarkers were analyzed on two occasions. Results Geometric mean CSF neopterin was 25% higher in the NCI group (p = 0.04) and NFL and neopterin were significantly correlated within the NCI group (r = 0.30; p<0.001) but not in the NCN group (r = -0.13; p = 0.3). Additionally, a trend towards higher NFL was seen in the NCI group (p = 0.06). Conclusions Mild HAND was associated with increased intrathecal immune activation, and the correlation between neopterin and NFL found in NCI subjects indicates an association between neurocognitive impairment, CNS inflammation and neuronal damage. Together these findings suggest that NCI despite ART may represent an active pathological process within the CNS that needs further characterization in prospective studies. PMID:27295036

  5. Binding of HIV-1 virions to α4β7 expressing cells and impact of antagonizing α4β7 on HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang; Li; Wei; Jin; Tao; Du; Biao; Wu; Yalan; Liu; Robin; J; Shattock; Qinxue; Hu

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein is reported to interact with α4β7, an integrin mediating the homing of lymphocytes to gut-associated lymphoid tissue, but the significance of α4β7 in HIV-1 infection remains controversial. Here, using HIV-1 strain Ba L, the gp120 of which was previously shown to be capable of interacting with α4β7, we demonstrated that α4β7 can mediate the binding of whole HIV-1 virions to α4β7-expressing transfectants. We further constructed a cell line stably expressing α4β7 and confirmed the α4β7-mediated HIV-1 binding. In primary lymphocytes with activated α4β7 expression, we also observed significant virus binding which can be inhibited by an anti-α4β7 antibody. Moreover, we investigated the impact of antagonizing α4β7 on HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells. In α4β7-activated CD4+ T cells, both anti-α4β7 antibodies and introduction of shorthairpin RNAs specifically targeting α4β7 resulted in a decreased HIV-1 infection. Our findings indicate that α4β7 may serve as an attachment factor at least for some HIV-1 strains. The established approach provides a promising means for the investigation of other viral strains to understand the potential roles of α4β7 in HIV-1 infection.

  6. Antimycobacterial and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Activity of Julianaceae and Clusiaceae Plant Species from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Gómez-Cansino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracts of 14 Julianaceae and 5 Clusiaceae species growing in Mexico were tested in vitro (50 µg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and HIV reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT. The Julianaceae bark and leaf extracts inhibited M. tuberculosis (>84.67% and HIV-RT (58.3% and >67.6%, respectively. The IC50 values for six selected extracts and their cytotoxicity (50 µg/mL to human macrophages were then determined. Amphipterygium glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium fairly inhibited M. tuberculosis with IC50 of 1.87–2.35 µg/mL; but their IC50 against HIV-RT was 59.25–97.83 µg/mL. Calophyllum brasiliense, Vismia baccifera, and Vismia mexicana effect on M. tuberculosis was noteworthy (IC50 3.02–3.64 µg/mL and also inhibited RT-HIV (IC50 26.24–35.17 µg/mL. These 6 extracts (50 µg/mL presented low toxicity to macrophages (<23.8%. The HPLC profiles of A. glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium indicated that their antimycobacterial activity cannot be related to masticadienonic, 3α, or 3β-hydromasticadienonic acids, suggesting that other compounds may be responsible for the observed activity or this might be a synergy result. The anti-HIV-RT and antimycobacterial activities induced by C. brasiliense can be attributed to the content of calanolides A, B, as well as soulatrolide.

  7. CD4+CD25+CD127 regulatory cells play multiple roles in maintaining HIV-1 p24 production in patients on long-term treatment: HIV-1 p24-producing cells and suppression of anti-HIV immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Mei Jiao

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: CD4+CD25+CD127 regulatory cells play multiple roles in maintaining HIV-1 p24 production in long-term ART patients. Treg cells may be a target for eliminating the latent HIV reservoir after effective long-term ART.

  8. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

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    Mateusz Stoszko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4+ T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal.

  9. Assessing molecular docking tools for relative biological activity prediction: a case study of triazole HIV-1 NNRTIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączek, Tomasz; Siwek, Agata; Paneth, Piotr

    2013-12-23

    Molecular docking is a technique widely used in drug design. Many studies exist regarding the general accuracy of various docking programs, but case studies for a given group of related compounds are rare. In order to facilitate identification of novel triazole HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), several docking and scoring programs were evaluated for their ability to predict relative biological activity of 111 known 1,2,4-triazole and 76 other azole type NNRTIs. Glide, FlexX, Molegro Virtual Docker, AutoDock Vina, and Hyde were used. Different protocols, settings, scoring functions, and interaction terms were analyzed. We have found that the programs performance was dependent on the data set, indicating the importance of choosing good quality target data for any comparative study. The results suggest that after optimization and proper validation, some of the molecular docking programs can help in predicting relative biological activity of azole NNRTIs. PMID:24266618

  10. 2´,3´-Dialdehyde of ATP, ADP, and adenosine inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Julieta; Valadao, Ana Luiza Chaves; Aguiar, Renato Santana; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Rossi, Atila Duque; Arantes, Pablo Ricardo; Verli, Hugo; Quintana, Paula Gabriela; Heise, Norton; Tanuri, Amilcar; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis

    2014-01-01

    The 2´3´-dialdehyde of ATP or oxidized ATP (oATP) is a compound known for specifically making covalent bonds with the nucleotide-binding site of several ATP-binding enzymes and receptors. We investigated the effects of oATP and other oxidized purines on HIV-1 infection and we found that this compound inhibits HIV-1 and SIV infection by blocking early steps of virus replication. oATP, oxidized ADP (oADP), and oxidized Adenosine (oADO) impact the natural activity of endogenous reverse transcriptase enzyme (RT) in cell free virus particles and are able to inhibit viral replication in different cell types when added to the cell cultures either before or after infection. We used UFLC-UV to show that both oADO and oATP can be detected in the cell after being added in the extracellular medium. oATP also suppresses RT activity and replication of the HIV-1 resistant variants M184V and T215Y. We conclude that oATP, oADP and oADO display anti HIV-1 activity that is at in least in part due to inhibitory activity on HIV-1 RT.

  11. Differential effect of CLK SR Kinases on HIV-1 gene expression: potential novel targets for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobson Wendy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA processing plays a critical role in the replication of HIV-1, regulated in part through the action of host SR proteins. To explore the impact of modulating SR protein activity on virus replication, the effect of increasing or inhibiting the activity of the Cdc2-like kinase (CLK family of SR protein kinases on HIV-1 expression and RNA processing was examined. Results Despite their high homology, increasing individual CLK expression had distinct effects on HIV-1, CLK1 enhancing Gag production while CLK2 inhibited the virus. Parallel studies on the anti-HIV-1 activity of CLK inhibitors revealed a similar discrepant effect on HIV-1 expression. TG003, an inhibitor of CLK1, 2 and 4, had no effect on viral Gag synthesis while chlorhexidine, a CLK2, 3 and 4 inhibitor, blocked virus production. Chlorhexidine treatment altered viral RNA processing, decreasing levels of unspliced and single spliced viral RNAs, and reduced Rev accumulation. Subsequent experiments in the context of HIV-1 replication in PBMCs confirmed the capacity of chlorhexidine to suppress virus replication. Conclusions Together, these findings establish that HIV-1 RNA processing can be targeted to suppress virus replication as demonstrated by manipulating individual CLK function and identified chlorhexidine as a lead compound in the development of novel anti-viral therapies.

  12. Single-chain protein mimetics of the N-terminal heptad-repeat region of gp41 with potential as anti-HIV-1 drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespillo, Sara; Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Casares, Salvador; Morel, Bertrand; Cobos, Eva S; Mateo, Pedro L; Mouz, Nicolas; Martin, Christophe E; Roger, Marie G; El Habib, Raphaelle; Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2014-12-23

    During HIV-1 fusion to the host cell membrane, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of the envelope subunit gp41 become transiently exposed and accessible to fusion inhibitors or Abs. In this process, the NHR region adopts a trimeric coiled-coil conformation that can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an approach to rationally design single-chain protein constructs that mimic the NHR coiled-coil surface. The proteins were built by connecting with short loops two parallel NHR helices and an antiparallel one with the inverse sequence followed by engineering of stabilizing interactions. The constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified with high yield, and folded as highly stable helical coiled coils. The crystal structure of one of the constructs confirmed the predicted fold and its ability to accurately mimic an exposed gp41 NHR surface. These single-chain proteins bound to synthetic CHR peptides with very high affinity, and furthermore, they showed broad inhibitory activity of HIV-1 fusion on various pseudoviruses and primary isolates. PMID:25489108

  13. Soluble urokinase receptor levels in plasma during 5 years of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Piironen, Timo;

    2004-01-01

    High blood levels of the soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) strongly predict increased mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. This study investigated the plasma concentration of suPAR in 29 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients during 5 years treatment with highl...

  14. Harnessing the CRISPR/Cas9 system to disrupt latent HIV-1 provirus

    OpenAIRE

    Hirotaka Ebina; Naoko Misawa; Yuka Kanemura; Yoshio Koyanagi

    2013-01-01

    Even though highly active anti-retroviral therapy is able to keep HIV-1 replication under control, the virus can lie in a dormant state within the host genome, known as a latent reservoir, and poses a threat to re-emerge at any time. However, novel technologies aimed at disrupting HIV-1 provirus may be capable of eradicating viral genomes from infected individuals. In this study, we showed the potential of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit the HIV-1 genome and block its expression. When LTR-targ...

  15. Diphtheria Antibodies and T lymphocyte Counts in Patients Infected with HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. B. Speranza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the IgG levels anti-diphtheria (D-Ab and T cell counts (CD4+ and CD8+ in HIV-1 infected subjects undergoing or not highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Approximately 70% of all HIV-1 patients were unprotected against diphtheria. There were no differences in D-Ab according to CD4 counts. Untreated patients had higher D-Ab (geometric mean of 0.62 IU/ml than HAART-patients (geometric mean of 0.39 IU/ml. The data indicated the necessity of keeping all HIV-1 patients up-to-date with their vaccination.

  16. HIV-1初始传播病毒药物敏感性研究%The sensitivity of transmitted/founder HIV-1 to anti-HIV drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁寄葳; 赵建元; 米泽云; 魏涛; 岑山

    2016-01-01

    人类免疫缺陷病毒(human immunodeficiency virus type 1,HIV-1)黏膜感染绝大多数由一个或者少数几个病毒建立并最终发展为系统感染,上述病毒称为初始传播病毒(transmitted/founder virus,T/F病毒).研究T/F病毒对不同抗HIV-1药物的敏感性,可为艾滋病高危人群提供优化的暴露前预防性治疗(pre-exposure prophylaxis,PrEP)策略.本文首先构建了含荧光素酶报告基因的T/F病毒单轮感染系统,进而分析比较了长期感染病毒和T/F病毒对不同抗HIV-1药物的敏感性.实验结果显示,与同一亚型的长期感染病毒相比,T/F病毒对HIV-1核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂(nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors,NRTIs)、整合酶抑制剂(integrase inhibitors,INIs)及蛋白酶抑制剂(protease inhibitors,PIs)的敏感性并没有表现出显著性差异(P>0.05),而对非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂(non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors,NNRTIs)表现出一定的耐药性,IC50显著提高(P<0.05).这一结果提示,对于艾滋病高危人群的暴露前预防性治疗应避免选择NNRTIs.

  17. Residual viraemia in HIV-1-infected patients with plasma viral load activation markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Katzenstein, T L; Pedersen, B K;

    2008-01-01

    Despite undetectable viral load in conventional assays, probably all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected patients have residual viraemia (RV) detectable by ultra-sensitive assays. To study this issue, this study investigated virologic and immunologic consequences of RV in highly active...... antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated HIV-1-infected patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA or=1 episode with TMA-RV whereas 9 patients had undetectable TMA-RV throughout the study-period. Time-points with TMA-RV and PCR-RV were associated with higher circulating sTNFrII (+0.234 ng/ml, P = 0.030) and beta(2......)-microglobulin (+22 nmol/l, P = 0.016) and time-points with PCR-RV were also associated with higher IgA (+0.82 micromol/l, P = 0.035) and CD8-count (+1.18-fold, P = 0.001). Patients with TMA-RV in the study-period had higher HIV-1 RNA pre-HAART (P = 0.032). RV was not associated with proviral-HIV-1-DNA, CD4...

  18. Activity of phosphino palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes against HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Ntombenhle H; Elkhadir, Afag Y F; Gordhan, Bhavna G; Kana, Bavesh D; Darkwa, James; Meyer, Debra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is currently complicated by increased prevalence of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of drug candidates that offer the simultaneous management of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) would be of great benefit in the holistic treatment of HIV/AIDS, especially in sub-Saharan Africa which has the highest global prevalence of HIV-TB coinfection. Bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylpalladium(II) chloride (1), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylplatinum(II) chloride (2), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylpalladium(II) chloride (3) and bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylplatinum(II) (4) were investigated for the inhibition of HIV-1 through interactions with the viral protease. The complexes were subsequently assessed for biological potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv by determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) using broth microdilution. Complex (3) showed the most significant and competitive inhibition of HIV-1 protease (p = 0.014 at 100 µM). Further studies on its in vitro effects on whole virus showed reduced viral infectivity by over 80 % at 63 µM (p < 0.05). In addition, the complex inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at an MIC of 5 µM and was non-toxic to host cells at all active concentrations (assessed by tetrazolium dye and real time cell electronic sensing). In vitro evidence is provided here for the possibility of utilizing a single metal-based compound for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and TB. PMID:27246555

  19. 2B4 expression on natural killer cells increases in HIV-1 infected patients followed prospectively during highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Ullum, H; Pedersen, B K;

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection influences natural killer (NK) cell expression of inhibitory NK receptors and activating natural cytotoxicity receptors. It is unknown whether expression of the co-stimulatory NK cell receptor 2B4 (CD244) on NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells are affected...... expression on CD3- CD16+ NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells, proviral-DNA and plasma soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor (sTNFr)-II were investigated 6-monthly. For comparison, 2B4 expression was investigated in 20 healthy individuals. The concentration of 2B4+ NK cells was initially reduced in HIV-1 infected...... patients (P cells in HIV-1 infected patients was normal and did not change during follow-up. The relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) of 2B4 increased on both NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells during...

  20. CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygosity, HIV-1 Reservoir Size, and Lymphocyte Activation in Individuals Receiving Long-term Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Harrison, Linda J; Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Jost, Stephanie; Bosch, Ronald J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study of the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoir size, lymphocyte activation, and CCR5 expression in 114 CCR5(Δ32/WT) and 177 wild-type CCR5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Overall, no significant differences were found between groups for any of these parameters. However, higher levels of CCR5 expression correlated with lower amounts of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA. The relationship between CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity, CCR5 expression, and markers of HIV-1 persistence is likely to be complex and may be influenced by factors such as the duration of ART.

  1. Conformational analysis on anti-HIV-1 peptide T22([Tyr5,12Lys7]-polyphemusinⅡ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The conformational scan of anti-HIV peptide T22 ([Tyr5,12, Lys7]-polyphemusin Ⅱ) backbone on a deformed potential energy surface (PES) was performed using the potential smoothing searching (PSS) protocol. All located minima were then transferred to the original PES using undeformed optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) potential function, and minimized by multi-conformer minimization (MCM). For solution-phase calculations, the GB/SA continuum model for water was used. This application of PSS integrated with MCM is proved a feasible method for solving the multiple-minimum problem in the conformational analysis of flexible molecules with cyclic structure.

  2. A novel mode of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activation: ligation of CD28 alone induces HIV-1 replication in naturally infected lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Induction of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication in infected CD4+ T lymphocytes requires cellular activation. The ligation of CD28, a signal-transducing receptor with a natural ligand on activated B cells and antigen-presenting cells, provides a costimulating signal for interleukin 2 production and T-cell proliferation as well as coactivation of the transfected HIV long terminal repeat in Jurkat cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of CD28 ligation to ...

  3. Role of the primer activation signal in tRNA annealing onto the HIV-1 genome studied by single-molecule FRET microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Beerens (Nancy); M.D.E. Jepsen (Mette); V. Nechyporuk-Zloy (Volodymyr); A.C. Krüger (Asger); J.-L. Darlix (Jean-Luc); J. Kjems (Jørgen); V. Birkedal (Victoria)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHIV-1 reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNAlys3 molecule that binds to the primer binding site (PBS) in the genomic RNA. An additional interaction between the tRNA molecule and the primer activation signal (PAS) is thought to regulate the initiation of reverse transcription.

  4. L-selectin and P-selectin are novel biomarkers of cervicovaginal inflammation for preclinical mucosal safety assessment of anti-HIV-1 microbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Maohua; He, Benxia; Yang, Jingyi; Bao, Rong; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Dihan; Chen, Yaoqing; Li, Liangzhu; Han, Chen; Yang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yaoming; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yan, Huimin

    2012-06-01

    A major obstacle thwarting preclinical development of microbicides is the lack of a validated biomarker of cervicovaginal inflammation. Therefore, the present study aims to identify novel noninvasive soluble markers in a murine model for assessment of microbicide mucosal safety. By performing cytokine antibody array analysis, we identified two adhesion molecules, L-selectin and P-selectin, which significantly increased when mucosal inflammation was triggered by nonoxynol-9 (N9), an anti-HIV-1 microbicide candidate that failed clinical trials, in a refined murine model of agent-induced cervicovaginal inflammation. We found that patterns of detection of L-selectin and P-selectin were obviously different from those of the two previously defined biomarkers of cervicovaginal inflammation, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). The levels of these two soluble selectins correlated better than those of MCP-1 and IL-6 with the duration and severity of mucosal inflammation triggered by N9 and two approved proinflammatory compounds, benzalkonium chloride (BZK) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), but not by two nonproinflammatory compounds, carboxymethyl celluose (CMC; microbicide excipients) and tenofovir (TFV; microbicide candidate). These data indicated that L-selectin and P-selectin can serve as additional novel cervicovaginal inflammation biomarkers for preclinical mucosal safety evaluation of candidate microbicides for the prevention of infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted pathogens. PMID:22391529

  5. Production and purification of immunologically active core protein p24 from HIV-1 fused to ricin toxin B subunit in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Lim Miguel A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gag protein from HIV-1 is a polyprotein of 55 kDa, which, during viral maturation, is cleaved to release matrix p17, core p24 and nucleocapsid proteins. The p24 antigen contains epitopes that prime helper CD4 T-cells, which have been demonstrated to be protective and it can elicit lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, p24 is likely to be an integral part of any multicomponent HIV vaccine. The availability of an optimal adjuvant and carrier to enhance antiviral responses may accelerate the development of a vaccine candidate against HIV. The aim of this study was to investigate the adjuvant-carrier properties of the B ricin subunit (RTB when fused to p24. Results A fusion between ricin toxin B subunit and p24 HIV (RTB/p24 was expressed in E. coli. Affinity chromatography was used for purification of p24 alone and RTB/p24 from cytosolic fractions. Biological activity of RTB/p24 was determined by ELISA and affinity chromatography using the artificial receptor glycoprotein asialofetuin. Both assays have demonstrated that RTB/p24 is able to interact with complex sugars, suggesting that the chimeric protein retains lectin activity. Also, RTB/p24 was demonstrated to be immunologically active in mice. Two weeks after intraperitoneal inoculation with RTB/p24 without an adjuvant, a strong anti-p24 immune response was detected. The levels of the antibodies were comparable to those found in mice immunized with p24 alone in the presence of Freund adjuvant. RTB/p24 inoculated intranasally in mice, also elicited significant immune responses to p24, although the response was not as strong as that obtained in mice immunized with p24 in the presence of the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin. Conclusion In this work, we report the expression in E. coli of HIV-1 p24 fused to the subunit B of ricin toxin. The high levels of antibodies obtained after intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization of mice demonstrate the adjuvant-carrier properties of RTB when

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in DYRK1A Associated with Replication of HIV-1 in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Bol; P.D. Moerland; S. Limou; Y. van Remmerden; C. Coulonges; D. Manen; J.T. Herbeck; J. Fellay; M. Sieberer; J.G. Sietzema; R. van 't Slot; J. Martinson; J.F. Zagury; H. Schuitemaker; A.B. van 't Wout

    2011-01-01

    Background: HIV-1 infected macrophages play an important role in rendering resting T cells permissive for infection, in spreading HIV-1 to T cells, and in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia. During highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART), macrophages keep producing virus because tissue penetr

  7. Diketo acid inhibitor mechanism and HIV-1 integrase: Implications for metal binding in the active site of phosphotransferase enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Grobler, Jay A.; Stillmock, Kara; Hu, Binghua; Witmer, Marc; Felock, Peter; Espeseth, Amy S.; Wolfe, Abigail; Egbertson, Melissa; Bourgeois, Michele; Melamed, Jeffrey; Wai, John S.; Young, Steve; Vacca, Joseph; Hazuda, Daria J.

    2002-01-01

    The process of integrating the reverse-transcribed HIV-1 DNA into the host chromosomal DNA is catalyzed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN). Integration requires two metal-dependent reactions, 3′ end processing and strand transfer. Compounds that contain a diketo acid moiety have been shown to selectively inhibit the strand transfer reaction of IN in vitro and in infected cells and are effective as inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. To characterize the molecular basis of inhibition, we...

  8. Support Vector Machine Applied to Predicting the Activity of HIV-1 IN Inhibitors%用支持向量机预测HIV-1整合酶抑制剂活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘昕; 谭建军; 陈慰祖; 刘斌; 李杉; 王存新

    2013-01-01

    HIV integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration process in the viral life cycle. IN helps the viral reverse transcription product cDNA integrating into the host chromosome. As an indispensable enzyme, IN is also an important target for designing and developing the novel anti-HIV drugs. Constructing the QSAR model of the HIV-1 IN pyrimidones inhibitors can help for understanding of the structural factors. In this paper, the CoMFA software was used to calculate topological descriptors, polarizable descriptors and hydrophilic descriptors and other structural parameters for 68 compounds. The structural parameters were selected as inputs of support vector machine ( SVM) to establish the non-linear regression model. Results show that the SVM algorithm combined with QSAR can establish the forecasting model for inhibitors, and provide biological information for the design of anti-HIV drugs.%HIV整合酶可催化病毒复制周期中的整合过程,即将HIV反转录产物cDNA整合入宿主基因组,它是病毒复制过程中不可缺少的酶,也是抗HIV药物设计的重要靶点.构建嘧啶酮类(pyrimidones) HIV-1整合酶抑制剂定量构效关系模型,有助于进一步了解影响抑制剂活性的结构因素.本文应用CoMFA软件计算了68个化合物的拓扑、分子极化、亲水性等结构参数,用所选的结构参数作为支持向量机(support vector machine,SVM)的输入,建立起非线性的支持向量机回归模型.研究表明:支持向量机算法与分子结构参数的有机集成,可为HIV整合酶抑制剂的结构与活性数据建立起预测模型,为抗HIV药物设计提供生物学信息.

  9. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  10. Dendritic cells exposed to MVA-based HIV-1 vaccine induce highly functional HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T cell responses in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Climent

    Full Text Available Currently, MVA virus vectors carrying HIV-1 genes are being developed as HIV-1/AIDS prophylactic/therapeutic vaccines. Nevertheless, little is known about the impact of these vectors on human dendritic cells (DC and their capacity to present HIV-1 antigens to human HIV-specific T cells. This study aimed to characterize the interaction of MVA and MVA expressing the HIV-1 genes Env-Gag-Pol-Nef of clade B (referred to as MVA-B in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC and the subsequent processes of HIV-1 antigen presentation and activation of memory HIV-1-specific T lymphocytes. For these purposes, we performed ex vivo assays with MDDC and autologous lymphocytes from asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. Infection of MDDC with MVA-B or MVA, at the optimal dose of 0.3 PFU/MDDC, induced by itself a moderate degree of maturation of MDDC, involving secretion of cytokines and chemokines (IL1-ra, IL-7, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-15, IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, IP-10, MIG, and IFN-α. MDDC infected with MVA or MVA-B and following a period of 48 h or 72 h of maturation were able to migrate toward CCL19 or CCL21 chemokine gradients. MVA-B infection induced apoptosis of the infected cells and the resulting apoptotic bodies were engulfed by the uninfected MDDC, which cross-presented HIV-1 antigens to autologous CD8(+ T lymphocytes. MVA-B-infected MDDC co-cultured with autologous T lymphocytes induced a highly functional HIV-specific CD8(+ T cell response including proliferation, secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, MIP-1β, MIP-1α, RANTES and IL-6, and strong cytotoxic activity against autologous HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T lymphocytes. These results evidence the adjuvant role of the vector itself (MVA and support the clinical development of prophylactic and therapeutic anti-HIV vaccines based on MVA-B.

  11. Persistent Inflammation and Endothelial Activation in HIV-1 Infected Patients after 12 Years of Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ullum, Henrik; Katzenstein, Terese L;

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART).......The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART)....

  12. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-12-08

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency.

