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Sample records for anthropomorphic thorax phantom

  1. Development of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom for image quality control measurements in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the ionizing radiation brought by countless benefits to man. But they are associated to the current damages of radiation interaction with the body. Quality control programs of the diagnostic radiology equipment are based in the prevalence of the benefits above the damages. This program determines that tests should be done to guarantee the quality of the medical images, reducing the patients and workers absorbed doses and the cost. However, those tests cannot be made in people and it is on this moment that phantoms are used. Diagnostic radiology phantoms can be of several types, going from simple boxes to the exact representation in the human body, called anthropomorphic phantom. The aim of this study was to develop an anthropomorphic thorax phantom to be used in tests for image quality control measurements in diagnostic radiology and also for professionals' training for analysis of radiologic images. This simulator was made with natural human skeleton, heart and lungs, besides the thorax soft tissue were simulated using epoxy-resin tissue and a pair of lungs was made of foamed-polyurethane. (author)

  2. Assessing heterogeneity correction algorithms using the Radiological Physics Center's anthropomorphic thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) was established as a resource in radiation dosimetry and physics for cooperative clinical trial groups and radiotherapy facilities that deliver radiation treatments to patients entered onto cooperative group protocols. The RPC's primary responsibility is to assure NCI and the cooperative groups that the participating institutions deliver radiation treatments that are clinically comparable to those delivered by other institutions in the cooperative groups. One of the remote audit techniques used by the RPC to assure NCI is to credential institutions using its anthropomorphic phantoms, i.e. an end to end test from imaging to planning to final dose delivery as if the phantom were an actual patient. With the recent the implementation of several lung protocols requiring heterogeneity corrected target doses, the RPC, through its credentialing activities have evaluated numerous heterogeneity correction algorithms as used in various treatment planning systems. These systems include Elekta Pinnacle superposition convolution (SC) (adaptive convolve and collapsed cone) algorithms, Varian Eclipse pencil beam (PB) and AAA algorithms, TomoTherapy planning station SC, Accuray Multiplan PB and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, Nomos Corvus PB, CMS XiO SC, BrainLab PB and Elekta PrecisePlan Clarkson algorithm

  3. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  4. Measurement of Entrance Surface Dose on an Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom Using a Miniature Fiber-Optic Dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jae Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology.

  5. Effect of reconstruction methods and x-ray tube current–time product on nodule detection in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom: A crossed-modality JAFROC observer study

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, J D; Chakraborty, D. P.; Szczepura, K; Tootell, A K; Vamvakas, I.; Manning, D J; Hogg, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate nodule detection in an anthropomorphic chest phantom in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) and filtered back projection (FBP) over a range of tube current–time product (mAs). Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study: (i) an anthropomorphic chest phantom was loaded with spherical simulated nodules of 5, 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter and +100, −630, and −800 Hounsfield units electron density; this would gener...

  6. Development of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom for image quality control measurements in diagnostic radiology; Construcao de um objeto simulador antropomorfico de torax para medidas de controle da qualidade da imagem em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerqueira, Rafaela A.D.; Maia, Ana F., E-mail: rafaelatoff@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (DF/UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Conceicao, Bruno M.; Teixeira, Carlos H.C.; Mota, Cleber D.; Rodrigues, Tania M.A. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (DM/UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Morfologia

    2011-07-01

    The use of the ionizing radiation brought by countless benefits to man. But they are associated to the current damages of radiation interaction with the body. Quality control programs of the diagnostic radiology equipment are based in the prevalence of the benefits above the damages. This program determines that tests should be done to guarantee the quality of the medical images, reducing the patients and workers absorbed doses and the cost. However, those tests cannot be made in people and it is on this moment that phantoms are used. Diagnostic radiology phantoms can be of several types, going from simple boxes to the exact representation in the human body, called anthropomorphic phantom. The aim of this study was to develop an anthropomorphic thorax phantom to be used in tests for image quality control measurements in diagnostic radiology and also for professionals' training for analysis of radiologic images. This simulator was made with natural human skeleton, heart and lungs, besides the thorax soft tissue were simulated using epoxy-resin tissue and a pair of lungs was made of foamed-polyurethane. (author)

  7. Development of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom for image quality control measurements in diagnostic radiology; Construcao de um objeto simulador antropomorfico de torax para medidas de controle da qualidade de imagem em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerqueira, R.A.D.; Maia, A.F., E-mail: rafaelatoff@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Conceicao, B.M.; Teixeira, C.H.C.; Mota, C.D.; Rodrigues, T.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Morfologia

    2010-07-01

    The use of the ionizing radiation brought by countless benefits to man. But they are associated to the current damages of radiation interaction with the body. Quality control programs of the diagnostic radiology equipment are based in the prevalence of the benefits above the damages. This program determines that tests should be done to guarantee the quality of the medical images, reducing the patients and workers absorbed doses and the cost. However, those tests cannot be made in people and it is on this moment that phantoms are used. Diagnostic radiology phantoms can be of several types, going from simple boxes to the exact representation in the human body, called anthropomorphic phantom. The aim of this study was to develop an anthropomorphic thorax phantom to be used in tests for image quality control measurements in diagnostic radiology and also for professionals' training for analysis of radiologic images. This simulator was made with natural human skeleton, heart and lungs, besides the thorax soft tissue were simulated using epoxy-resin tissue and a pair of lungs was made of foamed-polyurethane. (author)

  8. A statistically defined anthropomorphic software breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms have emerged in the past decade because of recent advances in 3D breast x-ray imaging techniques. Computer phantoms in the literature have incorporated power-law noise to represent glandular tissue and branching structures to represent linear components such as ducts. When power-law noise is added to those phantoms in one piece, the simulated fibroglandular tissue is distributed randomly throughout the breast, resulting in dense tissue placement that may not be observed in a real breast. The authors describe a method for enhancing an existing digital anthropomorphic breast phantom by adding binarized power-law noise to a limited area of the breast. Methods: Phantoms with (0.5 mm)3 voxel size were generated using software developed by Bakic et al. Between 0% and 40% of adipose compartments in each phantom were replaced with binarized power-law noise (β = 3.0) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 volumetric glandular fraction. The phantoms were compressed to 7.5 cm thickness, then blurred using a 3 × 3 boxcar kernel and up-sampled to (0.1 mm)3 voxel size using trilinear interpolation. Following interpolation, the phantoms were adjusted for volumetric glandular fraction using global thresholding. Monoenergetic phantom projections were created, including quantum noise and simulated detector blur. Texture was quantified in the simulated projections using power-spectrum analysis to estimate the power-law exponent β from 25.6 × 25.6 mm2 regions of interest. Results: Phantoms were generated with total volumetric glandular fraction ranging from 3% to 24%. Values for β (averaged per projection view) were found to be between 2.67 and 3.73. Thus, the range of textures of the simulated breasts covers the textures observed in clinical images. Conclusions: Using these new techniques, digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms can be generated with a variety of glandular fractions and patterns. β values for this new phantom are comparable

  9. Automatic Synthesis of Anthropomorphic Pulmonary CT Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Carretero, Daniel; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Diaz Cacio, Mario; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The great density and structural complexity of pulmonary vessels and airways impose limitations on the generation of accurate reference standards, which are critical in training and in the validation of image processing methods for features such as pulmonary vessel segmentation or artery–vein (AV) separations. The design of synthetic computed tomography (CT) images of the lung could overcome these difficulties by providing a database of pseudorealistic cases in a constrained and controlled scenario where each part of the image is differentiated unequivocally. This work demonstrates a complete framework to generate computational anthropomorphic CT phantoms of the human lung automatically. Starting from biological and image-based knowledge about the topology and relationships between structures, the system is able to generate synthetic pulmonary arteries, veins, and airways using iterative growth methods that can be merged into a final simulated lung with realistic features. A dataset of 24 labeled anthropomorphic pulmonary CT phantoms were synthesized with the proposed system. Visual examination and quantitative measurements of intensity distributions, dispersion of structures and relationships between pulmonary air and blood flow systems show good correspondence between real and synthetic lungs (p > 0.05 with low Cohen’s d effect size and AUC values), supporting the potentiality of the tool and the usefulness of the generated phantoms in the biomedical image processing field. PMID:26731653

  10. Synthesized interstitial lung texture for use in anthropomorphic computational phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchetti, Marc F.; Solomon, Justin B.; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    A realistic model of the anatomical texture from the pulmonary interstitium was developed with the goal of extending the capability of anthropomorphic computational phantoms (e.g., XCAT, Duke University), allowing for more accurate image quality assessment. Contrast-enhanced, high dose, thorax images for a healthy patient from a clinical CT system (Discovery CT750HD, GE healthcare) with thin (0.625 mm) slices and filtered back- projection (FBP) were used to inform the model. The interstitium which gives rise to the texture was defined using 24 volumes of interest (VOIs). These VOIs were selected manually to avoid vasculature, bronchi, and bronchioles. A small scale Hessian-based line filter was applied to minimize the amount of partial-volumed supernumerary vessels and bronchioles within the VOIs. The texture in the VOIs was characterized using 8 Haralick and 13 gray-level run length features. A clustered lumpy background (CLB) model with added noise and blurring to match CT system was optimized to resemble the texture in the VOIs using a genetic algorithm with the Mahalanobis distance as a similarity metric between the texture features. The most similar CLB model was then used to generate the interstitial texture to fill the lung. The optimization improved the similarity by 45%. This will substantially enhance the capabilities of anthropomorphic computational phantoms, allowing for more realistic CT simulations.

  11. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers.

  12. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers. - Highlights: ► Two thyroid phantoms were developed (OSCT and OSAP) with different types of acrylics. ► Thyroid glands were represented anthropomorphically in the both phantoms. ► Different prototypes of thyroid were built of simulate healthy or unhealthy glands. ► Images indicate that anthropomorphic phantoms correctly simulate the thyroid gland

  13. Characterisation of an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dose measurements in radiology beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, L. M. S.; Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Santos, W. S.; Pereira, A. J. S.; Rodrigues, T. M. A.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dosimetric measurements of conventional radiology beams. This phantom was developed by a previous research project at the Federal University of Sergipe for image quality control tests. As the phantom consists of tissue-equivalent material, it is possible to characterise it for dosimetric studies. For comparison, a geometric chest phantom, consisting of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) with dimensions of 30×30×15 cm³ was used. Measurements of incident air kerma (Ki) and entrance surface dose (ESD) were performed using ionisation chambers. From the results, backscatter factors (BSFs) of the two phantoms were determined and compared with values estimated by CALDose_X software, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. For the technical parameters evaluated in this study, the ESD and BSF values obtained experimentally showed a good similarity between the two phantoms, with minimum and maximum difference of 0.2% and 7.0%, respectively, and showed good agreement with the results published in the literature. Organ doses and effective doses for the anthropomorphic phantom were also estimated by the determination of conversion coefficients (CCs) using the visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code. Therefore, the results of this study prove that the anthropomorphic thorax phantom proposed is a good tool to use in dosimetry and can be used for risk evaluation of X-ray diagnostic procedures.

  14. Application of GEANT4 radiation transport toolkit to dose calculations in anthropomorphic phantoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, P; Peralta, L; Alves, C; Chaves, A; Lopes, M C

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present the implementation of a dose calculation application, based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit. Validation studies were performed with an homogeneous water phantom and an Alderson--Rando anthropomorphic phantom both irradiated with high--energy photon beams produced by a clinical linear accelerator. As input, this tool requires computer tomography images for automatic codification of voxel based geometries and phase space distributions to characterize the incident radiation field. Simulation results were compared with ionization chamber, thermoluminescent dosimetry data and commercial treatment planning system calculations. In homogeneous water phantom, overall agreement with measurements were within 1--2%. For anthropomorphic simulated setups (thorax and head irradiation) mean differences between GEANT4 and TLD measurements were less than 2%. Significant differences between GEANT4 and a semi--analytical algorithm implemented in the treatment planning system, were found in low density ...

  15. Characterization of a novel anthropomorphic plastinated lung phantom

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Sungwon; Henry, Robert W.; Bouley, Donna M.; Bennett, N. Robert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    Phantoms are widely used during the development of new imaging systems and algorithms. For development and optimization of new imaging systems such as tomosynthesis, where conventional image quality metrics may not be applicable, a realistic phantom that can be used across imaging systems is desirable. A novel anthropomorphic lung phantom was developed by plastination of an actual pig lung. The plastinated phantom is characterized and compared with reference to in vivo images of the same tiss...

  16. Development of a physical 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Develop a technique to fabricate a 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom with known ground truth for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. Methods: The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying composition, size, and shape. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the portion of the voxel phantom consisting of the glandular tissue, skin, and Cooper's ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are then fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototyping using a single material with 50% glandular equivalence. The remaining adipose compartments are then filled using an epoxy-based resin (EBR) with 100% adipose equivalence. The phantom sections are stacked to form the physical anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The authors fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue, deformed to a 5 cm compressed thickness. Both the rapid prototype (RP) and EBR phantom materials are radiographically uniform. The coefficient of variation (CoV) of the relative attenuation between RP and EBR phantom samples was <1% and the CoV of the signal intensity within RP and EBR phantom samples was <1.5% on average. Digital mammography and reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images of the authors' phantom were reviewed by two radiologists; they reported that the images are similar in appearance to clinical images, noting there are still artifacts from air bubbles in the EBR. Conclusions: The authors have developed a technique to produce 3D anthropomorphic breast phantoms with known ground truth, yielding highly realistic x-ray images. Such phantoms may serve both qualitative and quantitative performance assessments for 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems.

  17. Characterization of a novel anthropomorphic plastinated lung phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sungwon; Henry, Robert W; Bouley, Donna M; Bennett, N Robert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2008-12-01

    Phantoms are widely used during the development of new imaging systems and algorithms. For development and optimization of new imaging systems such as tomosynthesis, where conventional image quality metrics may not be applicable, a realistic phantom that can be used across imaging systems is desirable. A novel anthropomorphic lung phantom was developed by plastination of an actual pig lung. The plastinated phantom is characterized and compared with reference to in vivo images of the same tissue prior to plastination using high resolution 3D CT. The phantom is stable over time and preserves the anatomical features and relative locations of the in vivo sample. The volumes for different tissue types in the phantom are comparable to the in vivo counterparts, and CT numbers for different tissue types fall within a clinically useful range. Based on the measured CT numbers, the phantom cardiac tissue experienced a 92% decrease in bulk density and the phantom pulmonary tissue experienced a 78% decrease in bulk density compared to their in vivo counterparts. By-products in the phantom from the room temperature vulcanizing silicone and plastination process are also identified. A second generation phantom, which eliminates most of the by-products, is presented. Such anthropomorphic phantoms can be used to evaluate a wide range of novel imaging systems. PMID:19175148

  18. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-07-01

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor's trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  19. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Rulon [Henry Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland 20817 (United States); Liacouras, Peter [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20899 (United States); Thomas, Andrew [ATC Healthcare, Washington, District of Columbia 20006 (United States); Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B. [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor’s trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  20. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor’s trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  1. Computational anthropomorphic phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: evolution and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models of human anatomy used in the calculation of radiation dose distribution in the human body upon exposure to a radiation source. Depending on the manner to represent human anatomy, they are categorized into two classes: stylized and tomographic phantoms. Stylized phantoms, which have mainly been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), describe human anatomy by using simple mathematical equations of analytical geometry. Several improved stylized phantoms such as male and female adults, pediatric series, and enhanced organ models have been developed following the first hermaphrodite adult stylized phantom, Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD)-5 phantom. Although stylized phantoms have significantly contributed to dosimetry calculation, they provide only approximations of the true anatomical features of the human body and the resulting organ dose distribution. An alternative class of computational phantom, the tomographic phantom, is based upon three-dimensional imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Computed Tomography (CT). The tomographic phantoms represent the human anatomy with a large number of voxels that are assigned tissue type and organ identity. To date, a total of around 30 tomographic phantoms including male and female adults, pediatric phantoms, and even a pregnant female, have been developed and utilized for realistic radiation dosimetry calculation. They are based on MRI/CT images or sectional color photos from patients, volunteers or cadavers. Several investigators have compared tomographic phantoms with stylized phantoms, and demonstrated the superiority of tomographic phantoms in terms of realistic anatomy and dosimetry calculation. This paper summarizes the history and current status of both stylized and tomographic phantoms, including Korean computational phantoms. Advantages, limitations, and future prospects are also discussed

  2. Optimized generation of high resolution breast anthropomorphic software phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The authors present an efficient method for generating anthropomorphic software breast phantoms with high spatial resolution. Employing the same region growing principles as in their previous algorithm for breast anatomy simulation, the present method has been optimized for computational complexity to allow for fast generation of the large number of phantoms required in virtual clinical trials of breast imaging. Methods: The new breast anatomy simulation method performs a direct calculation of the Cooper's ligaments (i.e., the borders between simulated adipose compartments). The calculation corresponds to quadratic decision boundaries of a maximum a posteriori classifier. The method is multiscale due to the use of octree-based recursive partitioning of the phantom volume. The method also provides user-control of the thickness of the simulated Cooper's ligaments and skin. Results: Using the proposed method, the authors have generated phantoms with voxel size in the range of (25-1000 μm)3/voxel. The power regression of the simulation time as a function of the reciprocal voxel size yielded a log-log slope of 1.95 (compared to a slope of 4.53 of our previous region growing algorithm). Conclusions: A new algorithm for computer simulation of breast anatomy has been proposed that allows for fast generation of high resolution anthropomorphic software phantoms.

  3. OSL Based Anthropomorphic Phantom and Real-Time Organ Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Hintenlang, Ph.D

    2009-02-10

    The overall objective of this project was the development of a dosimetry system that provides the direct measurement of organ does in real-time with a sensitivity that makes it an effective tool for applications in a wide variety of health physics applications. The system included the development of a real-time readout system for fiber optic coupled (FOC) dosimeters that is integrated with a state-of-art anthropomorphic phantom to provide instantaneous measures of organ doses throughout the phantom. The small size of the FOC detectors and optical fibers allow the sensitive volume of the detector to be located at organ centroids (or multiple locations distributed through the organ) within a tissue equivalent, anthropomorphic phantom without perturbing the tissue equivalent features of the phantom. The developed phantom/dosimetry system can be used in any environment where personnel may be exposed to gamma or x-ray radiations to provide the most accurate determinations of organ and effective doses possible to date.

  4. Optimized generation of high resolution breast anthropomorphic software phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R. [Computer and Information Sciences Department, Delaware State University, Dover, Delaware 19901 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The authors present an efficient method for generating anthropomorphic software breast phantoms with high spatial resolution. Employing the same region growing principles as in their previous algorithm for breast anatomy simulation, the present method has been optimized for computational complexity to allow for fast generation of the large number of phantoms required in virtual clinical trials of breast imaging. Methods: The new breast anatomy simulation method performs a direct calculation of the Cooper's ligaments (i.e., the borders between simulated adipose compartments). The calculation corresponds to quadratic decision boundaries of a maximum a posteriori classifier. The method is multiscale due to the use of octree-based recursive partitioning of the phantom volume. The method also provides user-control of the thickness of the simulated Cooper's ligaments and skin. Results: Using the proposed method, the authors have generated phantoms with voxel size in the range of (25-1000 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel. The power regression of the simulation time as a function of the reciprocal voxel size yielded a log-log slope of 1.95 (compared to a slope of 4.53 of our previous region growing algorithm). Conclusions: A new algorithm for computer simulation of breast anatomy has been proposed that allows for fast generation of high resolution anthropomorphic software phantoms.

  5. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  6. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2009-07-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  7. Experimental validation of a kV source model and dose computation method for CBCT imaging in an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental validation of a kilovoltage (kV) X-ray source characterization model in an anthropomorphic phantom to estimate patient-specific absorbed dose from kV cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging procedures and compare these doses to nominal weighted CT-dose index (CTDIw) dose estimates. We simulated the default Varian on-board imager 1.4 (OBI) default CBCT imaging protocols (i.e., standard-dose head, low-dose thorax, pelvis, and pelvis spotlight) using our previously developed and easy to implement X-ray point-source model and source characterization approach. We used this characterized source model to compute absorbed dose in homogeneous and anthropomorphic phantoms using our previously validated in-house kV dose computation software (kVDoseCalc). We compared these computed absorbed doses to doses derived from ionization chamber measurements acquired at several points in a homogeneous cylindrical phantom and from thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) placed in the anthropomorphic phantom. In the homogeneous cylindrical phantom, computed values of absorbed dose relative to the center of the phantom agreed with measured values within ≤2% of local dose, except in regions of high-dose gradient where the distance to agreement (DTA) was 2 mm. The computed absorbed dose in the anthropomorphic phantom generally agreed with TLD measurements, with an average percent dose difference ranging from 2.4% ± 6.0% to 5.7% ± 10.3%, depending on the characterized CBCT imaging protocol. The low-dose thorax and the standard dose scans showed the best and worst agreement, respectively. Our results also broadly agree with published values, which are approximately twice as high as the nominal CTDIw would suggest. The results demonstrate that our previously developed method for modeling and characterizing a kV X-ray source could be used to accurately assess patient-specific absorbed dose from kV CBCT procedures within reasonable accuracy, and serve as further

  8. Calcium scoring with dual-energy CT in men and women: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Liu, Songtao; Myers, Kyle; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to quantify and compare the potential impact of gender differences on coronary artery calcium scoring with dual-energy CT. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom with four synthetic heart vessels (diameter 3-4.5 mm: female/male left main and left circumflex artery) were scanned with and without female breast plates. Ten repeat scans were acquired in both single- and dual-energy modes and reconstructed at six reconstruction settings: two slice thicknesses (3 mm, 0.6 mm) and three reconstruction algorithms (FBP, IR3, IR5). Agatston and calcium volume scores were estimated from the reconstructed data using a segmentation-based approach. Total calcium score (summation of four vessels), and male/female calcium scores (summation of male/female vessels scanned in phantom without/with breast plates) were calculated accordingly. Both Agatston and calcium volume scores were found comparable between single- and dual-energy scans (Pearson r= 0.99, pimaging protocols for improved gender-specific calcium scoring.

  9. Organ shielding and doses in Low-Earth orbit calculated for spherical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther

    2013-08-01

    Humans in space are exposed to elevated levels of radiation compared to ground. Different sources contribute to the total exposure with galactic cosmic rays being the most important component. The application of numerical and anthropomorphic phantoms in simulations allows the estimation of dose rates from galactic cosmic rays in individual organs and whole body quantities such as the effective dose. The male and female reference phantoms defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the hermaphrodite numerical RANDO phantom are voxel implementations of anthropomorphic phantoms and contain all organs relevant for radiation risk assessment. These anthropomorphic phantoms together with a spherical water phantom were used in this work to translate the mean shielding of organs in the different anthropomorphic voxel phantoms into positions in the spherical phantom. This relation allows using a water sphere as surrogate for the anthropomorphic phantoms in both simulations and measurements. Moreover, using spherical phantoms in the calculation of radiation exposure offers great advantages over anthropomorphic phantoms in terms of computational time. In this work, the mean shielding of organs in the different voxel phantoms exposed to isotropic irradiation is presented as well as the corresponding depth in a water sphere. Dose rates for Low-Earth orbit from galactic cosmic rays during solar minimum conditions were calculated using the different phantoms and are compared to the results for a spherical water phantom in combination with the mean organ shielding. For the spherical water phantom the impact of different aluminium shielding between 1 g/cm2 and 100 g/cm2 was calculated. The dose equivalent rates were used to estimate the effective dose rate.

  10. Optimization of a protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy by using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Susie Medeiros Oliveira; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de, E-mail: susie@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Glavam, Adriana Pereira; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar [Clinica de Diagnostico Por Imagem (CDPI/DASA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: to develop a study aiming at optimizing myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods: imaging of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a GE SPECT Ventri gamma camera, with varied activities and acquisition times, in order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the quality of the reconstructed medical images. The {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi radiotracer was utilized, and then the images were clinically evaluated on the basis of data such as summed stress score, and on the technical image quality and perfusion. The software ImageJ was utilized in the data quantification. Results: the results demonstrated that for the standard acquisition time utilized in the procedure (15 seconds per angle), the injected activity could be reduced by 33.34%. Additionally, even if the standard scan time is reduced by 53.34% (7 seconds per angle), the standard injected activity could still be reduced by 16.67%, without impairing the image quality and the diagnostic reliability. Conclusion: the described method and respective results provide a basis for the development of a clinical trial of patients in an optimized protocol. (author)

  11. Optimization of a protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy by using an anthropomorphic phantom*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Susie Medeiros Oliveira; Glavam, Adriana Pereira; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar; de Sá, Lidia Vasconcellos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a study aiming at optimizing myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods Imaging of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a GE SPECT Ventri gamma camera, with varied activities and acquisition times, in order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the quality of the reconstructed medical images. The 99mTc-sestamibi radiotracer was utilized, and then the images were clinically evaluated on the basis of data such as summed stress score, and on the technical image quality and perfusion. The software ImageJ was utilized in the data quantification. Results The results demonstrated that for the standard acquisition time utilized in the procedure (15 seconds per angle), the injected activity could be reduced by 33.34%. Additionally, even if the standard scan time is reduced by 53.34% (7 seconds per angle), the standard injected activity could still be reduced by 16.67%, without impairing the image quality and the diagnostic reliability. Conclusion The described method and respective results provide a basis for the development of a clinical trial of patients in an optimized protocol. PMID:25741088

  12. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  13. Construction of a anthropomorphic phantom for dose measurement in hands in brachytherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work was to show the differences between the dose value measured by dosimeter endpoint and the values measured in different points inside the hand during brachytherapy procedures. For this, the procedures involved in the handling of sources were analyzed and the simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom hand

  14. Thorax; Thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanski, Michael; Dettmer, Sabine; Opherk, Jan Patrick; Ringe, Kristina [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Keberle, Marc [Bruederkrankenhaus St. Josef, Paderborn (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2010-07-01

    The book on thorax radiology covers the following topics: congenital diseases, respiratory system diseases, work-related diseases, infections, interstitial pneumonia, vascular diseases, immunological unclear diseases, bronchopulmonal neoplasm, lung diseases, mediastinum, thorax and pleura, thorax trauma, therapy consequences.

  15. Evaluation of an anthropomorphic male pelvic phantom for image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Schaly

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available B Schaly1, V Varchena2, P Au3, G Pang3,41Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Kitchener, ON, Canada; 2CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA, USA; 3Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Soft-tissue imaging in the treatment room is one of the main challenges faced today in high precision radiotherapy. The objective of this work is to evaluate a new anthropomorphic male pelvic phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA, USA that can be used in a radiotherapy department to assess the ability of an X-ray imaging system for imaging soft-tissue targets in the treatment room. To this end, we evaluated the tissue-equivalency of the phantom materials in terms of the linear attenuation and energy absorption coefficients. X-ray computed tomography (CT images of the phantom were also obtained and compared with that of patients. Our results demonstrated that the male pelvic phantom is a good representation of actual prostate cancer patients and can be a valuable tool for image-guided radiotherapy. Keywords: image-guided radiotherapy, X-ray imaging, anthropomorphic phantomPACS numbers: 87.56.Fc, 87.59.bd, 87.85.Lf

  16. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Taynna Vernalha Rocha [Faculdades Pequeno Principe (FPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Cordova Junior, Arno Lotar; Almeida, Cristiane Maria; Piedade, Pedro Argolo; Silva, Cintia Mara da, E-mail: taynnavra@gmail.com [Centro de Radioterapia Sao Sebastiao, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Brincas, Gabriela R. Baseggio [Centro de Diagnostico Medico Imagem, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Marins, Priscila; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5- mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results: For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. (author)

  17. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Taynná Vernalha Rocha; Cordova Junior, Arno Lotar; Piedade, Pedro Argolo; da Silva, Cintia Mara; Marins, Priscila; Almeida, Cristiane Maria; Brincas, Gabriela R. Baseggio; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. PMID:27141132

  18. A second generation of physical anthropomorphic 3D breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Adam; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-03-01

    Previous fabrication of anthropomorphic breast phantoms has demonstrated their viability as a model for 2D (mammography) and 3D (tomosynthesis) breast imaging systems. Further development of these models will be essential for the evaluation of breast x-ray systems. There is also the potential to use them as the ground truth in virtual clinical trials. The first generation of phantoms was segmented from human subject dedicated breast computed tomography data and fabricated into physical models using highresolution 3D printing. Two variations were made. The first was a multi-material model (doublet) printed with two photopolymers to represent glandular and adipose tissues with the greatest physical contrast available, mimicking 75% and 35% glandular tissue. The second model was printed with a single 75% glandular equivalent photopolymer (singlet) to represent glandular tissue, which can be filled independently with an adipose-equivalent material such as oil. For this study, we have focused on improving the latter, the singlet phantom. First, the temporary oil filler has been replaced with a permanent adipose-equivalent urethane-based polymer. This offers more realistic contrast as compared to the multi-material approach at the expense of air bubbles and pockets that form during the filling process. Second, microcalcification clusters have been included in the singlet model via crushed eggshells, which have very similar chemical composition to calcifications in vivo. The results from these new prototypes demonstrate significant improvement over the first generation of anthropomorphic physical phantoms.

  19. Use of MOSFET dosimeters to validate Monte Carlo radiation treatment calculation in an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, R.; Abella, V.; Santos, A.; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning based on Monte Carlo simulation provide a very accurate dose calculation compared to deterministic systems. Nowadays, Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters are increasingly utilized in radiation therapy to verify the received dose by patients. In the present work, we have used the MCNP6 (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code) to simulate the irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO) with a medical linear accelerator. The detailed model of the Elekta Precise multileaf collimator using a 6 MeV photon beam was designed and validated by means of different beam sizes and shapes in previous works. To include in the simulation the RANDO phantom geometry a set of Computer Tomography images of the phantom was obtained and formatted. The slices are input in PLUNC software, which performs the segmentation by defining anatomical structures and a Matlab algorithm writes the phantom information in MCNP6 input deck format. The simulation was verified and therefore the phantom model and irradiation was validated throughout the comparison of High-Sensitivity MOSFET dosimeter (Best medical Canada) measurements in different points inside the phantom with simulation results. On-line Wireless MOSFET provide dose estimation in the extremely thin sensitive volume, so a meticulous and accurate validation has been performed. The comparison show good agreement between the MOSFET measurements and the Monte Carlo calculations, confirming the validity of the developed procedure to include patients CT in simulations and approving the use of Monte Carlo simulations as an accurate therapy treatment plan.

  20. Novel anthropomorphic hip phantom corrects systemic interscanner differences in proximal femoral vBMD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is increasingly used in osteoporosis studies to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone quality and strength. However, QCT is confronted by technical issues in the clinical research setting, such as potentially confounding effects of body size on vBMD measurements and lack of standard approaches to scanner cross-calibration, which affects measurements of vBMD in multicenter settings. In this study, we addressed systematic inter-scanner differences and subject-dependent body size errors using a novel anthropomorphic hip phantom, containing a calibration hip to estimate correction equations, and a contralateral test hip to assess the quality of the correction. We scanned this phantom on four different scanners and we applied phantom-derived corrections to in vivo images of 16 postmenopausal women scanned on two scanners. From the phantom study, we found that vBMD decreased with increasing phantom size in three of four scanners and that inter-scanner variations increased with increasing phantom size. In the in vivo study, we observed that inter-scanner corrections reduced systematic inter-scanner mean vBMD differences but that the inter-scanner precision error was still larger than expected from known intra-scanner precision measurements. In conclusion, inter-scanner corrections and body size influence should be considered when measuring vBMD from QCT images. (paper)

  1. Development of a patient-specific two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; Burkett, George W.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Chen, Lin; Stern, Robin L.; Boone, John M.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a technique for the construction of a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom specific to an individual patient's pendant breast anatomy. Three-dimensional breast images were acquired on a prototype dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) scanner as part of an ongoing IRB-approved clinical trial of bCT. The images from the breast of a patient were segmented into adipose and glandular tissue regions and divided into 1.59 mm thick breast sections to correspond to the thickness of polyethylene stock. A computer-controlled water-jet cutting machine was used to cut the outer breast edge and the internal regions corresponding to glandular tissue from the polyethylene. The stack of polyethylene breast segments was encased in a thermoplastic ‘skin’ and filled with water. Water-filled spaces modeled glandular tissue structures and the surrounding polyethylene modeled the adipose tissue compartment. Utility of the phantom was demonstrated by inserting 200 µm microcalcifications as well as by measuring point dose deposition during bCT scanning. Affine registration of the original patient images with bCT images of the phantom showed similar tissue distribution. Linear profiles through the registered images demonstrated a mean coefficient of determination (r2) between grayscale profiles of 0.881. The exponent of the power law describing the anatomical noise power spectrum was identical in the coronal images of the patient's breast and the phantom. Microcalcifications were visualized in the phantom at bCT scanning. The real-time air kerma rate was measured during bCT scanning and fluctuated with breast anatomy. On average, point dose deposition was 7.1% greater than the mean glandular dose. A technique to generate a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom from bCT images has been demonstrated. The phantom is the first, to our knowledge, to accurately model the uncompressed pendant breast and the glandular tissue

  2. Evaluation of an anthropomorphic male pelvic phantom for image-guided radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Geordi

    2009-01-01

    B Schaly1, V Varchena2, P Au3, G Pang3,41Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Kitchener, ON, Canada; 2CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA, USA; 3Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Soft-tissue imaging in the treatment room is one of the main challenges faced today in high precision radiotherapy. The objective of this work is to evaluate a new anthropomorphic male pelvic phantom (C...

  3. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low-dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha H; Wolff, Jan E; Kiljunen, Timo; Schulze, Dirk; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low-dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The second aim was to characterize MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities for two dental photon energy ranges, dose dependency, dose rate dependency, and accumulated dose dependency. A further aim was to compare the performance of MOSFETs with those of TLDs in an anthropomorphic phantom head using a dentomaxillofacial CBCT device. The uncertainty was assessed by exposing 20 MOSFETs and a Barracuda MPD reference dosimeter. The MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities were evaluated for two photon energy ranges (50-90 kVp) using a constant dose and polymethylmethacrylate backscatter material. MOSFET and TLD comparative point-dose measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic phantom that was exposed with a clinical CBCT protocol. The MOSFET single exposure low dose limit (25% uncertainty, k = 2) was 1.69 mGy. An averaging of eight MOSFET exposures was required to attain the corresponding TLD (0.3 mGy) low-dose limit. The sensitivity was 3.09 ± 0.13 mV/mGy independently of the photon energy used. The MOSFET dosimeters did not present dose or dose rate sensitivity but, however, presented a 1% decrease of sensitivity per 1000 mV for accumulated threshold voltages between 8300 mV and 17500 mV. The point doses in an anthropomorphic phantom ranged for MOSFETs between 0.24 mGy and 2.29 mGy and for TLDs between 0.25 and 2.09 mGy, respectively. The mean difference was -8%. The MOSFET dosimeters presented statistically insignificant energy dependency. By averaging multiple exposures, the MOSFET dosimeters can achieve a TLD-comparable low-dose limit and constitute a feasible method for diagnostic dosimetry using anthropomorphic phantoms. However, for single in

  4. Development of anthropomorphic hand phantoms for personal dosimetry in 90Y-Zevalin preparation and patient delivering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolini, R; d'Errico, F; Traino, A C; Paternostro, E; Laganà, A; Romei, C; Pazzagli, F; Del Gratta, A

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent hand phantoms were achieved to measure the extremity dose involved in Zevalin (90)Y-labelling and patient delivering procedure for radioimmunotherapy treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The extremity doses to hands and wrists of operators were measured by using thermoluminescent detectors mounted on the developed phantoms. Measurements of chest- and lens-equivalent doses performed on a Rando phantom are also reported. PMID:23960242

  5. Development of anthropomorphic hand phantoms for personal dosimetry in 90Y-Zevalin preparation and patient delivering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolini, R; d'Errico, F; Traino, A C; Paternostro, E; Laganà, A; Romei, C; Pazzagli, F; Del Gratta, A

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent hand phantoms were achieved to measure the extremity dose involved in Zevalin (90)Y-labelling and patient delivering procedure for radioimmunotherapy treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The extremity doses to hands and wrists of operators were measured by using thermoluminescent detectors mounted on the developed phantoms. Measurements of chest- and lens-equivalent doses performed on a Rando phantom are also reported.

  6. A computer-controlled pump and realistic anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for validating image-guided systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ralph; Wilson, Emmanuel; Tang, Jonathan; Stoianovici, Dan; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The development of image-guided interventions requires validation studies to evaluate new protocols. So far, these validation studies have been limited to animal models and to software and physical phantoms that simulate respiratory motion but cannot accommodate needle punctures in a realistic manner. We have built a computer-controlled pump that drives an anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for simulating natural breathing patterns. This pump consists of a power supply, a motion controller with servo amplifier, linear actuator, and custom fabricated pump assembly. By generating several sample waveforms, we were able to simulate typical breathing patterns. Using this pump, we were able to produce chest wall movements similar to typical chest wall movements observed in humans. This system has potential applications for evaluating new respiratory compensation algorithms and may facilitate improved testing of image-guided protocols under realistic interventional conditions.

  7. Calibration of a total body potassium monitor with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. D.; Allen, B. J.

    1996-11-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom was used to calibrate a supine geometry sodium iodide total body potassium monitor. Correction factors accommodating variability in subject size were empirically determined. Measurements on 12 males of weight 45 - 96 kg, height 161 - 184 cm and 18 females of weight 48 - 89 kg, height 153 - 175 cm, showed that the calibration factor was significantly correlated (r = 0.88, p , indicating comparable accuracy to -based calibration procedures. Fat-free mass determined from the potassium measurements of 16 subjects correlated significantly with fat-free mass estimated from skinfold thickness (r = 0.98, p bioimpedance analysis (r = 0.98, p -based methods of calibrating total body potassium monitors.

  8. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations.Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord demonstrated

  9. Design and manufacturing of anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom for use in nuclear medicine centres in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosilla, A; Díaz Londoño, G; García, M; Ruíz, F; Andrade, P; Pérez, A

    2014-12-01

    Anthropomorphic phantoms are used in nuclear medicine for imaging quality control, calibration of gamma spectrometry system for the study of internal contamination with radionuclides and for internal dosimetric studies. These are constructed of materials that have radiation attenuation coefficients similar to those of the different organs and tissues of the human body. The material usually used for the manufacture of phantoms is polymethyl methacrylate. Other materials used for this purpose are polyethylene, polystyrene and epoxy resin. This project presents the design and manufacture of an anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom that includes the cervical spine, trachea and oesophagus, using a polyester resin (ρ = 1.1 g cm(-3)). Its linear and mass attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined and simulated by means of XCOM software, finding that this material reproduces the soft tissue ICRU-44 in a range of energies between 80 keV and 11 MeV, with less than a 5 % difference. PMID:24567500

  10. Evaluation of the usefulness of a MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom for 6-MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Kitou, Satoshi; Goka, Tomonori; Matsubara, Kana; Kameoka, Satoru; Matsuura, Taeko; Ariji, Takaki; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a metal oxide-silicon field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detector as a in vivo dosimeter, we performed in vivo dosimetry using the MOSFET detector with an anthropomorphic phantom. We used the RANDO phantom as an anthropomorphic phantom, and dose measurements were carried out in the abdominal, thoracic, and head and neck regions for simple square field sizes of 10 x 10, 5 x 5, and 3 x 3 cm(2) with a 6-MV photon beam. The dose measured by the MOSFET detector was verified by the dose calculations of the superposition (SP) algorithm in the XiO radiotherapy treatment-planning system. In most cases, the measured doses agreed with the results of the SP algorithm within +/-3%. Our results demonstrated the utility of the MOSFET detector for in vivo dosimetry even in the presence of clinical tissue inhomogeneities. PMID:20821083

  11. Creating an anthropomorphic digital MR phantom--an extensible tool for comparing and evaluating quantitative imaging algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosca, Ryan J; Jackson, Edward F

    2016-01-21

    Assessing and mitigating the various sources of bias and variance associated with image quantification algorithms is essential to the use of such algorithms in clinical research and practice. Assessment is usually accomplished with grid-based digital reference objects (DRO) or, more recently, digital anthropomorphic phantoms based on normal human anatomy. Publicly available digital anthropomorphic phantoms can provide a basis for generating realistic model-based DROs that incorporate the heterogeneity commonly found in pathology. Using a publicly available vascular input function (VIF) and digital anthropomorphic phantom of a normal human brain, a methodology was developed to generate a DRO based on the general kinetic model (GKM) that represented realistic and heterogeneously enhancing pathology. GKM parameters were estimated from a deidentified clinical dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI exam. This clinical imaging volume was co-registered with a discrete tissue model, and model parameters estimated from clinical images were used to synthesize a DCE-MRI exam that consisted of normal brain tissues and a heterogeneously enhancing brain tumor. An example application of spatial smoothing was used to illustrate potential applications in assessing quantitative imaging algorithms. A voxel-wise Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated negligible differences between the parameters estimated with and without spatial smoothing (using a small radius Gaussian kernel). In this work, we reported an extensible methodology for generating model-based anthropomorphic DROs containing normal and pathological tissue that can be used to assess quantitative imaging algorithms.

  12. SU-E-I-94: Automated Image Quality Assessment of Radiographic Systems Using An Anthropomorphic Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In a large, academic medical center, consistent radiographic imaging performance is difficult to routinely monitor and maintain, especially for a fleet consisting of multiple vendors, models, software versions, and numerous imaging protocols. Thus, an automated image quality control methodology has been implemented using routine image quality assessment with a physical, stylized anthropomorphic chest phantom. Methods: The “Duke” Phantom (Digital Phantom 07-646, Supertech, Elkhart, IN) was imaged twice on each of 13 radiographic units from a variety of vendors at 13 primary care clinics. The first acquisition used the clinical PA chest protocol to acquire the post-processed “FOR PRESENTATION” image. The second image was acquired without an antiscatter grid followed by collection of the “FOR PROCESSING” image. Manual CNR measurements were made from the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions of the phantom in each image. An automated image registration algorithm was used to estimate the CNR of the same insert using similar ROIs. Automated measurements were then compared to the manual measurements. Results: Automatic and manual CNR measurements obtained from “FOR PRESENTATION” images had average percent differences of 0.42%±5.18%, −3.44%±4.85%, and 1.04%±3.15% in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions, respectively; measurements obtained from “FOR PROCESSING” images had average percent differences of -0.63%±6.66%, −0.97%±3.92%, and −0.53%±4.18%, respectively. The maximum absolute difference in CNR was 15.78%, 10.89%, and 8.73% in the respective regions. In addition to CNR assessment of the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts, the automated method also provided CNR estimates for all 75 contrast-detail inserts in each phantom image. Conclusion: Automated analysis of a radiographic phantom has been shown to be a fast, robust, and objective means for assessing radiographic

  13. A breathing thorax phantom with independently programmable 6D tumour motion for dosimetric measurements in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, P.; Richter, D.; Schuy, C.; Schubert, E.; Haberer, Th; Durante, M.; Bert, C.

    2012-04-01

    Irradiation of moving targets using a scanned ion beam can cause clinically intolerable under- and overdosages within the target volume due to the interplay effect. Several motion mitigation techniques such as gating, beam tracking and rescanning are currently investigated to overcome this restriction. To enable detailed experimental studies of potential mitigation techniques a complex thorax phantom was developed. The phantom consists of an artificial thorax with ribs to introduce density changes. The contraction of the thorax can be controlled by a stepping motor. A robotic driven detector head positioned inside the thorax mimics e.g. a lung tumour. The detector head comprises 20 ionization chambers and 5 radiographic films for target dose measurements. The phantom’s breathing as well as the 6D tumour motion (3D translation, 3D rotation) can be programmed independently and adjusted online. This flexibility allows studying the dosimetric effects of correlation mismatches between internal and external motions, irregular breathing, or baseline drifts to name a few. Commercial motion detection systems, e.g. VisionRT or Anzai belt, can be mounted as they would be mounted in a patient case. They are used to control the 4D treatment delivery and to generate data for 4D dose calculation. To evaluate the phantom’s properties, measurements addressing reproducibility, stability, temporal behaviour and performance of dedicated breathing manoeuvres were performed. In addition, initial dosimetric tests for treatment with a scanned carbon beam are reported.

  14. Modelling human exposure to space radiation with different shielding: the FLUKA code coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astronauts' exposure to the various components of the space radiation field is of great concern for long-term missions, especially for those in deep space such as a possible travel to Mars. Simulations based on radiation transport/interaction codes coupled with anthropomorphic model phantoms can be of great help in view of risk evaluation and shielding optimisation, which is therefore a crucial issue. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code can be coupled with two types of anthropomorphic phantom (a mathematical model and a 'voxel' model) to calculate organ-averaged absorbed dose, dose equivalent and 'biological' dose under different shielding conditions. Herein the 'biological dose' is represented by the average number of 'Complex Lesions' (CLs) per cell in a given organ. CLs are clustered DNA breaks previously calculated by means of event-by-event track structure simulations at the nm level and integrated on-line into FLUKA, which adopts a condensed-history approach; such lesions have been shown to play a fundamental role in chromosome aberration induction, which in turn can be correlated with carcinogenesis. Examples of calculation results will be presented relative to Galactic Cosmic Rays, as well as to the August 1972 Solar Particle Event. The contributions from primary ions and secondary particles will be shown separately, thus allowing quantification of the role played by nuclear reactions occurring in the shield and in the human body itself. As expected, the SPE doses decrease dramatically with increasing the Al shielding thickness; nuclear reaction products, essentially due to target fragmentation, are of minor importance. A 10 g/cm2 Al shelter resulted to be sufficient to respect the 30-day limits for deterministic effects recommended for missions in Low Earth Orbit. In contrast with the results obtained for SPEs, the calculated GCR doses are almost independent of the Al shield thickness, and the GCR doses to internal organs are not significantly lower than the skin

  15. Modelling human exposure to space radiation with different shielding: the FLUKA code coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballarini, F [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy); Alloni, D [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia (Italy); Battistoni, G [INFN - National Institute of Nuclear Physics, (Italy); Cerutti, F [INFN - National Institute of Nuclear Physics (Italy)] (and others)

    2006-05-15

    Astronauts' exposure to the various components of the space radiation field is of great concern for long-term missions, especially for those in deep space such as a possible travel to Mars. Simulations based on radiation transport/interaction codes coupled with anthropomorphic model phantoms can be of great help in view of risk evaluation and shielding optimisation, which is therefore a crucial issue. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code can be coupled with two types of anthropomorphic phantom (a mathematical model and a 'voxel' model) to calculate organ-averaged absorbed dose, dose equivalent and 'biological' dose under different shielding conditions. Herein the 'biological dose' is represented by the average number of 'Complex Lesions' (CLs) per cell in a given organ. CLs are clustered DNA breaks previously calculated by means of event-by-event track structure simulations at the nm level and integrated on-line into FLUKA, which adopts a condensed-history approach; such lesions have been shown to play a fundamental role in chromosome aberration induction, which in turn can be correlated with carcinogenesis. Examples of calculation results will be presented relative to Galactic Cosmic Rays, as well as to the August 1972 Solar Particle Event. The contributions from primary ions and secondary particles will be shown separately, thus allowing quantification of the role played by nuclear reactions occurring in the shield and in the human body itself. As expected, the SPE doses decrease dramatically with increasing the Al shielding thickness; nuclear reaction products, essentially due to target fragmentation, are of minor importance. A 10 g/cm{sup 2} Al shelter resulted to be sufficient to respect the 30-day limits for deterministic effects recommended for missions in Low Earth Orbit. In contrast with the results obtained for SPEs, the calculated GCR doses are almost independent of the Al shield thickness, and the GCR doses to internal

  16. Modelling human exposure to space radiation with different shielding: the FLUKA code coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gadioli, E.; Garzelli, M. V.; Liotta, M.; Mairani, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Parini, V.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinsky, L.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Trovati, S.; Zankl, M.

    2006-05-01

    Astronauts' exposure to the various components of the space radiation field is of great concern for long-term missions, especially for those in deep space such as a possible travel to Mars. Simulations based on radiation transport/interaction codes coupled with anthropomorphic model phantoms can be of great help in view of risk evaluation and shielding optimisation, which is therefore a crucial issue. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code can be coupled with two types of anthropomorphic phantom (a mathematical model and a ''voxel'' model) to calculate organ-averaged absorbed dose, dose equivalent and ''biological'' dose under different shielding conditions. Herein the ''biological dose'' is represented by the average number of ''Complex Lesions'' (CLs) per cell in a given organ. CLs are clustered DNA breaks previously calculated by means of event-by-event track structure simulations at the nm level and integrated on-line into FLUKA, which adopts a condensed-history approach; such lesions have been shown to play a fundamental role in chromosome aberration induction, which in turn can be correlated with carcinogenesis. Examples of calculation results will be presented relative to Galactic Cosmic Rays, as well as to the August 1972 Solar Particle Event. The contributions from primary ions and secondary particles will be shown separately, thus allowing quantification of the role played by nuclear reactions occurring in the shield and in the human body itself. As expected, the SPE doses decrease dramatically with increasing the Al shielding thickness; nuclear reaction products, essentially due to target fragmentation, are of minor importance. A 10 g/cm2 Al shelter resulted to be sufficient to respect the 30-day limits for deterministic effects recommended for missions in Low Earth Orbit. In contrast with the results obtained for SPEs, the calculated GCR doses are almost independent of the Al shield thickness, and the GCR doses to internal organs are not significantly lower than

  17. Evaluation of iterative reconstruction method and attenuation correction on brain dopamine transporter SPECT using anthropomorphic striatal phantom

    OpenAIRE

    Akira Maebatake; Ayaka Imamura; Yui Kodera; Yasuo Yamashita; Kazuhiko Himuro; Shingo Baba; Kenta Miwa; Masayuki Sasaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to determine the optimal reconstruction parameters for iterative reconstruction in different devices and collimators for dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The results were compared between filtered back projection (FBP) and different attenuation correction (AC) methods.Methods: An anthropomorphic striatal phantom was filled with 123I solutions at different striatum-to-background radioactivity ratios. Data wer...

  18. Medical staff extremity dosimetry in CT fluoroscopy: an anthropomorphic hand voxel phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, C.; Becker, F.; Blunck, C.; DiMaria, S.; Baptista, M.; Esteves, B.; Paulo, G.; Santos, J.; Teles, P.; Vaz, P.

    2013-08-01

    This work aims to contribute to the study of the radiation dose distribution delivered to the hands of medical staff members during a general computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopic guided procedure. In this study, both Monte Carlo simulations and measurements were performed. For free-in-air and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) body phantom measurements, a standard pencil ionization chamber (IC) 100 mm long was used. The CT scanner model was implemented using MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) and was successfully validated by comparing the simulated results with measurements. Subsequently, CT images of a hand, together with an anthropomorphic phantom, were voxelized and used with the MCNPX code for dose calculations. The hand dose distribution study was performed both by using thermo-luminescent detector measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The validated simulation tool provides a new perspective for detailed investigations of CT-irradiation scenarios. Simulations show that there is a strong dose gradient, namely the even zones of the hand that are in precise vicinity to the x-ray beam only receive about 4% of the maximum dose delivered to adjacent areas which are directly exposed to the primary x-ray beam. Finally, the scatter contribution of the patient was also studied through MC simulations. The results show that for directly exposed parts of the hand surface, the dose is reduced by the body of the patient (due to the shielding), whereas the dose is increased by scattered radiation from the patient for parts of the skin that receive scattered radiation only.

  19. Dose evaluation in occupationally exposed workers through dosimeters ring and wrist type with an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Nuclear Medicine service of the Clinica San Pablo (Peru), the occupationally exposed workers carried out the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals to patients, so it is vital to measure the equivalent dose to the hands during the procedures in order to optimize the exposure to the ionizing radiation and execute the Radiological Safety Regulation (D.S. No. 009-97-Em) and the standard IR 002.2012 of radiation protection and safety in nuclear medicine. In this paper was designed and built a hand anthropomorphic phantom made of paraffin following the description given for the standard man, later were placed dosimeters ring and wrist type UD-807 model, Panasonic brand. Then we proceeded to irradiate using vial containers of Tc-99 and I-131. The obtained results showed the difference between the equivalent dose obtained among the ring and wrist dosimeter also getting a dose of 153 mSv /year when working with 99mTc and of 61 mSv /year when working with iodine-131. Was also demonstrated that the ring dosimeter shows the average dose received in the hand with less dispersion. It was found that under the national regulation on Requirements of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety in Medicine article 63, indicates that higher doses of 150 mSv /year the occupationally exposed workers should have hand dosimetry. Finally the individual dose limit of 500 mSv /year in extremities can be overcome if adequate radiation protection standards do not apply. (author)

  20. Optimising radiographic bitewing examination to adult and juvenile patients through the use of anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four anthropomorphic phantoms (an adult male, an adult female, a 10-y-old child and a 5-y-old child) were exposed to bitewing radiographs at film and digital settings using both rectangular and round collimation. Optically stimulated dosemeters were used. For children, average organ doses were <40 μGy and the organs with the highest doses were the salivary glands, parotid, oral mucosa, skin and extrathoracic airway. For adults, average organ doses were <200 μGy. Highest adult doses were to the salivary glands, oral mucosa and skin. Effective doses ranged from 1.5 to 1.8 μSv for children and from 2.6 to 3.6 μSv for adults when optimised technique factors were employed, including digital receptors, rectangular collimation, size-appropriate exposure times and proper clinical judgment. Optimised doses were a fraction of the natural daily background exposure. Therefore, predictions of hypothetical cancer incidence or detriment in patient populations exposed to such low doses are highly speculative and should be discouraged. (authors)

  1. In vivo proton dosimetry using a MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom with tissue inhomogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Matsuura, Taeko; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    When in vivo proton dosimetry is performed with a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detector, the response of the detector depends strongly on the linear energy transfer. The present study reports a practical method to correct the MOSFET response for linear energy transfer dependence by using a simplified Monte Carlo dose calculation method (SMC). A depth-output curve for a mono-energetic proton beam in polyethylene was measured with the MOSFET detector. This curve was used to calculate MOSFET output distributions with the SMC (SMC(MOSFET)). The SMC(MOSFET) output value at an arbitrary point was compared with the value obtained by the conventional SMC(PPIC), which calculates proton dose distributions by using the depth-dose curve determined by a parallel-plate ionization chamber (PPIC). The ratio of the two values was used to calculate the correction factor of the MOSFET response at an arbitrary point. The dose obtained by the MOSFET detector was determined from the product of the correction factor and the MOSFET raw dose. When in vivo proton dosimetry was performed with the MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom, the corrected MOSFET doses agreed with the SMC(PPIC) results within the measurement error. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful in vivo proton dosimetry with a MOSFET detector. PMID:22402385

  2. Intensity modulated irradiation of a thorax phantom: comparisons between measurements, Monte Carlo calculations and pencil beam calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Wolfram U.; Bakai, Annemarie; Nüsslin, Fridtjof

    2001-06-01

    The present study investigates the application of compensators for the intensity modulated irradiation of a thorax phantom. Measurements are compared with Monte Carlo and standard pencil beam algorithm dose calculations. Compensators were manufactured to produce the intensity profiles that were generated from the scientific version of the KonRad IMRT treatment-planning system for a given treatment plan. The comparison of dose distributions calculated with a pencil beam algorithm, with the Monte Carlo code EGS4 and with measurements is presented. By measurements in a water phantom it is demonstrated that the method used to manufacture the compensators reproduces the intensity profiles in a suitable manner. Monte Carlo simulations in a water phantom show that the accelerator head model used for simulations is sufficient. No significant overestimations of dose values inside the target volume by the pencil beam algorithm are found in the thorax phantom. An overestimation of dose values in lung by the pencil beam algorithm is also not found. Expected dose calculation errors of the pencil beam algorithm are suppressed, because the dose to the low density region lung is reduced by the use of a non-coplanar beam arrangement and by intensity modulation.