  13. Mycobacterial and HIV infections up-regulated human zinc finger protein 134, a novel positive regulator of HIV-1 LTR activity and viral propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Benjamin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Concurrent occurrence of HIV and Tuberculosis (TB infections influence the cellular environment of the host for synergistic existence. An elementary approach to understand such coalition at the molecular level is to understand the interactions of the host and the viral factors that subsequently effect viral replication. Long terminal repeats (LTR of HIV genome serve as a template for binding trans-acting viral and cellular factors that regulate its transcriptional activity, thereby, deciding the fate of HIV pathogenesis, making it an ideal system to explore the interplay between HIV and the host. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, using biotinylated full length HIV-1 LTR sequence as bait followed by MALDI analyses, we identified and further characterized human-Zinc-finger-protein-134 (hZNF-134 as a novel positive regulator of HIV-1 that promoted LTR-driven transcription and viral production. Over-expression of hZNF-134 promoted LTR driven luciferase activity and viral transcripts, resulting in increased virus production while siRNA mediated knockdown reduced both the viral transcripts and the viral titers, establishing hZNF-134 as a positive effector of HIV-1. HIV, Mycobacteria and HIV-TB co-infections increased hZNF-134 expressions in PBMCs, the impact being highest by mycobacteria. Corroborating these observations, primary TB patients (n = 22 recorded extraordinarily high transcript levels of hZNF-134 as compared to healthy controls (n = 16. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: With these observations, it was concluded that hZNF-134, which promoted HIV-1 LTR activity acted as a positive regulator of HIV propagation in human host. High titers of hZNF-134 transcripts in TB patients suggest that up-regulation of such positive effectors of HIV-1 upon mycobacterial infection can be yet another mechanism by which mycobacteria assists HIV-1 propagation during HIV-TB co-infections. hZNF-134, an uncharacterized host protein, thus

  14. A novel approach to inhibit HIV-1 infection and enhance lysis of HIV by a targeted activator of complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Liuyu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system is one of the most potent weapons of innate immunity. It is not only a mechanism for direct protection against invading pathogens but it also interacts with the adaptive immunity to optimize the pathogen-specific humoral and cellular defense cascades in the body. Complement-mediated lysis of HIV is inefficient but the presence of HIV particles results in complement activation by the generation of many C3-fragments, such as C3dg and C3d. It has been demonstrated that activation of complement can enhance HIV infection through the binding of special complement receptor type 2 expression on the surface of mature B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Presentation of the hypothesis Previous studies have proven that the complement-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infection is mediated by the association of complement receptor type 2 bound to the C3 fragment and deposited on the surface of HIV virions. Thus, we hypothesize that a new activator of complement, consisting of a target domain (C3-binding region of complement receptor type 2 linked to a complement-activating human IgG1 Fc domain (CR2-Fc, can target and amplify complement deposition on HIV virions and enhance the efficiency of HIV lysis. Testing the hypothesis Our hypothesis was tested using cell-free HIV-1 virions cultivated in vitro and assessment of virus opsonization was performed by incubating appropriate dilutions of virus with medium containing normal human serum and purified CR2-Fc proteins. As a control group, viruses were incubated with normal human serum under the same conditions. Virus neutralization assays were used to estimate the degree of CR2-Fc-enhanced lysis of HIV compared to untreated virus. Implications of the hypothesis The targeted complement activator, CR2-Fc, can be used as a novel approach to HIV therapy by abrogating the complement-enhanced HIV infection of cells.

  15. Infected Cell Killing by HIV-1 Protease Promotes NF-κB Dependent HIV-1 Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Bren, Gary D.; Joe Whitman; Nathan Cummins; Brett Shepard; Rizza, Stacey A; Trushin, Sergey A.; Badley, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Acute HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells often results in apoptotic death of infected cells, yet it is unclear what evolutionary advantage this offers to HIV-1. Given the independent observations that acute T cell HIV-1 infection results in (1) NF-kappaB activation, (2) caspase 8 dependent apoptosis, and that (3) caspase 8 directly activates NF-kappaB, we questioned whether these three events might be interrelated. We first show that HIV-1 infected T cell apoptosis, NF-kappaB activation, and casp...

  16. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyangshuk [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Medical Life Sciences, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Yong Soo [Department of Biological Science, College of Natural Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinseu, E-mail: jinpark@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  17. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction

  18. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Bashir

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV. Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection.

  19. Persistent inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV-1 infected patients after 12 years of antiretroviral therapy.

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    Frederikke F Rönsholt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART. METHODS: Inflammation and endothelial activation were assessed by measuring levels of immunoglobulins, β2-microglobulin, interleukin (IL 8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, sE-Selectin, and sP-Selectin. RESULTS: HIV infected patients had higher levels of β2-microglobulin, IL-8, TNFα, and sICAM-1 than uninfected controls, and HIV infected patients lacked correlation between platelet counts and sP-Selectin levels found in uninfected controls. CONCLUSION: Discrete signs of systemic and vascular inflammation persist even after very long term cART.

  20. The perlecan heparan sulfate proteoglycan mediates cellular uptake of HIV-1 Tat through a pathway responsible for biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) mediate internalization of HIV-1 Tat. Herein, we report that human WiDr cells, which express perlecan but no other HSPGs, can internalize 125I-labeled Tat with minimal lysosomal degradation. Pre-treatment of cells with heparitinase almost completely abolished 125I-Tat surface binding, while the use of an HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter-reporter construct demonstrated that transactivation was potently blocked by pretreatment of cells with heparitinase, indicating an essential role for perlecan in the biologic effects of Tat. We conclude that the perlecan mediates Tat uptake and is required for HIV-1 LTR-directed transactivation in this human cell type

  1. Toxicity and in vitro activity of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents in primary CNS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R; On, Hung; Roberts, Emma; Lu, Hao K; Moso, Michael A; Raison, Jacqueline A; Papaioannou, Catherine; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Purcell, Damian F J; Wesselingh, Steve L; Gorry, Paul R; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV persists in long lived latently infected cells in the blood and tissue, and treatment is required lifelong. Recent clinical studies have trialed latency-reversing agents (LRA) as a method to eliminate latently infected cells; however, the effects of LRA on the central nervous system (CNS), a well-known site of virus persistence on cART, are unknown. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity and potency of a panel of commonly used and well-known LRA (panobinostat, romidepsin, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, hexamethylene bisacetamide [HMBA], and JQ-1) in primary fetal astrocytes (PFA) as well as monocyte-derived macrophages as a cellular model for brain perivascular macrophages. We show that most LRA are non-toxic in these cells at therapeutic concentrations. Additionally, romidepsin, JQ-1, and panobinostat were the most potent at inducing viral transcription, with greater magnitude observed in PFA. In contrast, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, and HMBA all demonstrated little or no induction of viral transcription. Together, these data suggest that some LRA could potentially activate transcription in latently infected cells in the CNS. We recommend that future trials of LRA also examine the effects of these agents on the CNS via examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

  2. Toxicity and in vitro activity of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents in primary CNS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R; On, Hung; Roberts, Emma; Lu, Hao K; Moso, Michael A; Raison, Jacqueline A; Papaioannou, Catherine; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Purcell, Damian F J; Wesselingh, Steve L; Gorry, Paul R; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV persists in long lived latently infected cells in the blood and tissue, and treatment is required lifelong. Recent clinical studies have trialed latency-reversing agents (LRA) as a method to eliminate latently infected cells; however, the effects of LRA on the central nervous system (CNS), a well-known site of virus persistence on cART, are unknown. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity and potency of a panel of commonly used and well-known LRA (panobinostat, romidepsin, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, hexamethylene bisacetamide [HMBA], and JQ-1) in primary fetal astrocytes (PFA) as well as monocyte-derived macrophages as a cellular model for brain perivascular macrophages. We show that most LRA are non-toxic in these cells at therapeutic concentrations. Additionally, romidepsin, JQ-1, and panobinostat were the most potent at inducing viral transcription, with greater magnitude observed in PFA. In contrast, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, and HMBA all demonstrated little or no induction of viral transcription. Together, these data suggest that some LRA could potentially activate transcription in latently infected cells in the CNS. We recommend that future trials of LRA also examine the effects of these agents on the CNS via examination of cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:26727904

  3. Toll-like receptor expression and activation in astroglia: differential regulation by HIV-1 Tat, gp120, and morphine

    OpenAIRE

    El-Hage, Nazira; PODHAIZER, Elizabeth M.; Sturgill, Jamie; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we determine whether morphine alone or in combination with HIV-1 Tat or gp120 affects the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by astrocytes and to assess whether TLRs expressed by astrocytes function in the release of inflammatory mediators in vitro. TLR profiling by immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, in-cell westerns, and RT-PCR showed that subpopulations of astrocytes possessed TLR 2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9 antigenicity. Exposure to HIV-1 Tat, gp120, and/or morp...

  4. Bezafibrate for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia in HIV1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Geraix

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in HIV-infected patients has been associated with the development of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CD including dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia being the most frequent metabolic disturbance in these patients. Fibrates are indicated when hypertriglyceridemia is accentuated and persists for over six months. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of bezafibrate for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia in HIV-infected individuals on HAART. All patients received 400mg/day of bezafibrate and were evaluated three times: Mo (pre-treatment, M1 (one month after treatment, and M2 (six months after treatment. Fifteen adult individuals, eight males and seven females with mean age = 41.2 ± 7.97 years and triglyceride serum levels > 400mg/dL were included in the study. Smoking, alcohol ingestion and sedentarism rates were 50%, 6.66% and 60%, respectively. Family history of CD, hypertension and diabetes mellitus was reported in 33.3%, 40% and 46.7% of the cases, respectively, while dyslipidemia was reported by only 13.3%. More than half of the patients were using a protease inhibitor plus a nucleotide analog transcriptase inhibitor. Eutrophy and tendency toward overweight were observed at all three study time points. There were significant reductions in triglyceride serum levels from Mo to M1 and from Mo to M2. No significant changes were observed in the serum levels of creatine phosphokinase, hepatic enzymes, CD4+, CD8+ and viral load. Therefore, bezafibrate seems to be safe and effective for the reduction of hypertriglyceridemia in HIV-infected patients on HAART.

  5. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  6. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR, which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  7. Tenascin-C is an innate broad-spectrum, HIV-1–neutralizing protein in breast milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Genevieve G.; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Amos, Joshua D.; Ho, Carrie; Kunz, Erika L.; Anasti, Kara; Stamper, Lisa W.; Liebl, Brooke E.; Barbas, Kimberly H.; Ohashi, Tomoo; Moseley, Martin Arthur; Liao, Hua-Xin; Erickson, Harold P.; Alam, S. Munir; Permar, Sallie R.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving an AIDS-free generation will require elimination of postnatal transmission of HIV-1 while maintaining the nutritional and immunologic benefits of breastfeeding for infants in developing regions. Maternal/infant antiretroviral prophylaxis can reduce postnatal HIV-1 transmission, yet toxicities and the development of drug-resistant viral strains may limit the effectiveness of this strategy. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, greater than 90% of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding remain uninfected, despite daily mucosal exposure to the virus for up to 2 y. Moreover, milk of uninfected women inherently neutralizes HIV-1 and prevents virus transmission in animal models, yet the factor(s) responsible for this anti-HIV activity is not well-defined. In this report, we identify a primary HIV-1–neutralizing protein in breast milk, Tenascin-C (TNC). TNC is an extracellular matrix protein important in fetal development and wound healing, yet its antimicrobial properties have not previously been established. Purified TNC captured and neutralized multiclade chronic and transmitted/founder HIV-1 variants, and depletion of TNC abolished the HIV-1–neutralizing activity of milk. TNC bound the HIV-1 Envelope protein at a site that is induced upon engagement of its primary receptor, CD4, and is blocked by V3 loop- (19B and F39F) and chemokine coreceptor binding site-directed (17B) monoclonal antibodies. Our results demonstrate the ability of an innate mucosal host protein found in milk to neutralize HIV-1 via binding to the chemokine coreceptor site, potentially explaining why the majority of HIV-1–exposed breastfed infants are protected against mucosal HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24145401

  8. Fucoidans as Potential Inhibitors of HIV-1

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    Vladimir S. Prassolov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV. It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001–100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001–0.05 µg/mL. High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan, and S. japonica (galactofucan were the most effective inhibitors.

  9. Fucoidans as potential inhibitors of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofjeva, Maria M; Imbs, Tatyana I; Shevchenko, Natalya M; Spirin, Pavel V; Horn, Stefan; Fehse, Boris; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2013-08-19

    The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans) was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001-100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001-0.05 µg/mL). High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan), and S. japonica (galactofucan) were the most effective inhibitors.

  10. Effect of HIV-1-related protein expression on cardiac and skeletal muscles from transgenic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidot David M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and the consequent acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS has protean manifestations, including muscle wasting and cardiomyopathy, which contribute to its high morbidity. The pathogenesis of these myopathies remains partially understood, and may include nutritional deficiencies, biochemical abnormalities, inflammation, and other mechanisms due to viral infection and replication. Growing evidence has suggested that HIV-1-related proteins expressed by the host in response to viral infection, including Tat and gp120, may also be involved in the pathophysiology of AIDS, particularly in cells or tissues that are not directly infected with HIV-1. To explore the potentially independent effects of HIV-1-related proteins on heart and skeletal muscles, we used a transgenic rat model that expresses several HIV-1-related proteins (e.g., Tat, gp120, and Nef. Outcome measures included basic heart and skeletal muscle morphology, glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress, and gene expressions of atrogin-1, muscle ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1 and Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGFβ1, three factors associated with muscle catabolism. Results Consistent with HIV-1 associated myopathies in humans, HIV-1 transgenic rats had increased relative heart masses, decreased relative masses of soleus, plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles, and decreased total and myosin heavy chain type-specific plantaris muscle fiber areas. In both tissues, the levels of cystine (Cyss, the oxidized form of the anti-oxidant cysteine (Cys, and Cyss:Cys ratios were significantly elevated, and cardiac tissue from HIV-1 transgenic rats had altered glutathione metabolism, all reflective of significant oxidative stress. In HIV-1 transgenic rat hearts, MuRF-1 gene expression was increased. Further, HIV-1-related protein expression also increased atrogin-1 (~14- and ~3-fold and TGFβ1 (~5-fold and ~3-fold in heart and

  11. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship and comparative molecular field analysis studies within a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Uiaran de Oliveira; Souza, Alessandra Mendonça Teles de; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Brito, Monique Araújo de; Bello, Murilo Lamim; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel

    2013-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a public health problem worldwide caused by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment with antiretroviral drugs is the best option for viral suppression, reducing morbidity and mortality. However, viral resistance in HIV-1 therapy has been reported. HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for effective viral replication and an attractive target for the development of new inhibitors. In the study reported here, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (2D/3D-QSAR) studies, applying hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) methods, respectively, were performed on a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The best HQSAR model (q (2) = 0.802, r (2) = 0.972) was obtained using atoms, bonds, and connectivity as the fragment distinction, a fragment size of 2-5 atoms, hologram length of 61 bins, and six components. The best CoMFA model (q (2) = 0.748, r (2) = 0.974) was obtained with alignment of all atoms of the tricyclic phthalimide moiety (alignment II). The HQSAR contribution map identified that the carbonyl-hydroxy-aromatic nitrogen motif made a positive contribution to the activity of the compounds. Furthermore, CoMFA contour maps suggested that bulky groups in meta and para positions in the phenyl ring would increase the biological activity of this class. The conclusions of this work may lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 IN inhibition and contribute to the design of new and more potent derivatives.

  12. HLA-DR expression on regulatory T cells is closely associated with the global immune activation in HIV-1 infected subjects na(i)ve to antiretroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jian; LI Ming-yuan; WANG Ying; QIAN Ke-lei; CAO Qing-hua; QIU Chen-li; QIU Cao; XUE Yi-le; ZHANG Xiao-yan; ZHONG Ping; XU Jian-qing

    2011-01-01

    Background The frequencies of regulatory T cells (Tregs) increased over the HIV infection but its counts actually decreased. We proposed that the decrease of Treg counts may cause the reduction of inhibitory effect and thereby account for the over-activation of Tregs during HIV infection. However, it remains unknown whether Tregs are also over-activated and thereafter the activation induced death may lead to the decrease of Tregs. Methods Tregs were defined as CD4+CD25+CD127lo/-T cells. Eighty-one HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in our study, and twenty-two HIV-1 seronegative donors were recruited as the control. The levels of HLA-DR on Tregs were determined by FACSAria flow cytometer. ResultsCompared to HIV-1 seronegative donors, the levels of HLA-DR on CD4+CD25+CD127lo/- Tregs were significantly increased in HIV-1 infected patients, and its increase was positively associated with viral loads (r=0.3163,P=0.004) and negatively with CD4 T-cell counts (r=-0.4153, P<0.0001). In addition, significant associations between HLA-DR expression on CD4+CD25+CD127lo/-Tregs and the percentages of HLA-DR, CD38, Ki67 expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were also identified. Conclusion HLA-DR on Tregs is a good marker for viral replication and disease progression. The over-activation of Tregs might result in the decrease of Tregs.

  13. Catalytic Water Co-Existing with a Product Peptide in the Active Site of HIV-1 Protease Revealed by X-Ray Structure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash; Das, Amit; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Hosur, Madhusoodan

    2009-01-01

    Background It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not...

  14. Curcumin protects microglia and primary rat cortical neurons against HIV-1 gp120-mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Guo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a molecule found in turmeric root that has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor properties and has been widely used as both an herbal drug and a food additive to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. To explore whether curcumin is able to ameliorate HIV-1-associated neurotoxicity, we treated a murine microglial cell line (N9 and primary rat cortical neurons with curcumin in the presence or absence of neurotoxic HIV-1 gp120 (V3 loop protein. We found that HIV-1 gp120 profoundly induced N9 cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. HIV-1 gp120 also induced apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin exerted a powerful inhibitory effect against HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal damage, reducing the production of ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 by N9 cells and inhibiting apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin may exert its biological activities through inhibition of the delayed rectification and transient outward potassium (K(+ current, as curcumin effectively reduced HIV-1 gp120-mediated elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current in neurons. We conclude that HIV-1 gp120 increases ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 production in microglia, and induces cortical neuron apoptosis by affecting the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current. Curcumin reduces production of ROS and inflammatory mediators in HIV-1-gp120-stimulated microglia, and protects cortical neurons against HIV-1-mediated apoptosis, most likely through inhibition of HIV-1 gp120-induced elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ current.

  15. Metabolic and immune activation effects of treatment interruption in chronic HIV-1 infection: implications for cardiovascular risk.

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    Pablo Tebas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Concern about costs and antiretroviral therapy (ART-associated toxicities led to the consideration of CD4 driven strategies for the management of HIV. That approach was evaluated in the SMART trial that reported an unexpected increase of cardiovascular events after treatment interruption (TI. Our goal was to evaluate fasting metabolic changes associated with interruption of antiretroviral therapy and relate them to changes of immune activation markers and cardiovascular risk. METHODOLOGY: ACTG 5102 enrolled 47 HIV-1-infected subjects on stable ART, with or=500 cells/microL. Subjects were randomly assigned to continue ART for 18 weeks with or without 3 cycles of interleukin-2 (IL-2 (cycle = 4.5 million IU sc BID x 5 days every 8 weeks. After 18 weeks ART was discontinued in all subjects until the CD4 cell count dropped below 350 cells/microL. Glucose and lipid parameters were evaluated every 8 weeks initially and at weeks 2, 4, 8 and every 8 weeks after TI. Immune activation was evaluated by flow-cytometry and soluble TNFR2 levels. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By week 8 of TI, levels of total cholesterol (TC (median (Q1, Q3 (-0.73 (-1.19, -0.18 mmol/L, p<0.0001, LDL, HDL cholesterol (-0.36(-0.73,-0.03mmol/L, p = 0.0007 and -0.05(-0.26,0.03, p = 0.0033, respectively and triglycerides decreased (-0.40 (-0.84, 0.07 mmol/L, p = 0.005. However the TC/HDL ratio remained unchanged (-0.09 (-1.2, 0.5, p = 0.2. Glucose and insulin levels did not change (p = 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. After TI there was marked increase in immune activation (CD8+/HLA-DR+/CD38+ cells, 34% (13, 43, p<0.0001 and soluble TNFR2 (1089 ng/L (-189, 1655, p = 0.0008 coinciding with the rebound of HIV viremia. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that interrupting antiretroviral therapy does not reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD risk, as the improvements in lipid parameters are modest and overshadowed by the decreased HDL levels. Increased immune cell activation and systemic

  16. Immunodeficient Parameters in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Model

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    Sulie L. Chang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently an HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rat model was created that carries a gag-pol-deleted HIV-1 genome under the control of the HIV-1 viral promoter. However, other viral proteins are expressed in most organs and tissues, and are found in the circulating blood. Since HIV-1 targets the immune system in humans, we examined two immunological parameters, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion (LEA and inflammatory cytokine production, in 5 mo old HIV-1Tg rats to identify immune functions that may be impaired even before the onset of symptoms of HIV-1 infection. We administered a single injection (i.p. of the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 250 ug/kg, to 5 mo old HIV-1Tg rats, age-matched transgenic control (Tg rats, and F344/NHsd (F344 control background strain rats. LPS induced an LEA response in both the Tg control and F344 control animals. However, in the HIV-1Tg rats, there was no LEA response to LPS. Following LPS administration, there was significantly greater serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, two pro-inflammatory cytokines, in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to the control animals. In contrast, the serum level of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was comparable in the HIV-1Tg, Tg control, and F344 control rats. Our data show that, in the HIV-1Tg rat, there is a negative correlation between the LEA response and the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to bacterial endotoxin. These findings suggest that the persistent presence of viral proteins may be, at least, partially responsible for the immunodeficiency that occurs with HIV-1 infection, and that the HIV-1Tg rat could be a valid rodent model in which to study various aspects of HIV-1 infection.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of HIV-1 antigen and antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Hu, Ningjie; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Yu, Qigui; Misra, Anupam K.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2011-05-01

    Raman spectra of anti-HIV-1 antibody, HIV-1 antigen (p24), and HIV-1 antibody-antigen complex have been measured in near-infrared and UV regions: 785 nm; 830 nm; and 244 nm laser excitations. The spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen was excited with an infrared laser and contains numerous Raman peaks. The most prominent peaks are broad bands at 1343, 1449, 1609 and 1655 cm-1, which are characteristic of the Raman spectra of biological cells. The UV Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen has a completely different structure. It has two strong peaks at 1613 cm-1 and 1173 cm-1. The peak at 1613 cm-1 is associated with vibrations of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Try). The second strongest peak at 1173 cm-1 is associated with the vibration of Tyr. The Raman peak pattern of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex is very similar to that of the HIV-1 antigen. The only difference is that the peak at 1007 cm-1 of the Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex is slightly enhanced compared to that of the HIV-1 antigen. This indicates that the peaks of the HIV-1 antigen dominate the Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex.

  18. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Aubrie; Kremb, Stephan; Bader, Theresa Maria; Helfer, Markus; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Gerwick, William H; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Voolstra, Christian R

    2016-02-01

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%-40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery. PMID:26861355

  19. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1)

    KAUST Repository

    O’Rourke, Aubrie

    2016-02-04

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery.

  20. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J; Valente, Susana T

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. PMID:26810656

  1. Elucidating a Key Anti-HIV-1 and Cancer-Associated Axis: The Structure of CCL5 (Rantes) in Complex with CCR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-06-01

    CCL5 (RANTES) is an inflammatory chemokine which binds to chemokine receptor CCR5 and induces signaling. The CCL5:CCR5 associated chemotactic signaling is of critical biological importance and is a potential HIV-1 therapeutic axis. Several studies provided growing evidence for the expression of CCL5 and CCR5 in non-hematological malignancies. Therefore, the delineation of the CCL5:CCR5 complex structure can pave the way for novel CCR5-targeted drugs. We employed a computational protocol which is primarily based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, and report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CCL5:CCR5 complex structure which is in excellent agreement with experimental findings and clarifies the functional role of CCL5 and CCR5 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. A wealth of polar and non-polar interactions contributes to the tight CCL5:CCR5 binding. The structure of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CCR5 has recently been derived through a similar computational protocol. A comparison between the CCL5 : CCR5 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structures depicts that both the chemokine and the virus primarily interact with the same CCR5 residues. The present work provides insights into the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 by CCL5.

  2. Sulfated Polysaccharides in Marine Sponges: Extraction Methods and Anti-HIV Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. S. Esteves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction, fractionation and HIV-1 inhibition potential of polysaccharides extracted from three species of marine sponges, Erylus discophorus, Cliona celata and Stelletta sp., collected in the Northeastern Atlantic, is presented in this work. The anti-HIV activity of 23 polysaccharide pellets and three crude extracts was tested. Crude extracts prepared from Erylus discophorus specimens were all highly active against HIV-1 (90 to 95% inhibition. Cliona celata pellets showed low polysaccharide content (bellow 38.5% and almost no anti-HIV activity (<10% inhibition. Stelletta sp. pellets, although quite rich in polysaccharide (up to 97.3%, showed only modest bioactivity (<36% HIV-1 inhibition. Erylus discophorus pellets were among the richest in terms of polysaccharide content (up to 98% and the most active against HIV-1 (up to 95% inhibition. Chromatographic fractionation of the polysaccharide pellet obtained from a specimen of Erylus discophorus (B161 yielded only modestly active fractions. However, we could infer that the active molecule is most probably a high molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide (>2000 kDa, whose mechanism is possibly preventing viral attachment and entry (fusion inhibitor.

  3. Correlation of Increases in 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D During Vitamin D Therapy With Activation of CD4+ T Lymphocytes in HIV-1-Infected Males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich; Kolte, Lilian; Hitz, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Background: In HIV-1-infected individuals, levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes are depleted and regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs) are elevated. In vitro studies have demonstrated effects of vitamin D on the growth and differentiation of these cells. We speculated whether supplementation with vitamin D...... could have an effect on CD4+ T lymphocytes or Tregs in HIV-1-infected males. Methods: We conducted a placebo-controlled randomized study that ran for 16 weeks and included 61 HIV-1-infected males, of whom 51 completed the protocol. The participants were randomized to 1 of 3 daily treatments: (1) 0.......5-1.0 µg calcitriol and 1200 IU (30 µg) cholecalciferol, (2) 1200 IU cholecalciferol, (3) placebo. Percentages of the following T-lymphocyte subsets were determined: naïve CD4+ and CD8+ cells, activated CD4+ and CD8+ cells, and CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127low Tregs. Furthermore 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 25...

  4. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kremb, Stephan

    2014-08-21

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  5. Aggressive HIV-1?

    OpenAIRE

    van der Hoek Lia; de Ronde Anthony; Berkhout Ben

    2005-01-01

    Abstract New York City health officials announced on February 11, 2005 that a patient rapidly developed full-blown AIDS shortly after being diagnosed with a rare, drug-resistant strain of HIV-1. The New York City Department of Health issued an alert to all hospitals and doctors and a press conference was held to announce the emergence of an aggressive HIV-1 strain that may be difficult to treat and that appears to trigger rapid progression to AIDS. Is the panic justified?

  6. Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry by targeting gp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin L(U); Shu-wen LIU; Shi-bo JIANG; Shu-guang WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism by which tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells. METHODS: The inhibitory activity of tannin on HIV-1 replication and entry was detected by p24 production and HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, respectively. The inhibitory activity on the gp41 six-helix bundle formation was determined by an improved sandwich ELISA. RESULTS: Tannins from different sources showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 replication,HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, and the gp4 six-helix bundle formation. CONCLUSION: Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells by interfering with the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, thus blocking HIV-1 fusion with the target cell.

  7. Human semen contains exosomes with potent anti-HIV-1 activity

    OpenAIRE

    Madison, Marisa N; Roller, Richard J.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles secreted into the extracellular milieu by diverse cell types. Exosomes facilitate intercellular communication, modulate cellular pheno/genotype, and regulate microbial pathogenesis. Although human semen contains exosomes, their role in regulating infection with viruses that are sexually transmitted remains unknown. In this study, we used semen exosomes purified from healthy human donors to evaluate the role of exosomes on the infectivity of diff...

  8. Antiretroviral activity of the aminothiol WR1065 against Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 in vitro and Simian Immunodeficiency virus (SIV ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borojerdi Jennifer P

    2009-11-01

    antiretroviral activity. WR1065 was active against both an acute infection of HIV-1 and a chronic infection of SIV. The data suggest that the non-toxic drug amifostine may be a useful antiretroviral agent given either alone or in combination with other drugs as adjuvant therapy.

  9. An anti-HIV-1 V3 loop antibody fully protects cross-clade and elicits T-cell immunity in macaques mucosally challenged with an R5 clade C SHIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Watkins

    Full Text Available Neutralizing antibodies have been shown to protect macaques against SHIV challenge. However, genetically diverse HIV-1 clades have evolved, and a key question left unanswered is whether neutralizing antibodies can confer cross-clade protection in vivo. The novel human monoclonal antibody HGN194 was isolated from an individual infected with an HIV-1 clade AG recombinant circulating recombinant form (CRF. HGN194 targets an epitope in the third hypervariable loop (V3 of HIV-1 gp120 and neutralizes a range of relatively neutralization-sensitive and resistant viruses. We evaluated the potential of HGN194 to protect infant rhesus monkeys against a SHIV encoding a primary CCR5-tropic HIV-1 clade C envelope. After high-dose mucosal challenge, all untreated controls became highly viremic while all HGN194-treated animals (50 mg/kg were completely protected. When HGN194 was given at 1 mg/kg, one out of two monkeys remained aviremic, whereas the other had delayed, lower peak viremia. Interestingly, all protected monkeys given high-dose HGN194 developed Gag-specific proliferative responses of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. To test whether generation of the latter involved cryptic infection, we ablated CD8+ cells after HGN194 clearance. No viremia was detected in any protected monkeys, thus ruling out virus reservoirs. Thus, induction of CD8 T-cell immunity may have resulted from transient "Hit and Run" infection or cross priming via Ag-Ab-mediated cross-presentation. Together, our data identified the HGN194 epitope as protective and provide proof-of-concept that this anti-V3 loop mAb can prevent infection with sterilizing immunity after challenge with virus of a different clade, implying that V3 is a potential vaccine target.

  10. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Nunzio, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.di-nunzio@pasteur.fr [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Fricke, Thomas [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Miccio, Annarita [University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Centro di Medicina Rigenerativa, Modena (Italy); Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Souque, Philippe [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco [Institute of Biomedical Technologies, CNR, Milano (Italy); Mavilio, Fulvio [University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Centro di Medicina Rigenerativa, Modena (Italy); Genethon, Evry (France); Charneau, Pierre [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Diaz-Griffero, Felipe, E-mail: felipe.diaz-griffero@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  11. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC.

  12. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC. PMID:27326669

  13. Punica granatum (Pomegranate juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1 infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2 binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored.

  14. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Luban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature uncoating of the virion core, and activation of TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Unattached, K63-linked ubiquitin chains are generated that activate the TAK1 kinase complex and downstream inflammatory mediators. Polymorphisms in the capsid recognition domain of TRIM5 explain the observed species-specific differences among orthologues and the relatively weak anti-HIV-1 activity of human TRIM5. Better understanding of the complex interaction between TRIM5 and the retrovirus capsid lattice may someday lead to exploitation of this interaction for the development of potent HIV-1 inhibitors.

  15. HIV-1 tat promotes integrin-mediated HIV transmission to dendritic cells by binding Env spikes and competes neutralization by anti-HIV antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Monini

    Full Text Available Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs. Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions.

  16. Molecular Understanding of HIV-1 Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been an important breakthrough in the treatment of HIV-1 infection and has also a powerful tool to upset the equilibrium of viral production and HIV-1 pathogenesis. Despite the advent of potent combinations of this therapy, the long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs like cells from monocyte-macrophage lineage and resting memory CD4+ T cells which are established early during primary infection constitute a major obstacle to virus eradication. Further HAART interruption leads to immediate rebound viremia from latent reservoirs. This paper focuses on the essentials of the molecular mechanisms for the establishment of HIV-1 latency with special concern to present and future possible treatment strategies to completely purge and target viral persistence in the reservoirs.

  17. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 2-Thioxopyrimidin-4(1H-one Derivatives as Potential Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy M. Khalifa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 5-allyl-6-benzylpyrimidin-4(3H-ones bearing different substituents at the C-2 position of the pyrimidine core have been synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro activities against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in the human T-lymphotropic type (MT-4 cell cultures. The majority of the title compounds showed moderate to good activities against HIV-1. Amongst them, 5-allyl-6-benzyl-2-(3-hydroxypropylthiopyrimidin-4(3H-one analogue 11c exhibited the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (IC50 0.32 µM. The biological testing results clearly indicated that the substitution at C-2 position of the pyrimidine ring could increase the anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT activity.

  18. Efficient Gene Transfer Mediated by HIV-1-based Defective Lentivector and Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have drawn considerable attention recently and show great promise to become important delivery vehicles for future gene transfer manipulation. In the present study we have optimized a protocol for preparation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-based defective lentiviral vectors (DLV) and characterized these vectors in terms of their transduction of different cells. Transient co-transfection of 293T packaging cells with DNA plasmids encoding lentiviral vector constituents resulted in production of high-titer DLV (0.5-1.2 × 107IU/mL), which can be further concentrated over 100-fold through a single step ultracentrifugation. These vectors were capable of transducing a variety of cells from both primate and non-primate sources and high transduction efficiency was achieved using concentrated vectors. Assessment of potential generation of RCV revealed no detection of infection by infectious particles in DLV-transduced CEM, SupT-1 and MT-2 cells. Long-term culture of transduced cells showed a stable expression of transgenes without apparent alteration in cellular morphology and growth kinetics. Vector mobilization to untransduced cells mediated by wild-type HIV-1 infection was confirmed in this test. Challenge of transduced human T-lymphocytes with wild-type HIV-1 showed these cells are totally resistant to the viral infection. Considering the effective gene transfer and stable gene expression, safety and anti-HIV activity, these DLV vectors warrant further exploration for their potential use as a gene transfer vehicle in the development of gene therapy protocols.

  19. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

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    Qing-Xiu Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession, and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities.

  20. Hologram quantitative structure–activity relationship and comparative molecular field analysis studies within a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

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    Magalhães UO

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Uiaran de Oliveira Magalhães,1 Alessandra Mendonça Teles de Souza,1 Magaly Girão Albuquerque,2 Monique Araújo de Brito,3 Murilo Lamim Bello,1 Lucio Mendes Cabral,4 Carlos Rangel Rodrigues1 1Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Faculdade de Farmácia, Laboratório de Modelagem Molecular and QSAR (ModMolQSAR, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; 2Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Instituto de Química, Laboratório de Modelagem Molecular (LabMMol, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; 3Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF, Faculdade de Farmácia, Laboratório de Química Medicinal Computacional (LabQMC, Niterói, RJ, Brazil; 4Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Faculdade de Farmácia, Laboratório de Tecnologia Farmacêutica Industrial (LabTIF, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Abstract: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a public health problem worldwide caused by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Treatment with antiretroviral drugs is the best option for viral suppression, reducing morbidity and mortality. However, viral resistance in HIV-1 therapy has been reported. HIV-1 integrase (IN is an essential enzyme for effective viral replication and an attractive target for the development of new inhibitors. In the study reported here, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure–activity relationship (2D/3D-QSAR studies, applying hologram quantitative structure–activity relationship (HQSAR and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA methods, respectively, were performed on a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.802, r2 = 0.972 was obtained using atoms, bonds, and connectivity as the fragment distinction, a fragment size of 2–5 atoms, hologram length of 61 bins, and six components. The best CoMFA model (q2 = 0.748, r2 = 0.974 was obtained with alignment of all atoms of the tricyclic phthalimide moiety (alignment II. The HQSAR contribution map identified that the carbonyl

  1. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) is Associated with Metabolic Changes in HIV-1-Infected Africans: A Prospective Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fourie, Carla M T; Van Rooyen, Johannes M; Olsen, Michael H;

    2011-01-01

    Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is associated with inflammation and may predict lipodystrophy and dysmetabolism in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. We aimed to assess firstly, whether suPAR levels are elevated in treated......-infected black South Africans had significantly higher suPAR levels than uninfected controls at baseline and at follow-up 3 years later. However, only the treated HIV-1-infected participants showed an increase in suPAR levels at follow-up. The treated group also showed signs of lipodystrophy...

  2. Differential in vitro inhibitory activity against HIV-1 of alpha-(1-3- and alpha-(1-6-D-mannose specific plant lectins : Implication for microbicide development

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    Balzarini Jan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant lectins such as Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA and Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA are natural proteins able to link mannose residues, and therefore inhibit HIV-target cell interactions. Plant lectins are candidate for microbicide development. Objective To evaluate the activity against HIV of the mannose-specific plant lectins HHA and GNA at the cellular membrane level of epithelial cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC, two potential target cells of HIV at the genital mucosal level. Methods The inhibitory effects of HHA and GNA were evaluated on HIV adsorption to genital epithelial HEC-1A cell line, on HIV transcytosis throughout a monolayer of polarized epithelial HEC-1A cells, on HIV adsorption to MDDC and on transfer of HIV from MDDC to autologous T lymphocytes. Results HHA faintly inhibited attachment to HEC-1A cells of the R5-tropic HIV-1Ba-L strain, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas GNA moderately inhibited HIV adsorption in the same context, but only at high drug doses. Only HHA, but not GNA, inhibited HIV-1JR-CSF transcytosis in a dose-dependent manner. By confocal microscopy, HHA, but not GNA, was adsorbed at the epithelial cell surface, suggesting that HHA interacts specifically with receptors mediating HIV-1 transcytosis. Both plant lectins partially inhibited HIV attachment to MDDC. HHA inhibited more efficiently the transfer of HIV from MDDC to T cell, than GNA. Both HHA and GNA lacked toxicity below 200 μg/ml irrespective the cellular system used and do not disturb the monolayer integrity of epithelial cells. Conclusion These observations demonstrate higher inhibitory activities of the lectin plant HHA by comparison to GNA, on HIV adsorption to HEC-1A cell line, HIV transcytosis through HEC-1A cell line monolayer, HIV adsorption to MDDC and HIV transfer from MDDC to T cells, highlighting the potential interest of HHA as effective microbicide against HIV.

  3. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N

    2016-04-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  4. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  5. A Study on Placental Factors in the First,Second and Third Trimester against HIV-1 in Vitro%早、中、晚孕期胎盘因子体外抗HIV-1的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉平; 康佳丽; 夏薇; 曾耀英

    2008-01-01

    Objective To systemically investigate the effects of PF in the first,second and third trimesters against HIV-1 infection in vitro,and to evaluate their possible roles in HIV-1 intrauterine infection.Methods Calcein-AM stained H9/HIV-1 ⅢB cells were treated with difierent concentrations of PF in the first,second and third trimesters respectively,which was then mixed with MT2 cells and put under fluorescent microscopy for detection of HIV-1-mediated syncytium formation.MT2 cells were treated with cell-free HIV-1 Ⅲ B,and then washed and cultured with different concentrations of PF in the first,second and third trimesters respectively.Furthcrly,the protecting effect of PFs against HIV-1-infected cells Was determined with MTT,viral replication Was evaluated by measurement of the levels of p24 antigen in culture supernatants with ELISA and the inhibition rate Was calculated.Results PFs did not suppress HIV-1-mediated syncytium formation,however,they significantly increased the viabilities of HIV-1-infected cells and the inhibition rates of p24 antigen levels.Moreover,their effects arrived at the highest in the first trimester,and decreased along with the progress of pregnancy.In addition,the anti-HIV-1 activities of PFs were dose-dependent.Conclusion PFs from placental cells can decrease HIV-1 infection in vitro,and may have an essential role in mducing HIV-1 vertical transmission via placenta.%目的:探讨早、中、晚孕期胎盘因子(PF)体外抗人免疫缺陷病毒-1(HTV-1)的作用及其在HIV-1垂直传播中可能的作用.方法:采用荧光染料Calcien-AM标记的H9/HIV-1 ⅢB分别与早、中、晚孕期不同稀释浓度的PF作用后,与MT2细胞混合培养,荧光显微镜下观察合胞体的形成;用游离的HIV-1 ⅢB感染MT2细胞,并分别与早、中、晚孕期不同稀释浓度的PF作用后,用MTT法检测HW-1感染细胞的存活率,用HIV-1 p24抗原试剂盒检测细胞培养上清中p24抗原含量的变化.结

  6. HIV-1 Tat activates indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase in murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures in a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent manner

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    Kelley Keith W

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have established that activation of the tryptophan degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO mediates the switch from cytokine-induced sickness behavior to depressive-like behavior. Because human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Tat protein causes depressive-like behavior in mice, we investigated its ability to activate IDO in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs derived from neonatal C57BL/6 mice. Methods Depressive-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice was assessed by the forced swim test. Expression of cytokines and IDO mRNA in OHSCs was measured by real-time RT-PCR and cytokine protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. p38 MAPK phosphorylation was analyzed by western blot. Results Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of Tat (40 ng induced depressive-like behavior in the absence of sickness. Addition of Tat (40 ng/slice to the medium of OHSCs induced IDO steady-state mRNA that peaked at 6 h. This effect was potentiated by pretreatment with IFNγ. Tat also induced the synthesis and release of TNFα and IL-6 protein in the supernatant of the slices and increased expression of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and the serotonin transporter (SERT. Tat had no effect on endogenous synthesis of IFNγ. To explore the mechanisms of Tat-induced IDO expression, slices were pretreated with the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitor SB 202190 for 30 min before Tat treatment. SB 202190 significantly decreased IDO expression induced by Tat, and this effect was accompanied by a reduction of Tat-induced expression of TNFα, IL-6, iNOS and SERT. Conclusion These data establish that Tat induces IDO expression via an IFNγ-independent mechanism that depends upon activation of p38 MAPK. Targeting IDO itself or the p38 MAPK signaling pathway could provide a novel therapy for comorbid depressive disorders in HIV-1-infected patients.

  7. Tetherin does not significantly restrict dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 transmission and its expression is upregulated by newly synthesized HIV-1 Nef

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    Wu Li

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are among the first cells to encounter HIV-1 and play important roles in viral transmission and pathogenesis. Immature DCs allow productive HIV-1 replication and long-term viral dissemination. The pro-inflammatory factor lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces DC maturation and enhances the efficiency of DC-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Type I interferon (IFN partially inhibits HIV-1 replication and cell-cell transmission in CD4+ T cells and macrophages. Tetherin is a type I IFN-inducible restriction factor that blocks HIV-1 release and modulates CD4+ T cell-mediated cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1. However, the role of type I IFN and tetherin in HIV-1 infection of DCs and DC-mediated viral transmission remains unknown. Results We demonstrated that IFN-alpha (IFNα-induced mature DCs restricted HIV-1 replication and trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. Tetherin expression in monocyte-derived immature DCs was undetectable or very low. High levels of tetherin were transiently expressed in LPS- and IFNα-induced mature DCs, while HIV-1 localized into distinct patches in these DCs. Knockdown of induced tetherin in LPS- or IFNα-matured DCs modestly enhanced HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells, but had no significant effect on wild-type HIV-1 replication in mature DCs. Intriguingly, we found that HIV-1 replication in immature DCs induced significant tetherin expression in a Nef-dependent manner. Conclusions The restriction of HIV-1 replication and transmission in IFNα-induced mature DCs indicates a potent anti-HIV-1 response; however, high levels of tetherin induced in mature DCs cannot significantly restrict wild-type HIV-1 release and DC-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Nef-dependent tetherin induction in HIV-1-infected immature DCs suggests an innate immune response of DCs to HIV-1 infection.

  8. Impact of HIV-1 infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy on the kinetics of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell turnover in HIV-infected patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempicki, Richard A.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Baseler, Michael W.; Adelsberger, Joseph W.; Dewar, Robin L.; Natarajan, Ven; Bosche, Marjorie C.; Metcalf, Julia A.; Stevens, Randy A.; Lambert, Laurie A.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Polis, Michael A.; Davey, Richard T.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Lane, H. Clifford

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of HIV infection on T cell turnover, we examined levels of DNA synthesis in lymph node and peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets by using ex vivo labeling with BrdUrd. Compared with healthy controls (n = 67), HIV-infected patients (n = 57) had significant increases in the number and fraction of dividing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Higher percentages of dividing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were noted in patients with the higher viral burdens. No direct correlation was noted between rates of T cell turnover and CD4+ T cell counts. Marked reductions in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation were seen in 11/11 patients 1–12 weeks after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). These reductions persisted for the length of the study (16–72 weeks). Decreases in naïve T cell proliferation correlated with increases in the levels of T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles. Division of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased dramatically in association with rapid increases in HIV-1 viral loads in 9/9 patients 5 weeks after termination of HAART and declined to pre-HAART-termination levels 8 weeks after reinitiation of therapy. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that HIV-1 infection induces a viral burden-related, global activation of the immune system, leading to increases in lymphocyte proliferation. PMID:11095734

  9. Approaches for Identification of HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors Targeting gp41 Pocket

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    Asim K. Debnath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon, was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD, it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs.

  10. Structural modifications of CH(OH)-DAPYs as new HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi-Hong; Huang, Xia-Yun; Wu, Hai-Qiu; Chen, Wen-Xue; He, Qiu-Qin; Chen, Fen-Er; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2014-04-15

    A series of CR2(OH)-diarylpyrimidine derivatives (CR2(OH)-DAPYs) featuring a hydrophobic group at CH(OH) linker between wing I and the central pyrimidine were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cell cultures. All the target compounds except for compound 3k displayed inhibitory activity against HIV-1 wild-type with EC50 values ranging from 7.21±1.99 to 0.067±0.006 μM. Among them, compound 3d showed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50=0.067±0.006 μM, SI>592), which was approximately 2-fold more potent than the reference drugs nevirapine (NVP) and delaviridine (DLV) in the same assay. In addition, the binding modes with HIV-1 RT and the preliminary SAR studies of these new derivatives were also investigated. PMID:24680058

  11. Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is the body's first response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered as part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. The search for natural compounds and phytoconstituents that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing a prolonged inflammation could be useful for human health. Here, the anti-inflammatory properties of plant-based drugs are put together with both in vitro and acute (carrageenan, egg albumin and croton oil) and chronic (cotton pellet) in vivo models. PMID:26939273

  12. The Effect of β-Carotene Supplementation on the Pharmacokinetics of Nelfinavir and Its Active Metabolite M8 in HIV-1-infected Patients

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    Humayoun Akhtar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available β-Carotene supplements are often taken by individuals living with HIV-1. Contradictory results from in vitro studies suggest that β-carotene may inhibit or induce cytochrome P450 enzymes and transporters. The study objective was to investigate the effect of β-carotene on the steady-state pharmacokinetics of nelfinavir and its active metabolite M8 in HIV-1 infected individuals. Twelve hour nelfinavir pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted at baseline and after 28 days of β-carotene supplementation (25,000 IU twice daily. Nelfinavir and M8 concentrations were measured with validated assays. Non-compartmental methods were used to calculate the pharmacokinetic parameters. Geometric mean ratios comparing day 28 to day 1 area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–12 h, maximum (Cmax and minimum (Cmin concentrations of nelfinavir and M8 are presented with 90% confidence intervals. Eleven subjects completed the study and were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences in nelfinavir AUC0–12 h and Cmin (−10%, +4% after β-carotene supplementation. The M8 Cmin was increased by 31% while the M8 AUC0–12 h and Cmax were unchanged. During the 28 day period, mean CD4+ % and CD4+:CD8+ ratio increased significantly (p < 0.01. β-carotene supplementation increased serum carotene levels but did not cause any clinically significant difference in the nelfinavir and M8 exposure.

  13. Structural and biochemical study on the inhibitory activity of derivatives of 5-nitro-furan-2-carboxylic acid for RNase H function of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagita, Hiroshi; Urano, Emiko; Matsumoto, Kishow; Ichikawa, Reiko; Takaesu, Yoshihisa; Ogata, Masakazu; Murakami, Tsutomu; Wu, Hongui; Chiba, Joe; Komano, Jun; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2011-01-15

    Rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants is one of the most serious problems in chemotherapy for HIV-1 infectious diseases. Inhibitors acting on a target not addressed by approved drugs are of great importance to suppress drug-resistant viruses. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has two enzymatic functions, DNA polymerase and RNase H activities. The RNase H activity is an attractive target for a new class of antiviral drugs. On the basis of the hit chemicals found in our previous screening with 20,000 small molecular-weight compounds, we synthesized derivatives of 5-nitro-furan-2-carboxylic acid. Inhibition of RNase H enzymatic activity was measured in a biochemical assay with real-time monitoring of florescence emission from the digested RNA substrate. Several derivatives showed higher inhibitory activities that those of the hit chemicals. Modulation of the 5-nitro-furan-2-carboxylic moiety resulted in a drastic decrease in inhibitory potency. In contrast, many derivatives with modulation of other parts retained inhibitory activities to varying degrees. These findings suggest the binding mode of active derivatives, in which three oxygen atoms aligned in a straight form at the nitro-furan moiety are coordinated to two divalent metal ions located at RNase H reaction site. Hence, the nitro-furan-carboxylic moiety is one of the critical scaffolds for RNase H inhibition. Of note, the RNase H inhibitory potency of a derivative was improved by 18-fold compared with that of the original hit compound, and no significant cytotoxicity was observed for most of the derivatives showing inhibitory activity. Since there is still much room for modification of the compounds at the part opposite the nitro-furan moiety, further chemical conversion will lead to improvement of compound potency and specificity. PMID:21193314

  14. Minocycline fails to modulate cerebrospinal fluid HIV infection or immune activation in chronic untreated HIV-1 infection: results of a pilot study

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    Fuchs Dietmar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minocycline is a tetracycline antibiotic that has been shown to attenuate central nervous system (CNS lentivirus infection, immune activation, and brain injury in model systems. To initiate assessment of minocycline as an adjuvant therapy in human CNS HIV infection, we conducted an open-labelled pilot study of its effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood biomarkers of infection and immune responses in 7 viremic subjects not taking antiretroviral therapy. Results There were no discernable effects of minocycline on CSF or blood HIV-1 RNA, or biomarkers of immune activation and inflammation including: CSF and blood neopterin, CSF CCL2, CSF white blood cell count, and expression of cell-surface activation markers on CSF and blood T lymphocytes and monocytes. Conclusions This pilot study of biological responses to minocycline suggests little potential for its use as adjunctive antiviral or immunomodulating therapy in chronic untreated HIV infection.