  3. On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distributions of radiation absorbed dose within human anatomy have been estimated through Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques implemented for two different classes of computational anthropomorphic phantoms: (1) mathematical equation-based stylized phantoms and (2) tomographic image-based voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms constructed from tomographic images of real human anatomy have been actively developed since the late 1980s to overcome the anatomical approximations necessary with stylized phantoms, which themselves have been utilized since the mid 1960s. However, revisions of stylized phantoms have also been pursued in parallel to the development of voxel phantoms since voxel phantoms (1) are initially restricted to the individual-specific anatomy of the person originally imaged, (2) must be restructured on an organ-by-organ basis to conform to reference individual anatomy and (3) cannot easily represent very fine anatomical structures and tissue layers that are thinner than the voxel dimensions of the overall phantom. Although efforts have been made to improve the anatomic realism of stylized phantoms, most of these efforts have been limited to attempts to alter internal organ structures. Aside from the internal organs, the exterior shapes, and especially the arm structures, of stylized phantoms are also far from realistic descriptions of human anatomy, and may cause dosimetry errors in the calculation of organ-absorbed doses for external irradiation scenarios. The present study was intended to highlight the need to revise the existing arm structure within stylized phantoms by comparing organ doses of stylized adult phantoms with those from three adult voxel phantoms in the lateral photon irradiation geometry. The representative stylized phantom, the adult phantom of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) series and two adult male voxel phantoms, KTMAN-2 and VOXTISS8, were employed for Monte Carlo dose calculation, and data from another voxel phantom, VIP

  4. On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Lee, Choonik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Lee, Jai-Ki [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-07

    Distributions of radiation absorbed dose within human anatomy have been estimated through Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques implemented for two different classes of computational anthropomorphic phantoms: (1) mathematical equation-based stylized phantoms and (2) tomographic image-based voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms constructed from tomographic images of real human anatomy have been actively developed since the late 1980s to overcome the anatomical approximations necessary with stylized phantoms, which themselves have been utilized since the mid 1960s. However, revisions of stylized phantoms have also been pursued in parallel to the development of voxel phantoms since voxel phantoms (1) are initially restricted to the individual-specific anatomy of the person originally imaged, (2) must be restructured on an organ-by-organ basis to conform to reference individual anatomy and (3) cannot easily represent very fine anatomical structures and tissue layers that are thinner than the voxel dimensions of the overall phantom. Although efforts have been made to improve the anatomic realism of stylized phantoms, most of these efforts have been limited to attempts to alter internal organ structures. Aside from the internal organs, the exterior shapes, and especially the arm structures, of stylized phantoms are also far from realistic descriptions of human anatomy, and may cause dosimetry errors in the calculation of organ-absorbed doses for external irradiation scenarios. The present study was intended to highlight the need to revise the existing arm structure within stylized phantoms by comparing organ doses of stylized adult phantoms with those from three adult voxel phantoms in the lateral photon irradiation geometry. The representative stylized phantom, the adult phantom of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) series and two adult male voxel phantoms, KTMAN-2 and VOXTISS8, were employed for Monte Carlo dose calculation, and data from another voxel phantom, VIP

  5. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Jaekel, Oliver [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  6. Pediatric radiation dosimetry for positron-emitting radionuclides using anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Bolch, Wesley E. [Departments of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850 (United States); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) plays an important role in the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and surveillance of clinically localized diseases. Combined PET/CT imaging exhibits significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than conventional imaging when it comes to detecting malignant tumors in children. However, the radiation dose from positron-emitting radionuclide to the pediatric population is a matter of concern since children are at a particularly high risk when exposed to ionizing radiation.Methods: The authors evaluate the absorbed fractions and specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of monoenergy photons/electrons as well as S-values of 9 positron-emitting radionuclides (C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, Cu-64, Ga-68, Rb-82, Y-86, and I-124) in 48 source regions for 10 anthropomorphic pediatric hybrid models, including the reference newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-yr-old male and female models, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended general purpose Monte Carlo transport code.Results: The self-absorbed SAFs and S-values for most organs were inversely related to the age and body weight, whereas the cross-dose terms presented less correlation with body weight. For most source/target organ pairs, Rb-82 and Y-86 produce the highest self-absorbed and cross-absorbed S-values, respectively, while Cu-64 produces the lowest S-values because of the low-energy and high-frequency of electron emissions. Most of the total self-absorbed S-values are contributed from nonpenetrating particles (electrons and positrons), which have a linear relationship with body weight. The dependence of self-absorbed S-values of the two annihilation photons varies to the reciprocal of 0.76 power of the mass, whereas the self-absorbed S-values of positrons vary according to the reciprocal mass.Conclusions: The produced S-values for common positron-emitting radionuclides can be exploited for the assessment of radiation dose delivered to the pediatric population from various PET

  7. [CALCULATION OF RADIATION LOADS ON THE ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOM ONBOARD THE SPACE STATION IN THE CASE OF ADDITIONAL SHIELDING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashov, D A; Shurshakov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of calculating doses from space ionizing radiation for a modeled orbital station cabin outfitted with an additional shield aimed to reduce radiation loads on cosmonaut. The shield is a layer with the mass thickness of -6 g/cm2 (mean density = 0.62 g/cm3) that covers the outer cabin wall and consists of wet tissues and towels used by cosmonauts for hygienic purposes. A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom imitates human body. Doses were calculated for the standard orbit of the International space station (ISS) with consideration of the longitudinal and transverse phantom orientation relative to the wall with or without the additional shield. Calculation of dose distribution in the human body improves prediction of radiation loads. The additional shield reduces radiation exposure of human critical organs by -20% depending on their depth and body spatial orientation in the ISS compartment.

  8. [CALCULATION OF RADIATION LOADS ON THE ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOM ONBOARD THE SPACE STATION IN THE CASE OF ADDITIONAL SHIELDING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashov, D A; Shurshakov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of calculating doses from space ionizing radiation for a modeled orbital station cabin outfitted with an additional shield aimed to reduce radiation loads on cosmonaut. The shield is a layer with the mass thickness of -6 g/cm2 (mean density = 0.62 g/cm3) that covers the outer cabin wall and consists of wet tissues and towels used by cosmonauts for hygienic purposes. A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom imitates human body. Doses were calculated for the standard orbit of the International space station (ISS) with consideration of the longitudinal and transverse phantom orientation relative to the wall with or without the additional shield. Calculation of dose distribution in the human body improves prediction of radiation loads. The additional shield reduces radiation exposure of human critical organs by -20% depending on their depth and body spatial orientation in the ISS compartment. PMID:26554132

  9. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. - Author-Highlights: • The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. • FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. • The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. • The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus

  10. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  11. Solid anthropomorphic infant whole body DXA phantom: Design, evaluation, and multisite testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) requires phantoms for quality control and cross-calibration. No commercially available phantoms are designed specifically for infant whole-body scanning. We fabricated a phantom closely matching a 7-kg human infant in body habitus using PVC, nylon-mix, and poly...

  12. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Gallas, Raya R; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy, so-called "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover all steps from therapy planning to follow-up to fulfill the high demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gains growing importance in the treatment process and established phantoms (such as the Alderson head) cannot be used for those tests, novel multimodality phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study for such a customizable multimodality head phantom. We used a set of patient CT images as the basis for the anthropomorphic head shape. The recipient - consisting of an epoxy resin - was produced using rapid prototyping (3D printing). The phantom recipient includes a nasal air cavity, two soft tissues volumes and cranial bone. Additionally a spherical tumor volume was positioned in the center. The volumes were filled with dipotassium phosphate-based cranial bone surrogate, agarose gel, and distilled water. The tumor volume was filled with normoxic dosimetr...

  13. Post-operative irradiation techniques for advanced larynx and hypopharynx cancer: a dosimetric comparison using anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Using anthropomorphic phantoms, to compare the matchline inhomogeneity and spinal cord sparing aspects of 3 previously described post-operative irradiation techniques for patients status-post laryngectomy. Materials and Methods: Two anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed with human bones and tissue equivalent material. One was sectioned coronally and one sagittally/parasagittally. Both had a stoma placed 2 cm above the sternal notch. Film compressed between the sections served as the dosimetric tool. Simulation films were taken and fields outlined for 3 different techniques as follows: 1) University of Florida's (UF), Gainesville, 3-field, 2) modified Cleveland Clinic's (CC) Single Isocenter/Asymmetric Collimators (the matchline was feathered twice during this experiment) and 3) MD Anderson's (MDA) 3-field. Conformal blocks were constructed and ported to confirm accuracy. A formal treatment plan was completed and then executed on both phantoms to a scaled dose equivalent of 60 Gy to isocenter. The exposed film infrared optical density was converted into dose and then normalized to the prescription dose to yield isodose plots. Isodose zones exceeding 100% had to measure at least 15mm in diameter to be considered significant in accordance with ICRU Report 50 guidelines. Results: Table 1 indicates the degree of matchline inhomogeneity for each method with percent isodose values. Both the MDA and UF techniques provided a 1.0-1.5 cm non-irradiated spinal cord gap between the opposed laterals and AP supraclavicular (APS) fields while underdosing a considerable volume of tissue potentially at risk for recurrence along parasagittal planes at the level of field junction. The CC technique showed no such underdosed regions. Table 1. % Isodose Across Matchline. Anterior, Mid and Posterior coronal planes measure 4,7 and 9 cm deep from the anterior neck surface respectively. Conclusions: This anthropomorphic phantom dosimetric analysis suggests that all 3 methods

  14. SU-F-BRE-06: Evaluation of Patient CT Dose Reconstruction From 3D Diode Array Measurements Using Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, M; Benhabib, S; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I; Popple, R [The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Faught, A; Followill, D [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare 3D reconstructed dose of IMRT plans from 3D diode array measurements with measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: Six IMRT plans were created for the IROC Houston (RPC) head and neck (H and N) and lung phantoms following IROC Houston planning protocols. The plans included flattened and unflattened beam energies ranging from 6 MV to 15 MV and both static and dynamic MLC tecH and Niques. Each plan was delivered three times to the respective anthropomorphic phantom, each of which contained thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and radiochromic films (RCFs). The plans were also delivered to a Delta4 diode array (Scandidos, Uppsala, Sweden). Irradiations were done using a TrueBeam STx (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The dose in the patient was calculated by the Delta4 software, which used the diode measurements to estimate incident energy fluence and a kernel-based pencil beam algorithm to calculate dose. The 3D dose results were compared with the TLD and RCF measurements. Results: In the lung, the average difference between TLDs and Delta4 calculations was 5% (range 2%–7%). For the H and N, the average differences were 2.4% (range 0%–4.5%) and 1.1% (range 0%–2%) for the high- and low-dose targets, respectively, and 12% (range 10%-13%) for the organ-at-risk simulating the spinal cord. For the RCF and criteria of 7%/4mm, 5%/3mm, and 3%/3mm, the average gamma-index pass rates were 95.4%, 85.7%, and 76.1%, respectively for the H and N and 76.2%, 57.8%, and 49.5% for the lung. The pass-rate in the lung decreased with increasing beam energy, as expected for a pencil beam algorithm. Conclusion: The H and N phantom dose reconstruction met the IROC Houston acceptance criteria for clinical trials; however, the lung phantom dose did not, most likely due to the inaccuracy of the pencil beam algorithm in the presence of low-density inhomogeneities. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA81647 (NCI, DHHS)

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary radiation exposure from high-energy photon therapy using an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, Matthias; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments delivering large amounts of monitor units (MUs) recently raised concern about higher risks for secondary malignancies. In this study, optimised combinations of several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) have been implemented in order to achieve a high precision in Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport simulations and the calculation of in- and out-of-field photon and neutron dose-equivalent distributions in an anthropomorphic phantom using MCNPX, v.2.7. The computer model included a Varian Clinac 2100C treatment head and a high-resolution head phantom. By means of the applied VRTs, a relative uncertainty for the photon dose-equivalent distribution of 8 MeV, has been calculated. Relative uncertainty, calculated for each voxel, could be kept below 5 % in average over all voxels of the phantom. Thus, a very detailed neutron dose distribution could be obtained. The achieved precision now allows a far better estimation of both photon and especially neutron doses out-of-field, where neutrons can become the predominant component of secondary radiation. PMID:26311702

  16. Dosimetric impact of interplay effect in lung IMRT and VMAT treatment using in-house dynamic thorax phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhlisin; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Tumor motion due to patient's respiratory is a significant problem in radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer. The purpose of this project is to study the interplay effect through dosimetry verification between the calculated and delivered dose, as well as the dosimetric impact of leaf interplay with breathing-induced tumor motion in IMRT and VMAT treatment. In this study, a dynamic thorax phantom was designed and constructed for dosimetry measurement. The phantom had a linear sinusoidal tumor motion toward superior-inferior direction with variation of amplitudes and periods. TLD-100 LiF:Mg,Ti and Gafchromic EBT2 film were used to measure dose in the midpoint target and the spinal cord. The IMRT and VMAT treatment had prescription dose of 200 cGy per fraction. The dosimetric impact due to interplay effect during IMRT and VMAT treatment were resulted in the range of 0.5% to -6.6% and 0.9% to -5.3% of target dose reduction, respectively. Meanwhile, mean dose deviation of spinal cord in IMRT and VMAT treatment were around 1.0% to -6.9% and 0.9% to -6.3%, respectively. The results showed that if respiratory management technique were not implemented, the presence of lung tumor motion during dose delivery in IMRT and VMAT treatment causes dose discrepancies inside tumor volume.

  17. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 m

  18. SU-E-T-607: An Experimental Validation of Gamma Knife Based Convolution Algorithm On Solid Acrylic Anthropomorphic Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopishankar, N; Bisht, R K [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dosimetric evaluation of convolution algorithm in Gamma Knife (Perfexion Model) using solid acrylic anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: An in-house developed acrylic phantom with ion chamber insert was used for this purpose. The middle insert was designed to fit ion chamber from top(head) as well as from bottom(neck) of the phantom, henceforth measurement done at two different positions simultaneously. Leksell frame fixed to phantom simulated patient treatment. Prior to dosimetric study, hounsfield units and electron density of acrylic material were incorporated into the calibration curve in the TPS for convolution algorithm calculation. A CT scan of phantom with ion chamber (PTW Freiberg, 0.125cc) was obtained with following scanning parameters: Tube voltage-110kV, Slice thickness-1mm and FOV-240mm. Three separate single shot plans were generated in LGP TPS (Version 10.1.) with collimators 16mm, 8mm and 4mm respectively for both ion chamber positions. Both TMR10 and Convolution algorithm based planning (CABP) were used for dose calculation. A dose of 6Gy at 100% isodose was prescribed at centre of ion chamber visible in the CT scan. The phantom with ion chamber was positioned in the treatment couch for dose delivery. Results: The ion chamber measured dose was 5.98Gy for 16mm collimator shot plan with less than 1% deviation for convolution algorithm whereas with TMR10 measured dose was 5.6Gy. For 8mm and 4mm collimator plan merely a dose of 3.86Gy and 2.18Gy respectively were delivered at TPS calculated time for CABP. Conclusion: CABP is expected to perform accurate prediction of time for dose delivery for all collimators, but significant variation in measured dose was observed for 8mm and 4mm collimator which may be due collimator size effect. Effect of metal artifacts caused by pins and frame on the CT scan also may have role in misinterpreting CABP. The study carried out requires further investigation.

  19. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, J; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Soni...

  20. Assessment of phase based dose modulation for improved dose efficiency in cardiac CT on an anthropomorphic motion phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Adam; Nilsen, Roy; Nett, Brian

    2014-03-01

    State of the art automatic exposure control modulates the tube current across view angle and Z based on patient anatomy for use in axial full scan reconstructions. Cardiac CT, however, uses a fundamentally different image reconstruction that applies a temporal weighting to reduce motion artifacts. This paper describes a phase based mA modulation that goes beyond axial and ECG modulation; it uses knowledge of the temporal view weighting applied within the reconstruction algorithm to improve dose efficiency in cardiac CT scanning. Using physical phantoms and synthetic noise emulation, we measure how knowledge of sinogram temporal weighting and the prescribed cardiac phase can be used to improve dose efficiency. First, we validated that a synthetic CT noise emulation method produced realistic image noise. Next, we used the CT noise emulation method to simulate mA modulation on scans of a physical anthropomorphic phantom where a motion profile corresponding to a heart rate of 60 beats per minute was used. The CT noise emulation method matched noise to lower dose scans across the image within 1.5% relative error. Using this noise emulation method to simulate modulating the mA while keeping the total dose constant, the image variance was reduced by an average of 11.9% on a scan with 50 msec padding, demonstrating improved dose efficiency. Radiation dose reduction in cardiac CT can be achieved while maintaining the same level of image noise through phase based dose modulation that incorporates knowledge of the cardiac reconstruction algorithm.

  1. Reliability of attenuation measurements in CT of the lumbar spine: evaluation with an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moström, U; Ytterbergh, C

    1988-01-01

    A phantom was constructed with the intention of simulating the clinical situation at examination of the spine. Artifacts from bony vertebral structures were analyzed and the uniformity in a body-shaped object was studied. Tests were carried out on eight CT scanners. A considerable variation in uniformity was found between the tested scanner models. The CT numbers within the spinal canal and in a region anterior to the spine were elevated for most of the scanners. The deviation varied considerably, however, between models.

  2. Radiation Pattern Measurement of a Low-Profile Wearable Antenna Using an Optical Fibre and a Solid Anthropomorphic Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Hong Loh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study into radiation pattern measurements of an electrically small dielectric resonator antenna (DRA operating between 2.4 and 2.5 GHz in the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM radio band for body-centric wireless communication applications. To eliminate the distortion of the radiation pattern associated with the unwanted radiation from a metallic coaxial cable feeding the antenna we have replaced it with a fibre optic feed and an electro-optical (EO transducer. The optical signal is then converted back to RF using an Opto-Electric Field Sensor (OEFS system. To ensure traceable measurements of the radiation pattern performance of the wearable antenna a generic head and torso solid anthropomorphic phantom model has been employed. Furthermore, to illustrate the benefits of the method, numerical simulations of the co-polar and cross-polar H-plane radiation patterns at 2.4, 2.45, and 2.5 GHz are compared with the measured results obtained using: (i an optical fibre; and (ii a metallic coaxial cable.

  3. Poster — Thur Eve — 09: Evaluation of electrical impedance and computed tomography fusion algorithms using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Brige Paul; Krishnan, Kalpagam; Liu, Jeff; Kohli, Kirpal [BC Cancer Agency — Fraser Valley Centre (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Integration of biological conductivity information provided by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) with anatomical information provided by Computed Tomography (CT) imaging could improve the ability to characterize tissues in clinical applications. In this paper, we report results of our study which compared the fusion of EIT with CT using three different image fusion algorithms, namely: weighted averaging, wavelet fusion, and ROI indexing. The ROI indexing method of fusion involves segmenting the regions of interest from the CT image and replacing the pixels with the pixels of the EIT image. The three algorithms were applied to a CT and EIT image of an anthropomorphic phantom, constructed out of five acrylic contrast targets with varying diameter embedded in a base of gelatin bolus. The imaging performance was assessed using Detectability and Structural Similarity Index Measure (SSIM). Wavelet fusion and ROI-indexing resulted in lower Detectability (by 35% and 47%, respectively) yet higher SSIM (by 66% and 73%, respectively) than weighted averaging. Our results suggest that wavelet fusion and ROI-indexing yielded more consistent and optimal fusion performance than weighted averaging.

  4. SU-D-BRE-01: A Realistic Breathing Phantom of the Thorax for Testing New Motion Mitigation Techniques with Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A prototype breathing phantom (named LuCa) has been developed which simulates the anatomy and motion of a patient thorax.In this work, we describe the results of the first commissioning tests with LuCa. Methods: The phantom provides a close representation of the human thorax. The lungs,contained within a tissue-equivalent ribcage and skin,are made from a polymer foam,which is inflated and deflated using a custommade ventilator. A tumor is simulated using a wooden ball with cutplanes for placing GafChromic films. The ventilator,controlled with Labview software,simulates a full range of breathing motion types.Commissioning tests were performed to assess its performance using imaging (CT and radiographic) and film dosimetry as follows:i)maximum Tumor excursion at acceptable pressure ranges, ii)tumor Motion repeatability between breathing periods,iii)reproducibility between measurement days,iv)tumor-to-surface motion correlation and v)reproducibility of film positioning in phantom. Results: The phantom can generate repeatable motion patterns with sin4,sin,breath-hold (tumor amplitude repeatability 2=0.92. Reproducibility of film positioning within the thorax was within 0.9mm, and maximum 3° error from the coronal plane. Film measurements revealed that the film repositioning error yields relative errors in the mean dose over the planned target volume (PTV) of up to 2.5% and 4.5% for films at the center and on the edge of the PTV respectively. Conclusion: Commissioning tests have shown that the LuCa phantom can produce tumor motion with excellent repeatability. However,a poorer performance in reproducibility of tumor amplitude for a given peak pressure week-to-week. Film set-up reproducibility is adequate for detection of dosimetric errors resulting from motion of >3%. This work is funded by Swiss National Fund Grants 320030-127569 and 320030-1493942-1

  5. Experience of development and testing of a new model of an anthropomorphic radiodosimetric phantom of the human body ARDF-10 'Roman'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhov, R.E.; Finkel, F.V., E-mail: bruxov@radek.ru, E-mail: felix@radek.ru [STC RADEK, Russian Federation, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    In 2006-2010 by the commission of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland applied scientific research and development of a new model of an anthropomorphic radio dosimetric phantom of the human body (the Phantom) were performed, after the development of the production technology and initial testing in 2010-2012 the first serial copy of the Phantom under the name ARDF-10 ROMAN was produced. The main application of the new model of the Phantom ARDF-10 ROMAN: - increase of the precision of calibration and implementation of the periodic monitoring of Whole body counters (WBC) equipment, standardization of measurement procedure for inter-laboratory comparisons of the incorporated activity. - metrological support of the development and implementation of new methods for human radiation spectrometry: identification of radionuclide content of incorporated activity in the human body; measurements of the activity of incorporated technogenic and natural radionuclides in the whole body and in the lungs; measurements of {sup 90}Sr content in the bone tissue. Study of the mechanisms of the intake, distribution, accumulation and excretion of the radionuclides in the human body, such as: daughter products of {sup 222}Rn decay in the respiratory tract, {sup 241}Am, other transuranic elements; isotopes of iodine in the thyroid gland; radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients for diagnostic and medicinal purposes. Obtaining estimates of spatial-temporal distribution of individual internal exposure dose of a human. The result of the work of recent years has been the creation of hygienic safe standard sample of an anthropomorphic radio dosimetric phantom of the human body ARDF-10 ROMAN, consisting of 4 anthropometric models of body parts, which are independent assembly units (head phantom, neck phantom, torso phantom, knee phantom). Phantom models are made from simulators of bone, soft (muscle) and lungs biological tissue. The Phantom contains 28 separate elements. To

  6. Evaluation of patient doses from upper gastrointestinal tract examinations based on the dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate organ dose and effective dose to patients from examinations of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Absorbed doses of various tissues and organs were measured using novel photodiode dosimeters installed in an anthropomorphic phantom representing a standard Japanese adult body. The organ dose and the effective dose were assessed from the absorbed doses according to the definitions seen in the publications of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Dose measurements were performed for each projection of the upper GI tract examination in seven procedures at four hospitals and in a mobile coach, and organ and effective doses were assessed for each procedure. Organ doses obtained in the observation areas such as the stomach, esophagus and colon were in the order of several to more than 60 mGy, though they decreased to less than 1 mGy for tissues and organs distant from the observation areas. Organ doses and effective doses differed largely according to tube voltage, filtration and tube current or mAs value of the x-ray generator used, and by examination protocol, number of images, fluoroscopy time, and imaging units such as screen/film, computed radiography, digital radiography and flat panel detector. The number of images and the fluoroscopy time were 7 and 1.5 min for the examination in the mobile coach, and 18-22 and 2-6 min in the hospitals. Evaluated effective dose for the examination in the mobile coach was 2.9 mSv, and that in the hospitals ranged from 4.0-13.4 mSv at a ratio of more than three. (author)

  7. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-03: Development and Implementation of An Anthropomorphic Pediatric Spine Phantom for the Assessment of Craniospinal Irradiation Procedures in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D; Summers, P; Followill, D; Sahoo, N; Mahajan, A; Stingo, F; Kry, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design an anthropomorphic pediatric spine phantom for use in the evaluation of proton therapy facilities for clinical trial participation by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center (formerly RPC). Methods: This phantom was designed to perform an end-to-end audit of the proton spine treatment process, including simulation, dose calculation by the treatment planning system (TPS), and proton treatment delivery. The design incorporated materials simulating the thoracic spinal column of a pediatric patient, along with two thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-100 capsules and radiochromic film embedded in the phantom for dose evaluation. Fourteen potential materials were tested to determine relative proton stopping power (RSP) and Hounsfield unit (HU) values. Each material was CT scanned at 120kVp, and the RSP was obtained from depth ionization scans using the Zebra multilayer ion chamber (MLIC) at two energies: 160 MeV and 250 MeV. To determine tissue equivalency, the measured RSP for each material was compared to the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS for a given HU. Results: The materials selected as bone, tissue, and cartilage substitutes were Techron HPV Bearing Grade (Boedeker Plastics, Inc.), solid water, and blue water, respectively. The RSP values did not differ by more than 1.8% between the two energies. The measured RSP for each selected material agreed with the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS within 1.2%. Conclusion: An anthropomorphic pediatric proton spine phantom was designed to evaluate proton therapy delivery. The inclusion of multiple tissue substitutes increases heterogeneity and the level of difficulty for institutions to successfully treat the phantom. The following attributes will be evaluated: absolute dose agreement, distal range, field width, junction match and right/left dose profile alignment. The phantom will be tested at several institutions using a 5% dose agreement criterion, and a 5%/3mm gamma analysis

  8. Use of VAP3D software in the construction of pathological anthropomorphic phantoms for dosimetric evaluations; Uso do software VAP3D na construcao de fantomas antropomorficos patologicos para avaliacoes dosimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Lindeval Fernandes de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEM/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper performs a new type of dosimetric evaluation, where it was used a phantom of pathological voxels (representative phantom of sick person). The software VAP3D (Visualization and Analysis of Phantoms 3D) were used for, from a healthy phantom (phantom representative of healthy person), to introduce three dimensional regions to simulate tumors. It was used the Monte Carlo ESGnrc code to simulate the X ray photon transport, his interaction with matter and evaluation of absorbed dose in organs and tissues from thorax region of the healthy phantom and his pathological version. This is a computer model of typical exposure for programming the treatments in radiodiagnostic

  9. Scatter estimation and removal of anti-scatter grid-line artifacts from anthropomorphic head phantom images taken with a high resolution image detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, R.; Jain, A.; Shankar, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    In radiography, one of the best methods to eliminate image-degrading scatter radiation is the use of anti-scatter grids. However, with high-resolution dynamic imaging detectors, stationary anti-scatter grids can leave grid-line shadows and moiré patterns on the image, depending upon the line density of the grid and the sampling frequency of the x-ray detector. Such artifacts degrade the image quality and may mask small but important details such as small vessels and interventional device features. Appearance of these artifacts becomes increasingly severe as the detector spatial resolution is improved. We have previously demonstrated that, to remove these artifacts by dividing out a reference grid image, one must first subtract the residual scatter that penetrates the grid; however, for objects with anatomic structure, scatter varies throughout the FOV and a spatially differing amount of scatter must be subtracted. In this study, a standard stationary Smit-Rontgen X-ray grid (line density - 70 lines/cm, grid ratio - 13:1) was used with a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 (pixel size - 75 micron) to image anthropomorphic head phantoms. For a 15 x 15cm FOV, scatter profiles of the anthropomorphic head phantoms were estimated then iteratively modified to minimize the structured noise due to the varying grid-line artifacts across the FOV. Images of the anthropomorphic head phantoms taken with the grid, before and after the corrections, were compared demonstrating almost total elimination of the artifact over the full FOV. Hence, with proper computational tools, antiscatter grid artifacts can be corrected, even during dynamic sequences.

  10. SU-D-BRE-01: A Realistic Breathing Phantom of the Thorax for Testing New Motion Mitigation Techniques with Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, R; Peroni, M; Bernatowicz, K; Zakova, M; Knopf, A; Safai, S [Paul Scherrer Institut, Psi-villigen, Aargau (Switzerland); Parkel, T [CSEM, Swiss Centre of Electronics and Microtechnology, Landquart, Graubunden (Switzerland)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A prototype breathing phantom (named LuCa) has been developed which simulates the anatomy and motion of a patient thorax.In this work, we describe the results of the first commissioning tests with LuCa. Methods: The phantom provides a close representation of the human thorax. The lungs,contained within a tissue-equivalent ribcage and skin,are made from a polymer foam,which is inflated and deflated using a custommade ventilator. A tumor is simulated using a wooden ball with cutplanes for placing GafChromic films. The ventilator,controlled with Labview software,simulates a full range of breathing motion types.Commissioning tests were performed to assess its performance using imaging (CT and radiographic) and film dosimetry as follows:i)maximum Tumor excursion at acceptable pressure ranges, ii)tumor Motion repeatability between breathing periods,iii)reproducibility between measurement days,iv)tumor-to-surface motion correlation and v)reproducibility of film positioning in phantom. Results: The phantom can generate repeatable motion patterns with sin{sup 4},sin,breath-hold (tumor amplitude repeatability <0.5mm over 10min),aswell as patient-specific motion types. Maximum excursions of the tumor are 20mm and 14mm for the large and small tumor inserts respectively. Amplitude reproducibility (Coefficient of Variation) averaged at 16% for the workable pressure range over 2 months. Good correlation between tumor and surface motion was found with R{sup 2}=0.92. Reproducibility of film positioning within the thorax was within 0.9mm, and maximum 3° error from the coronal plane. Film measurements revealed that the film repositioning error yields relative errors in the mean dose over the planned target volume (PTV) of up to 2.5% and 4.5% for films at the center and on the edge of the PTV respectively. Conclusion: Commissioning tests have shown that the LuCa phantom can produce tumor motion with excellent repeatability. However,a poorer performance in reproducibility of

  11. Evaluation of Iterative Reconstruction Method and Attenuation Correction in Brain Dopamine Transporter SPECT Using an Anthropomorphic Striatal Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebatake, Akira; Imamura, Ayaka; Kodera, Yui; Yamashita, Yasuo; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Baba, Shingo; Miwa, Kenta; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to determine the optimal reconstruction parameters for iterative reconstruction in different devices and collimators for dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The results were compared between filtered back projection (FBP) and different attenuation correction (AC) methods. Methods: An anthropomorphic striatal phantom was filled with 123I solutions at different striatum-to-background radioactivity ratios. Data were acquired using two SPECT/CT devices, equipped with a low-to-medium-energy general-purpose collimator (cameras A-1 and B-1) and a low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator (cameras A-2 and B-2). The SPECT images were once reconstructed by FBP using Chang’s AC and once by ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) using both CTAC and Chang’s AC; moreover, scatter correction was performed. OSEM on cameras A-1 and A-2 included resolution recovery (RR). The images were analyzed, using the specific binding ratio (SBR). Regions of interest for the background were placed on both frontal and occipital regions. Results: The optimal number of iterations and subsets was 10i10s on camera A-1, 10i5s on camera A-2, and 7i6s on cameras B-1 and B-2. The optimal full width at half maximum of the Gaussian filter was 2.5 times the pixel size. In the comparison between FBP and OSEM, the quality was superior on OSEM-reconstructed images, although edge artifacts were observed in cameras A-1 and A-2. The SBR recovery of OSEM was higher than that of FBP on cameras A-1 and A-2, while no significant difference was detected on cameras B-1 and B-2. Good linearity of SBR was observed in all cameras. In the comparison between Chang’s AC and CTAC, a significant correlation was observed on all cameras. The difference in the background region influenced SBR differently in Chang’s AC and CTAC on cameras A-1 and B-1. Conclusion: Iterative reconstruction improved image quality on all cameras

  12. ROC evaluation of SPECT myocardial lesion detectability with and without single iteration non-uniform Chang attenuation compensation using an anthropomorphic female phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, S.; Jaszczak, R.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Biomedical Engineering]|[Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States). Radiology; Gilland, D.R.; Turkington, T.G.; Coleman, R.E. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States). Radiology; Tsui, B.M.W. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Biomedical Engineering; Metz, C.E. [Univ. of Chicago Medical Center, IL (United States). Radiology

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate lesion detectability with and without nonuniform attenuation compensation (AC) in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in women using an anthropomorphic phantom and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) methodology. Breast attenuation causes artifacts in reconstructed images and may increase the difficulty of diagnosis of myocardial perfusion imaging in women. The null hypothesis tested using the ROC study was that nonuniform AC does not change the lesion detectability in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in women. The authors used a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm and Chang`s single iteration method for AC. In conclusion, with the proposed myocardial defect model nuclear medicine physicians demonstrated no significant difference for the detection of the anterior wall defect; however, a greater accuracy for the detection of the inferior wall defect was observed without nonuniform AC than with it. Medical physicists did not demonstrate any statistically significant difference in defect detection accuracy with or without nonuniform AC in the female phantom.

  13. Second generation anthropomorphic physical phantom for mammography and DBT: Incorporating voxelized 3D printing and inkjet printing of iodinated lesion inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikaria, Dhiraj; Musinsky, Stephanie; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Solomon, Justin; Diao, Andrew; Gehm, Michael E.; Samei, Ehsan; Glick, Stephen J.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-03-01

    Physical phantoms are needed for the evaluation and optimization of new digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems. Previously, we developed an anthropomorphic phantom based on human subject breast CT data and fabricated using commercial 3D printing. We now present three key advancements: voxelized 3D printing, photopolymer material doping, and 2D inkjet printing of lesion inserts. First, we bypassed the printer's control software in order to print in voxelized form instead of conventional STL surfaces, thus improving resolution and allowing dithering to mix the two photopolymer materials into arbitrary proportions. We demonstrated ability to print details as small as 150μm, and dithering to combine VeroWhitePlus and TangoPlus in 10% increments. Second, to address the limited attenuation difference among commercial photopolymers, we evaluated a beta sample from Stratasys with increased TiO2 doping concentration up to 2.5%, which corresponded to 98% breast density. By spanning 36% to 98% breast density, this doubles our previous contrast. Third, using inkjet printers modified to print with iopamidol, we created 2D lesion patterns on paper that can be sandwiched into the phantom. Inkjet printing has advantages of being inexpensive and easy, and more contrast can be delivered through overprinting. Printing resolution was maintained at 210 μm horizontally and 330 μm vertically even after 10 overprints. Contrast increased linearly with overprinting at 0.7% per overprint. Together, these three new features provide the basis for creating a new anthropomorphic physical breast phantom with improved resolution and contrast, as well as the ability to insert 2D lesions for task-based assessment of performance.

  14. Effect of imaging parameters of spiral CT scanning on image quality for the dental implants. Visual evaluation using a semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of parameters of spiral CT scanning on the image quality required for the planning of dental implants operations. A semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom which has artificial mandibular canals and teeth roots was used as a standard object for imaging. Spiral CT scans for the phantom settled in water phantom with diameters of 20 and 16 cm were performed. Visibility of the artificial mandibular canal made of a Teflon tube and gaps between tooth apex and canal in the mandibular phantom was evaluated for various combinations of the slice thickness, tables speeds, angles to the canal, and x-ray tube currents. Teeth roots were made of PVC (poly vinyl chloride). The artificial mandibular canal was clearly observed on the images of 1 mm slice thickness. At the same table speed of 2 mm /rotation, the images of thin slice (1 mm) were superior to that of thick slice (2 mm). The gap between teeth apex and canal was erroneously diagnosed on the images with table speeds of 3 mm/rotation. Horizontal scanning in parallel to the canal result in poor image quality for observation of mandibular canals because of the partial volume effect. A relatively high x-ray tube current (125 mA) at thin slice (1 mm) scanning was required for scanning the mandibular phantom in 20 cm water vessel. Spiral scanning with slice thickness of 1 mm and table speeds of 1 of 2 mm/rotation seemed to be suitable for dental implants. The result of this study suggested that diagnosis from two independent spiral scans with a different angle to the object was more accurate and more efficient than single spiral scanning. (author)

  15. Fast 3D coronary artery contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with magnetization transfer contrast, fat suppression and parallel imaging as applied on an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan, Roy; Rüssel, Iris K; Sijens, Paul E

    2006-09-01

    A magnetic resonance sequence for high-resolution imaging of coronary arteries in a very short acquisition time is presented. The technique is based on fast low-angle shot and uses fat saturation and magnetization transfer contrast prepulses to improve image contrast. GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisitions (GRAPPA) is implemented to shorten acquisition time. The sequence was tested on a moving anthropomorphic silicone heart phantom where the coronary arteries were filled with a gadolinium contrast agent solution, and imaging was performed at varying heart rates using GRAPPA. The clinical relevance of the phantom was validated by comparing the myocardial relaxation times of the phantom's homogeneous silicone cardiac wall to those of humans. Signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were higher when parallel imaging was used, possibly benefiting from the acquisition of one partition per heartbeat. Another advantage of parallel imaging for visualizing the coronary arteries is that the entire heart can be imaged within a few breath-holds.

  16. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body

  17. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Morishita, J [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JP (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body.

  18. Effects of exposure equalization on image signal-to-noise ratios in digital mammography: A simulation study with an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The scan equalization digital mammography (SEDM) technique combines slot scanning and exposure equalization to improve low-contrast performance of digital mammography in dense tissue areas. In this study, full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired with an anti-scatter grid at various exposure levels were superimposed to simulate SEDM images and investigate the improvement of low-contrast performance as quantified by primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs). Methods: We imaged an anthropomorphic breast phantom (Gammex 169 ''Rachel,'' Gammex RMI, Middleton, WI) at various exposure levels using a FFDM system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). The exposure equalization factors were computed based on a standard FFDM image acquired in the automatic exposure control (AEC) mode. The equalized image was simulated and constructed by superimposing a selected set of FFDM images acquired at 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 times of exposure levels to the standard AEC timed technique (125 mAs) using the equalization factors computed for each region. Finally, the equalized image was renormalized regionally with the exposure equalization factors to result in an appearance similar to that with standard digital mammography. Two sets of FFDM images were acquired to allow for two identically, but independently, formed equalized images to be subtracted from each other to estimate the noise levels. Similarly, two identically but independently acquired standard FFDM images were subtracted to estimate the noise levels. Corrections were applied to remove the excess system noise accumulated during image superimposition in forming the equalized image. PSNRs over the compressed area of breast phantom were computed and used to quantitatively study the effects of exposure equalization on low-contrast performance in digital mammography. Results: We found that the highest achievable PSNR improvement factor was 1.89 for

  19. Evaluation of neutron doses received at different organs in radiotherapy treatments using the UAB PADC based dosemeters in an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K.; Castelo, J. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Servicio de Radiofisica, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    The NEUTOR project was set up to study radiotherapy patient exposures to the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photon radiation above approx8 MeV. These neutrons may reach the patient directly, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well. A miniaturised version of the UAB PADC based neutron dosemeter is used, together with thermoluminescence Li-6/Li-7 pairs, in several positions inside an anthropomorphic female phantom to determine doses received by the patient at several organs or tissues. Irradiations were made at a 15 MV LINAC (Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla, Spain), an 18 MV LINAC (Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Spain) and a 23 MV LINAC (Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany). Preliminary patient dose maps obtained from the UAB PADC dosemeter measurements (considering an average calibration factor for all neutron energies) are reported in this work.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging properties of multimodality anthropomorphic silicone rubber phantoms for validating surgical robots and image guided therapy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carling L.; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James; Kim, Peter C. W.

    2012-02-01

    The development of image guided robotic and mechatronic platforms for medical applications requires a phantom model for initial testing. Finding an appropriate phantom becomes challenging when the targeted patient population is pediatrics, particularly infants, neonates or fetuses. Our group is currently developing a pediatricsized surgical robot that operates under fused MRI and laparoscopic video guidance. To support this work, we describe a method for designing and manufacturing silicone rubber organ phantoms for the purpose of testing the robotics and the image fusion system. A surface model of the organ is obtained and converted into a mold that is then rapid-prototyped using a 3D printer. The mold is filled with a solution containing a particular ratio of silicone rubber to slacker additive to achieve a specific set of tactile and imaging characteristics in the phantom. The expected MRI relaxation times of different ratios of silicone rubber to slacker additive are experimentally quantified so that the imaging properties of the phantom can be matched to those of the organ that it represents. Samples of silicone rubber and slacker additive mixed in ratios ranging from 1:0 to 1:1.5 were prepared and scanned using inversion recovery and spin echo sequences with varying TI and TE, respectively, in order to fit curves to calculate the expected T1 and T2 relaxation times of each ratio. A set of infantsized abdominal organs was prepared, which were successfully sutured by the robot and imaged using different modalities.

  1. Typical exposure parameters, organ doses and effective doses for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and direct measurements with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerth, Monika; Treitl, Karla Maria; Treitl, Marcus [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Seidenbusch, Michael C. [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Clinical Centre of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Sadeghi-Azandaryani, Mojtaba [Clinical Centre of the County of Erding, Department of Vascular Surgery, Erding (Germany); Lechel, Ursula [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Radiation exposure of patients during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures ranks in the upper sector of medical exposure. Thus, estimation of radiation doses achieved during EVAR is of great importance. Organ doses (OD) and effective doses (ED) administered to 17 patients receiving EVAR were determined (1) from the exposure parameters by performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical phantoms and (2) by measurements with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a physical anthropomorphic phantom. The mean fluoroscopy time was 26 min, the mean dose area product was 24995 cGy cm2. The mean ED was 34.8 mSv, ODs up to 626 mSv were found. Whereas digital subtraction angiographies (DSA) and fluoroscopies each contributed about 50 % to the cumulative ED, the ED rates of DSAs were found to be ten times higher than those of fluoroscopies. Doubling of the field size caused an ED rate enhancement up to a factor of 3. EVAR procedures cause high radiation exposure levels that exceed the values published thus far. As a consequence, (1) DSAs should be only performed when necessary and with a low image rate, (2) fluoroscopies should be kept as short as possible, and (3) field sizes should be minimized. (orig.)

  2. Effective dose estimation for pediatric voiding cystourethrography using an anthropomorphic phantom set and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan [McMaster University, Department of Medical and Health Physics, Hamilton (Canada); Thomas, Karen E.; Falkiner, Michelle; Gordon, Christopher L. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre L. [Hospital for Sick Children, Image-Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2009-06-15

    The risks associated with radiation exposure are higher in children than in adults. Therefore the use of fluoroscopy in common pediatric examinations such as voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) requires accurate determination of the associated effective dose. To estimate effective dose for VCUG examinations performed in children younger than 10 years using anthropomorphic phantoms and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. MOSFETs were placed within four phantoms representing children {<=}10 years old, at locations corresponding to radiosensitive organs, and exposed to a mock VCUG (5 min of fluoroscopy, 50 spot exposures) to minimize measurement error. Effective dose was measured and scaled to a standardized clinical VCUG (1 min fluoroscopy, 5 spot exposures) determined from patient logs. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to assess the accuracy of the measured effective dose. The dose area product (DAP) from each VCUG was compared to the effective dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.10 to 0.55 mSv, increased with age, and were higher in girls. Fluoroscopy accounted for 88-90% of the total effective dose, and spot exposures 10-12%. MOSFET-measured and simulation-derived effective doses were comparable (T > 0.12). DAP was strongly correlated with effective dose for both genders (r {sup 2}>0.97, P < 0.0001). Effective doses for VCUG examinations performed in children {<=}10 years of age are low but not negligible. (orig.)

  3. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0.

  4. SU-E-I-89: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Pediatric Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, 80 mA, 0.7s rotation time. Image quality was assessed by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: For the baseline protocol, CNR was found to decrease from 0.460 ± 0.182 to 0.420 ± 0.057 when kVa was activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.620 ± 0.040. The liver dose decreased by 30% with kVa activation. Conclusion: Application of kVa reduces the liver dose up to 30%. However, reduction in image quality for abdominal scans occurs when using the automated tube voltage selection feature at the baseline protocol. As demonstrated by the CNR and NPS analysis, the texture and magnitude of the noise in reconstructed images at ASiR 40% was found to be the same as our baseline images. We have demonstrated that 30% dose reduction is possible when using 40% ASiR with kVa in pediatric patients.

  5. Comparisons of point and average organ dose within an anthropomorphic physical phantom and a computational model of the newborn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, J B; Roshau, J N; Tressler, M A; Hintenlang, D E; Arreola, M M; Williams, J L; Bouchet, L G; Bolch, W E

    2002-06-01

    Pediatric radiographic examinations yield medical benefits and/or diagnostic information that must be balanced against potential risk from patient radiation exposure. Consequently, clinical tools for measuring internal organ dose are needed for medical risk assessment. In this study, a physical phantom and Monte Carlo simulation model of the newborn patient were developed based upon their stylized mathematical expressions (ORNL and MIRD model series). The physical phantom was constructed using tissue equivalent substitutes for soft tissue, lung, and skeleton. Twenty metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were then inserted at three-dimensional positions representing the centroids of organs assigned in the ICRP's definition of the effective dose. MOSFET-derived point estimates of organ dose were shown to be in reasonable agreement with Monte Carlo estimates for representative newborn head, chest, and abdomen radiographic exams. Ratios of average organ dose assessed via MCNP simulations to the MOSFET-derived point doses (point-to-organ dose scaling factors, SF(POD)) are tabulated for subsequent use in clinical irradiations of the newborn phantom/MOSFET system. Values of SF(POD) indicate that MOSFET measurements of point dose for in-field exposures need to be adjusted only to within 10% to report volume-averaged organ dose. Larger adjustments to point doses are noted for organs out-of-field. For walled organs, point estimates of organ dose at the content centroid are shown to underestimate the average wall dose when the organ is within the primary field: SF(POD) of 1.19 for the stomach (AP chest exam), and SF(POD) of 1.15 for the urinary bladder (AP abdomen exam).

  6. Volumetric x-ray coherent scatter imaging of cancer in resected breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study using virtual anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer patients undergoing surgery often choose to have a breast conserving surgery (BCS) instead of mastectomy for removal of only the breast tumor. If post-surgical analysis such as histological assessment of the resected tumor reveals insufficient healthy tissue margins around the cancerous tumor, the patient must undergo another surgery to remove the missed tumor tissue. Such re-excisions are reported to occur in 20%–70% of BCS patients. A real-time surgical margin assessment technique that is fast and consistently accurate could greatly reduce the number of re-excisions performed in BCS. We describe here a tumor margin assessment method based on x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) imaging and demonstrate its utility in surgical margin assessment using Monte Carlo simulations. A CSCT system was simulated in Geant4 and used to simulate two virtual anthropomorphic CSCT scans of phantoms resembling surgically resected tissue. The resulting images were volume-rendered and found to distinguish cancerous tumors embedded in complex distributions of adipose and fibroglandular breast tissue (as is expected in the breast). The images exhibited sufficient spatial and spectral (i.e. momentum transfer) resolution to classify the tissue in any given voxel as healthy or cancerous. ROC analysis of the classification accuracy revealed an area under the curve of up to 0.97. These results indicate that coherent scatter imaging is promising as a possible fast and accurate surgical margin assessment technique. (paper)

  7. Quality assurance in RapidArc with Alderson anthropomorphic phantom using radiochromic film in comparison to MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presented the quality control for RapidArc using an Alderson human body phantom and radiochromic film as an alternative system to approve the treatment plan for brain tumor. Thus, it was comprised the dose distributions provided by the treatment planning system with those measured by the film radiochromic. The gamma index (Γ) analysis, to verify the acceptability of the dose distribution, was 95% of approved points, with the mostly non-compliance points in regions near the PTV’s edges. These non-compliance points may be associated to transmission blades aspects, because the regions near the edges present significant losses compared to the central areas. Also, MATLAB has proved an effective tool for that measurements and it can be used in quality assurance programs. (author)

  8. MO-E-17A-02: Incorporation of Contrast Medium Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms: The Advent of 5D XCAT Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahbaee, P [NC State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Segars, W [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a unique method to incorporate the dynamics of contrast-medium propagation into the anthropomorphic phantom, to generate a five-dimensional (5D) patient model for multimodality imaging studies. Methods: A compartmental model of blood circulation network within the body was embodied into an extended cardiac-torso (4D-XCAT) patient model. To do so, a computational physiologic model of the human cardiovascular system was developed which includes a series of compartments representing heart, vessels, and organs. Patient-specific cardiac output and blood volume were used as inputs influenced by the weight, height, age, and gender of the patient's model. For a given injection protocol and given XCAT model, the contrast-medium transmission within the body was described by a series of mass balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast enhancement-time curves for each organ; thereby defining the tissue materials including the contrastmedium within the XCAT model. A library of time-dependent organ materials was then defined. Each organ in each voxelized 4D-XCAT phantom was assigned to a corresponding time-varying material to create the 5D-XCAT phantom in which the fifth dimension is blood/contrast-medium within the temporal domain. Results: The model effectively predicts the time-varying concentration behavior of various contrast-medium administration in each organ for different patient models as function of patient size (weight/height) and different injection protocol factors (injection rate and pattern, iodine concentration or volume). The contrast enhanced XCAT patient models was developed based on the concentration of iodine as a function of time after injection. Conclusion: Majority of medical imaging systems take advantage of contrast-medium administration in terms of better image quality, the effect of which was ignored in previous optimization studies. The study enables a comprehensive optimization of contrast

  9. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  10. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  11. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessa, C La; Berger, T; Kaderka, R; Schardt, D; Burmeister, S; Labrenz, J; Reitz, G; Durante, M

    2014-04-21

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient's body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm³ cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence ⁶LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and ⁷LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ≤ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 thermal neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order of magnitude as the primary radiation. In carbon therapy delivered with

  12. Design and development of an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces: feasibility study; Conception et developpement d'un fantome anthropomorphe equipe de detecteurs dans le but d'evaluer la dose efficace a un poste de travail: etude de faisabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furstoss, Ch

    2006-11-15

    My PhD study aims to determine the feasibility to design and develop, for photon fields, an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces. First of all, the energy losses within the organs are calculated using the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code, in order to determine the detection positions within the different organs. Then, to decrease the number of detection positions, the organ contribution to the effective dose is studied. Finally, the characteristics of the detectors to insert and the characteristics of the phantom to use are deduced. The results show that 24 or 23 detection positions, according to the wT values (publication 60 or new recommendations of the ICRP), give a E estimation with an uncertainty of {+-}15 % from 50 keV to 4 MeV. Moreover, the interest of such an instrument is underlined while comparing the E estimation by the personal dose equivalent Hp to the E estimation by the instrumented phantom when the phantom is irradiated by point sources (worker in front of a glove box for example). Last, after the detector and phantom characteristic determination, two types of detectors and one type of phantom are selected. However, for the detectors mainly, developments are necessary. Follow up this study, the characterization and the adaptation of the detectors to the project would be interesting. Furthermore, the study to mixed photon-neutrons would be required the needs of the radiological protection community. (author)

  13. Effective dose estimation for pediatric upper gastrointestinal examinations using an anthropomorphic phantom set and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emigh, Brent [McMaster University, Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton (Canada); Gordon, Christopher L.; Falkiner, Michelle; Thomas, Karen E. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre L. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Image-Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-09-15

    There is a need for updated radiation dose estimates in pediatric fluoroscopy given the routine use of new dose-saving technologies and increased radiation safety awareness in pediatric imaging. To estimate effective doses for standardized pediatric upper gastrointestinal (UGI) examinations at our institute using direct dose measurement, as well as provide dose-area product (DAP) to effective dose conversion factors to be used for the estimation of UGI effective doses for boys and girls up to 10 years of age at other centers. Metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were placed within four anthropomorphic phantoms representing children {<=}10 years of age and exposed to mock UGI examinations using exposures much greater than used clinically to minimize measurement error. Measured effective dose was calculated using ICRP 103 weights and scaled to our institution's standardized clinical UGI (3.6-min fluoroscopy, four spot exposures and four examination beam projections) as determined from patient logs. Results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations and related to fluoroscope-displayed DAP. Measured effective doses for standardized pediatric UGI examinations in our institute ranged from 0.35 to 0.79 mSv in girls and were 3-8% lower for boys. Simulation-derived and measured effective doses were in agreement (percentage differences <19%, T > 0.18). DAP-to-effective dose conversion factors ranged from 6.5 x 10{sup -4} mSv per Gy-cm{sup 2} to 4.3 x 10{sup -3} mSv per Gy-cm{sup 2} for girls and were similarly lower for boys. Using modern fluoroscopy equipment, the effective dose associated with the UGI examination in children {<=}10 years at our institute is < 1 mSv. Estimations of effective dose associated with pediatric UGI examinations can be made for children up to the age of 10 using the DAP-normalized conversion factors provided in this study. These estimates can be further refined to reflect individual hospital examination

  14. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi [Division of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Noto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Niigata 951-8520 (Japan); Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi, E-mail: masaito@clg.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  15. Advances in development of young-pediatric anthropometric and anthropomorphic head and neck phantoms for dosimetry; Avancos no desenvolvimento de fantomas antropomorfico e antropometrico de cabeca e pescoco infanto-juvenil para dosimetria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: thompson@nuclear.ufmg.br; campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2005-07-01

    The neck malign cancer in pediatric population differs significantly than adult cancer. The pediatric primary malign tumors result in the neck and head fence 5% . The malign cervical tumors, generally, are rabdomyossarcoms and lymphomas. The least frequent malign cancer includes metastasis, scammous cells and thyroid cancer. The larynx cancer treatment is surgery, preferentially. However, lesions with little infiltration, that do not compromise the vocals cords mobile, do not infiltrate cartilage, and do not compromise neither the anterior comissure neither the arytenoid, can be controlled with exclusive radiotherapy. The traditional dose for sub-clinical disease in larynx cancer, neck and head region, has been 50 to 60 Gy to standard fraction of 2 Gy/day, five times for week. When the treatment is consummated with exclusive radiotherapy in primary tumor. The dose must be higher, diversifying from 66 (for small tumors T1) to 70 Gy (for higher tumors, that T2 or T3). Phantoms are simulators utilized for dose prediction in patient simulating radiation interactions with matter. Also it is applied for radio diagnosis equipment calibration and quality control of medical image. Many kind of phantoms are developed, handmade and commercialized, with matters and forms most varied, holding distinct purpose, in senses of establishing double check parameters for reducing planning and calibration errors. This study addresses the development of a object for simulating young-pediatric anthropometric and anthropomorphic head and neck, called phantom, for dosimetric studies. The methodology will be based on the preparation of a phantom respecting the anatomic standards and its tissue equivalent composition. The hope is that phantom can be used in the scientific researches of radiation protocols applied to young-pediatric patient. (author)

  16. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  17. TH-A-19A-03: Impact of Proton Dose Calculation Method On Delivered Dose to Lung Tumors: Experiments in Thorax Phantom and Planning Study in Patient Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, C; Daartz, J; Dowdell, S; Ruggieri, T; Sharp, G; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Evaluate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation and the prediction of the treatment planning system (TPS) in a lung phantom and compare them in a cohort of 20 lung patients treated with protons. Methods: A 2-dimensional array of ionization chambers was used to evaluate the dose across the target in a lung phantom. 20 lung cancer patients on clinical trials were re-simulated using a validated Monte Carlo toolkit (TOPAS) and compared to the TPS. Results: MC increases dose calculation accuracy in lung compared to the clinical TPS significantly and predicts the dose to the target in the phantom within ±2%: the average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target is 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients show a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. The lower dose correlates significantly with aperture size and the distance of the tumor to the chest wall (Spearman's p=0.0002/0.004). For large tumors MC also predicts consistently higher V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} to the normal lung, due to a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target can show large deviations, though this effect is very patient-specific. Conclusion: Advanced dose calculation techniques, such as MC, would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. This would increase the accuracy of the relationships between dose and effect, concerning tumor control as well as normal tissue toxicity. As the role of proton therapy in the treatment of lung cancer continues to be evaluated in clinical trials, this is of ever-increasing importance. This work was supported by National Cancer Institute Grant R01CA111590.

  18. Dose evaluation in occupationally exposed workers through dosimeters ring and wrist type with an anthropomorphic phantom; Evaluacion de la dosis en trabajadores ocupacionalmente expuestos a traves de dosimetros tipo anillo y de muneca con un fantoma antropomorfico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, R.; Gastelo, E. [Univesidad Nacional Pedro Ruiz Gallo, Huamachuco, Lambayeque (Peru); Paucar, R.; Tolentino, D.; Herrera, J. [Complejo Hospitalario San Pablo, Lima (Peru); Armas, D., E-mail: fispalma@hotmail.com [Consorcio Proxtronics del Pacifico S. A. C., Cal. Manuela Estacio Mza. D1-2 Lote 13, San Miguel, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    In the Nuclear Medicine service of the Clinica San Pablo (Peru), the occupationally exposed workers carried out the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals to patients, so it is vital to measure the equivalent dose to the hands during the procedures in order to optimize the exposure to the ionizing radiation and execute the Radiological Safety Regulation (D.S. No. 009-97-Em) and the standard IR 002.2012 of radiation protection and safety in nuclear medicine. In this paper was designed and built a hand anthropomorphic phantom made of paraffin following the description given for the standard man, later were placed dosimeters ring and wrist type UD-807 model, Panasonic brand. Then we proceeded to irradiate using vial containers of Tc-99 and I-131. The obtained results showed the difference between the equivalent dose obtained among the ring and wrist dosimeter also getting a dose of 153 mSv /year when working with {sup 99m}Tc and of 61 mSv /year when working with iodine-131. Was also demonstrated that the ring dosimeter shows the average dose received in the hand with less dispersion. It was found that under the national regulation on Requirements of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety in Medicine article 63, indicates that higher doses of 150 mSv /year the occupationally exposed workers should have hand dosimetry. Finally the individual dose limit of 500 mSv /year in extremities can be overcome if adequate radiation protection standards do not apply. (author)

  19. Comparison of accuracy and time-efficiency of CT colonography between conventional and panoramic 3D interpretation methods: An anthropomorphic phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the conventional three-dimensional (3D) interpretation method with the panoramic 3D method with regard to accuracy and time-efficiency in the detection of colonic polyps, using pig colonic phantoms as the standard of reference. Materials and methods: One-hundred and sixty-two polyps were created in 18 pig colonic phantoms. CT colonography was performed with a 64-row detector CT scanner. Two-week interval reviews for the CTC image dataset with both the conventional and the panoramic 3D interpretation method were independently performed by three radiologists. The sensitivities of both methods were compared with the McNemar test. The mean interpretation time for each interpretation method was also assessed and compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Compared with the conventional 3D method (0.96 for reader 1, 0.89 for reader 2, and 0.97 for reader 3), the panoramic method revealed comparable sensitivities (0.91 for reader 1, 0.86 for reader 2, and 0.93 for reader 3) (p > 0.05). Interpretation time was significantly shorter with the panoramic method (115.1 ± 32.7 s for reader 1, 229.7 ± 72.2 s for reader 2, and 282.6 ± 113.7 s for reader 3) than with the conventional method (218.9 ± 59.9 s for reader 1, 379.4 ± 117.0 s for reader 2, and 458.7 ± 149.4 s for reader 3) for all readers (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Compared with the conventional 3D interpretation method, the panoramic 3D interpretation method shows improved time-efficiency and comparable sensitivity in the detection of colonic polyps.

  20. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  1. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials

  2. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first generation of heterogenoeous anthropomorphic mathematical models to be used in dose calculations was the MIRD-5 adult phantom, followed by the pediatric MIRD-type phantoms and by the GSF sex-specific phantoms ADAM and EVA. A new generation of realistic anthropomorphic models is now introduced. The organs and tissues of these models consist of a well defined number of volume elements (voxels), derived from computer tomographic (CT) data; consequently, these models were named voxel or tomographic models. So far two voxel models of real patients are available: one of an 8 week old baby and of a 7 year old child. For simplicity, the model of the baby will be referred to as BABY and that of the child as CHILD. In chapter 1 a brief literature review is given on the existing mathematical models and their applications. The reasons that lead to the construction of the new CT models is discussed. In chapter 2 the technique is described which allows to convert any physical object into computer files to be used for dose calculations. The technique which produces three dimensional reconstructions of high resolution is discussed. In chapter 3 the main characteristics of the models of the baby and child are given. Tables of organ masses and volumes are presented together with three dimensional images of some organs and tissues. A special mention is given to the assessment of bone marrow distribution. Chapter 4 gives a short description of the Monte Carlo code used in conjunction with the models to calculate organ and tissue doses resulting from photon exposures. Some technical details concerning the computer files which describe the models are also given. (orig./HP)

  3. Automatic Synthesis of Anthropomorphic Pulmonary CT Phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez-Carretero, Daniel; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Diaz Cacio, Mario; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The great density and structural complexity of pulmonary vessels and airways impose limitations on the generation of accurate reference standards, which are critical in training and in the validation of image processing methods for features such as pulmonary vessel segmentation or artery–vein (AV) separations. The design of synthetic computed tomography (CT) images of the lung could overcome these difficulties by providing a database of pseudorealistic cases in a constrained and controlled sc...

  4. Adult phantoms as function of body mass, height and posture by using caucasian anthropomorphic statistics; Fantomas adultos em funcao da massa corporal, da altura e da postura usando estatisticas antropometricas caucasianas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Richard; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira; Khoury, Helen Jamil, E-mail: rkramer@uol.com.b, E-mail: vagner.cassola@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Milian, Felix Mas, E-mail: felix_mas_milian@yahoo.co [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia

    2011-10-26

    The CALLDose{sub X} 4.0 computer program uses conversion coefficients for the MASH and FASH adult phantoms on the vertical and supine postures, representing the standard man and woman according to ICRP 90 and are called 'basic phantoms'. For improving the representation of real patients in the CALLDose{sub X}, this paper developed adults phantoms as function of mass and height by using anthropometric data from nine of them prevailing caucasian countries

  5. Radiation dose and cancer risk from pediatric CT examinations on 64-slice CT: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Shiting [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Law, Martin Wai-Ming [Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong); Huang Bingsheng [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Ng, Sherry [Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong); Li Ziping; Meng Quanfei [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Khong, Pek-Lan, E-mail: plkhong@hkucc.hku.hk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: To measure the radiation dose from CT scans in an anthropomorphic phantom using a 64-slice MDCT, and to estimate the associated cancer risk. Materials and methods: Organ doses were measured with a 5-year-old phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Four protocols; head CT, thorax CT, abdomen CT and pelvis CT were studied. Cancer risks, in the form of lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence, were estimated by linear extrapolation using the organ radiation doses and the LAR data. Results: The effective doses for head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis CT, were 0.7 mSv, 3.5 mSv, 3.0 mSv, 1.3 mSv respectively. The organs with the highest dose were; for head CT, salivary gland (22.33 mGy); for thorax CT, breast (7.89 mGy); for abdomen CT, colon (6.62 mGy); for pelvis CT, bladder (4.28 mGy). The corresponding LARs for boys and girls were 0.015-0.053% and 0.034-0.155% respectively. The organs with highest LARs were; for head CT, thyroid gland (0.003% for boys, 0.015% for girls); for thorax CT, lung for boys (0.014%) and breast for girls (0.069%); for abdomen CT, colon for boys (0.017%) and lung for girls (0.016%); for pelvis CT, bladder for both boys and girls (0.008%). Conclusion: The effective doses from these common pediatric CT examinations ranged from 0.7 mSv to 3.5 mSv and the associated lifetime cancer risks were found to be up to 0.16%, with some organs of higher radiosensitivity including breast, thyroid gland, colon and lungs.

  6. Dosimetry in thorax X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose to the entrance of thorax during a radiological study has been measured in a phantom of paraffin and with thermoluminescent dosemeters. This work was realized in the living room 1 of the X-rays service of the General Hospital No. 1 IMSS in Zacatecas. For the study thermoluminescent dosemeters of CaSO4:Dy were used. The irradiation of the thoracic region is the more studied through the conventional radiology, method that continues occupying the first place as diagnostic in diverse pathologies due to generates images of the heart, lungs, spine, etc. As well as can to observe the location of subclavian catheters, nasogastric sound, endotracheal tubes and umbilical catheters. The magnitude of the dose that is received during the realization of this study type is not usually measured, since the main concern is to have a good image to make a good diagnostic. The measurements were carried out using parameters of the equipment that were defined with base to the experience of the technical radiologist. It was found that the irradiation field is not uniform and that in any point where the dose was measured it is not exceeded the 7 mGy settled by the Mexican Official Standard-157-SSA-1996 for a thorax study. (author)

  7. The measurement of organic radiation dose of multi-slice CT scanning by using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom%中国人仿真胸部体模检测多层螺旋CT扫描组织器官剂量的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭刚; 曾勇明; 罗天友; 赵峰; 张志伟; 郁仁强; 彭盛坤

    2011-01-01

    目的 利用中国人仿真胸部模型来测量不同噪声指数下胸部各组织器官的吸收剂量,计算有效剂量(ED)并对MSCT胸部扫描进行剂量评估.方法 对CDP-1C型中国人仿真胸部体模在CT体层解剖和X线衰减两方面进行等效性论证;通过在体模内布放热释光剂量计(TLD)来测量不同噪声水平下各组织器官的吸收剂量,并记录相应的剂量长度乘积(DLP);将两者分别换算为ED后选择单因素t检验方法进行对比研究,分析自动管电流调制(ATCM)技术时不同噪声指数胸部CT扫描的剂量水平.结果 中国人仿真胸部体模与成人CT胸部图像的结构相似.体模主要器官平均CT值为肺-788.04 HU、心脏45.64 HU、肝脏65.84 HU、脊柱254.32 HU,与成人偏差程度分别为肺0.10%、心脏3.04%、肝脏4.49%、脊柱4.36%.肝脏的平均CT值差异有统计学意义(t=-8.705,P<0.05);肺、心脏和脊柱平均CT值与人体差异无统计学意义(t值分别为-0.752、-1.219、-1.138,P>0.05).当噪声指数从8.5逐渐增至22.5时,DLP从393.57 mGy·cm递减至78.75 mGy·cm,各器官吸收剂量呈下降趋势(以肺为例,平均吸收剂量从22.38 mGy递减至3.66 mGy).应用DLP所计算的ED较器官吸收剂量计算的ED偏低(以噪声指数为8.5为例,两种方法的ED分别为6.69和8.77 mSv).结论 应用中国人仿真体模来进行CT剂量评估更为准确;基于ATCM技术的胸部CT扫描噪声指数设定至少应大于8.5.%Objective Using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to measure the absorbed dose of various tissues and organs under different noise index, and to assess the radiation dose of MSCT chest scanning with the effective dose(ED). Methods The equivalence of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom(CDP-1C) and the adult chest on CT sectional anatomy and X-ray attenuation was demonstrated. The absorbed doses of various tissues and organs under different noise index were measured by laying thermoluminescent

  8. Quality assurance in RapidArc with Alderson anthropomorphic phantom using radiochromic film in comparison to MATLAB; Controle de qualidade em RapidArc com simulador de corpo humano antropomorfico Alderson utilizando filme radiocromico em comparacao ao MATLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Paulo L.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Santos, Maira R.; Trindade, Cassia; Martins, Lais P.; Batista, Delano V.S., E-mail: Paulo8_lgarcia@hotmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Victor G. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (SQRIS/INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Qualidade em Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2012-12-15

    This paper presented the quality control for RapidArc using an Alderson human body phantom and radiochromic film as an alternative system to approve the treatment plan for brain tumor. Thus, it was comprised the dose distributions provided by the treatment planning system with those measured by the film radiochromic. The gamma index (Γ) analysis, to verify the acceptability of the dose distribution, was 95% of approved points, with the mostly non-compliance points in regions near the PTV’s edges. These non-compliance points may be associated to transmission blades aspects, because the regions near the edges present significant losses compared to the central areas. Also, MATLAB has proved an effective tool for that measurements and it can be used in quality assurance programs. (author)

  9. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 4. Organ doses for adults due to idealized external photon exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report contains extensive tables and figures of conversion coefficients of organ and tissue equivalent dose, normalised to air kerma free in air for voxel anthropomorphic phantoms and for standard geometries of external photon radiation, estimated with Monte Carlo techniques. Four realistic adult voxel phantoms were used for the calculations, based on computed tomographic data of real people: three male phantoms, two of them being of average size, one representing a big man, and one female phantom of a tall and somewhat over weighted woman. (orig.)

  10. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 4. Organ doses for adults due to idealized external photon exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N; Regulla, D

    2002-01-01

    The present report contains extensive tables and figures of conversion coefficients of organ and tissue equivalent dose, normalised to air kerma free in air for voxel anthropomorphic phantoms and for standard geometries of external photon radiation, estimated with Monte Carlo techniques. Four realistic adult voxel phantoms were used for the calculations, based on computed tomographic data of real people: three male phantoms, two of them being of average size, one representing a big man, and one female phantom of a tall and somewhat over weighted woman.

  11. IGRT/ART phantom with programmable independent rib cage and tumor motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Olivier C. L., E-mail: o.haas@coventry.ac.uk [Control Theory and Applications Centre, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 2TL (United Kingdom); Mills, John A.; Land, Imke; Mulholl, Pete; Menary, Paul; Crichton, Robert; Wilson, Adrian; Sage, John [Department of Clinical Physics and Bioengineering, University Hospital, Coventry CV2 2DX (United Kingdom); Anna, Morenc [University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, LE1 5WW (United Kingdom); Depuydt, Tom [Radiotherapy, Medical Physics Group, University Hospital UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101 - 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the design and experimental evaluation of the Methods and Advanced Equipment for Simulation and Treatment in Radiation Oncology (MAESTRO) thorax phantom, a new anthropomorphic moving ribcage combined with a 3D tumor positioning system to move target inserts within static lungs. Methods: The new rib cage design is described and its motion is evaluated using Vicon Nexus, a commercial 3D motion tracking system. CT studies at inhale and exhale position are used to study the effect of rib motion and tissue equivalence. Results: The 3D target positioning system and the rib cage have millimetre accuracy. Each axis of motion can reproduce given trajectories from files or individually programmed sinusoidal motion in terms of amplitude, period, and phase shift. The maximum rib motion ranges from 7 to 20 mm SI and from 0.3 to 3.7 mm AP with LR motion less than 1 mm. The repeatability between cycles is within 0.16 mm root mean square error. The agreement between CT electron and mass density for skin, ribcage, spine hard and inner bone as well as cartilage is within 3%. Conclusions: The MAESTRO phantom is a useful research tool that produces programmable 3D rib motions which can be synchronized with 3D internal target motion. The easily accessible static lungs enable the use of a wide range of inserts or can be filled with lung tissue equivalent and deformed using the target motion system.

  12. SU-E-I-80: Quantification of Respiratory and Cardiac Motion Effect in SPECT Acquisitions Using Anthropomorphic Models: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadimitroulas, P; Kostou, T; Kagadis, G [University of Patras, Rion, Ahaia (Greece); Loudos, G [Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Attika (Greece)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify, evaluate the impact of cardiac and respiratory motion on clinical nuclear imaging protocols. Common SPECT and scintigraphic scans are studied using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, comparing the resulted images with and without motion. Methods: Realistic simulations were executed using the GATE toolkit and the XCAT anthropomorphic phantom as a reference model for human anatomy. Three different radiopharmaceuticals based on 99mTc were studied, namely 99mTc-MDP, 99mTc—N—DBODC and 99mTc—DTPA-aerosol for bone, myocardium and lung scanning respectively. The resolution of the phantom was set to 3.5 mm{sup 3}. The impact of the motion on spatial resolution was quantified using a sphere with 3.5 mm diameter and 10 separate time frames, in the ECAM modeled SPECT scanner. Finally, respiratory motion impact on resolution and imaging of lung lesions was investigated. The MLEM algorithm was used for data reconstruction, while the literature derived biodistributions of the pharmaceuticals were used as activity maps in the simulations. Results: FWHM was extracted for a static and a moving sphere which was ∼23 cm away from the entrance of the SPECT head. The difference in the FWHM was 20% between the two simulations. Profiles in thorax were compared in the case of bone scintigraphy, showing displacement and blurring of the bones when respiratory motion was inserted in the simulation. Large discrepancies were noticed in the case of myocardium imaging when cardiac motion was incorporated during the SPECT acquisition. Finally the borders of the lungs are blurred when respiratory motion is included resulting to a dislocation of ∼2.5 cm. Conclusion: As we move to individualized imaging and therapy procedures, quantitative and qualitative imaging is of high importance in nuclear diagnosis. MC simulations combined with anthropomorphic digital phantoms can provide an accurate tool for applications like motion correction

  13. SU-E-I-80: Quantification of Respiratory and Cardiac Motion Effect in SPECT Acquisitions Using Anthropomorphic Models: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify, evaluate the impact of cardiac and respiratory motion on clinical nuclear imaging protocols. Common SPECT and scintigraphic scans are studied using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, comparing the resulted images with and without motion. Methods: Realistic simulations were executed using the GATE toolkit and the XCAT anthropomorphic phantom as a reference model for human anatomy. Three different radiopharmaceuticals based on 99mTc were studied, namely 99mTc-MDP, 99mTc—N—DBODC and 99mTc—DTPA-aerosol for bone, myocardium and lung scanning respectively. The resolution of the phantom was set to 3.5 mm3. The impact of the motion on spatial resolution was quantified using a sphere with 3.5 mm diameter and 10 separate time frames, in the ECAM modeled SPECT scanner. Finally, respiratory motion impact on resolution and imaging of lung lesions was investigated. The MLEM algorithm was used for data reconstruction, while the literature derived biodistributions of the pharmaceuticals were used as activity maps in the simulations. Results: FWHM was extracted for a static and a moving sphere which was ∼23 cm away from the entrance of the SPECT head. The difference in the FWHM was 20% between the two simulations. Profiles in thorax were compared in the case of bone scintigraphy, showing displacement and blurring of the bones when respiratory motion was inserted in the simulation. Large discrepancies were noticed in the case of myocardium imaging when cardiac motion was incorporated during the SPECT acquisition. Finally the borders of the lungs are blurred when respiratory motion is included resulting to a dislocation of ∼2.5 cm. Conclusion: As we move to individualized imaging and therapy procedures, quantitative and qualitative imaging is of high importance in nuclear diagnosis. MC simulations combined with anthropomorphic digital phantoms can provide an accurate tool for applications like motion correction

  14. Application of the Voxeldose software for dosimetric evaluation on the thyroid during thorax-AP irradiation considering the peak voltages (k Vp) most used in diagnostic X-ray; Aplicacao do software Voxeldose para avaliacao dosimetrica na tireoide durante irradiacoes de torax-AP nas tensoes de pico (kVp) mais utilizadas em raio-X diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, I.F.; Vieira, J.W., E-mail: igoradiologia@hotmail.co, E-mail: jwvieira@br.inter.ne [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Leal Neto, V., E-mail: viriatoleal@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Lima, F.R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The evaluation of the absorbed dose distribution can be obtained through a computational model of exposures (ECM), being one the main difficulties at the specific dosimetric evaluation such as the radiodiagnostic, coupling the Monte Carlo computer code, developed for general use, to a anthropomorphic model. This problem can be solved by the software used in this paper, the VoxelDose, and it consists of an algorithm for X-ray diagnostic sources with the Monte Carlo EGS4 code coupled to the voxel anthropomorphic phantoms MAX (Male Adult voXel) and FAX (Female Adult voXel). The graphic interface allows the user to insert the mos common exams parameters, and to execute the simulation, obtaining conversion coefficients and the estimative of the deposited energy on organs/tissues radio sensible during the routine procedures. The data obtained were organized into graphics showing the thyroid equivalent dose, which is a radio sensible with 20 g mass and a weight factor of 5 %, compared with the effective dose during an irradiation of thorax-AP

  15. Monte Carlo Simulations for Homeland Security Using Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Kimberly A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A radiological dispersion device (RDD) is a device which deliberately releases radioactive material for the purpose of causing terror or harm. In the event that a dirty bomb is detonated, there may be airborne radioactive material that can be inhaled as well as settle on an individuals leading to external contamination.

  16. An experimental study of comparing digital tomosynthesis and multi-slice CT scanning for the detection of pulmonary nodules using the anthropomorphic chest phantom%数字断层融合技术与多层CT胸部扫描病变检出及辐射剂量的体模研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵峰; 曾勇明; 彭盛坤; 彭刚; 郁仁强; 谭欢; 蔡文晶

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价数字断层融合(DTS)技术及MSCT胸部扫描对肺结节的检出率及辐射剂量水平.方法 采用DTS及MSCT分别扫描共置入45个肺模拟结节及热释光剂量计(TLD)的胸部体模,记录并储存图像,测量胸部主要组织器官的吸收剂量并计算有效剂量.采用Fisher确切概率法(样本数小于30)和x2检验,比较DTS与MSCT扫描对模拟结节检出率的差别;两种检查方法器官吸收剂量的比较采用配对t检验.结果 DTS与MSCT对肺结节的检出率分别为66.7%( 30/45)和91.1% (41/45),差异有统计学意义(x2=8.073,P<0.05);对CT值为- 650 HU的磨玻璃结节检出率分别为73.3% (11/15)和93.3%( 14/15),差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).DTS对CT值为- 800 HU及直径<8 mm的磨玻璃结节检出率分别为33.3% (5/15)和16.7% (2/12),MSCT的检出率分别为80.0% (12/15)和66.7% (8/12),两者差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).胸部DTS检查各主要组织器官(肺、胸椎、心脏、肝脏、乳腺和甲状腺)的吸收剂量明显低于MSCT,两者差异有统计学意义(上述部位的t值分别为19.69、30.01、16.33、5.06、9.43和8.05,P值均<0.05).DTS与MSCT胸部扫描的有效剂量分别为0.65和7.71 mSv.结论 DTS对于CT值为- 650 HU的磨玻璃结节检出率与MSCT相近,对极低密度(- 800 HU)磨玻璃结节及直径<8 mm的磨玻璃结节检出率低.肺部结节检查时,DTS有效剂量低于MSCT,约为MSCT辐射剂量的8.41%.%Objective To compare detection rate of pulmonary nodules and the radiation doses of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and MSCT chest scanning by using the anthropomorphic chest phantom which contains thermoluminescent dosimeters ( TLD ) and simulated pulmonary nodules. Methods The radiation doses of DTS and MSCT scanning were measured by using the anthropomorphic chest phantom which contains 45 TLD and simulated pulmonary nodules.The radiation doses of najor organs were converted into effective dose ( ED

  17. Comparison of different phantoms used in digital diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bor, Dogan, E-mail: bor@eng.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Engineering Physics. Tandogan, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Unal, Elif, E-mail: elf.unall@gmail.com [Radat Dosimetry Laboratory Services, 06830, Golbasi, Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, Anil, E-mail: m.aniluslu@gmail.com [Radat Dosimetry Laboratory Services, 06830, Golbasi, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-21

    The organs of extremity, chest, skull and lumbar were physically simulated using uniform PMMA slabs with different thicknesses alone and using these slabs together with aluminum plates and air gaps (ANSI Phantoms). The variation of entrance surface air kerma and scatter fraction with X-ray beam qualities was investigated for these phantoms and the results were compared with those measured from anthropomorphic phantoms. A flat panel digital radiographic system was used for all the experiments. Considerable variations of entrance surface air kermas were found for the same organs of different designs, and highest doses were measured for the PMMA slabs. A low contrast test tool and a contrast detail test object (CDRAD) were used together with each organ simulation of PMMA slabs and ANSI phantoms in order to test the clinical image qualities. Digital images of these phantom combinations and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired in raw and clinically processed formats. Variation of image quality with kVp and post processing was evaluated using the numerical metrics of these test tools and measured contrast values from the anthropomorphic phantoms. Our results indicated that design of some phantoms may not be efficient enough to reveal the expected performance of the post processing algorithms.

  18. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use. (paper)

  19. Investigating human infant anthropomorphism in products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellen, K.; Saaksjarvi, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we set out to investigate the nature and effects of infant anthropomorphism in products, i.e. products that share features of human infants. Across four studies, evidence suggests that infant anthropomorphism comprise four dimensions: sweetness, simplicity, sympathy, and smallness. We

  20. Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Thorax and Abdomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard; Ivarsson, Johan; Maltese, Matthew R.

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death and injury for children in the United States. Pediatric anthropomorphic test devices (ATD) and computational models are important tools for the evaluation and optimization of automotive restraint systems for child occupants. The thorax interacts with the restraints within the vehicle, and any thoracic model must mimic this interaction in a biofidelic manner to ensure that restraint designs protect humans as intended. To define thoracic biofidelity for adults, Kroell et al. (1974) conducted blunt impacts to the thoraces of adult postmortem human subjects (PMHS), which have formed the basis for biofidelity standards for modern adult ATD thoraces (Mertz et al. 1989). The paucity of pediatric PMHS for impact research led to the development of pediatric model biofidelity requirements through scaling. Geometric scale factors and elastic moduli of skull and long bone have been used to scale the adult thoracic biofidelity responses to the 3-, 6-, and 10-year-old child (Irwin and Mertz 1997; Mertz et al. 2001; van Ratingen et al. 1997). There is currently a need for data that apply to the child without scaling, both for validation of scaling methods used in the past and to confirm the validity of the specifications currently used to develop models of the child.

  1. Validation of CT brain perfusion methods using a realistic dynamic head phantom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riordan, A.J.; Prokop, M.; Viergever, M.A.; Dankbaar, J.W.; Smit, E.J.; Jong, H.W. de

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Development and evaluation of a realistic hybrid head phantom for the validation of quantitative CT brain perfusion methods. METHODS: A combination, or hybrid, of CT images of an anthropomorphic head phantom together with clinically acquired MRI brain images was used to construct a dynamic

  2. A human head phantom for experimental dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve a better understanding of the behavior of nuclear particles in a human head experiment a phantom preserving similar tissues as well as similar anthropomorphic characteristics was used. In this work a biologic equivalent tissue material was developed, maintaining the chemical composition and tissue density, based on enriched PMMA. A humanoid head phantom was built using a human skull as a base, donated by the Morphology Department of the Institute for Biologic Sciences-ICB/UFMG. Muscles were replaced with biologic equivalent tissue material following anatomic precepts. The phantom presents: formalized animal salivary glands, brain and submandibular lymph nodes; human teeth; hair; prosthetic eyes and nose as well as human equivalent skin containing silicone and animal collagen. This phantom present several important conditions as human morphological characteristics, equivalent biological tissue and the head bone structure. It will be used in radiotherapy and brachytherapy studies, dosimetry and quality control of medical diagnostic image. (author)

  3. Anthropomorphism and Teleology in Reasoning about Biological Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Pinchas; Zohar, Anat

    1991-01-01

    Reports on interviews with 28 high school biology students in Jerusalem concerning teleological and anthropomorphic formulations and reasoning. Results indicate acceptance of anthropomorphic formulations does not imply a prevalence of anthropomorphic reasoning. Most high school students can distinguish between anthropomorphic formulations and…

  4. Creating an anthropomorphic digital MR phantom—an extensible tool for comparing and evaluating quantitative imaging algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosca, Ryan J.; Jackson, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Assessing and mitigating the various sources of bias and variance associated with image quantification algorithms is essential to the use of such algorithms in clinical research and practice. Assessment is usually accomplished with grid-based digital reference objects (DRO) or, more recently, digital anthropomorphic phantoms based on normal human anatomy. Publicly available digital anthropomorphic phantoms can provide a basis for generating realistic model-based DROs that incorporate the heterogeneity commonly found in pathology. Using a publicly available vascular input function (VIF) and digital anthropomorphic phantom of a normal human brain, a methodology was developed to generate a DRO based on the general kinetic model (GKM) that represented realistic and heterogeneously enhancing pathology. GKM parameters were estimated from a deidentified clinical dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI exam. This clinical imaging volume was co-registered with a discrete tissue model, and model parameters estimated from clinical images were used to synthesize a DCE-MRI exam that consisted of normal brain tissues and a heterogeneously enhancing brain tumor. An example application of spatial smoothing was used to illustrate potential applications in assessing quantitative imaging algorithms. A voxel-wise Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated negligible differences between the parameters estimated with and without spatial smoothing (using a small radius Gaussian kernel). In this work, we reported an extensible methodology for generating model-based anthropomorphic DROs containing normal and pathological tissue that can be used to assess quantitative imaging algorithms.

  5. Balancing of the anthropomorphous robot walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaev, V. M.; Nikitina, D. V.; Fadeev, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Anthropomorphic robots are designed a human environment operates: buildings and structures, cabs and etc. The movement of these robots is carried out by walking which provides high throughput to overcome natural and manmade obstacles. The article presents some algorithm results for dynamic walking on the anthropomorphic robot AR601 example. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University.

  6. Human phantom

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    This human phantom has been received by CERN on loan from the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It is used by the Health Physics Group to study personel radiation doses near the accelerators.

  7. Bases for calibration of whole body counters using anthropomorphic physical simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantification of radionuclides in the human body can be carried out through in vivo measurements performed in facilities generically called whole body counters. The calibration of such units is usually done by using physical anthropomorphic phantoms, which can be defined as artificial structures with geometrical characteristics and attenuation properties similar to the living tissues. This work presents the development of the phantoms necessary to the monitoring of the internal contamination by the radionuclides manipulated in Brazil. It also presents the procedures for the calibration of the detectors used for the in vivo measurements. The developed phantoms are applied in the determination of radionuclides deposited in specific organs, such as Th-232 and Am-241 in the lungs and skull, isotopes of iodine in the thyroid and photon emitters in the energy range from 100 to 3000 keV in the whole body. (author)

  8. Partial volume simulation in software breast phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyu; Pokrajac, David; Shi, Xiquan; Liu, Fengshan; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-03-01

    A modification to our previous simulation of breast anatomy is proposed, in order to improve the quality of simulated projections generated using software breast phantoms. Anthropomorphic software breast phantoms have been used for quantitative validation of breast imaging systems. Previously, we developed a novel algorithm for breast anatomy simulation, which did not account for the partial volume (PV) of various tissues in a voxel; instead, each phantom voxel was assumed to contain single tissue type. As a result, phantom projection images displayed notable artifacts near the borders between regions of different materials, particularly at the skin-air boundary. These artifacts diminished the realism of phantom images. One solution is to simulate smaller voxels. Reducing voxel size, however, extends the phantom generation time and increases memory requirements. We achieved an improvement in image quality without reducing voxel size by the simulation of PV in voxels containing more than one simulated tissue type. The linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of each voxel is calculated by combining attenuation coefficients proportional to the voxel subvolumes occupied by the various tissues. A local planar approximation of the boundary surface is employed, and the skin volume in each voxel is computed by decomposition into simple geometric shapes. An efficient encoding scheme is proposed for the type and proportion of simulated tissues in each voxel. We illustrate the proposed methodology on phantom slices and simulated mammographic projections. Our results show that the PV simulation has improved image quality by reducing quantization artifacts.

  9. Biomedical phantoms. (Latest citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, construction, and evaluation of various anthropomorphic phantoms: mathematical or physical models or constructs simulating human tissue which are used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology. The radiation characteristics of phantom materials are addressed, simulating human body tissue, muscles, organs, bones, and skin. (Contains a minimum of 112 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Coronary calcium mass scores measured by identical 64-slice MDCT scanners are comparable : a cardiac phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Groen, Jaap M.; Vliegenthart-Proenca, Rozemarijn; Renema, KlaasJan W. K.; de Lange, Frank; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    To assess whether absolute mass scores are comparable or differ between identical 64-slice MDCT scanners of the same manufacturer and to compare absolute mass scores to the physical mass and between scan modes using a calcified phantom. A non-moving anthropomorphic phantom with nine calcifications o

  11. 49 CFR 572.185 - Thorax (upper torso) assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Thorax (upper torso) assembly. 572.185 Section 572... Impact Crash Test Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.185 Thorax (upper torso) assembly. (a) The thorax assembly of the dummy must meet the requirements of both (b) and (c) of this section. Section...

  12. C臂锥形束CT成像时间对脑血管成像图像质量及辐射剂量影响的体模研究%Correlation of acquisition time of C-arm cone-beam CT with image quality and radiation doseduring cerebral angiography using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙静坤; 曾勇明; 杨靖捷; 王杰; 郁仁强; 金瑞; 彭刚

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of acquisition time of C-arm cone-beam CT on image quality and radiation dose of cerebral angiography.Methods C-arm cone-beam CT of cerebral angiography was performed on the male anthropomorphic head phantom,with DynaCT imaging mode and the acquisition time of 5 s,8 s and 20 s were used.Scanning was performed with each acquisition time for three times,and VR,MIP and MPR images were reconstructed.The attenuation values and their standard deviations of intracranial segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA),middle cerebral artery(MCA),anterior cerebral artery(ACA) and uniformed brain tissues were measured to calculate the image noise,signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR).We used the image noise,SNR and CNR as the objective standard to evaluate the image quality,and One-way ANOVA analysis of variance was used to assess the difference among them.A scale with scores 1 to 5 was used to rate the quality of the reconstructed image of ICA,MCA,ACA as a subjective evaluation,the difference among the evaluation scores were analyzed using Kruskal-wallis.We recorded the dose area product (DAP) of each acquisition time and the effective dose(ED) was calculated to assess the radiation dose,the difference among them were analyzed using One-way ANOVA analysis of variance.Results In C-arm cone beam CT 20 s imaging,the SNR of intracranial segment of the ICA,M CA,ACA were 22.29± 1.41,29.36 ±0.11 and 23.13 ±2.10 respectively,in 5 s imaging13.83 ±0.61,14.65 ±0.16 and 12.79±0.19 respectively,in 8 s imaging 14.92±0.96,18.97 ± 1.24 and 16.65 ±0.46 respectively,all the results showed a significant difference (F valued 58.19,327.29,52.74 respectively,all P valued<0.01),the CNR of 20 s imaging were higher than that of 5 s and 8 s imaging,the Noise of ICA,MCA,ACA and the uniformed brain tissues of 20 s imaging were lower than that of 5 s and 8 s imaging,all the results showed significant difference (all P valued<0

  13. Heart dosimetry in radiotherapy with hybrid computational phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    segmentation were estimated for a left side breast radiotherapy by simulating different realistic coronary artery topologies in a single representative thorax anatomy and calculating doses due to beam sets, with and without irradiation of the internal mammary chain. The inter-topology variability of the mean dose to the most irradiated coronary artery, the left descending coronary artery, was assessed to 35% and 19% with and without the internal mammary chain irradiation, respectively; and it was of 76% and 49%, respectively, considering the dose to the most irradiated 2% of this coronary artery volume. Finally, an order of magnitude of the differences between measurements by radiochromic films and dose calculations by the ISOgray treatment planning system in the peripheral field area, has been estimated by for both a simple configuration (parallelepiped physical phantom, homogeneous media, open square field) and a complex configuration (anthropomorphic physical phantom, heterogeneous media, rectangular tangential beams with wedge filter). These differences were judged significant essentially around the geometrical border of the irradiation field for both configuration. (author)

  14. Cardiovascular dosimetry using hybrid computational phantoms after external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    segmentation were estimated for a left side breast radiotherapy by simulating different realistic coronary artery topologies in a single representative thorax anatomy and calculating doses due to beam sets, with and without irradiation of the internal mammary chain. The inter-topology variability of the mean dose to the most irradiated coronary artery, the left descending coronary artery, was assessed to 35% and 19% with and without the internal mammary chain irradiation, respectively; and it was of 76% and 49%, respectively, considering the dose to the most irradiated 2% of this coronary artery volume. Finally, an order of magnitude of the differences between measurements by radiochromic films and dose calculations by the ISOgray treatment planning system in the peripheral field area, has been estimated by for both a simple configuration (parallelepiped physical phantom, homogeneous media, open square field) and a complex configuration (anthropomorphic physical phantom, heterogeneous media, rectangular tangential beams with wedge filter). These differences were judged significant essentially around the geometrical border of the irradiation field for both configuration. (author)

  15. Diaphragmatic Hernia Presenting as Empyema Thorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyendra Dhar, Sanjay K. Bhasin, J.G. Langer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic injuries are relatively rare and result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Regardlessof mechanism, seemingly innocent penetrating injuries may be long forgotten by the patient and arethe most commonly missed diaphragmatic injury. Diagnosis is often missed and high index of suspicionis vital. The clinical signs associated with a diaphragmatic hernia can range from no outward signs toimmediately life-threatening respiratory compromise. We report an unusual case of diaphragmatichernia presenting as empyema thorax after suffering from penetrating injury.

  16. Optimum location of external markers using feature selection algorithms for real-time tumor tracking in external-beam radiotherapy: a virtual phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankali, Saber; Esmaili Torshabi, Ahmad; Samadi Miandoab, Payam; Baghizadeh, Amin

    2016-01-01

    In external-beam radiotherapy, using external markers is one of the most reliable tools to predict tumor position, in clinical applications. The main challenge in this approach is tumor motion tracking with highest accuracy that depends heavily on external markers location, and this issue is the objective of this study. Four commercially available feature selection algorithms entitled 1) Correlation-based Feature Selection, 2) Classifier, 3) Principal Components, and 4) Relief were proposed to find optimum location of external markers in combination with two "Genetic" and "Ranker" searching procedures. The performance of these algorithms has been evaluated using four-dimensional extended cardiac-torso anthropomorphic phantom. Six tumors in lung, three tumors in liver, and 49 points on the thorax surface were taken into account to simulate internal and external motions, respectively. The root mean square error of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) as prediction model was considered as metric for quantitatively evaluating the performance of proposed feature selection algorithms. To do this, the thorax surface region was divided into nine smaller segments and predefined tumors motion was predicted by ANFIS using external motion data of given markers at each small segment, separately. Our comparative results showed that all feature selection algorithms can reasonably select specific external markers from those segments where the root mean square error of the ANFIS model is minimum. Moreover, the performance accuracy of proposed feature selection algorithms was compared, separately. For this, each tumor motion was predicted using motion data of those external markers selected by each feature selection algorithm. Duncan statistical test, followed by F-test, on final results reflected that all proposed feature selection algorithms have the same performance accuracy for lung tumors. But for liver tumors, a correlation-based feature selection algorithm, in

  17. Using NURBS type phantoms for the investigation of morphological factors affecting pulmonary anthropo-radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As existing phantoms used for the calibration of dosimetry measurements, notably in anthropo-radiometry, exhibit a poor anatomic realism because of their crude geometries, compositions and densities, and some other drawbacks, the authors, within the frame of improvement of calibration techniques, report the combined use of Mesh and NURBS-type phantoms (Non Uniform Rational B-Splines) which allow smooth shapes and finer geometries to be replicated. More precisely, they report the application of this type of phantoms to the modelling of a thorax and of a ribcage. They describe the protocols used to generate these phantoms and how some variations are introduced to take morphological characteristics (for example a female thorax) as well as various gamma ray distributions into account. Results are discussed in terms of validation of phantoms, and morphology variation

  18. Development of pathological anthropomorphic models using 3D modelling techniques for numerical dosimetry; Desenvolvimento de modelos antropomorficos patologicos usando tecnicas de modelagem 3D para dosimetria numerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Kleber Souza Silva [Faculdade Integrada de Pernambuco (FACIPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    Computational exposure models can be used to estimate human body absorbed dose in a series of situations such as X-Ray exams for diagnosis, accidents and medical treatments. These models are fundamentally composed of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), an algorithm that simulates a radioactive source and a Monte Carlo Code. The accuracy of data obtained in the simulation is strongly connected to the adequacy of such simulation to the real situation. The phantoms are one of the key factors for the researcher manipulation. They are generally developed in supine position and its anatomy is patronized by compiled data from international institutions such as ICRP or ICRU. Several pathologies modify the structure of organs and body tissues. In order to measure how significant these alterations are, an anthropomorphic model was developed for this study: patient mastectomies. This model was developed using voxel phantom FASH and then coupled with EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

  19. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  20. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  1. Revisiting the Effect of Anthropomorphizing a Social Cause Campaign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Williams

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that anthropomorphism can be harnessed as a tool to boost intentions to comply with social cause campaigns. Drawing on the human tendency to extend moral concern to entities portrayed as humanlike, it has been argued that adding personified features to a social campaign elevates anticipated guilt at failing to comply, and this subsequently boosts intentions to comply with that campaign. The present research aimed to extend extant research by disentangling the effects of emotional and non-emotional anthropomorphism, and differentiating amongst other emotional mechanisms of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect (namely, anticipated pride and anticipated regret. Experiment 1 (N = 294 compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and emotionally-neutral anthropomorphized campaign posters for boosting campaign compliance intentions against non-anthropomorphized posters. We also measured potential mechanisms including anticipated guilt, regret, and pride. Results failed to support the anthropomorphism-compliance effect, and no changes in anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. Experiments 2 (N = 150 and 3 (N = 196 represented further tests of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect. Despite high statistical power and efforts to closely replicate the conditions under which the anthropomorphism-compliance effect had been previously observed, no differences in compliance intention or anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. A meta-analysis of the effects of anthropomorphism on compliance and anticipated emotion across the three experiments revealed effect size estimates that did not differ significantly from zero. The results of these three experiments suggest that the anthropomorphism-compliance effect is fragile and perhaps subject to contextual and idiographic influences. Thus, this research provides important insight and impetus for future research on the applied and theoretical

  2. Revisiting the Effect of Anthropomorphizing a Social Cause Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa A; Masser, Barbara; Sun, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that anthropomorphism can be harnessed as a tool to boost intentions to comply with social cause campaigns. Drawing on the human tendency to extend moral concern to entities portrayed as humanlike, it has been argued that adding personified features to a social campaign elevates anticipated guilt at failing to comply, and this subsequently boosts intentions to comply with that campaign. The present research aimed to extend extant research by disentangling the effects of emotional and non-emotional anthropomorphism, and differentiating amongst other emotional mechanisms of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect (namely, anticipated pride and anticipated regret). Experiment 1 (N = 294) compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and emotionally-neutral anthropomorphized campaign posters for boosting campaign compliance intentions against non-anthropomorphized posters. We also measured potential mechanisms including anticipated guilt, regret, and pride. Results failed to support the anthropomorphism-compliance effect, and no changes in anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. Experiments 2 (N = 150) and 3 (N = 196) represented further tests of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect. Despite high statistical power and efforts to closely replicate the conditions under which the anthropomorphism-compliance effect had been previously observed, no differences in compliance intention or anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. A meta-analysis of the effects of anthropomorphism on compliance and anticipated emotion across the three experiments revealed effect size estimates that did not differ significantly from zero. The results of these three experiments suggest that the anthropomorphism-compliance effect is fragile and perhaps subject to contextual and idiographic influences. Thus, this research provides important insight and impetus for future research on the applied and theoretical utility of

  3. Biomechanical simulation of thorax deformation using finite element approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Chen, Xian; Ohgi, Junji; Miura, Toshiro; Nakamoto, Akira; Matsumura, Chikanori; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background The biomechanical simulation of the human respiratory system is expected to be a useful tool for the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases. Because the deformation of the thorax significantly influences airflow in the lungs, we focused on simulating the thorax deformation by introducing contraction of the intercostal muscles and diaphragm, which are the main muscles responsible for the thorax deformation during breathing. Methods We constructed a finite element model of t...

  4. Biomedical phantoms. January 1977-January 1989 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1977-January 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, construction, and evaluation of various anthropomorphic phantoms, used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology. The radiation characteristics of phantom materials are addressed, simulating human body tissue, muscles, organs, bones, and skin. (Contains 128 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  5. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  6. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. X. Geroge Xu

    2011-01-28

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-03-01

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  8. The use of zeolites to generate PET phantoms for the validation of quantification strategies in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zito, Felicia; De Bernardi, Elisabetta; Soffientini, Chiara; Canzi, Cristina; Casati, Rosangela; Gerundini, Paolo; Baselli, Giuseppe [Nuclear Medicine Department, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, via Francesco Sforza 35, 20122 Milan (Italy); Bioengineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy) and Tecnomed Foundation, University of Milano-Bicocca, via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (Italy); Bioengineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Nuclear Medicine Department, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, via Francesco Sforza 35, 20122 Milan (Italy); Bioengineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: In recent years, segmentation algorithms and activity quantification methods have been proposed for oncological {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET. A full assessment of these algorithms, necessary for a clinical transfer, requires a validation on data sets provided with a reliable ground truth as to the imaged activity distribution, which must be as realistic as possible. The aim of this work is to propose a strategy to simulate lesions of uniform uptake and irregular shape in an anthropomorphic phantom, with the possibility to easily obtain a ground truth as to lesion activity and borders. Methods: Lesions were simulated with samples of clinoptilolite, a family of natural zeolites of irregular shape, able to absorb aqueous solutions of {sup 18}F-FDG, available in a wide size range, and nontoxic. Zeolites were soaked in solutions of {sup 18}F-FDG for increasing times up to 120 min and their absorptive properties were characterized as function of soaking duration, solution concentration, and zeolite dry weight. Saturated zeolites were wrapped in Parafilm, positioned inside an Alderson thorax-abdomen phantom and imaged with a PET-CT scanner. The ground truth for the activity distribution of each zeolite was obtained by segmenting high-resolution finely aligned CT images, on the basis of independently obtained volume measurements. The fine alignment between CT and PET was validated by comparing the CT-derived ground truth to a set of zeolites' PET threshold segmentations in terms of Dice index and volume error. Results: The soaking time necessary to achieve saturation increases with zeolite dry weight, with a maximum of about 90 min for the largest sample. At saturation, a linear dependence of the uptake normalized to the solution concentration on zeolite dry weight (R{sup 2}= 0.988), as well as a uniform distribution of the activity over the entire zeolite volume from PET imaging were demonstrated. These findings indicate that the {sup 18}F

  9. Asbestos-related diseases of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbestos fibers can lead to pulmonary fibrosis, thickening of the pleura and malignancies. These pathologic changes are possible rather than determinate and depend on the type of asbestos fiber, length of exposure to fibers and individual factors. In Germany asbestos fibers were widely used until 1993. Worldwide, there is currently no general ban on the use of asbestos. The leading cause of asbestos-related diseases is occupational exposure. Due to a long latency period the appearance of such diseases may be delayed for more than 40 years so that the final number of cases has not yet been reached. Occupationally-derived asbestos-related diseases of the thorax are asbestosis, asbestos-related benign pleurisy and malignant pleural mesothelioma. Bronchial carcinoma can also be caused by asbestos exposure. For proof of occupational exposure, radiologists are required to report the presence of characteristic findings. The detection, in particular by chest X-ray and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), requires high quality images and standardized evaluation. The standardized ILO classification and the semi-quantitative HRCT coding are medical findings on which statutory registration criteria are based. (orig.)

  10. Dosimetry in thorax X-rays; Dosimetria en radiografia de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinedo S, A.; Hernandez O, M.; Duran M, H. A.; Gonzalez G, R.; Guerra M, J. A.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: lare_56@hotmail.com

    2009-10-15

    The dose to the entrance of thorax during a radiological study has been measured in a phantom of paraffin and with thermoluminescent dosemeters. This work was realized in the living room 1 of the X-rays service of the General Hospital No. 1 IMSS in Zacatecas. For the study thermoluminescent dosemeters of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy were used. The irradiation of the thoracic region is the more studied through the conventional radiology, method that continues occupying the first place as diagnostic in diverse pathologies due to generates images of the heart, lungs, spine, etc. As well as can to observe the location of subclavian catheters, nasogastric sound, endotracheal tubes and umbilical catheters. The magnitude of the dose that is received during the realization of this study type is not usually measured, since the main concern is to have a good image to make a good diagnostic. The measurements were carried out using parameters of the equipment that were defined with base to the experience of the technical radiologist. It was found that the irradiation field is not uniform and that in any point where the dose was measured it is not exceeded the 7 mGy settled by the Mexican Official Standard-157-SSA-1996 for a thorax study. (author)

  11. Dose in thorax X-ray; Dosis en radiografia de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinedo S, A.; Hernandez O, M.; Duran M, H. A.; Gonzalez G, R.; Guerra M, J. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: lare_56@hotmail.com

    2009-10-15

    The entrance dose that a patient receives during a radiological study of thorax was measured, these measures were realized with thermoluminescent dosemeters of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, placed in paraffin phantom. The radiation control in diagnostic radiology should be an important element during each radiological procedure. Current studies suggest that even low dose of X-rays used in routine diagnostic procedures can give space to a small incidence of latent damaging effects in patient. The irradiation of thoracic region is more studied through the conventional radiology, method that continues occupying the first place like diagnostic in several pathologies it generates images of heart, lungs, spine, etc. As well as, allow to observe the location of catheters, subclavian s, nasogastric sound, endotracheal tubes and umbilical catheters. The dose magnitude that is received during the realization of this study type is not usually measured, since the main concern is to have a good image to make a good diagnostic. The measures were realized using equipment parameters that were defined on experience of radiologist technician. The work was realized in the living room 1 of X-rays service of General Hospital of Zone No. 1 of IMSS in Zacatecas. The obtained results demonstrated that irradiation field is not uniform and that in any point where the dose was measured it is not exceeded to that established by the Mexican Official Standard-157-SSA-1996 for a study of thorax X-ray. (Author)

  12. Design And Implementation Of Anthropomorphic Robotic Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The report focuses on the design and demonstration of an anthropomorphic robotic arm with seven degrees of freedom using readily available low-cost components to perform different real time human hand applications. The robotic arm consists of a shoulder, elbow, wrist and a five-finger gripper. It can perform different gripping actions, such as lateral, spherical, cylindrical and tip-holding gripping actions; each finger has three movable links. The actuator used for the robotic arm is a high torque dc servo motor and the five-finger gripper consists of five cables placed like tendons in the human arm. Implementation is done using a human hand glove which senses the motion from sensor technology to produce a proportional analog voltage, digitized via the microcontroller Atmel ATmega32. The microcontroller then through the processed signal controls the mechanical structure that is the robotic arm. Keywords –

  13. Development of a breathing phantom for comparison of two breathing surrogates systems in 4DCT-imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Vásquez Torres, Andrés Camilo

    2011-01-01

    Die vierdimensionale Computertomographie (4D-CT) benötigt ein Monitorsignal für die Atmung. Verschiede Systeme sind zur Zeit verfügbar, aber um diese Systeme unter realistischen Bedingungen zu testen, ist ein Phantom mit einem beweglichen Zielobjekt und einer verformbaren äußeren Kontur erforderlich. Ein anthropomorphes Phantom wurde entwickelt und getestet. Die Atmungsbewegung eines Probanden wurde zusammen mit einer synchronen und asynchronen Bewegungen eines Lungentumors reproduziert. Das ...

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of adult and pediatric computed tomography exams: Validation studies of organ doses with physical phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Daniel J.; Lee, Choonsik; Tien, Christopher; Fisher, Ryan; Hoerner, Matthew R.; Hintenlang, David; Bolch, Wesley E. [J Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6131 (United States); National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1502 (United States); J Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6131 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0374 (United States); J Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6131 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo source model of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT scanner using organ doses measured in physical anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The x-ray output of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX version 2.6. The resulting source model was able to perform various simulated axial and helical computed tomographic (CT) scans of varying scan parameters, including beam energy, filtration, pitch, and beam collimation. Two custom-built anthropomorphic phantoms were used to take dose measurements on the CT scanner: an adult male and a 9-month-old. The adult male is a physical replica of University of Florida reference adult male hybrid computational phantom, while the 9-month-old is a replica of University of Florida Series B 9-month-old voxel computational phantom. Each phantom underwent a series of axial and helical CT scans, during which organ doses were measured using fiber-optic coupled plastic scintillator dosimeters developed at University of Florida. The physical setup was reproduced and simulated in MCNPX using the CT source model and the computational phantoms upon which the anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed. Average organ doses were then calculated based upon these MCNPX results. Results: For all CT scans, good agreement was seen between measured and simulated organ doses. For the adult male, the percent differences were within 16% for axial scans, and within 18% for helical scans. For the 9-month-old, the percent differences were all within 15% for both the axial and helical scans. These results are comparable to previously published validation studies using GE scanners and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms. Conclusions: Overall results of this study show that the Monte Carlo source model can be used to accurately and reliably calculate organ doses for patients undergoing a variety of axial or helical CT

  15. Reconstruction of voxel phantoms for skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality that utilizes ionizing radiation for the destruction of neoplastic human cells. One of the requirements for this treatment methodology success lays on the appropriate use of planning systems, which performs, among other information, the patient's dose distribution estimate. Nowadays, transport codes have been providing huge subsidies to these planning systems, once it enables specific and accurate patient organ and tissue dosimetry. The model utilized by these codes to describe the human anatomy in a realistic way is known as voxel phantoms, which are represented by discrete volume elements (voxels) directly associated to tomographic data. Nowadays, voxel phantoms doable of being inserted and processed by the transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) presents a 3-4 mm image resolution; however, such resolution limits some thin body structure discrimination, such as skin. In this context, this work proposes a calculus routine that discriminates this region with thickness and localization in the voxel phantoms similar to the real, leading to an accurate dosimetric skin dose assessment by the MCNP code. Moreover, this methodology consists in manipulating the voxel phantoms volume elements by segmenting and subdividing it in different skin thickness. In addition to validate the skin dose calculated data, a set of experimental evaluations with thermoluminescent dosimeters were performed in an anthropomorphic phantom. Due to significant differences observed on the dose distribution of several skin representations, it was found that is important to discriminate the skin thickness similar to the real. The presented methodology is useful to obtain an accurate skin dosimetric evaluation for several radiotherapy procedures, with particular interest on the electron beam radiotherapy, in which highlights the whole body irradiation therapy (TSET), a procedure under implementation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da

  16. Morphology and functional anatomy of the growing thorax; Morphologie und funktionelle Anatomie des wachsenden Thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weninger, W.J.; Meng, S.; Geyer, S.H.; Weninger, S.U.G. [Integrative Morphology Group, Unversitaet Wien (Austria); Institut fuer Anatomie, Universitaet Wien (Austria)

    2003-12-01

    Morphogenesis of most thoracic organs and structures is not finished with birth but perpetuates in postnatal life. The postnatal growth is partly associated with enormous changes in structure, morphology, and function. Our study presents an overview of morphological, topological and functional peculiarities of thoracic anatomy during infancy, childhood and adolescence. It focuses on the development of the mammary gland, osseous structures of the chest wall, thymus, heart, and lungs. Most of the presented data are based on post-mortem studies. Measurements and numerical data are mainly included for illustration of growth-associated changes. (orig.) [German] Die Morphogenese mancher thorakaler Strukturen und Organe ist zum Zeitpunkt der Geburt noch nicht vollstaendig abgeschlossen. Ihr postpartales Wachstum geht mit teils enormen strukturellen, morphologischen und funktionellen Veraenderungen einher. Die hier praesentierte Arbeit gibt einen Ueberblick ueber morphologische, topologische und funktionelle Besonderheiten der Anatomie des Thorax und seiner Organe im Neonatus, Saeugling, Kind und Jugendlichen. Der Schwerpunkt liegt auf der Beschreibung der Entwicklung der Brustdruese, des knoechernen Thorax, des Thymus, des Herzen und der Lunge. Die vorgestellten Daten stammen grossteils aus Post-mortem-Studien und dienen vorwiegend dazu, das Ausmass wachstumsassoziierter Veraenderungen und Relationen zu illustrieren. (orig.)

  17. Optimization and objective and subjective analysis of thorax image for computerized radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research aimed at optimizing computational chest radiographic images (in previous posterior projection-PA). To this end, we used a homogeneous patient equivalent phantom in Computational Imaging System calibration, in order to obtain a satisfactory noise signal relation for a diagnosis, adjusting to a minimum dose received by the patient. The techniques have been applied in an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO). The images obtained were evaluated by a radiologist, which identified the best image to determine possible pathologies (fracture or pneumonia). The technique were quantified objectively (Detective Quantum Efficiency - DQE, Modulation Transfer Function MTF, Noise Power Spectrum, NPS). Comparing optimized techniques with the clinical routine, it is concluded that all provide doses below reference levels. However the choice of the best technique for viewing possible pneumonia and/or fracture, was determined based on the first 3D (Dose, Diagnostic, Dollar) and regarded as gold standard. This image presented a reduction of dose and loading of tube around 70.5% and 80% respectively when compared with the clinical routine

  18. HIT anthropomorphic robotic hand and finger motion control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays many anthropomorphic robotic hands have been put forward. These hands emphasize different aspects according to their applications. HIT Anthropomorphic Robotic Hand (ARhand) is a simple,lightweight and dexterous design per the requirements of anthropomorphic robots. Underactuated self-adaptive theory is adopted to decrease the number of motors and weight. The fingers of HIT ARhand with multi phalanges have the same size as those of an adult hand. Force control is realized with the position sensor, joint torque sensor and fingertip torque sensor. From the 3D model, the whole hand, with the low power consumption DSP control board integrated in it, will weigh only 500 g. It will be assembled on a BIT-Anthropomorphic Robot.

  19. Variable curvature phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a variable curvature dosimetry phantom is briefly described. The phantom was developed to test the accuracy of the dose modification algorithms used to estimate dose distributions inside patient contours. 1 fig

  20. A Global Obstacle-avoidance Map for Anthropomorphic Arms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Fang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available More and more humanoid robots are used in human society, and they face a wide variety of complicated manipulation tasks, which are mainly to be achieved by their anthropomorphic arms. Obstacle avoidance for the anthropomorphic arm must be a fundamental consideration to guarantee the successful implementation of these tasks. Different from traditional methods searching for feasible or optimal collision-free solutions for the anthropomorphic arm, a global obstacle- avoidance map for the whole arm is proposed to indicate the complete set of feasible solutions. In this map, the motion of the arm can be appropriately planned to intuitively control the configuration of the arm in motion. First, the cubic spline function is adopted to interpolate some well-chosen path points to generate a smooth collision-free path for the wrist of the anthropomorphic arm. Second, based on the path function of the wrist, the time and the self-rotation angle of the arm about the “shoulder-wrist” axis are used to parameterize all possible configurations of the arm so that a global two- dimensional map considering the obstacle avoidance can be established. Subsequently, a collision-free self-rotation angle profile of the arm can be well planned. Finally, the joint trajectories of a specific anthropomorphic arm, which correspond to the planned path of the wrist and self-rotation angle profile of the arm, can be solved on the basis of the general kinematic analysis of the anthropomorphic arm, and the specific structure. Several simulations are conducted to verify that the proposed collision-free motion planning method for anthropomorphic arms has some advantages and can be regarded as a convenient and intuitive tool to control the configuration of the anthropomorphic arm in motion, without collision with obstacles in its surroundings.