  15. Catalytic water co-existing with a product peptide in the active site of HIV-1 protease revealed by X-ray structure analysis.

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    Vishal Prashar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not been found so far in the crystal structures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the first observation of the coexistence in the active site, of a water molecule WAT1, along with the carboxyl terminal product (Q product peptide. The product peptide has been generated in situ through cleavage of the full-length substrate. The N-terminal product (P product has diffused out and is replaced by a set of water molecules while the Q product is still held in the active site through hydrogen bonds. The position of WAT1, which hydrogen bonds to both the catalytic aspartates, is different from when there is no substrate bound in the active site. We propose WAT1 to be the position from where catalytic water attacks the scissile peptide bond. Comparison of structures of HIV-1 protease complexed with the same oligopeptide substrate, but at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.0 shows interesting changes in the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions from the catalytic aspartates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The structure is suggestive of the repositioning, during substrate binding, of the catalytic water for activation and subsequent nucleophilic attack. The structure could be a snap shot of the enzyme active site primed for the next round of catalysis. This structure further suggests that to achieve the goal of designing inhibitors mimicking the transition-state, the hydrogen-bonding pattern between WAT1 and the enzyme should be replicated.

  16. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Talia H.; Dubyak, George R.; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 30 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent antiretroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV-1 have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV-1 pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are ...

  17. HIV-1 p17 matrix protein interacts with heparan sulfate side chain of CD44v3, syndecan-2, and syndecan-4 proteoglycans expressed on human activated CD4+ T cells affecting tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Francesco, Maria A; Baronio, Manuela; Poiesi, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    HIV-1 p17 contains C- and N-terminal sequences with positively charged residues and a consensus cluster for heparin binding. We have previously demonstrated by affinity chromatography that HIV-1 p17 binds strongly to heparin-agarose at physiological pH and to human activated CD4(+) T cells. In this study we demonstrated that the viral protein binds to heparan sulfate side chains of syndecan-2, syndecan-4, and CD44v3 purified from HeLa cells and that these heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) co-localize with HIV-1 p17 on activated human CD4(+) T cells by confocal fluorescence analysis. Moreover, we observed a stimulatory or inhibitory activity when CD4(+) T cells were activated with mitogens together with nanomolar or micromolar concentrations of the matrix protein.

  18. 禹白附提取物抗HIV病毒的实验研究%Experimental study on anti-HIV activities with extract from tuber of Typhonium giganteum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温瑞兴; 马洪涛; 王晓艳; 王霞; 杨怡妹; 王小利

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of anti-HIV-1 virus with extracts from the tuber of Typhonium giganteum.so as to discover new and high efficient anti-HIV-1 leading compounds from natural prod-ucts and Chinese materia medica.Methods Extract from the tuber of T.giganteum was isolated and purifled by the way of phytochemistry,such as column chromatography.Then anti-HIV-1 activities of the extracts were assessed by in vitro method,MT4 cells and HIVⅢB virus were used for the experiment.The results were judged by cytopathic effect(CPE)method and p24 antigen assay method.Mechanism studies were carried out bv BIA techniques(BIACORE~(R)3000 molecule coupled equipment).Results The extracts of T. giganteum showed potential anti-HIV-1 activities.Two of them showed gp-41 transmembrance protein and Vif protein expression inhibition,respectively.Conclusion These extracts in the tuber of T.giganteum might rewardingly contribute to anti-HIV-1 activities,which could be developed to be more efficient and less toxic leading compounds in the further.%目的 研究白附子提取物抗HIV-1的作用,寻找新型高效的抗HIV-1中药先导化合物.方法 采用植物化学技术对禹白附进行提取分离,再通过细胞生物学方法 [细胞病变观察法(CPE)法和MTT法]检验提取物的抗HIV-1作用,并结合作用靶点的研究对提取物的作用机制进行探讨.结果 发现禹白附提取物具有很好的抗HIV-1作用,筛选出3个抗HIV-1作用显著的有效部位,其中两个有效部位的作用靶点分别为HIV-1的gp-41跨膜蛋白和Vif表达蛋白.结论 禹白附提取物具有很强的抗HIV-1作用,为进一步寻找高效低毒的抗HIV-1先导化合物奠定了基础,值得进行深入研究.

  19. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Arts, Eric J.; Hazuda, Daria J.

    2012-01-01

    The most significant advance in the medical management of HIV-1 infection has been the treatment of patients with antiviral drugs, which can suppress HIV-1 replication to undetectable levels. The discovery of HIV-1 as the causative agent of AIDS together with an ever-increasing understanding of the virus replication cycle have been instrumental in this effort by providing researchers with the knowledge and tools required to prosecute drug discovery efforts focused on targeted inhibition with ...

  20. Screening of Fungi from Chinese Medical Plants for Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to isolate anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents from natural products, 97 ethanolic extracts of 90 fungi were tested for their inhibitory activity on HIV-1. Most of the extracts tested were relatively non-toxic to human lymphocytic MT-4 cells, but extracts of some fungi exhibited potent anti-HIV activity in an in vitro 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay with a selectivity index greater than 3. Most fungi were isolated from Dendrobium sp. and Taxus sp.

  1. Impact of the terminal bulges of HIV-1 cTAR DNA on its stability and the destabilizing activity of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltz, Hervé; Azoulay, Joel; Bernacchi, Serena; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves

    2003-04-18

    Reverse transcription of HIV-1 genomic RNA to double-stranded DNA by reverse transcriptase (RT) is a critical step in HIV-1 replication. This process relies on two viral proteins, the RT enzyme and nucleocapsid protein NCp7 that has well documented nucleic acid chaperone properties. At the beginning of the linear DNA synthesis, the newly made minus-strand strong-stop DNA ((-)ssDNA) is transferred to the 3'end of the genomic RNA by means of an hybridization reaction between transactivation response element (TAR) RNA and cTAR DNA sequences. Since both TAR sequences exhibit stable hairpin structures, NCp7 needs to destabilize the TAR structures in order to chaperone their hybridization. To further characterize the relationships between TAR stability and NC-mediated destabilization, the role of the A(49) and G(52) bulged residues in cTAR DNA stability was investigated. The stability of cTAR and mutants where one or the two terminal bulges were replaced by base-pairs as well as the NCp7-mediated destabilization of these cTAR sequences were examined. Thermodynamic data indicate that the two bulges cooperatively destabilize cTAR by reducing the stacking interactions between the bases. This causes a free energy change of about 6.4 kcal/mol and seems to be critical for NC activity. Time-resolved fluorescence data of doubly labelled cTAR derivatives suggest that NC-mediated melting of cTAR ends propagates up to the 10C.A(44) mismatch or T(40) bulge. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation was also used to monitor cTAR ends fraying by NC. Results show that NC causes a very significant increase of cTAR ends fraying, probably limited to the terminal base-pair in the case of cTAR mutants. Since the TAR RNA and cTAR DNA bulges or mismatches appear well conserved among all HIV-1 strains, the present data support the notion of a co-evolutionary relationship between TAR and NC activity. PMID:12684000

  2. The naive CD4+ count in HIV-1-infected patients at time of initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy is strongly associated with the level of immunological recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, OG; Kirk, O; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt;

    2002-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy can induce considerable, sustained viral suppression followed by immunological recovery, in which naive CD4 + cells are important. Long-term immunological recovery was investigated during the first 3 y of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 210 HIV-1...... immunological recovery that can be obtained from treatment. Surprisingly, the naive CD4 + cell count tended to stabilize at a subnormal level after 18 months of HAART. This finding merits further investigation.......-infected patients. The focus was on the naive CD4 + cell time course and associations between naive CD4 + cell counts and established prognostic markers. Total and naive CD4 + cell counts were measured using flow cytometry. The HIV-RNA detection limit was 20 copies/ml. During 36 months of HAART, the total...

  3. CCR5:抗HIV-1药物的新靶点%CCR5, a New Target of Anti-HIV Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩燕星; 蒋建东

    2003-01-01

    CCR5为细胞膜蛋白,属于G蛋白偶联受体家族的成员,是HIV-1入侵机体细胞的主要辅助受体之一.在过去的几年中,对CCR5的生物学特性以及在HIV感染过程中所起作用的研究取得了明显的进展,以CCR5为靶点的HIV受体拮抗剂倍受关注,主要有以下4种:(1)趋化因子衍生物;(2)低分子量非肽类;(3)单克隆抗体;(4)肽类化合物.本文综述了近年来CCR5和以其为靶点的HIV受体拮抗剂的研究进展.

  4. Platelets and HIV-1 infection: old and new aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Donato; Pugliese, Agostino

    2008-09-01

    In this review we summarize the data on interaction of platelets with HIV-1 infection. Thrombocytopenia is a common finding among HIV-1 infected patients; several combined factors contribute to low peripheral platelet counts, which are present during all the stages of the disease. In addition, a relationship between platelet count, plasma viral load and disease progression has been reported, and this shows the potential influence platelets may have on the natural history of HIV-1 disease. Several lines of evidence have shown that platelets are an integral part of inflammation, and can be also potent effector cells of innate immune response as well as of adaptive immunity. Thus, we rewieved the role of inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines as activators of platelets during HIV-1 infection. Moreover, platelets show a direct interaction with HIV-1 itself, through different pathogenic mechanisms as binding, engulfment, internalisation of HIV-1, playing a role in host defence during HIV-1 infection, by limiting viral spread and probably by inactivating viral particles. Platelets may also play an intriguing role on endothelial dysfunction present in HIV-1 infection, and this topic begins to receive systematic study, inasmuch as interaction between platelets and endothelial cells is important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in HIV-1 infected patients, especially in those patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Finally, this review attempts to better define the state of this emerging issue, to focus areas of potential clinical relevance, and to suggest several directions for future research.

  5. Phenotypic Knockout of HIV-1 Chemokine Coreceptor CXCR4 and CCR5 by Intrakines for Blocking HIV-1 Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 张岩; 王平忠; 王九平; 黄长形; 孙永涛; 白雪帆

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the phenotypic knockout of HIV-1 chemokine coreceptor CXCR4 and CCR5 by intrakines and its inhibitory effect on HIV-1 infection. Primary human PBLs were transduced with the recombinant vector pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR), followed by anti-NGFR/anti-IgG-magnetic bead method selection and FCM detection. The transduced PBLs were infected with DP1 HIV-1 virus thereafter envelope-mediated syncytium formation and p24 detection were carried out to study the blockage of HIV-1 infection by co-inactivation of CCR5 and CXCR4. pLNCX-R-K-S-K (△NGFR)-transduced PBILs were isolated with an anti-NGFR/anti-IgG-magnetic bead method. After isolation, about 70% of the PBLs were positive for the NGFR marker. When the transduced PBLs were infected with DP1 HIV-1 virus, envelop-mediated syncytium formation was almost completely inhibited by pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR) transfection. Also, p24 antigen was very low in the cultures of pLNCX-R-K-S-K (△NGFR) transduced PBLs. pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR) transduction inhibited the production of DP1 p24 antigen by 15%, 43% and 19% on days 4, 7 and 10 respectively. The lymphocytes with the phenotypic knockout of CCR5 and CXCR4 could protect primary human PBLs from DP1 HIV-1 virus infection.

  6. Mechanism of action of the HIV-1 integrase inhibitory peptide LEDGF 361-370.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayouka, Zvi; Levin, Aviad; Maes, Michal; Hadas, Eran; Shalev, Deborah E; Volsky, David J; Loyter, Abraham; Friedler, Assaf

    2010-04-01

    The HIV-1 integrase protein (IN) mediates integration of the viral cDNA into the host genome and is a target for anti-HIV drugs. We have recently described a peptide derived from residues 361-370 of the IN cellular partner protein LEDGF/p75, which inhibited IN catalytic activity in vitro and HIV-1 replication in cells. Here we performed a comprehensive study of the LEDGF 361-370 mechanism of action in vitro, in cells and in vivo. Alanine scan, fluorescence anisotropy binding studies, homology modeling and NMR studies demonstrated that all residues in LEDGF 361-370 contribute to IN binding and inhibition. Kinetic studies in cells showed that LEDGF 361-370 specifically inhibited integration of viral cDNA. Thus, the full peptide was chosen for in vivo studies, in which it inhibited the production of HIV-1 RNA in mouse model. We conclude that the full LEDGF 361-370 peptide is a potent HIV-1 inhibitor and may be used for further development as an anti-HIV lead compound.

  7. Interplay between the RNA interference machinery and HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Schopman, N.C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Resistente infecties zijn lastig te behandelen. Nick Schopman onderzocht een verbeterde RNA-interferentie (RNAi)-gebaseerde anti-hiv-1 gentherapie. Dit kan in de toekomst leiden tot een nieuwe aanpak van de behandeling van resistente infecties. Schopman beschrijft een nieuw ontwerp van een RNAi-molecuul dat een aanzienlijke verbetering is ten opzichte van het huidige ontwerp. Verder bekeek hij de impact van hiv-1-infectie op RNAi in verschillende celtypes. Het ontrafelen van het RNAi-mechanis...

  8. Clinical experience of the 23-valent capsular polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccination in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chien-Ching; Chen, Mao-Yuan; Hsieh, Szu-Min; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sheng, Wang-Hwei; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2004-05-01

    To assess the impact of vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine on the risks for development of pneumococcal disease, all-cause community-acquired pneumonia, HIV progression, and mortality and immunologic and virologic responses among HIV-1-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), we conducted a 2-year prospective observational cohort study at a university hospital in Taiwan. A total of 305 HIV-1-infected patients who received 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (vaccinees) and 203 patients who did not (non-vaccinees) were prospectively observed between 1 June 2000 and 31 October 2002. Changes of CD4+ and plasma viral load (PVL) from baseline to week 4 of vaccination were assessed in 31 randomly selected vaccinees. The incidence of pneumococcal disease and bacteremia of vaccinees was 2.1 per 1000 patient-years (PY) (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.7-2.5 per 1000 PY) over the median observation of 641 days (range, 37-832 days) following vaccination while that of non-vaccinee was 21.8 per 1000 PY (95% CI, 20.1-23.7 per 1000 PY) and 7.3 per 1000 PY (95% CI, 7.0-7.6 per 1000 PY), respectively, over the observation of 500 days (range, 32-851 days), with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for developing pneumococcal disease of 0.085 (95% CI, 0.010-0.735) and for bacteremia of 0.22 (95% CI, 0.018-2.561). The median CD4+ count increased by 45 x 10(6) l(-1) (P = 0.01) and median PVL change was 0 log(10) copies/ml (range of decrease, -0.74 to 2.47 log(10) copies/ml) after 1 month of pneumococcal vaccination among the subgroup of 31 vaccinees receiving HAART. The median CD4+ count increase from baseline to the end of study was 149 x 10(6) l(-1) for vaccinees and 107 x 10(6) l(-1) for non-vaccinees (P = 0.21). The AOR of developing all-cause community-acquired pneumonia and new AIDS-defining opportunistic illnesses (OI) of vaccinees as compared to non-vaccinees was 1.876 (95% CI, 0.785-4.485) and 0.567 (95% CI, 0

  9. Discovery, characterization, and lead optimization of 7-azaindole non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Richard A; Lu, Xiao; Detorio, Mervi; Montero, Catherine; Hammond, Emily T; Ehteshami, Maryam; Domaoal, Robert A; Nettles, James H; Feraud, Michel; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2016-08-15

    A library of 585 compounds built off a 7-azaindole core was evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity, and ten hits emerged with submicromolar potency and therapeutic index >100. Of these, three were identified as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors and were assayed against relevant resistant mutants. Lead compound 8 inhibited RT with submicromolar potency (IC50=0.73μM) and also maintained some activity against the clinically important RT mutants K103N and Y181C (IC50=9.2, 3.5μM) in cell-free assays. Free energy perturbation guided lead optimization resulted in the development of a compound with a two-fold increase in potency against RT (IC50=0.36μM). These data highlight the discovery of a unique scaffold with the potential to move forward as next-generation anti-HIV-1 agents. PMID:27390064

  10. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wan; Qin, Yan; Bai, Lei [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Lan, Ke [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jian-Hua, E-mail: Jh_wang@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2013-06-05

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4{sup +} T cells.

  11. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4+ T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4+ T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4+ T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells

  12. Raltegravir with optimized background therapy for resistant HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steigbigel, Roy T; Cooper, David A; Kumar, Princy N;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raltegravir (MK-0518) is an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase active against HIV-1 susceptible or resistant to older antiretroviral drugs. METHODS: We conducted two identical trials in different geographic regions to evaluate the safety and efficacy of...

  13. A Novel Lectin with Antiproliferative and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities from Dried Fruiting Bodies of the Monkey Head Mushroom Hericium erinaceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanrui Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A lectin designated as Hericium erinaceum agglutinin (HEA was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Hericium erinaceum with a chromatographic procedure which entailed DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and FPLC Superdex 75. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 51 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequences was distinctly different from those of other isolated mushroom lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of HEA was inhibited at the minimum concentration of 12.5 mM by inulin. The lectin was stable at pH 1.9–12.1 and at temperatures up to 70∘C, but was inhibited by Hg2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ ions. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes, and demonstrated antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2 and breast cancer (MCF7 cells with an IC50 of 56.1 M and 76.5 M, respectively. It manifested HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 31.7 M. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes but was devoid of antifungal activity.

  14. Large-scale functional purification of recombinant HIV-1 capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdeleine Hung

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 virion maturation, capsid proteins undergo a major rearrangement to form a conical core that protects the viral nucleoprotein complexes. Mutations in the capsid sequence that alter the stability of the capsid core are deleterious to viral infectivity and replication. Recently, capsid assembly has become an attractive target for the development of a new generation of anti-retroviral agents. Drug screening efforts and subsequent structural and mechanistic studies require gram quantities of active, homogeneous and pure protein. Conventional means of laboratory purification of Escherichia coli expressed recombinant capsid protein rely on column chromatography steps that are not amenable to large-scale production. Here we present a function-based purification of wild-type and quadruple mutant capsid proteins, which relies on the inherent propensity of capsid protein to polymerize and depolymerize. This method does not require the packing of sizable chromatography columns and can generate double-digit gram quantities of functionally and biochemically well-behaved proteins with greater than 98% purity. We have used the purified capsid protein to characterize two known assembly inhibitors in our in-house developed polymerization assay and to measure their binding affinities. Our capsid purification procedure provides a robust method for purifying large quantities of a key protein in the HIV-1 life cycle, facilitating identification of the next generation anti-HIV agents.

  15. One of the immune activation profiles observed in HIV-1-infected adults with suppressed viremia is linked to metabolic syndrome: The ACTIVIH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psomas, Christina; Younas, Mehwish; Reynes, Christelle; Cezar, Renaud; Portalès, Pierre; Tuaillon, Edouard; Guigues, Adeline; Merle, Corinne; Atoui, Nadine; Fernandez, Céline; Le Moing, Vincent; Barbuat, Claudine; Marin, Grégory; Nagot, Nicolas; Sotto, Albert; Eliaou, Jean-François; Sabatier, Robert; Reynes, Jacques; Corbeau, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Immune activation in HIV-1-infected individuals is reduced under antiretroviral therapies, but persists, resulting in various morbidities. To better characterize this phenomenon, using a panel of 68 soluble and cell surface markers, we measured the level of activation in circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, monocytes, NK cells, polynuclear and endothelial cells as well as of inflammation and fibrinolysis in 120 virologic responders over 45years of age. As compared with age- and sex-matched uninfected individuals, we observed a persistence of activation in all the cell subpopulations analyzed, together with marks of inflammation and fibrinolysis. Two independent hierarchical clustering analyses allowed us to identify five clusters of markers that varied concurrently, and five patient groups, each with the same activation profile. The five groups of patients could be characterized by a marker of CD4+ T cell, CD8+ T cell, NK cell, monocyte activation or of inflammation, respectively. One of these profiles was strongly associated with marks of metabolic syndrome, particularly with hyperinsulinemia (OR 12.17 [95% CI 1.79-82.86], p=0.011). In conclusion, our study unveils biomarkers linked to metabolic syndrome that could be tested as predictive markers, and opens the way to new therapeutic approaches tailored to each patient group. PMID:27428436

  16. Estimating the Impact of Plasma HIV-1 RNA Reductions on Heterosexual HIV-1 Transmission Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Lingappa, Jairam R.; Hughes, James P.; Wang, Richard S.; BAETEN, Jared M.; Connie Celum; Gray, Glenda E.; Stevens, Wendy S.; Deborah Donnell; Campbell, Mary S.; Carey Farquhar; Essex, M.; Mullins, James I.; Coombs, Robert W.; Helen Rees; Lawrence Corey

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of sexual transmission of HIV-1 is strongly associated with the level of HIV-1 RNA in plasma making reduction in HIV-1 plasma levels an important target for HIV-1 prevention interventions. A quantitative understanding of the relationship of plasma HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 transmission risk could help predict the impact of candidate HIV-1 prevention interventions that operate by reducing plasma HIV-1 levels, such as antiretroviral therapy (ART), therapeutic vaccines, and other ...

  17. Rapid activity prediction of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: harnessing docking energetic components for empirical scoring by chemometric and artificial neural network approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangsunan, Patcharapong; Kittiwachana, Sila; Meepowpan, Puttinan; Kungwan, Nawee; Prangkio, Panchika; Hannongbua, Supa; Suree, Nuttee

    2016-06-01

    Improving performance of scoring functions for drug docking simulations is a challenging task in the modern discovery pipeline. Among various ways to enhance the efficiency of scoring function, tuning of energetic component approach is an attractive option that provides better predictions. Herein we present the first development of rapid and simple tuning models for predicting and scoring inhibitory activity of investigated ligands docked into catalytic core domain structures of HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme. We developed the models using all energetic terms obtained from flexible ligand-rigid receptor dockings by AutoDock4, followed by a data analysis using either partial least squares (PLS) or self-organizing maps (SOMs). The models were established using 66 and 64 ligands of mercaptobenzenesulfonamides for the PLS-based and the SOMs-based inhibitory activity predictions, respectively. The models were then evaluated for their predictability quality using closely related test compounds, as well as five different unrelated inhibitor test sets. Weighting constants for each energy term were also optimized, thus customizing the scoring function for this specific target protein. Root-mean-square error (RMSE) values between the predicted and the experimental inhibitory activities were determined to be rapid weighted energy tuning methods via PLS and SOMs analyses is a viable approach to predict the potential inhibitory activity and to discriminate among small drug-like molecules to target a specific protein of interest. PMID:27314501

  18. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. ► The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. ► In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1IIIB and HIV-1BaL as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1IIIB activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1IIIB and anti-HIV-1BaL activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, “phenotypic drug evaluation”, may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  19. Identification of an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120 influencing neutralization by anti-V3 antibodies and soluble CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Hemming, A; Bolmstedt, A;

    1994-01-01

    Glycosylation is necessary for HIV-1 gp120 to attain a functional conformation, and individual N-linked glycans of gp120 are important, but not essential, for replication of HIV-1 in cell culture. We have constructed a mutant HIV-1 infectious clone lacking a signal for N-linked glycosylation in the...... V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120. Lack of an N-linked glycan was verified by a mobility enhancement of mutant gp120 in SDS-gel electrophoresis. The mutated virus showed no differences in either gp120 content per infectious unit or infectivity, indicating that the N-linked glycan was neither essential nor...

  20. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  1. HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are substrates for the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein

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    Cara Andrea

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of diketoacid-containing derivatives as inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase (IN (IN inhibitors, IINs has played a major role in validating this enzyme as an important target for antiretroviral therapy. Since the in vivo efficacy depends on access of these drugs to intracellular sites where HIV-1 replicates, we determined whether the IINs are recognized by the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein (P-gp thereby reducing their intracellular accumulation. To address the effect of IINs on drug transport, nine quinolonyl diketo acid (DKA derivatives active on the HIV-1 IN strand transfer (ST step and with EC50 ranging from 1.83 to >50 μm in cell-based assays were tested for their in vitro interaction with P-gp in the CEM-MDR cell system. IINs were investigated for the inhibition and induction of the P-gp function and expression as well as for multidrug resistance (MDR reversing ability. Results The HIV-1 IINs act as genuine P-gp substrates by inhibiting doxorubicin efflux and inducing P-gp functional conformation changes as evaluated by the modulation of UIC2 mAb epitope. Further, IINs chemosensitize MDR cells to vinblastine and induce P-gp expression in drug sensitive revertants of CEM-MDR cells. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that HIV-1 IINs are P-gp substrates. This biological property may influence the absorption, distribution and elimination of these novels anti HIV-1 compounds.