  1. Membership function used to construction of a hand homogeneous phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractures and dislocations of the hand are some injuries most frequently encountered in trauma of the musculoskeletal system. In evaluating these lesions, in addition to physical examination, radiography, in at least two incidents, is the investigation of choice, and rarely is necessary the help of other images to establish the diagnosis and treatment. The image quality of X-ray examination is therefore essential. In this study, a homogeneous phantom hand was developed to be used in the optimization of images from hand using computed radiography system process. In this procedure were quantified thicknesses of different tissues that constitute an anthropomorphic phantom hand. To perform the classification and quantification of tissue was applied membership functions for histograms of CT scans. The same procedure was adopted for retrospective examinations of 30 patients of the Hospital das Clinicas, Botucatu Medicine School, UNESP (HCFMB-UNESP). The results showed agreement between the thicknesses of tissues that make up the anthropomorphic phantom and sampling of patients, presenting variations between 12.63% and 6.48% for soft tissue and bone, respectively. (author)

  2. Asbestos-related diseases of the thorax; Asbestverursachte Veraenderungen am Thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hieckel, H.G. [Evangelische Lungenklinik Berlin (Germany); Hering, K.G. [Knappschaftskrankenhaus Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Asbestos fibers can lead to pulmonary fibrosis, thickening of the pleura and malignancies. These pathologic changes are possible rather than determinate and depend on the type of asbestos fiber, length of exposure to fibers and individual factors. In Germany asbestos fibers were widely used until 1993. Worldwide, there is currently no general ban on the use of asbestos. The leading cause of asbestos-related diseases is occupational exposure. Due to a long latency period the appearance of such diseases may be delayed for more than 40 years so that the final number of cases has not yet been reached. Occupationally-derived asbestos-related diseases of the thorax are asbestosis, asbestos-related benign pleurisy and malignant pleural mesothelioma. Bronchial carcinoma can also be caused by asbestos exposure. For proof of occupational exposure, radiologists are required to report the presence of characteristic findings. The detection, in particular by chest X-ray and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), requires high quality images and standardized evaluation. The standardized ILO classification and the semi-quantitative HRCT coding are medical findings on which statutory registration criteria are based. (orig.) [German] Asbestfasern koennen zu einer Lungenfibrose, zu Verdickungen der Pleura und zu Malignomen fuehren. Diese pathologischen Veraenderungen sind fakultativ und abhaengig von der Asbestart, der Dauer der Exposition und von individuellen Faktoren. Asbest fand bis 1993 in Deutschland breiten Einsatz. Weltweit besteht noch kein Verbot. Mehrheitlich sind asbestbedingte Erkrankungen Folgen beruflicher Expositionen. Bis zu ihrem Auftreten liegen lange Latenzzeiten bis ueber 40 Jahre, sodass das Maximum noch nicht erreicht ist. Asbestverursachte Berufserkrankungen am Thorax sind die Asbestose und asbestverursachte benigne Pleuraerkrankungen sowie das maligne Pleuramesotheliom. Bronchialkarzinome koennen asbestverursacht sein. Zur Beweisfuehrung wird von der

  3. A sub-domain based regularization method with prior information for human thorax imaging using electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can be used as a bed-side monitoring tool for human thorax imaging. EIT has high temporal resolution characteristics but at the same time it suffers from poor spatial resolution due to ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Often regularization methods are used as a penalty term in the cost function to stabilize the sudden changes in resistivity. In human thorax monitoring, with conventional regularization methods employing Tikhonov type regularization, the reconstructed image is smoothed between the heart and the lungs, that is, it makes it difficult to distinguish the exact boundaries of the lungs and the heart. Sometimes, obtaining structural information of the object prior to this can be incorporated into the regularization method to improve the spatial resolution along with helping create clear and distinct boundaries between the objects. However, the boundary of the heart is changed rapidly due to the cardiac cycle hence there is no information concerning the exact boundary of the heart. Therefore, to improve the spatial resolution for human thorax monitoring during the cardiac cycle, in this paper, a sub-domain based regularization method is proposed assuming the lungs and part of background region is known. In the proposed method, the regularization matrix is modified anisotropically to include sub-domains as prior information, and the regularization parameter is assigned with different weights to each sub-domain. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments for 2D human thorax monitoring are performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed regularization method. The results show a better reconstruction performance with the proposed regularization method. (paper)

  4. Flexibility and control of thorax deformation during hawkmoth flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Noriyasu; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between neuromuscular systems and body mechanics plays an important role in the production of coordinated movements in animals. Lepidopteran insects move their wings by distortion of the thorax structure via the indirect flight muscles (IFMs), which are activated by neural signals at every stroke. However, how the action of these muscles affects thorax deformation and wing kinematics is poorly understood. We measured the deformation of the dorsal thorax (mesonotum) of tethered flying hawkmoths, Agrius convolvuli, using a high-speed laser profilometer combined with simultaneous recordings of electromyograms and wing kinematics. We observed that locally amplified mesonotum deformation near the wing hinges ensures sufficient wing movement. Furthermore, phase asymmetry in IFM activity leads to phase asymmetry in mesonotum oscillations and wingbeats. Our results revealed the flexibility and controllability of the single structure of the mesonotum by neurogenic action of the IFMs. PMID:26740560

  5. Potentiation of chemically induced lung fibrosis by thorax irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraperitoneal injection of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) causes epithelial cell death, followed 2 to 4 days later by extensive proliferation of type II alveolar cells in mouse lung. Five to 8 days after BHT, most dividing cells are capillary endothelial cells or interstitial cells. In animials that were exposed to 200 rad thorax irradiation immediately or 1 day after BHT, lung hydroxyproline was increased 2 weeks later. The response was dose dependent, and the interaction between BHT and thorax irradiation was synergistic. Light microscopy showed abnormal accumulation of collagen in the alveolar septa. Lung hydroxyproline was not increased in animals that were irradiated 6 days after BHT, compared to animals treated with BHT alone. We concluded that fibrosis develops if lung is damaged by a blood-borne agent and radiation to the thorax occurs at a time when it may compromise alveolar reepithelialization. Exposure to x-rays during proliferation of capillary endothelial cells or interstitial cells does not enhance development of fibrosis

  6. Evaluation of the effective dose in an anthropomorphic phantom in radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to perform a modeling of the human anatomy using Voxel models applied to Monte Carlo code and the Visual Monte Carlo software, simulating irradiation of the human body, so you can make the dose assessment in individuals who have been exposed to any external ionizing radiation source. Making the future, an assessment of both results with limits of validity of TECDOC-1162 expressions of the IAEA in case of point source

  7. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low-dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Koivisto; J.E. Wolff; T. Kiljunen; D. Schulze; M. Kortesniemi

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low-dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the t

  8. Pediatric radiation dosimetry for positron-emitting radionuclides using anthropomorphic phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) plays an important role in the diagnosis, staging, treatment, and surveillance of clinically localized diseases. Combined PET/CT imaging exhibits significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than conventional imaging when it comes to detecti

  9. Evaluation of organ doses in adult and paediatric CT examinations based on Monte Carlo simulations and in-phantom dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K; Nomura, K; Muramatsu, Y; Takahashi, K; Obara, S; Akahane, K; Satake, M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and organ doses evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations through comparisons with doses evaluated by in-phantom dosimetry. Organ doses were measured with radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter (RGD) set at various organ positions within adult and 1-y-old anthropomorphic phantoms. For the dose simulations, the X-ray spectrum and bow-tie filter shape of a CT scanner were estimated and 3D voxelised data of the CTDI and anthropomorphic phantoms from the acquired CT images were derived. Organ dose simulations and measurements were performed with chest and abdomen-pelvis CT examination scan parameters. Relative differences between the simulated and measured doses were within 5 % for the volume CTDI and 13 % for organ doses for organs within the scan range in adult and paediatric CT examinations. The simulation results were considered to be in good agreement with the measured doses. PMID:25848103

  10. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom.

  11. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom

  12. Physical phantom of typical Korean male for radiation protection purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose distribution within a human body can be measured using physical anthropomorphic phantoms. In an effort to establish reference Korean physical model, the first Korean physical phantom of average Korean adult male was constructed using computed tomography (CT) images of a healthy volunteer. The body dimension of the subject was close to that of average Korean male. The source images were obtained using fusion positron emission tomography machine at Radiation Health Research Inst. in Korea, and ported into rapid proto-typing process. The physical phantom was composed of three tissue-equivalent materials: epoxy resin, urethane foam and polyurethane representing bone, lungs and soft tissues, respectively. The densities of the tissue-equivalent materials were close to those recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and measurements. To facilitate dose mapping, the phantom was sliced into 2 cm sections. Hole grids for thermoluminescence (TL) dosemeter chips were drilled. To verify the appropriateness of the physical phantom, organ doses of selected organs were measured for reference photon beam, and compared with those computed by tomographic model constructed from the same CT images. Absorbed doses converted from TL relative response showed good agreement within 7% with those calculated. (authors)

  13. High resolution, MRI-based, segmented, computerized head phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubal, I.G.; Harrell, C.R.; Smith, E.O.; Smith, A.L.; Krischlunas, P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1999-01-01

    The authors have created a high-resolution software phantom of the human brain which is applicable to voxel-based radiation transport calculations yielding nuclear medicine simulated images and/or internal dose estimates. A software head phantom was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal individual. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x256 matrix from a GE Signa 2 scanner, have isotropic voxel dimensions of 1.5 mm and were manually segmented by the clinical staff. Each voxel of the phantom contains one of 62 index numbers designating anatomical, neurological, and taxonomical structures. The result is stored as a 256x256x128 byte array. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. The computerized array represents a high resolution model of a typical human brain and serves as a voxel-based anthropomorphic head phantom suitable for computer-based modeling and simulation calculations. It offers an improved realism over previous mathematically described software brain phantoms, and creates a reference standard for comparing results of newly emerging voxel-based computations. Such voxel-based computations lead the way to developing diagnostic and dosimetry calculations which can utilize patient-specific diagnostic images. However, such individualized approaches lack fast, automatic segmentation schemes for routine use; therefore, the high resolution, typical head geometry gives the most realistic patient model currently available.

  14. Depth dose distributions measured with thermoluminescence detectors inside the anthropomorphic torso of the MATROSHKA experiment inside and outside the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Hajek, Michael; Bergmann, Robert; Bilski, Pawel; Puchalska, Msc. Monika

    The ESA MATROSHKA (MTR) facility was realized through the German Aerospace Center, DLR, Cologne, as main contractor, aiming for the determination of skin and organ doses within a simulated human upper torso. MTR simulates, by applying an anthropomorphic upper torso, as exact as possible an astronaut performing either an extravehicular activity (EVA) (MTR Phase 1) or an astronaut working inside the International Space Station (MTR Phase 2A). It consists of a human phantom, a Base Structure and a Carbon fibre container - simulating the astronaut‘s space suit. The phantom itself is made up of 33 slices composed of natural bones, embedded in tissue equivalent plastic of different density for tissue and lung. The Phantom slices are equipped with channels and cut-outs to allow the accommodation of active and passive dosemeters, temperature and pressure sensors. Over 4800 passive detectors (thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) and plastic nuclear track detectors) constitute the radiation experiments which are beside inside the phantom also located on top the head of the phantom, in front of the belly and around the body as part of a Poncho and a Hood. In its 1st exposure phase (MTR 1: 2004 - 2005) MTR measured the depth dose distribution of an astronaut performing an EVA - mounted outside the Zvezda Module. In its 2nd exposure phase the phantom was positioned inside the ISS to monitor the radiation environment and measure the depth dose distribution in dependence on the inside shielding configurations. The majority of the TLDs provided for the determination of the depth dose distribution was provided by IFJ-PAN, ATI and DLR. Data of "combined" depth dose distribution of the three different groups will be shown for the MTR-1 exposure (outside the ISS) and the MTR-2A (inside the ISS). The discussion will focus on the difference in depth dose as well as skin dose distribution based on the different shielding thickness provided by the two experimental phases.

  15. Saccadic head and thorax movements in freely walking blowflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, G.; Hateren, J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    Visual information processing is adapted to the statistics of natural visual stimuli, and these statistics depend to a large extent on the movements of an animal itself. To investigate such movements in freely walking blowflies, we measured the orientation and position of their head and thorax, with

  16. Training for thorax diagnostics. Systematic cardiopulmonary image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The training book on thorax diagnostics using image analysis is supposed to be a supplement to the usual textbooks based on comprehensive experiences of radiologists. The covered issues are the following: heart insufficiency, acute/ chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema; pneumonia and tuberculosis; bronchial carcinoma; lung fibrosis, sarcoidosis and pneumoconiosis, pleural effusion and pneumothorax.

  17. Recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax after radiation therapy to the thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twiford, T.W. Jr.; Zornoza, J.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1978-03-01

    Two patients who received radiation therapy to the thorax and who developed recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces are presented. Patients with recurrent pneumothoraces secondary to radiation have not been described previously. Pleural changes secondary to radiation may contribute significantly to the complicated clinical course of these patients.

  18. Automated phantom assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an automated phantom assay system developed for assaying phantoms spiked with minute quantities of radionuclides. The system includes a computer-controlled linear-translation table that positions the phantom at exact distances from a spectrometer. A multichannel analyzer (MCA) interfaces with a computer to collect gamma spectral data. Signals transmitted between the controller and MCA synchronize data collection and phantom positioning. Measured data are then stored on disk for subsequent analysis. The automated system allows continuous unattended operation and ensures reproducible results

  19. Calibration of a large hyperpure germanium array for in-vivo detection of the actinides with a tissue-equivalent torso phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For calibration of the array for internally deposited 238Pu, 239Pu, and 241Am, a tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom, was used for efficiency determinations at the ORNL facility. This phantom consists of a tissue-equivalent torso into which is imbedded an adult male skeleton, interchangeable organs containing a homogeneous distribution of various radionuclides, and two sets of chest overlay plates for simulation of progressively thicker tissue over the chest, as well as differing thoracic fat contents

  20. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  1. Optimal markers' placement on the thorax for clinical gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Sangeux, Morgan; Baker, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Although, several thorax models have been proposed for clinical gait analysis, none has received widespread acceptance nor been subject to any extensive validation work, especially for the marker set to use. The aim of this study was thus to determine the optimal and minimal makers' placement on the thorax for clinical gait analysis. Ten healthy subjects have performed a series of movements (arm, head, trunk) with large amplitude during walking. Reflective markers were taped on the thorax (C7, T2, T4, T6, T8, T10, T12, sternum, clavicles and ribs) and their 3D positions were captured with an opto-electronic system. Each combination of 3 markers has been tested. The global error of each model was computed with the estimated position of the markers considering the thorax segment as a solid segment. Two families of marker sets were identified with the lowest error. The first family was composed by two anterior and one posterior marker on the thorax (incisura jugularis (IJ), xiphoid process, and T8). The second family was composed by two posterior and one anterior maker (IJ, T2 and T8 or T10). Even, if these two families of marker sets presented a similar error for marker position, the angles obtained from these marker sets showed large differences especially for the axial rotation movement of the trunk (up to 40.1°). The optimal and minimal maker set identified with a variety of large movements of the trunk, head and arms was IJ, T2 and T8 or T10.

  2. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use.

  3. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use

  4. Blowfly flight and optic flow I. Thorax kinematics and flight dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilstra, C; Van Hateren, JH

    1999-01-01

    The motion of the thorax of the blowfly Calliphora vicina was measured during cruising flight inside a cage measuring 40 cmx40 cmx40 cm, Sensor coils mounted on the thorax picked up externally generated magnetic fields and yielded measurements of the position and orientation of the thorax with a res

  5. Blowfly Flight and Optic Flow. I. Thorax Kinematics and Flight Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilstra, C.; Hateren, J.H. van

    1999-01-01

    The motion of the thorax of the blowfly Calliphora vicina was measured during cruising flight inside a cage measuring 40cm×40cm×40 cm. Sensor coils mounted on the thorax picked up externally generated magnetic fields and yielded measurements of the position and orientation of the thorax with a resol

  6. 21. Phantom pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, A.P.; Vanduynhoven, E.; Kleef, M. van; Huygen, F.; Pope, J.E.; Mekhail, N.

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the p

  7. Kids See Human Too: Adapting an Individual Differences Measure of Anthropomorphism for a Child Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, Rachel L.; Lemm, Kristi M.

    2016-01-01

    The study of anthropomorphism in adults has received considerable interest with the development of the Individual Differences in Anthropomorphism Questionnaire (IDAQ; Waytz, Cacioppo, & Epley, 2010). Anthropomorphism in children--its development, correlates, and consequences--is also of significant interest, yet a comparable measure does not…

  8. Evaluation of a method for correction of scatter radiation in thorax cone beam CT; Evaluation d'une methode de correction du rayonnement diffuse en tomographie du thorax avec faisceau conique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M. [CEA Grenoble (DTBS/STD), Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique, LETI, 38 (France); Esteve, F. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution. X-ray scatter estimation is a big challenge for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax: scatter level is significantly higher on cone beam systems compared to collimated fan beam systems. The effects of this scattered radiation are cupping artefacts, streaks, and quantification inaccuracies. The beam stops conventional scatter estimation approach can be used for CBCT but leads to a significant increase in terms of dose and acquisition time. At CEA-LETI has been developed an original scatter management process without supplementary acquisition. Methods and Materials: This Analytical Plus Indexing-based method (API) of scatter correction in CBCT is based on scatter calibration through offline acquisitions with beam stops on lucite plates, combined to an analytical transformation issued from physical equations. This approach has been applied with success in bone densitometry and mammography. To evaluate this method in CBCT, acquisitions from a thorax phantom with and without beam stops have been performed. To compare different scatter correction approaches, Feldkamp algorithm has been applied on rough data corrected from scatter by API and by beam stops approaches. Results: The API method provides results in good agreement with the beam stops array approach, suppressing cupping artefact. Otherwise influence of the scatter correction method on the noise in the reconstructed images has been evaluated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the API method is effective for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax. Compared to a beam stops array method it needs a lower x-ray dose and shortens acquisition time. (authors)

  9. Radiological diagnostics of abdomen and thorax. Image interpretation considering anatomical landmarks and clinical symptoms; Radiologische Diagnostik Abdomen und Thorax. Bildinterpretation unter Beruecksichtigung anatomischer Landmarken und klinischer Symptome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krombach, Gabriele A. [Universitaetsklinikum Giessen (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Mahnken, Andreas H. (ed.) [Universitaetsklinikum Marburg (Germany). Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2015-07-01

    The book on radiological diagnostics of abdomen and thorax - image interpretation considering anatomical landmarks and clinical symptoms - includes three chapters: (1) imaging of different parts of the body: thorax and abdomen. (II) Thorax: head and neck; mediastinum; heard and pericardium; large vessels; lungs and pleura; mamma. (III) Abdomen: liver; gall bladder and biliary tract; pancreas; gastrointestinal tract; spleen and lymphatic system; adrenal glands; kidneys and urinary tract; female pelvis; male pelvis.

  10. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: larissathompson@hotmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Dias, Humberto G., E-mail: fisicamedica.hl@mariopenna.org.br [Luxemburgo Hospital, Mario Penna Institute, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  11. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: larissathompson@hotmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dias, Humberto G., E-mail: fisicamedica.hl@mariopenna.org.br [Instituto Mario Penna, Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Hospital Luxemburgo

    2013-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  12. Evaluation of human thorax FE model in various impact scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansová M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the validation of the 50th percentile male model — a detailed FE model of the thoracic segment of the human body developed within project Development of a Finite Element Model of the Human Thorax and Upper Extremities (THOMO co-funded by the European Commission (7th Framework Programme. The model response was tested in three impact scenarios: frontal, lateral and oblique. The resulting impactor contact force vs. time and chest deflection vs. time responses were compared with experimental results. The strain profile of the 5th rib was checked with lateral and oblique strain profiles from post-mortem human subject (PMHS experiments. The influence of heart and lungs on the mechanical response of the model was assessed and the material data configuration, giving the most biofidelic thorax behaviour, was identified.

  13. Lung pair phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ''authentic lung tissue'' or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold

  14. Stability of phantom wormholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has recently been shown that traversable wormholes may be supported by phantom energy. In this work phantom wormhole geometries are modeled by matching an interior traversable wormhole solution, governed by the equation of state p=ωρ with ω<-1, to an exterior vacuum spacetime at a finite junction interface. The stability analysis of these phantom wormholes to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations about static equilibrium solutions is carried out. A master equation dictating the stability regions is deduced, and by separating the cases of a positive and a negative surface energy density, it is found that the respective stable equilibrium configurations may be increased by strategically varying the wormhole throat radius. The first model considered, in the absence of a thin shell, is that of an asymptotically flat phantom wormhole spacetime. The second model constructed is that of an isotropic pressure phantom wormhole, which is of particular interest, as the notion of phantom energy is that of a spatially homogeneous cosmic fluid, although it may be extended to inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes

  15. Evolution of prehension ability in an anthropomorphic neurorobotic arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Massera

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show how a simulated anthropomorphic robotic arm controlled by an artificial neural network can develop effective reaching and grasping behaviour through a trial and error process in which the free parameters encode the control rules which regulate the fine-grained interaction between the robot and the environment and variations of the free parameters are retained or discarded on the basis of their effects at the level of the global behaviour exhibited by the robot situated in the environment. The obtained results demonstrate how the proposed methodology allows the robot to produce effective behaviours thanks to its ability to exploit the morphological properties of the robot's body (i.e. its anthropomorphic shape, the elastic properties of its muscle-like actuators and the compliance of its actuated joints and the properties which arise from the physical interaction between the robot and the environment mediated by appropriate control rules.

  16. Mechanical Engineering of Leg Joints of Anthropomorphic Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavluk Nikita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of design engineering of anthropomorphic robot legs is considered. An overview of the existing anthropomorphic robots and an analysis of servomechanisms and bearing parts involved in the assembly of robot legs are presented. We propose an option for constructing the legs of the robot Antares under development. A two-motor layout, used in the knee, ensures higher joint power along with independent interaction with the neighboring upper and lower leg joints when bending. To reduce the electrical load on the main battery of the robot, the upper legs are provided with a mounting pad for additional batteries powering servos. Direct control of the servos is also carried out through the sub-controllers, responsible for all 6 engines installed in the articular joints of the robot legs.

  17. Phantom energy traversable wormholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that a possible candidate for the present accelerated expansion of the Universe is 'phantom energy'. The latter possesses an equation of state of the form ω≡p/ρ<-1, consequently violating the null energy condition. As this is the fundamental ingredient to sustain traversable wormholes, this cosmic fluid presents us with a natural scenario for the existence of these exotic geometries. 'Note, however, that the notion of phantom energy is that of a homogeneously distributed fluid. Nevertheless, it can be extended to inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes, and it is shown that traversable wormholes may be supported by phantom energy. Because of the fact of the accelerating Universe, macroscopic wormholes could naturally be grown from the submicroscopic constructions that originally pervaded the quantum foam. One could also imagine an advanced civilization mining the cosmic fluid for phantom energy necessary to construct and sustain a traversable wormhole. In this context, we investigate the physical properties and characteristics of traversable wormholes constructed using the equation of state p=ωρ, with ω<-1. We analyze specific wormhole geometries, considering asymptotically flat spacetimes and imposing an isotropic pressure. We also construct a thin shell around the interior wormhole solution, by imposing the phantom energy equation of state on the surface stresses. Using the 'volume integral quantifier' we verify that it is theoretically possible to construct these geometries with vanishing amounts of averaged null energy condition violating phantom energy. Specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity and time are also deduced from the traversability conditions for a particular wormhole geometry. These phantom energy traversable wormholes have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications. For instance, an advanced civilization may use these geometries to induce closed timelike curves, consequently violating

  18. Leap Motion Device Used to Control a Real Anthropomorphic Gripper

    OpenAIRE

    Staretu, Ionel; Moldovan, Catalin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents for the first time the use of the Leap Motion device to control an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers. First, a description of the Leap Motion device is presented, highlighting its main functional characteristics, followed by testing of its use for capturing the movements of a human hand’s fingers in different configurations. Next, the HandCommander soft module and the Interface Controller application are described. The HandCommander is a software module created to ...

  19. Anthropomorphic Soft Robotics - from Torque Control to Variable Intrinsic Compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Albu-Schäffer, Alin; Eiberger, Oliver; Fuchs, Matthias; Grebenstein, Markus; Haddadin, Sami; Ott, Christian; Stemmer, Andreas; Wimböck, Thomas; Wolf, Sebastian; Borst, Christoph; Hirzinger, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives an overview on the developments at the German Aerospace enter DLR towards anthropomorphic robots which not only try to approach the force and velocity performance of humans, but also have similar safety and robustness features based on a compliant behaviour. We achieve this compliance either by joint torque sensing and impedance control, or, in our newest systems, by compliant mechanisms (so called VIA - variable impedance actuators), whose intrinsic compliance can be adjusted...

  20. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Canervari, C.; Castiglioni, I.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in a

  1. Almost human: Anthropomorphism increases trust resilience in cognitive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Ewart J; Monfort, Samuel S; McKendrick, Ryan; Smith, Melissa A B; McKnight, Patrick E; Krueger, Frank; Parasuraman, Raja

    2016-09-01

    We interact daily with computers that appear and behave like humans. Some researchers propose that people apply the same social norms to computers as they do to humans, suggesting that social psychological knowledge can be applied to our interactions with computers. In contrast, theories of human-automation interaction postulate that humans respond to machines in unique and specific ways. We believe that anthropomorphism-the degree to which an agent exhibits human characteristics-is the critical variable that may resolve this apparent contradiction across the formation, violation, and repair stages of trust. Three experiments were designed to examine these opposing viewpoints by varying the appearance and behavior of automated agents. Participants received advice that deteriorated gradually in reliability from a computer, avatar, or human agent. Our results showed (a) that anthropomorphic agents were associated with greater, a higher resistance to breakdowns in trust; (b) that these effects were magnified by greater uncertainty; and c) that incorporating human-like trust repair behavior largely erased differences between the agents. Automation anthropomorphism is therefore a critical variable that should be carefully incorporated into any general theory of human-agent trust as well as novel automation design. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27505048

  2. Evaluation of organ doses in brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer using mathematical reference Indian adult phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantifying organ dose to healthy organs during radiotherapy is essential to estimate the radiation risk. Dose factors are generated by simulating radiation transport through an anthropomorphic mathematical phantom representing a reference Indian adult using the Monte Carlo method. The mean organ dose factors (in mGy min-1 GBq-1) are obtained considering the Micro Selectron 192Ir source and BEBIG 60Co sources in the uterus of a reference Indian adult female phantom. The present study provides the factors for mean absorbed dose to organs applicable to the Indian female patient population undergoing brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer. This study also includes a comparison of the dimension of organs in the phantom model with measured values of organs in the various investigated patients. (author)

  3. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Songxiang; Gupta, Rajiv; Kyprianou, Iacovos

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  4. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Songxiang; Kyprianou, Iacovos [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Gupta, Rajiv, E-mail: songxiang.gu@fda.hhs.gov, E-mail: rgupta1@partners.org, E-mail: iacovos.kyprianou@fda.hhs.gov [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  5. Computed tomography of the thorax in children with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied retrospectively the value of computed tomography of the thorax in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. Twenty-six patients were studied, which showed as the most frequency pulmonary findings bronchial wall thickening in 22 patients (84.6), followed by bronchiectasis in 16 patients (61.5%). Less frequent finding were ill-defined patch consolidation, mucoid impaction, bullaes and atelectasis. We found a predominant distribution of bronchial wall thickening and bronchiectasis in the upper lobes of the lungs. Computed tomography is the more sensitive technique for early visualization and location of the manifestations of cystic fibrosis bronchopathy. (author)

  6. DEEP code to calculate dose equivalents in human phantom for external photon exposure by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes a computer code DEEP which calculates the organ dose equivalents and the effective dose equivalent for external photon exposure by the Monte Carlo method. MORSE-CG, Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is incorporated into the DEEP code to simulate photon transport phenomena in and around a human body. The code treats an anthropomorphic phantom represented by mathematical formulae and user has a choice for the phantom sex: male, female and unisex. The phantom can wear personal dosimeters on it and user can specify their location and dimension. This document includes instruction and sample problem for the code as well as the general description of dose calculation, human phantom and computer code. (author)

  7. Roomba is not a Robot; AIBO is still Alive! Anthropomorphic Language in Online Forums

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, Julia; Mubin, Omar; Kaplan, Frédéric; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Anthropomorphism describes people’s tendency to ascribe humanlike qualities to non-human artifacts, such as robots. We investigated anthropomorphic language in 750 posts of online forums about the Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner, the AIBO robotic dog and the iPad tablet computer. Results of this content analysis suggest a significant difference for anthropomorphic language usage among the three technologies. In contrast to Roomba and iPad, the specific characteristics of the robotic dog enhance...

  8. Hybrid computational phantoms of the male and female newborn patient: NURBS-based whole-body models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthropomorphic computational phantoms are computer models of the human body for use in the evaluation of dose distributions resulting from either internal or external radiation sources. Currently, two classes of computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilized for organ dose assessment: (1) stylized phantoms and (2) voxel phantoms which describe the human anatomy via mathematical surface equations or 3D voxel matrices, respectively. Although stylized phantoms based on mathematical equations can be very flexible in regard to making changes in organ position and geometrical shape, they are limited in their ability to fully capture the anatomic complexities of human internal anatomy. In turn, voxel phantoms have been developed through image-based segmentation and correspondingly provide much better anatomical realism in comparison to simpler stylized phantoms. However, they themselves are limited in defining organs presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography images-the two major sources in voxel phantom construction. By definition, voxel phantoms are typically constructed via segmentation of transaxial images, and thus while fine anatomic features are seen in this viewing plane, slice-to-slice discontinuities become apparent in viewing the anatomy of voxel phantoms in the sagittal or coronal planes. This study introduces the concept of a hybrid computational newborn phantom that takes full advantage of the best features of both its stylized and voxel counterparts: flexibility in phantom alterations and anatomic realism. Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces, a mathematical modeling tool traditionally applied to graphical animation studies, was adopted to replace the limited mathematical surface equations of stylized phantoms. A previously developed whole-body voxel phantom of the newborn female was utilized as a realistic anatomical framework for hybrid phantom construction. The construction of a hybrid

  9. The Phantom brane revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    The Phantom brane is based on the normal branch of the DGP braneworld. It possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, but no big-rip future singularity. In this braneworld, the cosmological constant is dynamically screened at late times. Consequently it provides a good fit to SDSS DR11 measurements of H(z) at high redshifts. We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations on the brane. Perturbations of radiation, matter and the Weyl fluid are self-consistently evolved until the present epoch. We find that the late time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials φ, Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which φ = Ψ. On the Brane, by contrast, the ratio φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter dominated epoch (z ≤ 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large scale structure. The phantom brane also displays a pole in its equation of state, which provides a key test of this dark energy model.

  10. Jamitons: Phantom Traffic Jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowszun, Jorj

    2013-01-01

    Traffic on motorways can slow down for no apparent reason. Sudden changes in speed by one or two drivers can create a chain reaction that causes a traffic jam for the vehicles that are following. This kind of phantom traffic jam is called a "jamiton" and the article discusses some of the ways in which traffic engineers produce…

  11. Design for a 5-DOF Cable-Driven Anthropomorphic Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a motion control approach for a 5-DOF cable-driven manipulator is designed, and the mechanical structure design of this anthropomorphic-arm is introduced. For the 5-DOF manipulator, a hybrid algorithm is proposed to make the trajectory tracing of the manipulator in task space with high accuracy; the goals of the first phase of the robot arm have been meet. Although the method of motion control is limited in the current state, it serves as a strong foundation on which to test the performance and interface of the electronic components. The coupling cable lengths among the different joint modules are analyzed in detail.

  12. Comparison study of reconstruction algorithms for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis using various breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-suk; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a recently developed system for three-dimensional imaging that offers the potential to reduce the false positives of mammography by preventing tissue overlap. Many qualitative evaluations of digital breast tomosynthesis were previously performed by using a phantom with an unrealistic model and with heterogeneous background and noise, which is not representative of real breasts. The purpose of the present work was to compare reconstruction algorithms for DBT by using various breast phantoms; validation was also performed by using patient images. DBT was performed by using a prototype unit that was optimized for very low exposures and rapid readout. Three algorithms were compared: a back-projection (BP) algorithm, a filtered BP (FBP) algorithm, and an iterative expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. To compare the algorithms, three types of breast phantoms (homogeneous background phantom, heterogeneous background phantom, and anthropomorphic breast phantom) were evaluated, and clinical images were also reconstructed by using the different reconstruction algorithms. The in-plane image quality was evaluated based on the line profile and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and out-of-plane artifacts were evaluated by means of the artifact spread function (ASF). Parenchymal texture features of contrast and homogeneity were computed based on reconstructed images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom. The clinical images were studied to validate the effect of reconstruction algorithms. The results showed that the CNRs of masses reconstructed by using the EM algorithm were slightly higher than those obtained by using the BP algorithm, whereas the FBP algorithm yielded much lower CNR due to its high fluctuations of background noise. The FBP algorithm provides the best conspicuity for larger calcifications by enhancing their contrast and sharpness more than the other algorithms; however, in the case of small-size and low

  13. Tissue-like phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V.; De Grand, Alec M.

    2007-10-30

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  14. The dependence of computed tomography number to relative electron density conversion on phantom geometry and its impact on planned dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inness, Emma K; Moutrie, Vaughan; Charles, Paul H

    2014-06-01

    A computed tomography number to relative electron density (CT-RED) calibration is performed when commissioning a radiotherapy CT scanner by imaging a calibration phantom with inserts of specified RED and recording the CT number displayed. In this work, CT-RED calibrations were generated using several commercially available phantoms to observe the effect of phantom geometry on conversion to electron density and, ultimately, the dose calculation in a treatment planning system. Using an anthropomorphic phantom as a gold standard, the CT number of a material was found to depend strongly on the amount and type of scattering material surrounding the volume of interest, with the largest variation observed for the highest density material tested, cortical bone. Cortical bone gave a maximum CT number difference of 1,110 when a cylindrical insert of diameter 28 mm scanned free in air was compared to that in the form of a 30 × 30 cm(2) slab. The effect of using each CT-RED calibration on planned dose to a patient was quantified using a commercially available treatment planning system. When all calibrations were compared to the anthropomorphic calibration, the largest percentage dose difference was 4.2 % which occurred when the CT-RED calibration curve was acquired with heterogeneity inserts removed from the phantom and scanned free in air. The maximum dose difference observed between two dedicated CT-RED phantoms was ±2.1 %. A phantom that is to be used for CT-RED calibrations must have sufficient water equivalent scattering material surrounding the heterogeneous objects that are to be used for calibration. PMID:24760737

  15. Leap Motion Device Used to Control a Real Anthropomorphic Gripper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Staretu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents for the first time the use of the Leap Motion device to control an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers. First, a description of the Leap Motion device is presented, highlighting its main functional characteristics, followed by testing of its use for capturing the movements of a human hand’s fingers in different configurations. Next, the HandCommander soft module and the Interface Controller application are described. The HandCommander is a software module created to facilitate interaction between a human hand and the GraspIT virtual environment, and the Interface Controller application is required to send motion data to the virtual environment and to test the communication protocol. For the test, a prototype of an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers was made, including a proper hardware system of command and control, which is briefly presented in this paper. Following the creation of the prototype, the command system performance test was conducted under real conditions, evaluating the recognition efficiency of the objects to be gripped and the efficiency of the command and control strategies for the gripping process. The gripping test is exemplified by the gripping of an object, such as a screw spanner. It was found that the command system, both in terms of capturing human hand gestures with the Leap Motion device and effective object gripping, is operational. Suggestive figures are presented as examples.

  16. Anthropomorphic Design of the Human-Like Walking Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Hsun Chiang; Fan-Ren Chang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we present a new concept of the mechanical design of a humanoid robot.The goal is to build a humanoid robot utilizing a new structure which is more suitable for human-like walking with the characteristics of the knee stretch,heel-contact,and toe-off.Inspired by human skeleton,we made an anthropomorphic pelvis for the humanoid robot.In comparison with conventional humanoid robots,with such the anthropomorphic pelvis,our robot is capable of adjusting the center of gravity of the upper body by the motion of pelvic tilt,thus reducing the required torque at the ankle joint and the velocity variations in human-like walking.With more precise analysis of the foot mechanism,the fixed-length inverted pendulum can be used to describe the dynamics of biped walking,thus preventing redundant works and power consumption in length variable inverted pendulum system.As the result of the new structure we propose,a humanoid robot is able to walk with human-like gait.

  17. Using Animals to Teach Children Biology: Exploring the Use of Biological Explanations in Children's Anthropomorphic Storybooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerdts, Megan; Van De Walle, Gretchen; LoBue, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Anthropomorphism--the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman entities--has long been a staple of children's media. However, children's experiences with anthropomorphic media may interfere with biological reasoning instead encouraging an anthropocentric view of the natural world. To date, little research has addressed…

  18. Anthropomorphizing Science: How Does It Affect the Development of Evolutionary Concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Cristine H.; Lane, Jonathan D.; Evans, E. Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of anthropomorphic language to describe biological change in both educational settings and popular science, little is known about how anthropomorphic language influences children's understanding of evolutionary concepts. In an experimental study, we assessed whether the language used to convey evolutionary concepts…

  19. Lifting the Taboo Regarding Teleology and Anthropomorphism in Biology Education--Heretical Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Anat; Ginossar, Shlomit

    1998-01-01

    Advocates removing the taboo regarding anthropomorphism and teleology in biology education. Argues that for high school students, accepting such formulations does not necessarily imply anthropomorphic or teleological reasoning. Further, living organisms seem goal-oriented because of their adaptation for survival. Concludes with the argument that…

  20. A realistic 3-D gated cardiac phantom for quality control of gated myocardial perfusion SPET: the Amsterdam gated (AGATE) cardiac phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Jacco J.N.; Busemann Sokole, Ellinor; Verberne, Hein J.; Habraken, Jan B.A.; Eck-Smit, Berthe L.F. van [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stadt, Huybert J.F. van de; Jaspers, Joris E.N.; Shehata, Morgan; Heeman, Paul M. [Department of Medical Technological Development, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-02-01

    A realistic 3-D gated cardiac phantom with known left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fractions (EFs) was produced to evaluate quantitative measurements obtained from gated myocardial single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The 3-D gated cardiac phantom was designed and constructed to fit into the Data Spectrum anthropomorphic torso phantom. Flexible silicone membranes form the inner and outer walls of the simulated left ventricle. Simulated LV volumes can be varied within the range 45-200 ml. The LV volume curve has a smooth and realistic clinical shape that is produced by a specially shaped cam connected to a piston. A fixed 70-ml stroke volume is applied for EF measurements. An ECG signal is produced at maximum LV filling by a controller unit connected to the pump. This gated cardiac phantom will be referred to as the Amsterdam 3-D gated cardiac phantom, or, in short, the AGATE cardiac phantom. SPET data were acquired with a triple-head SPET system. Data were reconstructed using filtered back-projection following pre-filtering and further processed with the Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS) software to determine LV volume and EF values. Ungated studies were performed to measure LV volumes ranging from 45 ml to 200 ml. The QGS-determined LV volumes were systematically underestimated. For different LV combinations, the stroke volumes measured were consistent at 60-61 ml for 8-frame studies and 63-65 ml for 16-frame studies. QGS-determined EF values were slightly overestimated between 1.25% EF units for 8-frame studies and 3.25% EF units for 16-frame studies. In conclusion, the AGATE cardiac phantom offers possibilities for quality control, testing and validation of the whole gated cardiac SPET sequence, and testing of different acquisition and processing parameters and software. (orig.)

  1. Dosimetric impact of interplay effect in lung IMRT and VMAT treatment using in-house dynamic thorax phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia, S.; Nurlely; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this research was to determining of protein from connective tissue (protein) in the inner layer of organic and broiler chicken gizzard. The presence of collagens was observed by submersion with 0.1 M NaOH base pH 8 and without submersion. The physiochemical properties and characteristic of collagen from inner layer chicken gizzard such as FTIR spectra, element content, morphology and SDS-PAGE pattern were evaluated. FTIR spectrum in the sample without submersion shown collagen components had wave number that are in the range of wave number (3289-1078 cm-1) bovine collagen. While, FTIR spectrum in the sample with submersion exhibited removal of molecular functional groups and decreasing intensity of infrared absorption. The element content and morphology of two samples indicated that the elements found in the samples were recognized as the elements generally found in proteins and had little structure at SEM micrograph. SDS-PAGE pattern demonstrated that collagen from inner layer chicken gizzard had >120 kDa on molecular unit weight indicating that type 1 collagen is a major component of inner layer chicken gizzard collagen. This study demonstrated the existence of collagen from exploited bio-waste to be an alternative possible source for collagen production.

  2. Simulated evaluation of an intraoperative surface modeling method for catheter ablation by a real phantom simulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Deyu; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Packer, Douglas; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we propose a phantom experiment method to quantitatively evaluate an intraoperative left-atrial modeling update method. In prior work, we proposed an update procedure which updates the preoperative surface model with information from real-time tracked 2D ultrasound. Prior studies did not evaluate the reconstruction using an anthropomorphic phantom. In this approach, a silicone heart phantom (based on a high resolution human atrial surface model reconstructed from CT images) was made as simulated atriums. A surface model of the left atrium of the phantom was deformed by a morphological operation - simulating the shape difference caused by organ deformation between pre-operative scanning and intra-operative guidance. During the simulated procedure, a tracked ultrasound catheter was inserted into right atrial phantom - scanning the left atrial phantom in a manner mimicking the cardiac ablation procedure. By merging the preoperative model and the intraoperative ultrasound images, an intraoperative left atrial model was reconstructed. According to results, the reconstruction error of the modeling method is smaller than the initial geometric difference caused by organ deformation. As the area of the left atrial phantom scanned by ultrasound increases, the reconstruction error of the intraoperative surface model decreases. The study validated the efficacy of the modeling method.

  3. A new, open-source, multi-modality digital breast phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G.

    2016-03-01

    An anthropomorphic digital breast phantom has been developed with the goal of generating random voxelized breast models that capture the anatomic variability observed in vivo. This is a new phantom and is not based on existing digital breast phantoms or segmentation of patient images. It has been designed at the outset to be modality agnostic (i.e., suitable for use in modeling x-ray based imaging systems, magnetic resonance imaging, and potentially other imaging systems) and open source so that users may freely modify the phantom to suit a particular study. In this work we describe the modeling techniques that have been developed, the capabilities and novel features of this phantom, and study simulated images produced from it. Starting from a base quadric, a series of deformations are performed to create a breast with a particular volume and shape. Initial glandular compartments are generated using a Voronoi technique and a ductal tree structure with terminal duct lobular units is grown from the nipple into each compartment. An additional step involving the creation of fat and glandular lobules using a Perlin noise function is performed to create more realistic glandular/fat tissue interfaces and generate a Cooper's ligament network. A vascular tree is grown from the chest muscle into the breast tissue. Breast compression is performed using a neo-Hookean elasticity model. We show simulated mammographic and T1-weighted MRI images and study properties of these images.

  4. Detection of urinary stones at reduced radiation exposure: a phantom study comparing computed radiography and a low-dose digital radiography linear slit scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Chakraborty, D. P.; Thoeny, Harriet C.; Loupatatzis, Christos; Vock, Peter; Harald, Bonel

    2010-01-01

    Objective In this experimental study we assessed the diagnostic performance of linear slit scanning radiography (LSSR) compared to conventional computed radiography (CR) in the detection of urinary calculi in an anthropomorphic phantom imitating patients weighing approximately 58 to 88 kg. Conclusion Compared to computed radiography, LSSR is superior in the detection of urinary stones and may be used for pretreatment localization and follow-up at a lower patient exposure. PMID:19457787

  5. Infant Cardiac CT Angiography with 64-Slice and 256-Slice CT: Comparison of Radiation Dose and Image Quality Using a Pediatric Phantom

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yi-Wei; Yang, Ching-Ching; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to investigate the image quality and radiation exposure of pediatric protocols for cardiac CT angiography (CTA) in infants under one year of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Cardiac CTA examinations were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 1-year-old child scanned with non-electrocardiogram-gated (NG), retrospectively electrocardiogram-gated helical (RGH) and prospectively electrocardiogram-gated axial (PGA) techniques in 64-slic...

  6. The phantom illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmonte, Alessandra; Soranzo, Alessandro; Rudd, Michael E; Agostini, Tiziano

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that visible luminance gradients may generate contrast effects. In this work we present a new paradoxical illusion in which the luminance range of gradual transitions has been reduced to make them invisible. By adopting the phenomenological method proposed by Kanizsa, we have found that unnoticeable luminance gradients still generate contrast effects. But, most interestingly, we have found that when their width is narrowed, rather than generating contrast effects on the surrounded surfaces, they generate an assimilation effect. Both high- and low-level interpretations of this "phantom" illusion are critically evaluated. PMID:26505683

  7. Study on a 7-DOF anthropomorphic weld arm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A kind of new obstacle space expression is proposed in this paper, in which a virtual force field (VFF) is built. Using the torque and joint optimization acted by the virtual force field on the anthropomorphic weld arm, the real-time selection of a redundant join (R-joint) is done and its equivalent virtual torque is obtained, thus the redundant joint can be controlled with whose force feedback. An inverse kinematics solution of a 6-DOF robot is applied to other six joints of the arm. Simulation experiments indicate the new inverse kinematics solution has perfect collision avoidance effect, and it is well simplified. Therefore, it can be applied to a welding task in complex operation space.

  8. Source Separation with One Ear: Proposition for an Anthropomorphic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Pichevar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an example of an anthropomorphic approach, in which auditory-based cues are combined with temporal correlation to implement a source separation system. The auditory features are based on spectral amplitude modulation and energy information obtained through 256 cochlear filters. Segmentation and binding of auditory objects are performed with a two-layered spiking neural network. The first layer performs the segmentation of the auditory images into objects, while the second layer binds the auditory objects belonging to the same source. The binding is further used to generate a mask (binary gain to suppress the undesired sources from the original signal. Results are presented for a double-voiced (2 speakers speech segment and for sentences corrupted with different noise sources. Comparative results are also given using PESQ (perceptual evaluation of speech quality scores. The spiking neural network is fully adaptive and unsupervised.

  9. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  10. Computational modeling of the mathematical phantoms of the Brazilian woman to internal dosimetry calculations and for comparison of the absorbed fractions with specific reference women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theme of this work is the study of the concept of mathematical dummy - also called phantoms - used in internal dosimetry and radiation protection, from the perspective of computer simulations. In this work he developed the mathematical phantom of the Brazilian woman, to be used as the basis of calculations of Specific Absorbed Fractions (AEDs) in the body's organs and skeleton by virtue of goals with regarding the diagnosis or therapy in nuclear medicine. The phantom now developed is similar, in form, to Snyder phantom making it more realistic for the anthropomorphic conditions of Brazilian women. For so we used the Monte Carlo method of formalism, through computer modeling. As a contribution to the objectives of this study, it was developed and implemented the computer system cFAE - consultation Fraction Specific Absorbed, which makes it versatile for the user's query researcher

  11. SU-E-J-209: Geometric Distortion at 3T in a Commercial 4D MRI-Compatible Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Wronski, M; Kim, A; Stanisz, G; Sarfehnia, A; Keller, B [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There are very few commercial 4D phantoms that are marketed as MRI compatible. We are evaluating one such commercial phantom, made to be used with an MRI-Linear accelerator. The focus of this work is to characterize the geometric distortions produced in this phantom at 3T using 3 clinical MR pulse sequences. Methods: The CIRS MRI-Linac Dynamic Phantom (CIRSTM) under investigation in this study consists of a softwaredriven moving tumour volume within a thorax phantom body and enables dose accumulation by placing a dosimeter within the tumour volume. Our initial investigation is to evaluate the phantom in static mode prior to examining its 4D capability. The water-filled thorax phantom was scanned using a wide-bore Philips 3T Achieva MRI scanner employing a Thoracic xl coil and clinical 2D T1W FFE, 2D T1W TSE and 3D T1W TFE pulse sequences. Each of the MR image sets was rigidly fused with a reference CT image of the phantom employing a rigid registration with 6 degrees of freedom. Geometric distortions between the MR and CT image sets were measured in 3 dimensions at selected points along the periphery of the distortion grid embedded within the phantom body (11.5, 7.5 and 3 cm laterally, ant/post and sup/inf of magnetic isocenter respectively). Results: The maximal measured geometric distortions between the MR and reference CT points of interest were 0.9, 1.8 and 1.3 mm in the lateral, anteriorposterior and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. For all 3 spatial dimensions, the maximal distortions occurred for the FFE pulse sequence. Maximal distortions for the 2D FFE, 2D TSE and 3D TFE sequences were 1, 0.7 and 1.8 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Our initial static investigation of this phantom shows minimal geometric distortions at 3T along the periphery of the embedded grid. CIRS has provided us with a phantom at no charge for evaluation at 3 Tesla.

  12. Study on pedestrian thorax injury in vehicle-to-pedestrian collisions using finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjun Liu; Hui Zhao; Kui Li; Sen Su; Xiaoxiang Fan; Zhiyong Yin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the collision parameters of vehicle and the pedestrian thorax injury by establishing the chest simulation models in car-pedestrian collision at different velocities and angles.Methods: 87 cases of vehicle-to-pedestrian accidents, with detailed injury information and determined vehicle impact parameters, were included.The severity of injury was scaled in line with the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS).The chest biomechanical response parameters and change characteristics were obtained by using Hyperworks and LS-DYNA computing.Simulation analysis was applied to compare the characteristics of injuries.Results: When impact velocities at 25, 40 and 55 km/h, respectively, 1) the maximum values of thorax velocity criterion (VC) were for 0.29, 0.83 and 2.58 m/s;and at the same collision velocity, the thorax VC from the impact on pedestrian's front was successively greater than on his back and on his side;2) the maximum values of peak stress on ribs were 154, 177 and 209 MPa;and at the same velocity, peak stress values on ribs from the impact on pedestrian's side were greater than on his front and his back.Conclusion: There is a positive correlation between the severity and risk of thorax injury and the collision velocity and angle of car-thorax crashes.At the same velocity, it is of greater damage risk when the soft tissue of thorax under a front impact;and there is also a greater risk of ribs fracture under a side impact of the thorax.This result is of vital significance for diagnosis and protection of thorax collision injuries.

  13. Multimodal phantom of liver tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena K Chmarra

    Full Text Available Medical imaging plays an important role in patients' care and is continuously being used in managing health and disease. To obtain the maximum benefit from this rapidly developing technology, further research is needed. Ideally, this research should be done in a patient-safe and environment-friendly manner; for example, on phantoms. The goal of this work was to develop a protocol and manufacture a multimodal liver phantom that is suitable for ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging modalities. The proposed phantom consists of three types of mimicked soft tissues: liver parenchyma, tumors, and portal veins, that are made of six ingredients: candle gel, sephadex®, agarose, glycerol, distilled water, and silicone string. The entire procedure is advantageous, since preparation of the phantom is simple, rather cost-effective, and reasonably quick - it takes around 2 days. Besides, most of the phantom's parts can be reused to manufacture a new phantom. Comparison of ultrasound images of real patient's liver and the developed phantom shows that the phantom's liver tissue and its structures are well simulated.

  14. The Phantom of Liberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    One of the few things we have in common in contemporary society is the future of our children. But it seems that even the “we” of childhood, of learning and free play, has turned into a common ground for instrumentalization and competition. Today, the pedagogical paradox—Kant’s meditation on the ......? These are some of the questions addressed by The Phantom of Liberty, which sets out to reestablish a social and aesthetic dialogue between visual art and psychology, philosophy, pedagogy, and critical journalism....... on the paradox that the subject’s predisposition for freedom must be learned—is increasingly lost in governmental obsession about the efficiency of education and schooling. From another perspective, artists are addressing questions of childhood, play, and pedagogy. What ideological and moral transformations...

  15. A 3-dimensional rigid cluster thorax model for kinematic measurements during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, D; Malone, A; O'Brien, T; Simms, C K

    2014-04-11

    The trunk has been shown to work as an active segment rather than a passenger unit during gait and it is felt that trunk kinematics should be given more consideration during gait assessment. While 3-dimensional assessment of the thorax with respect to the pelvis and laboratory can provide a comprehensive description of trunk movement, the majority of existing 3-D thorax models demonstrate shortcomings such as the need for multiple skin marker configurations, difficult landmark identification and practical issues for assessment on female subjects. A small number of studies have used rigid cluster models to quantify thorax movement, however the models and points of attachment are not well described and validation rarely considered. The aim of this study was to propose an alternative rigid cluster 3-D thorax model to quantify movement during gait and provide validation of this model. A rigid mount utilising active markers was developed and applied over the 3rd thoracic vertebra, previously reported as an area of least skin movement artefact on the trunk. The model was compared to two reference thorax models through simultaneous recording during gait on 15 healthy subjects. Excellent waveform similarity was demonstrated between the proposed model and the two reference models (CMC range 0.962-0.997). Agreement of discrete parameters was very-good to excellent. In addition, ensemble average graphs demonstrated almost identical curve displacement between models. The results suggest that the proposed model can be confidently used as an alternative to other thorax models in the clinical setting.

  16. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation......, orbital exenteration or secondary implantation of an orbital implant in the period between 1993 and 2003. A total of 267 patients were identified and invited to participate; of these, 173 agreed to participate. These patients’ medical records were reviewed. A structured interview focusing on pain...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...

  17. The influence of patient size on dose conversion coefficients: a hybrid phantom study for adult cardiac catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Perry; Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32209 (United States); Siragusa, Daniel [Department of Radiology, Division of Vascular Interventional Radiology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32209 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E [Departments of Nuclear and Radiological and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu

    2009-06-21

    In this study, the influence of patient size on organ and effective dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) was investigated for a representative interventional fluoroscopic procedure-cardiac catheterization. The study was performed using hybrid phantoms representing an underweight, average and overweight American adult male. Reference body sizes were determined using the NHANES III database and parameterized based on standing height and total body mass. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients were calculated for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left anterior oblique and right anterior oblique projections using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.5.0 with the metric dose area product being used as the normalization factor. Results show body size to have a clear influence on DCCs which increased noticeably when body size decreased. It was also shown that if patient size is neglected when choosing a DCC, the organ and effective dose will be underestimated to an underweight patient and will be overestimated to an underweight patient, with errors as large as 113% for certain projections. Results were further compared with those published for a KTMAN-2 Korean patient-specific tomographic phantom. The published DCCs aligned best with the hybrid phantom which most closely matched in overall body size. These results highlighted the need for and the advantages of phantom-patient matching, and it is recommended that hybrid phantoms be used to create a more diverse library of patient-dependent anthropomorphic phantoms for medical dose reconstruction.

  18. Who Sees Human? The Stability and Importance of Individual Differences in Anthropomorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waytz, Adam; Cacioppo, John; Epley, Nicholas

    2010-05-01

    Anthropomorphism is a far-reaching phenomenon that incorporates ideas from social psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and the neurosciences. Although commonly considered to be a relatively universal phenomenon with only limited importance in modern industrialized societies-more cute than critical-our research suggests precisely the opposite. In particular, we provide a measure of stable individual differences in anthropomorphism that predicts three important consequences for everyday life. This research demonstrates that individual differences in anthropomorphism predict the degree of moral care and concern afforded to an agent, the amount of responsibility and trust placed on an agent, and the extent to which an agent serves as a source of social influence on the self. These consequences have implications for disciplines outside of psychology including human-computer interaction, business (marketing and finance), and law. Concluding discussion addresses how understanding anthropomorphism not only informs the burgeoning study of nonpersons, but how it informs classic issues underlying person perception as well. PMID:24839457

  19. Who Sees Human? The Stability and Importance of Individual Differences in Anthropomorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Waytz, Adam; Cacioppo, John; Epley, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphism is a far-reaching phenomenon that incorporates ideas from social psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and the neurosciences. Although commonly considered to be a relatively universal phenomenon with only limited importance in modern industrialized societies—more cute than critical—our research suggests precisely the opposite. In particular, we provide a measure of stable individual differences in anthropomorphism that predicts three important consequenc...

  20. Study Of Dose Distribution In A Human Body In Space Flight With The Spherical Tissue-Equivalent Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Akatov, Yu; Petrov, V.; Kartsev, I.; Polenov, Boris; Petrov, V.; Lyagushin, V.

    In the space experiment MATROSHKA-R, the spherical tissue equivalent phantom (30 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module. Due to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a real human body. If compared with the anthropomorphic phantom Rando used inside and outside the ISS, the spherical phantom has lower mass, smaller size, and requires less crew time for the detector retrieval; its tissue-equivalent properties are closer to the standard human body tissue than the Rando-phantom material. In the first phase of the experiment the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid state track detectors). There were two experimental sessions with the spherical phantom in the crew cabin, (1) from Jan. 29, 2004 to Apr. 30, 2004 and (2) from Aug. 11, 2004 to Oct. 10, 2005. The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. The results obtained with the passive detectors returned to the ground after each session show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being observed close to the outer wall of the crew cabin, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom (0.31 mGy/day) is obviously due to the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and Earth' radiation belt contribution on the ISS trajectory. Minimum dose rate (0.15 mGy/day) is caused mainly by the strongly penetrating GCR particles and is observed behind more than 5 g/cm2 tissue shielding. Critical organ doses, mean-tissue and effective doses of a crew member in the crew cabin are also estimated with the spherical phantom. The estimated effective

  1. Optimization and objective and subjective analysis of thorax image for computerized radiology; Otimizacao e analise objetiva e subjetiva de imagem de torax para radiologia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velo, Alexandre F.; Miranda, Jose Ricardo A., E-mail: afvelo@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. Biociencias. Dept. de Fisica e Biofisica; Pina, Diana R.; Ribeiro, Sergio M., E-mail: drpina@fmb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem; Duarte, Sergio, E-mail: sbd@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro,RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This research aimed at optimizing computational chest radiographic images (in previous posterior projection-PA). To this end, we used a homogeneous patient equivalent phantom in Computational Imaging System calibration, in order to obtain a satisfactory noise signal relation for a diagnosis, adjusting to a minimum dose received by the patient. The techniques have been applied in an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO). The images obtained were evaluated by a radiologist, which identified the best image to determine possible pathologies (fracture or pneumonia). The technique were quantified objectively (Detective Quantum Efficiency - DQE, Modulation Transfer Function MTF, Noise Power Spectrum, NPS). Comparing optimized techniques with the clinical routine, it is concluded that all provide doses below reference levels. However the choice of the best technique for viewing possible pneumonia and/or fracture, was determined based on the first 3D (Dose, Diagnostic, Dollar) and regarded as gold standard. This image presented a reduction of dose and loading of tube around 70.5% and 80% respectively when compared with the clinical routine.

  2. Enhancement of finger motion range with compliant anthropomorphic joint design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çulha, Utku; Iida, Fumiya

    2016-04-01

    Robotic researchers have been greatly inspired by the human hand in the search to design and build adaptive robotic hands. Especially, joints have received a lot of attention upon their role in maintaining the passive compliance that gives the fingers flexibility and extendible motion ranges. Passive compliance, which is the tendency to be employed in motion under the influence of an external force, is the result of the stiffness and the geometrical constraints of the joints that define the direction of the motion. Based on its building elements, human finger joints have multi-directional passive compliance which means that they can move in multiple axis of motion under external force. However, due to their complex anatomy, only simplified biomechanical designs based on physiological analysis are preferred in present day robotics. To imitate the human joints, these designs either use fixed degree of freedom mechanisms which substantially limit the motion axes of compliance, or soft materials that can deform in many directions but hinder the fingers' force exertion capacities. In order to find a solution that lies between these two design approaches, we are using anatomically correct finger bones, elastic ligaments and antagonistic tendons to build anthropomorphic joints with multi-directional passive compliance and strong force exertion capabilities. We use interactions between an index finger and a thumb to show that our joints allow the extension of the range of motion of the fingers up to 245% and gripping size to 63% which can be beneficial for mechanical adaptation in gripping larger objects. PMID:26891473

  3. Anthropomorphic robot for recognition and drawing generalized object images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Vera M.

    1998-10-01

    The process of recognition, for instance, understanding the text, written by different fonts, consists in the depriving of the individual attributes of the letters in the particular font. It is shown that such process, in Nature and technique, can be provided by the narrowing the spatial frequency of the object's image by its defocusing. In defocusing images remain only areas, so-called Informative Fragments (IFs), which all together form the generalized (stylized) image of many identical objects. It is shown that the variety of shapes of IFs is restricted and can be presented by `Geometrical alphabet'. The `letters' for this alphabet can be created using two basic `genetic' figures: a stripe and round spot. It is known from physiology that the special cells of visual cortex response to these particular figures. The prototype of such `genetic' alphabet has been made using Boolean algebra (Venn's diagrams). The algorithm for drawing the letter's (`genlet's') shape in this alphabet and generalized images of objects (for example, `sleeping cat'), are given. A scheme of an anthropomorphic robot is shown together with results of model computer experiment of the robot's action--`drawing' the generalized image.

  4. The impact of cardiac gating on the detection of coronary calcifications in dual-energy chest radiography: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, John M.; Liu, Ray; Saunders, Rowland; Markley, Jonathan; Moreno, Nery; Seamans, John; Wiese, Scott; Jabri, Kadri; Gilkeson, Robert C.

    2006-03-01

    The detection of coronary calcifications with CT is generally accepted as a useful method for predicting early onset of coronary artery disease. Film-screen X-ray and fluoroscopy have also been shown to have high predictive value for coronary disease diagnosis, but have minimal sensitivity. Recently, flat-panel detectors capable of dual-energy techniques have enabled the separation of soft-tissue and bone from images. Clinical studies report substantially improved sensitivity for the detection of coronary calcifications using these techniques. However, heart motion causes minor artefacts from misregistration of both calcified and soft-tissue structures, resulting in inconsistent detection of calcifications. This research examines whether cardiac gating improves the reliability of calcification detection. Single-energy, gated, and non-gated dual-energy imaging techniques are examined in a dynamic phantom model. A gating system was developed to synchronize two dual-energy exposures to a specified phase of the cardiac cycle. The performance and repeatability of the gating system was validated with the use of a cyclical phantom. An anthropomorphic phantom was developed to simulate both cardiac and soft-tissue motion, and generate ECG-like output signals. The anthropomorphic phantom and motion artefact accuracy was verified by comparison with clinical images of patients with calcifications. The ability of observers to detect calcifications in non-gated, and gated techniques was compared through the use of an ROC experiment. Gating visibly reduces the effect of motion artifacts in the dual-energy images. Without gating, motion artefacts cause greater variability in calcification detection. Comparison of the average area-under-the-curve of the ROC curves show that gating significantly increases the accuracy of calcification detection. The effects of motion and gating on DE cardiac calcification detection have been demonstrated and characterized in a phantom model that

  5. Effects of experimentally increased trunk stiffness on thorax and pelvis rotations during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen Hua; Lin, Xiao Cong; Meijer, Onno G; Gao, Jin Tuan; Hu, Hai; Prins, Maarten R; Liang, Bo Wei; Zhang, Li Qun; Van Dieën, Jaap H; Bruijn, Sjoerd M

    2014-02-01

    Patients with non-specific low back pain, or a similar disorder, may stiffen their trunk, which probably alters their walking coordination. To study the direct effects of increasing trunk stiffness, we experimentally increased trunk stiffness during walking, and compared the results with what is known from the literature about gait coordination with, e.g., low back pain. Healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at 3 speeds (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5m/s), in three conditions (normal, while contracting their abdominal muscles, or wearing an orthopedic brace that limits trunk motions). Kinematics of the legs, thorax and pelvis were recorded, and relative Fourier phases and amplitudes of segment motions were calculated. Increasing trunk stiffness led to a lower thorax-pelvis relative phase, with both a decrease in thorax-leg relative phase, and an increase in pelvis-leg relative phase, as well as reduced rotational amplitude of thorax relative to pelvis. While lower thorax-pelvis relative phase was also found in patients with low back pain, higher pelvis-leg relative phase has never been reported in patients with low back pain or related disorders. These results suggest that increasing trunk stiffness in healthy subjects causes short-term gait coordination changes which are different from those seen in patients with back pain.

  6. Organosilicon phantom for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Kusmic, Claudia; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Meucci, Sandro; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Pini, Roberto; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique. Although commercially available photoacoustic imaging systems currently exist, the technology is still in its infancy. Therefore, the design of stable phantoms is essential to achieve semiquantitative evaluation of the performance of a photoacoustic system and can help optimize the properties of contrast agents. We designed and developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom with exceptionally fine geometry; the phantom was tested using photoacoustic experiments loaded with the standard indocyanine green dye and compared to an agar phantom pattern through polyethylene glycol-gold nanorods. The linearity of the photoacoustic signal with the nanoparticle number was assessed. The signal-tonoiseratio and contrast were employed as image quality parameters, and enhancements of up to 50 and up to 300%, respectively, were measured with the PDMS phantom with respect to the agar one. A tissue-mimicking (TM)-PDMS was prepared by adding TiO2 and India ink; photoacoustic tests were performed in order to compare the signal generated by the TM-PDMS and the biological tissue. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  7. Robot arm based flat panel CT-guided electromagnetic tracked spine interventions: phantom and animal model experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, Aachen (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Wiemann, Christian; Guenther, Rolf W. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A. [Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate accuracy and procedure times of electromagnetic tracking (EMT) in a robotic arm mounted flat panel setting using phantom and animal cadaveric models. A robotic arm mounted flat panel (RMFP) was used in combination with EMT to perform anthropomorphic phantom (n = 90) and ex vivo pig based punctures (n = 120) of lumbar facet joints (FJ, n = 120) and intervertebral discs (IVD, n = 90). Procedure accuracies and times were assessed and evaluated. FJ punctures were carried out with a spatial accuracy of 0.8 {+-} 0.9 mm (phantom) and 0.6 {+-} 0.8 mm (ex vivo) respectively. While IVD punctures showed puncture deviations of 0.6 {+-} 1.2 mm (phantom) and 0.5 {+-} 0.6 mm (ex vivo), direct and angulated phantom based punctures had accuracies of 0.8 {+-} 0.9 mm and 1.0 {+-} 1.3 mm. Planning took longer for ex vivo IVD punctures compared to phantom model interventions (39.3 {+-} 17.3 s vs. 20.8 {+-} 5.0 s, p = 0.001) and for angulated vs. direct phantom FJ punctures (19.7 {+-} 5.1 s vs. 28.6 {+-} 7.8 s, p < 0.001). Puncture times were longer for ex vivo procedures when compared to phantom model procedures in both FJ (37.9 {+-} 9.0 s vs. 23.6 {+-} 7.2 s, p = 0.001) and IVD punctures (43.9 {+-} 16.1 s vs. 31.1 {+-} 6.4 s, p = 0.026). The combination of RMFP with EMT provides an accurate method of navigation for spinal interventions such as facet joint punctures and intervertebral disc punctures. (orig.)

  8. New format for storage of voxel phantom, and exposure computer model EGS4/MAX to EGSnrc/MASH update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal Neto, Viriato [Departamento de Energia Nuclear (DEN). Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco. Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W. [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco. UPE, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/NE-CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Lindeval F., E-mail: lindeval@dmat.ufrr.br [Departamento de Matematica. Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In order to estimate the dosage absorbed by those subjected to ionizing radiation, it is necessary to perform simulations using the exposure computational model (ECM). Such models are consists essentially of an anthropomorphic phantom and a Monte Carlo code (MC). The conjunction of a voxel phantom of the MC code is a complex process and often results in solving a specific problem. This is partly due to the way the phantom voxel is stored on a computer. It is usually required a substantial amount of space to store a static representation of the human body and also a significant amount of memory for reading and processing a given simulation. This paper presents a new way to store data concerning the geometry irradiated (similar to the technique of repeated structures used in the geometry of MCNP code), reducing by 52% the disk space required for storage when compared to the previous format applied by Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq). On the other hand, research in numerical dosimetry leads to a constant improvement on the resolution of voxel phantoms leading thus to a new requirement, namely, to develop new estimates of dose. Therefore, this work also performs an update of the MAX (Male Adult voXel)/EGS4 ECM for the MASH (Adult MaleMeSH)/EGSnrc ECM and presents instances of dosimetric evaluations using the new ECM. Besides the update of the phantom and the MC code, the algorithm of the source used has also been improved in contrast to previous publications. (author)

  9. New format for storage of voxel phantom, and exposure computer model EGS4/MAX to EGSnrc/MASH update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to estimate the dosage absorbed by those subjected to ionizing radiation, it is necessary to perform simulations using the exposure computational model (ECM). Such models are consists essentially of an anthropomorphic phantom and a Monte Carlo code (MC). The conjunction of a voxel phantom of the MC code is a complex process and often results in solving a specific problem. This is partly due to the way the phantom voxel is stored on a computer. It is usually required a substantial amount of space to store a static representation of the human body and also a significant amount of memory for reading and processing a given simulation. This paper presents a new way to store data concerning the geometry irradiated (similar to the technique of repeated structures used in the geometry of MCNP code), reducing by 52% the disk space required for storage when compared to the previous format applied by Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq). On the other hand, research in numerical dosimetry leads to a constant improvement on the resolution of voxel phantoms leading thus to a new requirement, namely, to develop new estimates of dose. Therefore, this work also performs an update of the MAX (Male Adult voXel)/EGS4 ECM for the MASH (Adult MaleMeSH)/EGSnrc ECM and presents instances of dosimetric evaluations using the new ECM. Besides the update of the phantom and the MC code, the algorithm of the source used has also been improved in contrast to previous publications. (author)

  10. Optimization of dose radiation and image quality on computed tomography of thorax in adult women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, G. R.; Casian C, G. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. IPN No. 5160, 07760 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gaona, E.; Franco E, J. G.; Molina F, N., E-mail: gaen1310@correo.xoc.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Xochimilco, Calz. del Hueso 1100, 04960 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The objective of the study is the optimization of the dose (Dlp) and image quality in the exploration of adult women in studies of thorax with computed tomography (CT). The CT is a technique of exploration with high radiation doses to patients with an increase of the risk factors of developing cancer in the future, but X-rays are a very important medical diagnostic tool. We performed a retrospective survey of 50 female patients who had thorax tomography using the automatic protocol established by the manufacturer, a database of dose (Dlp), measures of patient A P and radiological parameters such as kV and m A was obtained. Subsequently, we carry out the prospective study with 30 patients with prescription of thorax tomography, scans were conducted with CT with reduced doses using manual techniques protocol of exploration while maintaining diagnostic image quality. The results show that the prospective study patients received doses lower than 30% on average. In general the dose patients were within the confidence interval of 95% of the levels of diagnostic reference (DRL) adopted by the European Community for CT and the most common value is 400 Dlp for thorax. Comparative image quality study was conducted using the protocol of the manufacturer and the manual protocol and image quality was diagnostic after dose reduction up to 30%. The reduction of radiation dose in female patients in studies of thorax CT helps to reduce risk factors of developing cancer later in life. A thorax tomography study includes the fibro-glandular tissue of the breast which is very sensitive to stochastic effects of radiation. (Author)

  11. SU-F-18C-08: A Validation Study of a Commercially Available Software Package's Absorbed Dose Estimates in a Physical Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supanich, M [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Siegelman, J [Brigham and Women' s Hospital Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of the absorbed dose estimates from CT scans generated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a commercially available radiation dose monitoring software program. Methods: Axial CT studies of an anthropomorphic abdomen phantom with dose bores at a central location and 4 peripheral locations were conducted using a fixed tube current at 120 kV. A 100 mm ion chamber and a 0.6 cc ion chamber calibrated at diagnostic energy levels were used to measure dose in the phantom at each of the 5 dose bore locations. Simulations using the software program's Monte Carlo engine were run using a mathematical model of the anthropomorphic phantom to determine conversion coefficients between the CTDIvol used for the study and the dose at the location of the dose bores. Simulations were conducted using both the software's generic CT beam model and a refined model generated using HVL and bow tie filter profile measurements made on the scanner used for the study. Results: Monte Carlo simulations completed using the generalized beam model differed from the measured conversion factors by an absolute value average of 13.0% and 13.8% for the 100 mm and 0.6 cc ion chamber studies, respectively. The MC simulations using the scanner specific beam model generated conversion coefficients that differed from the CTDIvol to measured dose conversion coefficients by an absolute value average of 7.3% and 7.8% for the 100 mm and 0.6 cc ion chamber cases, respectively. Conclusion: A scanner specific beam model used in MC simulations generates more accurate dose conversion coefficients in an anthropomorphic phantom than those generated with a generalized beam model. Agreement between measured conversion coefficients and simulated values were less than 20% for all positions using the universal beam model.

  12. Generation of a head phantom according to the 95. percentile Chinese population data for evaluating the specific absorption rate by wireless communication devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Chinese head phantom (CHP) is constructed for evaluating the specific absorption rate (SAR) by the wireless transceivers. The dimensions of the head phantom are within 4 % difference compared with the 95. percentile data from the China's standard. The shell's thickness and the configuration of the pinna are the same as those of the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM). Three computable models for the mobile phones are generated and used in the SAR simulations with the SAM and the CHP. The results show that the simulated SAR from the SAM head is similar. Its morphological reason has been analysed. The authors discuss the conservativeness of the two head phantoms as well. The CHP can be used in the inter-laboratory evaluation for the SAR uncertainty. It can also provide the information for the SAR variability due to physical difference, which will benefit the maintenance and the harmonisation of the standards. (authors)

  13. [Phantom Study on Dose Reduction Using Iterative Reconstruction in Low-dose Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minehiro, Kaori; Takata, Tadanori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Sakuda, Keita; Nunome, Haruka; Kawashima, Hiroko; Sanada, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    We investigated dose reduction ability of an iterative reconstruction technology for low-dose computed tomography (CT) for lung cancer screening. The Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) provided in a multi slice CT system, Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare) was used. An anthropomorphic chest phantom (N-1, Kyoto Kagaku) was scanned at volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) of 0.50-11.86 mGy with 120 kV. For noise (standard deviation) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements, CTP486 and CTP515 modules in the Catphan (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned. Radiological technologists were participated in the perceptual comparison. SAFIRE reduced the SD values by approximately 50% compared with filter back projection (FBP). The estimated dose reduction rates by SAFIRE determined from the perceptual comparison was approximately 23%, while 75% dose reduction rate was expected from the SD value reduction of 50%. PMID:26685831

  14. In phantom figures of merit for an epithermal beam produced by a D-D compact neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) Scientific Community renewed the interest in the development of compact neutron sources for in hospital BNCT in order to skip the problems related to the use of nuclear reactors and to increase the number of treated patients. This paper presents a feasibility study for the exploitation of a high power D-D compact neutron facility, designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Ca, USA), for the treatment of tumours with diffuse metastases, such as liver cancer. The MCNP code is used to carry out an accurate study of the epithermal column and to assess both the free beam parameters and the in phantom figures of merit to evaluate the beam effectiveness. Various Beam Shaping Assemblies are tested using different materials and geometrical shapes in order to optimize the therapeutic ratio. Finally, the dose profiles are calculated along the beam axis in the anthropomorphic phantom 'ADAM'. (author)

  15. Coordination of leg swing, thorax rotations, and pelvis rotations during gait: The organisation of total body angular momentum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Meijer, Onno G.; van Dieën, Jaap H.; Kingma, Idsart; Lamoth, Claudine J.C.

    2008-01-01

    In walking faster than 3 km/h, transverse pelvic rotation lengthens the step ("pelvic step"). It is often assumed that the thorax then starts to counter rotate to limit total body angular momentum around the vertical. But the relative timing of pelvis and thorax rotation during gait is insufficientl

  16. Experimental dosimetric evaluation in pelvis phantom, subjected to prostate radiation therapy protocol at 15 MV Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Andrea Silva Dias de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dias, Humberto Galvao [Centro de Radioterapia Hospital Luxemburgo, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Among the existing malignant neoplasia, the prostate cancer is most common among male population. Due to its high incidence and morbidity, there is a need for investment in advanced technology for better treatment associated with research and social mobilization to prevent the disease. As an efficient method of treatment for such tumor, radiation teletherapy brings favorable results for the patient, particularly when the cancer is diagnosed early. There are, however, the needs to assess the absorbed doses that reach the prostate in the radiation protocols in order to certify the treatment efficacy. The present research goal is to obtain the profile of absorbed dose distributed in a synthetic prostate on male pelvis phantom following a standard radiation therapy protocol. The methodology makes use of a NRI made phantom and a 15MV Linac accelerator. This phantom has anthropomorphic and anthropometric features containing the major internal organs, including bone, prostate, intestine, and bladder. The exposition was made in a 15 MV linear accelerator taken the isocenter in four fields as a 'BOX' of opposing beams. The dosimetry was prepared using GafChromic EBT type 2 radiochromic film and calibration in a solid water phantom. The radiochromic films were digitized on the Microtek Scan Maker 6900XL model scanner operating in the transmission mode and optical density readings based on RGB mode in the computer program Imagedig. The absorbance readings were performed in the spectrophotometer SP-220 mark BIOSPECTRO obtaining calibration curves generated by the collected data. The results reproduce the dose distribution generated in two orthogonal radiochromic films positioned onto the synthetic prostate. Discussions regarding the characteristics of the phantom and methods of irradiation in relation to the achieved dose profile will be addressed. (author)

  17. Eigenbreasts for statistical breast phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ketcha, M.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.; Park, Subok; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-03-01

    To facilitate rigorous virtual clinical trials using model observers for breast imaging optimization and evaluation, we demonstrated a method of defining statistical models, based on 177 sets of breast CT patient data, in order to generate tens of thousands of unique digital breast phantoms. In order to separate anatomical texture from variation in breast shape, each training set of breast phantoms were deformed to a consistent atlas compressed geometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then performed on the shape-matched breast CT volumes to capture the variation of patient breast textures. PCA decomposes the training set of N breast CT volumes into an N-1-dimensional space of eigenvectors, which we call eigenbreasts. By summing weighted combinations of eigenbreasts, a large ensemble of different breast phantoms can be newly created. Different training sets can be used in eigenbreast analysis for designing basis models to target sub-populations defined by breast characteristics, such as size or density. In this work, we plan to generate ensembles of 30,000 new phantoms based on glandularity for an upcoming virtual trial of lesion detectability in digital breast tomosynthesis. Our method extends our series of digital and physical breast phantoms based on human subject anatomy, providing the capability to generate new, unique ensembles consisting of tens of thousands or more virtual subjects. This work represents an important step towards conducting future virtual trials for tasks-based assessment of breast imaging, where it is vital to have a large ensemble of realistic phantoms for statistical power as well as clinical relevance.

  18. Validation of a mathematical phantom for dose assessment of radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sealed radioactive sources are widely used in the industry with the purpose of well logging, non-destructive testing, food irradiation, process control systems, elemental analysis and others. Among the most used sources, it can mention: 137Cs, 60Co, 192Ir, 85Kr and Americium-Beryllium with radiation activities ranging between a few MegaBecquerels (MBq) to million of GBq, as the case of food irradiation. In general, these sources present sufficient activity to represent a significant health hazard when inadequately shielded or not handled according to proper safety procedures, producing radiation exposures to workers and to members of public. In cases of overexposure to ionizing radiation, an estimative of the dose received by victims of radiation accidents, as well as its distribution within the organism, can be provided by use an anthropomorphic phantom associates with a theoretical simulation Monte Carlo method to simulate the radioactive source and its interactions with the phantom. In this work is presented the validation results of application of a mathematical phantom modeled in Geant4, as a tool to reconstruct dose of radiological accidents due to external exposure. The results are compared with the dosimetry of real accidents. (author)

  19. Limiting CT radiation dose in children with craniosynostosis: phantom study using model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical professionals need to exercise particular caution when developing CT scanning protocols for children who require multiple CT studies, such as those with craniosynostosis. To evaluate the utility of ultra-low-dose CT protocols with model-based iterative reconstruction techniques for craniosynostosis imaging. We scanned two pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms with a 64-slice CT scanner using different low-dose protocols for craniosynostosis. We measured organ doses in the head region with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Numerical simulations served to estimate organ and effective doses. We objectively and subjectively evaluated the quality of images produced by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) 30%, ASiR 50% and Veo (all by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Image noise and contrast were determined for different tissues. Mean organ dose with the newborn phantom was decreased up to 83% compared to the routine protocol when using ultra-low-dose scanning settings. Similarly, for the 5-year phantom the greatest radiation dose reduction was 88%. The numerical simulations supported the findings with MOSFET measurements. The image quality remained adequate with Veo reconstruction, even at the lowest dose level. Craniosynostosis CT with model-based iterative reconstruction could be performed with a 20-μSv effective dose, corresponding to the radiation exposure of plain skull radiography, without compromising required image quality. (orig.)

  20. Limiting CT radiation dose in children with craniosynostosis: phantom study using model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko; Lampinen, Anniina [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmu, Kirsi [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); School of Science, Aalto University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki (Finland); Reijonen, Vappu; Kortesniemi, Mika [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); Leikola, Junnu [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, Riku [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-09-15

    Medical professionals need to exercise particular caution when developing CT scanning protocols for children who require multiple CT studies, such as those with craniosynostosis. To evaluate the utility of ultra-low-dose CT protocols with model-based iterative reconstruction techniques for craniosynostosis imaging. We scanned two pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms with a 64-slice CT scanner using different low-dose protocols for craniosynostosis. We measured organ doses in the head region with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Numerical simulations served to estimate organ and effective doses. We objectively and subjectively evaluated the quality of images produced by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) 30%, ASiR 50% and Veo (all by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Image noise and contrast were determined for different tissues. Mean organ dose with the newborn phantom was decreased up to 83% compared to the routine protocol when using ultra-low-dose scanning settings. Similarly, for the 5-year phantom the greatest radiation dose reduction was 88%. The numerical simulations supported the findings with MOSFET measurements. The image quality remained adequate with Veo reconstruction, even at the lowest dose level. Craniosynostosis CT with model-based iterative reconstruction could be performed with a 20-μSv effective dose, corresponding to the radiation exposure of plain skull radiography, without compromising required image quality. (orig.)

  1. Concept development of a tendon arm manipulator and anthropomorphic robotic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    AMETEK/ORED inhouse research and development efforts leading toward a next-generation robotic manipulator arm and end-effector technology is summarized. Manipulator arm development has been directed toward a multiple-degree-of-freedom, flexible, tendon-driven concept referred to here as a Tendon Arm Manipulator (TAM). End-effector development has been directed toward a three-fingered, dextrous, tendon-driven, anthropomorphic configuration which is referred to as an Anthropomorphic Robotic Hand (ARH). Key technology issues are identified for both concepts.

  2. Experimental research on specific activity of 24Na using Chinese reference man phantom irradiated by 252Cf neutrons source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the specific activity of '24Na per unit neutron fluence, AB/Φ,in blood produced for Chinese reference man irradiated by 252Cf neutron source,and to analyze the effects of scattering neutrons from ground,wall,and ceiling in irradiation site on it.Methods: A 252Cf neutron source of 3×108 n/s and the anthropomorphic phantom were used for experiments. The phantom was made from 4 mm thick of outer covering by perspex and the liquid tissue-equivalent substitute in it. The data of phantom dimensions fit into Chinese reference man.The weight ratios of H, N, O and C in substitute equal from source to long axis of phantom were 1.1, 2.1, 3.1 and 4.1 m, respectively. Both the neutron source and the position of xiphisternum of the phantom were 1.6 m above the floor. Results: The average specific activity of 24Na per unit neutron fluence was related to the irradiation-distances, d, and its maximum value, AB/ΦM, deduced by experimental data was about 1.85×10-7 Bq·cm2·g-1. Conclusions: The AB/ΦM corresponds to that of phantom irradiated by plane-parallel beams, and the value is about more 3% than that by BOMAB phantom reported in literature. It has shown that floor-(wall-)scattered neutrons in irradiation site have significant contribution to the specific activity of 24Na, but they contributed relatively little to the induced neutron doses. Consequently,using the specific activity of 24Na for assessing accidental neutron doses received by an individual, the contribution of scattered neutrons in accident site will lead dose to be overestimated, and need to be correct. (authors)

  3. Interaction Between Thorax, Lumbar, and Pelvis Movements in the Transverse Plane During Gait at Three Velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Ya-Ting; Yoshida, Yasuyuki; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Suzuki, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    We determined the angular range of motion and the relative timing of displacement in the thorax, lumbar spine, and pelvis in the transverse plane during treadmill walking at three velocities. Nine healthy young females walked on a treadmill for three minutes at 0.40, 0.93, and 1.47 m/s. The position

  4. Training for thorax diagnostics. Systematic cardiopulmonary image analysis; Trainer Thoraxdiagnostik. Systematische kardiopulmonale Bildanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, Johannes [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hagen gem.GmbH (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2010-07-01

    The training book on thorax diagnostics using image analysis is supposed to be a supplement to the usual textbooks based on comprehensive experiences of radiologists. The covered issues are the following: heart insufficiency, acute/ chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema; pneumonia and tuberculosis; bronchial carcinoma; lung fibrosis, sarcoidosis and pneumoconiosis, pleural effusion and pneumothorax.

  5. REML estimates of genetic parameters of sexual dimorphism for wing and thorax length in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandrine Mignon-Grasteau; Jean David; Patricia Gibert; Hélène Legout; Georges Pétavy; Brigitte Moreteau; Catherine Beaumont

    2004-08-01

    Restricted maximum likelihood was used to estimate genetic parameters of male and female wing and thorax length in isofemale lines of Drosophila melanogaster, and results compared to estimates obtained earlier with the classical analysis of variance approach. As parents within an isofemale line were unknown, a total of 500 parental pedigrees were simulated and mean estimates computed. Full and half sibs were distinguished, in contrast to usual isofemale studies in which animals were all treated as half sibs and hence heritability was overestimated. Heritability was thus estimated at 0.33, 0.38, 0.30 and 0.33 for male and female wing length and male and female thorax length, respectively, whereas corresponding estimates obtained using analysis of variance were 0.46, 0.54, 0.35 and 0.38. Genetic correlations between male and female traits were 0.85 and 0.62 for wing and thorax length, respectively. Sexual dimorphism and the ratio of female to male traits were moderately heritable (0.30 and 0.23 for wing length, 0.38 and 0.23 for thorax length). Both were moderately and positively correlated with female traits, and weakly and negatively correlated with male traits. Such heritabilities confirmed that sexual dimorphism might be a fast evolving trait in Drosophila.

  6. Anthropomorphism in Sign Languages: A Look at Poetry and Storytelling with a Focus on British Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Napoli, Donna Jo

    2010-01-01

    The work presented here considers some linguistic methods used in sign anthropomorphism. We find a cline of signed anthropomorphism that depends on a number of factors, including the skills and intention of the signer, the animacy of the entities represented, the form of their bodies, and the form of vocabulary signs referring to those entities.…

  7. Localized air foci in the lower thorax in the patients with pneumothorax: Skip pneumothoraces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics and imaging features of localized air foci in the lower thorax in patients with pneumothorax using thin-section multidetector computed tomography. Materials and methods: Of 10,547 consecutive CT examinations comprising the chest, the CT scans of 146 patients with ordinary pneumothoraces were identified and retrospectively evaluated. The study group included 110 male and 36 female patients (mean age, 50 years; range, 1–93 years). All examinations were performed at our institution between January 2009 and December 2009. Cause of pneumothorax was classified as traumatic or non-traumatic. Localized air foci in the lower thorax were defined as being localized air collections in the lower thorax that did not appear to be adjacent to the lung. If these criteria were met, the shape, size, location laterality, and number of foci were evaluated. Associations with trauma, sex, severity of the pneumothorax, and laterality were evaluated using the χ2 test. All P values <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Localized air foci in the lower thorax presented as slit-like or small ovoid air collections in the lowest part of the pleural space. These foci were observed in 79/146 (54.1%) patients. The traumatic pneumothoraces group showed a higher prevalence of these features than the non-traumatic group. Some foci that were situated in the anterior part mimicked the appearance of free intraperitoneal air. Conclusion: Patients with pneumothorax commonly had localized air foci in the lower thorax. Because such foci can mimic pneumoperitoneum, accurate recognition of them is required to avoid confusion with free intraperitoneal air, especially in traumatic cases

  8. Localized air foci in the lower thorax in the patients with pneumothorax: Skip pneumothoraces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higuchi@hosp.niigata.niigata.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, 463-7 Chuo-ku, Shumoku, Niigata 950-1197 (Japan); Takahashi, Naoya, E-mail: nandtr@hosp.niigata.niigata.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, 463-7 Chuo-ku, Shumoku, Niigata 950-1197 (Japan); Kiguchi, Takao, E-mail: takakig@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, 463-7 Chuo-ku, Shumoku, Niigata 950-1197 (Japan); Shiotani, Motoi, E-mail: Shiotani14@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Niigata Cancer Center Hospital, 2-15-3 Chuo-ku, Kawagishicho, Niigata 951-8566 (Japan); Maeda, Haruo, E-mail: h-maeda@hosp.niigata.niigata.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, 463-7 Chuo-ku, Shumoku, Niigata 950-1197 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics and imaging features of localized air foci in the lower thorax in patients with pneumothorax using thin-section multidetector computed tomography. Materials and methods: Of 10,547 consecutive CT examinations comprising the chest, the CT scans of 146 patients with ordinary pneumothoraces were identified and retrospectively evaluated. The study group included 110 male and 36 female patients (mean age, 50 years; range, 1–93 years). All examinations were performed at our institution between January 2009 and December 2009. Cause of pneumothorax was classified as traumatic or non-traumatic. Localized air foci in the lower thorax were defined as being localized air collections in the lower thorax that did not appear to be adjacent to the lung. If these criteria were met, the shape, size, location laterality, and number of foci were evaluated. Associations with trauma, sex, severity of the pneumothorax, and laterality were evaluated using the χ{sup 2} test. All P values <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Localized air foci in the lower thorax presented as slit-like or small ovoid air collections in the lowest part of the pleural space. These foci were observed in 79/146 (54.1%) patients. The traumatic pneumothoraces group showed a higher prevalence of these features than the non-traumatic group. Some foci that were situated in the anterior part mimicked the appearance of free intraperitoneal air. Conclusion: Patients with pneumothorax commonly had localized air foci in the lower thorax. Because such foci can mimic pneumoperitoneum, accurate recognition of them is required to avoid confusion with free intraperitoneal air, especially in traumatic cases.

  9. SU-E-I-24: Design and Fabrication of a Multi-Functional Neck and Thyroid Phantom for Medical Dosimetry and Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdizadeh, S; Sina, S [Radiation Research Center, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F [Nuclear Engineering department, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faghihi, R [Radiation Research Center, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Engineering department, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, A [Shiraz University of medical sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is the design and fabrication of a multipurpose anthropomorphic neck and thyroid phantom for use in medical applications (i.e. quality control of images in nuclear medicine, and dosimetry). Methods: The designed neck phantom is composed of seven elliptic cylindrical slices with semi-major axis of 14 and semi-minor axis of 12.5 cm, each having the thickness of 2cm. Thyroid gland, bony part of the neck, and the wind pipe were also built inside the neck phantom. Results: The phantom contains some removable plugs,inside and at its surface to accommodate the TLD chips with different shapes and dimensions, (i.e. rod, cylindrical and cubical TLD chips)for the purpose of medical dosimetry (i.e. in radiology, radiotherapy, and nuclear medicine). For the purpose of quality control of images in nuclear medicine, the removable thyroid gland was built to accommodate the radioactive iodine. The female and male thyroid glands were built in two sizes separately. Conclusion: The designed phantom is a multi-functional phantom which is applicable for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy, and quality control of images in nuclear medicine.

  10. Membership function used to construction of a hand homogeneous phantom; Aplicacao de funcoes de pertinencia na construcao de fantoma de mao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavan, Ana Luiza Menegatti; Alvarez, Matheus; Alves, Allan Felipe Fattori; Rosa, Maria Eugenia Dela; Miranda, Jose Ricardo de Arruda [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias; Pina, Diana Rodrigues [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Doencaas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem; Duarte, Sergio Barbosa [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Fractures and dislocations of the hand are some injuries most frequently encountered in trauma of the musculoskeletal system. In evaluating these lesions, in addition to physical examination, radiography, in at least two incidents, is the investigation of choice, and rarely is necessary the help of other images to establish the diagnosis and treatment. The image quality of X-ray examination is therefore essential. In this study, a homogeneous phantom hand was developed to be used in the optimization of images from hand using computed radiography system process. In this procedure were quantified thicknesses of different tissues that constitute an anthropomorphic phantom hand. To perform the classification and quantification of tissue was applied membership functions for histograms of CT scans. The same procedure was adopted for retrospective examinations of 30 patients of the Hospital das Clinicas, Botucatu Medicine School, UNESP (HCFMB-UNESP). The results showed agreement between the thicknesses of tissues that make up the anthropomorphic phantom and sampling of patients, presenting variations between 12.63% and 6.48% for soft tissue and bone, respectively. (author)

  11. Hepatic hydro thorax: patient with pleural effusion to the right presenting tracer migration to the contralateral thorax projection on early scintigraphic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Hepatic hydrothorax is a significant pleural effusion, greater than 500 mL, that appears as a clinical manifestation of portal hypertension in patients with advanced cirrhosis, in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. Its mechanisms may be explained by migration of ascitic fluid through diaphragm defects. Radioisotope scintigraphy may contribute for the diagnostic of hepatic hydrothorax. Case report: Female, 79 years old, with a history of hepatic cirrhosis due to hepatitis B virus, without primary pulmonary or heart disease. She presented worsening of clinical ascites and dyspnoea, and it was diagnosed an extensive right pleural effusion. She underwent a thoracocentesis with a drainage of 2000 mL of light yellow-citrine fluid with transudate features. The pleural effusion quickly relapsed, leading the hypothesis of a hepatic hydrothorax. A scintigraphy was requested to assess peritoneo-pleural shunt. A dose of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of 99mTc sulfur colloid was instilled intraperitoneally. Static images involving the thorax and upper abdomen were acquired at 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes and 4 hours after injection. At 10 minutes the radiotracer was seen on the left side of the thoracic region. The scintigraphy was repeated three days later, just after new thoracocentesis, due to the tracer progression to the left side of the thorax differed to the location of pleural effusion. Likewise, until 4 hours of the second study, the radiotracer was seen again on the left side of the thorax. However, a delayed image of 24 showed accumulation of the radiotracer in the right pleural cavity, confirming peritoneo-pleural shunt as cause of pleural effusion in this patient. Discussion: Hydrothorax is an uncommon complication in patients with decompensated hepatic cirrhosis. Its mechanisms are still not well elucidated, however, it is known that presence of defects in the diaphragm associated with the imbalance of ascitic fluid volume and the pleural absorptive

  12. Hepatic hydro thorax: patient with pleural effusion to the right presenting tracer migration to the contralateral thorax projection on early scintigraphic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiki, W.A.; Ribeiro, V.P.B.; Gusman, L.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R; Watanabe, T.; Costa, P.L.A.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMUSP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hepatic hydrothorax is a significant pleural effusion, greater than 500 mL, that appears as a clinical manifestation of portal hypertension in patients with advanced cirrhosis, in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. Its mechanisms may be explained by migration of ascitic fluid through diaphragm defects. Radioisotope scintigraphy may contribute for the diagnostic of hepatic hydrothorax. Case report: Female, 79 years old, with a history of hepatic cirrhosis due to hepatitis B virus, without primary pulmonary or heart disease. She presented worsening of clinical ascites and dyspnoea, and it was diagnosed an extensive right pleural effusion. She underwent a thoracocentesis with a drainage of 2000 mL of light yellow-citrine fluid with transudate features. The pleural effusion quickly relapsed, leading the hypothesis of a hepatic hydrothorax. A scintigraphy was requested to assess peritoneo-pleural shunt. A dose of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of {sup 99m}Tc sulfur colloid was instilled intraperitoneally. Static images involving the thorax and upper abdomen were acquired at 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes and 4 hours after injection. At 10 minutes the radiotracer was seen on the left side of the thoracic region. The scintigraphy was repeated three days later, just after new thoracocentesis, due to the tracer progression to the left side of the thorax differed to the location of pleural effusion. Likewise, until 4 hours of the second study, the radiotracer was seen again on the left side of the thorax. However, a delayed image of 24 showed accumulation of the radiotracer in the right pleural cavity, confirming peritoneo-pleural shunt as cause of pleural effusion in this patient. Discussion: Hydrothorax is an uncommon complication in patients with decompensated hepatic cirrhosis. Its mechanisms are still not well elucidated, however, it is known that presence of defects in the diaphragm associated with the imbalance of ascitic fluid volume and the pleural

  13. Is this car looking at you? How anthropomorphism predicts fusiform face area activation when seeing cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Simone; Brick, Timothy R; Müller, Barbara C N; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphism encompasses the attribution of human characteristics to non-living objects. In particular the human tendency to see faces in cars has long been noticed, yet its neural correlates are unknown. We set out to investigate whether the fusiform face area (FFA) is associated with seeing human features in car fronts, or whether, the higher-level theory of mind network (ToM), namely temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) show a link to anthropomorphism. Twenty participants underwent fMRI scanning during a passive car-front viewing task. We extracted brain activity from FFA, TPJ and MPFC. After the fMRI session participants were asked to spontaneously list adjectives that characterize each car front. Five raters judged the degree to which each adjective can be applied as a characteristic of human beings. By means of linear mixed models we found that the implicit tendency to anthropomorphize individual car fronts predicts FFA, but not TPJ or MPFC activity. The results point to an important role of FFA in the phenomenon of ascribing human attributes to non-living objects. Interestingly, brain regions that have been associated with thinking about beliefs and mental states of others (TPJ, MPFC) do not seem to be related to anthropomorphism of car fronts.

  14. The Eyes have it : Eye Tracking Analysis of Anthropomorphic Car Fronts using Spatiotemporal Scan Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Purucker, Christian; Jan R. Landwehr; Sprott, David E.; Herrmann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Eye tracking has traditionally relied on regions of interest as a data source for analysis. Although widespread, this methodology is prone to several limitations. A new approach for eye tracking data analysis relying on spatiotemporal scan statistics is proposed and an exemplary experiment on anthropomorphic car front design is conducted.

  15. Whole body counter calibration using Monte Carlo modeling with an array of phantom sizes based on national anthropometric reference data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During construction of the whole body counter (WBC) at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), efficiency calibration was needed to translate acquired counts of 40K to actual grams of potassium for measurement of total body potassium (TBK) in a diverse subject population. The MCNP Monte Carlo n-particle simulation program was used to describe the WBC (54 detectors plus shielding), test individual detector counting response, and create a series of virtual anthropomorphic phantoms based on national reference anthropometric data. Each phantom included an outer layer of adipose tissue and an inner core of lean tissue. Phantoms were designed for both genders representing ages 3.5 to 18.5 years with body sizes from the 5th to the 95th percentile based on body weight. In addition, a spherical surface source surrounding the WBC was modeled in order to measure the effects of subject mass on room background interference. Individual detector measurements showed good agreement with the MCNP model. The background source model came close to agreement with empirical measurements, but showed a trend deviating from unity with increasing subject size. Results from the MCNP simulation of the CNRC WBC agreed well with empirical measurements using BOMAB phantoms. Individual detector efficiency corrections were used to improve the accuracy of the model. Nonlinear multiple regression efficiency calibration equations were derived for each gender. Room background correction is critical in improving the accuracy of the WBC calibration.

  16. Whole body counter calibration using Monte Carlo modeling with an array of phantom sizes based on national anthropometric reference data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shypailo, R J; Ellis, K J

    2011-05-21

    During construction of the whole body counter (WBC) at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), efficiency calibration was needed to translate acquired counts of (40)K to actual grams of potassium for measurement of total body potassium (TBK) in a diverse subject population. The MCNP Monte Carlo n-particle simulation program was used to describe the WBC (54 detectors plus shielding), test individual detector counting response, and create a series of virtual anthropomorphic phantoms based on national reference anthropometric data. Each phantom included an outer layer of adipose tissue and an inner core of lean tissue. Phantoms were designed for both genders representing ages 3.5 to 18.5 years with body sizes from the 5th to the 95th percentile based on body weight. In addition, a spherical surface source surrounding the WBC was modeled in order to measure the effects of subject mass on room background interference. Individual detector measurements showed good agreement with the MCNP model. The background source model came close to agreement with empirical measurements, but showed a trend deviating from unity with increasing subject size. Results from the MCNP simulation of the CNRC WBC agreed well with empirical measurements using BOMAB phantoms. Individual detector efficiency corrections were used to improve the accuracy of the model. Nonlinear multiple regression efficiency calibration equations were derived for each gender. Room background correction is critical in improving the accuracy of the WBC calibration.

  17. Whole body counter calibration using Monte Carlo modeling with an array of phantom sizes based on national anthropometric reference data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shypailo, R. J.; Ellis, K. J.

    2011-05-01

    During construction of the whole body counter (WBC) at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), efficiency calibration was needed to translate acquired counts of 40K to actual grams of potassium for measurement of total body potassium (TBK) in a diverse subject population. The MCNP Monte Carlo n-particle simulation program was used to describe the WBC (54 detectors plus shielding), test individual detector counting response, and create a series of virtual anthropomorphic phantoms based on national reference anthropometric data. Each phantom included an outer layer of adipose tissue and an inner core of lean tissue. Phantoms were designed for both genders representing ages 3.5 to 18.5 years with body sizes from the 5th to the 95th percentile based on body weight. In addition, a spherical surface source surrounding the WBC was modeled in order to measure the effects of subject mass on room background interference. Individual detector measurements showed good agreement with the MCNP model. The background source model came close to agreement with empirical measurements, but showed a trend deviating from unity with increasing subject size. Results from the MCNP simulation of the CNRC WBC agreed well with empirical measurements using BOMAB phantoms. Individual detector efficiency corrections were used to improve the accuracy of the model. Nonlinear multiple regression efficiency calibration equations were derived for each gender. Room background correction is critical in improving the accuracy of the WBC calibration.

  18. Development of a external exposure computational model for studying of input dose in skin for radiographs of thorax and vertebral column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dosimetric measurements do not always happen directly in the human body. Therefore, these assessments can be performed using anthropomorphic models (phantoms) evidencing models computational exposure (MCE) using techniques of Monte Carlo Method for virtual simulations. These processing techniques coupled with more powerful and affordable computers make the Monte Carlo method one of the tools most used worldwide in radiation transport area. In this work, the Monte Carlo EGS4 program was used to develop a computer model of external exposure to study the entrance skin dose for chest and column X-radiography and, aiming to optimize these practices by reducing doses to patients, professionals involved and the general public. The results obtained experimentally with the electrometer Radcal, model 9015, associated with the ionization chamber for radiology model 10X5-6, showed that the proposed computational model can be used in quality assurance programs in radiodiagnostic, evaluating the entrance skin dose when varying parameters of the radiation beam such as kilo voltage peak (kVp), current-time product (mAs), total filtration and distance surface source (DFS), optimizing the practices in radiodiagnostic and meeting the current regulation

  19. Phantom study to evaluate quantitative changes in myocardial radioisotope concentration for single photon emission computed tomography; Comparison between Tl-201 and Tc-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Takashi; Kitabata, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Mitsuo; Kato, Kazuzo (Cardiovascular Inst., Tokyo (Japan)); Okabe, Akifumi

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative changes in Tl-201 and Tc-99m in myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were evaluated using phantom studies. The absorption rate of gamma ray by the tissues surrounding the myocardium was less for Tc-99m (maximum, 61.2%) than Tl-201 (maximum, 70.8%). In studies on quantification of defects with various concentrations of the radioisotopes, Tc-99m was found superior to Tl-201. In comparing a focal defect in the anterior wall near the surface of the thorax (Defect A) with that in the posterior wall deep in the thorax (Defect B), Defect A had a better quantification than Defect B. Absorber, scattering, and background, however, precluded quantification, especially in Defect B. Although scatter subtraction may in part improve quantification, quantification seemed to be dependent on algorithm in image reconstruction, as well as spatial resolution of the equipment. (N.K.).

  20. Pengaruh Window Level Dan Window Width Pada Lung Window Dan Mediastinum Window Pada Kualitas Citra CT-Scan Thorax

    OpenAIRE

    Gaol, Syahnaro Lumban

    2015-01-01

    This Research of image CT-SCAN thorax with influence of window level and window width, to obtain, get value of window level and optimal window width lung window and mediastinum window, so that get image of CT-SCAN thorax which with image quality. Image of CT-SCAN thorax obtained for mediastinum window use window width 350, 400, 450, 500 HU. And Window level 50,100,150 HU. While for lung window use window width 1000,1100 HU. The window level - 500-,600,-700,-800,-900,-1000 HU, by three observe...

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of in-vivo measurement of lung contamination; Simulacion Monte Carlo de medida in-vivo de contaminacion en pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraleda, M.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lopez, M. A.; Navarro, J. F.; Broggio, D.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the technique used to simulate in-vivo measurement of lung contaminated with enriched uranium using an anthropomorphic phantom of thorax. This work was carried out as part of an international intercomparison between different institutions within collaborative actions EURADOS promoted.

  2. Study of dose distribution in a human body in international space station compartments with the tissue-equivalent spherical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Tolochek, Raisa V.; Kartsev, Ivan S.; Petrov, Vladislav M.; Nikolaev, Igor V.; Moskalyova, Svetlana I.; Lyagushin, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is known to be key hazard of manned space mission. To estimate accurately radiation health risk detailed study of dose distribution inside human body by means of human phantom is conducted. In the space experiment MATROSHKA-R, the tissue-equivalent spherical phantom (32 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been used on board the ISS for more than 8 years. Owing to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a real human body. If compared with the anthropomorphic phantom Rando used inside and outside the ISS, the spherical phantom has lower mass, smaller size and requires less crew time for the detector installation/retrieval; its tissue-equivalent properties are closer to the standard human body tissue than the Rando-phantom material. Originally the spherical phantom was installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module, then in the Piers-1, MIM-2 and MIM-1 modules of the ISS Russian segment, and finally in JAXA Kibo module. Total duration of the detector exposure is more than 1700 days in 8 sessions. In the first phase of the experiment with the spherical phantom, the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid-state track detectors). The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. After each session the passive detectors are returned to the ground. The results obtained show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being observed close to the outer wall of the compartment, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom is obviously due to the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and Earth' radiation belt contribution on

  3. Dosimetry in an IMRT phantom designed for a remote monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate delivery of prescribed dose is essential to ensure the most successful outcome from advanced radiation treatments such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and constructed to conduct a remote-audit program for IMRT treatments. The accuracy of the dosimetry in the phantom was assessed by comparing the results obtained from different detectors with those from Monte Carlo calculations. The developed phantom has a shape of a cylinder with one target and three organs at risk (OARs) inside the unit. The target and OARs were shaped similar to those of nasopharyngeal cancer patients, and manufactured for their identification during computed tomography imaging. The phantom was designed with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) holders that were inserted inside the target and the OARs for the measurements of absolute dose. In addition, the phantom allowed measurements with ionization chambers placed at the TLD locations. As a result, an inter-comparison between the two types of dosimeters was possible. For the measurement of the relative dose distribution across the target and OARs, two film slots were orthogonally placed near the center of the phantom, which also enabled the insertion of inhomogeneities near the target. Measurements with TLDs, provided by Korea Food and Drug Administration and Radiological Physics Center, and measurements with an ionization chamber (IC) were performed in four cases. The first case was one anterior field of 6 MV x rays delivered to the phantom; the second case used the same anterior field, but with inhomogeneities inserted into the phantom. The third case was three fields of 6 MV beams at an equi-gantry angle for the homogeneous phantom, and the fourth case was IMRT delivery to the phantom without inhomogeneities. For each case, measurements with both TLDs and IC were performed. For cases 1-3, theoretical predictions were obtained by using the Monte Carlo (MC) codes (BEAMnrc and

  4. Calibration of the Gamma Knife Perfexion using TG-21 and the solid water Leksell dosimetry phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To calibrate a Gamma Knife (GK) Perfexion using TG-21 with updated chamber-dependent values for modern microionization chambers in the new solid water Leksell dosimetry phantom. This work illustrates a calibration method using commercially available equipment, instruments, and an established dosimetry protocol that may be adopted at any GK center, thus reducing the interinstitutional variation in GK calibration. The calibration was verified by three third-party dosimetry checks. In addition, measurements of the relative output factors are presented and compared to available data and the new manufacturer-provided relative output factors yet to be released. Methods: An absolute dose calibration based on the TG-21 formalism, utilizing recently reported phantom material and chamber-dependent factors, was performed using a microionization chamber in a spherical solid water phantom. The result was compared to other calibration protocols based on TG-51. Independent verification of the machine output was conducted through M.D. Anderson Dosimetry Services (MDADS), using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in an anthropomorphic head phantom; the Radiological Physics Center (RPC), using TLDs in the standard Elekta ABS plastic calibration phantom (gray phantom), included with the GK; and through a collaborative international calibration survey by the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) using alanine dosimeters, also in the gray phantom. The alanine dosimeters were read by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Finally, Gafchromic EBT film was used to measure relative output factors and these factors were compared to values reported in the literature as well as new values announced for release by Elekta. The films were exposed in the solid water phantom using an included film insert accessory. Results: Compared to the TG-21 protocol in the solid water phantom, the modified and unmodified TG-51 calibrations resulted in dose rates which were 1

  5. Heart-induced movements in the thorax as detected by MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Solberg, Lars Erik; Fosse, Erik; Hol, Per Kristian

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide information for the use of radar in diagnostics a qualitative map of movements in the thorax has been obtained. This map was based on magnetic resonance image sequences of a human thorax during suspended respiration. The movements were measured using two distinct techniques. Segmentation provided measures of aorta dilatation and displacements, and image edge detection indicated other movements. The largest heart movements were found in the anterior and left regions of the heart with in-plane displacements on the order of 1 cm and which caused lung vessels displacements on the order of 2-3mm especially on the left side due to the heart ventricular. Mechanical coupling between the heart and aorta caused aorta displacements and shape distortions. Despite this coupling, aorta dilatations most likely reflected blood pressure variations.

  6. SU-E-T-13: A Feasibility Study of the Use of Hybrid Computational Phantoms for Improved Historical Dose Reconstruction in the Study of Late Radiation Effects for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroccia, H; O' Reilly, S; Bolch, W [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, N; Li, Z; Slopsema, R [Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced cancer effects are well-documented following radiotherapy. Further investigation is needed to more accurately determine a dose-response relationship for late radiation effects. Recent dosimetry studies tend to use representative patients (Taylor 2009) or anthropomorphic phantoms (Wirth 2008) for estimating organ mean doses. In this study, we compare hybrid computational phantoms to patient-specific voxel phantoms to test the accuracy of University of Florida Hybrid Phantom Library (UFHP Library) for historical dose reconstructions. Methods: A cohort of 10 patients with CT images was used to reproduce the data that was collected historically for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (i.e. caliper measurements and photographs). Four types of phantoms were generated to show a range of refinement from reference hybrid-computational phantom to patient-specific phantoms. Each patient is matched to a reference phantom from the UFHP Library based on height and weight. The reference phantom is refined in the anterior/posterior direction to create a ‘caliper-scaled phantom’. A photograph is simulated using a surface rendering from segmented CT images. Further refinement in the lateral direction is performed using ratios from a simulated-photograph to create a ‘photograph and caliper-scaled phantom’; breast size and position is visually adjusted. Patient-specific hybrid phantoms, with matched organ volumes, are generated and show the capabilities of the UF Hybrid Phantom Library. Reference, caliper-scaled, photograph and caliper-scaled, and patient-specific hybrid phantoms are compared with patient-specific voxel phantoms to determine the accuracy of the study. Results: Progression from reference phantom to patient specific hybrid shows good agreement with the patient specific voxel phantoms. Each stage of refinement shows an overall trend of improvement in dose accuracy within the study, which suggests that computational phantoms can show

  7. Comparative breast phantom studies of tomographic scintimammography performed with PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Comparative breast phantom studies were performed of tomographic scintimammography by means of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with NaI(Tl) detectors vs. Positron Emission Tomography with a dedicated scanner utilizing BGO detector ring (PET) or a dual-head gamma with NaI(Tl) detectors capable of Positron Emission Coincidence Imaging (PECI). Materials and methods: A female thorax phantom was used. Activities of the 'myocardium', 'thorax', 'liver' and 'breasts' were adjusted to emulate the count rates observed with patients. Hollow plastic spheres, imitating hot lesions (1.5-20 ml), filled with radioactive saline were inserted in the center of each 'breast'. The activities in the 'lesions' were varied in the 1.5' to 12' range above the 'breast' background. SPECT data were acquired with Tc-99m using gamma cameras with NaI(Tl) detectors. A modified FBP (CODE) and OSEM reconstruction algorithms were used to render SPECT tomographic images. PET (GE Advance with BGO) and PECI (Siemens E.CAM with NaI(Tl)) scans were acquired using F-18 FDG. Vendor supplied reconstruction algorithms were used. Results: The reconstructed hot 'lesions' contrast and resolution were obtained. Image quality obtained can be ranked as follows: (1) PET (BGO), (2) PECI (NaI(Tl)), (3) NaI(Tl) SPECT. Conclusion: Assuming comparable uptake values of Tc-99m-sestamibi and F-18 FDG, PET seems to be a superior methodology in visualization of simulated breast lesions as compared to SPECT and PECI. All these tomographic methods appear to be promising adjunct to x-ray mammography in difficult to interpret cases

  8. Retained guidewire penetrating through the aorta into the thorax: an unusual cause of recurrent bilateral pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YongHun; Yu, JunSik; Kim, YoHan; Lee, WooSurng

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous complications of the Seldinger technique have been reported in the literature, only a few complications are related to guidewires. We here report a case of a patient with a guidewire lost and retained in the aorta during vertebral artery stenting. Unfortunately, the guidewire in the aorta was not detected for 5 years, and it penetrated through the aorta into the left thorax, leading to recurrent left pneumothorax. No physician identified the wandering guidewire in the left thorax, and the recurrent left pneumothorax was only managed with closed thoracostomy drainage several times. After 4 months, the patient presented to our hospital with repeated severe chest pain, and newly developed right pneumothorax was diagnosed on chest X-rays. We meticulously evaluated the radiological findings of the other hospitals to identify the cause of the recurrent pneumothorax and discovered that the lost and wandering guidewire had crossed over from the left to the right thorax through the anterior mediastinum. The guidewire was identified as the cause of the recurrent bilateral pneumothorax, and the patient was successfully treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without any events.