  2. Thriving under Stress: Selective Translation of HIV-1 Structural Protein mRNA during Vpr-Mediated Impairment of eIF4E Translation Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Sharma; Alper Yilmaz; Kim Marsh; Alan Cochrane; Kathleen Boris-Lawrie

    2012-01-01

    Translation is a regulated process and is pivotal to proper cell growth and homeostasis. All retroviruses rely on the host translational machinery for viral protein synthesis and thus may be susceptible to its perturbation in response to stress, co-infection, and/or cell cycle arrest. HIV-1 infection arrests the cell cycle in the G2/M phase, potentially disrupting the regulation of host cell translation. In this study, we present evidence that HIV-1 infection downregulates translation in lymp...

  3. Impact of chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma on residual viremia and cellular HIV-1 DNA in patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

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    Anthony R Cillo

    Full Text Available The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20 pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0 post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical trials registration unique identifier: NCT00001137.

  4. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinand Roesch; Oussama Meziane; Anna Kula; Sébastien Nisole; Françoise Porrot; Ian Anderson; Fabrizio Mammano; Ariberto Fassati; Alessandro Marcello; Monsef Benkirane; Olivier Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    International audience HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively inve...

  5. The Antiviral Activity of Approved and Novel Drugs against HIV-1 Mutations Evaluated under the Consideration of Dose-Response Curve Slope.

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    Shuai Chang

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify common HIV-1 mutation complexes affecting the slope of inhibition curve, and to propose a new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope to evaluate phenotypic resistance.Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed 22 HIV-1 common mutation complexes. IC50 and slope of 10 representative approved drugs and a novel agent against these mutations were measured to determine the resistance phenotypes. The values of new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope of the inhibition curve were calculated, and the correlations between parameters were assessed.Depending on the class of drug, there were intrinsic differences in how the resistance mutations affected the drug parameters. All of the mutations resulted in large increases in the IC50s of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The effects of the mutations on the slope were the most apparent when examining their effects on the inhibition of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors. For example, some mutations, such as V82A, had no effect on IC50, but reduced the slope. We proposed a new concept, termed IIPatoxic, on the basis of IC50, slope and the maximum limiting concentrations of the drug. The IIPatoxic values of 10 approved drugs and 1 novel agent were calculated, and were closely related to the IIPmax values (r > 0.95, p < 0.001.This study confirms that resistance mutations cannot be accurately assessed by IC50 alone, because it tends to underestimate the degree of resistance. The slope parameter is of very importance in the measurement of drug resistance and the effect can be applied to more complex patterns of resistance. This is the most apparent when testing the effects of the mutations on protease inhibitors activity. We also propose a new index, IIPatoxic, which incorporates both the IC50 and the slope. This new index could complement current IIP indices, thereby enabling predict the

  6. HIV-1 Tat and HIV-associated Dementia%HIV-1Tat蛋白与艾滋病脑病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周勤华; 姚鑫; 惠斌

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 gene expression requires the transcriptional activator protein Tal of human immunodeficiency virus-1 ( HIV-1) , which stimulates viral transcript elongation. A significant number of people infected with the HIV develop neurologic complications. HIV-1-associated dementia( HAD) is a severe central nervous system(CNS) disorder neurologically induced by HIV-1. HAD represents the most severe form of HIV-related neuropsychiatric impairment and is characterized by motor dysfunction and impaired cognitions and behaviors. HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription( Tat) is an important factor in viral pathogenesis. The Tat protein not only drives the regulatory regions of the virus, but also might be actively released from the cells and then interacts with the cell surface receptors of other uninfected cells in the brain leading to cellular dysfunction. Growing evidence indicates that HIV-1 Tat protein play a major role in pathogenesis of HAD. This article reviewed the pleomorphic actions of Tat protein and the evidence supporting its central role in the neuropathogenesis of HAD.%Tat蛋白是HIV-1编码的反式转录激活因子,其主要功能是反式激活HIV-1病毒基因组转录的起始和延伸,启动病毒复制,近年来研究发现,Tat蛋白在HIV-1感染所引起的严重中枢神经系统(CNS)并发症——艾滋病脑病中起重要作用,是艾滋病脑病发生与发展的重要致病因子.本文就HIV-1 Tat蛋白在艾滋病脑病中的研究进展作一综述.

  7. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

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    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  8. α1Proteinase inhibitor regulates CD4+ lymphocyte levels and is rate limiting in HIV-1 disease.

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    Cynthia L Bristow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The regulation of adult stem cell migration through human hematopoietic tissue involves the chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 (CD184. In addition, human leukocyte elastase (HLE plays a key role. When HLE is located on the cell surface (HLE(CS, it acts not as a proteinase, but as a receptor for α(1proteinase inhibitor (α(1PI, α(1antitrypsin, SerpinA1. Binding of α(1PI to HLE(CS forms a motogenic complex. We previously demonstrated that α(1PI deficiency attends HIV-1 disease and that α(1PI augmentation produces increased numbers of immunocompetent circulating CD4(+ lymphocytes. Herein we investigated the mechanism underlying the α(1PI deficiency that attends HIV-1 infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Active α(1PI in HIV-1 subjects (median 17 µM, n = 35 was significantly below normal (median 36 µM, p220 CD4 cells/µl, CD4(+ lymphocytes were correlated solely with active α(1PI (r(2 = 0.93, p<0.0001, n = 26. The monoclonal anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody 3F5 present in HIV-1 patient blood is shown to bind and inactivate human α(1PI. Chimpanzee α(1PI differs from human α(1PI by a single amino acid within the 3F5-binding epitope. Unlike human α(1PI, chimpanzee α(1PI did not bind 3F5 or become depleted following HIV-1 challenge, consistent with the normal CD4(+ lymphocyte levels and benign syndrome of HIV-1 infected chimpanzees. The presence of IgG-α(1PI immune complexes correlated with decreased CD4(+ lymphocytes in HIV-1 subjects. CONCLUSIONS: This report identifies an autoimmune component of HIV-1 disease that can be overcome therapeutically. Importantly, results identify an achievable vaccine modification with the novel objective to protect against AIDS as opposed to the current objective to protect against HIV-1 infection.

  9. CD4 and MHC class I down-modulation activities of nef alleles from brain- and lymphoid tissue-derived primary HIV-1 isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Gabuzda, Dana; Cowley, Daniel; Ellett, Anne; Chiavaroli, Lisa; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 nef undergoes adaptive evolution in the CNS, reflecting altered requirements for HIV-1 replication in macrophages/microglia and brain-specific immune selection pressures. The role of Nef in HIV-1 neurotropism and the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is unclear. In this study, we characterized 82 nef alleles cloned from brain, CSF, spinal cord and blood/lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates from 7 subjects with HAD. CNS isolate-derived nef alleles were genetically compartmentalized and had reduced sequence diversity compared to those from lymphoid tissue isolates. Defective nef alleles predominated in a brain-derived isolate from one of the 7 subjects (MACS2-br). The ability of Nef to down-modulate CD4 and MHC class 1 (MHC-1) was generally conserved among nef alleles from both CNS and lymphoid tissues. However, the potency of CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation was variable, which was associated with sequence alterations known to influence these Nef functions. These results suggest that CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation are highly conserved functions among nef alleles from CNS- and lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates that may contribute to viral replication and escape from immune surveillance in the CNS. PMID:21165790

  10. Psoriasis patients are enriched for genetic variants that protect against HIV-1 disease.

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    Haoyan Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis.

  11. A new vinyl selenone-based domino approach to spirocyclopropyl oxindoles endowed with anti-HIV RT activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, M; Rossi, L; Sancineto, L; Tramontano, E; Corona, A; Bagnoli, L; Santi, C; Pannecouque, C; Tabarrini, O; Marini, F

    2016-02-14

    Herein, we disclose a general and flexible access to spirocyclopropyl oxindoles by a domino Michael/intramolecular nucleophilic substitution pathway with variously substituted vinyl selenones and enolizable oxindoles in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. The spirocyclopropyl oxindole being a privileged scaffold, some of the synthesized compounds were selected for biological evaluation. Compound showed selective anti-HIV-1 activity thanks to its ability to inhibit the reverse transcriptase.

  12. NKT cells in HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell population that have important immunoregulatory functions and have been shown to be involved in host immunity against a range of microorganisms. It also emerges that they might play a role in HIV-1 infection, and therefore be selectively depleted during the early stages of infection. Recent studies are reviewed regarding the dynamics of NKT depletion during HIV-I infection and their recovery under highly active antiretrovirai treatment (HAART). Possible mechanisms for these changes are proposed based on the recent developments in HIV pathogenesis. Further discussions are focused on HIV's disruption of NKT activation by downregulating CDId expression on antigen presentation cells (APC). HIV-1 protein Nefis found to play the major role by interrupting the intraceilular trafficking of nascent and recycling CDId molecules.

  13. Polymorphisms of CUL5 are associated with CD4+ T cell loss in HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ping; Duggal, Priya; Wang, Li Hua; O'Brien, Stephen J; Donfield, Sharyne; Goedert, James J; Phair, John; Buchbinder, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2007-01-26

    Human apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (Apobec3) antiretroviral factors cause hypermutation of proviral DNA leading to degradation or replication-incompetent HIV-1. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) suppresses Apobec3 activity through the Cullin 5-Elongin B-Elongin C E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We examined the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the CUL5 gene (encoding Cullin 5 protein) on AIDS disease progression in five HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts. A total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning 93 kb in the CUL5 locus were genotyped and their haplotypes inferred. A phylogenetic network analysis revealed that CUL5 haplotypes were grouped into two clusters of evolutionarily related haplotypes. Cox survival analysis and mixed effects models were used to assess time to AIDS outcomes and CD4(+) T cell trajectories, respectively. Relative to cluster I haplotypes, the collective cluster II haplotypes were associated with more rapid CD4(+) T cell loss (relative hazards [RH] = 1.47 and p = 0.009), in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mainly attributable to a single cluster II haplotype (Hap10) (RH = 2.49 and p = 0.00001), possibly due to differential nuclear protein-binding efficiencies of a Hap10-specifying SNP as indicated by a gel shift assay. Consistent effects were observed for CD4(+) T cell counts and HIV-1 viral load trajectories over time. The findings of both functional and genetic epidemiologic consequences of CUL5 polymorphism on CD4(+) T cell and HIV-1 levels point to a role for Cullin 5 in HIV-1 pathogenesis and suggest interference with the Vif-Cullin 5 pathway as a possible anti-HIV-1 therapeutic strategy. PMID:17257057

  14. Polymorphisms of CUL5 are associated with CD4+ T cell loss in HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Ping An

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (Apobec3 antiretroviral factors cause hypermutation of proviral DNA leading to degradation or replication-incompetent HIV-1. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif suppresses Apobec3 activity through the Cullin 5-Elongin B-Elongin C E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We examined the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the CUL5 gene (encoding Cullin 5 protein on AIDS disease progression in five HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts. A total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning 93 kb in the CUL5 locus were genotyped and their haplotypes inferred. A phylogenetic network analysis revealed that CUL5 haplotypes were grouped into two clusters of evolutionarily related haplotypes. Cox survival analysis and mixed effects models were used to assess time to AIDS outcomes and CD4(+ T cell trajectories, respectively. Relative to cluster I haplotypes, the collective cluster II haplotypes were associated with more rapid CD4(+ T cell loss (relative hazards [RH] = 1.47 and p = 0.009, in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mainly attributable to a single cluster II haplotype (Hap10 (RH = 2.49 and p = 0.00001, possibly due to differential nuclear protein-binding efficiencies of a Hap10-specifying SNP as indicated by a gel shift assay. Consistent effects were observed for CD4(+ T cell counts and HIV-1 viral load trajectories over time. The findings of both functional and genetic epidemiologic consequences of CUL5 polymorphism on CD4(+ T cell and HIV-1 levels point to a role for Cullin 5 in HIV-1 pathogenesis and suggest interference with the Vif-Cullin 5 pathway as a possible anti-HIV-1 therapeutic strategy.

  15. The thalidomide analogue CC-3052 inhibits HIV-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) expression in acutely and chronically infected cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Maestra, L; Zaninoni, A; Marriott, J B; Lazzarin, A; Dalgleish, A G; Barcellini, W

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effect of the water-soluble, highly stable thalidomide analogue CC-3052 on HIV-1 expression and TNF-α production in latently infected promonocytic U1 cells, acutely infected T cells and monocyte-derived human macrophages (MDM), and in mitogen-stimulated ex vivo cultures from patients with primary acute HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 expression was assessed by Northern blot analysis of RNAs, and ELISA for p24 antigen release and reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. TNF-α expression was evaluated by RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ELISA for mRNA and ELISA for protein secretion. We demonstrated that CC-3052 is able to inhibit HIV-1 expression, as evaluated by mRNA, p24 release and RT activity, in phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)- and cytokine-stimulated U1 cells. Furthermore, CC-3052 inhibited HIV-1 expression, as evaluated by p24 and RT activity, in acutely infected MDM and T cells. As far as TNF-α is concerned, CC-3052 significantly reduced TNF-α mRNA and protein secretion in PMA-stimulated U937 and U1 cells, and in PMA-stimulated uninfected and acutely infected MDM. Consistently, the addition of CC-3052 reduced TNF-α production in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood cultures from patients during the primary acute phase of HIV-1 infection. Since TNF-α is among the most potent enhancers of HIV-1 expression, the effect of CC-3052 on TNF-α may account for its inhibitory activity on HIV-1 expression. Given the well documented immunopathological role of TNF-α and its correlation with viral load, advanced disease and poor prognosis, CC-3052 could be an interesting drug for the design of therapeutic strategies in association with anti-retroviral agents. PMID:10606973

  16. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris L.

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    McCoy Joe-Ann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mint family (Lamiaceae produces a wide variety of constituents with medicinal properties. Several family members have been reported to have antiviral activity, including lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., sage (Salvia spp., peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L., basil (Ocimum spp. and self-heal (Prunella vulgaris L.. To further characterize the anti-lentiviral activities of Prunella vulgaris, water and ethanol extracts were tested for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection. Results Aqueous extracts contained more anti-viral activity than did ethanol extracts, displaying potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 at sub μg/mL concentrations with little to no cellular cytotoxicity at concentrations more than 100-fold higher. Time-of-addition studies demonstrated that aqueous extracts were effective when added during the first five hours following initiation of infection, suggesting that the botanical constituents were targeting entry events. Further analysis revealed that extracts inhibited both virus/cell interactions and post-binding events. While only 40% inhibition was maximally achieved in our virus/cell interaction studies, extract effectively blocked post-binding events at concentrations similar to those that blocked infection, suggesting that it was targeting of these latter steps that was most important for mediating inhibition of virus infectivity. Conclusions We demonstrate that aqueous P. vulgaris extracts inhibited HIV-1 infectivity. Our studies suggest that inhibition occurs primarily by interference of early, post-virion binding events. The ability of aqueous extracts to inhibit early events within the HIV life cycle suggests that these extracts, or purified constituents responsible for the antiviral activity, are promising microbicides and/or antivirals against HIV-1.

  17. Down-regulation of HIV-1 Infection by Inhibition of the MAPK Signaling Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Gong; Xi-hui Shen; Chao Chen; Hui Qiu; Rong-ge Yang

    2011-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1)can interact with and exploit the host cellular machinery to replicate and propagate itself.Numerous studies have shown that the Mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK)signal pathway can positively regulate the replication of HIV-1,but exactly how each MAPK pathway affects HIV-1 infection and replication is not understood.In this study,we used the Extracellular signal-regulated kinase(ERK)pathway inhibitor,PD98059,the Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK)pathway inhibitor,SP600125,and the p38 pathway inhibitor,SB203580,to investigate the roles of these pathways in HIV-1replication.We found that application of PD98059 results in a strong VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus and HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.In addition,SB203580 and SP600125 also elicited marked VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus inhibition activity but no HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.We also found that SB203580 and SP600125 can enhance the HIV-1 inhibition activity of PD98059when cells were treated with all three MAPK pathway inhibitors in combination.Finally,we show that HIV-1virus inhibition activity of the MAPK pathway inhibitors was the result of the negative regulation of HIV-1 LTR promoter activity.

  18. A Novel HIV-1 Therapeutic Target:Tat Transactivator protein%一个新的HIV-1治疗靶--Tat转录激活蛋白

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁伟; 王亚芹; DAVALIAN DARIUSH

    2004-01-01

    Tat is a HIV-1 transaction transcriptional activator protein and plays a pivotal role in viral replication and in several AIDS-associated pathologies. Its biological properties and functions make it as a good candidate for the development of an anti-AIDS vaccine and/or drug. Strategies designing vaccines and drugs for anti-AIDS include vaccines derived from Tat, extracellular Tat-binding antagonists, inhibitors of Tat-activated intracellular second messengers, anti-Tat antisense,anti-TAR antisense, decoy and antagonists, anti-Tat intracellular intrabody, inhibitors of intracellular Tat cofactors and so on. An effective anti-AIDS therapy will require a multi-targeted approach in which classic antiviral drugs and protease inhibitors are combined with novel extracellular and intracellular Tat antagonists. This approach could prevent the development of drug-resistant HIV strains and decrease the dosage and related toxicity of each single drug and lead to a cure for AIDS-associated pathologies.%Tat是HIV-1病毒进行转录和复制的一个十分重要的蛋白质,同时,Tat也与HIV-1感染引起的严重病理学程度密切相关.Tat的生物学性质和功能决定了其是一个理想的开发抗AIDS疫苗和药物的靶蛋白.基于Tat自身及其作用的TARRNA,可以设计Tat疫苗、细胞外结合Tat的拮抗剂、抗Tat的反义核酸、抗TAR的反义核酸、抗Tat的细胞内抗体和细胞内Tat协同因子的抑制剂等.传统的抗病毒药物及蛋白酶抑制剂与新的细胞内和细胞外Tat拮抗剂联合使用,多靶点地抑制HIV-1的复制将是一个有效的抗AIDS的治疗方案.这一治疗方案能够防止HIV病毒耐药株的产生,减少单一作用靶点药物的用药剂量和降低相应的毒性,最终治愈AIDS相关的病理学变化.

  19. HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected adults in early HIV-1 infection have elevated CD4+ T cell counts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Barbour

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: HIV-1 is often acquired in the presence of pre-existing co-infections, such as Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2. We examined the impact of HSV-2 status at the time of HIV-1 acquisition for its impact on subsequent clinical course, and total CD4+ T cell phenotypes. METHODS: We assessed the relationship of HSV-1/HSV-2 co-infection status on CD4+ T cell counts and HIV-1 RNA levels over time prior in a cohort of 186 treatment naïve adults identified during early HIV-1 infection. We assessed the activation and differentiation state of total CD4+ T cells at study entry by HSV-2 status. RESULTS: Of 186 recently HIV-1 infected persons, 101 (54% were sero-positive for HSV-2. There was no difference in initial CD8+ T cell count, or differences between the groups for age, gender, or race based on HSV-2 status. Persons with HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infection sustained higher CD4+ T cell counts over time (+69 cells/ul greater (SD = 33.7, p = 0.04 than those with HIV-1 infection alone (Figure 1, after adjustment for HIV-1 RNA levels (-57 cells per 1 log(10 higher HIV-1 RNA, p<0.0001. We did not observe a relationship between HSV-2 infection status with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels over time. HSV-2 acquisition after HIV-1 acquisition had no impact on CD4+ count or viral load. We did not detect differences in CD4+ T cell activation or differentiation state by HSV-2+ status. DISCUSSION: We observed no effect of HSV-2 status on viral load. However, we did observe that treatment naïve, recently HIV-1 infected adults co-infected with HSV-2+ at the time of HIV-1 acquisition had higher CD4+ T cell counts over time. If verified in other cohorts, this result poses a striking paradox, and its public health implications are not immediately clear.

  20. Fluorinated betulinic acid derivatives and evaluation of their anti-HIV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jizhen; Goto, Masuo; Yang, Xiaoming; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Huang, Li; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Several fluorinated derivatives of the anti-HIV maturation agent bevirimat (1) were synthesized and evaluated for anti-HIV replication activity. The modified positions were the C-2, C-3, C-28, and C-30 positions, either directly on the betulinic acid (2) skeleton or in the attached side chains. Compound 18, which has a trifluoromethyl group added to C-30 of its isopropenyl group, exhibited similar potency to 1 against HIV-1NL4-3. In total, our current studies support our prior conclusion that C-30 allylic modification is unlikely to be a pharmacophore for anti-HIV activity, but could be a meaningful route to manipulate other properties of 2-related compounds.

  1. Immune-correlates analysis of an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial reveals an association of nonspecific interferon-γ secretion with increased HIV-1 infection risk: a cohort-based modeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunda Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated risk of HIV-1 infection among recipients of an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5-vectored HIV-1 vaccine was previously reported in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial. We assessed pre-infection cellular immune responses measured at 4 weeks after the second vaccination to determine their roles in HIV-1 infection susceptibility among Step study male participants. METHODS: We examined ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using an ELISpot assay in 112 HIV-infected and 962 uninfected participants. In addition, we performed flow cytometric assays to examine T-cell activation, and ex vivo IFN-γ and interleukin-2 secretion from CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. We accounted for the sub-sampling design in Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs of HIV-1 infection per 1-log(e increase of the immune responses. FINDINGS: We found that HIV-specific immune responses were not associated with risk of HIV-1 infection. However, each 1-log(e increase of mock responses measured by the ELISpot assay (i.e., IFN-γ secretion in the absence of antigen-specific stimulation was associated with a 62% increase of HIV-1 infection risk among vaccine recipients (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: (1.28, 2.04, p<0.001. This association remains after accounting for CD4(+ or CD8(+ T-cell activation. We observed a moderate correlation between ELISpot mock responses and CD4(+ T-cells secreting IFN-γ (ρ = 0.33, p = 0.007. In addition, the effect of the Step vaccine on infection risk appeared to vary with ELISpot mock response levels, especially among participants who had pre-existing anti-Ad5 antibodies (interaction p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of cells, likely CD4(+ T-cells, producing IFN-γ without stimulation by exogenous antigen appears to carry information beyond T-cell activation and baseline characteristics that predict risk of HIV-1 infection. These results motivate additional investigation to

  2. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection.

  3. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:27056720

  4. HIV-1 Capsid Assembly Inhibitor (CAI) Peptide: Structural Preferences and Delivery into Human Embryonic Lung Cells and Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Klaus; Frank, Martin; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Reed, Jennifer; Spring, Herbert; Debus, Jürgen; Didinger, Bernd; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2008-01-01

    The Human immunodeficiency virus 1 derived capsid assembly inhibitor peptide (HIV-1 CAI-peptide) is a promising lead candidate for anti-HIV drug development. Its drawback, however, is that it cannot permeate cells directly. Here we report the transport of the pharmacologically active CAI-peptide into human lymphocytes and Human Embryonic Lung cells (HEL) using the BioShuttle platform. Generally, the transfer of pharmacologically active substances across membranes, demonstrated by confocal las...

  5. HIV-1 Capsid Assembly Inhibitor (CAI) Peptide: Structural Preferences and Delivery into Human Embryonic Lung Cells and Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus Braun, Martin Frank, Rüdiger Pipkorn, Jennifer Reed, Herbert Spring, Jürgen Debus, Bernd Didinger, Claus-Wilhelm von der Lieth, Manfred Wiessler, Waldemar Waldeck

    2008-01-01

    The Human immunodeficiency 1 derived capsid assembly inhibitor peptide (HIV-1 CAI-peptide) is a promising lead candidate for anti-HIV drug development. Its drawback, however, is that it cannot permeate cells directly. Here we report the transport of the pharmacologically active CAI-peptide into human lymphocytes and Human Embryonic Lung cells (HEL) using the BioShuttle platform. Generally, the transfer of pharmacologically active substances across membranes, demonstrated by confocal laser sca...

  6. High plasma levels of intact and cleaved soluble urokinase receptor reflect immune activation and are independent predictors of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Piironen, Timo; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High blood levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) (bulk measurement of 3-domain and 2-domain suPAR [suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III)], and suPAR(I-III) ligand complexes) strongly predict mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. This study in...

  7. High plasma levels of intact and cleaved soluble urokinase receptor reflect immune activation and are independent predictors of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Piironen, Timo; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla;

    2005-01-01

    High blood levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) (bulk measurement of 3-domain and 2-domain suPAR [suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III)], and suPAR(I-III) ligand complexes) strongly predict mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. This study investigated p...