  9. Image Noise, CNR, and Detectability of Low-Contrast, Low-Attenuation Liver Lesions in a Phantom: Effects of Radiation Exposure, Phantom Size, Integrated Circuit Detector, and Iterative Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Ajit H; Herts, Brian R; Dong, Frank; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Primak, Andrew N; Karim, Wadih; Baker, Mark E

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To assess image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and detectability of low-contrast, low-attenuation liver lesions in a semianthropomorphic phantom by using either a discrete circuit (DC) detector and filtered back projection (FBP) or an integrated circuit (IC) detector and iterative reconstruction (IR) with changes in radiation exposure and phantom size. Materials and Methods An anthropomorphic phantom without or with a 5-cm-thick fat-mimicking ring (widths, 30 and 40 cm) containing liver inserts with four spherical lesions was scanned with five exposure settings on each of two computed tomography scanners, one equipped with a DC detector and the other with an IC detector. Images from the DC and IC detector scanners were reconstructed with FBP and IR, respectively. Image noise and lesion CNR were measured. Four radiologists evaluated lesion presence on a five-point diagnostic confidence scale. Data analyses included receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and noninferiority analysis. Results The combination of IC and IR significantly reduced image noise (P < .001) (with the greatest reduction in the 40-cm phantom and at lower exposures) and improved lesion CNR (P < .001). There was no significant difference in area under the ROC curve between detector-reconstruction combinations at fixed exposure for either phantom. Reader accuracy with IC-IR was noninferior at 50% (100 mAs [effective]) and 25% (300 mAs [effective]) exposure reduction for the 30- and 40-cm phantoms, respectively (adjusted P < .001 and .04 respectively). IC-IR improved readers' confidence in the presence of a lesion (P = .029) independent of phantom size or exposure level. Conclusion IC-IR improved objective image quality and lesion detection confidence but did not result in superior diagnostic accuracy when compared with DC-FBP. Moderate exposure reductions maintained comparable diagnostic accuracy for both detector-reconstruction combinations. Lesion detection in the 40

  10. Image Noise, CNR, and Detectability of Low-Contrast, Low-Attenuation Liver Lesions in a Phantom: Effects of Radiation Exposure, Phantom Size, Integrated Circuit Detector, and Iterative Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Ajit H; Herts, Brian R; Dong, Frank; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Primak, Andrew N; Karim, Wadih; Baker, Mark E

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To assess image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and detectability of low-contrast, low-attenuation liver lesions in a semianthropomorphic phantom by using either a discrete circuit (DC) detector and filtered back projection (FBP) or an integrated circuit (IC) detector and iterative reconstruction (IR) with changes in radiation exposure and phantom size. Materials and Methods An anthropomorphic phantom without or with a 5-cm-thick fat-mimicking ring (widths, 30 and 40 cm) containing liver inserts with four spherical lesions was scanned with five exposure settings on each of two computed tomography scanners, one equipped with a DC detector and the other with an IC detector. Images from the DC and IC detector scanners were reconstructed with FBP and IR, respectively. Image noise and lesion CNR were measured. Four radiologists evaluated lesion presence on a five-point diagnostic confidence scale. Data analyses included receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and noninferiority analysis. Results The combination of IC and IR significantly reduced image noise (P < .001) (with the greatest reduction in the 40-cm phantom and at lower exposures) and improved lesion CNR (P < .001). There was no significant difference in area under the ROC curve between detector-reconstruction combinations at fixed exposure for either phantom. Reader accuracy with IC-IR was noninferior at 50% (100 mAs [effective]) and 25% (300 mAs [effective]) exposure reduction for the 30- and 40-cm phantoms, respectively (adjusted P < .001 and .04 respectively). IC-IR improved readers' confidence in the presence of a lesion (P = .029) independent of phantom size or exposure level. Conclusion IC-IR improved objective image quality and lesion detection confidence but did not result in superior diagnostic accuracy when compared with DC-FBP. Moderate exposure reductions maintained comparable diagnostic accuracy for both detector-reconstruction combinations. Lesion detection in the 40

  11. [Treatment outcome of surgical thoracic wall stabilization of the unstable thorax with and without lung contusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voggenreiter, G; Neudeck, F; Aufmkolk, M; Obertacke, U; Schmit-Neuerburg, K P

    1996-06-01

    Between 1988 and 1994, 295 patients with blunt chest trauma were treated. Forty-two patients had flail chest, requiring mechanical ventilation. Open reduction and osteosynthesis (ASIF reconstruction plates or isoelastic rip clamps) of the chest wall were performed in 20 patients. For the purpose of analysis we separated the patients into five groups: group I (n = 10) had chest wall stabilization in flail chest without pulmonary contusion (average ISS 31.0, AIS-thorax 4.1); group II (n = 10) had chest wall stabilization in flail chest with pulmonary contusion (average ISS 37.0, AIS-thorax 4.3); group III (n = 18) had fail chest without pulmonary contusion (average ISS 36.3, AIS-thorax 4.2); group IV (n = 4) had flail chest with pulmonary contusion (average ISS 37.8, AIS-thorax 4.0); group V (n = 29) had pulmonary contusion without flail chest (average ISS 34.5. AIS-thorax 4.1). With open reduction and internal fixation of unstable chest wall segments, the duration of ventilatory support, mortality and pneumonia were significantly reduced to 6.5 (1-25) days in group I (mortality rate 0%, incidence of pneumonia 10%) compared to group III (duration of ventilatory support 26.7 days, mortality rate 39%, incidence of pneumonia 16%). Eighty percent of the patients in group I were extubated within 5 days postoperatively. In group II 4 patients underwent emergency thoracotomy for intrathoracic injuries (3 of them died between 4 h and 31 days) and 2 patients for laceration of the lung. In all these cases the chest wall was stabilized after thoracotomy. One patient was stabilized for a deformation of the chest wall and two for paradoxical movement of the chest wall during weaning from the respirator. The mean duration of ventilation in group II was 30.8 (10-112) days (mortality rate 30%, incidence of pneumonia 30%). No complications related to the osteosynthesis arose during the follow-up. In conclusion, the best indication for early operative chest wall stabilization is flail

  12. Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso after irradiation with a simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Koerner, Christine; George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Reitz, Guenther

    The adequate knowledge of the radiation environment and the doses incurred during a space mission is essential for estimating an astronaut's health risk. The space radiation environment is complex and variable, and exposures inside the spacecraft and the astronaut's body are com-pounded by the interactions of the primary particles with the atoms of the structural materials and with the body itself. Astronauts' radiation exposures are measured by means of personal dosimetry, but there remains substantial uncertainty associated with the computational extrap-olation of skin dose to organ dose, which can lead to over-or under-estimation of the health risk. Comparisons of models to data showed that the astronaut's Effective dose (E) can be pre-dicted to within about a +10In the research experiment "Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso" at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL, Brookhaven, USA the large 1972 SPE spectrum was simulated using seven different proton energies from 50 up to 450 MeV. A phantom torso constructed of natural bones and realistic distributions of human tissue equivalent materials, which is comparable to the torso of the MATROSHKA phantom currently on the ISS, was equipped with a comprehensive set of thermoluminescence detectors and human cells. The detectors are applied to assess the depth dose distribution and radiation transport codes (e.g. GEANT4) are used to assess the radiation field and interactions of the radiation field with the phantom torso. Lymphocyte cells are strategically embedded at selected locations at the skin and internal organs and are processed after irradiation to assess the effects of shielding on the yield of chromosome damage. The first focus of the pre-sented experiment is to correlate biological results with physical dosimetry measurements in the phantom torso. Further on the results of the passive dosimetry using the anthropomorphic phantoms represent the best tool to generate reliable to

  13. Analysis of the IHC Adaptation for the Anthropomorphic Speech Processing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrovsky Alexander A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the properties of the physiological model of the adaptive behaviour of the chemical synapse between inner hair cells (IHC and auditory neurons. On the basis of the performed analysis, we propose equivalent structures of the model for implementation in the digital domain. The main conclusion of the analysis is that the synapse reservoir model is equivalent in its properties to the signal-dependent automatic gain-control mechanism. We plot guidelines for creation of artificial anthropomorphic algorithms, which exploit properties of the original synapse model. This paper also presents a concise description of the experiments, which prove the presence of the positive effect from the introduction of the depicted anthropomorphic algorithm into feature extraction of the automated speech recognition engine.

  14. Mechanical design and performance specifications of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T. Belter, MS, BS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we set forth a detailed analysis of the mechanical characteristics of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. We report on an empirical study concerning the performance of several commercially available myoelectric prosthetic hands, including the Vincent, iLimb, iLimb Pulse, Bebionic, Bebionic v2, and Michelangelo hands. We investigated the finger design and kinematics, mechanical joint coupling, and actuation methods of these commercial prosthetic hands. The empirical findings are supplemented with a compilation of published data on both commercial and prototype research prosthetic hands. We discuss numerous mechanical design parameters by referencing examples in the literature. Crucial design trade-offs are highlighted, including number of actuators and hand complexity, hand weight, and grasp force. Finally, we offer a set of rules of thumb regarding the mechanical design of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands.

  15. Mechanical design and performance specifications of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belter, Joseph T; Segil, Jacob L; Dollar, Aaron M; Weir, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we set forth a detailed analysis of the mechanical characteristics of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. We report on an empirical study concerning the performance of several commercially available myoelectric prosthetic hands, including the Vincent, iLimb, iLimb Pulse, Bebionic, Bebionic v2, and Michelangelo hands. We investigated the finger design and kinematics, mechanical joint coupling, and actuation methods of these commercial prosthetic hands. The empirical findings are supplemented with a compilation of published data on both commercial and prototype research prosthetic hands. We discuss numerous mechanical design parameters by referencing examples in the literature. Crucial design trade-offs are highlighted, including number of actuators and hand complexity, hand weight, and grasp force. Finally, we offer a set of rules of thumb regarding the mechanical design of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands.

  16. 78 FR 69943 - Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Q3s 3-Year-Old Child Side Impact Test Dummy, Incorporation by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... CFR Part 572 Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Q3s 3-Year-Old Child Side Impact Test Dummy, Incorporation... Part 572 RIN 2127-AL04 Anthropomorphic Test Devices; Q3s 3-Year-Old Child Side Impact Test Dummy...) representing a 3-year-old child, called the ``Q3s'' side impact test dummy. The agency plans to use the Q3s...

  17. Phantoms for calculations of absorbed organ dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a computer code IDES (Internal Dose Estimation System). In this code, MIRD Transformation Method is used and photon simulation by Monte Carlo method is also possible. We have studied Japanese phantoms in two procedures, mathematical phantom and 'symbol phantoms'. Our mathematical phantoms realize their height and body weights but does not hold some of organ weights, which were measured by TANAKA and KAWAMURA. The symbol phantom can solve this discrepancy and realize a realistic phantom, although it remains problems of authorization and normalization. Errors were estimated for internal dose calculations and it was pointed out that to use realistic organ weights and parameters of kinetics was important competitively to reduce uncertainty of the results. (author)

  18. Kerr-Like Phantom Wormhole

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Galaxia; Matos, Tonatiuh; García, Nadiezhda Motelongo

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study a Kerr-like wormhole with phantom matter as source. It has three parameters: mass, angular momentum and scalar field charge. This wormhole has a naked ring singularity, other wise it is regular everywhere. The mean feature of this wormhole is that the mouth of the throat lie on a sphere of the same radius as the ring singularity an avoids any observer to see or to reach the singularity, it behaves like an anti-horizon. We analyse the geodesics of the wormhole and find th...

  19. 'Phantom' inflation in warped compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, in a class of warped compactifications with the brane/flux annihilation, we find that the inflation may be driven by a flat direction identified as that along the number p of D3 branes located at the tip of the Klebanov-Strassler throat. The spectrum of adiabatic perturbation generated during inflation is nearly scale invariant, which may be obtained by using the results shown in the phantom inflation, since in a four-dimension effective description the evolution of energy density along the p direction is slowly increasing.

  20. Generation of human-like motion on anthropomorphic systems using inverse dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Saab, Layale; Souères, Philippe; Mansard, Nicolas; Fourquet, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the generation of human-like whole-body movements on anthropomorphic systems. We propose a general framework to generate robot movements from the definition of ordered stack of tasks and a global resolution scheme that enables to consider different kinds of constraints. We compare qualitatively the robot movements generated from this software with similar recorded human movements. We start with a direct global comparison of body movements. Then we analyze the magnitude of...

  1. AR-601 anthropomorphic robot modeling and virtualization toolset for research and education purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirazetdinov, R.; Kamalov, A.; Nikitina, D.; Katsevman, E.

    2016-06-01

    A program toolset for modeling and visualization of anthropomorphic robot AR-601 produced by “NPO Androidnaya technika” was implemented, allowing one to test the components of the control system and to debug control algorithms on a virtual model of the robot. The toolset might be used for both scientific and educational purposes. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of the Kazan Federal University (KFU).

  2. Flexydos3D: A new deformable anthropomorphic 3D dosimeter readout with optical CT scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Deene, Yves; Hill, Robin; Skyt, Peter S.; Booth, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    A new deformable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dosimeter is proposed that can be cast in an anthropomorphic shape and that can be used for 3D radiation dosimetry of deformable targets. The new material has additional favorable characteristics as it is tissue equivalent for high-energy photons, easy to make and is non-toxic. In combination with dual wavelength optical scanning, it is a powerful dosimeter for dose verification of image gated or organ tracked radiotherapy with moving and deforming targets.

  3. Optimal Selection of Measurement Configurations for Stiffness Model Calibration of Anthropomorphic Manipulators

    OpenAIRE

    Klimchik, Alexandr; Wu, Yier; Pashkevich, Anatol; Caro, Stéphane; Furet, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    International audience The paper focuses on the calibration of elastostatic parameters of spatial anthropomorphic robots. It proposes a new strategy for optimal selection of the measurement configurations that essentially increases the efficiency of robot calibration. This strategy is based on the concept of the robot test-pose and ensures the best compliance error compensation for the test configuration. The advantages of the proposed approach and its suitability for practical application...

  4. MATSIM -The Development and Validation of a Numerical Voxel Model based on the MATROSHKA Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Peter; Rollet, Sofia; Berger, Thomas; Bergmann, Robert; Hajek, Michael; Latocha, Marcin; Vana, Norbert; Zechner, Andrea; Reitz, Guenther

    The AIT Austrian Institute of Technology coordinates the project MATSIM (MATROSHKA Simulation) in collaboration with the Vienna University of Technology and the German Aerospace Center. The aim of the project is to develop a voxel-based model of the MATROSHKA anthro-pomorphic torso used at the International Space Station (ISS) as foundation to perform Monte Carlo high-energy particle transport simulations for different irradiation conditions. Funded by the Austrian Space Applications Programme (ASAP), MATSIM is a co-investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) ELIPS project MATROSHKA, an international collaboration of more than 18 research institutes and space agencies from all over the world, under the science and project lead of the German Aerospace Center. The MATROSHKA facility is designed to determine the radiation exposure of an astronaut onboard ISS and especially during an ex-travehicular activity. The numerical model developed in the frame of MATSIM is validated by reference measurements. In this report we give on overview of the model development and compare photon and neutron irradiations of the detector-equipped phantom torso with Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA. Exposure to Co-60 photons was realized in the standard ir-radiation laboratory at Seibersdorf, while investigations with neutrons were performed at the thermal column of the Vienna TRIGA Mark-II reactor. The phantom was loaded with passive thermoluminescence dosimeters. In addition, first results of the calculated dose distribution within the torso are presented for a simulated exposure in low-Earth orbit.

  5. Exact solution of phantom dark energy model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wen-Fu; Shui Zheng-Wei; Tang Bin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the phantom dark energy model derived from the scalar field with a negative kinetic term. By assuming a particular relation between the time derivative of the phantom field and the Hubble function, an exact solution of the model is constructed. Absence of the 'big rip' singularity is shown explicitly. We then derive special features of phantom dark energy model and show that its predictions are consistent with all astrophysical observations.

  6. Neutron dosimetry in solid water phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites-Rengifo, Jorge Luis, E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Calzada de la Cruz 118 Sur, Tepic Nayarit, Mexico and Instituto Tecnico Superior de Radiologia, ITEC, Calle Leon 129, Tepic Nayarit (Mexico); Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene, E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. postal 336, 98000, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The neutron spectra, the Kerma and the absorbed dose due to neutrons were estimated along the incoming beam in a solid water phantom. Calculations were carried out with the MCNP5 code, where the bunker, the phantom and the model of the15 MV LINAC head were modeled. As the incoming beam goes into the phantom the neutron spectrum is modified and the dosimetric values are reduced.

  7. Anthropomorphic “Motion Design” on Non-Holonomic Vehicle for Intuitive Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Yokota

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the case of operating a vehicle, if the interface extracts human intention correctly and naturally, and if the vehicle moves like a human, then the human feels this operation to be intuitive. For realizing intuitive operation, this paper proposes motion design which makes vehicle motion anthropomorphic. The strategy of this motion design is: for making anthropomorphic motion, a certain normative motion for the vehicle is needed. Thus, we measure several subjectsʹ motion in order to create normative motion. But these motions are different due to individual characteristics, because human motions are described in the time domain. Therefore, the human motion in the time domain is plotted to the phase plane. In the phase plane each subjectsʹ motion was almost the same ellipse and then we fitted these ellipses to one ellipse by the least square method. Thus, we adopt this fitted ellipse as normative motion and call it “standard human motion”. The standard human motion is implemented on the actual non‐holonomic vehicle and evaluated by the Semantic Differential (SD method. From the results, we discovered that our motion design can create anthropomorphic vehicle motion.

  8. Do Phantom Cuntz-Krieger Algebras Exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arklint, Sara E.

    2013-01-01

    If phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras do not exist, then purely infinite Cuntz-Krieger algebras can be characterized by outer properties. In this survey paper, a summary of the known results on non-existence of phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras is given......If phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras do not exist, then purely infinite Cuntz-Krieger algebras can be characterized by outer properties. In this survey paper, a summary of the known results on non-existence of phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras is given...

  9. Thermal neutron distribution in a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the improvement of a well-approximated phantom to simulate precisely thermal neutron distribution at the actual irradiation condition in tissues or organs for the treatment of malignant tumor, neutron distribution was calculated with a Monte Carlo method for phantoms made of polyethylene, water, and Rossi solution. Dependency of thermal neutron distribution in the organism was investigated on phantom materials, irradiation area size, and boron concentration. By specifying phantom shape and size, movement and disappearance of neutron particle was simulated with injection into the phantom followed by scattering, collision or absorption. Calculation was terminated when the neutron was positioned outside the phantom. As for the distribution characteristics dependency on phantom materials, water showed similar results of distribution pattern with a Rossi solution. Polyethylene phantom needed, however, correction both for absolute value and distribution pattern. For irradiation area size, thermal neutron flux in a surface layer was reduced as the area size became smaller. As for the effect of boron concentration on the neutron flux, the effect was practically negligible in the case of not more than 10 μg 10B/g in Rossi solution. In conclusion, it was clarified that well-approximation of thermal neutron distribution by an appropriate phantom could permit dose equivalent evaluation before actual irradiation for the treatment of malignant tumor. (Takagi, S.)

  10. Do you believe in phantoms?

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    “Phantoms” are tools that simulate a therapy’s response by mimicking the conditions of the human body. They are required in hadron therapy in order to optimise and verify the therapy before performing it on the patient. The better the phantom, the more accurate the treatment plan and the more effective the therapy. In the framework of the EU-funded project ENTERVISION*, a team of CERN researchers has designed an innovative piece of equipment able to evaluate radiobiology-related parameters in a very accurate way.   The ENTERVISION phantom being tested at HIT. A key challenge in hadron therapy – i.e. the medical use of hadrons to treat cancer – is to evaluate the biological effect of the delivered radiation. This can be achieved by using accurate dosimetry techniques to study the biological response in terms of the dose deposited and other physical parameters of the beam, such as the Linear Energy Transfer (LET). The job of the “phan...

  11. Phantom study of thallium-201 myocadial single photon emission computed tomography for evaluating its ability to quantify residual myocardium in infarct area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtake, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kosaka, Noboru; Momose, Toshimitsu; Nishikawa, Junichi; Iio, Masahiro

    1988-03-01

    We studied the relationship between the count of myocardial wall in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image and the thickness of wall or the concentration of Thallium-201 (Tl) in wall. For this purpose, we used phantom of thorax and myocardium. Thoracic phantom consists of mediastinum filled with low concentrated Tl solution and lung filled with wooden tip. Myocardial phantom consists of eight parts (upper and lower parts of anterior wall, septum, posteroinferior wall and lateral wall). In one phantom we changed the thickness of wall (10 mm, 7.5 mm, 5 mm, 2.5 mm, 0 mm) and in another phantom we changed the Tl concentration (100 %, 75 %, 50 %, 25 %, 0 %). In our results, the thickness and the concentration correlated well with the count and five grades (100 %, 75 %, 50 %, 25 %, 0 %) were well separated though it was said that SPECT is inaccurate in quantification. But in 180 deg half scan, the count of upper part was 10 - 15 % lower than that of lower part and the count of posteroinferior wall was about 10 % lower than that of anterior wall. We have to take it into account in quantification. In conclusion, using Tl-201 myocardial SPECT residual myocardium in infarct area can be evaluated from the severity of defect, and from that the severity of ischemia can be evaluated.

  12. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; van der Schans, CP

    2000-01-01

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time elap

  13. Phantom pain and risk factors : A multivariate analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Stewart, R; van der Schans, CP

    2002-01-01

    Phantom pain has been given considerable attention in literature. Phantom Pain reduces quality of life, and patients suffering from phantom pain make heavy use of the medical system. Many risk factors have been identified for phantom Pain in univariate analyses, including phantom sensations, stump P

  14. Abdominal CT during pregnancy: a phantom study on the effect of patient centring on conceptus radiation dose and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomou, G.; Damilakis, J. [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, P.O. Box 2208, Crete (Greece); Papadakis, A.E. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Crete (Greece)

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effect of patient centring on conceptus radiation dose and image quality in abdominal CT during pregnancy. Three anthropomorphic phantoms that represent a pregnant woman at the three trimesters of gestation were subjected to a routine abdominal CT. Examinations were performed with fixed mAs (mAs{sub f}) and with the automatic exposure control system (AEC) activated. The percent reduction between mAs{sub f} and modulated mAs (mAs{sub mod}) was calculated. Conceptus dose (D{sub c}) was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. To study the effect of misplacement of pregnant women on D{sub c}, each phantom was positioned at various locations relative to gantry isocentre. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The maximum reduction between mAs{sub f} and mAs{sub mod} was 59.8 %, while the corresponding D{sub C} reduction was 59.3 %. D{sub C} was found to decrease by up to 25 % and 7.9 % for phantom locations below and above the isocentre, respectively. Image quality deteriorated when AEC was activated, and it was progressively improved from lower to higher than the isocentre locations. Centring errors do not result in an increase in D{sub c}. To maintain image quality, accurate centring is required. (orig.)

  15. A Thorax Simulator for Complex Dynamic Bioimpedance Measurements With Textile Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Mark; Muhlsteff, Jens; Teichmann, Daniel; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements on the human thorax are suitable for assessment of body composition or hemodynamic parameters, such as stroke volume; they are non-invasive, easy in application and inexpensive. When targeting personal healthcare scenarios, the technology can be integrated into textiles to increase ease, comfort and coverage of measurements. Bioimpedance is generally measured using two electrodes injecting low alternating currents (0.5-10 mA) and two additional electrodes to measure the corresponding voltage drop. The impedance is measured either spectroscopically (bioimpedance spectroscopy, BIS) between 5 kHz and 1 MHz or continuously at a fixed frequency around 100 kHz (impedance cardiography, ICG). A thorax simulator is being developed for testing and calibration of bioimpedance devices and other new developments. For the first time, it is possible to mimic the complete time-variant properties of the thorax during an impedance measurement. This includes the dynamic real part and dynamic imaginary part of the impedance with a peak-to-peak value of 0.2 Ω and an adjustable base impedance (24.6 Ω ≥ Z0 ≥ 51.6 Ω). Another novelty is adjustable complex electrode-skin contact impedances for up to 8 electrodes to evaluate bioimpedance devices in combination with textile electrodes. In addition, an electrocardiographic signal is provided for cardiographic measurements which is used in ICG devices. This provides the possibility to generate physiologic impedance changes, and in combination with an ECG, all parameters of interest such as stroke volume (SV), pre-ejection period (PEP) or extracellular resistance (Re) can be simulated. The speed of all dynamic signals can be altered. The simulator was successfully tested with commercially available BIS and ICG devices and the preset signals are measured with high correlation (r = 0.996). PMID:25148671

  16. Normal lines in the x-ray and the CT of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper defines the line (band) as the longitudinal opacity not bigger than 2 mm of wide. It is a useful word, appropriately used in the description of radiological shades inside the mediastine (for example, line of previous union) or inside the lung (as the interlobars incisions). The lines of union are radiological densities formed by the interfaces of two different and independent structures that when entering in contact and depending on their position with regard to the radiation sheaf, images that can be in some cases of utility in the identification of the thorax pathology. The paper also includes the classes of lines and like they are observed in images

  17. Radiation exposure of premature infants by biomedical radiography of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic X-ray pictures of premature infants must chiefly be carried out under conditions of neonatal intensive care. For it are very often only single-pulse generators available. Radiation exposure dependends chiefly on the type of generator and comparison between single-pulse generators and 6-pulse generators was performed. CaF2 thermoluminescent dosimetry revealed that the entrance close of the useful field is considerably higher in single-pulse generators than in the 6-pulse generators. The indication for X-ray pictures of the premature infant thorax under bed-side conditions with single-pulse generators must be very precise. (author)

  18. Monte Carlo optimization of total body irradiation in a phantom and patient geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakarova, R.; Müntzing, K.; Krantz, M.; Hedin, E.; Hertzman, S.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this work is to apply a Monte Carlo (MC) accelerator model, validated by experimental data at isocentre distances, to a large-field total body irradiation (TBI) technique and to develop a strategy for individual patient treatment on the basis of MC dose distributions. Calculations are carried out using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc code packages for a 15 MV Varian accelerator. Acceptable agreement is obtained between MC data and measurements in a large water phantom behind a spoiler at source-skin distances (SSD) = 460 cm as well as in a CIRS® thorax phantom. Dose distributions in patients are studied when simulating bilateral beam delivery at a distance of 480 cm to the patient central sagittal plane. A procedure for individual improvement of the dose uniformity is suggested including the design of compensators in a conventional treatment planning system (TPS) and a subsequent update of the dose distribution. It is demonstrated that the dose uniformity for the simple TBI technique can be considerably improved. The optimization strategy developed is straightforward and suitable for clinics where the TPS available is deficient to calculate 3D dose distributions at extended SSD.

  19. Fundamental theories in a phantom universe

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.

    2004-01-01

    Starting with the holographic dark energy model of Li it is shown that the holographic screen at the future event horizon is sent toward infinity in the phantom energy case, so allowing for the existence of unique fundamental theories which are mathematically consistent in phantom cosmologies.

  20. Oscillating phantom in $F(R)$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the oscillating effective equation of state (EoS) of the universe around the phantom divide in the framework of $F(R)$ gravity. We illustrate the behavior of $F(R)$ with realizing multiple crossings of the phantom divide.

  1. Kerr-Like Phantom Wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, Galaxia; García, Nadiezhda Motelongo

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study a Kerr-like wormhole with phantom matter as source. It has three parameters: mass, angular momentum and scalar field charge. This wormhole has a naked ring singularity, other wise it is regular everywhere. The mean feature of this wormhole is that the mouth of the throat lie on a sphere of the same radius as the ring singularity an avoids any observer to see or to reach the singularity, it behaves like an anti-horizon. We analyse the geodesics of the wormhole and find that an observer can go through the geodesics without troubles, but the equator presents an infinity potential barrier which avoids to reach the throat. From an analysis of the Riemann tensor we obtain that the tidal forces permits the wormhole to be traversable for an observer like a human being.

  2. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association.

  3. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin-Özemir, Zeynep; Tektürk, Pınar; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Baykan, Betül

    2014-01-01

    Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association. PMID:25624930

  4. Calculation of organ doses from environmental gamma rays using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ doses from environmental γ-rays (U-238, Th-232, K-40) were calculated using Monte Carlo methods for three typical sources of a semi-infinite volume source in the air, an infinite plane source in the ground and a volume source in the ground. γ-ray fields in the natural environment were simulated rigourously without approximations or simplifications in the intermediate steps except for the disturbance of the radiation field by the human body which was neglected. Organ doses were calculated for four anthropomorphic phantoms representing a baby, a child, a female and a male adult. The dose of a fetus is given by the dose to the uterus of the adult female. Air kerma and dose conversion factors normalised to air kerma and to source intensity are given for monoenergetic sources and for the natural radionuclides. (orig./HP)

  5. Tissue mimicking materials for a multi-imaging modality prostate phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Thus, anthropomorphic phantoms can be constructed

  6. Thorax mapping for localised lung impedance change using focused impedance measurement (FIM: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humayra Ferdous

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Focused Impedance Measurement (FIM is a technique where impedance can be measured with the optimum level of localization without much increase in complexity of measuring instrument. The electrodes are applied on the skin surface but the organs inside also contributes to the measurement, as the body is a volume conductor. In a healthy and disease free lung region, the air enters at breathe-in increases the impedance of the lung and impedance reduces during breathe-out. In contrast, for a diseased lung, where part of the lungs is filled with water or some fluid, air will not enter into this zone reducing impedance change between inspiration and expiration. With this idea, the current work had been executed to have general view of localised impedance change throughout thorax using 6-electrode FIM. This generated a matrix mapping from both the front and from the back of the thorax, which  afterwards provided that how impedance change due to ventilation varies from frontal plane to back plane of human bodies.

  7. Survey radiography and computerized tomography imaging of the thorax in female dogs with mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Tatiana

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate early diagnosis of lung metastases is important for establishing therapeutic measures. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare survey thoracic radiographs and computerized tomography (CT scans to specifically identify lung metastases in female dogs with mammary tumors. Methods Twenty-one female dogs, weighing 3 to 34 kg and aged from 5 years to 14 years and 10 months, with mammary tumors were studied. In all dogs before the imaging examinations, fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mammary tumors was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Three-view thoracic radiographs were accomplished: right lateral, left lateral and ventrodorsal views. Sequential transverse images of the thorax were acquired on a spiral Scanner, before and after intravenous bolus injection of nonionic iodine contrast. Soft-tissue and lung windows were applied. All the mammary tumors were surgically removed and examined histologically. Results The correlation between the cytological and histological results regarding presence of malignancy was observed in only 17 cases. In radiographic examinations, no dog displayed signs of lung metastases or thorax chest lesions. CT detected lung metastasis in two cases, while small areas of lung atelectasis located peripherally were found in 28.57% of the dogs. Conclusion In this study population, spiral CT showed higher sensitivity than chest radiographies to detect lung metastasis; this indicates that CT should be performed on all female dogs with malignant mammary tumors.

  8. Compact and extended objects from self-interacting phantom fields

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Makhmudov, Arislan; Urazalina, Ainur; Singleton, Douglas; Scott, John

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate localized and extended objects for gravitating, self-interacting phantom fields. The phantom fields come from two scalar fields with a "wrong sign" (negative) kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian. This study covers several solutions supported by these phantom fields: phantom balls, traversable wormholes, phantom cosmic strings, and "phantom" domain walls. These four systems are solved numerically and we try to draw out general, interesting features in each case.

  9. Results on Dose Distributions in a Human Body from the Matroshka-R Experiment onboard the ISS Obtained with the Tissue-Equivalent Spherical Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Nikolaev, Igor; Kartsev, Ivan; Tolochek, Raisa; Lyagushin, Vladimir

    -tissue and effective doses of a crew member in the ISS compartments are also estimated with the spherical phantom data. The estimated effective dose rate is found to be from 10 % to 15 % lower than the averaged dose on the phantom surface as dependent on the attitude of the critical organs. If compared with the anthropomorphic phantom Rando used inside and outside the ISS earlier, the Matroshka-R space experiment spherical phantom has lower mass, smaller size, and requires less crew time for the detector installation/retrieval; its tissue-equivalent properties are closer to the standard human body tissue than the Rando-phantom material. New sessions with the two tissue-equivalent phantoms are of great interest. Development of modified passive and active detector sets is in progress for the future ISS expeditions. Both the spherical and Rando-type phantoms proved their effectiveness to measure the critical organ doses and effective doses in-flight and if supplied with modernized dosimeters can be recommended for future exploratory manned missions to monitor continuously the crew exposure to space radiation.

  10. Phantom evaluation of scatter and attenuation correction in thallium-201/technetium-99m acquisition in myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Yoichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Kira, Tomohiro; Kojima, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masanori; Nishi, Jyunko; Katsuda, Noboru; Takahashi, Mutsumasa [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Motomura, Nobutoku

    2001-04-01

    This phantom study was carried out to evaluate the usefulness of scatter correction combined with transmission-based attenuation correction in separate and simultaneous {sup 201}Tl/{sup 99m}Tc myocardial SPECT. An anthropomorphic torso phantom was used in this study. We used the triple-energy-window (TEW) method for scatter correction and transmission computed tomography (TCT) images for attenuation correction. Images without corrections (UC) and images with corrections (SAC) for scatter and attenuation were reconstructed for the evaluation. The differences in defect size between {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl UC images led to interpretation errors in separate (separate protocol) and simultaneous dual-isotope studies (simultaneous protocol). These errors were more prominent in the infero-posterior wall in the simultaneous protocol. Improvement for overestimation in object size and underestimation in defect contrast was visually obtained, and increased contrast was also shown by the myocardium-to-defect count (MD) ratios on SAC images in the separate and simultaneous protocols. However, {sup 201}Tl SAC images in the simultaneous protocol still had less defect contrast than the corresponding {sup 201}Tl SAC images in the separate protocol. From the results of our phantom experiment, separate rest {sup 201}Tl/ stress {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi acquisitions may be recommended in clinical practice. Further clinical and phantom studies will be needed to validate the method using scatter correction combined with transmission-based attenuation correction. (author)

  11. Poster — Thur Eve — 71: A 4D Multimodal Lung Phantom for Regmentation Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, D [McGill University, Physics, Montreal QC (Canada); Levesque, I R [McGill University, Oncology, Montreal QC (Canada); Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); El Naqa, I [McGill University, Physics, Montreal QC (Canada); McGill University, Oncology, Montreal QC (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Segmentation and registration of medical imaging data are two processes that can be integrated (a process termed regmentation) to iteratively reinforce each other, potentially improving efficiency and overall accuracy. A significant challenge is presented when attempting to validate the joint process particularly with regards to minimizing geometric uncertainties associated with the ground truth while maintaining anatomical realism. This work demonstrates a 4D MRI, PET, and CT compatible tissue phantom with a known ground truth for evaluating registration and segmentation accuracy. The phantom consists of a preserved swine lung connected to an air pump via a PVC tube for inflation. Mock tumors were constructed from sea sponges contained within two vacuum-sealed compartments with catheters running into each one for injection of radiotracer solution. The phantom was scanned using a GE Discovery-ST PET/CT scanner and a 0.23T Phillips MRI, and resulted in anatomically realistic images. A bifurcation tracking algorithm was implemented to provide a ground truth for evaluating registration accuracy. This algorithm was validated using known deformations of up to 7.8 cm using a separate CT scan of a human thorax. Using the known deformation vectors to compare against, 76 bifurcation points were selected. The tracking accuracy was found to have maximum mean errors of −0.94, 0.79 and −0.57 voxels in the left-right, anterior-posterior and inferior-superior directions, respectively. A pneumatic control system is under development to match the respiratory profile of the lungs to a breathing trace from an individual patient.

  12. Mechanical coupling between transverse plane pelvis and thorax rotations during gait is higher in people with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoorn, W; Bruijn, S M; Meijer, O G; Hodges, P W; van Dieën, J H

    2012-01-10

    This study investigated whether people with low back pain (LBP) reduce variability of movement between the pelvis and thorax (trunk) in the transverse plane during gait at different speeds compared to healthy controls. Thirteen people with chronic LBP and twelve healthy controls walked on a treadmill at speeds from 0.5 to 1.72 m/s, with increments of 0.11 m/s. Step-to-step variability of the trunk, pelvis, and thorax rotations were calculated. Step-to-step deviations of pelvis and thorax rotations from the average pattern (residual rotations) were correlated to each other, and the linear regression coefficients between these deviations calculated. Spectral analysis was used to determine the frequencies of the residual rotations, to infer the relation of reduced trunk variability to trunk stiffness and/or damping. Variability of trunk motion (thorax relative to pelvis) was lower (P=0.02), covariance between the residual rotations of pelvis and thorax motions was higher (P=0.03), and the linear regression coefficients were closer to 1 (P=0.05) in the LBP group. Most power of segmental residual rotations was below stride frequency (~1 Hz). In this frequency range, trunk residual rotations had less power than pelvis or thorax residual rotations. These data show that people with LBP had lower variability of trunk rotations, as a result of the coupling of deviations of residual rotations in one segment to deviations of a similar shape (correlation) and amplitude (regression coefficient) in the other segment. These results support the argument that people with LBP adopt a protective movement strategy, possibly by increased trunk stiffness.

  13. The reference phantoms: voxel vs polygon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C H; Yeom, Y S; Nguyen, T T; Wang, Z J; Kim, H S; Han, M C; Lee, J K; Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N; Bolch, W E; Lee, C; Chung, B S

    2016-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference male and female adult phantoms, described in Publication 110, are voxel phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography scans of a male and a female patient, respectively. The voxel in-plane resolution and the slice thickness, of the order of a few millimetres, are insufficient for proper segmentation of smaller tissues such as the lens of the eye, the skin, and the walls of some organs. The calculated doses for these tissues therefore present some limitations, particularly for weakly penetrating radiation. Similarly, the Publication 110 phantoms cannot represent 8-40-µm-thick target regions in respiratory or alimentary tract organs. Separate stylised models have been used to represent these tissues for calculation of the ICRP reference dose coefficients (DCs). ICRP Committee 2 recently initiated a research project, the ultimate goal of which is to convert the Publication 110 phantoms to a high-quality polygon-mesh (PM) format, including all source and target regions, even those of the 8-40-µm-thick alimentary and respiratory tract organs. It is expected that the converted phantoms would lead to the same or very similar DCs as the Publication 110 reference phantoms for penetrating radiation and, at the same time, provide more accurate DCs for weakly penetrating radiation and small tissues. Additionally, the reference phantoms in the PM format would be easily deformable and, as such, could serve as a starting point to create phantoms of various postures for use, for example, in accidental dose calculations. This paper will discuss the current progress of the phantom conversion project and its significance for ICRP DC calculations.

  14. Charged black holes in phantom cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Qadir, Asghar; Rashid, Muneer Ahmad [National University of Sciences and Technology, Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    2008-11-15

    In the classical relativistic regime, the accretion of phantom-like dark energy onto a stationary black hole reduces the mass of the black hole. We have investigated the accretion of phantom energy onto a stationary charged black hole and have determined the condition under which this accretion is possible. This condition restricts the mass-to-charge ratio in a narrow range. This condition also challenges the validity of the cosmic-censorship conjecture since a naked singularity is eventually produced due to accretion of phantom energy onto black hole. (orig.)

  15. Depth Dose Distribution Study within a Phantom Torso after Irradiation with a Simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Matthiae, Daniel; Koerner, Christine; George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Cucinotta, Francis; Reitz, Guenther

    2010-01-01

    with the phantom torso. Lymphocyte cells are strategically embedded at selected locations at the skin and internal organs and are processed after irradiation to assess the effects of shielding on the yield of chromosome damage. The initial focus of the present experiment is to correlate biological results with physical dosimetry measurements in the phantom torso. Further on, the results of the passive dosimetry within the anthropomorphic phantoms represent the best tool to generate reliable data to benchmark computational radiation transport models in a radiation field of interest. The presentation will give first results of the physical dose distribution, the comparison with GEANT4 computer simulations based on a Voxel model of the phantom, and a comparison with the data from the chromosome aberration study.

  16. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the posture modification of Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference phantoms of ICRP 110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, D. C.; Santos, W. S.; Alves, M. C.; Souza, D. N.; Carvalho, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to modify the standing posture of the anthropomorphic reference phantoms of ICRP publication 110, AM (Adult Male) and AF (Adult Female), to the sitting posture. The change of posture was performed using the Visual Monte Carlo software (VMC) to rotate the thigh region of the phantoms and position it between the region of the leg and trunk. Scion Image software was used to reconstruct and smooth the knee and hip contours of the phantoms in a sitting posture. For 3D visualization of phantoms, the VolView software was used. In the change of postures, the organ and tissue masses were preserved. The MCNPX was used to calculate the equivalent and effective dose conversion coefficients (CCs) per fluence for photons for six irradiation geometries suggested by ICRP publication 110 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO) and energy range 0.010-10 MeV. The results were compared between the standing and sitting postures, for both sexes, in order to evaluate the differences of scattering and absorption of radiation for different postures. Significant differences in the CCs for equivalent dose were observed in the gonads, colon, prostate, urinary bladder and uterus, which are present in the pelvic region, and in organs distributed throughout the body, such as the lymphatic nodes, muscle, skeleton and skin, for the phantoms of both sexes. CCs for effective dose showed significant differences of up to 16% in the AP irradiation geometry, 27% in the PA irradiation geometry and 13% in the ROT irradiation geometry. These results demonstrate the importance of using phantoms in different postures in order to obtain more precise conversion coefficients for a given exposure scenario.

  17. Quantifying the effect of respiratory motion on lung tumour dosimetry with the aid of a breathing phantom with deforming lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nioutsikou, Elena; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve

    2006-07-01

    The contribution of organ and tumour motion to the degradation of planned dose distributions during radiotherapy to the breathing lung has been experimentally investigated and quantified. An anthropomorphic, tissue-equivalent breathing phantom with deformable lungs has been built, in which the lung tumour can be driven in any arbitrary 3D trajectory. The trajectory is programmed into a motion controller connected to a high-precision moving platform that is connected to the tumour. The motion controller is connected to the accelerator's dose counter and the speed of motion is scaled to the dose rate. This ensures consistent delivery despite variation in either the dose rate or inter-segment timing. For this study, the phantom was made to breathe by a set of periodic equations representing respiratory motion by an asymmetric, trigonometric function. Several motion amplitudes were selected to be applied in the primary axis of motion. Five three-dimensional, geometrically conformal (3DCRT) fractions with different starting phases (spaced uniformly in the breathing cycle) were delivered to the phantom and compared to a delivery where the phantom was static at the end-expiration position. A set of intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans (IMRT) was subsequently delivered in the same manner. Bigger amplitudes of motion resulted in a higher degree of dose blurring. Severe underdosages were observed when deliberately selecting the PTV wrongly, their extent being correlated with the degree of margin error. IMRT motion-averaged dose distributions exhibited areas of high dose in the gross tumour volume (GTV) which were not present in the static irradiations, arising from booster segments that the optimizer was creating to achieve planning target volume (PTV) homogeneity during the inverse-planning process. 3DCRT, on the other hand, did not demonstrate such effects. It has been concluded that care should be taken to control the delivered fluence when delivering IMRT to the

  18. Advances in fiducial-free image-guidance for spinal radiosurgery with CyberKnife--a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürweger, Christoph; Drexler, Christian; Kufeld, Markus; Muacevic, Alexander; Wowra, Berndt

    2010-12-22

    The image-guided CyberKnife radiosurgery system is apable of tracking spinal targets without fiducial implants. Recently, a new version of this fiducial-free image guidance modality ("enhanced Xsight spine tracking") has been introduced. We assessed the accuracy of this novel technique versus its precursor in a comparative phantom study. The CyberKnife consists of a 6 MV linac on a six-axis robot and a stereoscopic kV image guidance system. An anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom with a cervical spine section was mounted on the linac nozzle. The robotic manipulator was used to precisely move the phantom to defined positions in the CyberKnife workspace. Multiple stereoscopic images were acquired at different translational and rotational positions. The enhanced Xsight spine tracking readouts were recorded and compared to the nominal phantom position. These tests were repeated with the original Xsight spine tracking version to analyze potential differences. Enhanced Xsight spine tracking correctly reported translational offsets with an RMS error of less than 0.4 mm. Yaw and roll rotations were detected with an accuracy of 0.2°, 0.25°. Pitch offsets were slightly underestimated, with up to 0.3° for an offset of ± 2°. Nominal X (left-right) translational offsets were partially misinterpreted as roll (0.2° at a 10 mm offset). Apart from this, no correlation between rotational and translational directions was found. In comparison, the original Xsight spine tracking showed identical results for translations, but larger systematic and statistical errors for rotations. Enhanced Xsight spine tracking measurably improves precision in fiducial-free spinal radiosurgery with the CyberKnife.

  19. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time (“phantom energy” without “Big Rip” singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time (“cosmological constant” with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  20. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashenok, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats - ICREA and Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-Par-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yurov, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-23

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time ('phantom energy' without 'Big Rip' singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time ('cosmological constant' with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  1. In good company? Perception of movement synchrony of a non-anthropomorphic robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Hagen; Saez-Pons, Joan; Syrdal, Dag Sverre; Dautenhahn, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological developments like cheap sensors and the decreasing costs of computational power have brought the possibility of robotic home companions within reach. In order to be accepted it is vital for these robots to be able to participate meaningfully in social interactions with their users and to make them feel comfortable during these interactions. In this study we investigated how people respond to a situation where a companion robot is watching its user. Specifically, we tested the effect of robotic behaviours that are synchronised with the actions of a human. We evaluated the effects of these behaviours on the robot's likeability and perceived intelligence using an online video survey. The robot used was Care-O-bot3, a non-anthropomorphic robot with a limited range of expressive motions. We found that even minimal, positively synchronised movements during an object-oriented task were interpreted by participants as engagement and created a positive disposition towards the robot. However, even negatively synchronised movements of the robot led to more positive perceptions of the robot, as compared to a robot that does not move at all. The results emphasise a) the powerful role that robot movements in general can have on participants' perception of the robot, and b) that synchronisation of body movements can be a powerful means to enhance the positive attitude towards a non-anthropomorphic robot.

  2. The anthropomorphic design and experiments of HIT/DLR five-fingered dexterous hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Shaowei; Liu Yiwei; Jin Minghe; Lan Tian; Liu Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new developed anthropomorphic robot dexterous hand: HIT/DLR Hand II. The hand is composed of an independent palm and five identical modular fingers, and each finger has three degree of freedom (DOFs) and four joints. All the actuators and electronics are integrated in the finger body and the palm. Owing to using a new actuator, drivers and a novel arrangement, both the length and width of the finger is about two third of its former version. By using the wire coupling mechanism, the distal phalanx transmission ratio is kept exactly 1:1 in the whole movement range. The packing mechanism which is implemented directly in the finger body and palm not only reduces the size of whole hand but also make it more anthropomorphic. Additionally, the new designed force/torque and position sensors are integrated in the hand for increasing multisensory capability. To evaluate the performances of the finger mechanism, the position and impedance control experiments are conducted.

  3. In good company? Perception of movement synchrony of a non-anthropomorphic robot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Lehmann

    Full Text Available Recent technological developments like cheap sensors and the decreasing costs of computational power have brought the possibility of robotic home companions within reach. In order to be accepted it is vital for these robots to be able to participate meaningfully in social interactions with their users and to make them feel comfortable during these interactions. In this study we investigated how people respond to a situation where a companion robot is watching its user. Specifically, we tested the effect of robotic behaviours that are synchronised with the actions of a human. We evaluated the effects of these behaviours on the robot's likeability and perceived intelligence using an online video survey. The robot used was Care-O-bot3, a non-anthropomorphic robot with a limited range of expressive motions. We found that even minimal, positively synchronised movements during an object-oriented task were interpreted by participants as engagement and created a positive disposition towards the robot. However, even negatively synchronised movements of the robot led to more positive perceptions of the robot, as compared to a robot that does not move at all. The results emphasise a the powerful role that robot movements in general can have on participants' perception of the robot, and b that synchronisation of body movements can be a powerful means to enhance the positive attitude towards a non-anthropomorphic robot.

  4. Malignant diffuse pleural mesothelioma: Comparison between computed tomography and conventional plain radiography of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma is increasing although diagnosis of this disease may be very difficult. Computed tomography examinations and conventional chest X-rays of 30 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were reviewed independently, to evaluate the role of both modalities. CT offered the following advantages over conventional chest X-ray examinations: Ct was more sensitive in detecting the smooth and nodular changes of malignant pleural mesothelioma, especially at the diaphragm and lower parts of the thorax, tumours could be better demonstrated at the pericardium and in the greater fissure, in some cases, where chest films showed just abnormal widening of the mediastinum, CT could differentiate between tumour involvement of the mediastinal pleura and local invasion of the mediastinum by the tumour CT was more effective in detecting pleural calcifications and thickening of the contralateral pleura. CT proves more accurate in assessing the extent of the disease, and gives additional diagnostic help. (orig.)

  5. Extramedullary haematopoiesis as a cause of a paravertebral mass in the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological due to extensive extramedullary haematopoiesis taking place in the posterior mediastinum in two patients are described, and the literature is reviewed. Characteristic features are a polycyclic or spindle-shaped configuration of the mass, with bilateral paravertebral localisation in the caudal and middle third of the thorax. There is absence of inflammatory or neoplastic changes in the neighbouring skeleton, but in thalassaemia there may be changes in the paravertebral portion of the ribs. Computer tomographically, the combination of a solid paravertebral tumour, with adjacent rib changes, is characteristic of thalassaemia with extramedullary haematopoiesis. In the absence of other skeletal changes, computed tomography is valuable for differential diagnosis. Lymphomas occur considerably more often and may appear identical but, because of the well know fat content of myolipoma, the scan shows contrast values between -15 and +40 HU. Because of their high vascularity, there is a marked increase in density following intravenous contrast medium. (orig.)

  6. Extramedullary haematopoiesis as a cause of a paravertebral mass in the thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmeinwieser, J.; Gullota, U.; Reiser, M.; Saida, Y.; Mack, D.

    1982-07-01

    The radiological symptoms due to extensive extramedullary haematopoiesis taking place in the posterior mediastinum in two patients are described, and the literature is reviewed. Characteristic features are a polycyclic or spindle-shaped configuration of the mass, with bilateral paravertebral localisation in the caudal and middle third of the thorax. There is absence of inflammatory or neoplastic changes in the neighbouring skeleton, but in thalassaemia there may be changes in the paravertebral portion of the ribs. Computer tomographically, the combination of a solid paravertebral tumour, with adjacent rib changes, is characteristic of thalassaemia with extramedullary haematopoiesis. In the absence of other skeletal changes, computed tomography is valuable for differential diagnosis. Lymphomas occur considerably more often and may appear identical but, because of the well know fat content of myolipoma, the scan shows contrast values between -15 and +40 HU. Because of their high vascularity, there is a marked increase in density following intravenous contrast medium.

  7. The thorax morphology of Epiophlebia (Insecta: Odonata) nymphs--including remarks on ontogenesis and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsse, Sebastian; Helmker, Benjamin; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The species of Epiophlebia are unique among the recent Odonata in showing a mixture of morphological characters of dragonflies (Anisoptera) and damselflies (Zygoptera). The status of the four described extant species of Epiophlebia is disputable from a genetic as well as from a morphological point of view. Here we present an analysis of the thoracic musculature of different nymphal instars of Epiophlebia laidlawi and Epiophlebia superstes to elucidate their morphology and ontogenetic development. In total, 75 muscles have been identified in the thorax of Epiophlebia. This represents the highest number of thoracic muscles ever found in any odonate. It includes six muscles that are reported for the first time for Odonata, and three of these are even new for Pterygota. In total, our results indicate that Epiophlebia has the most ancestral thoracic morphology among Odonata. PMID:26246088

  8. In vivo 3D FD OCT of subpleural lung parenchyma in the intact thorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, S.; Schnabel, C.; Knels, L.; Koch, E.

    2010-02-01

    In vivo determination of three-dimensional and dynamic geometries of alveolar structures with adequate resolution is essential to develop numerical models of the lung. To gain insight into the dynamics of alveoli a thorax window was prepared in anesthetized rabbits by removal of muscle tissue between 3rd and 4th rib without harming the parietal pleura. The transparent parietal pleura allows contact-free imaging by intra-vital microscopy (IVM) and 3D optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT). We have demonstrated that it is possible to acquire the identical region in the inspiratory and expiratory phase, and that OCT in this animal model is suitable for generating 3D geometry of in vivo lung parenchyma. The 3D data sets of the fine structure of the lung beneath the pleura could provide a basis for the development of threedimensional numerical models of the lung.

  9. Phantom Limb Pain: Mechanisms and Treatment Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Bishnu Subedi; George T. Grossberg

    2011-01-01

    The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neuron...

  10. Pediatric phantoms for use in dosimetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimating absorbed doses to children from external and internal radiation sources has become important to the nuclear industry and pediatric nuclear medicine. The Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section at ORNL has recently completed the design of mathematical representations of children of ages newborn, 1 year, and 5 years old. These mathematical representations will be referred to as pediatric phantoms. Using these phantoms, relevant energy deposition data have been developed which establish a meaningful model for use in estimating radiation dose to children

  11. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom for highly penetrating radiations

  12. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  13. Liver hydatid cyst ruptured into the thorax: CT angiography findings of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Intrathoracic rupture of hepatic hydatid cyst is a rare but severe condition causing a spectrum of lesions to the pleura, lung parenchyma, and bronchi. Pulmonary complications result from the proximity of hydatid cysts in the liver and the diaphragm. Objectives and tasks: In this report we aimed to present computed tomography (CT) angiography findings of a case with liver hydatid cyst ruptured into the thorax. The patient underwent CT angiography examination with suspicion of pulmonary embolism. Materials and methods: A 71-year-old female patient admitted to our emergency department with complaints of severe and persistent cough. Basal region of the right hemithorax could not get breath sounds on physical examination. Chest radiography revealed the presence of consolidation-effusion. The patient was treated with antibiotherapy for pneumonia and parapneumonic effusion. Because of the clinical symptoms and chest radiograph findings persisted the patient underwent CT angiography examination with suspicion of pulmonary embolism. Results: On CT angiography images pulmonary artery and its branches were normal. There were subtotal collapse in the right middle and lower lung lobes and complicated cystic lesion that has air densities in the basal interlobar space. Another thick walled complicated cystic lesion with multiple septations and air densities was detected in the right posterior liver lobe. The right hemidiaphragm was interrupted and the right liver lobe partially herniated into the thorax cavity. Serologic tests were positive for Echinococcus granulosus and there were prior therapy history for liver cyst hydatid. The diagnostic aspiration findings were consistent with hydatid cyst lesion. Conclusion: In patients with hepatic hydatid cyst associated with persistent and severe cough, thoracic rupture of the cyst should be considered in differential diagnosis. CT angiography is fast, non-invasive and effective method in the detection of

  14. Phantom Limb Pain: Mechanisms and Treatment Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Bishnu; Grossberg, George T.

    2011-01-01

    The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neurons in the brain has been proposed in the generation of phantom pain. A wide variety of treatment approaches have been employed, but mechanism-based specific treatment guidelines are yet to evolve. Phantom limb pain is considered a neuropathic pain, and most treatment recommendations are based on recommendations for neuropathic pain syndromes. Mirror therapy, a relatively recently proposed therapy for phantom limb pain, has mixed results in randomized controlled trials. Most successful treatment outcomes include multidisciplinary measures. This paper attempts to review and summarize recent research relative to the proposed mechanisms of and treatments for phantom limb pain. PMID:22110933

  15. Phantom Limb Pain: Mechanisms and Treatment Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Subedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neurons in the brain has been proposed in the generation of phantom pain. A wide variety of treatment approaches have been employed, but mechanism-based specific treatment guidelines are yet to evolve. Phantom limb pain is considered a neuropathic pain, and most treatment recommendations are based on recommendations for neuropathic pain syndromes. Mirror therapy, a relatively recently proposed therapy for phantom limb pain, has mixed results in randomized controlled trials. Most successful treatment outcomes include multidisciplinary measures. This paper attempts to review and summarize recent research relative to the proposed mechanisms of and treatments for phantom limb pain.

  16. Fast 3D coronary artery contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with magnetization transfer contrast, fat suppression and parallel imaging as applied on an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irwan, Roy; Russel, Inis K.; Sijens, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    A magnetic resonance sequence for high-resolution imaging of coronary arteries in a very short acquisition time is presented. The technique is based on fast low-angle shot and uses fat saturation and magnetization transfer contrast Prepulses to improve image contrast. GeneRalized Autocalibrating Par

  17. An overview of systems for CT- and MRI-guided percutaneous needle placement in the thorax and abdomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnolli, Maarten M.; Hanumara, Nevan C.; Franken, Michel; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Broeders, Ivo A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive biopsies, drainages and therapies in the soft tissue organs of the thorax and abdomen are typically performed through a needle, which is inserted percutaneously to reach the target area. The conventional workflow for needle placement employs an iterative freehand technique. This a

  18. Pelvis-thorax coordination in the transverse plane during walking in persons with nonspecific low back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, Claudine J C; Meijer, Onno G; Wuisman, Paul I J M; van Dieën, Jaap H; Levin, Mindy F; Beek, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Transverse pelvis and thorax rotations were studied during walking in 39 patients with nonspecific low back pain and 19 healthy participants. OBJECTIVES: To gain insight into the consequences of low back pain for gait and to identify clinically useful measures for characterizing the qu

  19. Effect of trunk sagittal attitude on shoulder, thorax and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics in able-bodied subjects during gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Leardini

    Full Text Available It has been shown that an original attitude in forward or backward inclination of the trunk is maintained at gait initiation and during locomotion, and that this affects lower limb loading patterns. However, no studies have shown the extent to which shoulder, thorax and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics are modified during gait due to this sagittal inclination attitude. Thirty young healthy volunteers were analyzed during level walking with video-based motion analysis. Reflecting markers were mounted on anatomical landmarks to form a two-marker shoulder line segment, and a four-marker thorax and pelvis segments. Absolute and relative spatial rotations were calculated, for a total of 11 degrees of freedom. The subjects were divided into two groups of 15 according to the median of mean thorax inclination angle over the gait cycle. Preliminary MANOVA analysis assessed whether gender was an independent variable. Then two-factor nested ANOVA was used to test the possible effect of thorax inclination on body segments, planes of motion and gait periods, separately. There was no significant difference in all anthropometric and spatio-temporal parameters between the two groups, except for subject mass. The three-dimensional kinematics of the thorax and pelvis were not affected by gender. Nested ANOVA revealed group effect in all segment rotations apart those at the pelvis, in the sagittal and frontal planes, and at the push-off. Attitudes in sagittal thorax inclination altered trunk segments kinematics during gait. Subjects with a backward thorax showed less thorax-to-pelvis motion, but more shoulder-to-thorax and thorax-to-laboratory motion, less motion in flexion/extension and in lateral bending, and also less motion during push-off. This contributes to the understanding of forward propulsion and sideways load transfer mechanisms, fundamental for the maintenance of balance and the risk of falling.

  20. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragusin, O; Bosmans, H; Pappas, C; Desmet, W

    2008-09-21

    the quality of the images independently of radiation exposure settings. The SAM anthropomorphic phantom has the advantage of visualization of stenotic lesions during the injection of a contrast agent and using an anatomical background. In the future, this phantom could potentially bridge the gap between physics tests and the clinical reality in the catheterization laboratory. PMID:18711249

  1. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    images independently of radiation exposure settings. The SAM anthropomorphic phantom has the advantage of visualization of stenotic lesions during the injection of a contrast agent and using an anatomical background. In the future, this phantom could potentially bridge the gap between physics tests and the clinical reality in the catheterization laboratory

  2. Which Phantom Is Better for Assessing the Image Quality in Full-Field Digital Mammography?: American College of Radiology Accreditation Phantom versus Digital Mammography Accreditation Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare between the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom and digital mammography accreditation phantom in assessing the image quality in full-field digital mammography (FFDM). In each week throughout the 42-week study, we obtained phantom images using both the ACR accreditation phantom and the digital mammography accreditation phantom, and a total of 42 pairs of images were included in this study. We assessed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in each phantom image. A radiologist drew a square-shaped region of interest on the phantom and then the mean value of the SNR and the standard deviation were automatically provided on a monitor. SNR was calculated by an equation, measured mean value of SNR-constant coefficient of FFDM/standard deviation. Two breast radiologists scored visible objects (fibers, specks, and masses) with soft-copy images and calculated the visible rate (number of visible objects/total number of objects). We compared SNR and the visible rate of objects between the two phantoms and calculated the k-coefficient for interobserver agreement. The SNR of the ACR accreditation phantom ranged from 42.0 to 52.9 (Mean, 47.3 ± 2.79) and that of Digital Phantom ranged from 24.8 to 54.0 (Mean, 44.1 ± 9.93) (p = 0.028). The visible rates of all three types of objects were much higher in the ACR accreditation phantom than those in the digital mammography accreditation phantom (p < 0.05). Interobserver agreement for visible rates of objects on phantom images was fair to moderate agreement (k-coefficients: 0.34-0.57). The ACR accreditation phantom is superior to the digital mammography accreditation phantom in terms of SNR and visibility of phantom objects. Thus, ACR accreditation phantom appears to be satisfactory for assessing the image quality in FFDM.

  3. Development of modified voxel phantoms for the numerical dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents involving external sources: implementation in SESAME tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courageot, Estelle; Sayah, Rima; Huet, Christelle [External Dosimetry Department, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Radiological Protection and Human Health Division, Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, IRSN/DRPH/SDE, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)], E-mail: estelle.courageot@irsn.fr

    2010-05-07

    Estimating the dose distribution in a victim's body is a relevant indicator in assessing biological damage from exposure in the event of a radiological accident caused by an external source. When the dose distribution is evaluated with a numerical anthropomorphic model, the posture and morphology of the victim have to be reproduced as realistically as possible. Several years ago, IRSN developed a specific software application, called the simulation of external source accident with medical images (SESAME), for the dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents by numerical simulation. This tool combines voxel geometry and the MCNP(X) Monte Carlo computer code for radiation-material interaction. This note presents a new functionality in this software that enables the modelling of a victim's posture and morphology based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces. The procedure for constructing the modified voxel phantoms is described, along with a numerical validation of this new functionality using a voxel phantom of the RANDO tissue-equivalent physical model. (note)

  4. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  5. Adjustable fetal phantom for pulse oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubán, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2009-05-01

    As the measuring head of a fetal pulse oximeter must be attached to the head of the fetus inside the mother's uterus during labor, testing, and developing of fetal pulse oximeters in real environment have several difficulties. A fetal phantom could enable evaluation of pulse oximeters in a simulated environment without the restrictions and difficultness of medical experiments in the labor room. Based on anatomic data we developed an adjustable fetal head phantom with three different tissue layers and artificial arteries. The phantom consisted of two arteries with an inner diameter of 0.2 and 0.4 mm. An electronically controlled pump produced pulse waves in the arteries. With the phantom we investigated the sensitivity of a custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter at different pulsation intensity and artery diameters. The results showed that the oximeter was capable of identifying 4% and 2% changes in diameter between the diastolic and systolic point in arteries of over 0.2 and 0.4 mm inner diameter, respectively. As the structure of the phantom is based on reported anatomic values, the results predict that the investigated custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter has sufficient sensitivity to detect the pulse waves and to calculate the R rate on the fetal head.

  6. An MRI phantom using carrageenan gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Yamamoto, Naotake; Tanaka, Akio; Hiraki, Yoshio [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Uchida, Nobue; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a new solid type carrageenan gel phantom. The ingredients of the new gel are carrageenan, manganese chloride, sodium chloride, sodium azide, and water. The gel phantom has sufficient strength to form a torso without the use of a reinforcing agent. A phantom of a desired shape can be created by pouring a hot solution of carrageenan into a mold. The phantom can then be cut easily with a knife and trimmed into the desired shape. The recommended concentrations of the ingredients are; 5 wt% carrageenan, 0.2 mM MnCl{sub 2}, 0.19 wt% NaCl, 0.1 wt% NaN{sub 3}, with the remainder being water. T{sub 2} and T{sub 1} of this phantom at 1.5 T are 84.9 ms and 429 ms respectively. The conductivity and relative dielectric constant at 63.8 MHz are 0.769 S/m and 81.4 respectively. (author)

  7. Pharmacological interventions for phantom limb pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jun; LIAN Yan-hong; XIE Kang-jie; CAI Shu-nü

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the mechanisms and current clinical application of pharmacological interventions for phantom limb pain.Data sources Both Chinese and English language literatures were searched using MEDLINE (1982-2011),Pubmed (1982-2011) and the Index of Chinese Language Literature (1982-2011).Study selection Data from published articles about pharmacological management of phantom limb pain in recent domestic and foreign literature were selected.Data extraction Data were mainly extracted from 96 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review.Results By reviewing the mechanisms and current clinical application of pharmacological interventions for phantom limb pain,including anticonvulsants,antidepressants,local anaesthetics,N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists,non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs,tramadol,opioids,calcitonin,capsaicin,beta-adrenergic blockers,clonidine,muscle relaxants,and emerging drugs,we examined the efficacy and safety of these medications,outlined the limitations and future directions.Conclusions Although there is lack of evidence-based consensus guidelines for the pharmacological management of phantom limb pain,we recommend tricyclic antidepressants,gabapentin,tramadol,opioids,local anaesthetics and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists as the rational options for the treatment of phantom limb pain.

  8. Identification of anthropomorphic, teleological and vitalist conceptions amongst participants of an annual meeting of SBBq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Leites Larentis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to identify epistemological obstacles amongst participants of XXXIX Annual Meeting of Brazilian Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. A questionnaire with selected excerpts of scientific papers from high impact factor journals was answered by 97 participants of this annual meeting (39 under-graduates, 42 graduate students, and 16 professors and researchers. From Bachelard’s notion of teleological obstacle, it was possible to identify vitalist conceptions (animism, teleological approaches of the evolution processes, expressed in apologies of immanent purposes in organisms’ adaptation, and an anthropomorphic vision of the biological processes under evaluation in the answers and also in the acceptance or not recognition of these obstacles in the excerpts. The presence of figures of speech, metaphors and analogies (verbal obstacle were verified in explaining the evolution and the immune system, also present in the excerpts.

  9. Contextual analysis of fragmentation of the anthropomorphic figurines from the Late Neolithic site of Selevac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Porčić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The biographical approach to material culture and the hypothesis of deliberate fragmentation of anthropomorphic figurines are used in this paper to deduce a hypothesis that there should be an association between particular fragmentation categories and context types in the archaeological record of the Late Neolithic settlements in Central Balkans. This hypothesis is tested using published data from the site of Selevac by performing correspondence analysis and chi-square test on a contingency table in which categories of fragmentation are cross-tabulated with context types. The results are statistically significant, suggesting that complete figurines are associated with houses while transversely broken figurines are associated with pits. There is also evidence that figurines were broken differentially in respect to their original size.

  10. Evaluation in the use of bismuth shielding on cervical spine CT scan using a male phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleme, C.; Mourao, A. P. [Centro Federal de Educacion Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Biomedical Engineering Center, Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil); Lyra, M. A., E-mail: carolinaaleme@gmail.com [Universidad Federal de Minas Gerais, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Av. Pdte. Antonio Carlos 6627, Pampulha, 31270-91 Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The cervical spine is the region of the column that articulates the head and chest. The tests of computed tomography (CT) performed in this region have as main objectives to diagnose fractures, dislocations and tumors. In CT scans the cervical spine volume is limited by the foramen Magnum and the first thoracic vertebra. In this region is the thyroid that is directly irradiated by X-ray beam during cervical scan. Based on this information, it was studied the dose variation deposited in thyroid and in nearby organs, such as: lenses, spinal cord in the foramen Magnum region and breasts, with and without the use of bismuth protector. In this study was used a male anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent s dosimeters (TLD-100) were required to register the individual doses in the organs of interest. CT scans were performed on a GE Bright Speed scanner of 32 channels. With the data obtained, it was found the organ dose variation. The largest recorded dose was in the thyroid. Comparing two scans it was possible to note that the use of the bismuth protector promoted a 26% reduction in the thyroid dose and an increase in the lens dose. (Author)

  11. An organic scintillator neutron spectrometer suitable for in-phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transportable organic scintillator spectrometry system based on a 1 cm high x 1 cm dia. cylindrical stilbene scintillator with a 30 cm light-pipe has been developed for neutron spectrometry inside anthropomorphic phantoms in order to improve knowledge of dose and dose-equivalent distributions in the body. Electronic pulse-shape discrimination is used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray events in the scintillator. The spectrometer is shown to give excellent results in the range of neutron energies from 1.5 to 7 MeV when used with an unfolding program based on differentiation of the pulse-height distribution. Below 1 MeV problems are experienced with pulse-shape discrimination, and below 2 MeV there are found to be some shortcomings in the differentiation method for this size of scintillator. Above about 9 MeV more sophisticated unfolding methods are shown to be desirable. Problems of stability of the system, difficulties in the measurement and calculation of the response functions, and disadvantages of using stilbene are discussed. (author)

  12. Rapid genetic algorithm optimization of a mouse computational model: Benefits for anthropomorphization of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Teodora Bot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While the mouse presents an invaluable experimental model organism in biology, its usefulness in cardiac arrhythmia research is limited in some aspects due to major electrophysiological differences between murine and human action potentials (APs. As previously described, these species-specific traits can be partly overcome by application of a cell-type transforming clamp (CTC to anthropomorphize the murine cardiac AP. CTC is a hybrid experimental-computational dynamic clamp technique, in which a computationally calculated time-dependent current is inserted into a cell in real time, to compensate for the differences between sarcolemmal currents of that cell (e.g., murine and the desired species (e.g., human. For effective CTC performance, mismatch between the measured cell and a mathematical model used to mimic the measured AP must be minimal. We have developed a genetic algorithm (GA approach that rapidly tunes a mathematical model to reproduce the AP of the murine cardiac myocyte under study. Compared to a prior implementation that used a template-based model selection approach, we show that GA optimization to a cell-specific model results in a much better recapitulation of the desired AP morphology with CTC. This improvement was more pronounced when anthropomorphizing neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to human-like APs than to guinea pig APs. CTC may be useful for a wide range of applications, from screening effects of pharmaceutical compounds on ion channel activity, to exploring variations in the mouse or human genome. Rapid GA optimization of a cell-specific mathematical model improves CTC performance and may therefore expand the applicability and usage of the CTC technique.

  13. Phantom evolving wormholes with big rip singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a family of inhomogeneous and anisotropic gravitational fields exhibiting a future singularity at a finite value of the proper time. The studied spherically symmetric spacetimes are asymptotically Friedmann-Robertson-Walker at spatial infinity and describe wormhole configurations filled with two matter components: one inhomogeneous and anisotropic fluid and another isotropic and homogeneously distributed fluid, characterized by the supernegative equation of state \\omega=p/\\rho < -1. In previously constructed wormholes, the notion of the phantom energy was used in a more extended sense than in cosmology, where the phantom energy is considered a homogeneously distributed fluid. Specifically, for some static wormhole geometries the phantom matter was considered as an inhomogeneous and anisotropic fluid, with radial and lateral pressures satisfying the relations $p_{r}/\\rho<-1$ and $p_{_l} \

  14. Development of a voxel phantom specific for simulation of eye brachytherapy; Desenvolvimeto de um fantoma de voxel especifico para simulacao de braquiterapia ocular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcilio S.; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: msilveira.fisica@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: jose-wilson59@live.com [lnstituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    The ophthalmic brachytherapy involves inserting a plate with seeds of radioactive material in the patient's eye for the treatment of tumors. The radiation dose to be taken by the patient is prescribed by physicians and time of application of the material is calculated from calibration curves supplied by the manufacturers of the plates. To estimate the dose absorbed by the patient, in a series of diagnostic tests, it is necessary to perform simulations using a computational model of exposure. These models are composed primarily by a anthropomorphic phantom, and a Monte Carlo code. The coupling of a phantom voxel whole body to a Monte Carlo code is a complex process because the computer model simulations with exposure takes time, knowledge of the code used and various adjustments to be implemented. The problem is aggravated even more complex when you want to radiate one region of the body. In this work we developed a phantom, specifically the region containing the eyeball, from MASH (Male Adult voxel). This model was coupled to the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc (Electron Gamma Shower) together with an algorithm simulator source of I-125 , considering only its effect of higher energy range.

  15. An Attempted Substitute Study of Total Skin Electron Therapy Technique by Using Helical Photon Tomotherapy with Helical Irradiation of the Total Skin Treatment: A Phantom Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ta Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An anthropomorphic phantom was used to investigate a treatment technique and analyze the dose distributions for helical irradiation of the total skin (HITS by helical tomotherapy (HT. Hypothetical bolus of thicknesses of 0, 10, and 15 mm was added around the phantom body to account for the dose homogeneity and setup uncertainty. A central core structure was assigned as a “complete block” to force the dose tangential delivery. HITS technique with prescribed dose (Dp of 36 Gy in 36 fractions was generated. The radiochromic EBT2 films were used for the dose measurements. The target region with 95.0% of the Dp received by more than 95% of the PTV was obtained. The calculated mean doses for the organs at risk (OARs were 4.69, 3.10, 3.20, and 2.94 Gy for the lung, heart, liver, and kidneys, respectively. The measurement doses on a phantom surface for a plan with 10 mm hypothetical bolus and bolus thicknesses of 0, 1, 2, and 3 mm are 89.5%, 111.4%, 116.9%, and 117.7% of Dp, respectively. HITS can provide an accurate and uniform treatment dose in the skin with limited doses to OARs and is safe to replace a total skin electron beam regimen.

  16. Poster — Thur Eve — 39: Feasibility of Commissioning HybridArc with the Delta 4 two plane diode phantom: comparisons with Gafchromic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojechko, C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary AB (Canada); Ploquin, N. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary AB (Canada); University of Calgary, Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary AB (Canada); Hudson, A. [University of Calgary, Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary AB (Canada); Sayous, Y. [Université Paul Sabotier Toulouse (France)

    2014-08-15

    HybridArc is a relatively novel radiation therapy technique which combines optimized dynamic conformai arcs (DCA) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). HybridArc has possible dosimetry and efficiency advantages over stand alone DCA and IMRT treatments and can be readily implemented on any linac capable of DCA and IMRT, giving strong motivation to commission the modality. The Delta4 phantom (Scandidos, Uppsala, Sweden) has been used for IMRT and VMAT clinical dosimetric verification making it a candidate for HybridArc commissioning. However the HybridArc modality makes use of several non co-planar arcs which creates setup issues due to the geometry of the Delta4, resulting in possible phantom gantry collisions for plans with non-zero couch angles. An analysis was done determining the feasibility of using the Delta4 fixed at 0° couch angle compared with results obtained using Gafchromic ETB2 film (Ashland, Covington Kentucky) in an anthropomorphic phantom at the planned couch angles. A gamma index analysis of the measured and planned dose distributions was done using Delta4 and DoseLab Pro (Mobius Medical Systems, Houston Texas) software. For both arc and IMRT sub-fields there is reasonable correlation between the gamma index found from the Delta4 and Gafchromic film. All results show the feasibility of using the Delta4 for HybridArc commissioning.

  17. Phantom for moving organ dosimetry with gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindran, Paul; Babu, Ebenezer Suman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore India (India); Mahata, Anurupa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indo-American Cancer Hospital and Research Institute, Hyderabad (India)], E-mail: paul@cmcvellore.ac.in

    2009-05-01

    The displacements caused by the cardiac and respiratory motions cause smearing of the dose distribution that defeats the purpose of high precision radiotherapy. A phantom that holds a gel cylinder and radiochromic film, was designed and developed to simulate the respiratory motion in the superior and inferior directions. The effect of lung movement on dose distribution was studied by exposing gel as well as a radiochromic film using the phantom. The results obtained with Gel was comparable to those obtained with the radiochromic films.

  18. Potential of Hybrid Computational Phantoms for Retrospective Heart Dosimetry After Breast Radiation Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.moignier@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Derreumaux, Sylvie; Broggio, David; Beurrier, Julien [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Chea, Michel; Boisserie, Gilbert [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie Salpetriere, Service de Radiotherapie, Paris (France); Franck, Didier; Aubert, Bernard [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Mazeron, Jean-Jacques [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie Salpetriere, Service de Radiotherapie, Paris (France)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Current retrospective cardiovascular dosimetry studies are based on a representative patient or simple mathematic phantoms. Here, a process of patient modeling was developed to personalize the anatomy of the thorax and to include a heart model with coronary arteries. Methods and Materials: The patient models were hybrid computational phantoms (HCPs) with an inserted detailed heart model. A computed tomography (CT) acquisition (pseudo-CT) was derived from HCP and imported into a treatment planning system where treatment conditions were reproduced. Six current patients were selected: 3 were modeled from their CT images (A patients) and the others were modelled from 2 orthogonal radiographs (B patients). The method performance and limitation were investigated by quantitative comparison between the initial CT and the pseudo-CT, namely, the morphology and the dose calculation were compared. For the B patients, a comparison with 2 kinds of representative patients was also conducted. Finally, dose assessment was focused on the whole coronary artery tree and the left anterior descending coronary. Results: When 3-dimensional anatomic information was available, the dose calculations performed on the initial CT and the pseudo-CT were in good agreement. For the B patients, comparison of doses derived from HCP and representative patients showed that the HCP doses were either better or equivalent. In the left breast radiation therapy context and for the studied cases, coronary mean doses were at least 5-fold higher than heart mean doses. Conclusions: For retrospective dose studies, it is suggested that HCP offers a better surrogate, in terms of dose accuracy, than representative patients. The use of a detailed heart model eliminates the problem of identifying the coronaries on the patient's CT.

  19. Radiation to the head, neck, and upper thorax of the young and thyroid neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now generally accepted that an association exists between external radiation administered to the head, neck and upper thorax of infants, children and adolescents and the subsequent development of neoplastic changes in the thyroid gland. Until recent years external radiation was frequently administered to shrink an enlarged thymus, or for the treatment of tonsillitis, adenoiditis, hearing loss, hemangioma, acne, tinea capitis and other conditions. During the course of these treatments, the thyroid gland was exposed to scattered radiation. It is stressed that the use of external radiation therapy was then accepted practice and its value was attested by many. The likelihood of adverse effects was not initially apparent, primarily because of the long periods of time between the administration of the therapy and the recognition of changes in the thyroid. The availability and effectiveness of other therapeutic measures and the growing concern about the delayed effects of radiation therapy when administered to the young for relatively benign conditions has, in recent years, largely eliminated use of this form of therapy, except in a few unusual conditions

  20. First identification of nanoparticles on thorax, abdomen and wings of the worker bee Apis dorsata Fabricius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Atanu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of nanoparticles on the body of the honeybee Apis dorsata Fabricius, was investigated for the first time to better understand the bee’s behaviour. These have been observed by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Our study clearly denotes that the Indian rock honey bee Apis dorsata possess calcium silicate and calcium phosphate nanoparticles on its body surface of 5-50 nm in diameter. In particular, the nanoparticles on the abdomen and thorax of A. dorsata have an average diameter of about 10 nanometers and they are smaller than those found on wings of the same bees which are about 20 nanometers. The nanoparticles found are different of the ones previously observed on honey bees or other insects. The origin and role of these natural nanoparticles on the body of the Indian rock bee need to be to be further investigated; more research in the subject might raise important aspects in relation to the conservation of these unique pollinators.

  1. Cerebrovascular injury caused by a high strain rate insult in the thorax

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased in documented incidence and public prominence in recent conflicts. Evidence for a thoracic mechanism of blast-induced TBI was recently reviewed and, while the totality is compelling, data from experiments isolating this mechanism is sparse. Notably, one recent study showed pericapillar haemorrhage in brain tissue from victims of single, fatal gunshot wounds to the chest. Here, qualitative results are reported for a small field study that isolated a thoracic mechanism for TBI caused by a high strain rate insult in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, mass 49-80 kg) in a natural environment. In each of three cases, petechiae were present on the surface of the frontal, occipital and/or left parietal lobes, along with capillary damage in the choroid plexus. The location of the projectile impact to the thorax seemed to affect the degree of damage. This may be due to the proximity to the great vessels. The data reported here provides direct evid...

  2. Modifications of the thorax radiography after postoperative irradiation in mammary carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheier, M.; Rhomberg, W.; Schelling, F.

    1987-02-01

    The radiogenic modifications of the thorax radiography were evaluated in 100 patients irradiated postoperatively for mammary carcinoma between January, 1980 and March, 1983. No adjuvant chemotherapy was given. A telecobalt unit was used for the irradiations. A computer-assisted planning (Evados) was applied in order to obtain an individual optimization especially for the fields situated at the thoracic walls. The average focal doses to the thoracic wall and the regional lymph nodes were between 50 and 52 Gy. Taking into consideration all modifications visualized by radiography, 65% of patients had subacute radiogenic reactions in the lungs, especially in the apex fields. In general the modifications had no clinical importance. Only seven patients presented more severe forms of pneumonitis with clinical symptoms. Fibroses were developed only in the apex fields; infraclavicular infiltrations were seen only in exceptional cases. There were no costal necroses, essential pleural reactions, or radiogenic enlargements of the heart shadow. The rate of pulmonary reactions with clinical symptoms is reduced as compared with former techniques, e.g. opposing tangential fields. The knowledge of anamnesis and typical radiographic modifications should help to avoid problems of differentiation between apex reactions and tuberculosis.

  3. Validation of calculation algorithms for organ doses in CT by measurements on a 5 year old paediatric phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabin, Jérémie; Mencarelli, Alessandra; McMillan, Dayton; Romanyukha, Anna; Struelens, Lara; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-06-01

    Many organ dose calculation tools for computed tomography (CT) scans rely on the assumptions: (1) organ doses estimated for one CT scanner can be converted into organ doses for another CT scanner using the ratio of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) between two CT scanners; and (2) helical scans can be approximated as the summation of axial slices covering the same scan range. The current study aims to validate experimentally these two assumptions. We performed organ dose measurements in a 5 year-old physical anthropomorphic phantom for five different CT scanners from four manufacturers. Absorbed doses to 22 organs were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters for head-to-torso scans. We then compared the measured organ doses with the values calculated from the National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT (NCICT) computer program, developed at the National Cancer Institute. Whereas the measured organ doses showed significant variability (coefficient of variation (CoV) up to 53% at 80 kV) across different scanner models, the CoV of organ doses normalised to CTDIvol substantially decreased (12% CoV on average at 80 kV). For most organs, the difference between measured and simulated organ doses was within  ±20% except for the bone marrow, breasts and ovaries. The discrepancies were further explained by additional Monte Carlo calculations of organ doses using a voxel phantom developed from CT images of the physical phantom. The results demonstrate that organ doses calculated for one CT scanner can be used to assess organ doses from other CT scanners with 20% uncertainty (k  =  1), for the scan settings considered in the study.

  4. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong, E-mail: ouyang.jinsong@mgh.harvard.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Ackerman, Jerome L. [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Petibon, Yoann [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  5. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic18F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R2 = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast

  6. Ultrasonographic Quantification of Fat Content in Fatty Liver Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Young; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Joo, Gyung Soo; Kim, Ho Jung; Kim, Young Beom; Lee, Byoung Ho [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    Assuming that the fat content of certain tissue might be quantified by measurirrg the ultrasound echo level, we analyzed the ultrasound histograms obtained from the fatty liver phantoms that contained various amount of fat. Various amount of margarine(Mazola. Cliff wood. USA) was mixed with 2% of agarin solution state to produce fatty liver phantoms that contained 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of fat. We obtained ultrasound histogram from each fatty liver phantom in gel state. We used 2% agar gel as a control. The ultrasound histograms from the control phantom showed gradual increase in echo level as the depth from the surface increased. The echo level from the phantom that contained 5% of fat showed gradual increase and subsequent decrease with the peak echo level at the depth of 3cm. The echo levels from the phantoms that contained more in 5% of fat gradually decreased as the depth from the surface increased; the change becoming more pronounced as the fat content of the phantom increased. The echo levels measured at the depth of 1cm were 9.3(control), 29.6(5%phantom), 3l.3 (10% phantom), 26.3 (20% phantom), l8.8 (30% phantom), and l6dB (40% phantom). Fat content of fatty phantoms can not be quantified by measuring only echo level. Simultaneous measurement of attenuation of ultrasound, which is not easy to do and not done in this study, is prerequisite to quantify fat content

  7. Image Quality of Digital Direct Flat-Panel Mammography Versus an Indirect Small-Field CCD Technique Using a High-Contrast Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Barbara Krug

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the detection of microcalcifications on mammograms of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired by a direct digital flat-panel detector mammography system (FPM versus a stereotactic breast biopsy system utilizing CCD (charge-coupled device technology with either a 1024 or 512 acquisition matrix (1024 CCD and 512 CCD. Materials and Methods. Randomly distributed silica beads (diameter 100–1400 m and anthropomorphic scatter bodies were applied to 48 transparent films. The test specimens were radiographed on a direct digital FPM and by the indirect 1024 CCD and 512 CCD techniques. Four radiologists rated the monitor-displayed images independently of each other in random order. Results. The rate of correct positive readings for the “number of detectable microcalcifications” for silica beads of 100–199 m in diameter was 54.2%, 50.0% and 45.8% by FPM, 1024 CCD and 512 CCD, respectively. The inter-rater variability was most pronounced for silica beads of 100–199 m in diameter. The greatest agreement with the gold standard was observed for beads >400 m in diameter across all methods. Conclusion. Stereotactic spot images taken by 1024 matrix CCD technique are diagnostically equivalent to direct digital flat-panel mammograms for visualizing simulated microcalcifications >400 m in diameter.

  8. Thorax irradiation triggers a local and systemic accumulation of immunosuppressive CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymphocyte infiltration is a common feature of radiation-induced pneumonitis and fibrosis, but their contribution to the pathogenic processes is still unclear. Here, we addressed the impact of thorax irradiation on the T cell compartment with a focus on immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg). C57BL/6 wild type mice (WT) received anesthesia only (sham controls, 0 Gy) or were exposed to a single dose of whole thorax irradiation (15 Gy). Immune cells from lung tissue, spleen, and cervical lymph nodes were collected 10 to 84 days post-irradiation and phenotypically characterized by flow cytometry. Whole thorax irradiation provoked an increased influx of CD3+ T cells at 42 and 84 days post-irradiation. In contrast, local irradiation caused a sustained reduction in CD3+ T cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, we observed a significant local and systemic increase in the fraction of CD4+ T cells expressing the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), the phenotypic marker for murine Treg, at day 21 post-irradiation. The accumulation of Treg was associated with increased levels of T cells expressing surface proteins characteristic for recruitment and immunosuppressive activity, e.g. CD103, CTLA-4 and CD73. Importantly, Treg isolated at this time point were able to suppress CD4+ effector T cells to a similar extent as Treg isolated from control mice. The response of the adaptive immune system to whole thorax irradiation is characterized by local immunoactivation and systemic immunosuppression. The transient accumulation of immunosuppressive CD4+ FoxP3+ Treg may be required to protect the lung against excessive inflammation-induced tissue damage. Further investigations shall define the mechanisms underlying the accumulation of Treg and their role for the pathogenesis of radiation-induced lung disease

  9. The MYST-containing protein Chameau is required for proper sensory organ specification during Drosophila thorax morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Hainaut

    Full Text Available The adult thorax of Drosophila melanogaster is covered by a stereotyped pattern of mechanosensory bristles called macrochaetes. Here, we report that the MYST containing protein Chameau (Chm contributes to the establishment of this pattern in the most dorsal part of the thorax. Chm mutant pupae present extra-dorsocentral (DC and scutellar (SC macrochaetes, but a normal number of the other macrochaetes. We provide evidences that chm restricts the singling out of sensory organ precursors from proneural clusters and genetically interacts with transcriptional regulators involved in the regulation of achaete and scute in the DC and SC proneural cluster. This function of chm likely relies on chromatin structure regulation since a protein with a mutation in the conserved catalytic site fails to rescue the formation of supernumerary DC and SC bristles in chm mutant flies. This is further supported by the finding that mutations in genes encoding chromatin modifiers and remodeling factors, including Polycomb group (PcG and Trithorax group (TrxG members, dominantly modulate the penetrance of chm extra bristle phenotype. These data support a critical role for chromatin structure modulation in the establishment of the stereotyped sensory bristle pattern in the fly thorax.

  10. Note on the Schwarzschild-phantom wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Lukmanova, Regina; Izmailov, Ramil; Yanbekov, Almir; Karimov, Ramis; Potapov, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown by Lobo, Parsaei and Riazi (LPR) that phantom energy with $\\omega =p_{r}/\\rho <-1$ could support phantom wormholes. Several classes of such solutions have been derived by them. While the inner spacetime is represented by asymptotically flat phantom wormhole that have repulsive gravity, it is most likely to be unstable to perturbations. Hence, we consider a situation, where a phantom wormhole is somehow trapped inside a Schwarzschild sphere across a thin shell. Applying the method developed by Garcia, Lobo and Visser (GLV), we shall exemplify that the shell can possess zones of stability depending on certain constraints. It turns out that zones corresponding to "force" constraint are more restrictive than those from the "mass" constraint. We shall also enumerate the interior energy content by using the gravitational energy integral proposed by Lynden-Bell, Katz and Bi% \\v{c}\\'ak. It turns out that, even though the interior mass is positive, the integral implies repulsive energy. ...

  11. Tissue quantification for development of pediatric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization of the risk- benefit ratio is a major concern in the pediatric radiology, due to the greater vulnerability of children to the late somatic effects and genetic effects of exposure to radiation compared to adults. In Brazil, it is estimated that the causes of death from head trauma are 18 % for the age group between 1-5 years and the radiograph is the primary diagnostic test for the detection of skull fracture . Knowing that the image quality is essential to ensure the identification of structures anatomical and minimizing errors diagnostic interpretation, this paper proposed the development and construction of homogeneous phantoms skull, for the age group 1-5 years. The construction of the phantoms homogeneous was performed using the classification and quantification of tissue present in the skull of pediatric patients. In this procedure computational algorithms were used, using Matlab, to quantify distinct biological tissues present in the anatomical regions studied , using pictures retrospective CT scans. Preliminary data obtained from measurements show that between the ages of 1-5 years, assuming an average anteroposterior diameter of the pediatric skull region of the 145.73 ± 2.97 mm, can be represented by 92.34 mm ± 5.22 of lucite and 1.75 ± 0:21 mm of aluminum plates of a provision of PEP (Pacient equivalent phantom). After its construction, the phantoms will be used for image and dose optimization in pediatric protocols process to examinations of computerized radiography

  12. Phantom breast sensations are frequent after mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorthe Marie Helbo; Kehlet, Henrik; Gærtner, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Phantom breast sensation (PBS) following mastectomy has been recognized for many years. PBS is a feeling that the removed breast is still there. The reported prevalence and risk factors have not been established in large well-defined patient series. The purpose of this study was to examine...

  13. Development of software phantoms for software validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine software is expected to meet certain criteria. The specifications are frequently not available to the user and, as a consequence, the performance of a particular software package may not meet the users' expectations. Under most circumstances this may be evident immediately, but frequently the user will assume certain specifications based upon the clinical procedure that is being performed, and assume that the software should function in a certain fashion to give the value of a desired parameter. To this end, it is useful to have a number of software phantoms which can act as standard data sets for validation of the software and ensure that the results obtained do meet expectations. A number of problems surround the development of a set of software phantoms that can be transported between different systems. One solution is the creation of mathematical phantoms, in which case algorithms or source code may be transportable. This paper describes four such mathematical phantoms that have been used to validate an ejection fraction and Fourier analysis package. This particular software package has been found lacking in several respects, none of which would have been evident from the documentation provided. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs

  14. New eye phantom for ophthalmic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, Gessica; Orsi, Gianni; De Maria, Carmelo; Montemurro, Francesca; Palla, Michele; Rizzo, Stanislao; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we designed and realized a new phantom able to mimic the principal mechanical, rheological, and physical cues of the human eye and that can be used as a common benchmark to validate new surgical procedures, innovative vitrectomes, and as a training system for surgeons. This phantom, in particular its synthetic humor vitreous, had the aim of reproducing diffusion properties of the natural eye and can be used as a system to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of drugs and optimization of their dose, limiting animal experiments. The eye phantom was built layer-by-layer starting from the sclera up to the retina, using low cost and easy to process polymers. The validation of the phantom was carried out by mechanical characterization of each layer, by diffusion test with commercial drugs into a purposely developed apparatus, and finally by a team of ophthalmic surgeons. Experiments demonstrated that polycaprolactone, polydimethylsiloxane, and gelatin, properly prepared, are the best materials to mimic the mechanical properties of sclera, choroid, and retina, respectively. A polyvinyl alcohol-gelatin polymeric system is the best for mimicking the viscosity of the human humor vitreous, even if the bevacizumab half-life is lower than in the human eye.

  15. Dose evaluation for foetal computed tomography with a 320-row unit in wide-volume mode and an 80-row unit in helical scanning mode: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the maternal and foetal effective doses during foetal computed tomography (CT) and to compare the radiation dose, dose profile and image noise on 80-row CT in helical scanning mode and 320-row CT in wide-volume scanning mode. The radiation doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters implanted at various organ sites of an anthropomorphic pregnant phantom. The foetal doses in the 320-row multi-detector CT (MDCT) and 80-row MDCT units were higher than the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). The dose profile in the 320-row MDCT overlapped in two places but showed no overlap in the 80-row MDCT. There were no significant differences in image noise between the two scanning modes. The foetal dose evaluation by CTDIvol may underestimate the foetal radiation risk. When using the wide-volume mode, operators must take into account the number of scans and overlap between volumetric sections. (authors)

  16. A theoretical construction of wormhole supported by Phantom Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Rahaman, F.; Kalam, M.; Sarker, M; Gayen, K.

    2005-01-01

    A new solution has been presented for the spherically symmetric space time describing wormholes with Phantom Energy. The model suggests that the existence of wormhole is supported by arbitrarily small quantity of Phantom Energy.

  17. Characterization of MOSFET Dosimeter Angular Response Using a Spherical Phantom for Fluoroscopic Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu; Hill, Kevin; Yoshizumi, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters, placed in anthropomorphic phantoms, are a standard method for organ dosimetry in medical x-ray imaging applications. However, many x-ray applications, particularly fluoroscopy procedures, use variable projection angles. During dosimetry, the MOSFET detector active area may not always be perpendicular to the x-ray beam. The goal of this study was to characterize the dosimeter's angular response in the fluoroscopic irradiation involved in pediatric cardiac catheterization procedures, during which a considerable amount of fluoroscopic x-ray irradiation is often applied from various projection angles. A biological x-ray irradiator was used to simulate the beam quality of a biplane fluoroscopy imaging system. A custom-designed acrylic spherical scatter phantom was fabricated to measure dosimeter response (in mV) in two rotational axes, axial (ψ) and normal-to-axial (θ), in 30° increments, as well as four common oblique angles used in cardiac catheterization: a) 90° Left Anterior Oblique (LAO); b) 70° LAO/ 20° Cranial; c) 20° LAO/ 15° Cranial; and d) 30° Right Anterior Oblique (RAO). All results were normalized to the angle where the dosimeter epoxy is perpendicular to the beam or the Posterior-Anterior projection angle in the clinical setup. The relative response in the axial rotation was isotropic (within ± 10% deviation); that in the normal-to-axial rotation was isotropic in all angles except the ψ = 270° angle, where the relative response was 83 ± 9%. No significant deviation in detector response was observed in the four common oblique angles, with their relative responses being: a) 102 ± 3%; b) 90 ± 3%; c) 92 ± 3%; and d) 95 ± 3%, respectively. These angular correction factors will be used in future dosimetry studies for fluoroscopy. The spherical phantom may be useful for other applications, as it allows the measurement of dosimeter response in virtually all angles in the 3

  18. Phantom Energy Accretion onto Black Holes in Cyclic Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Cheng-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Black holes pose a serious problem in the cyclic or oscillating cosmology. It is speculated that, in the cyclic universe with phantom turnarounds, black holes will be torn apart by the phantom energy before turnaround before they can create any problems. In this paper, using the mechanism of the phantom accretion onto black holes, we find that black holes do not disappear before the phantom turnaround. But the remanent black holes will not cause any problems due to the Hawking evaporation.

  19. Enhanced diagnostic value for coronary CT angiography of calcified coronary arteries using dual energy and a novel high-Z contrast material: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jack W.; Ordovas, Karen G.; Sun, Yuxin; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2016-03-01

    Dual-energy CT is emerging as a dose-saving tool for coronary CT angiography that allows calcium-scoring without the need for a separate unenhanced scan acquisition. Unfortunately the similar attenuation coefficient profiles of iodine and calcium limits the accuracy of their decomposition in the material basis images. We evaluate a tungsten-based contrast material with a more distinct attenuation profile from calcium, and compare its performance to a conventional iodinated agent. We constructed a custom thorax phantom containing simulated sets of vessels 3, 6 and 9 mm in diameter. The vessel sets were walled with concentric and eccentric calcifications ("plaque") with concentrations of 0, 20, 30 and 40% weight calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP). The phantom was filled sequentially with iodine and tungsten contrast material, and scanned helically using a fast-kV-switching DECT scanner. At material decomposition, both iodine and tungsten vessel lumens were separable from the HAP vessel walls, but separation was superior with tungsten which showed minimal false positive signal in the HAP image. Assessing their relative performance using line profiles, the HAP signal was greater in the tungsten separation in 6/9 of the vessel sets, and within 15% of the iodine separation for the remaining 3/9 sets. The robust phantom design enabled systematic evaluation of dual-energy material separation for calcium and a candidate non-iodinated vascular contrast element. This approach can be used to screen further agents and also refine dual energy CT material decomposition approaches.

  20. SU-E-T-563: Multi-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Extend System of Gamma Knife: Treatment Verification Using Indigenously Designed Patient Simulating Multipurpose Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Aim of the study is to evaluate mechanical and radiological accuracy of multi-fraction regimen and validate Gamma knife based fractionation using newly developed patient simulating multipurpose phantom. Methods: A patient simulating phantom was designed to verify fractionated treatments with extend system (ES) of Gamma Knife however it could be used to validate other radiotherapy procedures as well. The phantom has options to insert various density material plugs and mini CT/MR distortion phantoms to analyze the quality of stereotactic imaging. An additional thorax part designed to predict surface doses at various organ sites. The phantom was positioned using vacuum head cushion and patient control unit for imaging and treatment. The repositioning check tool (RCT) was used to predict phantom positioning under ES assembly. The phantom with special inserts for film in axial, coronal and sagittal plane were scanned with X-Ray CT and the acquired images were transferred to treatment planning system (LGP 10.1). The focal precession test was performed with 4mm collimator and an experimental plan of four 16mm collimator shots was prepared for treatment verification of multi-fraction regimen. The prescription dose of 5Gy per fraction was delivered in four fractions. Each fraction was analyzed using EBT3 films scanned with EPSON 10000XL Scanner. Results: The measurement of 38 RCT points showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.28mm. The mean deviation of 0.28% and 0.31 % were calculated as CT and MR image distortion respectively. The radiological focus accuracy test showed its deviation from mechanical center point of 0.22mm. The profile measurement showed close agreement between TPS planned and film measured dose. At tolerance criteria of 1%/1mm gamma index analysis showed a pass rate of > 95%. Conclusion: Our results show that the newly developed multipurpose patient simulating phantom is highly suitable for the verification of fractionated stereotactic

  1. SU-E-T-563: Multi-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Extend System of Gamma Knife: Treatment Verification Using Indigenously Designed Patient Simulating Multipurpose Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisht, R; Kale, S; Gopishankar, N; Rath, G; Julka, P; Agarwal, D; Singh, M; Garg, A; Kumar, P; Thulkar, S; Sharma, B [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of the study is to evaluate mechanical and radiological accuracy of multi-fraction regimen and validate Gamma knife based fractionation using newly developed patient simulating multipurpose phantom. Methods: A patient simulating phantom was designed to verify fractionated treatments with extend system (ES) of Gamma Knife however it could be used to validate other radiotherapy procedures as well. The phantom has options to insert various density material plugs and mini CT/MR distortion phantoms to analyze the quality of stereotactic imaging. An additional thorax part designed to predict surface doses at various organ sites. The phantom was positioned using vacuum head cushion and patient control unit for imaging and treatment. The repositioning check tool (RCT) was used to predict phantom positioning under ES assembly. The phantom with special inserts for film in axial, coronal and sagittal plane were scanned with X-Ray CT and the acquired images were transferred to treatment planning system (LGP 10.1). The focal precession test was performed with 4mm collimator and an experimental plan of four 16mm collimator shots was prepared for treatment verification of multi-fraction regimen. The prescription dose of 5Gy per fraction was delivered in four fractions. Each fraction was analyzed using EBT3 films scanned with EPSON 10000XL Scanner. Results: The measurement of 38 RCT points showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.28mm. The mean deviation of 0.28% and 0.31 % were calculated as CT and MR image distortion respectively. The radiological focus accuracy test showed its deviation from mechanical center point of 0.22mm. The profile measurement showed close agreement between TPS planned and film measured dose. At tolerance criteria of 1%/1mm gamma index analysis showed a pass rate of > 95%. Conclusion: Our results show that the newly developed multipurpose patient simulating phantom is highly suitable for the verification of fractionated stereotactic

  2. Persistent candidemia in major burn patients: radiologic findings of the thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eil Seong; Lee, Kwan Seop; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To describe radiologic findings of burn-associated persistent candidemia of the thorax. This study included 42 patients with major burns in whom blood culture had shown the presence for more than 24 hours of persistent candidemia. The duration of positive culture for candidiasis ranged from two to 67 days(mean, 15 days). Radiographic(n=42) and thin-section CT findings(n=13) were retrospectively analyzed. The onset, pattern, size, distribution and persistence of parenchymal abnormalities as well as the presence or absence of pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy and cardiomegaly were assessed. On chest radiographs, positive findings were noticed in 61.9%(26/42) and on thin-section CT, in 76.9%(10/13). The most frequent radiographic finding was pulmonary nodule(s), observed in 14 patients(33.3%); in 13, these were bilateral. Bronchovascular bundle thickening(n=6, 14.3%), consolidation(n=4, 9.5%), cardiomegaly(n=6, 14.3%) and pleural effusion(n=4, 9.5%) were also observed. Those lesions appeared eight to 129 days(mean, 33 days) after the burn. Radiographic abnormalities persisted for seven to 115(mean, 35) days, regardless of the treatment. Thin-section CT showed parenchymal abnormalities in 10/13 patients(76.9%) and subpleural nodules of less than 1cm in diameter and without halo in all patients. Cardiomegaly, pleural effusion and mediastinal adenopathy were observed on CT in 5(38.5%), 4(30.8%) and 2(15.4%) of the 13 patients, respectively. In a high proportion of patients with burn-associated candidemia, chest radiograph and thin-section CT findings were positive. The most frequent radiographic parenchymal abnormality was multiple bilateral nodules.

  3. Gallium scans of the thorax in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS): Description and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, G.; Chen, D.C.P.; Siegel, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of distribution of gallium uptake in the thorax was investigated in patients (pts) with AIDS. Eleven pts (ages 18-53), all active homosexual males suspected of having acute pulmonary infection were studied. Ga lung scans were performed at 24-48 and/or 72 hrs. post injection. The diagnosis of AIDS was based on appropriate clinical and laboratory findings. The Ga activity in the lung was graded from zero = background to 4+ which is > liver activity. Eight of eleven pts have positive Ga scan while seven of eleven pts had positive CXR. Six pts had both positive CXR and Ga scan. One pt had a positive Ga scan with negative CXR, and one with positive CXR and negative Ga scan. The positive Ga scans included 3 pts with 4+ diffuse uptake, two pts with 2+ diffuse uptake, two pts with 1+ diffuse uptake, and two with hilar node uptake. Three pts have focal increased uptake superimposed on diffuse uptake. Two pts with 4+ diffuse uptake had mild abnormality on their CXR. One pt with 4+ uptake in the initial scan shows decreased activity on follow-up with clinical improvement after therapy. Thus, all but two pts with positive Ga scans had diffuse lung uptake. These two patients alone had B cell immunoblastic sarcoma and oral candidiasis. The pattern of Ga lung uptake in pts with AIDS reveal that a majority of positive scans are diffuse (6/8) and the intensity may suggest more active disease than CXR (2 normal) and, thus, the study may be useful in detecting changes from atypical pulmonary infection in this population.

  4. Gallium scans of the thorax in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS): Description and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pattern of distribution of gallium uptake in the thorax was investigated in patients (pts) with AIDS. Eleven pts (ages 18-53), all active homosexual males suspected of having acute pulmonary infection were studied. Ga lung scans were performed at 24-48 and/or 72 hrs. post injection. The diagnosis of AIDS was based on appropriate clinical and laboratory findings. The Ga activity in the lung was graded from zero = background to 4+ which is > liver activity. Eight of eleven pts have positive Ga scan while seven of eleven pts had positive CXR. Six pts had both positive CXR and Ga scan. One pt had a positive Ga scan with negative CXR, and one with positive CXR and negative Ga scan. The positive Ga scans included 3 pts with 4+ diffuse uptake, two pts with 2+ diffuse uptake, two pts with 1+ diffuse uptake, and two with hilar node uptake. Three pts have focal increased uptake superimposed on diffuse uptake. Two pts with 4+ diffuse uptake had mild abnormality on their CXR. One pt with 4+ uptake in the initial scan shows decreased activity on follow-up with clinical improvement after therapy. Thus, all but two pts with positive Ga scans had diffuse lung uptake. These two patients alone had B cell immunoblastic sarcoma and oral candidiasis. The pattern of Ga lung uptake in pts with AIDS reveal that a majority of positive scans are diffuse (6/8) and the intensity may suggest more active disease than CXR (2 normal) and, thus, the study may be useful in detecting changes from atypical pulmonary infection in this population

  5. Persistent candidemia in major burn patients: radiologic findings of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe radiologic findings of burn-associated persistent candidemia of the thorax. This study included 42 patients with major burns in whom blood culture had shown the presence for more than 24 hours of persistent candidemia. The duration of positive culture for candidiasis ranged from two to 67 days(mean, 15 days). Radiographic(n=42) and thin-section CT findings(n=13) were retrospectively analyzed. The onset, pattern, size, distribution and persistence of parenchymal abnormalities as well as the presence or absence of pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy and cardiomegaly were assessed. On chest radiographs, positive findings were noticed in 61.9%(26/42) and on thin-section CT, in 76.9%(10/13). The most frequent radiographic finding was pulmonary nodule(s), observed in 14 patients(33.3%); in 13, these were bilateral. Bronchovascular bundle thickening(n=6, 14.3%), consolidation(n=4, 9.5%), cardiomegaly(n=6, 14.3%) and pleural effusion(n=4, 9.5%) were also observed. Those lesions appeared eight to 129 days(mean, 33 days) after the burn. Radiographic abnormalities persisted for seven to 115(mean, 35) days, regardless of the treatment. Thin-section CT showed parenchymal abnormalities in 10/13 patients(76.9%) and subpleural nodules of less than 1cm in diameter and without halo in all patients. Cardiomegaly, pleural effusion and mediastinal adenopathy were observed on CT in 5(38.5%), 4(30.8%) and 2(15.4%) of the 13 patients, respectively. In a high proportion of patients with burn-associated candidemia, chest radiograph and thin-section CT findings were positive. The most frequent radiographic parenchymal abnormality was multiple bilateral nodules

  6. Whole-thorax irradiation induces hypoxic respiratory failure, pleural effusions and cardiac remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the mechanisms of death following a single lethal dose of thoracic radiation, WAG/RijCmcr (Wistar) rats were treated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax and followed until they were morbid or sacrificed for invasive assays at 6 weeks. Lung function was assessed by breathing rate and arterial oxygen saturation. Lung structure was evaluated histologically. Cardiac structure and function were examined by echocardiography. The frequency and characteristics of pleural effusions were determined. Morbidity from 15 Gy radiation occurred in all rats 5 to 8 weeks after exposure, coincident with histological pneumonitis. Increases in breathing frequencies peaked at 6 weeks, when profound arterial hypoxia was also recorded. Echocardiography analysis at 6 weeks showed pulmonary hypertension and severe right ventricular enlargement with impaired left ventricular function and cardiac output. Histologic sections of the heart revealed only rare foci of lymphocytic infiltration. Total lung weight more than doubled. Pleural effusions were present in the majority of the irradiated rats and contained elevated protein, but low lactate dehydrogenase, when compared with serum from the same animal. Pleural effusions had a higher percentage of macrophages and large monocytes than neutrophils and contained mast cells that are rarely present in other pathological states. Lethal irradiation to rat lungs leads to hypoxia with infiltration of immune cells, edema and pleural effusion. These changes may contribute to pulmonary vascular and parenchymal injury that result in secondary changes in heart structure and function. We report that conditions resembling congestive heart failure contribute to death during radiation pneumonitis, which indicates new targets for therapy. (author)

  7. Aspects of radiation protection during chest X-radiography; Strahlenhygienische Aspekte bei der Roentgenuntersuchung des Thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidenbusch, M.C.; Schneider, K. [Dr. von Haunersches Kinderspital, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie - Kinderradiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Radiation safety in conventional X-ray diagnostics is based on the concepts of justification, optimization of an X-ray examination and limitation of the radiation exposure achieved during the examination. Optimization of an X-ray examination has to be considered as a multimodal process in which all technical components of the X-ray equipment have to be adapted to each other and also have to be adapted to the anthropometric characteristics of patients and the clinical indications. In this article the technical components of a conventional pediatric chest X-radiograph are presented, and recommendations for optimizing chest X-rays in children are provided. The following measures are of prime importance: correct x-ray beam limitation, using the posteroanterior projection when possible and not using anti-scatter grids in children under approximately 8 years old. In pediatric radiology chest x-rays that are taken not at the peak of inspiration can also be of some diagnostic significance. Optimization of an X-ray examination inevitably results in the limitation of radiation exposure. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlenhygiene in der konventionellen radiologischen Diagnostik basiert auf der Trias Rechtfertigung, Optimierung bzw. Limitierung der Roentgenuntersuchung bzw. Strahlenexposition. Die Optimierung einer Roentgenuntersuchung ist als multimodaler Prozess aufzufassen, in welchem saemtliche technische Komponenten der Roentgeneinrichtung sowohl miteinander als auch mit den anthropometrischen Eigenschaften des Patienten und der klinischen Fragestellung abzustimmen sind. Im vorliegenden Beitrag werden die technischen Komponenten bei der konventionellen Roentgenuntersuchung des paediatrischen Thorax in ihrer Beziehung zueinander dargestellt und Empfehlungen fuer eine Optimierung der konventionellen Thoraxaufnahme bei Kindern ausgesprochen. Die wichtigsten Massnahmen bestehen in einer korrekten Einblendung, in der Anfertigung der Aufnahmen im posteroanterioren Strahlengang und im

  8. Procedures of hepatic scintigraphy and improvement of professionals by using anthropomorphic simulator object of liver in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates hepatic scintigraphy procedures and the possibility of professional improvement in nuclear medicine by using three-dimension anthropomorphic simulators representative of adult human liver. For the conformation of anthropomorphic simulator, it was used gypsum and acrylic. Three simulator objects representing cirrhosis livers. The simulator were filled with 99mTc diluted in water for the obtention of scintigraphic images. Tomographic images were analysed posterior and anterior of simulator representing an organ with more cirrhosis grade. It was observed that the simulators make possible the acquisition of images similar to the real images of liver with hepatic cirrhosis. The simulations of hemangiomas can contribute for continuous education of nuclear medicine professionals, as far the question of image formation is concerned, make possible the parameter study as, for example, the , matrix size energy window, zoom and counting statistic

  9. Use of VAP3D software for production and manipulation of synthetic radiographies of anthropomorphic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Lindeval Fernandes de, E-mail: lindeval@dmat.ufrr.b [Universidade Federal de Roraima (DMAT/UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Universidade de Pernambuco (EPP/UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Leal Neto, Viriato [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica has developed exposure computational models (ECM) involving a Monte Carlo code and voxel phantoms to simulate various situations of internal and external exposure to ionizing radiation. Most analyses of the produced results are presented in tables and graphics formats. An alternative to this traditional way of analyzing results is to save voxels of Regions of Interest (ROI) of the phantom irradiated with information like the location of the voxel and the energy deposited in it during the simulation. Such information can be saved to a text file and later turned into 3D objects. In this paper the VAP3D software has been used to read text files produced in simulations using the ECM of DEN (Nuclear Energy Dept. - UFPE), converting them into binary files of the type RAW, and visualize them. In order to reflect the radiosensitivity of the organs and tissues suggested by ICRP-60, for conversion of text file to binary, of the energy deposited values are multiplied by the weighting factor of the tissue to which the voxel belongs. The result of the multiplication is normalized to the interval [0, 255]. The files transformed are referred herein as synthetic radiographies. In VAP3D software, it is possible to generate stacks from theses radiographies in transverse, sagittal and coronal directions. In order to illustrate the production of synthetic radiographies, some images are presented in this paper, and dosimetric results are obtained from a variety of ROIs of the phantoms of DEN for radiological exams. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Sled Tests for Spacecraft Dynamic Environments using the Small Female and Large Male Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jessica A.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Newby, Nathaniel J.; Putnam, Jacob F.; Currie-Gregg, Nancy J.; Lawrence, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Anthropomorphic test devices (ATD) are widely used for military and automotive applications. These ATDs have been correlated to certain types of human injuries largely involving automotive-type energetics and directions of impact. Spacecraft dynamic events involve very different impact characteristics and, in the case of landings, require lower levels of acceptable injury risk due to the certainty of impact occurrence. This test series evaluated the small female and large male Hybrid IIII ATDs for spacecraft dynamic events.