  8. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  9. HIV-1 and T cell dynamics after interruption of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in patients with a history of sustained viral suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Richard T.; Bhat, Niranjan; Yoder, Christian; Chun, Tae-Wook; Metcalf, Julia A.; Dewar, Robin; Natarajan, Ven; Lempicki, Richard A.; Adelsberger, Joseph W.; Miller, Kirk D.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Polis, Michael A.; Walker, Robert E.; Falloon, Judith; Masur, Henry; Gee, Dennis; Baseler, Michael; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Fauci, Anthony S.; Lane, H. Clifford

    1999-01-01

    Identifying the immunologic and virologic consequences of discontinuing antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients is of major importance in developing long-term treatment strategies for patients with HIV-1 infection. We designed a trial to characterize these parameters after interruption of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in patients who had maintained prolonged viral suppression on antiretroviral drugs. Eighteen patients with CD4+ T cell counts ≥ 350 cells/μl and viral load below the limits of detection for ≥1 year while on HAART were enrolled prospectively in a trial in which HAART was discontinued. Twelve of these patients had received prior IL-2 therapy and had low frequencies of resting, latently infected CD4 cells. Viral load relapse to >50 copies/ml occurred in all 18 patients independent of prior IL-2 treatment, beginning most commonly during weeks 2–3 after cessation of HAART. The mean relapse rate constant was 0.45 (0.20 log10 copies) day−1, which was very similar to the mean viral clearance rate constant after drug resumption of 0.35 (0.15 log10 copies) day−1 (P = 0.28). One patient experienced a relapse delay to week 7. All patients except one experienced a relapse burden to >5,000 RNA copies/ml. Ex vivo labeling with BrdUrd showed that CD4 and CD8 cell turnover increased after withdrawal of HAART and correlated with viral load whereas lymphocyte turnover decreased after reinitiation of drug treatment. Virologic relapse occurs rapidly in patients who discontinue suppressive drug therapy, even in patients with a markedly diminished pool of resting, latently infected CD4+ T cells. PMID:10611346

  10. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Suppress HIV-1 Replication but Contribute to HIV-1 Induced Immunopathogenesis in Humanized Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Guangming Li; Menglan Cheng; Jun-Ichi Nunoya; Liang Cheng; Haitao Guo; Haisheng Yu; Yong-Jun Liu; Lishan Su; Liguo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I) induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were de...

  11. HIV-1, Methamphetamine and Astrocytes at Neuroinflammatory crossroads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen eBorgmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As a popular psychostimulant, methamphetamine (METH use leads to long-lasting, strong euphoric effects. While METH abuse is common in the general population, between 10-15% of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 patients report having abused METH. METH exacerbates the severity and onset of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND through direct and indirect mechanisms. Repetitive METH use decreases adherence to antiretroviral drug regimens, increasing the likelihood of HIV-1 disease progression towards AIDS. METH exposure also directly affects both innate and adaptive immunity, altering lymphocyte number and activity, cytokine signaling, phagocytic function, and CNS infiltration through the blood brain barrier. Further, METH triggers the neuronal dopamine reward pathway and leads to altered neuronal activity and direct toxicity. Concurrently, METH and HIV-1 alter the neuroimmune balance and induce neuroinflammation. Neuroinflammation modulates a wide range of brain functions including neuronal signaling and activity, glial activation, viral infection, oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Pathologically, glial activation is a hallmark of both HIV-1 and METH-associated neuroinflammation. Significant commonality exists in the neurotoxic mechanisms for both METH and HAND; however, the pathways dysregulated in astroglia during METH exposure are less clear. Thus alterations in astrocyte intracellular signaling pathways, gene expression and function during METH and HIV-1 comorbidity, neuroinflammation and HAND are carefully reviewed. Interventions targeting astrocytes in HAND and METH are presented as potential novel therapeutic approaches.

  12. Synergistic reduction of HIV-1 infectivity by 5-azacytidine and inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Roth, Megan E; Xie, Jiashu; Daly, Michele B; Clouser, Christine L; Landman, Sean R; Reilly, Cavan S; Bonnac, Laurent; Kim, Baek; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-06-01

    Although many compounds have been approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency type-1 (HIV-1) infection, additional anti-HIV-1 drugs (particularly those belonging to new drug classes) are still needed due to issues such as long-term drug-associated toxicities, transmission of drug-resistant variants, and development of multi-class resistance. Lethal mutagenesis represents an antiviral strategy that has not yet been clinically translated for HIV-1 and is based on the use of small molecules to induce excessive levels of deleterious mutations within the viral genome. Here, we show that 5-azacytidine (5-aza-C), a ribonucleoside analog that induces the lethal mutagenesis of HIV-1, and multiple inhibitors of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) interact in a synergistic fashion to more effectively reduce the infectivity of HIV-1. In these drug combinations, RNR inhibitors failed to significantly inhibit the conversion of 5-aza-C to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, suggesting that 5-aza-C acts primarily as a deoxyribonucleoside even in the presence of RNR inhibitors. The mechanism of antiviral synergy was further investigated for the combination of 5-aza-C and one specific RNR inhibitor, resveratrol, as this combination improved the selectivity index of 5-aza-C to the greatest extent. Antiviral synergy was found to be primarily due to the reduced accumulation of reverse transcription products rather than the enhancement of viral mutagenesis. To our knowledge, these observations represent the first demonstration of antiretroviral synergy between a ribonucleoside analog and RNR inhibitors, and encourage the development of additional ribonucleoside analogs and RNR inhibitors with improved antiretroviral activity. PMID:27117260

  13. 作用于HIV-1 gp120小分子HIV进入抑制剂NC-2的虚拟筛选及其作用机制%Virtual screening of small molecular HIV-1 entry inhibitor NC-2 targeting gp120 and its action mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段恒; 王玉芹; 宋德寿; 陈之朋; 裘佳寅; 陆路; 姜世勃; 刘叔文; 谭穗懿

    2013-01-01

    目的 基于中和抗体VRC01与HIV-1 gpl20的结合模式,利用计算机虚拟筛选,从IBS天然产物数据库中筛选靶向HIV-1gpl20的小分子HIV-l进入抑制剂,并对其抗病毒活性和机制进行研究.方法 运用MM-PBSA方法计算候选化合物与HIV-1gpl20结合后自由能的变化;利用HIV-1假病毒、活病毒技术及细胞融合实验,检测化合物抑制HIV-1感染的活性;XTT比色法检测化合物对细胞的毒性;采用酶联免疫吸附测定法(ELISA)研究化合物体外抗病毒活性的机理.结果 利用计算机从40 000个化合物中虚拟筛选出19个与gpl20结合后自由能降低较大的小分子化合物,其中NC-2具有抑制HIV-1感染和细胞融合的活性,其抑制HIV-1实验株ⅢB的IC50是1.95±0.44 μmol/L,抑制HIV-1JRFL假病毒的IC50是10.58±0.13 μrmol/L.酶联免疫吸附法结果表明NC-2体外能抑制HIV-1 gpl20与CD4的结合,但不抑制HIV-1 gp41六螺旋的形成.结论该计算机虚拟筛选的方法可为开发作用于HIV-1 gpl20的小分子进入抑制剂提供参考.同时,通过计算机辅助设计加病毒活性筛选的方法,得到一个新颖结构的HIV进入抑制剂NC-2.%Objective To screen the HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp120 from the IBS natural product database by virtual screening based on the binding mode of the neutralizing antibody VRC01 with HIV-1 gp120 and investigate the anti-viral activities of the inhibitors and their action mechanisms.Methods The binding interaction of the candidate molecules binding gp120 and changes of the binding free energy were analyzed by MM-PBSA calculation.The anti-HIV-1 activities of the tested compounds were detected by HIV-1 pseudotyped virus,laboratory-adapted HIV-1 and a cell-cell fusion assay.The cytotoxicity of the studied molecules was examined by XTT colorimetric assay.The mechanisms of the anti-viral activities of the candidate molecules were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results A total

  14. Interplay between the RNA interference machinery and HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.C.T. Schopman

    2012-01-01

    Resistente infecties zijn lastig te behandelen. Nick Schopman onderzocht een verbeterde RNA-interferentie (RNAi)-gebaseerde anti-hiv-1 gentherapie. Dit kan in de toekomst leiden tot een nieuwe aanpak van de behandeling van resistente infecties. Schopman beschrijft een nieuw ontwerp van een RNAi-mole

  15. MABGEL 1: first phase 1 trial of the anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 as a vaginal microbicide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina C Morris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs which potently neutralize a broad range of HIV isolates are potential microbicide candidates. To date, topical application of mAbs in humans and their stability in vaginal secretions has not been studied. OBJECTIVES: To assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of the mAbs 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 when applied vaginally in women. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 trial. METHODS: Twenty-eight healthy, sexually abstinent women administered 2.5 g of gel daily for 12 days containing either 10 or 20 mg/g of each mAb (MABGEL or placebo. Main clinical evaluations and sampling occurred at baseline, 1, 8, and 24 hours post-1st dose and 12 and 36 hours post-12th dose. RESULTS: After adjustment for dilution factors, median levels of 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12 in vaginal secretions at 1 hour post high-dose MABGEL were 7.74, 5.28 and 7.48 mg/ml respectively. Levels of 2F5 and 4E10 declined exponentially thereafter with similar estimated half-lives (4.6 and 4.3 hours. In contrast, 2G12 levels declined more rapidly in the first 8 hours, with an estimated half-life of 1.4 hours during this period. There was no evidence of systemic absorption. There were no significant differences in local or systemic adverse event rates or vaginal flora changes (by qPCR between active and placebo gel arms. Whilst at least 1 adverse event was recorded in 96% of participants, 95% were mild and none were serious. CONCLUSIONS: Vaginal application of 50 mg of each mAb daily was safe over a 12 day period. Median mAb concentrations detected at 8 hours post dose were potentially sufficient to block HIV transmission.2G12 exhibited more rapid elimination from the human vagina than 4E10 and 2F5, likely due to poor stability of 2G12 in acidic human vaginal secretions. Further research is needed to develop mAb-based vaginal microbicides and delivery systems. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN 64808733 UK CRN Portfolio 6470.

  16. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein activates transient melting of least stable parts of the secondary structure of TAR and its complementary sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, Serena; Stoylov, Stoyl; Piémont, Etienne; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard P; Darlix, Jean Luc; Mély, Yves

    2002-03-29

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 possesses a nucleic acid chaperone activity that is critical in minus and plus strand transfer during reverse transcription. The minus strand transfer notably relies on the ability of NCp7 to destabilize the stable stem with five contiguous, double-stranded segments of both the TAR sequence at the 3' end of the viral genome and the complementary sequence, cTAR, in minus strong-stop DNA. In order to examine the nature and the extent of NCp7 destabilizing activity, we investigated, by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, the interaction of TAR and cTAR with a (12-55)NCp7 peptide containing the zinc-finger motifs but lacking the ability to aggregate the oligonucleotides. The absorbance changes in the UV band of cTAR show that seven to eight base-pairs, on average, are melted per oligonucleotide at a ratio of one peptide to 7.5 nucleotides. In contrast, the melting of TAR does not exceed an average of one base-pair per oligonucleotide. This may be linked to the greater stability of TAR, since a strong correlation between NCp7 destabilizing effect and oligonucleotide stability was observed. The effect of (12-55)NCp7 on the stem terminus was investigated by using a cTAR molecule doubly labeled at the 3' and 5' ends by a donor/acceptor couple. In the absence of the peptide, about 80 % of the oligonucleotides are in a dark non-fluorescent state, having a close proximity of the two dyes. The remaining 20 % are distributed between three fluorescent species, having either the terminal segment, the two terminal segments or all segments of the stem melted. This is in line with a fraying mechanism wherein the stem terminus fluctuates rapidly between open and closed states. Addition of (12-55)NCp7 shifts the equilibrium toward the open species, suggesting that NC enhances fraying of the stem terminus. Taken together, our data suggest that NCp7 activates the transient opening of base-pairs in the least stable parts of the stem. Also

  17. 亲环素A与HIV-1的感染性%Cyclophilin A and infectivity of human immunodeficiency virus type-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳秋; 武建国

    2001-01-01

    Cyclophilin A(CyPA) is a cytoplasmic protein which binds to immunosuppressive drug—cyclosporin A and possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity. CyPA incorporated into virions through interactions with the Gag polyprotein in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) and its incorporation is essential for viral infectivity. This review discussed the function of CyPA in replication of HIV-1 virion and the usefulness of these studies for anti-HIV therapies.%亲环素A(CyPA)是免疫抑制药物环孢素A的受体,是胞质内一种具有肽基-脯氨酸顺/反异构酶活性的蛋白质。CyPA在HIV-1的生命周期中能掺入病毒颗粒,其掺入为HIV-1的感染性所必需。本文简要综述CyPA在HIV-1复制中的作用,以及这方面的研究对抗HIV-1治疗的意义。

  18. Morphogenesis of the infectious HIV-1 virion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ichi eSakuragi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The virion of HIV-1 is spherical and viral glycoprotein spikes (gp120, gp41 protrude from its envelope. The characteristic cone-shaped core exists within the virion, caging the ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex, which is comprised of viral RNA, nucleocapsid (NC and viral enzymes. The HIV-1 virion is budded and released from the infected cell as an immature donut-shaped particle. During or immediately after release, viral protease (PR is activated and subsequently processes the viral structural protein Gag. Through this maturation process, virions acquire infectivity, but its mechanism and transition of morphology largely remain unclear. Recent technological advances in experimental devices and techniques have made it possible to closely dissect the viral production site on the cell, the exterior – or even the interior – of an individual virion, and many new aspects on virion morphology and maturation. In this manuscript, I review the morphogenesis of HIV-1 virions. I focus on several studies, including some of our recent findings, which examined virion formation and/or maturation processes. The story of novel compound, which inhibits virion maturation, and the importance of maturation research are also discussed.

  19. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Amjad Ali; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected...

  20. Focus on Chirality of HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Famiglini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chiral HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are of great interest since one enantiomer is often more potent than the corresponding counterpart against the HIV-1 wild type (WT and the HIV-1 drug resistant mutant strains. This review exemplifies the various studies made to investigate the effect of chirality on the antiretroviral activity of top HIV-1 NNRTI compounds, such as nevirapine (NVP, efavirenz (EFV, alkynyl- and alkenylquinazolinone DuPont compounds (DPC, diarylpyrimidine (DAPY, dihydroalkyloxybenzyloxopyrimidine (DABO, phenethylthiazolylthiourea (PETT, indolylarylsulfone (IAS, arylphosphoindole (API and trifluoromethylated indole (TFMI The chiral separation, the enantiosynthesis, along with the biological properties of these HIV-1 NNRTIs, are discussed.

  1. IOPY/ISPY类HIV-1逆转录酶抑制剂的定量构效关系研究%Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship of IOPY/ISPY Analogues as HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱瑞新; 王飞; 刘琦; 康廷国

    2011-01-01

    C-5修饰的3-碘-4-芳氧基/芳硫基吡啶酮(IOPY/ISPY)类化合物是一类潜在的HIV-1非核苷类逆转录酶抑制剂,特别是这类化合物因具有同时抑制野生型和突变型病毒株的特性,而受到更加广泛的关注.首先利用两套2D通用描述符同时构建了该类化合物的线性和非线性定量构效关系模型.结果表明这些模型都具有较好的预测能力,并且非线性模型较线性模型预测能力更好些.为了更好、更形象地描述逆转录酶抑制剂的特征,进一步结合三维定量构效关系(3D-QSAR)模型,以及SAReport分析对该类化合物同时抑制野生型和突变型病%A series of C-5 modified 3-iodo-4-aryloxypyridinones(IOPY’s) and 3-iodo-4-arylthio-pyridinones(ISPY’s) serves as a potential class of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.These two pyridinone analogues are attracting more attentions mainly due to their potential abilities to si-multaneously inhibit wild type and mutant HIV-1 strains.In this study,two sets of traditional two-dimensional descriptors were applied respectively to create linear and binary QSAR models for these compounds.Our results indicated the well prediction ability of the obtained models.It is also indicated that binary model achieved a better prediction results than the linear one.Furthermore,in order to obtain a better description of the structure characteristics of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors,3D-QSAR models and SAReport analysis were used to explore the compound features which contribute to the inhibition of wild type as well as mutant HIV-1 strains.Our analysis reveals that there may existed three principles to follow when the compounds are modified:(i) the electrostatic potentials distribution of R-groups plays a key role in determining the biological activities of the compounds;(ii) an aromatic ring or aromatic heterocycle for R-groups is favorable to enhance the biological activity

  2. Negative Feedback Regulation of HIV-1 by Gene Editing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Salkind, Julian; Bella, Ramona; Young, Won-bin; Ferrante, Pasquale; Karn, Jonathan; Malcolm, Thomas; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method is comprised of the guide RNA (gRNA) to target a specific DNA sequence for cleavage and the Cas9 endonuclease for introducing breaks in the double-stranded DNA identified by the gRNA. Co-expression of both a multiplex of HIV-1-specific gRNAs and Cas9 in cells results in the modification and/or excision of the segment of viral DNA, leading to replication-defective virus. In this study, we have personalized the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by placing the gene encoding Cas9 under the control of a minimal promoter of HIV-1 that is activated by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We demonstrate that functional activation of CRISPR/Cas9 by Tat during the course of viral infection excises the designated segment of the integrated viral DNA and consequently suppresses viral expression. This strategy was also used in a latently infected CD4+ T-cell model after treatment with a variety of HIV-1 stimulating agents including PMA and TSA. Controlled expression of Cas9 by Tat offers a new strategy for safe implementation of the Cas9 technology for ablation of HIV-1 at a very early stage of HIV-1 replication during the course of the acute phase of infection and the reactivation of silent proviral DNA in latently infected cells. PMID:27528385

  3. Negative Feedback Regulation of HIV-1 by Gene Editing Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Salkind, Julian; Bella, Ramona; Young, Won-Bin; Ferrante, Pasquale; Karn, Jonathan; Malcolm, Thomas; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method is comprised of the guide RNA (gRNA) to target a specific DNA sequence for cleavage and the Cas9 endonuclease for introducing breaks in the double-stranded DNA identified by the gRNA. Co-expression of both a multiplex of HIV-1-specific gRNAs and Cas9 in cells results in the modification and/or excision of the segment of viral DNA, leading to replication-defective virus. In this study, we have personalized the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by placing the gene encoding Cas9 under the control of a minimal promoter of HIV-1 that is activated by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We demonstrate that functional activation of CRISPR/Cas9 by Tat during the course of viral infection excises the designated segment of the integrated viral DNA and consequently suppresses viral expression. This strategy was also used in a latently infected CD4+ T-cell model after treatment with a variety of HIV-1 stimulating agents including PMA and TSA. Controlled expression of Cas9 by Tat offers a new strategy for safe implementation of the Cas9 technology for ablation of HIV-1 at a very early stage of HIV-1 replication during the course of the acute phase of infection and the reactivation of silent proviral DNA in latently infected cells. PMID:27528385

  4. Screening of Potential HIV-1 Inhibitors/Replication Blockers Using Secure Lentiviral in Vitro System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Yanvarev, D V; Ivanov, A V; Novikov, M S; Stepanov, O A; Gottikh, M B; Kochetkov, S N; Fehse, B; Stocking, C; Prassolov, V S

    2011-10-01

    The development and usage of safe cell systems for testing agents which possess anti-HIV activity is a very important factor in the design of new drugs. We have described in detail a system we designed that is based on lentiviral vectors (Prokofjeva et. al.,Antiviral Therapy,in print) for swift and completely safe screening of potential HIV-1 replication inhibitors. The system enables one to test the efficiency of the inhibitory activity of compounds whose action is directed towards either wild-type HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or integrase, or mutant enzymes corresponding to the drug-resistant virus form. Testing results of a number of already known drugs, which correlate well with published data as well as data on newly synthesized compounds, were obtained. Application of this system substantially broadens the possibilities of preclinical anti-HIV drugs testing.

  5. A novel peptide that inhibits HIV-1 entry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong; HUANG Xiaoxing; WANG Qiong; YANG Yaling; TIAN Po; ZHANG Wentao

    2004-01-01

    @@ The global epidemic of HIV infection, the cause of AIDS, has created an urgent need for novel classes of antiretroviral agent. Besides reverse transcriptase and protease, the viral entry process provides new anti-HIV-1 targets. A new generation of antiviral drugs intended to block HIV entry into host cells is now under develop- ment[1]. These compounds are generally referred to as fusion or entry inhibitor. Several HIV-1 entry inhibitors that target CD4-gp120 interactions, co-receptor function, and gp41-mediated membrane fusion are in different stages of clinical development[2].

  6. Construction and characterization of a recombinant fowlpox virus containing HIV-1 multi-epitope-p24 chimeric gene in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The epidemic of HIV/AIDS is sweeping across the world. It is of great importance to figure out new ways to curb this disease. Epitope-based vaccine is one of these solutions. In this study, a chimeric gene was obtained by combination of a designed HIV-1 multi-epitope gene (MEG) and HIV-1 p24 gene. A re- combinant plasmid pUTA2-MEGp24 was then constructed by inserting MEGp24 gene into the down- stream of the promoter (ATI-P7.5×20) of fowlpox virus (FPV) transfer vector pUTA2. The recombinant plasmid and wild-type FPV 282E4 strain were then co-transfected into CEF cells and homologous re- combination occurred. A recombinant virus expressing HIV-1 protein MEGp24 was screened by ge- nome PCR and Western blot assay. Large scale preparation and purification of the recombinant fowl- pox virus (rFPV) were then carried out. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with the rFPV for three times on day 0, 14 and 42. Mice were executed and sampled one week after the third inoculation. Anti-HIV-1 antibody in serum and Th1 cytokines in the supernatant of cultured spleen cells were as- sayed by ELISA. The count of T lymphocyte subsets and the CTL activity of spleen lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, respectively. The results showed that HIV-1 specific antibody in serum and increased T lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ T, CD8+ T) were detected in the immunization group. CTL target-killing activity and higher secretion of Th1 cyto- kines (IFN-γ and IL-2) of spleen lymphocytes stimulated by H-2d-restricted CTL peptide were observed in immunized mice. We concluded that the rFPV may induce HIV-1 specific immunity especially cellular immunity in mice.

  7. Construction and characterization of a recombinant fowlpox virus containing HIV-1 multi-epitope-p24 chimeric gene in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LiShu; JIN NingYi; SONG YingJin; WANG Hong; MA HeWen; LI ZiJian; JIANG WenZheng

    2007-01-01

    The epidemic of HIV/AIDS is sweeping across the world. It is of great importance to figure out new ways to curb this disease. Epitope-based vaccine is one of these solutions. In this study, a chimeric gene was obtained by combination of a designed HIV-1 multi-epitope gene (MEG) and HIV-1 p24 gene. A recombinant plasmid pUTA2-MEGp24 was then constructed by inserting MEGp24 gene into the down-stream of the promoter (ATI-P7.5×20) of fowlpox virus (FPV) transfer vector pUTA2. The recombinant plasmid and wild-type FPV 282E4 strain were then co-transfected into CEF cells and homologous recombination occurred. A recombinant virus expressing HIV-1 protein MEGp24 was screened by genome PCR and Western blot assay. Large scale preparation and purification of the recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) were then carried out. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with the rFPV for three times on day 0, 14 and 42. Mice were executed and sampled one week after the third inoculation.Anti-HIV-1 antibody in serum and Th1 cytokines in the supernatant of cultured spleen cells were assayed by ELISA. The count of T lymphocyte subsets and the CTL activity of spleen lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, respectively. The results showed that HIV-1 specific antibody in serum and increased T lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ T, CD8+ T)were detected in the immunization group. CTL target-killing activity and higher secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-Y and IL-2) of spleen lymphocytes stimulated by H-2d-restricted CTL peptide were observed in immunized mice.We concluded that the rFPV may induce HIV-1 specific immunity especially cellular immunity in mice.

  8. The Novel Cyclophilin Inhibitor CPI-431-32 Concurrently Blocks HCV and HIV-1 Infections via a Similar Mechanism of Action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe A Gallay

    Full Text Available HCV-related liver disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients. Despite the recent advent of anti-HCV direct acting antivirals (DAAs, the treatment of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients remains a challenge, as these patients are refractory to most therapies and develop liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer more often than HCV mono-infected patients. Until the present study, there was no suitable in vitro assay to test the inhibitory activity of drugs on HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. Here we developed a novel in vitro "co-infection" model where HCV and HIV-1 concurrently replicate in their respective main host target cells--human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Using this co-culture model, we demonstrate that cyclophilin inhibitors (CypI, including a novel cyclosporin A (CsA analog, CPI-431-32, simultaneously inhibits replication of both HCV and HIV-1 when added pre- and post-infection. In contrast, the HIV-1 protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the HCV NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir only blocks the replication of a single virus in the "co-infection" system. CPI-431-32 efficiently inhibits HCV and HIV-1 variants, which are normally resistant to DAAs. CPI-431-32 is slightly, but consistently more efficacious than the most advanced clinically tested CypI--alisporivir (ALV--at interrupting an established HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. The superior antiviral efficacy of CPI-431-32 over ALV correlates with its higher potency inhibition of cyclophilin A (CypA isomerase activity and at preventing HCV NS5A-CypA and HIV-1 capsid-CypA interactions known to be vital for replication of the respective viruses. Moreover, we obtained evidence that CPI-431-32 prevents the cloaking of both the HIV-1 and HCV genomes from cellular sensors. Based on these results, CPI-431-32 has the potential, as a single agent or in combination with DAAs, to inhibit both HCV and HIV-1 infections.

  9. Association of HIV-1 Envelope-Specific Breast Milk IgA Responses with Reduced Risk of Postnatal Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollara, Justin; McGuire, Erin; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Rountree, Wes; Eudailey, Josh; Overman, R. Glenn; Seaton, Kelly E.; Deal, Aaron; Edwards, R. Whitney; Tegha, Gerald; Kamwendo, Deborah; Kumwenda, Jacob; Nelson, Julie A. E.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Ellington, Sascha; King, Caroline C.; Jamieson, Denise J.; van der Horst, Charles; Kourtis, Athena P.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers in resource-limited areas where replacement feeding is unsafe and impractical are repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 throughout breastfeeding. Despite this, the majority of infants do not contract HIV-1 postnatally, even in the absence of maternal antiretroviral therapy. This suggests that immune factors in breast milk of HIV-1-infected mothers help to limit vertical transmission. We compared the HIV-1 envelope-specific breast milk and plasma antibody responses of clade C HIV-1-infected postnatally transmitting and nontransmitting mothers in the control arm of the Malawi-based Breastfeeding Antiretrovirals and Nutrition Study using multivariable logistic regression modeling. We found no association between milk or plasma neutralization activity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, or HIV-1 envelope-specific IgG responses and postnatal transmission risk. While the envelope-specific breast milk and plasma IgA responses also did not reach significance in predicting postnatal transmission risk in the primary model after correction for multiple comparisons, subsequent exploratory analysis using two distinct assay methodologies demonstrated that the magnitudes of breast milk total and secretory IgA responses against a consensus HIV-1 envelope gp140 (B.con env03) were associated with reduced postnatal transmission risk. These results suggest a protective role for mucosal HIV-1 envelope-specific IgA responses in the context of postnatal virus transmission. This finding supports further investigations into the mechanisms by which mucosal IgA reduces risk of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk and into immune interventions aimed at enhancing this response. IMPORTANCE Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers are repeatedly exposed to the virus in breast milk. Remarkably, the transmission rate is low, suggesting that immune factors in the breast milk of HIV-1-infected mothers help to limit transmission. We compared the antibody

  10. Potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication by a Tat mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Luke W; Sivakumaran, Haran; Major, Lee; Suhrbier, Andreas; Harrich, David

    2009-11-10

    Herein we describe a mutant of the two-exon HIV-1 Tat protein, termed Nullbasic, that potently inhibits multiple steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Nullbasic was created by replacing the entire arginine-rich basic domain of wild type Tat with glycine/alanine residues. Like similarly mutated one-exon Tat mutants, Nullbasic exhibited transdominant negative effects on Tat-dependent transactivation. However, unlike previously reported mutants, we discovered that Nullbasic also strongly suppressed the expression of unspliced and singly-spliced viral mRNA, an activity likely caused by redistribution and thus functional inhibition of HIV-1 Rev. Furthermore, HIV-1 virion particles produced by cells expressing Nullbasic had severely reduced infectivity, a defect attributable to a reduced ability of the virions to undergo reverse transcription. Combination of these inhibitory effects on transactivation, Rev-dependent mRNA transport and reverse transcription meant that permissive cells constitutively expressing Nullbasic were highly resistant to a spreading infection by HIV-1. Nullbasic and its activities thus provide potential insights into the development of potent antiviral therapeutics that target multiple stages of HIV-1 infection.

  11. Potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication by a Tat mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke W Meredith

    Full Text Available Herein we describe a mutant of the two-exon HIV-1 Tat protein, termed Nullbasic, that potently inhibits multiple steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Nullbasic was created by replacing the entire arginine-rich basic domain of wild type Tat with glycine/alanine residues. Like similarly mutated one-exon Tat mutants, Nullbasic exhibited transdominant negative effects on Tat-dependent transactivation. However, unlike previously reported mutants, we discovered that Nullbasic also strongly suppressed the expression of unspliced and singly-spliced viral mRNA, an activity likely caused by redistribution and thus functional inhibition of HIV-1 Rev. Furthermore, HIV-1 virion particles produced by cells expressing Nullbasic had severely reduced infectivity, a defect attributable to a reduced ability of the virions to undergo reverse transcription. Combination of these inhibitory effects on transactivation, Rev-dependent mRNA transport and reverse transcription meant that permissive cells constitutively expressing Nullbasic were highly resistant to a spreading infection by HIV-1. Nullbasic and its activities thus provide potential insights into the development of potent antiviral therapeutics that target multiple stages of HIV-1 infection.

  12. Why Does the Molecular Structure of Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Individuals Infected with HIV-1 not Inform the Rational Design of an HIV-1 Vaccine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc H V Van Regenmortel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly assumed that neutralizing Mabs that bind to the HIV-1 Env glycoprotein are more specific reagents than anti-HIV-1 polyclonal antisera and that knowledge of the structure of these Mabs facilitates the rational design of effective HIV-1 vaccine immunogens. However, after more than ten years of unsuccessful experimentation using the structure-based reverse vaccinology approach, it is now evident that it is not possible to infer from the structure of neutralizing Mabs which HIV immunogens induced their formation nor which vaccine immunogens will elicit similar Abs in an immunized host. The use of Mabs for developing an HIV-1 vaccine was counterproductive because it overlooked the fact that the apparent specificity of a Mab very much depends on the selection procedure used to obtain it and also did not take into account that an antibody is never monospecific for a single epitope but is always polyspecific for many epitopes. When the rationale of the proponents of the unsuccessful rational design strategy is analyzed, it appears that investigators who claim they are designing a vaccine immunogen are only improving the binding reactivity of a single epitope-paratope pair and are not actually designing an immunogen able to generate protective antibodies. The task of a designer consists in imagining what type of immunogen is likely to elicit a protective immune response but in the absence of knowledge regarding which features of the immune system are responsible for producing a functional neutralizing activity in antibodies, it is not feasible to intentionally optimize a potential immunogen candidate in order to obtain the desired outcome. The only available option is actually to test possible solutions by trial-and-error experiments until the preset goal is perhaps attained. Rational design and empirical approaches in HIV vaccine research should thus not be opposed as alternative options since empirical testing is an integral part of a so

  13. Genotypic alteration of HAART-persistent HIV-1 reservoirs in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three HIV-1-infected individuals, on virally-suppressive highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), were treated in vivo with anti-retroviral inhibitor intensification and cell stimulatory therapies in attempting to eradicate latent viral reservoirs. Afterwards, the patients ceased all anti-retroviral drugs. Sequences of the V3 region of HIV-1 envelope protein (ENV) from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral DNA, patient blood plasma viral RNA and virion-associated RNA from viruses amplified by patient cell co-culture, were obtained before, during, and certain times after the clinical regimen. As anticipated, the V3 loop sequencing results indicate diversity in viral strain complexity among the individual patients. However, the detection of unique V3 ENV signature sequences or V3 signatures of low frequency, relative to those observed prior to therapy, indicate that the expression of specific viruses, or viruses of low abundance, can be induced through stimulation in vivo. Furthermore, this stimulation or general immune activation therapy (IAT) approach, consisting of administration of the anti-T-cell receptor antibody, OKT3, and IL-2 in vivo, appeared to have subsequently altered the genotype of the persistent viral reservoir in peripheral blood cells for two of the three patients

  14. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of New Fluoro-HEPT Analogues: An Investigation on Fluoro versus Hydroxy Substituents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard; Loddo, Roberta;

    2011-01-01

    Coupling of 6-benzyl-5-hydroxymethyluracil (1) with formaldehyde acetals followed by fluorination using (diethylamino)sulfur trifluoride (DAST) afforded 1-alkenyloxymethyl and 1-propargyloxymethyl 5-fluoromethyl-6-benzyluracils 3a-c. 6-(3,5-Dimethylbenzyl)-5-ethyl-1-[(2-fluoroethoxy)methyl]pyrimi...

  15. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherty Kathleen M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the

  16. Methylation: a regulator of HIV-1 replication?

    OpenAIRE

    Jeang Kuan-Teh; Yedavalli Venkat RK

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Recent characterizations of methyl transferases as regulators of cellular processes have spurred investigations into how methylation events might influence the HIV-1 life cycle. Emerging evidence suggests that protein-methylation can positively and negatively regulate HIV-1 replication. How DNA- and RNA- methylation might impact HIV-1 is also discussed.

  17. Diagnostik af HIV-1 infektionen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, C B; Dickmeiss, E; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    1991-01-01

    Different methods have been developed for the diagnosis of HIV infection, i.e. detection of antibodies, antigen and proviral DNA. ELISA methods for detecting HIV-1 antibodies are widely used as screening assays. A sample which is repeatedly positive with ELISA is re-tested with a confirmatory test......, e.g. western blot. Antibodies to HIV-1 are not detectable until 2-3 months after infection, but antigens may be detectable during the last weeks of this initial period, though they disappear with the appearance of the antibodies. In the later stages of HIV infection, HIV antigen is again detectable...... in a proportion of patients. Detection and quantitation of HIV antigen are used as indicators of disease progression and for monitoring the antiviral efficacy of therapeutic interventions. When no antibodies or antigens can be detected in persons suspected of having HIV infection, culture of HIV can be performed...

  18. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Extensive Cellular Reprogramming During HIV-1 Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcechowskyj, Jason A.; Didigu, Chuka A.; Lee, Jessica Y.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Sinha, Rohini; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Jensen, Shane T.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Doms, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Receptor engagement by HIV-1 during host cell entry activates signaling pathways that can reprogram the cell for optimal viral replication. To obtain a global view of the signaling events induced during HIV-1 entry, we conducted a quantitative phosphoproteomics screen of primary human CD4+ T cell after infection with an HIV-1 strain that engages the receptors CD4 and CXCR4. We quantified 1,757 phosphorylation sites with high stringency. The abundance of 239 phosphorylation sites from 175 genes, including several proteins in pathways known to be impacted by HIV-receptor binding, changed significantly within a minute after HIV-1 exposure. Several previously uncharacterized HIV-1 host factors were also identified and confirmed through RNAi depletion studies. Surprisingly, 5 serine/arginine-rich (SR)-proteins involved in mRNA splicing, including the splicing factor SRm300 (SRRM2) were differentially phosophorylated. Mechanistic studies with SRRM2 suggest that HIV-1 modulates host cell alternative splicing machinery during entry in order to facilitate virus replication and release. PMID:23684312

  19. Central HIV-1 Tat exposure elevates anxiety and fear conditioned responses of male mice concurrent with altered mu-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation and β-arrestin 2 activity in the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Yun K; Paris, Jason J; Lichtman, Aron H; Hauser, Kurt F; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Selley, Dana E; Knapp, Pamela E

    2016-08-01

    Co-exposure to opiates and HIV/HIV proteins results in enhanced CNS morphological and behavioral deficits in HIV(+) individuals and in animal models. Opiates with abuse liability, such as heroin and morphine, bind preferentially to and have pharmacological actions through μ-opioid-receptors (MORs). The mechanisms underlying opiate-HIV interactions are not understood. Exposure to the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein causes neurodegenerative outcomes that parallel many aspects of the human disease. We have also observed that in vivo exposure to Tat results in apparent changes in morphine efficacy, and thus have hypothesized that HIV proteins might alter MOR activation. To test our hypothesis, MOR-mediated G-protein activation was determined in neuroAIDS-relevant forebrain regions of transgenic mice with inducible CNS expression of HIV-1 Tat. G-protein activation was assessed by MOR agonist-stimulated [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) autoradiography in brain sections, and in concentration-effect curves of MOR agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in membranes isolated from specific brain regions. Comparative studies were done using the MOR-selective agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol]-enkephalin) and a more clinically relevant agonist, morphine. Tat exposure reduced MOR-mediated G-protein activation in an agonist, time, and regionally dependent manner. Levels of the GPCR regulatory protein β-arrestin-2, which is involved in MOR desensitization, were found to be elevated in only one affected brain region, the amygdala; amygdalar β-arrestin-2 also showed a significantly increased association with MOR by co-immunoprecipitation, suggesting decreased availability of MOR. Interestingly, this correlated with changes in anxiety and fear-conditioned extinction, behaviors that have substantial amygdalar input. We propose that HIV-1 Tat alters the intrinsic capacity of MOR to signal in response to agonist binding

  20. Dual anti-HIV mechanism of clofarabine

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Michele B.; Roth, Megan E.; Bonnac, Laurent; Maldonado, José O.; Xie, Jiashu; Clouser, Christine L; Patterson, Steven E.; Kim, Baek; Louis M. Mansky

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-1 replication kinetics inherently depends on the availability of cellular dNTPs for viral DNA synthesis. In activated CD4+ T cells and other rapidly dividing cells, the concentrations of dNTPs are high and HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs in an efficient manner. In contrast, nondividing cells such as macrophages have lower dNTP pools, which restricts efficient reverse transcription. Clofarabine is an FDA approved ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, which has shown potent anti...

  1. Selective elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by Env-directed, HIV-1-based virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently showed that both replicating and resting cells cultivated with ganciclovir (GCV) were killed when challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped HIV-1-based virus-like particles (VLPs) carrying the Nef7 (i.e., an HIV-1 Nef mutant incorporating in virions at high levels)/herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) fusion product. On this basis, a novel anti-HIV therapeutic approach based on Nef7/TK VLPs expressing X4 or R5 HIV cell receptor complexes has been attempted. We here report that (CD4-CXCR4) and (CD4-CCR5) Nef7-based VLPs efficiently enter cells infected by X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. Importantly, the delivery of the VLP-associated Nef7/TK led to cell death upon GCV treatment. Of interest, VLPs were effective also against non-replicating, HIV-1-infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV-targeted VLPs represent a promising candidate for the treatment of persistently HIV-1-infected cells that are part of virus reservoirs resistant to HAART therapies

  2. Ionic derivatives of betulinic acid as novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Holmes, Shaletha S; Baker, Gary A; Challa, Suresh; Bose, Himangshu S; Song, Zhiyan

    2012-10-01

    Betulinic acid is a natural product possessing abundant and favourable biological activity, including anti-cancer, anti-malarial, anti-inflammatory and anti-HIV properties, while causing minimal toxicity to unaffected cells. The full biological potency of betulinic acid cannot be fully unlocked, however, for a number of reasons, a primary one being its limited solubility in aqueous and biologically pertinent organic media. Aiming to improve the water solubility of betulinic acid without disrupting its structurally related bioactivity, we have prepared different ionic derivatives of betulinic acid. Inhibition bioassays on HIV-1 protease-catalysed peptide hydrolysis indicate significantly improved performance resulting from converting the betulinic acid to organic salt form. Indeed, for one particular cholinium-based derivative, its water solubility is improved more than 100 times and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value (22 μg mL(-1)) was one-third that of wide-type betulinic acid (60 μg mL(-1)). These encouraging results advise that additional studies of ionic betulinic acid derivatives as a therapeutic solution against HIV-1 infection are warranted.

  3. Rigidity analysis of HIV-1 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heal, J W [MOAC Doctoral Training Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Wells, S A; Jimenez-Roldan, E; Roemer, R A [Department of Physics and Centre for Scientific Computing, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Freedman, R F, E-mail: jack.heal@warwick.ac.uk [School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    We present a rigidity analysis on a large number of X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme HIV-1 protease using the 'pebble game' algorithm of the software FIRST. We find that although the rigidity profile remains similar across a comprehensive set of high resolution structures, the profile changes significantly in the presence of an inhibitor. Our study shows that the action of the inhibitors is to restrict the flexibility of the {beta}-hairpin flaps which allow access to the active site. The results are discussed in the context of full molecular dynamics simulations as well as data from NMR experiments.

  4. Predictors of attrition and immunological failure in HIV-1 patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy from different healthcare settings in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palladino

    Full Text Available In Mozambique, the evaluation of retention in HIV care and ART programmes is limited. To assess rate and predictors of attrition (no retention in care and HAART effectiveness in HIV-1 infected patients who pay for medication and laboratory testing in Mozambique, we conducted a multicenter survey of HIV-1-infected patients who started HAART during 2002-2006. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess risk of attrition and of therapy failure. Overall, 142 patients from 16 healthcare centers located in the capital city Maputo were followed-up for 22.2 months (12.1-46.7. The retention rate was 75%, 48% and 37% after one, two and three years, respectively. Risk of attrition was lower in patients with higher baseline CD4 count (P = 0.022 and attending healthcare center 1 (HCC1 (P = 0.013. The proportion of individuals with CD4 count ≤ 200 cells/µL was 55% (78/142 at baseline and decreased to 6% (3/52 at 36 months. Among the patients with available VL, 86% (64/74 achieved undetectable VL levels. The rate of immunologic failure was 17.2% (95% CI: 12.6-22.9 per 100 person-years. Risk of failure was associated to higher baseline CD4 count (P = 0.002, likely reflecting low adherence levels, and decreased with baseline VL ≥ 10,000 copies/mL (P = 0.033. These results suggest that HAART can be effective in HIV-1 infected patients from Mozambique that pay for their medication and laboratory testing. Further studies are required to identify the causes for low retention rates in patients with low CD4 counts and to better understand the association between healthcare setting and attrition rate.

  5. Clinical significance of HIV-1 coreceptor usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusso Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of phenotypically distinct HIV-1 variants with different prevalence during the progression of the disease has been one of the earliest discoveries in HIV-1 biology, but its relevance to AIDS pathogenesis remains only partially understood. The physiological basis for the phenotypic variability of HIV-1 was elucidated with the discovery of distinct coreceptors employed by the virus to infect susceptible cells. The role of the viral phenotype in the variable clinical course and treatment outcome of HIV-1 infection has been extensively investigated over the past two decades. In this review, we summarize the major findings on the clinical significance of the HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  6. Regional differences in prevalence of HIV-1 discordance in Africa and enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples into an HIV-1 prevention trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairam R Lingappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most HIV-1 transmission in Africa occurs among HIV-1-discordant couples (one partner HIV-1 infected and one uninfected who are unaware of their discordant HIV-1 serostatus. Given the high HIV-1 incidence among HIV-1 discordant couples and to assess efficacy of interventions for reducing HIV-1 transmission, HIV-1 discordant couples represent a critical target population for HIV-1 prevention interventions and prevention trials. Substantial regional differences exist in HIV-1 prevalence in Africa, but regional differences in HIV-1 discordance among African couples, has not previously been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Partners in Prevention HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Trial ("Partners HSV-2 Study", the first large HIV-1 prevention trial in Africa involving HIV-1 discordant couples, completed enrollment in May 2007. Partners HSV-2 Study recruitment data from 12 sites from East and Southern Africa were used to assess HIV-1 discordance among couples accessing couples HIV-1 counseling and testing, and to correlate with enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples. HIV-1 discordance at Partners HSV-2 Study sites ranged from 8-31% of couples tested from the community. Across all study sites and, among all couples with one HIV-1 infected partner, almost half (49% of couples were HIV-1 discordant. Site-specific monthly enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples into the clinical trial was not directly associated with prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, but was modestly correlated with national HIV-1 counseling and testing rates and access to palliative care/basic health care (r = 0.74, p = 0.09. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1 discordant couples are a critical target for HIV-1 prevention in Africa. In addition to community prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, national infrastructure for HIV-1 testing and healthcare delivery and effective community outreach strategies impact recruitment of HIV-1 discordant couples into HIV-1 prevention trials.

  7. Identification of an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120 influencing neutralization by anti-V3 antibodies and soluble CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Hemming, A; Bolmstedt, A;

    1994-01-01

    Glycosylation is necessary for HIV-1 gp120 to attain a functional conformation, and individual N-linked glycans of gp120 are important, but not essential, for replication of HIV-1 in cell culture. We have constructed a mutant HIV-1 infectious clone lacking a signal for N-linked glycosylation...... in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120. Lack of an N-linked glycan was verified by a mobility enhancement of mutant gp120 in SDS-gel electrophoresis. The mutated virus showed no differences in either gp120 content per infectious unit or infectivity, indicating that the N-linked glycan was neither essential nor...... affecting viral infectivity in cell culture. We found that the mutated virus lacking an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of gp120 was more resistant to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies to the V3-loop and neutralization by soluble recombinant CD4 (sCD4). Both viruses were equally well neutralized by Con...

  8. Estimating the impact of plasma HIV-1 RNA reductions on heterosexual HIV-1 transmission risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairam R Lingappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of sexual transmission of HIV-1 is strongly associated with the level of HIV-1 RNA in plasma making reduction in HIV-1 plasma levels an important target for HIV-1 prevention interventions. A quantitative understanding of the relationship of plasma HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 transmission risk could help predict the impact of candidate HIV-1 prevention interventions that operate by reducing plasma HIV-1 levels, such as antiretroviral therapy (ART, therapeutic vaccines, and other non-ART interventions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use prospective data collected from 2004 to 2008 in East and Southern African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to model the relationship of plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and heterosexual transmission risk with confirmation of HIV-1 transmission events by HIV-1 sequencing. The model is based on follow-up of 3381 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples over 5017 person-years encompassing 108 genetically-linked HIV-1 transmission events. HIV-1 transmission risk was 2.27 per 100 person-years with a log-linear relationship to log(10 plasma HIV-1 RNA. The model predicts that a decrease in average plasma HIV-1 RNA of 0.74 log(10 copies/mL (95% CI 0.60 to 0.97 reduces heterosexual transmission risk by 50%, regardless of the average starting plasma HIV-1 level in the population and independent of other HIV-1-related population characteristics. In a simulated population with a similar plasma HIV-1 RNA distribution the model estimates that 90% of overall HIV-1 infections averted by a 0.74 copies/mL reduction in plasma HIV-1 RNA could be achieved by targeting this reduction to the 58% of the cohort with plasma HIV-1 levels ≥4 log(10 copies/mL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This log-linear model of plasma HIV-1 levels and risk of sexual HIV-1 transmission may help estimate the impact on HIV-1 transmission and infections averted from candidate interventions that reduce plasma HIV-1 RNA levels.

  9. Why do HIV-1 and HIV-2 use different pathways to develop AZT resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 develops resistance to all available drugs, including the nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs such as AZT. ATP-mediated excision underlies the most common form of HIV-1 resistance to AZT. However, clinical data suggest that when HIV-2 is challenged with AZT, it usually accumulates resistance mutations that cause AZT resistance by reduced incorporation of AZTTP rather than selective excision of AZTMP. We compared the properties of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptase (RT in vitro. Although both RTs have similar levels of polymerase activity, HIV-1 RT more readily incorporates, and is more susceptible to, inhibition by AZTTP than is HIV-2 RT. Differences in the region around the polymerase active site could explain why HIV-2 RT incorporates AZTTP less efficiently than HIV-1 RT. HIV-1 RT is markedly more efficient at carrying out the excision reaction with ATP as the pyrophosphate donor than is HIV-2 RT. This suggests that HIV-1 RT has a better nascent ATP binding site than HIV-2 RT, making it easier for HIV-1 RT to develop a more effective ATP binding site by mutation. A comparison of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RT shows that there are numerous differences in the putative ATP binding sites that could explain why HIV-1 RT binds ATP more effectively. HIV-1 RT incorporates AZTTP more efficiently than does HIV-2 RT. However, HIV-1 RT is more efficient at ATP-mediated excision of AZTMP than is HIV-2 RT. Mutations in HIV-1 RT conferring AZT resistance tend to increase the efficiency of the ATP-mediated excision pathway, while mutations in HIV-2 RT conferring AZT resistance tend to increase the level of AZTTP exclusion from the polymerase active site. Thus, each RT usually chooses the pathway best suited to extend the properties of the respective wild-type enzymes.

  10. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruizhong Shen

    Full Text Available Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT. Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  11. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Om; Mason, Andrew; Luftig, Ronald B; Bautista, Abraham P

    2002-07-01

    Approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and it is likely that almost one in two of these subjects consumes alcohol. The majority of these patients suffer an accelerated course of liver disease as manifested by the onset of cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years of developing HCV infection, as well as an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is thought that chronic alcohol abuse mediates liver damage as a result of increased production of free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. In the setting of chronic HCV infection, alcohol ingestion has an additional effect of diminishing immune clearance and increasing viral burden to hasten the onset of cirrhosis and HCC. Likewise, chronic HCV and HIV-1 co-infection results in a net increase in HCV burden; higher prevalence rates of HCV transmission to sexual partners and offspring, as well as an accelerated progression to end stage liver disease as compared to individuals with HCV infection alone. Thus, the synergistic effects of alcohol abuse and HIV-1 greatly impact on the morbidity and mortality for patients with HCV coinfection. Ultimately, this cumulative disease process will require far more aggressive management with abstinence and counseling for alcohol abuse; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection and combination anti-viral therapy for HCV infection to stem the rapid progression to end stage liver disease. PMID:12086918

  12. German-austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy and in HIV1-exposed newborn - update 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchholz Bernd

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract German-Austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy - Update 2008 Bernd Buchholz (University Medical Centre Mannheim, Pediatric Clinic, Matthias Beichert (Mannheim, Gynecology and Obstetrics Practice, Ulrich Marcus (Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Thomas Grubert, Andrea Gingelmaier (Gynecology Clinic of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Dr. med. Annette Haberl (HIV-Department, J. W. Goethe-University Hospital, Frankfurt, Dr. med. Brigitte Schmied (Otto-Wagner Spital, Wien. In Germany during the last years about 200-250 HIV1-infected pregnant women delivered a baby each year, a number that is currently increasing. To determine the HIV-status early in pregnancy voluntary HIV-testing of all pregnant women is recommended in Germany and Austria as part of prenatal care. In those cases, where HIV1-infection was known during pregnancy, since 1995 the rate of vertical transmission of HIV1 was reduced to 1-2%. This low transmission rate has been achieved by the combination of anti-retroviral therapy of pregnant women, caesarean section scheduled before onset of labour, anti-retroviral post exposition prophylaxis in the newborn and refraining from breast-feeding by the HIV1-infected mother. To keep pace with new results in research, approval of new anti-retroviral drugs and changes in the general treatment recommendations for HIV1-infected adults, in 1998, 2001, 2003 and 2005 an interdisciplinary consensus meeting was held. Gynaecologists, infectious disease specialists, paediatricians, pharmacologists, virologists and members of the German AIDS Hilfe (NGO were participating in this conference to update the prevention strategies. A fifth update became necessary in 2008. The updating process was started in January 2008 and was terminated in September 2008. The guidelines provide new recommendations on the indication and the starting point for HIV-therapy in pregnancies without complications, drugs and drug combinations to be

  13. Enteric parasites in HIV-1/AIDS-infected patients from a Northwestern São Paulo reference unit in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ventura Cardoso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We describe the epidemiology of intestinal parasites in patients from an AIDS reference service in Northeastern São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Retrospective evaluation was done for all HIV-1/AIDS-positive patients whose Hospital de Base/São José do Rio Preto laboratorial analysis was positive for enteroparasites after diagnosis of HIV-1 infection, from January 1998 to December 2008. Statistical analysis was performed using the R statistical software version 2.4.1. The level of significance adopted was 5%. RESULTS: The most frequent protozoan was Isospora belli (4.2%, followed by Giardia lamblia (3.5%, Entamoeba coli (2.8%, and Cryptosporidium parvum (0.3%. Ancylostoma duodenale (1.4% was the most frequently detected helminth, while Taenia saginata and Strongiloides stercoralis were found in 0.7% of the samples. The results showed that diarrhea was significantly associated with giardiasis and isosporiasis. However, no association was observed between CD4+ cell counts, viral load, and the characteristics of any particular parasite. CONCLUSIONS: Our data may be useful for further comparisons with other Brazilian regions and other developing countries. The data may also provide important clues toward improving the understanding, prevention, and control of enteric parasites around the world.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity of mulberry (Morus alba L.) root bark

    OpenAIRE

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Park, Jae Ho; Park, Gwang Hun; Lee, Man Hyo; Lee, Jeong Rak; Koo, Jin Suk; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2014-01-01

    Background Root bark of mulberry (Morus alba L.) has been used in herbal medicine as anti-phlogistic, liver protective, kidney protective, hypotensive, diuretic, anti-cough and analgesic agent. However, the anti-cancer activity and the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of mulberry root bark have not been elucidated. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether mulberry root bark extract (MRBE) shows anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Methods In anti-inflammatory activity, NO was...

  15. Characterization of HIV-1 Resistance to Tenofovir Alafenamide In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot, Nicolas A; Johnson, Audun; Miller, Michael D; Callebaut, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) is an investigational prodrug of the HIV-1 nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NtRTI) tenofovir (TFV), with improved potency and drug delivery properties over the current prodrug, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). TAF is currently in phase 3 clinical studies for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, in combination with other antiretroviral agents. Phase 1 and 2 studies have shown that TAF was associated with increased peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) drug loading and increased suppression of HIV-1 replication compared to treatment with TDF. In this study, selection of in vitro resistance to both TAF and the parent compound, TFV, led to the emergence of HIV-1 with the K65R amino acid substitution in RT with 6.5-fold-reduced susceptibility to TAF. Although TAF is more potent than TFV in vitro, the antiviral susceptibilities to TAF and TFV of a large panel of nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitor (NRTI)-resistant mutants were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.97), indicating that the two compounds have virtually the same resistance profile when assessed as fold change from the wild type. TAF showed full antiviral activity in PBMCs against primary HIV-1 isolates with protease inhibitor, nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI), or integrase strand transfer inhibitor resistance but reduced activity against isolates with extensive NRTI resistance amino acid substitutions. However, the increased cell loading of TFV with TAF versus TDF observed in vivo suggests that TAF may retain activity against TDF-resistant mutant viruses. PMID:26149983

  16. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  17. Memory B cell antibodies to HIV-1 gp140 cloned from individuals infected with clade A and B viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Mouquet

    Full Text Available Understanding the antibody response to HIV-1 in humans that show broad neutralizing serologic activity is a crucial step in trying to reproduce such responses by vaccination. Investigating antibodies with cross clade reactivity is particularly important as these antibodies may target conserved epitopes on the HIV envelope gp160 protein. To this end we have used a clade B YU-2 gp140 trimeric antigen and single-cell antibody cloning methods to obtain 189 new anti-gp140 antibodies representing 51 independent B cell clones from the IgG memory B cells of 3 patients infected with HIV-1 clade A or B viruses and exhibiting broad neutralizing serologic activity. Our results support previous findings showing a diverse antibody response to HIV gp140 envelope protein, characterized by differentially expanded B-cell clones producing highly hypermutated antibodies with heterogenous gp140-specificity and neutralizing activity. In addition to their high-affinity binding to the HIV spike, the vast majority of the new anti-gp140 antibodies are also polyreactive. Although none of the new antibodies are as broad or potent as VRC01 or PG9, two clonally-related antibodies isolated from a clade A HIV-1 infected donor, directed against the gp120 variable loop 3, rank in the top 5% of the neutralizers identified in our large collection of 185 unique gp140-specific antibodies in terms of breadth and potency.

  18. In vivo functions of CPSF6 for HIV-1 as revealed by HIV-1 capsid evolution in HLA-B27-positive subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Henning

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The host protein CPSF6 possesses a domain that can interact with the HIV-1 capsid (CA protein. CPSF6 has been implicated in regulating HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, its functional significance for HIV-1 replication has yet to be firmly established. Here we provide evidence for two divergent functions of CPSF6 for HIV-1 replication in vivo. We demonstrate that endogenous CPSF6 exerts an inhibitory effect on naturally occurring HIV-1 variants in individuals carrying the HLA-B27 allele. Conversely, we find a strong selective pressure in these individuals to preserve CPSF6 binding, while escaping from the restrictive activity by CPSF6. This active maintenance of CPSF6 binding during HIV-1 CA evolution in vivo contrasts with the in vitro viral evolution, which can reduce CPSF6 binding to evade from CPSF6-mediated restriction. Thus, these observations argue for a beneficial role of CPSF6 for HIV-1 in vivo. CPSF6-mediated restriction renders HIV-1 less dependent or independent from TNPO3, RanBP2 and Nup153, host factors implicated in HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, viral evolution that maintains CPSF6 binding in HLA-B27+ subjects invariably restores the ability to utilize these host factors, which may be the major selective pressure for CPSF6 binding in vivo. Our study uncovers two opposing CA-dependent functions of CPSF6 in HIV-1 replication in vivo; however, the benefit for binding CPSF6 appears to outweigh the cost, providing support for a vital function of CPSF6 during HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  19. HIV-1 induces IL-10 production in human monocytes via a CD4-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jiaxiang; Sahu, Gautam K; Braciale, Vivian L; Cloyd, Miles W

    2005-06-01

    In HIV-infected patients, increased levels of IL-10, mainly produced by virally infected monocytes, were reported to be associated with impaired cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we investigated how HIV-1 induces IL-10 production in human monocytes. We found that CD14(+) monocytes infected by either HIV-1(213) (X4) or HIV-1(BaL) (R5) produced IL-10, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and to a lesser extent, IFN-gamma. However, the capacity of HIV-1 to induce these cytokines was not dependent on virus replication since UV-inactivated HIV-1 induced similar levels of these cytokines. In addition, soluble HIV-1 gp160 could induce CD14(+) monocytes to produce IL-10 but at lower levels. Cross-linking CD4 molecules (XLCD4) with anti-CD4 mAbs and goat anti-mouse IgG (GAM) resulted in high levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma but no IL-10 production by CD14(+) monocytes. Interestingly, neither anti-CD4 mAbs nor recombinant soluble CD4 (sCD4) receptor could block IL-10 secretion induced by HIV-1(213), HIV-1(BaL) or HIV-1 gp160 in CD14(+) monocytes, whereas anti-CD4 mAb or sCD4 almost completely blocked the secretion of the other cytokines. Furthermore, HIV-1(213) could induce IL-10 mRNA expression in CD14(+) monocytes while XLCD4 by anti-CD4 mAb and GAM failed to do so. As with IL-10 protein levels, HIV-1(213)-induced IL-10 mRNA expression in CD14(+) monocytes could not be inhibited by anti-CD4 mAb or sCD4. Taken together, HIV-1 binding to CD14(+) monocytes can induce CD4-independent IL-10 production at both mRNA and protein levels. This finding suggests that HIV induces the immunosuppressive IL-10 production in monocytes and is not dependent on CD4 molecules and that interference with HIV entry through CD4 molecules may have no impact on counteracting the effects of IL-10 during HIV infection. PMID:15937058

  20. Endocytosis of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) in astrocytes: a fiery path to its destination

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Ashok; Khandkar, Mehrab

    2014-01-01

    Despite successful suppression of peripheral HIV-1 infection by combination antiretroviral therapy, immune activation by residual virus in the brain leads to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). In the brain, several types of cells, including microglia, perivascular macrophage, and astrocytes have been reported to be infected by HIV-1. Astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, maintain homeostasis. The general consensus on HIV-1 infection in astrocytes is that it produces u...

  1. Quantifying Ongoing HIV-1 Exposure in HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples to Identify Individuals With Potential Host Resistance to HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Mackelprang, Romel D.; Jared M Baeten; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Farquhar, Carey; de Bruyn, Guy; Essex, Max; McElrath, M. Juliana; NAKKU-JOLOBA, Edith; Lingappa, Jairam R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunogenetic correlates of resistance to HIV-1 in HIV-1–exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals with consistently high exposure may inform HIV-1 prevention strategies. We developed a novel approach for quantifying HIV-1 exposure to identify individuals remaining HIV-1 uninfected despite persistent high exposure.

  2. HIV-1感染对NK细胞及其活化性受体CD226表达的影响%Induced abnormal activation receptor CD226 expression on the peripheral blood natural killer cells in HIV-1 infected individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶晓卉; 尚红; 马东初; 张子宁; 贾卫; 姜拥军; 金伯泉

    2003-01-01

    目的评价HIV-1感染对NK细胞以及CD226/PTA1表达的影响. 方法采用流式细胞术分析了27例HIV-1感染者以及16例健康献血员NK细胞相关膜抗原,用HIV-1SF33株体外感染外周血单个核细胞(PBMC),进行NK细胞活化表达CD226的动态观察. 结果 27例HIV-1感染者均处于无症状感染期,CD16+CD3-、CD8+CD3-细胞亚群百分率和绝对数均低于健康对照 (P<0.05),CD16+CD3-和CD8+CD3-细胞中表达CD226的细胞比例显著高于对照 (P<0.05).HIV-1和PHA均可体外诱导CD226在CD16+NK细胞表面高水平表达. 结论 CD226分子可能参与HIV-1感染诱导的NK细胞活化机制.

  3. SHIV-1157i and passaged progeny viruses encoding R5 HIV-1 clade C env cause AIDS in rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Siddappa Nagadenahalli B; Kramer Victor G; Chenine Agnès L; Sharma Prachi; Ong Helena; Song Ruijiang; Rasmussen Robert A; Humbert Michael; Xu Weidong; Else James G; Novembre Francis J; Strobert Elizabeth; O'Neil Shawn P; Ruprecht Ruth M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Infection of nonhuman primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strains is widely used to study lentiviral pathogenesis, antiviral immunity and the efficacy of AIDS vaccine candidates. SHIV challenges allow assessment of anti-HIV-1 envelope responses in primates. As such, SHIVs should mimic natural HIV-1 infection in humans and, to address the pandemic, encode HIV-1 Env components representing major viral subty...

  4. Role of semen in HIV-1 transmission: inhibitor or facilitator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncel, Gustavo F; Joseph, Theresa; Thurman, Andrea R

    2011-03-01

    Sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accounts for 60-90% of new infections, especially in developing countries. During male-to-female transmission, the virus is typically deposited in the vagina as cell-free and cell-associated virions carried by semen. But semen is more than just a carrier for HIV-1. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies supports both inhibitory and enhancing effects. Intrinsic antiviral activity mediated by cationic antimicrobial peptides, cytotoxicity, and blockage of HIV-dendritic cell interactions are seminal plasma properties that inhibit HIV-1 infection. On the contrary, neutralization of vaginal acidic pH, enhanced virus-target cell attachment by seminal amyloid fibrils, opsonization by complement fragments, and electrostatic interactions are factors that facilitate HIV-1 infection. The end result, i.e., inhibition or enhancement of HIV mucosal infection, in vivo, likely depends on the summation of all these biological effects. More research is needed, especially in animal models, to dissect the role of these factors and establish their relevance in HIV-1 transmission.

  5. Lack of adaptation to human tetherin in HIV-1 Group O and P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haworth Kevin G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 viruses are categorized into four distinct groups: M, N, O and P. Despite the same genomic organization, only the group M viruses are responsible for the world-wide pandemic of AIDS, suggesting better adaptation to human hosts. Previously, it has been reported that the group M Vpu protein is capable of both down-modulating CD4 and counteracting BST-2/tetherin restriction, while the group O Vpu cannot antagonize tetherin. This led us to investigate if group O, and the related group P viruses, possess functional anti-tetherin activities in Vpu or another viral protein, and to further map the residues required for group M Vpu to counteract human tetherin. Results We found a lack of activity against human tetherin for both the Vpu and Nef proteins from group O and P viruses. Furthermore, we found no evidence of anti-human tetherin activity in a fully infectious group O proviral clone, ruling out the possibility of an alternative anti-tetherin factor in this virus. Interestingly, an activity against primate tetherins was retained in the Nef proteins from both a group O and a group P virus. By making chimeras between a functional group M and non-functional group O Vpu protein, we were able to map the first 18 amino acids of group M Vpu as playing an essential role in the ability of the protein to antagonize human tetherin. We further demonstrated the importance of residue alanine-18 for the group M Vpu activity. This residue lies on a diagonal face of conserved alanines in the TM domain of the protein, and is necessary for specific Vpu-tetherin interactions. Conclusions The absence of human specific anti-tetherin activities in HIV-1 group O and P suggests a failure of these viruses to adapt to human hosts, which may have limited their spread.

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing HIV-1 gp41 Could Inhibit Env-Mediated Syncytium Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Geng; CHEN Yinghua

    2005-01-01

    Some monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) could inhibit infection by HIV-1. In this study, four mAbs against HIV-1 gp41 were prepared in mice. All four mAbs could bind to the recombinant soluble gp41 and recognize the native envelope glycoprotein gp160 expressed on the HIV-Env+ CHO-WT cell in flow cytometry analysis. Interestingly, the results show that all four mAbs purified by affinity chromatography could inhibit HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion (syncytium formation) by 40%-60% at 10 μg/mL, which implies potential inhibitory activities against HIV-1.

  7. Specific elimination of HIV-1 infected cells using Tat/Rev-dependent circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Perdigão, Pedro Ricardo Lucas, 1987-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Biologia Molecular e Genética). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2011 Despite the success of antiretroviral cocktails, a cure for HIV-1 remains elusive. This is mainly due to the existence of persistent cellular reservoirs infected with non-transcriptional, latent HIV-1. An effective treatment against HIV-1 would target both active and latent HIV-1-infected cells, and eliminate them without harming non-infected cells. In order to achieve this, we h...

  8. Human HERC5 restricts an early stage of HIV-1 assembly by a mechanism correlating with the ISGylation of Gag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Matthew W

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and characterization of several interferon (IFN-induced cellular HIV-1 restriction factors, defined as host cellular proteins or factors that restrict or inhibit the HIV-1 life cycle, have provided insight into the IFN response towards HIV-1 infection and identified new therapeutic targets for HIV-1 infection. To further characterize the mechanism underlying restriction of the late stages of HIV-1 replication, we assessed the ability of IFNbeta-induced genes to restrict HIV-1 Gag particle production and have identified a potentially novel host factor called HECT domain and RCC1-like domain-containing protein 5 (HERC5 that blocks a unique late stage of the HIV-1 life cycle. Results HERC5 inhibited the replication of HIV-1 over multiple rounds of infection and was found to target a late stage of HIV-1 particle production. The E3 ligase activity of HERC5 was required for blocking HIV-1 Gag particle production and correlated with the post-translational modification of Gag with ISG15. HERC5 interacted with HIV-1 Gag and did not alter trafficking of HIV-1 Gag to the plasma membrane. Electron microscopy revealed that the assembly of HIV-1 Gag particles was arrested at the plasma membrane, at an early stage of assembly. The mechanism of HERC5-induced restriction of HIV-1 particle production is distinct from the mechanism underlying HIV-1 restriction by the expression of ISG15 alone, which acts at a later step in particle release. Moreover, HERC5 restricted murine leukemia virus (MLV Gag particle production, showing that HERC5 is effective in restricting Gag particle production of an evolutionarily divergent retrovirus. Conclusions HERC5 represents a potential new host factor that blocks an early stage of retroviral Gag particle assembly. With no apparent HIV-1 protein that directly counteracts it, HERC5 may represent a new candidate for HIV/AIDS therapy.

  9. Expression, purification and characterization of a full-length recombinant HIV-1 Vpu from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njengele, Zikhona; Kleynhans, Ronel; Sayed, Yasien; Mosebi, Salerwe

    2016-12-01

    Vpu is one of four accessory proteins encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1). Vpu modulates the expression of several cellular restriction factors within the HIV-1 infected cell including CD4, CD74, the bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2) and NK-T-and-B antigen. The interaction of HIV-1 Vpu with these proteins interferes with the innate immune response directed against HIV-1; thereby promoting viral persistence. The involvement of HIV-1 Vpu in manipulating the cellular environment in ways that favor viral replication makes it an attractive target for anti-HIV drug intervention. This paper describes the over-expression and purification of a soluble HIV-1 Vpu from inclusion bodies by ion-exchange chromatography, allowing production of 6 mg of highly purified protein (>95% purity) per 10 mg of pelleted cells obtained from 1 L of bacterial culture. Far-UV circular dichroism showed that the recombinant protein is folded and retained its secondary structure. Moreover, using ELISA, known HIV-1 Vpu binding partners, BST-2 and CD74, showed that the refolded purified protein is functional or at least assumes a conformation that is capable of binding these putative binding partners. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the purification and successful solubilization of full-length, wild-type HIV-1 Vpu from inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. PMID:27590917

  10. Expression, purification and characterization of a full-length recombinant HIV-1 Vpu from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njengele, Zikhona; Kleynhans, Ronel; Sayed, Yasien; Mosebi, Salerwe

    2016-12-01

    Vpu is one of four accessory proteins encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1). Vpu modulates the expression of several cellular restriction factors within the HIV-1 infected cell including CD4, CD74, the bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2) and NK-T-and-B antigen. The interaction of HIV-1 Vpu with these proteins interferes with the innate immune response directed against HIV-1; thereby promoting viral persistence. The involvement of HIV-1 Vpu in manipulating the cellular environment in ways that favor viral replication makes it an attractive target for anti-HIV drug intervention. This paper describes the over-expression and purification of a soluble HIV-1 Vpu from inclusion bodies by ion-exchange chromatography, allowing production of 6 mg of highly purified protein (>95% purity) per 10 mg of pelleted cells obtained from 1 L of bacterial culture. Far-UV circular dichroism showed that the recombinant protein is folded and retained its secondary structure. Moreover, using ELISA, known HIV-1 Vpu binding partners, BST-2 and CD74, showed that the refolded purified protein is functional or at least assumes a conformation that is capable of binding these putative binding partners. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the purification and successful solubilization of full-length, wild-type HIV-1 Vpu from inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli.

  11. Dimeric 2G12 as a potent protection against HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin M Luo

    Full Text Available We previously showed that broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody 2G12 (human IgG1 naturally forms dimers that are more potent than monomeric 2G12 in in vitro neutralization of various strains of HIV-1. In this study, we have investigated the protective effects of monomeric versus dimeric 2G12 against HIV-1 infection in vivo using a humanized mouse model. Our results showed that passively transferred, purified 2G12 dimer is more potent than 2G12 monomer at preventing CD4 T cell loss and suppressing the increase of viral load following HIV-1 infection of humanized mice. Using humanized mice bearing IgG "backpack" tumors that provided 2G12 antibodies continuously, we found that a sustained dimer concentration of 5-25 µg/ml during the course of infection provides effective protection against HIV-1. Importantly, 2G12 dimer at this concentration does not favor mutations of the HIV-1 envelope that would cause the virus to completely escape 2G12 neutralization. We have therefore identified dimeric 2G12 as a potent prophylactic reagent against HIV-1 in vivo, which could be used as part of an antibody cocktail to prevent HIV-1 infection.

  12. SCREENING OF PLANTS FOR ANTI DERMATOPHYTE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Chauhan, A. Suthar, V. Naik and K. Salkar*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycotic infections of skin are caused by dermatophytes. Screening of plants for anti dermatophyte activity was carried out based on the literature search done. Native plants of Maharashtra (India were screened for anti dermatophyte activity. Various plant parts from different regions were collected and then extracted with three different solvents viz. alcohol, hydro-alcohol and aqueous. The obtained extracts were subjected for anti dermatophyte activity using agar-well diffusion technique. Three different concentrations of extract were checked for activity. Two species of dermatophytes, viz. - Trichophyton and Microsporum were used in the screening assay. Out of the twenty-eight plants screened by agar diffusion method, seven were found to be active with different activity profile. Methanol extract was the most active extract. Pterospermum suberifolium, Trachyspermum ammi, Peltaphorum pterocarpum, Ixora coccinia, Persicaria glabra, Terminallia elliptica and Cicca acida showed activity at different concentrations against the two species of dermatophytes. The data obtained can be used for further studying the anti dermatophyte potential of active plants.

  13. Heparin Alters Viral Serpin, Serp-1, Anti-Thrombolytic Activity to Anti-Thrombotic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xing; Schneider, Heather; Peters, Andrew; Macaulay, Colin; King, Elaine; Sun, Yunming; Liu, Liying; Dai, Erbin; Davids, Jennifer A; McFadden, Grant; Lucas, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) regulate coagulation and inflammation. Heparin, a glycosaminoglycan, is an important cofactor for modulation of the inhibitory function of mammalian serpins. The secreted myxoma viral serpin, Serp-1 exerts profound anti-inflammatory activity in a wide range of animal models. Serp-1 anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity is dependent upon inhibition of the uPA / uPA receptor thrombolytic complex. We demonstrate here that heparin binds to Serp-1 and...

  14. Human cellular restriction factors that target HIV-1 replication

    OpenAIRE

    Jeang Kuan-Teh; Luban Jeremy; Strebel Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent findings have highlighted roles played by innate cellular factors in restricting intracellular viral replication. In this review, we discuss in brief the activities of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme 3G (APOBEC3G), bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2), cyclophilin A, tripartite motif protein 5 alpha (Trim5α), and cellular microRNAs as examples of host restriction factors that target HIV-1. We point to countermeasures encoded by HIV-1 for moderating the potency of th...

  15. Liver Enzymes Abnormalities among Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Experienced and HAART Naïve HIV-1 Infected Patients at Debre Tabor Hospital, North West Ethiopia: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melashu Balew Shiferaw

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver disease has emerged as the most common non-AIDS-related cause of death in HIV patients. However, there is limited data regarding this condition including our setting in Ethiopia. Hence, liver enzyme abnormalities among highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART experienced and HAART naïve patients were assessed in this study. A total of 164 HAART experienced and 164 HAART naïve patients were studied. Blood specimen was collected to determine alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, CD4 count, and viral hepatitis. The prevalence of liver enzyme abnormality was 20.1% and 22.0% among HAART experienced and HAART naïve patients, respectively. The HAART experienced patients had higher mean ALT than HAART naïve patients (P=0.002. Viral hepatitis (AOR = 6.02; 95% CI = 1.87–19.39, opportunistic infections (AOR = 2.91; 95% CI = 1.04–8.19, current CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 (AOR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.06–4.39, and male sex (AOR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.001–3.33 were associated with elevated ALT and/or AST. In conclusion, liver enzyme abnormalities were high in both HAART experienced and HAART naïve HIV-1 infected patients. Hence, monitoring and management of liver enzyme abnormalities in HIV-1 infected patients are important in our setting.

  16. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev (Merck)

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  17. Structural basis for the inhibition of RNase H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by RNase H active site-directed inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G Sridhar; Smith, Robert F; Daniels, Christopher L; Abeywickrema, Pravien D; Reid, John C; Loughran, H Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J; Williams, Peter D; Darke, Paul L; Hazuda, Daria J; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-08-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  18. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Xu [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Mellon, Michael [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States);