  11. Calculation of dose in anthropomorphic dummies ICRP 110 simulation of protocols overall for a team of 320 sections TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to carry out, using a program of simulation Monte Carlo, an estimate of the dose received in anthropomorphic mannequins voxelized in tests of four protocols established for the Aquilion ONE General acquiring in conical beam of 320 X 0, 5 mm. Finally, will be obtained factors of conversion between values of product dose (DLP) length and effective doses for each protocol. (Author)

  12. Evaluation of radiation exposure with singleslice- and a multislice-spiral CT system (a phantom study); Untersuchungen zur Strahlenexposition bei der Einzelschicht- und Mehrschicht-Spiral-CT (eine Phantom-Studie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacomuzzi, S.M.; Rieger, M.; Lottersberger, C.; Peer, S.; Peer, R.; Buchberger, W.; Bale, R.; Mallouhi, A.; Jaschke, W. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Innsbruck (Austria); Torbica, P. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik, Innsbruck (Austria); Perkmann, R. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Gefaesschirurgie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of study was to compare patient dose applying singleslice- and multislice-spiral CT. Methods: The examinations were performed with a singleslice-spiral CT (Highspeed Advantage; GE Medical Systems; Milwaukee, USA) and with a multislice CT systems (LightSpeed QX/i GE Medical Systems; Milwaukee, USA). For the determination of the radiation exposure (absorbed dose) a selection of most executed protocols (thorax-helical, abdomen-helical, petrous bone-axial, head-axial) were simulated using an Alderson Rando Phantom. The dose was determined by means of lithiumfluorid-thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR 200). Results: For thorax and abdomen protocols higher energy dose values could be found using a multislice CT. On the average the energy dose values were increased by 2.6 on an average in relation to single slice spiral CT. The energy dose values of the multisclice CT using head protocols could be reduced by 30% in relation to single slice spiral CT due to suitable parameter selections. The energy dose applying a petrous bone protocol resulted in an average increase by a factor 1.5 using a multislice CT. Conclusion: Using the new multislice CT technique protocol strategies must be optimized regarding the patient doses. Users can operate critically in the sense of the radiation protection only if they are aware of the occurring dose amounts to the patient. (orig.) [German] Es soll im Vergleich die Dosisbelastung bei der Einzelschicht Spiral-CT zur Mehrschicht-Spiral-CT dargestellt werden. Methoden: Die Untersuchungen wurden mit einem Einzelschicht Spiral-CT (ES Spiral-CT) (Highspeed Advantage; Fa. GE Medical Systems; Milwaukee, USA) und einem Mehrschicht-Spiral-CT (MS Spiral-CT) (LightSpeed Qx/l; Fa. GE Medical Systems; Milwaukee, USA) durchgefuehrt. Fuer die Bestimmung der Strahlenexposition (Energiedosis) wurde eine Auswahl der routinemaessig am meisten durchgefuehrten Untersuchungen (Thorax-helical, Abdomen-helical, Felsenbein-axial, Schaedel-axial) an

  13. Small anthropomorphic figurines in clay at Ģipka Neolithic settlements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Biruta Loze

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Miniature Neolithic figurines in clay are a special topic of research. This especially concerns areas where their representation has so far been poor. While carrying out archaeological excavations in Northern Kurzeme, the north-west coastal dune zone of Rīga Bay, a ritual-like complex was recovered at Ģipka A site belonging to the local Culture of Pit Ceramics. It consists of several large and smaller fireplaces and pits, with the finds of fragmentary clay figurines recovered under the palisade that surrounded the settlement. The head and body of the miniature anthropomorphic figurines in clay have original modelling. It is possible to single out two types of figurine: with rather broad cheekbones, and oval modelling of face. The large amount of ochre found in the settlement and the purposeful breaking of figurines are evidence of their role during a rite. Clay figurines have a symbolic meaning, and the signs depicted on them, incised walking stick-shape and other motifs, are the symbols of early farmers.

  14. Manipulation of Non-verbal Interaction Style and Demographic Embodiment to Increase Anthropomorphic Computer Character Credibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Stanney, Kay M.

    2005-02-01

    For years, people have sought more natural means of communicating with their computers. Many have suggested that interaction with a computer should be as easy as interacting with other people, taking advantage of the multimodal nature of human communication. While users should, in theory, gravitate to such anthropomorphic embodiments, quite the contrary has been experienced; users generally have been dissatisfied and abandoned their use. This suggests a disconnect between the factors that make human-human communication engaging and those used by designers to support human-agent interaction. This paper discusses a set of empirical studies that attempted to replicate human-human nonverbal behavior. The focus revolved around the behaviors that portrayed a credible façade, helping the embodied conversational agent (ECA) to form a successful cooperative dyad with the user. Based on a review of the nonverbal literature, a framework was created that identified trustworthy and credible nonverbal behaviors across five areas and formed design guidelines for character interaction. The design suggestions for those areas emanating from the facial region (facial expression, eye contact and paralanguage) were experimentally supported but there was no concordant increase in perceived trust when bodily regions (posture and gesture) were added. In addition, in examining the importance of demographic elements in the embodiment, it was found that users prefer to interact with characters that match their ethnicity and are young looking. There was no significant preference for gender. The implications of these results, as well as other interesting consequences are discussed.

  15. Development of an Anthropomorphic Robotic Arm and Hand for Interactive Humanoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jamie K. Paik; Bu Hyun Shin; Young-bong Bang; Young-Bo Shim

    2012-01-01

    Humanoid robots are designed and built to mimic human form and movement.Ultimately,they are meant to resemble the size and physical abilities of a human in order to function in human-oriented environments and to work autonomously but to pose no physical threat to humans.Here,a humanoid robot that resembles a human in appearance and movement is built using powerful actuators paired with gear trains,joint mechanisms,and motor drivers that are all encased in a package no larger than that of the human physique.In this paper,we propose the construction of a humanoid-applicable anthropomorphic 7-DoF arm complete with an 8-DoF hand.The novel mechanical design of this humanoid arm makes it sufficiently compact to be compatible with currently available narrating-model humanoids,and to be sufficiently powerful and flexible to be functional; the number of degrees of freedom endowed in this robotic arm is sufficient for executing a wide range of tasks,including dexterous hand movements.The developed humanoid arm and hand are capable of sensing and interpreting incoming external force using the motor in each joint current without conventional torque sensors.The humanoid arm adopts an algorithm to avoid obstacles and the dexterous hand is capable of grasping objects.The developed robotic arm is suitable for use in an interactive humanoid robot.

  16. Variations of dose to the lung during computed tomography (CT) thorax examinations: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study determined the influence of patient individuality on lung organ doses for chest CT examinations. The aim was a statistical statement on the variability as well as the uncertainty caused by the patient individuality. Furthermore, the reproducibility of the mean organ dose value of the lung using the new ICRP 110 voxelized adult female phantom was determined. Calculation of lung doses for 61 female chest CT studies with identical scan parameters (120 kV, 135 mAs, 100 mm collimation, 1.5 pitch) were done. For all patients, the lung was contoured and the geometry was simulated using the Monte Carlo method without patient table and with its original voxel size. The lungs were completely included in the scan area. A so-called user code CTDOSPP was developed which extends the Monte Carlo package EGSnrc and enables rotational simulation of CT X-ray sources. A developed graphical user interface GMctdospp allows easy handling of simulation parameters and CT studies, which are loaded in the DicomRT struct format. The transformation of CT values to material and density values is carried out with a standard relationship. The ICRP adult female material composition of all organs were directly taken from the publication. The patient table and bed and pillow were assumed to be air in order to be similar to patient pool. All simulations were calibrated for better handling and visualisation to a CTDIair value of 22.9 mGy. Simulation values were grouped into 1 mSv classes. The organ dose classes fit well to a Gaussian distribution (correlation coefficient R2 = 0.97). The fit's mean value is 10 mSv with a standard deviation of 2 mSv. The variability is about ± 30 % with minimum at 8 mSv and maximum at 13 mSv. The calculated organ dose to the lungs of the ICRP adult female phantom is about 11 mSv and thus within the calculated standard deviation of the patient pool. For all simulations the statistical uncertainty was between 2 and 3.5 %. This present study shows good

  17. Cosmological perturbations on the phantom brane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Satadru; Viznyuk, Alexander; Shtanov, Yuri; Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations in a multi-component braneworld. Our braneworld possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, weff Consequently, the quasi-static approximation of Koyama and Maartens provides a good fit to the exact results during the matter-dominated epoch. We find that the late-time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials Φ and Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which Φ = Ψ. On the brane, by contrast, the ratio Φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter-dominated epoch (z lesssim 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large-scale structure.

  18. Phantom cosmology and Boltzmann brains problem

    CERN Document Server

    Astashenok, Artyom V; Yurov, Valerian V

    2013-01-01

    We consider the well-known Boltzmann brains problem in frames of simple phantom energy models with little rip, big rip and big freeze singularity. It is showed that these models (i) satisfy to observational data and (ii) may be free from Boltzmann brains problem. The human observers in phantom models can exist only in during for a certain period $t

  19. Phantoms for Radiation Measurements of Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of radiation efficiency for a handheld phone equipped with a patch and a helical antenna operated near the human user have been performed. Both measurements include a simple head plus hand phantom and live persons are considered. The position of the hand on the phone is found...... to be the main reason for the large variation in radiation efficiency among persons. The tilt angle of the phone and the distance between the head and phone only play a minor role...

  20. Quantification and comparison of visibility and image artifacts of a new liquid fiducial marker in a lung phantom for image-guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhög, Jonas Scherman; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : A new biodegradable liquid fiducial marker was devised to allow for easy insertion in lung tumors using thin needles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visibility of the liquid fiducial markers for image-guided radiation therapy and compare to existing solid fiducial markers...... and to one existing liquid fiducial marker currently commercially available. Methods : Fiducial marker visibility was quantified in terms of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) on planar kilovoltage x-ray images in a thorax phantom for different concentrations of the radio-opaque component of the new liquid...... fiducial marker, four solid fiducial markers, and one existing liquid fiducial marker. Additionally, the image artifacts produced on computer tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) of all fiducial markers were quantified. Results : The authors found that the new liquid fiducial marker with the highest...

  1. IMRT credentialing for prospective trials using institutional virtual phantoms: results of a joint European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Radiological Physics Center project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) credentialing for a EORTC study was performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC; RPCPH). Institutions were retrospectively requested to irradiate their institutional phantom (INSTPH) using the same treatment plan in the framework of a Virtual Phantom Project (VPP) for IMRT credentialing. CT data set of the institutional phantom and measured 2D dose matrices were requested from centers and sent to a dedicated secure EORTC uploader. Data from the RPCPH and INSTPH were thereafter centrally analyzed and inter-compared by the QA team using commercially available software (RIT; ver.5.2; Colorado Springs, USA). Eighteen institutions participated to the VPP. The measurements of 6 (33%) institutions could not be analyzed centrally. All other centers passed both the VPP and the RPC ±7%/4 mm credentialing criteria. At the 5%/5 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing), 11(92%) as compared to 12 (100%) centers pass the credentialing process with RPCPH and INSTPH (p = 0.29), respectively. The corresponding pass rate for the 3%/3 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing) was 2 (17%) and 9 (75%; p = 0.01), respectively. IMRT dosimetry gamma evaluations in a single plane for a H&N prospective trial using the INSTPH measurements showed agreement at the gamma index criteria of ±5%/5 mm (90% of pixels passing) for a small number of VPP measurements. Using more stringent, criteria, the RPCPH and INSTPH comparison showed disagreement. More data is warranted and urgently required within the framework of prospective studies

  2. From military to civil loadings: Preliminary numerical-based thorax injury criteria investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumtcha, Aristide Awoukeng; Bodo, Michèle; Taddei, Lorenzo; Roth, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Effects of the impact of a mechanical structure on the human body are of great interest in the understanding of body trauma. Experimental tests have led to first conclusions about the dangerousness of an impact observing impact forces or displacement time history with PMHS (Post Mortem human Subjects). They have allowed providing interesting data for the development and the validation of numerical biomechanical models. These models, widely used in the framework of automotive crashworthiness, have led to the development of numerical-based injury criteria and tolerance thresholds. The aim of this process is to improve the safety of mechanical structures in interaction with the body. In a military context, investigations both at experimental and numerical level are less successfully completed. For both military and civil frameworks, the literature list a number of numerical analysis trying to propose injury mechanisms, and tolerance thresholds based on biofidelic Finite Element (FE) models of different part of the human body. However the link between both frameworks is not obvious, since lots of parameters are different: great mass impacts at relatively low velocity for civil impacts (falls, automotive crashworthiness) and low mass at very high velocity for military loadings (ballistic, blast). In this study, different accident cases were investigated, and replicated with a previously developed and validated FE model of the human thorax named Hermaphrodite Universal Biomechanical YX model (HUBYX model). These previous validations included replications of standard experimental tests often used to validate models in the context of automotive industry, experimental ballistic tests in high speed dynamic impact and also numerical replication of blast loading test ensuring its biofidelity. In order to extend the use of this model in other frameworks, some real-world accidents were reconstructed, and consequences of these loadings on the FE model were explored. These various

  3. The relationship between pulmonary function tests, thorax HRCT, and quantitative ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Tunçalp; Ikitimur, Hande; Akpinar Tekgündüz, Sibel; Mutlu, Birsen; Yildirim, Nurhayat; Akman, Canan; Ozmen, Ozlem; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2005-01-01

    We have evaluated the relationship between pulmonary function tests (PFT), thorax high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images and quantitative ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphic studies in 16 male patients (mean age 65.6 +/- 5.5 years) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The mean forced vital capacity (FVC) value of the patient group was 2352 +/- 642 mL (65.4 +/- 15.8%), whereas mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) was found to be 1150 +/- 442 mL (40.8 +/- 14.9%). The ratio of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity to alveolar ventilation (DLCO/VA) was 3.17 +/- 0.88 mL/min/mmHg/L, and the mean partial oxygen (PaO(2)) and carbon dioxide (PaCO(2)) pressures were 68.5 +/- 11.04 mmHg and 38.9 +/- 5.8 mmHg respectively. For each patient, thorax HRCT and V/Q scintigraphic images of both lungs were divided into upper, mid and lower zones during examination. Visual scoring for the assessment of emphysema on thorax HRCT were used and images were graded from mild to severe ( or = 76%). Emphysema scores were found to be higher on upper zones with accompanying lowest V/Q ratios. DLCO/VA, DLCO, total emphysema scores, and individual emphysema scores of the upper, mid and lower zones were found to be correlated. As a conclusion, it can be stated that emphysematous changes in COPD patients are more apparent in the upper lung zones, which also have the lowest V/Q ratios. PMID:16456733

  4. [Leonardo da Vinci the first human body imaging specialist. A brief communication on the thorax oseum images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Raúl; Criales, José Luis; Cardoso, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The impressive development of computed tomography (CT) techniques such as the three dimensional helical CT produces a spatial image of the thoracic skull. At the beginning of the 16th century Leonardo da Vinci drew with great precision the thorax oseum. These drawings show an outstanding similarity with the images obtained by three dimensional helical CT. The cumbersome task of the Renaissance genius is a prime example of the careful study of human anatomy. Modern imaging techniques require perfect anatomic knowledge of the human body in order to generate exact interpretations of images. Leonardo's example is alive for anybody devoted to modern imaging studies.

  5. Characterization of a phantom setup for breast conserving cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Jacob T.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Collins, Jarrod A.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an anatomically and mechanically representative breast phantom for the validation of breast conserving surgical therapies, specifically, in this case, image guided surgeries. Using three patients scheduled for lumpectomy and four healthy volunteers in mock surgical presentations, the magnitude, direction, and location of breast deformations was analyzed. A phantom setup was then designed to approximate such deformations in a mock surgical environment. Specifically, commercially available and custom-built polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were used to mimic breast tissue during surgery. A custom designed deformation apparatus was then created to reproduce deformations seen in typical clinical setups of the pre- and intra-operative breast geometry. Quantitative analysis of the human subjects yielded a positive correlation between breast volume and amount of breast deformation. Phantom results reflected similar behavior with the custom-built PVA phantom outperforming the commercial phantom.

  6. Polarized light propagation through tissue and tissue phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, V; Walsh, J T JR; Maitland, D J

    2000-02-08

    We show that standard tissue phantoms can be used to mimic the intensity and polarization properties of tissue. Polarized light propagation through biologic tissue is typically studied using tissue phantoms consisting of dilute aqueous suspensions of microspheres. The dilute phantoms can empirically match tissue polarization and intensity properties. One discrepancy between the dilute phantoms and tissue exist: common tissue phantoms, such as dilute Intralipid and dilute 1-{micro}m-diameter polystyrene microsphere suspensions, depolarize linearly polarized light more quickly than circularly polarized light. In dense tissue, however, where scatterers are often located in close proximity to one another, circularly polarized light is depolarized similar to or more quickly than linearly polarized light. We also demonstrate that polarized light propagates differently in dilute versus densely packed microsphere suspensions, which may account for the differences seen between polarized light propagation in common dilute tissue phantoms versus dense biologic tissue.

  7. Nanoparticle-free tissue-mimicking phantoms with intrinsic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Maciej S.; Popov, Alexey P.; Bykov, Alexander V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    We present an alternative to the conventional approach, phantoms without scattering nanoparticles, where scattering is achieved by the material itself: spherical cavities trapped in a silicone matrix. We describe the properties and fabrication of novel optical phantoms based on a silicone elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glycerol mixture. Optical properties (absorption coefficient µa, reduced scattering coefficient µs', and anisotropy factor g) of the fabricated phantoms were retrieved from spectrophotometric measurements (in the 400–1100 nm wavelength range) using the inverse adding-doubling method. The internal structure of the phantoms was studied under a scanning electron microscope, and the chemical composition was assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Composition of the phantom material is reported along with the full characterization of the produced phantoms and ways to control their parameters. PMID:27375928

  8. Thorax, Trachea, and Lung Ultrasonography in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine: Assessment of an Objective Structured Training Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Breitkreutz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study objective. Focused lung ultrasound (LUS examinations are important tools in critical care medicine. There is evidence that LUS can be used for the detection of acute thoracic lesions. However, no validated training method is available. The goal of this study was to develop and assess an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE curriculum for focused thorax, trachea, and lung ultrasound in emergency and critical care medicine (THOLUUSE. Methods. 39 trainees underwent a one-day training course in a prospective educational study, including lectures in sonoanatomy and -pathology of the thorax, case presentations, and hands-on training. Trainees’ pre- and posttest performances were assessed by multiple choice questionnaires, visual perception tests by interpretation video clips, practical performance of LUS, and identification of specific ultrasound findings. Results. Trainees postcourse scores of correct MCQ answers increased from 56±4% to 82±2% (mean± SD; P<0.001; visual perception skills increased from 54±5% to 78±3% (P<0.001; practical ultrasound skills improved, and correct LUS was performed in 94%. Subgroup analysis revealed that learning success was independent from the trainees’ previous ultrasound experience. Conclusions. THOLUUSE significantly improves theoretical and practical skills for the diagnosis of acute thoracic lesions. We propose to implement THOLUUSE in emergency medicine training.

  9. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamart, S.; Pierrat, N.; De Carlan, L.; Franck, D. [IRSN/DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Dudoignon, N. [IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/LRPAT, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Rateau, S.; Van der Meeren, A.; Rouit, E. [CEA/DSV/DRR/SRCA/LRT BP no 12, F-91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Bottlaender, M. [CEA/SHFJ, 4, place du General Leclerc F-91400 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  10. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  11. Use of a realistic breathing lung phantom to evaluate dose delivery errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the effect of respiration-induced motion on delivered dose (the interplay effect) for different treatment techniques under realistic clinical conditions. Methods: A flexible resin tumor model was created using rapid prototyping techniques based on a computed tomography (CT) image of an actual tumor. Twenty micro-MOSFETs were inserted into the tumor model and the tumor model was inserted into an anthropomorphic breathing phantom. Phantom motion was programed using the motion trajectory of an actual patient. A four-dimensional CT image was obtained and several treatment plans were created using different treatment techniques and planning systems: Conformal (Eclipse), step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (Pinnacle), step-and-shoot IMRT (XiO), dynamic IMRT (Eclipse), complex dynamic IMRT (Eclipse), hybrid IMRT [60% conformal, 40% dynamic IMRT (Eclipse)], volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) [single-arc (Eclipse)], VMAT [double-arc (Eclipse)], and complex VMAT (Eclipse). The complex plans were created by artificially pushing the optimizer to give complex multileaf collimator sequences. Each IMRT field was irradiated five times and each VMAT field was irradiated ten times, with each irradiation starting at a random point in the respiratory cycle. The effect of fractionation was calculated by randomly summing the measured doses. The maximum deviation for each measurement point per fraction and the probability that 95% of the model tumor had dose deviations less than 2% and 5% were calculated as a function of the number of fractions. Tumor control probabilities for each treatment plan were calculated and compared. Results: After five fractions, measured dose deviations were less than 2% for more than 95% of measurement points within the tumor model for all plans, except the complex dynamic IMRT, step-and-shoot IMRT (XiO), complex VMAT, and single-arc VMAT plans. Reducing the dose rate of the complex IMRT plans from 600 to 200 MU

  12. Viscous dark energy and phantom evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Mauricio [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad del Bio-Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepcion (Chile)]. E-mail: mcataldo@ubiobio.cl; Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Lepe, Samuel [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Basicas y Matematicas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile)]. E-mail: slepe@ucv.cl

    2005-07-14

    In order to study if the bulk viscosity may induce a big rip singularity on the flat FRW cosmologies, we investigate dissipative processes in the universe within the framework of the standard Eckart theory of relativistic irreversible thermodynamics, and in the full causal Israel-Stewart-Hiscock theory. We have found cosmological solutions which exhibit, under certain constraints, a big rip singularity. We show that the negative pressure generated by the bulk viscosity cannot avoid that the dark energy of the universe to be phantom energy.

  13. Phantom for moving organ dosimetry with gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Paul; Mahata, Anurupa; Suman Babu, Ebenezer

    2009-05-01

    The displacements caused by the cardiac and respiratory motions cause smearing of the dose distribution that defeats the purpose of high precision radiotherapy. A phontom that holds a gel cylinder and radiochromic film, was designed and developed to simulate the respiratory motion in the superior and inferior directions. The effect of lung movement on dose distribution was studied by exposing gel as well as a radiochromic film using the phantom. The results obtained with Gel was comparable to those obtained with the radiochromic films.

  14. Type I singularities and the Phantom Menace

    CERN Document Server

    Naskar, Tapan

    2007-01-01

    We consider the future dynamics of a transient phantom dominated phase of the universe in LQC and in the RS braneworld, which both have a non-standard Friedmann equation. We find that for a certain class of potentials, the Hubble parameter oscillates with simple harmonic motion in the LQC case and therefore avoids any future singularity. For more general potentials we find that damping effects eventually lead to the Hubble parameter becoming constant. On the other hand in the braneworld case we find that although the type I singularity can be avoided, the scale factor still diverges at late times.

  15. Examining the Viability of Phantom Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwick, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    In the standard cosmological framework of the 0th-order FLRW metric and the use of perfect fluids in the stress-energy tensor, dark energy with an equation-of-state parameter w metric and the components of the stress-energy tensor, and we consider dynamic w and primordial isocurvature and adiabatic perturbations. We find that phantom dark energy does not necessarily have negative kinetic energy for all relevant length scales at all times and, by the same token, that quintessence dark energy does not necessarily have positive kinetic energy for all relevant length scales at all times.

  16. Phantom Energy with Variable G and A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arbab Ⅰ. Arbab

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate a cosmological model of a phantom energy with a variable cosmological constant (A) depending on the energy density (p) as A α ρ-α, α = const and a variable gravitational constant G. The model requires α -1 and α 0 and p decrease with cosmic expansion. For ordinary energy (or dark energy), i.e.ω > -1, we have -1 0 so that G > 0 increases with time and ρ decreases with time. Cosmic acceleration with dust particles is granted, provided -2/3 0.

  17. Getting started with PhantomJS

    CERN Document Server

    Beltran, Aries

    2013-01-01

    The book will follow aA standard tutorial approach, and will beas a complete guide detailing the major aspects of PhantomJS with particular focus on Website website Testingtesting.This book is written forIf you are a JavaScript developers who are is interested in developing applications that interact with various web services, and doing that using a headless browser, then this book is ideal for you. This book iswill also be good for you if you are planning to create a headless browser testing for your web application. Basic understanding of JavaScript is assumed.

  18. Detectable change of lung nodule volume with CT in a phantom study with high and low signal to background contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Li, Qin; Zeng, Rongping; Gong, Qi; Myers, Kyle; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    In previous work we developed a method for predicting the minimum detectable change (MDC) in nodule volume based on volumetric CT measurements. MDC was defined as the minimum increase/decrease in a nodule volume distinguishable from the baseline measurement at a specified level of detection performance, assessed using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). In this work we derived volume estimates of a set of synthetic nodules and calculated the detection performance for distinguishing them from baseline measurements. Eight spherical objects of 100HU radio density ranging in diameter from 5.0mm to 5.75mm and 8.0mm to 8.75mm with 0.25mm increments were placed in an anthropomorphic phantom with either no background (high-contrast task) or gelatin background (low-contrast task). The baseline was defined as 5.0mm for the first set of nodules and 8.0mm for the second set. The phantom was scanned using varying exposures, and reconstructed with slice thickness of 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0mm and two reconstruction kernels (standard and smooth). Volume measurements were derived using a previously developed matched- filter approach. Results showed that nodule size, slice thickness, and nodule-to-background contrast affected detectable change in nodule volume when using our volume estimator and the acquisition settings from our study. We also compared our experimental results to the values estimated by our previously-developed MDC prediction method. We found that experimental data for the 8mm baseline nodules matched very well with our predicted values of MDC. These results support considering the use of this metric when standardizing imaging protocols for lung nodule size change assessment.

  19. Comparison of ordered subsets expectation maximization and Chang's attenuation correction method in quantitative cardiac SPET: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, D; Slomka, P J; Hahn, L J; Kloiber, R

    1998-12-01

    Photon attenuation is one of the primary causes of artifacts in cardiac single photon emission tomography (SPET). Several attenuation correction algorithms have been proposed. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of using the ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm and Chang's non-uniform attenuation correction method on quantitative cardiac SPET. We performed SPET scans of an anthropomorphic phantom simulating normal and abnormal myocardial studies. Attenuation maps of the phantom were obtained from computed tomographic images. The SPET projection data were corrected for attenuation using OSEM reconstruction, as well as Chang's method. For each defect scan and attenuation correction method, we calculated three quantitative parameters: average radial maximum (ARM) ratio of the defect-to-normal area, maximum defect contrast (MDC) and defect volume, using automated three-dimensional quantitation. The differences between the two methods were less than 4% for defect-to-normal ARM ratio, 19% for MDC and 13% for defect volume. These differences are within the range of estimated statistical variation of SPET. The calculation times of the two methods were comparable. For all SPET studies, OSEM attenuation correction gave a more correct activity distribution, with respect to both the homogeneity of the radiotracer and the shape of the cardiac insert. The difference in uniformity between OSEM and Chang's method was quantified by segmental analysis and found to be less than 8% for the normal study. In conclusion, OSEM and Chang's attenuation correction are quantitatively equivalent, with comparable calculation times. OSEM reconstruction gives a more correct activity distribution and is therefore preferred.

  20. Low-Dose and Scatter-Free Cone-Beam CT Imaging Using a Stationary Beam Blocker in a Single Scan: Phantom Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive imaging dose from repeated scans and poor image quality mainly due to scatter contamination are the two bottlenecks of cone-beam CT (CBCT imaging. Compressed sensing (CS reconstruction algorithms show promises in recovering faithful signals from low-dose projection data but do not serve well the needs of accurate CBCT imaging if effective scatter correction is not in place. Scatter can be accurately measured and removed using measurement-based methods. However, these approaches are considered unpractical in the conventional FDK reconstruction, due to the inevitable primary loss for scatter measurement. We combine measurement-based scatter correction and CS-based iterative reconstruction to generate scatter-free images from low-dose projections. We distribute blocked areas on the detector where primary signals are considered redundant in a full scan. Scatter distribution is estimated by interpolating/extrapolating measured scatter samples inside blocked areas. CS-based iterative reconstruction is finally carried out on the undersampled data to obtain scatter-free and low-dose CBCT images. With only 25% of conventional full-scan dose, our method reduces the average CT number error from 250 HU to 24 HU and increases the contrast by a factor of 2.1 on Catphan 600 phantom. On an anthropomorphic head phantom, the average CT number error is reduced from 224 HU to 10 HU in the central uniform area.

  1. Accuracy of dual-energy computed tomography for the measurement of iodine concentration using cardiac CT protocols: validation in a phantom model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonce, James D. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Charleston, SC (United States); Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas G. [Siemens Healthcare, Imaging and Therapy Division, Forchheim (Germany); Wahlquist, Amy E.; Nietert, Paul J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Public Health Services, Charleston, SC (United States); Bastarrika, Gorka [University of Navarra, Department of Radiology, Pamplona (Spain); Meinel, Felix G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To assess the accuracy of dual-energy CT (DECT) for the quantification of iodine concentrations in a thoracic phantom across various cardiac DECT protocols and simulated patient sizes. Experiments were performed on first- and second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) systems in DECT mode using various cardiac DECT protocols. An anthropomorphic thoracic phantom was equipped with tubular inserts containing known iodine concentrations (0-20 mg/mL) in the cardiac chamber and up to two fat-equivalent rings to simulate different patient sizes. DECT-derived iodine concentrations were measured using dedicated software and compared to true concentrations. General linear regression models were used to identify predictors of measurement accuracy Correlation between measured and true iodine concentrations (n = 72) across CT systems and protocols was excellent (R = 0.994-0.997, P < 0.0001). Mean measurement errors were 3.0 ± 7.0 % and -2.9 ± 3.8 % for first- and second-generation DSCT, respectively. This error increased with simulated patient size. The second-generation DSCT showed the most stable measurements across a wide range of iodine concentrations and simulated patient sizes. Overall, DECT provides accurate measurements of iodine concentrations across cardiac CT protocols, strengthening the case for DECT-derived blood volume estimates as a surrogate of myocardial blood supply. (orig.)

  2. Calibrating pen dosimeters with and without a phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonato, Fernanda B.C.; Cescon, Claudinei T.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: fbnonato@ipen.b, E-mail: ctcescon@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Thirty one direct reading dosimeters (pen dosimeters) were calibrated and tested in standard beams of gamma radiation, with and without the use of a phantom. The calibration was performed with a Co-60 source and tested with a Cs-137 source. The dose-response curves of the pen dosimeters and their calibration factors for a Co-60 source, with and without the use of a phantom were obtained. The results show the need to calibrate the pen dosimeters with a phantom. (author)

  3. Prevalent Hallucinations during Medical Internships: Phantom Vibration and Ringing Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Hsuan Lin; Sheng-Hsuan Lin; Peng Li; Wei-Lieh Huang; Ching-Yen Chen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phantom vibration syndrome is a type of hallucination reported among mobile phone users in the general population. Another similar perception, phantom ringing syndrome, has not been previously described in the medical literature. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns (46 males, 28 females; mean age, 24.8±1.2 years) was conducted using repeated investigations of the prevalence and associated factors of phantom vibration and ringing. The accompanying sympto...

  4. Studies on Phantom Vibration and Ringing Syndrome among Postgraduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Atul Kumar Goyal

    2015-01-01

    Phantom vibrations and ringing of mobile phones are prevalent hallucinations in the general population. They might be considered as a normal brain mechanism. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of Phantom vibrations and ringing syndrome among students and to assess factors associated it. The survey of 300 postgraduate students belonging to different field of specialization was conducted at Kurukshetra University. 74% of students were found to have both Phantom vibrations and...

  5. Nanoparticle-free tissue-mimicking phantoms with intrinsic scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Wróbel, Maciej S.; Popov, Alexey P.; Bykov, Alexander V.; Tuchin, Valery V; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    We present an alternative to the conventional approach, phantoms without scattering nanoparticles, where scattering is achieved by the material itself: spherical cavities trapped in a silicone matrix. We describe the properties and fabrication of novel optical phantoms based on a silicone elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glycerol mixture. Optical properties (absorption coefficient µa, reduced scattering coefficient µs', and anisotropy factor g) of the fabricated phantoms were retriev...

  6. Infant phantom head circuit board for EEG head phantom and pediatric brain simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohsen, Safa

    The infant's skull differs from an adult skull because of the characteristic features of the human skull during early development. The fontanels and the conductivity of the infant skull influence surface currents, generated by neurons, which underlie electroencephalography (EEG) signals. An electric circuit was built to power a set of simulated neural sources for an infant brain activity simulator. Also, in the simulator, three phantom tissues were created using saline solution plus Agarose gel to mimic the conductivity of each layer in the head [scalp, skull brain]. The conductivity measurement was accomplished by two different techniques: using the four points' measurement technique, and a conductivity meter. Test results showed that the optimized phantom tissues had appropriate conductivities to simulate each tissue layer to fabricate a physical head phantom. In this case, the best results should be achieved by testing the electrical neural circuit with the sample physical model to generate simulated EEG data and use that to solve both the forward and the inverse problems for the purpose of localizing the neural sources in the head phantom.

  7. Calculations of radiation fields and monkey mid-head and mid-thorax responses in AFRRI-TRIGA reactor facility experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational study was performed to characterize the radiation exposure fields and the mid-head and mid-thorax response functions for monkeys irradiated in the Armed Forces Radiobiological Research Institute (AFRRI) reactor exposure facilities. Discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations were performed in one-dimensional spherical geometry to obtain the energy spectra of the neutrons and gamma rays entering the room through various spectrum modifiers and reaching the irradiation position. Adjoint calculations performed in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry yielded the mid-head and mid-thorax response functions, which were then folded with flux spectra to obtain the monkey mid-head and mid-thorax doses (kerma rates) received at the irradiation position. The results of the study are presented both as graphs and as tables. The resulting spectral shapes compared favorably with previous work; however, the magnitudes of the fluxes did not. The differences in the magnitudes may be due to the normalization factor used

  8. NOTE: Deformable and durable phantoms with controlled density of scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Lamouche, Guy; Maciejko, Romain; Dufour, Marc; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2008-07-01

    We have developed deformable and durable optical tissue phantoms with a simple and well-defined microstructure including a novel combination of scatterers and a matrix material. These were developed for speckle and elastography investigations in optical coherence tomography, but should prove useful in many other fields. We present in detail the fabrication process which involves embedding silica microspheres in a silicone matrix. We also characterize the resulting phantoms with scanning electron microscopy and optical measurements. To our knowledge, no such phantoms were proposed in the literature before. Our technique has a wide range of applicability and could also be adapted to fabricate phantoms with various optical and mechanical properties.

  9. A quality assurance phantom for IMRT dose verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Jiang, S. B.; Pawlicki, T.; Chen, Y.; Li, J. S.; Deng, J.; Boyer, A. L.

    2003-03-01

    This paper investigates a quality assurance (QA) phantom specially designed to verify the accuracy of dose distributions and monitor units (MU) calculated by clinical treatment planning optimization systems and by the Monte Carlo method for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The QA phantom is a PMMA cylinder of 30 cm diameter and 40 cm length with various bone and lung inserts. A procedure (and formalism) has been developed to measure the absolute dose to water in the PMMA phantom. Another cylindrical phantom of the same dimensions, but made of water, was used to confirm the results obtained with the PMMA phantom. The PMMA phantom was irradiated by 4, 6 and 15 MV photon beams and the dose was measured using an ionization chamber and compared to the results calculated by a commercial inverse planning system (CORVUS, NOMOS, Sewickley, PA) and by the Monte Carlo method. The results show that the dose distributions calculated by both CORVUS and Monte Carlo agreed to within 2% of dose maximum with measured results in the uniform PMMA phantom for both open and intensity-modulated fields. Similar agreement was obtained between Monte Carlo calculations and measured results with the bone and lung heterogeneity inside the PMMA phantom while the CORVUS results were 4% different. The QA phantom has been integrated as a routine QA procedure for the patient's IMRT dose verification at Stanford since 1999.

  10. Non-Gaussian statistical properties of virtual breast phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Craig K.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Eckstein, Miguel P.; Boone, John M.

    2014-03-01

    Images derived from a "phantom" are useful for characterizing the performance of imaging systems. In particular, the modulation transfer properties of imaging detectors are traditionally assessed by physical phantoms consisting of an edge. More recently researchers have come to realize that quantifying the effects of object variability can also be accomplished with phantoms in modalities such as breast imaging where anatomical structure may be the principal limitation in performance. This has driven development of virtual phantoms that can be used in simulation environments. In breast imaging, several such phantoms have been proposed. In this work, we analyze non-Gaussian statistical properties of virtual phantoms, and compare them to similar statistics from a database of breast images. The virtual phantoms assessed consist of three classes. The first is known as clustered-blob lumpy backgrounds. The second class is "binarized" textures which typically apply some sort of threshold to a stochastic 3D texture intended to represent the distribution of adipose and glandular tissue in the breast. The third approach comes from efforts at the University of Pennsylvania to directly simulate the 3D anatomy of the breast. We use Laplacian fractional entropy (LFE) as a measure of the non-Gaussian statistical properties of each simulation. Our results show that the simulation approaches differ considerably in LFE with very low scores for the clustered-blob lumpy background to very high values for the UPenn phantom. These results suggest that LFE may have value in developing and tuning virtual phantom simulation procedures.

  11. Phantom Eye Syndrome: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agda M. Andreotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this literature review was to describe the main features of phantom eye syndrome in relation to their possible causes, symptoms, treatments, and influence of eye amputation on quality of life of anophthalmic patients. For this, a bibliographical research was performed in Pubmed database using the following terms: “eye amputation,” “eye trauma,” “phantom eye syndrome,” “phantom pain,” and “quality of life,” associated or not. Thirteen studies were selected, besides some relevant references contained in the selected manuscripts and other studies hallowed in the literature. Thus, 56 articles were included in this review. The phantom eye syndrome is defined as any sensation reported by the patient with anophthalmia, originated anophthalmic cavity. In phantom eye syndrome, at least one of these three symptoms has to be present: phantom vision, phantom pain, and phantom sensations. This syndrome has a direct influence on the quality of life of the patients, and psychological support is recommended before and after the amputation of the eyeball as well as aid in the treatment of the syndrome. Therefore, it is suggested that, for more effective treatment of phantom eye syndrome, drug therapy should be associated with psychological approach.

  12. Improved precision of syndesmophyte measurement for the evaluation of ankylosing spondylitis using CT: a phantom and patient study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Yao, Lawrence; Ward, Michael M.

    2012-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease characterized by abnormal bone formation (syndesmophyte) at the margins of inter-vertebral disc spaces. Syndesmophyte growth is currently typically monitored by the visual inspection of radiographs. The limitations inherent to the modality (2D projection of a 3D object) and rater (qualitative human judgment) may compromise sensitivity. With newly available treatments, more precise measures of syndesmophytes are needed to determine whether treatment can slow rates of syndesmophyte growth. We previously presented a computer algorithm measuring syndesmophyte volumes and heights in the 3D space of CT scans. In this study, we present improvements to the original algorithm and evaluate the gain in precision as applied to an anthropomorphic vertebral phantom and patients. Each patient was scanned twice in one day, thus providing two syndesmophyte volume and height measures. The difference between those two measures (ideally zero) determines our algorithm's precision. The technical improvements to the algorithm decreased the mean volume difference (standard deviation) between scans from 3.01% (2.83%) to 1.31% (0.95%) and the mean height difference between scans from 3.16% (2.99%) to 1.56% (1.13%). The high precision of the improved algorithm holds promise for application to longitudinal clinical studies.

  13. String field theory inspired phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exact solution to the Friedmann equations with a stringy inspired phantom field is constructed. The Universe is considered as a slowly decaying D3-brane, which is described in the string field theory framework. The notable features of the concerned exactly solvable stringy dark energy (DE) model are a ghost sign of the kinetic term and a special polynomial form of the effective tachyon potential. Cosmological consequences of adding the cold dark matter (CDM) to this model are investigated as well. Solutions with large initial value of the CDM energy density attracted by the exact solution without the CDM are constructed numerically. In contrast to the ACDM model the Hubble parameter in our model is not a monotonic function of time. For specific initial data the DE state parameter UJDE is also not monotonic function of time. For these cases there are two separate domains of time where U'DE being less than - 1 is close to - 1. Stability conditions, under which the constructed solution is stable with respect to small fluctuations of the initial conditions, including the CDM energy density, are found. Keywords: string field theory, cosmology, tachyon, phantom, dark energy, cold dark matter, Big Rip (authors)

  14. Examining the Viability of Phantom Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwick, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    In the standard cosmological framework of the 0th-order FLRW metric and the use of perfect fluids in the stress-energy tensor, dark energy with an equation-of-state parameter $w < -1$ (known as phantom dark energy) implies negative kinetic energy and vacuum instability when modeled as a scalar field. However, the value of best fit from Planck and WMAP9 for present-day $w$ is indeed less than $-1$. We find that it is not as obvious as one might think that phantom dark energy has negative kinetic energy categorically. Staying within the confines of observational constraints and general relativity, for which there is good experimental validation, we consider a few reasonable departures from the standard 0th-order framework in an attempt to see if negative kinetic energy can be avoided in these settings despite an apparent $w<-1$. We consider a more accurate description of the universe through the perturbing of the isotropic and homogeneous FLRW metric and the components of the stress-energy tensor, and we ...

  15. On the application of an environmental radiological assessment system to an anthropomorphic surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin E; Hosseini, Ali; Dowdall, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments have seen the expansion of the system of radiological protection for humans to one including protection of the environment against detrimental effects of radiation exposure, although a fully developed framework for integration of human and ecological risk assessment for radionuclides is only at an early stage. In the context of integration, significant differences exist between assessment methodologies for humans and the environment in terms of transfer, exposure, and dosimetry. The aim of this elaboration was to explore possible implications of the simplifications made within the system of environmental radiological protection in terms of the efficacy and robustness of dose-rate predictions. A comparison was conducted between human radiological assessment and environmental radiological assessment for an anthropomorphic surrogate, the results for which, produced by both the environmental and human-oriented risk assessment systems, were critically compared and contrasted. The adopted approach split the calculations into several parts, these being 1) physical transfer in an ecosystem, 2) transfer to humans, 3) internal doses to humans, and 4) external doses to humans. The calculations were carried out using both a human radiological assessment and ecological risk assessment system for the same surrogate. The results of this comparison provided indications as to where the 2 systems are amenable to possible integration and where such integration may prove difficult. Initial stage transport models seem to be an obvious component amenable for integration, although complete integration is arguably unattainable as the differences between endpoints mean that the relevant outputs from the models will not be the same. For the transfer and dosimetry components of 2 typical methodologies, it seems that the efficacy of the environmental system is radionuclide-dependent, the predictions given by the environmental system for (90) Sr and (60) Co being

  16. Usefulness of a functional tracheobronchial phantom for interventional procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate usefulness of a functional tracheobronchial phantom for interventional procedure. The functional phantom was made as a actual size with human normal anatomy used silicone and a paper clay mold. A tracheobronchial-shape clay mold was placed inside a square box and liquid silicone was poured. After the silicone was formed, the clay was removed. We measured film density and tracheobronchial angle at the human, animal and phantom respectively. The film density of trachea part were 0.76 (± 0.011) in human, 0.97 (± 0.015) in animal, 0.45 (± 0.016) in phantom. The tracheobronchial bifurcation part measured 0.51 (± 0.006) in human, 0.65 (± 0.005) in animal, 0.65 (± 0.008) in phantom. The right bronchus part measured 0.14 (± 0.008) in human, 0.59 (± 0.014) in animal and 0.04 (± 0.007) in phantom. The left bronchus were 0.54 (± 0.004) in human, 0.54 (± 0.008) in animal and 0.08 (± 0.008) in phantom. At the stent part were 0.54 (± 0.004) in human, 0.59 (± 0.011) in animal and 0.04 (± 0.007) in phantom, respectively. The tracheobronchial angle of the left bronchus site were 42.6 (± 2.07).deg. in human, 43.4 (± 2.40).deg. in animal and 35 (± 2.00).deg. in phantom, respectively. The right bronchus site were 32.8 (± 2.77).deg. in human, 34.6 (± 1.94).deg. in animal and 50.2 (± 1.30).deg. in phantom, respectively. The phantom was useful for in-vitro testing of tracheobronchial interventional procedure, since it was easy to reproduce

  17. TU-F-17A-03: A 4D Lung Phantom for Coupled Registration/Segmentation Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, D; El Naqa, I [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Levesque, I [Montreal University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Coupling the processes of segmentation and registration (regmentation) is a recent development that allows improved efficiency and accuracy for both steps and may improve the clinical feasibility of online adaptive radiotherapy. Presented is a multimodality animal tissue model designed specifically to provide a ground truth to simultaneously evaluate segmentation and registration errors during respiratory motion. Methods: Tumor surrogates were constructed from vacuum sealed hydrated natural sea sponges with catheters used for the injection of PET radiotracer. These contained two compartments allowing for two concentrations of radiotracer mimicking both tumor and background signals. The lungs were inflated to different volumes using an air pump and flow valve and scanned using PET/CT and MRI. Anatomical landmarks were used to evaluate the registration accuracy using an automated bifurcation tracking pipeline for reproducibility. The bifurcation tracking accuracy was assessed using virtual deformations of 2.6 cm, 5.2 cm and 7.8 cm of a CT scan of a corresponding human thorax. Bifurcations were detected in the deformed dataset and compared to known deformation coordinates for 76 points. Results: The bifurcation tracking accuracy was found to have a mean error of −0.94, 0.79 and −0.57 voxels in the left-right, anterior-posterior and inferior-superior axes using a 1×1×5 mm3 resolution after the CT volume was deformed 7.8 cm. The tumor surrogates provided a segmentation ground truth after being registered to the phantom image. Conclusion: A swine lung model in conjunction with vacuum sealed sponges and a bifurcation tracking algorithm is presented that is MRI, PET and CT compatible and anatomically and kinetically realistic. Corresponding software for tracking anatomical landmarks within the phantom shows sub-voxel accuracy. Vacuum sealed sponges provide realistic tumor surrogate with a known boundary. A ground truth with minimal uncertainty is thus

  18. TU-F-17A-03: A 4D Lung Phantom for Coupled Registration/Segmentation Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Coupling the processes of segmentation and registration (regmentation) is a recent development that allows improved efficiency and accuracy for both steps and may improve the clinical feasibility of online adaptive radiotherapy. Presented is a multimodality animal tissue model designed specifically to provide a ground truth to simultaneously evaluate segmentation and registration errors during respiratory motion. Methods: Tumor surrogates were constructed from vacuum sealed hydrated natural sea sponges with catheters used for the injection of PET radiotracer. These contained two compartments allowing for two concentrations of radiotracer mimicking both tumor and background signals. The lungs were inflated to different volumes using an air pump and flow valve and scanned using PET/CT and MRI. Anatomical landmarks were used to evaluate the registration accuracy using an automated bifurcation tracking pipeline for reproducibility. The bifurcation tracking accuracy was assessed using virtual deformations of 2.6 cm, 5.2 cm and 7.8 cm of a CT scan of a corresponding human thorax. Bifurcations were detected in the deformed dataset and compared to known deformation coordinates for 76 points. Results: The bifurcation tracking accuracy was found to have a mean error of −0.94, 0.79 and −0.57 voxels in the left-right, anterior-posterior and inferior-superior axes using a 1×1×5 mm3 resolution after the CT volume was deformed 7.8 cm. The tumor surrogates provided a segmentation ground truth after being registered to the phantom image. Conclusion: A swine lung model in conjunction with vacuum sealed sponges and a bifurcation tracking algorithm is presented that is MRI, PET and CT compatible and anatomically and kinetically realistic. Corresponding software for tracking anatomical landmarks within the phantom shows sub-voxel accuracy. Vacuum sealed sponges provide realistic tumor surrogate with a known boundary. A ground truth with minimal uncertainty is thus

  19. Phantom jam avoidance through in-car speed advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijs, L.C.W.; Wismans, L.J.J.; Krol, L.; Berkum, van E.C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of phantom jams can be explained following the definition of Kerner & Konhäuser (1993) who state that a phantom jam occurs without the existence of a physical bottleneck and is caused by the imperfect driving style of road users under metastable traffic conditions. In order to prevent

  20. Building and assessing anatomically relevant phantoms for neonatal transcranial ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memoli, G; Sadhoo, N; Gelat, P; Shaw, A [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Gatto, M; Harris, R A, E-mail: gianluca.memoli@npl.co.uk [Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    This study describes the design and construction of a clinically relevant phantom to survey the temperature increase caused by ultrasound equipment, as currently used in neonatal head-scanning in the UK. The phantom is an ellipsoid of bone-mimic material, filled with brain-mimic; a circular hole in the external surface mimicks the fontanel, through which most clinically relevant scans are made. Finite-element simulations were used to identify possible hot spots and decide the most effective thermocouple positions within the phantom to investigate temperature rise during a typical scan. Novel materials were purposively designed to simulate key acoustic and thermal properties. Three Dimensional Printing (3DP) was employed for the fabrication of the skull phantom, and a specific strategy was successfully pursued to embed a thermocouple within the 3DP skull phantom during the manufacturing process. An in-process Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) was used to assess the correct position of the deposited thermocouple inside the fabricated skull phantom. The temperature increase in the phantom for a typical trans-fontanellar scan is also presented here. The current phantom will be used in a hospital survey in the UK and, in its final design, will allow for a more reliable evaluation of ultrasound heating than is currently possible.

  1. Phantom Accretion onto the Schwarzschild de-Sitter Black Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Sharif; G Abbas

    2011-01-01

    We deal with phantom energy accretion onto the Schwarzschild de-Sitter black hole. The energy flux conservation, relativistic Bernoulli equation and mass Bux conservation equation are formulated to discuss the phantom accretion. We discuss the conditions for critical accretion. It is found that the mass of the black hole decreases due to phantom accretion. There exist two critical points which lie in the exterior of horizons (black hole and cosmological horizons). The results for the phantom energy accretion onto the Schwarzschild black hole can be recovered by taking A → 0.%@@ We deal with phantom energy accretion onto the Schwarzschild de-Sitter black hole.The energy flux conserva-tion,relativistic Bernoulli equation and mass flux conservation equation are formulated to discuss the phantom accretion.We discuss the conditions for critical accretion.It is found that the mass of the black hole decreases due to phantom accretion.There exist two critical points which lie in the exterior of horizons(black hole and cosmological horizons).The results for the phantom energy accretion onto the Schwarzschild black hole can be recovered by taking ∧→0.

  2. Phantom limb pain: a case of maladaptive CNS plasticity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flor, Herta; Nikolajsen, Lone; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    Phantom pain refers to pain in a body part that has been amputated or deafferented. It has often been viewed as a type of mental disorder or has been assumed to stem from pathological alterations in the region of the amputation stump. In the past decade, evidence has accumulated that phantom pain...

  3. Neutron dosimetry in organs of an adult human phantom using linacs with multileaf collimator in radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Tunja 15001000 (Colombia); Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47012 Valladolid (Spain) and Departamento de Radiologia, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid E-47071 (Spain); CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid, E-28040 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, Granada E-18071 (Spain)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed doses due to neutrons in 87 organs/tissues for anthropomorphic phantoms, irradiated in position supine (head first into the gantry) with orientations anteroposterior (AP) and right-left (RLAT) with a 18 MV accelerator. Conversion factors from monitor units to {mu}Gy per neutron in organs, equivalent doses in organs/tissues, and effective doses, which permit to quantify stochastic risks, are estimated. Methods: MAX06 and FAX06 phantoms were modeled with MCNPX and irradiated with a 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D accelerator whose geometry included a multileaf collimator. Two actual fields of a pelvic treatment were simulated using electron-photon-neutron coupled transport. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were estimated from kerma. Equivalent doses were estimated using the radiation weighting factor corresponding to an average incident neutron energy 0.47 MeV. Statistical uncertainties associated to absorbed doses, as calculated by MCNPX, were also obtained. Results: Largest doses were absorbed in shallowest (with respect to the neutron pathway) organs. In {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, values of 2.66 (for penis) and 2.33 (for testes) were found in MAX06, and 1.68 (for breasts), 1.05 (for lenses of eyes), and 0.94 (for sublingual salivary glands) in FAX06, in AP orientation. In RLAT, the largest doses were found for bone tissues (leg) just at the entrance of the beam in the body (right side in our case). Values, in {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, of 1.09 in upper leg bone right spongiosa, for MAX06, and 0.63 in mandible spongiosa, for FAX06, were found. Except for gonads, liver, and stomach wall, equivalent doses found for FAX06 were, in both orientations, higher than for MAX06. Equivalent doses in AP are higher than in RLAT for all organs/tissues other than brain and liver. Effective doses of 12.6 and 4.1 {mu}SvMU{sup -1} were found for AP and RLAT, respectively. The organs/tissues with larger relative contributions to the effective dose were testes and breasts, in

  4. Regular phantom black holes as gravitational lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Eiroa, Ernesto F

    2015-01-01

    The distortion of the spacetime structure in the surroundings of black holes affects the trajectories of light rays. As a consequence, black holes can act as gravitational lenses. Observations of type Ia supernovas, show that our Universe is in accelerated expansion. The usual explanation is that the Universe is filled with a negative pressure fluid called dark energy, which accounts for 70 % of its total density, which can be modeled by a self-interacting scalar field with a potential. We consider a class of spherically symmetric regular phantom black holes as gravitational lenses. We study large deflection angles, using the strong deflection limit, corresponding to an asymptotic logarithmic approximation. In this case, photons passing close to the photon sphere of the black hole experiment several loops around it before they emerge towards the observer, giving place to two infinite sets of relativistic images. Within this limit, we find analytical expressions for the positions and the magnifications of thes...

  5. Examining the viability of phantom dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwick, Kevin J.

    2015-09-01

    In the standard cosmological framework of the 0th-order Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric and the use of perfect fluids in the stress-energy tensor, dark energy with an equation-of-state parameter w think that phantom dark energy has negative kinetic energy categorically. Analogously, we find that field models of quintessence dark energy (wϕ>-1 ) do not necessarily have positive kinetic energy categorically. Staying within the confines of observational constraints and general relativity, for which there is good experimental validation, we consider a few reasonable departures from the standard 0th-order framework in an attempt to see if negative kinetic energy can be avoided in these settings despite an apparent w positive kinetic energy for all relevant length scales at all times.

  6. Phantom space–times in fake supergravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bu Taam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss