WorldWideScience

Sample records for anthropometry

  1. Pediatric Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinich, Kathleen D.; Reed, Matthew P.

    Anthropometry is the measurement of human size, shape, and physical capabilities. Most pediatric anthropometry data are gathered to describe child growth patterns, but data on body size, mass distribution, range of motion, and posture are used to develop crash test dummies and computational models of child occupants. Pediatric anthropometry data are also used to determine child restraint dimensions, so they will accommodate the applicable population of child occupants.

  2. Anthropometry for HMD design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, Kathleen

    1992-10-01

    The importance of fit for helmet ensembles is not limited to just comfort. It impacts most other safety and performance needs of the helmets, including helmet retention, and optical and acoustical performance. The addition of optical systems to helmet ensembles increases the need for precision in fit. Helmet systems which were previously acceptable in terms of fit do not necessarily fit well enough to accommodate new performance requirements. The increased need for precision has introduced the need for better definition of human anthropometry for helmet design as well as definition of the head and helmet interface. Traditional anthropometry (human body measurements taken with calipers, or head boards, etc.) is no longer adequate. For advanced helmet systems, data on the shape, or change in the surface curvature and how this relates to helmet systems in three-dimensional space, is now a necessity. In fact, use of the old style of anthropometry can and has created problems rather than resolve them. This paper discusses some of the problems with the old methods and introduces new technologies and research which is being done to address the needs.

  3. Generation of Boundary Manikin Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Karen S.; Margerum, Sarah; Barr, Abbe; Ferrer, Mike A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop 3D digital boundary manikins that are representative of the anthropometry of a unique population. These digital manikins can be used by designers to verify and validate that the components of the spacesuit design satisfy the requirements specified in the Human Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR) document. Currently, the HSIR requires the suit to accommodate the 1st percentile American female to the 99th percentile American male. The manikin anthropometry was derived using two methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Whole Body Posture Based Analysis (WBPBA). PCA is a statistical method for reducing a multidimensional data set by using eigenvectors and eigenvalues. The goal is to create a reduced data set that encapsulates the majority of the variation in the population. WBPBA is a multivariate analytical approach that was developed by the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) to identify the extremes of the population for a given body posture. WBPBA is a simulation-based method that finds extremes in a population based on anthropometry and posture whereas PCA is based solely on anthropometry. Both methods yield a list of subjects and their anthropometry from the target population; PCA resulted in 20 female and 22 male subjects anthropometry and WBPBA resulted in 7 subjects' anthropometry representing the extreme subjects in the target population. The subjects anthropometry is then used to 'morph' a baseline digital scan of a person with the same body type to create a 3D digital model that can be used as a tool for designers, the details of which will be discussed in subsequent papers.

  4. Anthropometry of craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefánková, Eva; Horn, František; Neščáková, Eva; Kabát, Michal; Petrík, Michal; Trnka, Ján

    2015-01-01

    Anthropometry is becoming a popular method for diagnostics of various diseases in pediatric clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the growth changes in craniofacial parameters in patients with craniosynostosis and positional plagiocephaly. Inclusion criteria for the study were presence of craniostenosis or positional plagiocephaly in a patient with at least three anthropometric evaluations at our department. Studied patients were aged from 1.0 month to 2.5 years with median age at the first and last anthropometric evaluation as 1.83 and 25.27 months, respectively. Further anthropometric results in patients older than 2.5 years were excluded from the study. Statistical significance was tested by the Mann-Whitney test. The studied group consisted of 70.5% male patients. The type of craniosynostosis was represented by scaphocephaly in 44.1%, by trigonocephaly in 45.6% and by coronal craniosynostosis in 10.3% of the cases. Cranial index was proven as a suitable parameter for evaluating differences in the trend of growth in craniosynostosis (p<0.001) and also for evaluating post-operative results. Significance was found in width of the head (p=0.038) for scaphocephaly and in length of the head for trigonocephaly (p=0.001) in surgically treated patients. Trend of cranial growth in operated patients copied the curve of the norm but in higher or lower values which depends on the type of prematurely closed suture. Longitudinal anthropometric follow-up is an objective and measurable method that can accurately non-invasively and non-expensively assess skull growth in pediatric patients with cranial deformity. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Anthropometry. A Bibliography with Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    population strengths with anthropometry matching that of astronauts. (Author) DESCRIPTORS: *Biodynamics, * Bionics # *Hand (anatomy), *Huscular...PTB sockets with a thermoplastic material; Human locomotion ; Multichannel myoelectric control—experimental report; Guidelines for standards tor...years of wheelchair evaluation; Some observations on the transverse rotations of the human trunk during locomotion ; Hydraulic knee controls for knee

  6. Hand Anthropometry and SMS Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Vimala; Yeow, Paul H. P.

    The effect of hand anthropometry on Short Message Service (SMS) satisfaction was investigated using structured questionnaire interviews with 110 subjects, aged between 17-25 years old. Hand size was measured to assess its effect on mobile phone design factors satisfaction whereas thumb circumference and length were measured for keypad design factors. Small hand-sized subjects were found to be more satisfied with mobile phone dimensions than large hand-sized subjects. Thumb circumference significantly affects users` satisfaction towards key size and space between keys whereas thumb length significantly affects keypad layout satisfaction. Both thumb circumference and length significantly correlate negatively with the corresponding keypad design factors. Results confirm that hand anthropometry do affect users messaging satisfaction. These findings should prove useful to mobile phone designers who could look into the possibility of designing customized mobile phones that cater to large hand and thumb sized users, so as to increase their subjective satisfaction.

  7. Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconville, J. T.; Laubach, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    Data on body-size measurement are presented to aid in spacecraft design. Tabulated dimensional anthropometric data on 59 variables for 12 selected populations are given. The variables chosen were those judged most relevant to the manned space program. A glossary of anatomical and anthropometric terms is included. Selected body dimensions of males and females from the potential astronaut population projected to the 1980-1990 time frame are given. Illustrations of drawing-board manikins based on those anticipated body sizes are included.

  8. A Preliminary Anthropometry Standard for Australian Army Equipment Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED A Preliminary Anthropometry Standard for Australian Army Equipment Evaluation Mark Edwards, Alistair Furnell...Jemma Coleman and Sheena Davis Land Division Defence Science and Technology Organisation DSTO-TR-3006 ABSTRACT Anthropometry is the...Preliminary Anthropometry Standard for Australian Defence Force Army Equipment Evaluation Executive Summary Anthropometry is the

  9. Optics in gait analysis and anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Moreno, Alejandra Alicia

    2013-11-01

    Since antiquity, human gait has been studied to understand human movement, the kind of gait, in some cases, can cause musculoskeletal disorders or other health problems; in addition, also from antiquity, anthropometry has been important for the design of human items such as workspaces, tools, garments, among others. Nowadays, thanks to the development of optics and electronics, more accurate studies of gait and anthropometry can be developed. This work will describe the most important parameters for gait analysis, anthropometry and the optical systems used.

  10. Application of Digital Anthropometry for Craniofacial Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, Yasas S. N.; Zwahlen, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial anthropometry is an objective technique based on a series of measurements and proportions, which facilitate the characterization of phenotypic variation and quantification of dysmorphology. With the introduction of stereophotography, it is possible to acquire a lifelike three-dimensional (3D) image of the face with natural color and texture. Most of the traditional anthropometric landmarks can be identified on these 3D photographs using specialized software. Therefore, it has become possible to compute new digital measurements, which were not feasible with traditional instruments. The term “digital anthropometry” has been used by researchers based on such systems to separate their methods from conventional manual measurements. Anthropometry has been traditionally used as a research tool. With the advent of digital anthropometry, this technique can be employed in several disciplines as a noninvasive tool for quantifying facial morphology. The aim of this review is to provide a broad overview of digital anthropometry and discuss its clinical applications. PMID:25050146

  11. Photogrammetry procedures applied to anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimoto, Maria Lúcialeite Ribeiro; Klein, Alison Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the reliability and establish procedures for the use of digital photogrammetry in anthropometric measurements of the human hand. The methodology included the construction of a platform to allow the placement of the hand always equivalent to a distance of the camera lens and to annul the effects of parallax. We developed a software to perform the measurements from the images and built up a subject of proof in a cast from a negative mold, this object was subjected to measurements with digital photogrammetry using the data collection platform in caliper and the Coordinate Measuring Machine (MMC). The results of the application of photogrammetry in the data collection segment hand, allow us to conclude that photogrammetry is an effective presenting precision coefficient below 0.940. Within normal and acceptable values, given the magnitude of the data used in anthropometry. It was concluded photogrammetry then be reliable, accurate and efficient for carrying out anthropometric surveys of population, and presents less difficulty to collect in-place.

  12. "Oriental anthropometry" in plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senna-Fernandes Vasco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : According to Chinese medicine, the acupuncture-points′ (acupoints locations are proportionally and symmetrically distributed in well-defined compartment zones on the human body surface Oriental Anthropometry" (OA. Acupoints, if considered as aesthetic-loci, might be useful as reference guides in plastic surgery (PS. Aim: This study aimed to use aesthetic-loci as anatomical reference in surgical marking of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Method: This was an observational study based on aesthetic surgeries performed in private clinic. This study was based on 106 cases, comprising of 102 women and 4 men, with ages varying from 07 to 73 years, and with heights of between 1.34 m and 1.80 m. Patients were submitted to aesthetic surgical planning by relating aesthetic-loci to conventional surgical marking, including breast surgeries, abdominoplasty, rhytidoplasty, blepharoplasty, and hair implant. The aesthetic-surgical-outcome (ASO of the patients was assessed by a team of plastic surgeons (who were not involved in the surgical procedures over a follow-up period of one year by using a numeric-rating-scale in percentage (% terms. A four-point-verbal-rating-scale was used to record the patients′ opinion of therapeutic-satisfaction (TS. Results: ASO was 75.3 ± 9.4% and TS indicated that most patients (58.5% obtained "good" results. Of the remainder, 38.7% found the results "excellent", and 2.8% found them "fair". Discussion and Conclusion : The data suggested that the use of aesthetic-loci may be a useful tool for PS as an anatomical reference for surgical marking. However, further investigation is required to assess the efficacy of the OA by providing the patients more reliable balance and harmony in facial and body contours surgeries.

  13. Population Analysis: Communicating About Anthropometry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaxton, Sherry; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of communications about anthropometry and population analysis in particular for the design of aerospace systems. The difficulty of providing anthropometric accomodation an entire range of the population is reviewed, and the importance of communication of the issues with human system integration is emphasized, and the analysis of population as it applies to existing human factors methodologies is a novel way to assist with the communication. The issues of space suit design and anthropometry is reviewed as an example.

  14. the foundation of anthropometry and body composition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrition screening and assessment initiate the nutrition care process of individuals and groups and are also core in nutrition monitoring and evaluation.1 Anthropometry is an objective nutritional assessment method, and, in the case of infants and children, growth monitoring is also a sensitive indicator of health status.

  15. Anthropometry of young competitive sport rock climbers

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, P; Joubert, L; Lish, A; Mast, J; Wilkins, B

    2003-01-01

    Background: Adult elite competitive rock climbers are small in stature with low body mass and very low body fat percentage. These characteristics have generated concern that young climbers may attempt body mass reduction to extreme levels with adverse consequences for health and performance. No published anthropometry data for young competitive climbers exist.

  16. Anthropometry of the Medan - North Sumatera Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, I.; Sari, R. M.; Syahputri, K.; Rizkya, I.; Muchtar, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted on 780 students at a university in Medan, North Sumatra. The taken data is divided into two sub-groups, namely men and women, where the data of 343 men and women as many as 437 people. Taken anthropometry data is standing position, sitting position, hands, feet and body weight. This study presents statistical data in the form of standard deviation, average and percentiles. This research needs to be done because the population of the city of Medan is around 2,497,183 people, and Medan is the third largest city in Indonesia. The objectives this study is to collect the anthropometry data for ergonomics application and design product base on the customer need in Medan territory. Data retrieval is necessary because with this data is expected to be applied in the application of science of ergonomics, work station design, equipment design; tooling makes it convenient in everyday use.

  17. Anthropometry: Basic Studies ad Applications. Volume 1. 1964-1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    of cadaver dissection, anthropometry, radiography and cinetluoroscopy, photogrammetric, and computer analysis. Seventy-two antnropoaetric...harness), Males, Mobility, Radiography , photogrammetry, Spinal column, Head, Motion, Statistical analysis, Positioning reactions. Programming...Anatomy), Thorax , Vulnerability, Design standards, Impact tests, Performance standards, Evaluation, Acceleration, Motion, Anthropometry

  18. Anthropometry of an aging work force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, J F; Case, H W; Clauser, C E; Bradtmiller, B

    1991-01-01

    Faced with an aging labor force, industrial planners are worried about the possible need to redesign jobs and workspaces in the future. One area of concern is the changes that occur in body size characteristics as people age. Although no true database for the anthropometry of the American worker exists, available surveys and studies that include older individuals (40 to 70 years), and errors associated with these studies, are discussed. Using sample mean values from selected cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, the changes in weight and selected body dimensions are traced from the third to the eighth decade of life. As a practical exercise, age-associated changes in a number of workspace dimensions are tested against recommended design values for seated work stations. While acknowledging the need for flexibility in future workplace designs the authors conclude that age-related changes in body size are insufficient in themselves to justify the resizing of existing ergonomically-designed workplaces.

  19. Anthropometry and it application in ergonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Romelio Rodriguez-Añez

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometry, is the branch of the human science that studies the physical measurement of the human body, particularly size and shape. Ergonomics is the science of work: of the people who do it and the way it is done; the tools and equipment they use, the places they work in, and the psychological aspects of the working environment. In a simplifi ed way can be understood as the adaptation of work to man. One characteristic of the ergonomic is its interdisciplinarity; since it is based on many different areas of knowledge. Anthropometry has a special importance because of the emergence of complex work systems where knowledge of the physicaldimensions of man with accuracy is important. One application of anthropometrical measurement in ergonomics is the design of working space and the development of industrialized products such as furnishing, cars, tools, etc. With advances in technology, the precision and automation of measurement techniques will increase, improving definition of human size, and the mechanics of workspaces, clothing and equipment. A well-developed tool will perform better in a worker’s hand without injuring his bodily structures. On the other hand, anthropometric data is only meaningful if the workers’ activities are also analyzed. RESUMO A antropometria é o ramo das ciências humanas que estuda as medidas do corpo, particularmente o tamanho e a forma. A ergonomia é a ciência do trabalho e envolve: as pessoas que o fazem, a forma como é feito, as ferramentas e equipamentos que elas usam, os lugares em que elas trabalham e os aspectos psicossociais nas situações de trabalho. De forma bastante simplifi cada, pode ser entendida como a adaptação do trabalho ao homem. Uma característica da ergonomia é a sua interdisciplinaridade, pois diversas áreas do conhecimento lhe dão sustentação. A antropometria assumiu uma importância especial com o surgimento dos sistemas complexos de trabalho onde o conhecimento das

  20. [Body composition assessment by anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizábal, Juan Carlos; Restrepo, María Teresa; Estrada, Alejandro

    2007-06-01

    Anthropometry and electric impedance methods are widely used for body composition assessment. However the evidence is unclear whether the results obtained from the two methods can be compared. Two methods are compared for assessment of body composition; anthropometry and electric impedance. Body composition was measured in 70 women; aged 22 to 56 and 53 men; aged 24 to 54, using anthropometry (Durning/Womersley and Jackson/Pollock skinfolds equations) and electric impedance (foot to foot electric impedance) to obtain percentage body fat. The mean percentage body fat was significant higher with Durning/Womersley (25.2%) than Jackson/Pollock (20.1%) and electric impedance (19.3%) for men (pimpedance (27.6%) for women (p0.77) however, the concordance between methods to classify obesity subjects was low (Kbioelectrical impedance method. A significant difference was found between methods applied in men and women, and therefore these methods are not comparable.

  1. Validity of self-reported anthropometry in adult Mexican women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ortiz-Panozo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare direct and self-reported anthro­pometry in Mexican women. Materials and methods. Women aged 30-72 years, participating in the Mexican Teach­ers’ Cohort, completed a questionnaire with their anthropo­metric data in 2006-2008. After eleven months (median time, technicians performed anthropometry in 3 756 participants. We calculated correlations and multivariable-adjusted mean differences between direct and self-reported anthropomet­ric measures. Results. Correlations between direct and self-reported anthropometric measures ranged from 0.78 (waist circumference to 0.93 (weight. On average, women over-reported their height by 2.2 cm and underreported their weight, body mass index (BMI and waist and hip circumfer­ences by 1.3 kg, 1.3 kg/m2, 1.8 cm and 1.9 cm, respectively. Errors in self-reported anthropometry increased with rising measured BMI and were also independently associated with age, education and socioeconomic status. Conclusion. Self-reported anthropometry is sufficiently valid for epide­miological purposes in adult Mexican women. Errors in self-reported anthropometry might result in underestimation of the prevalence of overweight and obesity.

  2. Longitudinal Changes in Anthropometry and Body Composition in University Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hootman, Katie C.; Guertin, Kristin A.; Cassano, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We investigated predictors of weight gain in college freshmen. Participants: A longitudinal cohort study followed a representative sample of freshmen (N = 264) from 8/2011 to 6/2012. Methods: Repeated measurements of anthropometry, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), physical activity, and diet were collected. We investigated…

  3. A survey of anthropometry and physical accommodation in ergonomics curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, Christopher J; Parkinson, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    The size and shape of users are an important consideration for many products and environments. Designers and engineers in many disciplines must often accommodate these attributes to meet objectives such as fit and safety. When practitioners have academic training in addressing these issues, it is typically through courses in Human Factors/Ergonomics (HF/E). This paper investigates education related to physical accommodation and offers suggestions for improvement. A survey was conducted wherein 21 instructors at 18 universities in the United States provided syllabi for 29 courses, which were analysed to determine topics related to anthropometry and resources used for the courses. The results show that within the U.S., anthropometry is covered in the majority of courses discussing physical ergonomics, but important related concepts were often omitted (e.g., digital human modelling, multivariate accommodation and variability across global populations). Curricula could be improved by incorporating more accurate anthropometry, multivariate problems and interactive online tools. This paper describes a study investigating collegiate ergonomics courses within the U.S. in the area of physical accommodation. Course schedules and texts were studied for their treatment of several topics related to accommodating the spatial requirements (anthropometry) of users. Recommendations are made for improving course curricula.

  4. Breastfeeding pattern, anthropometry and health status of infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breastfeeding pattern, anthropometry and health status of infants attending child welfare clinics of a teaching hospital in Nigeria. ... Maternal older age, multiparity and delivery at a government health facility were positively associated with higher rates of EBF (p < 0.05). Only 110 (48.2%) babies were put to the breast ...

  5. Adipose tissue fatty acid patterns and changes in anthropometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahm, Christina Catherine; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre

    2011-01-01

    Diets rich in n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), but low in n-6 LC-PUFA and 18:1 trans-fatty acids (TFA), may lower the risk of overweight and obesity. These fatty acids have often been investigated individually. We explored associations between global patterns in adipose tissu...... fatty acids and changes in anthropometry....

  6. Nasofacial Anthropometry of Adult Bini Tribe In Nigeria | Omotoso ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation is a common phenomenon in the physiognomy of humans. Therefore, physical anthropometry provides the techniques to assess human body dimensions and to describe morphological variations that exist among different human population. This study was conducted to describe the physical morphometric ...

  7. Three-dimensional surface anthropometry: Applications to the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter R. M.; Rioux, Marc

    1997-09-01

    Anthropometry is the study of the measurement of the human body. By tradition this has been carried out taking the measurements from body surface landmarks, such as circumferences and breadths, using simple instruments like tape measures and calipers. Three-dimensional (3D) surface anthropometry enables us to extend the study to 3D geometry and morphology of mainly external human body tissues. It includes the acquisition, indexing, transmission, archiving, retrieval, interrogation and analysis of body size, shape, and surface together with their variability throughout growth and development to adulthood. While 3D surface anthropometry surveying is relatively new, anthropometric surveying using traditional tools, such as calipers and tape measures, is not. Recorded studies of the human form date back to ancient times. Since at least the 17th century 1 investigators have made attempts to measure the human body for physical properties such as weight, size, and centre of mass. Martin documented 'standard' body measurement methods in a handbook in 1928. 2 This paper reviews the past and current literature devoted to the applications of 3D anthropometry because true 3D scanning of the complete human body is fast becoming a reality. We attempt to take readers through different forms of technology which deal with simple forms of projected light to the more complex advanced forms of laser and video technology giving low and/or high resolution 3D data. Information is also given about image capture of size and shape of the whole as well as most component parts of the human body. In particular, the review describes with explanations a multitude of applications, for example, medical, product design, human engineering, anthropometry and ergonomics etc.

  8. Comparison of current ATDs with Chinese adults in anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Libo; Zhang, Kai; Lv, Xin; Yan, Lingbo

    2016-05-18

    Crash test dummies are full-scale anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) that simulate the dimensions, weight proportions, and articulation of the human body and are used to measure human injury potential in vehicle crashes. The Hybrid III dummy family, which is widely used currently, takes selected percentiles of anthropometry dimensions of U.S. adults as design references. The objective of this study was to assess the difference in anthropometry between Chinese adults and the currently used dummy. Based on the Chinese National Physical Fitness Surveillance of the year 2000, 2005, 2010 and National Standard of China GB/T 10000-1988, a series of anthropometric parameters for Chinese adults were obtained, and data analysis was conducted between Chinese adults and ATDs that are currently used. The comparison revealed distinct anthropometric difference between ATDs and Chinese adults. Based on the latest data, median Chinese females were about 2.6% lower in stature and about 8.03% lower in body weight than the ATD design targets. Similarly, median Chinese males were about 3.48% shorter and weighed 11.89% less than the ATD design targets. Although the anthropometric differences between Chinese adults and the Hybrid III ATD specifications were modest and growing smaller, it is advisable to take the differences in anthropometry between ATDs and Chinese adults into consideration when developing new vehicles in China to provide effective protection specifically for Chinese occupants.

  9. The role of anthropometry in designing for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadadur, Gopal; Parkinson, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of human factors and ergonomics facilitates the design of artefacts, tasks and environments that fulfil their users' physical and cognitive requirements. Research in these fields furthers the goal of efficiently accommodating the desired percentage of user populations through enhanced awareness and modelling of human variability. Design for sustainability (DfS) allows for these concepts to be leveraged in the broader context of designing to minimise negative impacts on the environment. This paper focuses on anthropometry and proposes three ways in which its consideration is relevant to DfS: reducing raw material consumption, increasing usage lifetimes and ethical human resource considerations. This is demonstrated through the application of anthropometry synthesis, virtual fitting, and sizing and adjustability allocation methods in the design of an industrial workstation seat for use in five distinct global populations. This work highlights the importance of and opportunities for using ergonomic design principles in DfS efforts. This research demonstrates the relevance of some anthropometry-based ergonomics concepts to the field of design for sustainability. A global design case study leverages human variability considerations in furthering three sustainable design goals: reducing raw material consumption, increasing usage lifetimes and incorporating ethical human resource considerations in design.

  10. School furniture match to students' anthropometry in the Gaza Strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Salah R

    2010-03-01

    This study aimed at comparing primary school students' anthropometry to the dimensions of school furniture and determining whether the furniture used matches the students' anthropometry. A sample of 600 male students, whose ages were between 6 and 11 years, from five primary schools in the Gaza Strip governorates participated in the study. Several students' body dimensions were measured. The dimensions measured included elbow-seat height, shoulder height, knee height, popliteal height and buttock-popliteal length. Measurements of the dimensions of the classroom furniture indicated that there was a considerable mismatch between the students' body dimensions and the classroom furniture. The mismatches in seat height, seat depth and desk height occurred for 99% of the students, while the mismatch for the back rest height was only 35%. Two design specifications were proposed in order to decrease the mismatch percentage based on the data obtained. The two proposed designs showed a considerable improvement in the match percentages as compared to the existing design. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Having identified mismatches between the dimensions of the school furniture used in primary schools in the Gaza Strip, two new design specifications are proposed and shown to improve match with the students' anthropometric dimensions. The findings of the study are also an important addition to local knowledge on school children's anthropometry.

  11. Detecting Key Inter-Joint Distances and Anthropometry Effects for Static Gesture Development using Microsoft Kinect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    AND ANTHROPOMETRY EFFECTS FOR STATIC GESTURE DEVELOPMENT USING MICROSOFT KINECT BY MICHAEL A. HAMILTON PATRICK MEAD RACHAEL LUND JAKE...DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Sep 2013–30 Sep 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Detecting Key Inter-Joint Distances and Anthropometry Effects for Static Gesture...prediction accuracy of 97 percent. 15. SUBJECT TERMS gestures anthropometry ANOVA Tukey 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  12. Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource (CAESAR), Final Report. Volume 1. Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinette, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    The Civilian Americana and European Surface Anthropometry Resource (CAESAR) project was a survey of the civilian populations of three countries representing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries...

  13. Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource (CAESAR). Volume II: Descriptions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blackwell, Sherri

    2002-01-01

    The Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource (CAESAR) project was a survey of the civilian populations of three countries representing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries...

  14. Anthropometry in relation to prostate cancer risk in the Netherlands : cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.G.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Dorant, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2000-01-01

    In the Netherlands Cohort Study, the authors investigated whether anthropometry is associated with prostate cancer risk. At baseline in 1986, 58,279 men aged 55-69 years completed a self- administered questionnaire on diet, anthropometry, and other risk factors for cancer. After 6.3 years of

  15. The influence of anthropometry and body composition on children's bone health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Malene; Holst, René; Schou, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    anthropometry and BC predict the development of the bone accruement. The longitudinal study is a part of The CHAMPS study-DK. Children were DXA scanned at baseline and at 2-year follow-up. BC (LM, BF %) and BMC, BMD and BA were measured. The relationship between bone traits, anthropometry and BC was analysed...

  16. Image analysis software versus direct anthropometry for breast measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quieregatto, Paulo Rogério; Hochman, Bernardo; Furtado, Fabianne; Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Sabino Neto, Miguel; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2014-10-01

    To compare breast measurements performed using the software packages ImageTool(r), AutoCAD(r) and Adobe Photoshop(r) with direct anthropometric measurements. Points were marked on the breasts and arms of 40 volunteer women aged between 18 and 60 years. When connecting the points, seven linear segments and one angular measurement on each half of the body, and one medial segment common to both body halves were defined. The volunteers were photographed in a standardized manner. Photogrammetric measurements were performed by three independent observers using the three software packages and compared to direct anthropometric measurements made with calipers and a protractor. Measurements obtained with AutoCAD(r) were the most reproducible and those made with ImageTool(r) were the most similar to direct anthropometry, while measurements with Adobe Photoshop(r) showed the largest differences. Except for angular measurements, significant differences were found between measurements of line segments made using the three software packages and those obtained by direct anthropometry. AutoCAD(r) provided the highest precision and intermediate accuracy; ImageTool(r) had the highest accuracy and lowest precision; and Adobe Photoshop(r) showed intermediate precision and the worst accuracy among the three software packages.

  17. Maternal Anthropometry and Mammographic Density in Adult Daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Karin B; Cohn, Barbara A; Goldberg, Mandy; Flom, Julie D; Dougan, Marcelle; Terry, Mary Beth

    2016-11-01

    We examined the relation between maternal anthropometry and mammographic density in the adult daughter using prospectively collected data. Our study included a total of 700 mother-daughter dyads participating in an adult follow-up of women born in 2 US birth cohorts: the Child Health and Development Study and the Boston, Massachusetts, and Providence, Rhode Island sites of the National Collaborative Perinatal Project. We observed an increased percent breast density at a mean age of 43.1 years in the daughters of mothers who gained 5 kg or less during pregnancy compared with mother-daughter pairs in which the mother gained 5 to 10 kg (β = 4.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.0 to 8.6). The daughters of mothers who were overweight at the time of conception (prepregnancy BMI ≥25) and who gained >5 kg during pregnancy had a lower percent density (β = -3.2, 95% confidence interval: -6.2 to -0.2) compared with mothers with a BMI 5 kg. We did not find any strong and consistent patterns between maternal anthropometry and the daughter's breast density, a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. A modest association between low gestational weight gain and increased breast density 40 years later in the daughter was observed, even after accounting for adult body size, and if confirmed, possible mechanisms need to be further elucidated. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Validating Paediatric Morphometrics: body proportion measurement using photogrammetric anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Bas; Brecheisen, Ralph; Gerver, Angèle; van Zonneveld, Geertjan; Gerver, Willem-Jan

    2015-11-01

    Taking multiple anthropometric measurements for the description of body proportions in an accurate way is a time-consuming procedure that requires specific tools and skills. This is why we developed an alternative method based on digital photography for taking these measurements which is faster and easier to use, to make anthropometry more user-friendly and approachable to paediatricians. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 54 children between 2 and 18 years of age. We compared manual measurements with photogrammetric measurements to validate our method. Inter-observer correlations of all measurements are ≥0.96 and mean differences are 0.3-0.9 cm, except for arm span. Comparison of manual to photogrammetric measurements shows mean differences of 0.6-1.3 cm, with correlations ≥0.92, except for sitting height and arm span. Correlations of ratios between methods are height/sitting height (r=0.77), biacromium/biiliacum (r=0.74) and subischial leg length/sitting height (r=0.75). Photogrammetric anthropometry is faster, easier to use and provides the paediatrician with more flexibility as taking the digital photographs and performing the analysis are separated.

  19. The affecting factors of breast anthropometry in Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sa Jin; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Min-Jeong

    2014-03-01

    Breast anthropometric morphology affects various factors with diverse physiognomy, making accurate measurements very difficult. The aim of this study was to measure the female breast using anthropometry and to use this method on normal subjects to examine breast asymmetry and consider the influence of age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), parity, delivery mode, and breastfeeding in premenopausal Korean women. In total, 17 parameters of breast were measured with participants in a standing position. Breast volume was also assessed. The mean values of the right and left breast volumes were calculated as 386.0±342.5 mL and 393.3±347.2 mL, respectively. With aging, the height of women decreased, but the weight, BMI, upper chest, middle chest, lower chest, waist, and hip widths, nipple-nipple length, and ptosis increased with statistical significance. No asymmetric differences were observed between each breast, except for nipple-inframammary fold length in 20-30-year-old women and upper arm length in 41-50-year-old women. In our study, the breast volume increased with age as a result of weight gain, but the delivery mode and breastfeeding did not affect anthropometric breast measurements. In conclusion, age, weight, and BMI are important factors in determining breast anthropometry in our study. The results of the present study will help in the comparison of the anthropometric breast values of Korean women with those of women in other countries and may also be useful in the understanding of breast physiologic change-related obstetrical factors and epidemiologic factors.

  20. Correlations Between Anthropometry and Lipid Profile in Women With PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiranmayee, Donthu; Kavya, Kothapalli; Himabindu, Yalamanchali; Sriharibabu, Manne; Madhuri, Gadi Leela Jaya; Venu, Swargam

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in reproductive age women and is associated with both reproductive and metabolic abnormalities. Recent studies have demonstrated an early onset of abnormal cardiovascular risk profile in women with PCOS. Abnormal lipid profile patterns are common in women with PCOS, and these abnormalities are not uniform in all populations. Anthropometry is a simple and commonly used research tool for assessing metabolic risk in women with PCOS. Therefore, this study examined the correlations between anthropometric parameters and lipid profile in women with PCOS. The objectives of the study were (1) To study the anthropometric profile of women with PCOS, (2) To examine the lipid profile pattern of these women with PCOS and (3) To see whether there exists any correlation between these anthropometric parameters and lipid profile. This observational cross-sectional study examined anthropometry and lipid profile in 86 married women with PCOS in the age group of 18-35 years and correlated them by using Pearson's correlation coefficient. More than 80% of the women with PCOS demonstrated abnormal anthropometric parameters, and in more than 70% women, lipid abnormalities such as low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and high levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were observed. Significant positive correlations were seen between body mass index (BMI) and triglycerides ( P ≤ 0.001) and waist circumference (WC) and triglycerides ( P ≤ 0.029). Negative correlations were observed between BMI and HDL cholesterol ( P ≤ 0.013). This study revealed that BMI and WC are the most important anthropometric parameters correlated to dyslipidemia in the south Indian women with PCOS.

  1. Anthropometry and body composition of south Indian babies at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthayya, S; Dwarkanath, P; Thomas, T; Vaz, M; Mhaskar, A; Mhaskar, R; Thomas, A; Bhat, S; Kurpad, Av

    2006-10-01

    To assess the consequences on body composition of increasing birth weight in Indian babies in relation to reported values in Western babies, and to assess the relationship between maternal and neonatal anthropometry and body composition. Prospective observational study. Bangalore City, India. A total of 712 women were recruited at 12.5+/-3.1 weeks of gestation (mean+/-standard deviation, SD) and followed up until delivery; 14.5% were lost to follow-up. Maternal body weight, height, mid upper-arm circumference and skinfold thicknesses were measured at recruitment. Weight and body composition of the baby (skinfold thicknesses, mid upper-arm circumference, derived arm fat index and arm muscle index; AFI and AMI, respectively) were measured at birth in hospital. The mean+/-SD birth weight of all newborns was 2.80+/-0.44 kg. Birth weight was significantly related to the triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness of the baby. In a small number of babies with large birth weight for gestational age, there was a relatively higher normalised AFI relative to AMI than for babies with lower or appropriate birth weight for gestational age. Maternal height and fat-free mass were significantly associated with the baby's length at birth. Skinfold thicknesses in Indian babies were similar to those reported in a Western population with comparable birth weights, and the relationship of AFI to birth weight appeared to be steeper in Indian babies. Thus, measures to increase birth weight in Indian babies should take into account possible adverse consequences on body composition. There were no significant relationships between maternal anthropometry and body composition at birth on multivariate analysis, except for sum of the baby's skinfold thicknesses and maternal fat-free mass (P<0.02).

  2. Improving the quality of child anthropometry: Manual anthropometry in the Body Imaging for Nutritional Assessment Study (BINA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkle, Joel; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Flores-Ayala, Rafael; Suchdev, Parminder S; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2017-01-01

    Anthropometric data collected in clinics and surveys are often inaccurate and unreliable due to measurement error. The Body Imaging for Nutritional Assessment Study (BINA) evaluated the ability of 3D imaging to correctly measure stature, head circumference (HC) and arm circumference (MUAC) for children under five years of age. This paper describes the protocol for and the quality of manual anthropometric measurements in BINA, a study conducted in 2016-17 in Atlanta, USA. Quality was evaluated by examining digit preference, biological plausibility of z-scores, z-score standard deviations, and reliability. We calculated z-scores and analyzed plausibility based on the 2006 WHO Child Growth Standards (CGS). For reliability, we calculated intra- and inter-observer Technical Error of Measurement (TEM) and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). We found low digit preference; 99.6% of z-scores were biologically plausible, with z-score standard deviations ranging from 0.92 to 1.07. Total TEM was 0.40 for stature, 0.28 for HC, and 0.25 for MUAC in centimeters. ICC ranged from 0.99 to 1.00. The quality of manual measurements in BINA was high and similar to that of the anthropometric data used to develop the WHO CGS. We attributed high quality to vigorous training, motivated and competent field staff, reduction of non-measurement error through the use of technology, and reduction of measurement error through adequate monitoring and supervision. Our anthropometry measurement protocol, which builds on and improves upon the protocol used for the WHO CGS, can be used to improve anthropometric data quality. The discussion illustrates the need to standardize anthropometric data quality assessment, and we conclude that BINA can provide a valuable evaluation of 3D imaging for child anthropometry because there is comparison to gold-standard, manual measurements.

  3. Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility Presentation to Open EVA Research Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2017-01-01

    NASA is required to accommodate individuals who fall within a 1st to 99th percentile range on a variety of critical dimensions. The hardware the crew interacts with must therefore be designed and verified to allow these selected individuals to complete critical mission tasks safely and at an optimal performance level. Until now, designers have been provided simpler univariate critical dimensional analyses. The multivariate characteristics of intra-individual and inter-individual size variation must be accounted for, since an individual who is 1st percentile in one body dimension will not be 1st percentile in all other dimensions. A more simplistic approach, assuming every measurement of an individual will fall within the same percentile range, can lead to a model that does not represent realistic members of the population. In other words, there is no '1st percentile female' or '99th percentile male', and designing for these unrealistic body types can lead to hardware issues down the road. Furthermore, due to budget considerations, designers are normally limited to providing only 1 size of a prototype suit, thus requiring other possible means to ensure that a given suit architecture would yield the necessary suit sizes to accommodate the entire user population. Fortunately, modeling tools can be used to more accurately model the types of human body sizes and shapes that will be encountered in a population. Anthropometry toolkits have been designed with a variety of capabilities, including grouping the population into clusters based on critical dimensions, providing percentile information given test subject measurements, and listing measurement ranges for critical dimensions in the 1st-99th percentile range. These toolkits can be combined with full body laser scans to allow designers to build human models that better represent the astronaut population. More recently, some rescaling and reposing capabilities have been developed, to allow reshaping of these static

  4. Anthropometry of external auditory canal by non-contactable measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Wang, Ren-Hung; Chen, Yen-Sheng; Fan, Chun-Chieh; Peng, Ying-Chin; Tu, Tsung-Hsien; Chen, Ching-I; Lin, Kuei-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Human ear canals cannot be measured directly with existing general measurement tools. Furthermore, general non-contact optical methods can only conduct simple peripheral measurements of the auricle and cannot obtain the internal ear canal shape-related measurement data. Therefore, this study uses the computed tomography (CT) technology to measure the geometric shape of the ear canal and the shape of the ear canal using a non-invasive method, and to complete the anthropometry of external auditory canal. The results of the study show that the average height and width of ear canal openings, and the average depth of the first bend for men are generally longer, wider and deeper than those for women. In addition, the difference between the height and width of the ear canal opening is about 40% (p < 0.05). Hence, the circular cross-section shape of the earplugs should be replaced with an elliptical cross-section shape during manufacturing for better fitting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  5. System for routine surface anthropometry using reprojection registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, R. J.; Owens, R. A.; Hartmann, P. E.

    2003-11-01

    Range data measurement can be usefully applied to non-invasive monitoring of anthropometric changes due to disease, healing or during normal physiological processes. We have developed a computer vision system that allows routine capture of biological surface shapes and accurate measurement of anthropometric changes, using a structured light stripe triangulation system. In many applications involving relocation of soft tissue for image-guided surgery or anthropometry it is neither accurate nor practical to apply fiducial markers directly to the body. This system features a novel method of achieving subject re-registration that involves application of fiducials by a standard data projector. Calibration of this reprojector is achieved using a variation of structured lighting techniques. The method allows accurate and comparable repositioning of elastic surfaces. Tests of repositioning using the reprojector found a significant improvement in subject registration compared to an earlier method which used video overlay comparison only. It has a current application to the measurement of breast volume changes in lactating mothers, but may be extended to any application where repeatable positioning and measurement is required.

  6. Assessment of Child Anthropometry in a Large Epidemiologic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louer, Amy L; Simon, Denise N; Switkowski, Karen M; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Gillman, Matthew W; Oken, Emily

    2017-02-02

    A high proportion of children have overweight and obesity in the United States and other countries. Accurate assessment of anthropometry is essential to understand health effects of child growth and adiposity. Gold standard methods of measuring adiposity, such as dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), may not be feasible in large field studies. Research staff can, however, complete anthropometric measurements, such as body circumferences and skinfold measurements, using inexpensive portable equipment. In this protocol we detail how to obtain manual anthropometric measurements from children, including standing and sitting height, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, mid-upper arm circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, and subscapular skinfold thickness, and procedures to assess the quality of these measurements. To demonstrate accuracy of these measurements, among 1,110 school-aged children in the pre-birth cohort Project Viva we calculated Spearman correlation coefficients comparing manual anthropometric measurements with a gold standard measure of body fat, DXA fat mass 1 . To address reliability, we evaluate intra-rater technical error of measurement at a quality control session conducted on adult female volunteers.

  7. Fetal metabolic influences of neonatal anthropometry and adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Jean M; Lindsay, Karen L; Walsh, Jennifer M; Horan, Mary; Molloy, Eleanor J; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2015-11-10

    Large for gestational age infants have an increased risk of obesity, cardiovascular and metabolic complications during life. Knowledge of the key predictive factors of neonatal adiposity is required to devise targeted antenatal interventions. Our objective was to determine the fetal metabolic factors that influence regional neonatal adiposity in a cohort of women with previous large for gestational age offspring. Data from the ROLO [Randomised COntrol Trial of LOw Glycaemic Index in Pregnancy] study were analysed in the ROLO Kids study. Neonatal anthropometric and skinfold measurements were compared with fetal leptin and C-peptide results from cord blood in 185 cases. Analyses were performed to examine the association between these metabolic factors and birthweight, anthropometry and markers of central and generalised adiposity. Fetal leptin was found to correlate with birthweight, general adiposity and multiple anthropometric measurements. On multiple regression analysis, fetal leptin remained significantly associated with adiposity, independent of gender, maternal BMI, gestational age or study group assignment, while fetal C-peptide was no longer significant. Fetal leptin may be an important predictor of regional neonatal adiposity. Interventional studies are required to assess the impact of neonatal adiposity on the subsequent risk of childhood obesity and to determine whether interventions which reduce circulating leptin levels have a role to play in improving neonatal adiposity measures.

  8. A standardized nomenclature for craniofacial and facial anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Jodi; Stephan, Carl N

    2016-05-01

    Standardized terms and methods have long been recognized as crucial to reduce measurement error and increase reliability in anthropometry. The successful prior use of craniometric landmarks makes extrapolation of these landmarks to the soft tissue context, as analogs, intuitive for forensic craniofacial analyses and facial photogrammetry. However, this extrapolation has not, so far, been systematic. Instead, varied nomenclature and definitions exist for facial landmarks, and photographic analyses are complicated by the generalization of 3D craniometric landmarks to the 2D face space where analogy is subsequently often lost, complicating anatomical assessments. For example, landmarks requiring palpation of the skull or the examination of the 3D surface typology are impossible to legitimately position; similar applies to median landmarks not visible in lateral photographs. To redress these issues without disposing of the craniometric framework that underpins many facial landmarks, we provide an updated and transparent nomenclature for facial description. This nomenclature maintains the original craniometric intent (and base abbreviations) but provides clear distinction of ill-defined (quasi) landmarks in photographic contexts, as produced when anatomical points are subjectively inferred from shape-from-shading information alone.

  9. Relationships Between Propulsion and Anthropometry in Paralympic Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingley, Andrew A; Pyne, David B; Burkett, Brendan

    2015-11-01

    To characterize relationships between propulsion, anthropometry, and performance in Paralympic swimming. A cross-sectional study of swimmers (13 male, 15 female) age 20.5 ± 4.4 y was conducted. Subject locomotor categorizations were no physical disability (n = 8, classes S13-S14) and low-severity (n = 11, classes S9-S10) or midseverity disability (n = 9, classes S6-S8). Full anthropometric profiles estimated muscle mass and body fat, a bilateral swim-bench ergometer quantified upper-body power production, and 100-m time trials quantified swimming performance. Correlations between ergometer mean power and swimming performance increased with degree of physical disability (low-severity male r = .65, ± 0.56, and female r = .68, ± 0.64; midseverity, r = .87, ± 0.41, and r = .79, ± 0.75). The female midseverity group showed nearperfect (positive) relationships for taller swimmers' (with a greater muscle mass and longer arm span) swimming faster, while for female no- and low-severity-disability groups, greater muscle mass was associated with slower velocity (r = .78, ± 0.43, and r = .65, ± 0.66). This was supported with lighter females (with less frontal surface area) in the low-severity group being faster (r = .94, ± 0.24). In a gender contrast, low-severity males with less muscle mass (r = -.64, ± 0.56), high skinfolds (r = .78, ± 0.43), a longer arm span (r = .58, ± 0.60) or smaller frontal surface area (r = -.93, ± 0.19) were detrimental to swimming-velocity production. Low-severity male and midseverity female Paralympic swimmers should be encouraged to develop muscle mass and upper-body power to enhance swimming performance. The generalized anthropometric measures appear to be a secondary consideration for coaches.

  10. ANTHROPOMETRY TO IDENTIFY HIGH VISCERAL FAT AREA IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim Pitanga, Francisco José; Seara Pitanga, Cristiano Penas; Calçada Dias Gabriel, Ronaldo Eugénio; Cristina Beck, Carmem; Rodrigues Moreira, Maria Helena

    2015-12-01

    the evaluation of the body fat distribution by anthropometry can serve to identify excess visceral fat. This diagnosis will enable implementation of specific measures to both prevent and treat excess visceral fat in postmenopausal women. the aim of this study was to analyze different anthropometric indicators and identify the best cutoff points to discriminate subjects with high visceral fat area (HVFA) in postmenopausal women. cross-sectional study with a sample of 255 postmenopausal women. Different Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and the areas under them compared in terms of the conicity index (C-index), body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist circumference (WC), weight-to-height ratio (WHtR) and HVFA. Sensitivity and specificity identified the best cutoff points between the different anthropometric indicators in order to discriminate subjects with HVFA. The confidence interval was set at 95%. statistically significant areas under the ROC curve were found for all anthropometric indicators analyzed. The following cutoff points, with their respective sensitivities and specificities to discriminate subjects with HVFA, were suggested: C-index (1.19; 75.00%- 74.77%); BMI (27.3 kg/m2; 81.08%-80.37%); WHR (0.98; 90.54%-83.18%); WC (85 cm; 85.14%-81.31%); and WHtR (0.55; 80.41%-80.37%). these results demonstrate that anthropometric indicators identify HVFA well in postmenopausal women and can be used instead of more sophisticated exams to detect high levels of visceral fat. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. Maternal stress and neonatal anthropometry: the NICHD Fetal Growth Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Deborah A; Ortega-Villa, Ana M; Grobman, William A; Hediger, Mary L; Grewal, Jagteshwar; Pugh, Sarah J; Kim, Sungduk; Newman, Roger; Chien, Ed; Owen, John; D'Alton, Mary E; Wapner, Ronald; Sciscione, Anthony; Albert, Paul S; Grantz, Katherine L

    2017-07-01

    The effect of maternal mood disorders on neonatal measurements is not well-defined. The Fetal Growth Studies-Singletons provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the relationship between perceived maternal stress and neonatal growth measurements. The purpose of this study was to determine whether perceived maternal stress during pregnancy is associated with anthropometric measurements in the neonate. This analysis was based on a prospective, multicenter longitudinal study of fetal growth. Women 18-40 years old with a body mass index of 19.0-29.9 kg/m 2 were screened at 8+0 to 13+6 weeks gestation for low-risk status associated with optimal fetal growth (eg, healthy, nonsmoking) and underwent serial sonographic examination at 6 study visits throughout gestation. At each study visit, women completed the Cohen's Perceived Stress Survey, which could have a score that ranges from 0-40. We used a latent class trajectory model to identify distinct groupings (ie, classes) of the Perceived Stress Survey trajectories over pregnancy. Trend analysis was used to determine whether neonatal measurements including birthweight, length, head circumference, and abdominal circumference differed by Perceived Stress Survey class and whether this relationship was modified by maternal race/ethnicity, after adjustment for gestational age at delivery, maternal height, age, and parity. Of the 2334 women enrolled in the study, 1948 women had complete neonatal anthropometry and were included in the analysis. Latent class analysis identified 3 Perceived Stress Survey trajectory classes, with mean Perceived Stress Survey scores of 2.82 (low), 7.95 (medium), and 14.80 (high). Neonatal anthropometric measures of birthweight, length, head circumference and abdominal circumference were similar (P=.78, =.10, =.18, and =.40 respectively), regardless of the participants' Perceived Stress Survey class. There was no effect modification by maternal race/ethnicity. Neonatal measurements did not differ by

  12. Gender Differences in NATO Anthropometry and the Implication for Protective Equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fullenkamp, Adam M.; Robinette, Kathleen; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the body proportions of men and women from the Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource (CAESAR) project, completed in 2002, and discusses proportions that have implications for protective apparel. CAESAR was an attempt to characterize the body size and shape

  13. Arm anthropometry indices in Turkish children and adolescents: changes over a three-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçek, Betül; Öztürk, Ahmet; Mazıcıoğlu, Mustafa Mümtaz; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2014-12-01

    Time-related changes and comparisons for mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), arm fat area (AFA) are lacking for Turkish children and adolescents. To determine the arm anthropometry indices (MUAC, TSF, AFA) in children and adolescents and to also assess the changes in these indices over a 3-year time period. The data of the Anthropometry of Turkish Children Aged 0-6 Years (ATCA-06) study and the Second Study of Determination of the Anthropometric Measurements of Turkish Children and Adolescents (DAMTCA-II) were used to calculate the arm anthropometry percentiles in a total group of 6982 children and adolescents aged 28 days to 17 years. The 3rd-97th percentiles were computed by the LMS method. In girls, 50th percentile MUAC values linearly increased with age. In boys, 50th percentile TSF values linearly increased until 10 years of age and decreased after age 11 years, while in girls, TSF values increased linearly with age. 50th percentile values for AFA showed a linear increase in both genders with age. Significant differences were found between the 5th, 50th and 95th percentile values for MUAC and AFA obtained in the two studies (DAMTCA-II and DAMTCA-I) in both boys and girls. The prominent finding was the significant and alarming increase in arm anthropometry indices in both genders within as short period of time as three years.

  14. Moderate Association of Anthropometry, but Not Training Volume, with Race Performance in Male Ultraendurance Cyclists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In 28 male Caucasian nonprofessional ultracyclists, we investigated whether anthropometry or training volume had an influence on race speed in the 600 km at the Swiss Cycling Marathon 2007. Anthropometric parameters (age, body mass, body height, skinfold thicknesses) were determined before the race to calculate body mass index and percent body…

  15. Anthropometry as a predictor of vertical jump heights derived from an instrumented platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, John F; Daily, Jeremy S; Mason, Melissa L; Shepherd, Catherine M; McLagan, Jessica R; Marshall, Mallory R; Walker, Ron H; West, Jason O

    2012-01-01

    The current study purpose examined the vertical height-anthropometry relationship with jump data obtained from an instrumented platform. Our methods required college-aged (n = 177) subjects to make 3 visits to our laboratory to measure the following anthropometric variables: height, body mass, upper arm length (UAL), lower arm length, upper leg length, and lower leg length. Per jump, maximum height was measured in 3 ways: from the subjects' takeoff, hang times, and as they landed on the platform. Standard multivariate regression assessed how well anthropometry predicted the criterion variance per gender (men, women, pooled) and jump height method (takeoff, hang time, landing) combination. Z-scores indicated that small amounts of the total data were outliers. The results showed that the majority of outliers were from jump heights calculated as women landed on the platform. With the genders pooled, anthropometry predicted a significant (p anthropometry-vertical jump relationship was not significant from heights calculated as subjects landed on the platform, likely due to the female outliers. Yet anthropometric data of men did predict a significant amount of variance from heights calculated when they landed on the platform; univariate correlations of men's data revealed that UAL was the best predictor. It was concluded that the large sample of men's data led to greater data heterogeneity and a higher univariate correlation. Because of our sample size and data heterogeneity, practical applications suggest that coaches may find our results best predict performance for a variety of college-aged athletes and vertical jump enthusiasts.

  16. Effects of Detraining on Anthropometry, Aerobic Capacity and Functional Ability in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, P. H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Structured exercise has shown to improve parameters of functional fitness in adults with Down syndrome (DS). However, few, if any, continue to exercise after exercise intervention studies. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of detraining on anthropometry, aerobic capacity and functional ability of…

  17. Impact of hemodialysis on dual X-ray absorptiometry, bioelectrical impedance measurements, and anthropometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Hansen, T B; Høgsberg, I M

    1996-01-01

    ), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and simple anthropometry in 19 patients (9 women and 10 men, mean age 46 y) before and after hemodialysis, removing 0.9-4.3 L (x: 2.8L) of ultrafiltrate. The reduction in fat-free mass (FFM) measured by DXA was highly correlated with the ultrafiltrate, as determined...

  18. Cross-Sectional Associations of Objectively Measured Physical Activity, Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Anthropometry in European Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientzek, A.; Diaz, M.J.T.; Castano, J.M.H.; Amiano, P.; Arriola, L.; Overvad, K.; Ostergaard, J.N.; Charles, M.A.; Fagherazzi, G.; Palli, D.; Bendinelli, B.; Skeie, G.; Borch, K.B.; Wendel-Vos, W.; Hollander, de E.L.; May, A.M.; Ouden, den M.E.M.; Trichopoulou, A.; Valanou, E.; Soderberg, S.; Franks, P.W.; Brage, S.; Vigl, M.; Boeing, H.; Ekelund, U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the independent associations between objectively measured physical activity (PA), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and anthropometry in European men and women. Methods: 2,056 volunteers from 12 centers across Europe were fitted with a heart rate and movement sensor at 2 visits

  19. Anthropometry in Klinefelter syndrome - multifactorial influences due to CAG length, testosterone treatment and possibly intrauterine hypogonadism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Simon; Skakkebæk, Anne; Trolle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Context: Klinefelter syndrome, 47, XXY (KS), is underdiagnosed partly due to few clinical signs complicating identification of affected individuals. Certain phenotypic traits are common in KS. However, not all aspects of the KS phenotype are well described. Objective: To describe anthropometry...

  20. Dietary intake of whole grains and plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations in relation to changes in anthropometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrø, Cecilie; Kristensen, Mette Bredal; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre

    2017-01-01

    adjusting for baseline anthropometry. For the different sources of whole grains, rye (women) and crispbread was significantly associated with gains in WC and body weight. Plasma alkylresorcinol concentration was associated with reduced WC, but not body weight, for women (ΔWC per 50 nmol/l increment: -0...

  1. Anthropometry, muscular strength and aerobic capacity up to 5 years after pediatric burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Mouton, Leonora J.; Van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Van Brussel, Marco; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Physical functioning is of major importance after burns in many areas of life, in both the short and the long term. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe anthropometry, muscular strength and aerobic capacity in children and adolescents between 0.5-5 years after burns over 10% TBSA.

  2. CRP and suPAR are differently related to anthropometry and subclinical organ damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Sehestedt, Thomas; Marott, Jacob L

    2013-01-01

    of the inflammation associated with CVD. METHODS: We studied 2273 subjects without CVD. Log-transformed CRP and suPAR were included in general linear and logistic regression models to compare associations with measures of anthropometry and subclinical organ damage (SOD). Owing to interactions on body mass index (BMI...

  3. Anthropometry, muscular strength and aerobic capacity up to 5 years after pediatric burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disseldorp, Laurien M; Mouton, Leonora J; Van der Woude, Lucas H V; Van Brussel, Marco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481962X; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Physical functioning is of major importance after burns in many areas of life, in both the short and the long term. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe anthropometry, muscular strength and aerobic capacity in children and adolescents between 0.5-5 years after burns over 10% TBSA.

  4. Touch in anthropometry: Enacting race in Dutch New Guinea 1903–1909.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mak, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Starting from the idea that race is an assemblage, the author investigates two instances of touch in anthropometry. Firstly, the detailed instructions for mechanized measurements of “the living”. Second, the practices involved in actual measurements of Papuans in Dutch New Guinea

  5. The study of dietary patterns and their relationship to anthropometry in female nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin Abashzadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are prone to continuous stress due to their job situation that lead to many physical and psychological disorders. this job stress also affects their personal life and career. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between major dietary patterns and anthropometry in nurses. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study from February to October 2014. In this cross-sectional study, 320 female nurses were selected randomly from eight hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This research project carried out with the code 24371 Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Research Ethics Committee approved. Anthropometry and blood pressure measurement was done. Data on physical activity were obtained using the short version of international physical activity questionnaire. Results: Three dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis and labeled: healthy, unhealthy and traditional. The healthy dietary pattern score was significantly related to weight and body mass index (BMI of participants after adjusting for confounders (P=0.05, P=0.01, respectively. There was not significant association between the unhealthy dietary pattern and anthropometry measures. The unhealthy dietary pattern score was inversely related to systolic and diastolic blood pressure after adjusting for confounders (P=0.001, P=0.03, respectively. There was not any significant association between the traditional dietary pattern and anthropometry and blood pressure measures (P>0.05. Conclusion: According to the result of this study, three dietary patterns including, healthy, unhealthy and traditional were identified in nurses. The healthy dietary pattern was associated with weight and BMI and the unhealthy dietary pattern was inversely associated with blood pressure. The traditional dietary pattern had no effect on anthropometry and blood pressure measures.

  6. Anthropometry in Klinefelter syndrome--multifactorial influences due to CAG length, testosterone treatment and possibly intrauterine hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Simon; Skakkebæk, Anne; Trolle, Christian; Bojesen, Anders; Hertz, Jens Michael; Cohen, Arieh; Hougaard, David Michael; Wallentin, Mikkel; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2015-03-01

    Klinefelter syndrome, 47, XXY (KS), is underdiagnosed partly due to few clinical signs complicating identification of affected individuals. Certain phenotypic traits are common in KS. However, not all aspects of the KS phenotype are well described. To describe anthropometry and body composition in KS and relate findings to biochemistry and X-chromosome related genetic markers. Seventy three KS males referred to our clinic and 73 age-matched controls underwent comprehensive measurements of anthropometry and body composition in a cross-sectional, case-controlled study. Furthermore, genetic analysis for parental origin of the supernumerary X-chromosome, skewed X-chromosome inactivation and androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat length was done. Anthropometry and body composition in KS and the effect of genotype hereon. KS males were taller (absolute difference: 5.1 cm, P Anthropometry and body composition in KS is specific and dysmorphic and affected by AR CAG repeat length and decreased exposure to testosterone already during fetal life.

  7. Relationship between the relative age effect and anthropometry, maturity and performance in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Susana Maria; Badiola, Aduna; Bidaurrazaga-Letona, Iraia; Zabala-Lili, Jon; Gravina, Leyre; Santos-Concejero, Jordan; Lekue, Jose Antonio; Granados, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The presence of the relative age effect (RAE) has been widely reported; however, its underlying causes have not yet been determined. With this in mind, the present study examined if anthropometry and performance were different amongst older and younger soccer players born in the same year. Eighty-eight young soccer players participated in the study (age 9.75 ± 0.30). Anthropometric measurements, physical tests (sprint, agility, endurance test, jump and hand dynamometry) and the estimation of the maturity status were carried out. Most players (65.9%) were born in the first half of the year. Older players were taller (P anthropometry and physical performance amongst older and younger pre-pubertal soccer players. These differences may underlie the RAE.

  8. Nutritional status at diagnosis in children with cancer. 2. An assessment by arm anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ronald; Collins, Laura; Nayiager, Trishana; Doring, Nancy; Kennedy, Charlene; Halton, Jacqueline; Walker, Scott; Sala, Alessandra; Webber, Colin

    2011-04-01

    Assessment of nutritional status in children with cancer is important but measures based on weight can be problematic at diagnosis, especially in those with advanced disease. Likewise, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry may be confounded by other radiological procedures and is not commonly available in low-income countries where most children with cancer live. Arm anthropometry is not subject to these constraints. In a study sample of 99 Canadian patients with cancer at diagnosis, mid-upper arm circumference correlated well with lean body mass as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry but triceps skin fold thickness was a poor predictor of fat mass. Arm anthropometry can be a useful tool for the measurement of nutritional status in children with cancer. However, further studies, particularly in low-income countries and in children with solid tumors at diagnosis, are required to determine the full extent of its utility.

  9. Monitoring anthropometry and fitness using maturity groups within youth rugby league.

    OpenAIRE

    Till, K; Jones, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anthropometry and fitness, and change in these characteristics over time, of youth rugby league players by using maturity status to determine annual categories instead of traditional chronological annual-age grouping. One hundred and twenty one male rugby league players were assessed using anthropometric (i.e., height, sitting height, body mass and sum of four skinfolds) and fitness (i.e., vertical jump, medicine ball chest throw, 10m and 2...

  10. The effects of anthropometry and leg muscle power on drive and transition phase of acceleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Jeffreys, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of anthropometry and leg muscle power on accelerative ability and its phases (drive and transition). METHODS: Thirty-six soccer players (age 12.4±1.2 years, body mass 49.9±8.9 kg and height 154.2±10.3 cm) were tested twice, in the beginn...

  11. The Association between Sweet Taste Function, Anthropometry, and Dietary Intake in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Julia Y Q; Lacy, Kathleen E; McBride, Robert; Keast, Russell S J

    2016-04-23

    Variation in ability to detect, recognize, and perceive sweetness may influence food consumption, and eventually chronic nutrition-related conditions such as overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults. Participants' (n = 60; mean age in years = 26, SD = ±7.8) sweet taste function for a range of sweeteners (glucose, fructose, sucrose, sucralose, erythritol, and Rebaudioside A) was assessed by measuring detection and recognition thresholds and sweetness intensity. Height, weight, and waist circumference were also measured, and participants also completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire. There was large inter-individual variation in detection, recognition and sweetness intensity measures. Pearson's correlation coefficient revealed no robust correlations between measures of sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake, with the exception of suprathreshold intensity, which was moderately correlated with total energy intake (r = 0.23-0.40). One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between the most and least sensitive participants in terms of BMI, waist circumference, and dietary intake for all measures of sweet taste function and sweeteners (all p > 0.01). When stratified into BMI categories, there were no significant differences in any measure of sweet taste function between the normal weight and overweight/obese participants (all p > 0.01). Results show that that sweet taste function is not associated with anthropometry and sweetness intensity measures are the most appropriate measure when assessing links between sweet taste and food consumption.

  12. Hand anthropometry survey of rural farm workers in south-eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, Okey Francis

    2016-04-01

    The importance of hand anthropometry as it relates to design of hand tools particularly for farm workers have been established; however, anthropometric data for this group of agricultural workers have continued to remain scarce. A survey of hand anthropometry relevant in design of agricultural hand tools was carried out on 200 male and 100 female adult farm workers in south-eastern Nigeria. Comparison of the male and female data obtained showed that male dimensions were higher than that recorded for the females. The hand anthropometric data of the male and female farm workers were compared with that of other populations but no clear distinction was observed. It was however clear that the following hand dimensions, 2nd Joint to root digit 3 and width at tip digit 3 recorded for Nigerian farm workers were highest and lowest, respectively, compared to other populations. Practitioner Summary: Hand anthropometric data relevant in design of hand tools have continued to remain scarce particularly for farm workers. Hand anthropometry survey of farm workers carried out in south-eastern Nigeria revealed higher dimensions for males than females; however, no clear distinction was observed in comparison with other populations.

  13. Three-dimensional facial anthropometry of unilateral cleft lip infants with a structured light scanning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghui; Wei, Jianhua; Wang, Xi; Wu, Guofeng; Ma, Dandan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Yanpu; Feng, Xinghua

    2013-08-01

    Cleft lip in the presence or absence of a cleft palate is a major public health problem. However, few studies have been published concerning the soft-tissue morphology of cleft lip infants. Currently, obtaining reliable three-dimensional (3D) surface models of infants remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate a new way of capturing 3D images of cleft lip infants using a structured light scanning system. In addition, the accuracy and precision of the acquired facial 3D data were validated and compared with direct measurements. Ten unilateral cleft lip patients were enrolled in the study. Briefly, 3D facial images of the patients were acquired using a 3D scanner device before and after the surgery. Fourteen items were measured by direct anthropometry and 3D image software. The accuracy and precision of the 3D system were assessed by comparative analysis. The anthropometric data obtained using the 3D method were in agreement with the direct anthropometry measurements. All data calculated by the software were 'highly reliable' or 'reliable', as defined in the literature. The localisation of four landmarks was not consistent in repeated experiments of inter-observer reliability in preoperative images (P0.05). The structured light scanning system is proven to be a non-invasive, accurate and precise method in cleft lip anthropometry. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypertension and anthropometry measurement on academic staff at public universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifli, Ilya Zulaikha; Abdullah, Mohammad Nasir; Baharuddin, Mohd Sapuan; Arul, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension or most commonly known as high blood pressure is a non-communicable disease affecting to health of people with non-detectible cause (primary) and some with determined causes (secondary). The prevalence of hypertension morbidity was very high globally, the consequences of the disease if not been treated is death. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hypertension and anthropometry measurements such as weight, height and body mass index among academic staff in public universities in Malaysia. The design for this study was cross-sectional and the method for data collection was mailed questionnaire. The initial sample size for this study was 189, therefore, 500 questionnaires were distributed to randomly selected academicians in public universities, colleges and polytechnics in Malaysia. However, only 101 questionnaires were returned and were analysed in this study. The target population were academicians which includes lecturers and senior lecturers in public universities in Malaysia. The methods of analysis employed was logistic regression and frequency analysis. It was found that weight, height and body mass index (BMI) have no significant relationship with hypertension but based on the Crude Odd Ratio, all these three anthropometry measures showed that there were protective risk of hypertension among lecturers and senior lecturers in public university, Malaysia. In a nutshell, there were no evidence to conclude that anthropometry measurements can affect hypertension status among academic staff at public university.

  15. Anthropometry and body composition do not predict bioavailable androgen or progesterone concentration in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Lea J; Vella, Emily T; Kiparissis, Yiannis; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to test the hypothesis that anthropometry and body composition were independently associated with sex-steroid concentration in adolescent girls. Premenarcheal (age, mean +/- SD = 10.9 +/- 0.6, N = 51), perimenarcheal (age = 13.7 +/- 0.6, N = 74), and postmenarcheal (age = 16.7 +/- 0.6, N = 44) cohorts provided saliva at morning recess during the schoolday over 6 weeks. Estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were quantified. Age, developmental cohort, self-reported Tanner stage of breast development and pubic-hair distribution, gynecological age, height, weight, waist/hip ratio, and percent body fat (by impedance) were assessed. Repeated measures were reduced to a mean. Data were hierarchically standardized for sexual maturation status, and then used to predict anthropometry/percent body fat. After intensive repeated sampling, individuals still varied widely in testosterone, progesterone, and DHEA concentrations within a developmental cohort (35.0 fat, or waist/hip ratio, whether or not measures were age-adjusted (21 univariate tests; 0.19 Low estradiol assay precision precluded analyses. In conclusion, despite considerable population variation in hormone concentration after repeated sampling, no evidence supported an association between anthropometry or pecent body fat and testosterone, progesterone, or DHEA in adolescent girls.

  16. Match between school furniture dimensions and children's anthropometry in Isfahan schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Asaad

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims   the main part of students' time is spent at school. Recent studies have  released that lack of match between students' anthropometry size and dimensions of existing  furniture is a risk factor in creating discomfort and muscle- skeletal disorders (such as backache and neck pain, reducing concentration, increasing fatigue, restless and eyestrain in youths and students.   Methods   In this study 982 students, 493 male (50.2% and 489 female (49.8% ranging 7 - 12 years old, were selected. In addition to age, sex, weight and height, six dimensions of anthropometric measures including: shoulder height, elbow rest height, knee height, popliteal height, buttock-popliteal length and hip breadth by anthropometry, caliper and adjustable seat height, goniometry, tape and scale, were taken into account.   Results   This study explains that there is a significant difference between the minimum and  maximum acceptable and available dimensions of furniture (p<0.001. The Height of desk in old  design is higher than acceptable height for many students (in the order of size in 100, 95.4, and 74.3 percent. The seat depth in this design is shorter for the majority of students (in the order of size in 92.1, 92 and 97.9 percent of studied students.   Conclusion   In designing suitable furniture for students, considering available anthropometry differences in age and sex is essential.  

  17. Effect of chromium supplementation on the glucose homeostasis and anthropometry of type 2 diabetic patients: Double blind, randomized clinical trial: Chromium, glucose homeostasis and anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Marília Mendonça; Carvalho, Ana Clara Martins Silva; Silva, Maria Sebastiana

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of chromium supplementation on the glucose homeostasis and anthropometry of type 2 diabetic patients. Fifty-six individuals with type 2 Diabetes were randomized on a double blind clinical trial into three groups: placebo (NC0), 50μg (NC50) and 200μg (NC200) of chromium nicotinate. Glucose homeostasis, anthropometry and physical activity intensity were evaluated at the beginning, at day 45 and at day 90. Energy intake was evaluated at the beginning, between the beginning and 45 days, and between days 45 and 90 of the study. There were no differences within or between groups for HOMA-IR, waist circumference, body fat percentage, lean body mass percentage and total energy intake during the trial. There was an increase of the HOMA-β in group NC0 (p=0.0349) and a decrease of 1.08kg in group NC50 (p=0.0048) at 90 days. The relation between body mass index, body fat percentage and insulin sensitivity did not change in the placebo and supplemented groups (p>0.05). In the effect of the intervention, for each 1cm increase in waist circumference there was an increase of 1.90±0.63 in HOMA-IR (p=0.0087) and 16.31±5.27% in HOMA-β (p=0.0073) in group NC200. No difference was seen in the intensity of physical activity within the groups and in the comparison between the supplemented groups (NC50 and NC200) and placebo (NC0) at 90 days. There was an increase in energy expenditure in physical activity at 90days (p=0.0371) of intervention in the group subjects NC50. As for total energy intake, there were no differences within or between the groups during the study. 50μg and 200μg supplementation with chromium nicotinate for 90days did not promote improvements in glucose homeostasis and anthropometry in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. The Association between Sweet Taste Function, Anthropometry, and Dietary Intake in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Y. Q. Low

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Variation in ability to detect, recognize, and perceive sweetness may influence food consumption, and eventually chronic nutrition-related conditions such as overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults. Participants’ (n = 60; mean age in years = 26, SD = ±7.8 sweet taste function for a range of sweeteners (glucose, fructose, sucrose, sucralose, erythritol, and Rebaudioside A was assessed by measuring detection and recognition thresholds and sweetness intensity. Height, weight, and waist circumference were also measured, and participants also completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire. There was large inter-individual variation in detection, recognition and sweetness intensity measures. Pearson’s correlation coefficient revealed no robust correlations between measures of sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake, with the exception of suprathreshold intensity, which was moderately correlated with total energy intake (r = 0.23–0.40. One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between the most and least sensitive participants in terms of BMI, waist circumference, and dietary intake for all measures of sweet taste function and sweeteners (all p > 0.01. When stratified into BMI categories, there were no significant differences in any measure of sweet taste function between the normal weight and overweight/obese participants (all p > 0.01. Results show that that sweet taste function is not associated with anthropometry and sweetness intensity measures are the most appropriate measure when assessing links between sweet taste and food consumption.

  19. The Association between Sweet Taste Function, Anthropometry, and Dietary Intake in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Julia Y. Q.; Lacy, Kathleen E.; McBride, Robert; Keast, Russell S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Variation in ability to detect, recognize, and perceive sweetness may influence food consumption, and eventually chronic nutrition-related conditions such as overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults. Participants’ (n = 60; mean age in years = 26, SD = ±7.8) sweet taste function for a range of sweeteners (glucose, fructose, sucrose, sucralose, erythritol, and Rebaudioside A) was assessed by measuring detection and recognition thresholds and sweetness intensity. Height, weight, and waist circumference were also measured, and participants also completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire. There was large inter-individual variation in detection, recognition and sweetness intensity measures. Pearson’s correlation coefficient revealed no robust correlations between measures of sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake, with the exception of suprathreshold intensity, which was moderately correlated with total energy intake (r = 0.23–0.40). One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between the most and least sensitive participants in terms of BMI, waist circumference, and dietary intake for all measures of sweet taste function and sweeteners (all p > 0.01). When stratified into BMI categories, there were no significant differences in any measure of sweet taste function between the normal weight and overweight/obese participants (all p > 0.01). Results show that that sweet taste function is not associated with anthropometry and sweetness intensity measures are the most appropriate measure when assessing links between sweet taste and food consumption. PMID:27120614

  20. Anthropometry and barbell trajectory in the snatch lift for elite women weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Leslie J; Garhammer, John; Rozenek, Ralph; Crussemeyer, Jill A; Vargas, Emmy M

    2014-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine relationships between anthropometry and horizontal barbell displacement during the pulling phase of the snatch lift (SN) in elite women weightlifters. Secondary objectives included description of anthropometric and displacement characteristics, and examinations of SN performance and competitive experience. Thirty-six women weightlifters competing at the 2009 Pan American Championships participated. Participants were measured for standing height, upper limb, trunk, thigh, and shank lengths, and completed a questionnaire about competition and training experience. Horizontal displacement from lift-off to first pull maximum (Dx1) and from first pull to second pull maximum (Dx2) was determined from the heaviest successful SN using 2-dimensional video analysis. Significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05) existed between thigh and lower-limb lengths and Dx2 in 53 kg participants; lower-limb length and Dx1 in 75 kg participants; and horizontal displacement and body segment ratios involving the upper and lower extremity in multiple weight classes. Correlations between anthropometry and Dx1 also reached significance with participants grouped by barbell trajectory type. Except for the trunk and thigh, body segment lengths were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) between weight classes. Significantly different body proportions existed in 48 kg participants compared with all other classes. Multiple thigh and trunk variables were significantly correlated with performance. Horizontal displacement values were similar to previous reports in the literature. Few significant relationships existed between displacement and performance, and none were found for competitive experience. Understanding relationships between anthropometry and barbell trajectory may be useful for optimizing SN technique.

  1. Anthropometry and somatotypes of competitive DanceSport participants: a comparison of three different styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liiv, H; Wyon, M; Jürimäe, T; Purge, P; Saar, M; Mäestu, J; Jürimäe, J

    2014-04-01

    Anthropometry in dance and aesthetic sports has been shown to play an important role in selection and performance criteria. The aim of the present study was to examine variations in somatotype and anthropometry in three different competitive dance styles: DanceSport Standard, Latin American and Ten Dance. Anthropometry and somatotype data were collected from thirty couples competing in Standard (n=24 individuals), Latin American (n=14) and Ten Dance (n=22) styles. A single tester (ISAK Level 1) carried out all anthropometric measurements using the Heath-Carter protocol and somatotypes were calculated using the Heath-Carter's decimal equations. Results indicated that the mean somatotype for the male dancers was 2.4-3.9-3.2, whilst for females it was 2.7-2.7-3.5. Factorial analysis reported Standard dancers scored significantly higher for ectomorphy, sitting height and arm span than Latin dancers (p<0.05). Correlation analysis with the Standard dancer's International Ranking highlighted moderate positive correlation with mesomorphy (r=0.434, p<0.05) and negative correlation with ectomorphy (r=-0.546, p<0.001). The findings of this study show that somatotypes differ among DanceSport participants by dance style. Compared with other aesthetic sports, male and female dancers were less mesomorphic and more ectomorphic. Standard dancers tend to be more ectomorphic with greater height, longer arm span and greater sitting height compared with Latin American dancers. Although Standard dancers were ectomorphic, those dancers who had higher mesomorphic ranking had higher places in the dancers' international ranking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of age, playing position, anthropometry and fitness on career attainment outcomes in rugby league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Kevin; Cobley, Steve; Morley, David; O'hara, John; Chapman, Chris; Cooke, Carlton

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of annual-age category, relative age, playing position, anthropometry and fitness on the career attainment outcomes of junior rugby league players originally selected for a talent identification and development (TID) programme. Junior rugby league players (N = 580) were grouped retrospectively according to their career attainment level (i.e., amateur, academy and professional). Anthropometric (height, sitting height, body mass, sum of four skinfolds), maturational (age at peak height velocity; PHV) and fitness (power, speed, change of direction speed, estimated[Formula: see text]) characteristics were assessed at the Under 13s, 14s and 15s annual-age categories. Relative age (Q2 = 8.5% vs. Q4 = 25.5%) and playing position (Pivots = 19.5% vs. Props = 5.8%) influenced the percentage of players attaining professional status. Anthropometry and fitness had a significant effect on career attainment at the Under 14 (P = 0.002, η(2) = 0.16) and 15 (P = 0.01, η(2) = 0.12) annual-age categories. Findings at the Under 14s showed future professional players were significantly later maturing compared to academy and amateur players. Findings suggest that relative age, playing position, anthropometry and fitness can influence the career attainment of junior rugby league players. TID programmes within rugby league, and other related team sports, should be aware and acknowledge the factors influencing long-term career attainment, and not delimit development opportunities during early adolescence.

  3. Pediatric Penile and Glans Anthropometry Nomograms: An Aid in Hypospadias Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Archana; Sikdar, Satyajit; Prakash, Raghu

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To establish pediatric penile and glans anthropometry nomograms. This may be used as a reference model for penile assessment while managing hypospadias. Patients and Methods: Between October 2012 and September 2013, 263 boys of varying ages (0–16 years) were included in the study. Those with genetic, endocrine disorders, having genital anomaly, undescended testis, neonates, and infants with a nonretractile prepuce, with multiple congenital anomalies and refusal to take part in the study were excluded. Evaluated outcome variables were stretched penile length, glans circumference (GC) at coronal sulcus, glans diameter at coronal sulcus (Gdcl), mid glans diameter, and ventral glans length. Glans ratios were generated by dividing Gdcl by GC. Data were expressed as mean, median, and standard deviation. Correlation between age and variables was evaluated using nonparametric Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: The patients were divided in six age groups, namely 0–1 (n = 61), 1–3 (n = 37), 3–5 (n = 36), 5–7 (n = 36), 7–12 (n = 45), and >12 years (n = 48). Gdcl was the maximum transverse glans diameter and based on it small glans size varied widely from 8.9 to 35.04 mm for various age groups. Although glans anthropometry showed age-related changes, glans ratio remained relatively constant between 0.49 and 0.53 (mean: 0.5 ± 0.051, r = 0.29). All the variables except glans ratio showed a significant positive correlation with age (r = 0.954–0.98, P anthropometry nomograms provide a reference model for hypospadias. This may aid in (a) objective preoperative assessment of glans size (b) patient selection for preoperative hormonal stimulation (c) provides a yardstick for postoperative cosmesis. PMID:28082769

  4. Maternal systemic or cord blood inflammation is associated with birth anthropometry in a Tanzanian prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, A L; Pedersen, S H; Urassa, M; Michael, D; Andreasen, A; Todd, J; Kinung'hi, S M; Changalucha, J; McDermid, J M

    2017-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with chronic systemic inflammation, with or without antiretroviral therapy. Consequences for foetal growth are not understood, particularly in settings where multiple maternal infections and malnutrition are common. The study was designed to examine maternal systemic circulating and umbilical cord blood cytokine concentrations in relation to birth anthropometry in a Tanzanian prospective cohort. A 9-plex panel of maternal plasma cytokines in HIV-positive (n = 44) and HIV-negative (n = 70) mothers and the same cytokines in umbilical cord blood collected at delivery was assayed. Linear regression modelled associations between maternal or cord blood cytokines and birth anthropometry. Health indicators (haemoglobin, mid-upper-arm circumference, body mass index) in HIV-positive mothers without considerable immunosuppression did not differ from HIV-negative women. Despite this, HIV-exposed infants had lower birthweight and length. Subgroup analyses indicated that HIV management using HAART was associated with lower plasma TNF-α, as were longer durations of any antiretroviral therapy (≥2 months). Greater maternal plasma TNF-α was associated with earlier delivery (-1.7 weeks, P = 0.039) and lower birthweights (-287 g; P = 0.020), while greater umbilical cord TNF-α (-1.43 cm; P = 0.036) and IL-12p70 (-2.4 cm; P = 0.008) were associated with shorter birth length. Birthweight was inversely associated with cord IL-12p70 (-723 g; P = 0.001) and IFN-γ (-482 g, P = 0.007). Maternal cytokines during pregnancy did not correlate with umbilical cord cytokines at delivery. Systemic inflammation identified in maternal plasma or umbilical cord blood was associated with poorer birth anthropometrics in HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants. Controlling maternal and/or foetal systemic inflammation may improve birth anthropometry. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Use of Anthropometry for the Prediction of Regional Body Tissue Distribution in Adults: Benefits and Limitations in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafoglieri, Aldo; Clarys, Jan Pieter; Cattrysse, Erik; Bautmans, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Regional body composition changes with aging. Some of the changes in composition are considered major risk factors for developing obesity related chronic diseases which in turn may lead to increased mortality in adults. The role of anthropometry is well recognized in the screening, diagnosis and follow-up of adults for risk classification, regardless of age. Regional body composition is influenced by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Therapeutic measures recommended to lower cardiovascular disease risk include lifestyle changes. The aim of this review is to systematically summarize studies that assessed the relationships between anthropometry and regional body composition. The potential benefits and limitations of anthropometry for use in clinical practice are presented and suggestions for future research given. PMID:25489489

  6. Anthropometry, muscular strength and aerobic capacity up to 5 years after pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseldorp, Laurien M; Mouton, Leonora J; Van der Woude, Lucas H V; Van Brussel, Marco; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2015-12-01

    Physical functioning is of major importance after burns in many areas of life, in both the short and the long term. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe anthropometry, muscular strength and aerobic capacity in children and adolescents between 0.5-5 years after burns over 10% TBSA. Assessments took place in a mobile exercise lab. Demographics, burn characteristics and anthropometrics were recorded. Muscular strength in six muscle groups was measured using hand-held dynamometry and aerobic capacity was measured with a graded cardiopulmonary exercise test. Subjects' scores were compared with Dutch age- and gender-matched norm values and converted to Z-scores. The assessments were completed by 24 subjects with pediatric burns ranging from 10 to 41% TBSA and time after burn from 1 to 5 years (58.3% male; 6-18 years). On group level, no significant differences between the subjects' scores and norm values were found. No trends were seen indicating an effect of extent of burn or time after burn. Individually, eight subjects (33.3%), mostly aged 6 or 7, showed significantly low performance on at least one variable: seven for strength, one for aerobic capacity and one for both. Anthropometry, muscular strength and aerobic capacity are adequate in the majority of Dutch children and adolescents 1-5 years after 10-41% TBSA burns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. The association between maternal dietary micronutrient intake and neonatal anthropometry - secondary analysis from the ROLO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Mary K; McGowan, Ciara A; Gibney, Eileen R; Donnelly, Jean M; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2015-10-07

    Micronutrients are necessary for fetal growth. However increasingly pregnant women are nutritionally replete and little is known about the effect of maternal micronutrient intakes on fetal adiposity in mothers with increased BMI. The aim of this study was to examine the association of maternal dietary micronutrient intake with neonatal size and adiposity in a cohort at risk of macrosomia. This was a cohort analysis of 554 infants from the ROLO study. Three day food diaries from each trimester were collected. Neonatal weight, length, circumferences and skinfold thicknesses were measured at birth. Multiple linear regression was used to identify associations between micronutrient intakes and neonatal anthropometry. Birthweight was negatively associated with maternal trimester 3 vitamin D intake and positively associated with trimester 3 vitamin B12 intake R2adj 19.8% (F = 13.19, p anthropometry even in women not at risk of malnutrition. Further research is necessary to determine optimal micronutrient intake in overweight and obese pregnant women. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN54392969.

  8. Evaluation of unilateral cleft lip and palate using anthropometry measurements post-alveolar bone grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simorangkir, H. J.; Hak, M. S.; Tofani, I.

    2017-08-01

    Rehabilitation of patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) requires multiple steps and coordination of multidisciplinary sciences to produce optimal results. Alveolar bone-grafting (ABG) is an important procedure in the treatment of such patients because it influences the eruption of teeth and stabilizes the maxilla. To evaluate the effect and suitability of alveolar bone grafting procedure at Cleft Center Harapan Kita Maternal and Child Hospital on nasal deformity from anthropometry with photogrammetry and aesthetic proportional in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate with UCLP. Patients with UCLP were evaluated post-ABG using anthropometry and photogrammetry to investigate the results anteriorly, laterally, and basally. Anthropometric measurements taken photogrammetrically used 14 points and 11 distance items. Evaluations were made of upper lip length, upper lip projection, and nostril sill elevation for both the cleft and non-cleft sides of patients’ faces. A t-test showed that the values for upper lip length and projection were significantly increased, and a correction test using a Fisher exam gave a value of 1. The ABG treatment protocol for patients with UCLP at the Cleft Lip and Palate Unit at Harapan Kita Maternal and Child Hospital is suitable to be performed; it aesthetically satisfies patients and their families.

  9. Anthropometry in Long-Term Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Childhood and Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Laura; Beaumont, Lesley; Cranston, Amy; Savoie, Stefanie; Nayiager, Trishana; Barr, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is an inadequate measure of nutritional status in children and adolescents with cancer as it does not distinguish muscle from adipose tissue. However, arm anthropometry offers simple assessments of fat mass and lean body mass; especially valuable in low- and middle-income countries where the great majority of young people with cancer live and access to sophisticated expensive measures of body composition is markedly limited. The nutritional status of 75 long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was assessed by arm anthropometry, in addition to BMI, in a cross-sectional cohort study. Normal ranges for triceps skin fold thickness (TSFT, a surrogate for fat mass) and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC, a surrogate for lean body mass) were between the 15th and 85th percentiles for age and sex. Overweight/obesity was classified as a TSFT >85th percentile and sarcopenia as an MUAC obesity was identified in 1/3 of subjects by a BMI >25 and by TSFT; and 20% of the subjects had a TSFT >95th percentile. Only two subjects were sarcopenic. None met the combined criteria for sarcopenic obesity. TSFT and MUAC/height indices did not add sensitivity to identification of sarcopenia or obesity. TSFT is a useful measure of overweight/obesity in this population, but MUAC does not identify a notable proportion with sarcopenia. Further resolution may be provided by more sophisticated measures of body composition.

  10. Prediction of fat-free body mass from bioelectrical impedance and anthropometry among 3-year-old children using DXA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlerskov, Katrine Tschentscher; Jensen, Signe Marie; Christensen, Line B

    2014-01-01

    For 3-year-old children suitable methods to estimate body composition are sparse. We aimed to develop predictive equations for estimating fat-free mass (FFM) from bioelectrical impedance (BIA) and anthropometry using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as reference method using data from 99...

  11. Predictors, Including Blood, Urine, Anthropometry, and Nutritional Indices, of All-Cause Mortality among Institutionalized Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwada, Hiroko; Nakayama, Takeo; Tomono, Yuji; Yamanaka, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    As the life expectancy of people with intellectual disability (ID) increases, it is becoming necessary to understand factors affecting survival. However, predictors that are typically assessed among healthy people have not been examined. Predictors of all-cause mortality, including blood, urine, anthropometry, and nutritional indices, were…

  12. Anthropometry at birth as a strong determinant factor of young women bone status: influence of high-level physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréban, Sophie; Chappard, Christine; Jaffré, Christelle; Briot, Karine; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the influence of anthropometry at birth on bone status and physical activity aptitudes of adult women. Our population was composed of 70 women (17-29 years): 40 athletes and 30 controls. Athletes participated in various long-lasting and high-level weight-bearing sports (10.2 ± 2.2h ours/week). Birth weight and height were collected. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was measured by DXA, at whole body, lumbar spine, non dominant femur (total hip (TH), femoral neck (FN)) and tibia. The Hip Structural Analysis software was applied to assess cross-sectional area (CSA), cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), section modulus (Z) and cortical thickness of three regions of the proximal femur: intertrochanter, narrow neck and femoral shaft. BMD and HSA measurements at all sites were significantly higher in athletes versus controls, as well as birth height (P = 0.009) and weight (P = 0.02). For the whole population, we found significant positive correlations between birth weight and BMDs (0.30 anthropometry, which can be used to predict fracture risk in later life. Predisposition to practice a weight-bearing sport could be related to the greater birth anthropometry described in athletes. The benefits of birth anthropometry on adult bone status appear to be maintained by sports. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Pre-Ramadan Education on Dietary Intake and Anthropometry-Comparison Between Two Groups of Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bencharif Meriem

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Fasting of Ramadan leads to changes in dietary habits, physical activity, sleep and time of drug intake for diabetics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-Ramadan education on dietary intake and anthropometry of two groups of patients.

  14. Anthropometry, DXA and leptin reflect subcutaneous but not visceral abdominal adipose tissue by MRI in 197 healthy adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinggaard, Jeanette; Hagen, Casper P; Christensen, Anders Nymark

    2017-01-01

    Background Abdominal fat distribution is associated with the development of cardio-metabolic disease independently of body mass index (BMI). We assessed anthropometry, serum adipokines, and DXA as markers of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) using.......001) and VAT% in boys (R2=16.4%, PAnthropometry and circulating leptin are valid markers of SAT%, but not of VAT%....

  15. Association between anthropometry-based nutritional status and malaria: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Efrem d'Avila; Alexandre, Márcia A; Salinas, Jorge L; de Siqueira, André M; Benzecry, Silvana G; de Lacerda, Marcus V G; Monteiro, Wuelton M

    2015-09-17

    Multiple studies in various parts of the world have analysed the association of nutritional status on malaria using anthropometric measures, but results differ due to the heterogeneity of the study population, species of the parasite, and other factors involved in the host and parasite relationship. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review on the inter-relationship of nutritional status based on anthropometry and malarial infection. Two independent reviewers accessed the MEDLINE and LILACS databases using the same search terms related to malaria and anthropometry. Prospective studies associating anthropometry and malaria (incidence or severity) were selected. References from the included studies and reviews were used to increase the review sensitivity. Data were extracted using a standardized form and the quality of the prospective studies was assessed. Selected articles were grouped based on exposures and outcomes. The search identified a total of 1688 studies: 1629 from MEDLINE and 59 from LILACS. A total of 23 met the inclusion criteria. Five additional studies were detected by reading the references of the 23 included studies and reviews, totaling 28 studies included. The mean sample size was 662.1 people, ranging from 57 to 5620. The mean follow-up was 365.8 days, ranging from 14 days to 1 year and 9 months, and nine studies did not report the follow-up period. Prospective studies assessing the relationship between malaria and malnutrition were mostly carried out in Africa. Of the 20 studies with malarial outcomes, fifteen had high and five had average quality, with an average score of 80.5 %. Most anthropometric parameters had no association with malaria incidence (47/52; 90.4 %) or parasite density (20/25; 80 %). However, the impact of malnutrition was noted in malaria mortality and severity (7/17; 41.2 %). Regarding the effects of malaria on malnutrition, malaria was associated with very few anthropometric parameters (8/39; 20.6

  16. Evaluation of the Indonesian National Standard for elementary school furniture based on children's anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanto; Lu, Chih-Wei; Lu, Jun-Ming

    2017-07-01

    In Indonesia, National Standardization Agency of Indonesia issued the Indonesian National Standard SNI 12-1015-1989 and SNI 12-1016-1989 to define the type of furniture dimensions that should be used by children in the elementary school level. This study aims to examine whether the current national standards for elementary school furniture dimensions issued by National Standardization Agency of Indonesia match the up-to-date Indonesian children's anthropometry. Two types of school furniture, small type (Type I, for grade 1-3) and large type (Type II, for grade 4-6), were evaluated in terms of seat height, seat depth, seat width and backrest height of a chair as well as the height and underneath height of a desk. 1146 students aged between 6 and 12 years old participated in the study. Seven anthropometric measurements were taken including stature, sitting shoulder height, sitting elbow height, popliteal height, buttock-popliteal length, knee height and hip breadth. Based on the standard school furniture dimensions and students' body dimensions, numbers of matches and mismatches between them were computed. Results indicated a substantial degree of mismatch between children's anthropometry and the standard dimensions of school furniture. The standard seat height was not appropriate for students among different grades with the mismatch percentage ranging from 63.4% to 96.7% for Type I and 72.7% to 99.0% for Type II. For desk height, the standard dimensions were not appropriate for students among different grades with the mismatch percentage ranging from 32.3% to 88.9% for Type I and 67.7% to 99.0% for Type II. Apparently, the current standards are out of date and need to be updated. Four different sizes of school furniture were hence proposed to accommodate the variation in students' anthropometry from Grade 1 to Grade 6. The proposed standard dimensions (PrS) of school furniture cover a slightly broader range of age and present a higher cumulative fit than the current

  17. The effects of foot morphology and anthropometry on unipodal postural control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica C. Alonso

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The maintenance of posture is a constant challenge for the body, as it requires rapid and accurate responses to unforeseen disturbances, which are needed to prevent falls and maintain balance. The purpose of the present study was to compare different types of plantar arch in relation to postural balance, and analyze the relationships between variations the plantar arch and anthropometric characteristics of the feet with unipedal static balance. We evaluated 100 men and women between the ages of 20 and 40 years old, to determine anthropometry and posturography with a force platform. There was a weak correlation between plantar arches and anthropometric measurements and postural balance, except for the length of the male foot, which showed a correlation between increased size and poorer static balance. We conclude that the type of plantar arch does not influence postural balance, and of the anthropometric factors, only foot length was related to postural balance.

  18. Technical activity profile and influence of body anthropometry on playing performance in female elite team handball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalsik, Lars B; Aagaard, Per; Madsen, Klavs

    2015-01-01

    To determine the physical demands placed on female elite team handball (TH) players in relation to playing position and body anthropometry, female elite TH primarily field players were monitored during match-play using video recording and subsequent computerized technical match analysis during 5...... regular tournament match seasons. Technical match activities were distributed in 6 major types of playing actions (shots, breakthroughs, fast breaks, technical errors, defensive errors, and tackles) and further divided into various subcategories (e.g., type of shot, hard or light tackles, claspings...... that female elite TH players during competitive games intermittently perform a high number of short-term, high-intense technical playing actions making modern female elite TH a physically demanding team sport. No sign of technical fatigue were observed, since the amount of intense technical playing actions...

  19. Technical match characteristics and influence of body anthropometry on playing performance in male elite team handball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalsik, Lars Bojsen; Madsen, Klavs; Aagaard, Per

    2015-01-01

    elite team handball players in relation to playing position and body anthropometry. Based on continuous video recording of individual players during elite team handball match-play (62 tournament games, ∼4 players per game), computerized technical match analysis was performed in male elite team handball...... players along with anthropometric measurements over a 6 season time span. Technical match activities were distributed in 6 major types of playing actions (shots, breakthroughs, fast breaks, tackles, technical errors, and defense errors) and further divided into various subcategories (e.g., hard or light...... tackles, type of shot, claspings, screenings, and blockings). Players showed 36.9 ± 13.1 (group mean ± SD) high-intense technical playing actions per match with a mean total effective playing time of 53.85 ± 5.87 minutes. In offense, each player performed 6.0 ± 5.2 fast breaks, received 34.5 ± 21...

  20. Virtual forensic anthropology: Novel applications of anthropometry and technology in a child death case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy-Jow, Stephanie Lynn; Lees, Duncan M B; Russell, Sean

    2013-01-10

    Full-body 3D virtual reconstructions were generated using 3D technology and anthropometry following the death of a young girl, allegedly from severe malnutrition as a result of abuse and neglect. Close range laser scanning, in conjunction with full colour digital texture photography, was used to document the child's condition shortly after death in order to demonstrate the number and pattern of injuries and to be able to demonstrate her condition forensically. Full-body digital reconstructions were undertaken to illustrate the extent of the malnutrition by comparing the processed post mortem scans with reconstructed images at normal weight for height and age. This is the first known instance of such an investigative tool. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Free Amino Acids in Human Milk and Associations with Maternal Anthropometry and Infant Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larnkjær, Anni; Bruun, Signe; Pedersen, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    . The aim was to investigate if maternal anthropometry was associated with the content of the FAA glutamic acid or glutamine in breast milk and if there was a negative association between these FAA and current size or early infant growth in fully breastfed infants. Methods: From a subgroup of 78 mothers......, of which 50 were fully breast feeding, from the Odense Child Cohort breast milk samples were collected 4 months after birth and analyzed for FAA. Information regarding breastfeeding status and infant weight and length was also recorded. Results: There was a large variation in the concentration of the FAAs.......013) but the correlation was attenuated when controlling for birth length (p = 0.089). Conclusions: The hypothesis that a high content of glutamic acid and glutamine in breast milk could downregulate milk intake to a degree affecting early growth could not be confirmed. Maternal factors associated with the level...

  2. Relative age effect on anthropometry, biological maturation and performance of young soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Oliveira Matta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n3p257   The study examined the presence of the relative age effect (RAE and association between birth quartile and anthropometry, biological maturation and physical and technical performance of young Brazilian soccer players. The sample included 119 male players, 74 of U-15 category and 45 of U-17 category, which were divided into quartiles according to the birth year. Biological maturation was assessed using the method of skeletal age of Fels. Anthropometric measurements included body weight, stature and subcutaneous adiposity. Physical fitness assessment included strength tests in the lower limbs, speed, aerobic endurance and anaerobic power. Technical skills included ball control, dribbling and kicking accuracy. Overall, 65.5% of soccer players were born on the first half of the year (c2= 8.069, p = 0.04; however, in the analysis by category, there was no significant difference in the distribution of birth dates for quartile when compared with the reference population (U-15: c2=6.322, p=0.10; U-17: c2=2.339, p=0.50. MANCOVA revealed no significant differences between anthropometry, biological maturation and physical and technical performance in both competitive categories. These results suggest that there is a higher proportion of young Brazilian soccer born on the first months of the year, but that RAE does not necessarily constitute an advantage under the anthropometric, physical and technical standpoint. The process of biological maturation of individuals should be considered by coaches in the selection of athletes.

  3. Young children's screen activities, sweet drink consumption and anthropometry: results from a prospective European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, S; Berg, C; Eiben, G; Lanfer, A; Reisch, L; Ahrens, W; Kourides, Y; Molnár, D; Moreno, L A; Siani, A; Veidebaum, T; Lissner, L

    2014-02-01

    This longitudinal study describes the relationship between young children's screen time, dietary habits and anthropometric measures. The hypothesis was that television viewing and other screen activities at baseline result in increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and increased BMI, BMI z-score and waist to height ratio (WHtR) two years later. A second hypothesis was that SSB consumption mediates the association between the screen activities and changes in the anthropometric measures. The study is a part of the prospective cohort study IDEFICS ("Identification and prevention of dietary and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants"), investigating diet, lifestyle and social determinants of obesity in 2 to 9-year-olds in eight European countries (baseline n=16,225, two-year follow-up; n=11,038). Anthropometry was objectively measured, and behaviours were parent-reported. The main hypothesis was supported, but the second hypothesis was not confirmed. The odds ratio of being in the highest quintile of % change in WHtR was 1.26 (95% CI: 1.17-1.36) and in BMI 1.22 (95% CI: 1.13-1.31), for each hour per day watching television. The odds ratio of having increased SSB consumption was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.09-1.29) for each hour per day watching TV. The associations for total screen time were slightly weaker. The results indicate substantial effects of TV viewing and other screen activities for young children, both on their consumption of sugary drinks and on an increase in BMI and central obesity. Our findings suggest that television viewing seems to have a stronger effect on food habits and anthropometry than other screen activities in this age group.

  4. Comparisons of foot anthropometry and plantar arch indices between German and Brazilian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Isabel C N; Onodera, Andrea N; Bosch, Kerstin; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2015-02-12

    Nowadays, trades and research have become closely related between different countries and anthropometric data are important for the development in global markets. The appropriate use of anthropometry may improve wellbeing, health, comfort and safety especially for footwear design. For children a proper fit of footwear is very important, not constraining foot growth and allowing a normal development. The aim of this study was to compare the anthropometric characteristics of German and Brazilian children's feet from 3 to 10 years of age. We compared five indirect measures of two databases of children's feet. Forefoot, midfoot and rearfoot widths were measured in static footprints and the Chippaux-Smirak and Staheli indices of the longitudinal arch were calculated. Brazilian children showed a significantly narrower forefoot from 5 to 10 years, wider rearfoot from 3 to 4 years, wider midfoot for 4 year-olds and narrower midfoot for 10 year-old children. Nevertheless, the Chippaux-Smirak and Staheli indices showed no group differences. The only exception was for 4 year-old Brazilian children who showed a higher Chippaux-Smirak index compared to German children (48.4 ± 17.7%; 42.1 ± 13.8%). Our study revealed anthropometric differences in absolute forefoot and rearfoot widths of German and Brazilian children, but a similar longitudinal arch development. At 4 years of age, Brazilian children present a foot anthropometry similar to the 3 year-olds and develop the plantar longitudinal arch from 4 to 5 years more rapidly when compared to German children.

  5. Quantification of ln-Flight Physical Changes: Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. S.; Amick, R.; Rajulu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, NASA does not have sufficient in-flight anthropometric data to assess the impact of changes in body shape and size. For developing future planetary and reduced-gravity suits, NASA needs to quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry and body posture to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. To obtain data on these changes, circumference, length, height, breadth, and depth for body segments (chest, waist, bicep, thigh, calf) from astronauts for preflight, in-flight, and post-flight conditions needs to be collected. Once these data have been collected, pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight anthropometric values will be compared, yielding microgravity factors. The neutral body posture (NBP) will also be measured, to determine body posture (joint angle) changes between subjects throughout the duration of a mission. Data collection, starting with Increments 37/38, is still in progress but has been completed for 6 out of 9 subjects. NASA suit engineers and NASA's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Project Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an issue. It has been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes were collected during Skylab 4, the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP), Space Shuttle mission STS-57, and a recent HRP study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation (Spinal Elongation, Master Task List [MTL] #221). The Skylab 4, ASTP, and the STS-57 studies found that, according to photographs, a distinct NBP exists. The still photographs showed a distinguishable posture with the arms raised and the shoulders abducted; in addition, the knees are flexed, with noticeable hip flexion, and the foot

  6. Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes: Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. S.; Reid, C. R.; Rajulu, S.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, NASA does not have sufficient in-flight anthropometric data gathered to assess the impact of physical body shape and size changes on suit sizing. For developing future planetary and reduced gravity suits, NASA needs to quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry, body posture, and neutral body postures (NBP) to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. To obtain these impacts, anthropometric data, circumference, length, height, breadth, and depth for body segments (i.e. chest, waist, bicep, thigh, calf) from astronauts for pre, in-, and postflight conditions needs to be collected. Once this data has been collected, a comparison between pre, in-, and postflight anthropometric values will be analyzed, yielding microgravity factors. The NBP will be used to determined body posture (joint angle) changes between subjects throughout the duration of a mission. Data collection, starting with Increments 37/38, is still in progress with the completion of 3 out of 12 subjects. NASA suit engineers and NASA's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Project Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an issue. It has been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent HRP study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation (Spinal Elongation, Master Task List [MTL] #221). The Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. The still photographs showed that there is a distinguishable posture with the arms raised and the shoulder abducted; and, in addition, the knees were flexed with noticeable hip flexion and the foot

  7. Whey protein preloads are more beneficial than soy protein preloads in regulating appetite, calorie intake, anthropometry, and body composition of overweight and obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahavorgar, Atefeh; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Shidfar, Farzad; Gohari, Mahmoodreza; Heydari, Iraj

    2014-10-01

    High-protein diets exert beneficial effects on appetite, anthropometry, and body composition; however, the effects of protein preloads depend on the amount, type, and time of consumption. Therefore, we hypothesized that long-term supplemental preloads of whey protein concentrate (WPC) and soy protein isolate (SPI) consumed 30 minutes before the largest meal would decrease appetite, calorie intake (CI), and anthropometry and improve body composition in overweight and obese men in free-living conditions. The subjects included 45 men with a body mass index between 25 and 40 kg/m(2) and who were randomly allocated to either the WPC (n = 26) or SPI (n = 19) groups. For 12 weeks, the subjects consumed 65 g WPC or 60 g SPI that was dissolved in 500 mL water 30 minutes before their ad libitum lunch. Appetite, CI, anthropometry, and body composition were assessed before and after the study and biweekly throughout. After 12 weeks, mean changes between the groups were significant for appetite (P = .032), CI (P = .045), anthropometry (body weight [P = .008], body mass index [P = .006], and waist circumference), and body composition (body fat mass and lean muscle [P anthropometry, and body composition (P anthropometry, and body composition of free-living overweight and obese men. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a Methodology to Gather Seated Anthropometry in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Young, Karen; Mesloh, Miranda

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation Program's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is required to accommodate the full population range of crewmembers according to the anthropometry requirements stated in the Human-Systems Integration Requirement (HSIR) document (CxP70024). Seated height is one of many critical dimensions of importance to the CEV designers in determining the optimum seat configuration in the vehicle. Changes in seated height may have a large impact to the design, accommodation, and safety of the crewmembers. Seated height can change due to elongation of the spine when crewmembers are exposed to microgravity. Spinal elongation is the straightening of the natural curvature of the spine and the expansion of inter-vertebral disks. This straightening occurs due to fluid shifts in the body and the lack of compressive forces on the spinal vertebrae. Previous studies have shown that as the natural curvature of the spine straightens, an increase in overall height of 3% of stature occurs which has been the basis of the current HSIR requirements. However due to variations in the torso/leg ratio and impact of soft tissue, data is nonexistent as to how spinal elongation specifically affects the measurement of seated height. In order to obtain this data, an experiment was designed to collect spinal elongation data while in a seated posture in microgravity. The purpose of this study was to provide quantitative data that represents the amount of change that occurs in seated height due to spinal elongation in microgravity environments. Given the schedule and budget constraints of ISS and Shuttle missions and the uniqueness of the problem, a methodology had to be developed to ensure that the seated height measurements were accurately collected. Therefore, simulated microgravity evaluations were conducted to test the methodology and procedures of the experiment. This evaluation obtained seat pan pressure and seated height data to a) ensure that the lap restraint provided sufficient

  9. Age- and sex-related differences in the anthropometry and neuromuscular fitness of competitive taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaidis PT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis,1 Krzysztof Buśko,2 Filipe Manuel Clemente,3 Ioannis Tasiopoulos,1 Beat Knechtle4 1Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Nikaia, Greece; 2Department of Biomechanics, Institute of Sport-National Research Institute, Warsaw, Poland; 3School of Sport and Leisure, Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, Melgaço, Portugal; 4Institute of Primary Care, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Anthropometry and neuromuscular fitness have been shown to relate with taekwondo (TKD performance; however, little information is available on the variation of these fitness components by sex and age in athletes practicing this sport. The aim of the present study was to examine the anthropometry and neuromuscular fitness of TKD athletes by sex and age. A total of 393 athletes (7–48 years old, separated into six age groups (7–9, 10–11, 12–13, 14–17, 18–32, and 33+, were examined for anthropometry and performed a series of neuromuscular fitness tests (flexibility, agility, muscle power, and isometric strength. An age × sex interaction on body mass, body height, and body fat percentage (BF, p≤0.003, η2≥0.045, but not on body mass index (p=0.172, η2=0.020, was shown, where a larger increase in body mass and body height from 12–13 to 14–17 groups was observed in males than in females, and the sex difference in BF increased from 12–13 to 14–17 age group. An age × sex interaction on sit-and-reach (SAR test, mean power output in the Bosco test, and Abalakov jump (p≤0.038, η2≥0.031 was observed with larger differences between 12–13 and 18–32 groups in males than in females. In SAR, it was remarkable that the male athletes achieved similar scores as female athletes in the 18–32 group. An age × sex group interaction on measures of isometric muscle strength (right and left handgrip, trunk, and legs was also shown (p≤0.002, η2≥0.068, where larger differences in male than female athletes were

  10. Digital 2D-photogrammetry and direct anthropometry--a comparing study on test accomplishment and measurement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Gromberg, Christine; Schüler, Grit; Hermanussen, Michael; Scheffler, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this methodological anthropometric study was to compare direct anthropometry and digital two-dimensional photogrammetry in 18 male and 27 female subjects, aged 24 to 65 years, from Potsdam, Germany. In view of the rising interest in reliable biometric kephalofacial data, we focussed on head and face measurements. Out of 34 classic facial anatomical landmarks, 27 landmarks were investigated both by direct anthropometry and 2D-photogrammetry; 7 landmarks could not be localized by 2D-photogrammetry. Twenty-six kephalofacial distances were analysed both by direct anthropometry and digital 2D-photogrammetry. Kephalofacial distances are on average 7.6% shorter when obtained by direct anthropometry. The difference between the two techniques is particularly evident in total head height (vertex-gnathion) due to the fact that vertex is usually covered by hair and escapes from photogrammetry. Also the distances photographic sellion-gnathion (1.3 cm, i. e. 11.6%) and nasal-gnathion (1.2 cm, i. e. 9.4%) differ by more than one centimetre. Differences below 0.5 cm between the two techniques were found when measuring mucosa-lip-height (2.2%), gonia (3.0%), glabella-stomion (3.9%), and nose height (glabella-subnasal) (4.0%). Only the estimates of forehead width were significantly narrower when obtained by 2D-photogrammetry (-1.4 cm, -13.1%). The methodological differences increased with increasing magnitude of the kephalometric distance. Apart from these limitations, both techniques are similarly valid and may replace each other.

  11. Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Emma; Wells, Jonathan C K; Cole, Tim J; O'Callaghan, Michael; Stock, Jay T

    2015-04-01

    The patterns of association between maternal or paternal and neonatal phenotype may offer insight into how neonatal characteristics are shaped by evolutionary processes, such as conflicting parental interests in fetal investment and obstetric constraints. Paternal interests are theoretically served by maximizing fetal growth, and maternal interests by managing investment in current and future offspring, but whether paternal and maternal influences act on different components of overall size is unknown. We tested whether parents' prepregnancy height and body mass index (BMI) were related to neonatal anthropometry (birthweight, head circumference, absolute and proportional limb segment and trunk lengths, subcutaneous fat) among 1,041 Australian neonates using stepwise linear regression. Maternal and paternal height and maternal BMI were associated with birthweight. Paternal height related to offspring forearm and lower leg lengths, maternal height and BMI to neonatal head circumference, and maternal BMI to offspring adiposity. Principal components analysis identified three components of variability reflecting neonatal "head and trunk skeletal size," "adiposity," and "limb lengths." Regression analyses of the component scores supported the associations of head and trunk size or adiposity with maternal anthropometry, and limb lengths with paternal anthropometry. Our results suggest that while neonatal fatness reflects environmental conditions (maternal physiology), head circumference and limb and trunk lengths show differing associations with parental anthropometry. These patterns may reflect genetics, parental imprinting and environmental influences in a manner consistent with parental conflicts of interest. Paternal height may relate to neonatal limb length as a means of increasing fetal growth without exacerbating the risk of obstetric complications. © 2014 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Prediction of fat-free body mass from bioelectrical impedance and anthropometry among 3-year-old children using DXA

    OpenAIRE

    Ejlerskov, Katrine T.; Jensen, Signe M.; Christensen, Line B.; Ritz, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Mølgaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    For 3-year-old children suitable methods to estimate body composition are sparse. We aimed to develop predictive equations for estimating fat-free mass (FFM) from bioelectrical impedance (BIA) and anthropometry using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as reference method using data from 99 healthy 3-year-old Danish children. Predictive equations were derived from two multiple linear regression models, a comprehensive model (height2/resistance (RI), six anthropometric measurements) and a s...

  13. New values anthropometry for classification of nutritional status in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Rodrigues, R A; Martinez Espinosa, M; Duarte Melo, C; Rodrigues Perracini, M; Rezende Fett, W C; Fett, C A

    2014-07-01

    Anthropometry provides information on the physical status of the individual and can be associated with aspects of health including nutritional status. Currently, the stratification of the arm and calf circumferences is classified into only two situations: "malnourished" and "well-nourished". A total of 513 interviews were conducted, and 391 elderly people (≥ 65 years) completed the assessment using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and anthropometry of selected samples of the population of Cuiabá-MT. The body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) was calculated for the elderly people, establishing five new reference values for circumferences, arm relaxed (RAC), abdomen (AC), and calf (CC) in centimeters (cm). The median age was 71 years (64% women and 36% men) and was correlated to the RAC (r=-0.180, p<0.001) and CC (r=-0.202, pp<0.001). The BMI obtained the median of 27 (15% malnourished, risk of malnutrition 13%, eutrophic 24%; overweight 33%, obese 16%), and it was correlated to the RAC (r=0.798, pp<0.001), AC (r=0.823 p p<0.001) and CC (r=0.605, pp<0.001). The MNA was 26 (malnourished 13.8%, risk of malnutrition 12.3%, well-nourished, 73.9%). The BMI stratification by morbidity vs no morbidity was 27.50 (n=287) and 24.4 (n=104) to total sample respectively (pp<0,05). The RAC x AC (r=0.798, pp<0.001), RAC x CC (r=0.648, pp<0.001), and CC x AC (r=0.496, pp<0.001) were correlated between themselves. The eutrophic classification by circumference for both genders: RAC=27.1-29.00 cm, AC=88.1-95.00 cm, CC=32.60-33.00 cm. There are more overweight and obese than malnourished, which is a risk factor for morbidity and MNA only identifies malnutrition. Circumferences showed good association with BMI and are easy to apply. Therefore, the proposal of the circumferences can simplify and expand the nutritional assessment.

  14. Technical activity profile and influence of body anthropometry on playing performance in female elite team handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsik, Lars B; Aagaard, Per; Madsen, Klavs

    2015-04-01

    To determine the physical demands placed on female elite team handball (TH) players in relation to playing position and body anthropometry, female elite TH primarily field players were monitored during match-play using video recording and subsequent computerized technical match analysis during 5 regular tournament match seasons. Technical match activities were distributed in 6 major types of playing actions (shots, breakthroughs, fast breaks, technical errors, defensive errors, and tackles) and further divided into various subcategories (e.g., type of shot, hard or light tackles, claspings, screenings, and blockings). Furthermore, anthropometric measurements were performed. Each player had 28.3 ± 11.0 (group means ± SD) high-intense playing actions per match with a total effective playing time of 50.70 ± 5.83 minutes. On average, each player made 2.8 ± 2.6 fast breaks, gave 7.9 ± 14.4 screenings, received 14.6 ± 9.2 tackles in total, and performed 7.7 ± 3.7 shots while in offense, along with 3.5 ± 3.8 blockings, 1.9 ± 2.7 claspings, and 6.2 ± 3.8 hard tackles in defense. Mean body height, body mass, and age in the Danish Premier Female Team Handball League were 175.4 ± 6.1 cm, 69.5 ± 6.5 kg, and 25.4 ± 3.7 years, respectively. Wing players were lighter (63.5 ± 4.8 kg, p games intermittently perform a high number of short-term, high-intense technical playing actions making modern female elite TH a physically demanding team sport. No sign of technical fatigue were observed, since the amount of intense technical playing actions remained unchanged in the second half. Marked positional differences in the physical demands were demonstrated, with wing players performing more fast breaks and less physical confrontations than BP and PV. Body anthropometry differed substantially between different playing positions. Consequently, this should lead to an increase in physical training in modern female elite TH directed at specific positions and individual physical

  15. Characterization of college football athletes and basketball: Anthropometry and Body Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Gil Gómez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction and Objectives. Anthropometric study of university population, comprising men and women college athletes participating in the Championships of Spain's 2008 College basketball and football. The aim of this study is to describe the body composition of male and female college athletes in football and basketball specialtiesMethods. This is a cross-sectional study with direct anthropometric measurements. These have been obtained by following the rules and techniques recommended by the International Group of Cineantropometry.Results. The college athletes generally have a higher percentage of muscle weight and fat mass and bone weight lower percentage of male college athletes. The male basketball players have a higher percentage of fat mass and bone weight and lower percentage of muscle weight in football players.  mong women, we found that basketball players have a higher percentage of bone weight and lower percentage of fat mass and muscle mass than soccer players.Conclusions. The competitive level of body composition changes substantially, primarily among females. It is important to have data on body composition at the college level.Keywords: Body Composition, Fat Mass, Muscle Mass, Weight Bone, Anthropometry.

  16. The science of badminton: game characteristics, anthropometry, physiology, visual fitness and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phomsoupha, Michael; Laffaye, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    Badminton is a racket sport for two or four people, with a temporal structure characterized by actions of short duration and high intensity. This sport has five events: men's and women's singles, men's and women's doubles, and mixed doubles, each requiring specific preparation in terms of technique, control and physical fitness. Badminton is one of the most popular sports in the world, with 200 million adherents. The decision to include badminton in the 1992 Olympics Game increased participation in the game. This review focuses on the game characteristics, anthropometry, physiology, visual attributes and biomechanics of badminton. Players are generally tall and lean, with an ectomesomorphic body type suited to the high physiological demands of a match. Indeed, a typical match characteristic is a rally time of 7 s and a resting time of 15 s, with an effective playing time of 31%. This sport is highly demanding, with an average heart rate (HR) of over 90% of the player's maximal HR. The intermittent actions during a game are demanding on both the aerobic and anaerobic systems: 60-70% on the aerobic system and approximately 30% on the anaerobic system, with greater demand on the alactic metabolism with respect to the lactic anaerobic metabolism. The shuttlecock has an atypical trajectory, and the players perform specific movements such as lunging and jumping, and powerful strokes using a specific pattern of movement. Lastly, badminton players are visually fit, picking up accurate visual information in a short time. Knowledge of badminton can help to improve coaching and badminton skills.

  17. CRP and suPAR are differently related to anthropometry and subclinical organ damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Sehestedt, Thomas; Marott, Jacob L; Hansen, Tine W; Olsen, Michael H; Andersen, Ove; Linneberg, Allan; Madsbad, Sten; Haugaard, Steen B; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2013-08-10

    Low-grade inflammation is a marker for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein (CRP) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) independently predict CVD. We tested the hypothesis that these biomarkers reflect different aspects of the inflammation associated with CVD. We studied 2273 subjects without CVD. Log-transformed CRP and suPAR were included in general linear and logistic regression models to compare associations with measures of anthropometry and subclinical organ damage (SOD). Owing to interactions on body mass index (BMI) (Panthropometry. In both genders, independent of smoking, log-CRP was positively associated with BMI (β: 0.28 to 0.40, P3: 1.31 (1.16-1.47), whereas log-CRP was not (1.00 (0.89-1.11))). CRP is positively associated with anthropometric measures, whereas suPAR is linked to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Interactions Between Race/Ethnicity and Anthropometry in Risk of Incident Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsey, Pamela L.; Pereira, Mark A.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Kandula, Namratha R.; Jacobs, David R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how adiposity influences racial/ethnic differences in diabetes incidence by exploring whether relations between anthropometric measures and incident diabetes vary by race/ethnicity. Data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis initiated in 2000 (n = 5,446 US men and women aged 45–84 years) were analyzed by using proportional hazards and Poisson regression. The diabetes incidence rate was 2/100 person-years (n = 479 cases). Interactions were present between race and anthropometry (P-interaction(race × body mass index) = 0.002). The slope of incident diabetes per anthropometric unit was greatest for Chinese, less for whites and Hispanics, and still less for blacks. For small waist, risk of incident diabetes was <1/100 person-years for all racial/ethnic groups. At intermediate waist levels, Chinese had the highest and whites the lowest rates of incident diabetes. At the respective 95th percentiles of waist circumference, risk of incident diabetes per 100 person-years was 3.9 for Chinese (104 cm), 3.5 for whites (121 cm), 5.0 for blacks (125 cm), and 5.3 for Hispanics (121 cm). Adiposity influenced relative diabetes occurrence across racial/ethnic groups, in that Chinese had a steeper diabetes risk per unit of adiposity. However, the generally low level of adiposity in Chinese led to a relatively low diabetes occurrence. PMID:20570825

  19. Maternal vitamin D status and infant anthropometry in a US multi-centre cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Cara L.; Gernand, Alison D.; Roth, Daniel E.; Bodnar, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy is linked to foetal growth and may impact infant growth. Aim This study examined the association between maternal vitamin D status and infant anthropometry. Subjects and methods Data came from n = 2473 mother–child pairs from the 12-site US Collaborative Perinatal Project (1959–1965). Maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured at ≤26 weeks gestation. Multivariate-adjusted linear mixed models were used to relate maternal vitamin D status to infant z-scores for length (LAZ), head circumference (HCZ), weight (WAZ) and BMI (BMIZ), measured at birth and 4, 8 and 12 months. Results Infants with maternal 25(OH)D ≥30 nmol/L vs <30 nmol/L had LAZ and HCZ measures 0.13 (95% CI = 0.03–0.23) and 0.20 (95% CI = 0.11–0.28) units higher, respectively, across the first year of life. Similar differences in WAZ and BMIZ at birth were resolved by 12 months of age due to interactions indicating steeper age slopes in infants with maternal 25(OH)D <30 nmol/L. Conclusion Low maternal vitamin D status was associated with deficits at birth in infant weight and BMI that were recouped across the first year of life; associations with reduced measures of linear and skeletal growth were sustained from birth to 12 months. PMID:25268792

  20. Predicting hepatic steatosis and liver fat content in obese children based on biochemical parameters and anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H-X; Xu, X-Q; Fu, J-F; Lai, C; Chen, X-F

    2015-04-01

    Predictors of quantitative evaluation of hepatic steatosis and liver fat content (LFC) using clinical and laboratory variables available in the general practice in the obese children are poorly identified. To build predictive models of hepatic steatosis and LFC in obese children based on biochemical parameters and anthropometry. Hepatic steatosis and LFC were determined using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 171 obese children aged 5.5-18.0 years. Routine clinical and laboratory parameters were also measured in all subjects. Group analysis, univariable correlation analysis, and multivariate logistic and linear regression analysis were used to develop a liver fat score to identify hepatic steatosis and a liver fat equation to predict LFC in each subject. The predictive model of hepatic steatosis in our participants based on waist circumference and alanine aminotransferase had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.959 (95% confidence interval: 0.927-0.990). The optimal cut-off value of 0.525 for determining hepatic steatosis had sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 90%. A liver fat equation was also developed based on the same parameters of hepatic steatosis liver fat score, which would be used to calculate the LFC in each individual. The liver fat score and liver fat equation, consisting of routinely available variables, may help paediatricians to accurately determine hepatic steatosis and LFC in clinical practice, but external validation is needed before it can be employed for this purpose. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  1. Design of Lesehan Chair by Using Kansei Engineering Method And Anthropometry Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pambudi, A. T.; Suryoputro, M. R.; Sari, A. D.; Kurnia, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Special Region of Yogyakarta (DIY) is known as city for academic. Many people come to get some education in college. They live in boarding house with some supporting facilities. The most common facilities is low table which lead students have to sit on the floor while studying on table which could cause higher risk of back pain and musculoskeletal disorder. To identify the solution to reduce back pain and musculoskeletal risk, it is needed to design a lesehan chair which also appropriate to customer needs. Kansei engineering method was used with a total of 30 respondents participated, 15 kansei words collected, and 12 kansei words selected by doing validation and reliability test. The result of this study showed that quality, aesthetics, and comfort level influence the design of lesehan chair. A design of lesehan chair was created by considering the suitable concept and merging it with the physical design and its anthropometry measurement. In this case, marginal homogeneity test is needed to identify the differences between each kansei words attribute and the design or product recommendation. The marginal homogeneity test results show that the design and product recommendation has fulfilled customer's desires and needs. For further research, it is needed to analyse and evaluate the posture of lesehan chair users in order to develop and improve its performance.

  2. Predicting muscle mass from anthropometry using magnetic resonance imaging as reference: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gindan, Yasmin Y; Hankey, Catherine R; Leslie, Wilma; Govan, Lindsay; Lean, Michael E J

    2014-02-01

    Identification and management of sarcopenia are limited by lack of reliable simple approaches to assess muscle mass. The aim of this review is to identify and evaluate simple methods to quantify muscle mass/volume of adults. Using Cochrane Review methodology, Medline (1946-2012), Embase (1974-2012), Web of Science (1898-2012), PubMed, and the Cochrane Library (to 08/2012) were searched for publications that included prediction equations (from anthropometric measurements) to estimate muscle mass by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adults. Of 257 papers identified from primary search terms, 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies (n = 10) assessed only regional/limb muscle mass/volume. Many studies (n = 9) assessed limb circumference adjusted for skinfold thickness, which limits their practical applications. Only two included validation in separate subject-samples, and two reported relationships between whole-body MRI-measured muscle mass and anthropometry beyond linear correlations. In conclusion, one simple prediction equation shows promise, but it has not been validated in a separate population with different investigators. Furthermore, it did not incorporate widely available trunk/limb girths, which have offered valuable prediction of body composition in other studies. © 2014 International Life Sciences Institute.

  3. Work stress, anthropometry, lung function, blood pressure, and blood-based biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Westerlund, Hugo; Goldberg, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Work stress is a risk factor for cardio-metabolic diseases, but few large-scale studies have examined the clinical profile of individuals with work stress. To address this limitation, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 43,593 working adults from a French population-based sample aged 1......, creatinine, glucose levels or resting blood pressure measures. This indicates that work stress is associated altered metabolic profile, increased systemic inflammation, and, in men, poorer liver function, which is a marker of high alcohol consumption.......Work stress is a risk factor for cardio-metabolic diseases, but few large-scale studies have examined the clinical profile of individuals with work stress. To address this limitation, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 43,593 working adults from a French population-based sample aged 18......–72 years (the CONSTANCES cohort). According to the Effort-Reward Imbalance model, work stress was defined as an imbalance between perceived high efforts and low rewards at work. A standardized health examination included measures of anthropometry, lung function, blood pressure and standard blood...

  4. 3-D breast anthropometry of plus-sized women in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandarum, Reena; Yu, Winnie; Hunter, Lawrance

    2011-09-01

    Exploratory retail studies in South Africa indicate that plus-sized women experience problems and dissatisfaction with poorly fitting bras. The lack of 3-D anthropometric studies for the plus-size women's bra market initiated this research. 3-D body torso measurements were collected from a convenience sample of 176 plus-sized women in South Africa. 3-D breast measurements extracted from the TC(2) NX12-3-D body scanner 'breast module' software were compared with traditional tape measurements. Regression equations show that the two methods of measurement were highly correlated although, on average, the bra cup size determining factor 'bust minus underbust' obtained from the 3-D method is approximately 11% smaller than that of the manual method. It was concluded that the total bust volume correlated with the quadrant volume (r = 0.81), cup length, bust length and bust prominence, should be selected as the overall measure of bust size and not the traditional bust girth and the underbust measurement. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study contributes new data and adds to the knowledge base of anthropometry and consumer ergonomics on bra fit and support, published in this, the Ergonomics Journal, by Chen et al. (2010) on bra fit and White et al. (2009) on breast support during overground running.

  5. Anthropometry, lipid profile and dietary pattern of patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajifdar B

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The anthropometry, lipid profile and dietary characteristics of 114 patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease (IHD were evaluated. There were 91 (80% men and the mean age was 56 +/- 9 years. The body mass index was near normal (24.4 +/- 3.4, but the waist: hip ratio was high (0.94 +/- 0.06 suggesting central obesity. This was well in accordance of the step II recommendations of the NCEP guidelines as regards their caloric intake and its break-up in terms of carbohydrate, protein and fat (including saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acids content. Their daily cholesterol intake (31 +/- 32 mg/day, range 4-180 was very low. The total cholesterol (212 +/- 37 mg% was marginally elevated, HDL cholesterol (33 +/- 7.5 mg% was low, LDL cholesterol (148 +/- 39 mg% was high and the total: HDL ratio (6.8 +/- 2.0 was significantly abnormal. The serum triglyceride level (154 +/- 68 mg% was on the higher side of normal. These observations give further credence to the recently evolving view that there are different and hitherto unrecognised risk factors of IHD in Indians, who seem to have the highest incidence of IHD amongst all ethnic groups of the world despite consuming a diet low in fat and cholesterol content.

  6. Radiologic anthropometry of the hand in patients with familial short stature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, C.D.; Lifshitz, F.; Levenbrown, J.

    1988-04-01

    Fifth metacarpal bone shortening (brachymetacarpia V) was recently described to be highly prevalent in children with familial short stature (FSS). To characterize the hand bones of FSS patients with and without brachymetacarpia V, the left hand bone age radiographs of 26 FSS children were reviewed. In 16/19 patients with clinical brachymetacarpia V radiographs revealed fifth metacarpal bone shortening with a gap of 2 mm or more between the distal end of the fifth metacarpal bone and a tangential line connecting the distal ends of the third and fourth metacarpal bones. Only one of 7 patients without clinical brachymetacarpia V had a gap of 2 mm. Radiologic anthropometry revealed that FSS patients with clinically shortened fifth metacarpal bone frequently had shortened first metacarpal bones, second and third proximal phalanges, and fifth distal phalanx as well. FSS patients without clinical fifth metacarpal bone shortening had shortened 3rd and 4th metacarpal bones, fifth proximal phalanx, and fifth distal phalanx. Fifth metacarpal bone shortening was only detected clinically if the fourth metacarpal bone was not short as well. Reduction in height correlated more with reduction in metacarpal bone length than with that of the other hand bones. These peculiar tubular bone alterations commonly seen in FSS suggest a disturbance in endochondral ossification, the process primarily involved in tubular bone elongation.

  7. Anthropometry and renal size of children suffering under sustained conflict in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehall, John

    2008-11-01

    To measure anthropometry, blood pressure and renal lengths of children in a war torn region of Sri Lanka and compare results with local and international standards. Measurements of 147 Tamil children in Kilinochchi, north-east Sri Lanka, were compared with the World Health Organization standards using Anthro 2005 software in a period of relative peace in December 2005. Renal lengths were measured by ultrasound and compared with Australian and Indian data. 1 2-5 years of age. The weight-to-height ratio for combined sexes revealed 13.9% were children was children was children are stunted and wasted in this older group. Girls are more affected than boys. 3 Renal lengths fell progressively below -2 SD for both age and height when compared with Australian and Indian children. Tamil children in Kilinochchi are more stunted and wasted than others in Sri Lanka, except those in the tea estates. Progressive renal stunting because of under-nutrition may be a mechanism for later disease. The loss of potential for human development can only be addressed by long-term improvement in access to nutrition.

  8. Accuracy and reliability of 3D stereophotogrammetry: A comparison to direct anthropometry and 2D photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindaroğlu, Furkan; Kutlu, Pınar; Duran, Gökhan Serhat; Görgülü, Serkan; Aslan, Erhan

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry by comparing it with the direct anthropometry and digital photogrammetry methods. The reliability of 3D stereophotogrammetry was also examined. Six profile and four frontal parameters were directly measured on the faces of 80 participants. The same measurements were repeated using two-dimensional (2D) photogrammetry and 3D stereophotogrammetry (3dMDflex System, 3dMD, Atlanta, Ga) to obtain images of the subjects. Another observer made the same measurements for images obtained with 3D stereophotogrammetry, and interobserver reproducibility was evaluated for 3D images. Both observers remeasured the 3D images 1 month later, and intraobserver reproducibility was evaluated. Statistical analysis was conducted using the paired samples t-test, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman limits of agreement. The highest mean difference was 0.30 mm between direct measurement and photogrammetry, 0.21 mm between direct measurement and 3D stereophotogrammetry, and 0.5 mm between photogrammetry and 3D stereophotogrammetry. The lowest agreement value was 0.965 in the Sn-Pro parameter between the photogrammetry and 3D stereophotogrammetry methods. Agreement between the two observers varied from 0.90 (Ch-Ch) to 0.99 (Sn-Me) in linear measurements. For intraobserver agreement, the highest difference between means was 0.33 for observer 1 and 1.42 mm for observer 2. Measurements obtained using 3D stereophotogrammetry indicate that it may be an accurate and reliable imaging method for use in orthodontics.

  9. Nasal Anthropometry on Facial Computed Tomography Scans for Rhinoplasty in Koreans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Moon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCephalometric analysis is essential for planning treatment in maxillofacial and aesthetic facial surgery. Although photometric analysis of the Korean nose has been attempted in the past, anthropometry of the deeper nasal structures in the same population based on computerized tomography (CT has not been published. We therefore measured three anthropometric parameters of the nose on CT scans in our clinical series of patients.MethodsWe conducted the current retrospective study of a total of 100 patients (n=100 who underwent a CT-guided radiological measurement at our institution during a period ranging from January of 2008 to August of 2010. In these patients, we took three anthropometric measurements: the nasofrontal angle, the pyramidal angle, and the linear distance between the nasion and the tip of the nasal bone.ResultsThe mean nasofrontal angle was 131.14° in the male patients and 140.70° in the female patients. The mean linear distance between the nasion and the tip of the nasal bone was 21.28 mm and 18.02 mm, respectively. The mean nasal pyramidal angle was 112.89° and 103.25° at the level of the nasal root, 117.49° and 115.60° at the middle level of the nasal bone, and 127.99° and 125.04° at the level of the tip of the nasal bone, respectively.ConclusionsIn conclusion, our data will be helpful in the preparation of silicone implants for augmentation and/or corrective rhinoplasty in ethnic Korean people.

  10. Influence of maturation on anthropometry and body composition in Japanese junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine maturity-related differences in anthropometry and body composition in Japanese youth within a single year. Methods Two hundred and ten Japanese youth aged from 13 to 13.99 years participated in this study. Their maturity status was assessed using a self-assessment of stage of pubic hair development. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to estimate percent body fat and lean body mass (LBM). Muscle thickness of the anterior thigh, posterior lower leg and rectus abdominis muscles were measured by ultrasound. Results For boys, height, body weight, and LBM in less mature groups were lower than that in more mature groups. The maturity-related differences were still significant after adjusting for chronological age. On the other hand, muscle thickness values in the lower extremity and abdomen differed among the groups at different stages of pubic hair development, whereas there was no maturity-related difference in the relative values corrected by LBM, except for those thickness values measured at the abdomen. For girls, only the muscle thickness at the anterior thigh and muscle thickness relative to LBM1/3 at the posterior lower leg was significantly affected by maturity status, but significant maturity-related difference was not found after adjusting for chronological age. Conclusions At least for Japanese boys and girls aged 13 years, maturity status affected body size in boys, but not in girls, and the influence of maturation on the muscularity of the lower extremity and trunk muscles is less in both sexes. PMID:23497570

  11. Anthropometry, CT, and DXA as predictors of GH deficiency in premenopausal women: ROC curve analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredella, Miriam A.; Utz, Andrea L.; Torriani, Martin; Thomas, Bijoy; Schoenfeld, David A.; Miller, Karen K.

    2009-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is a strong determinant of growth hormone (GH) secretion, and states of GH deficiency are associated with increased visceral adiposity and decreased lean body mass. The purpose of our study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of different methods of assessing body composition [anthropometry, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and computed tomography (CT)] to predict GH deficiency in premenopausal women and threshold values for each technique to predict GH deficiency, using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. We studied a group of 45 healthy lean, overweight, and obese premenopausal women who underwent anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist and hip circumferences, skin fold thickness), DXA, CT, and a GH-releasing hormone-arginine stimulation test. ROC curve analysis was used to determine cutoff values for each method to identify GH deficiency. Visceral adiposity measured by CT showed the highest sensitivity and specificity for identifying subjects with GH deficiency with a cutoff of >9,962 mm2 [area under the curve (AUC), 0.95; sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 77.8%; P = 0.0001]. Largest waist circumference showed high sensitivity and specificity with a cutoff of >101.7 cm (AUC, 0.89; sensitivity, 88.9%; specificity, 75%; P = 0.0001). When the ROC curves of visceral fat measured by CT and largest waist circumference were compared, the difference between the two methods was not statistically significant (P = 0.36). Our study showed that the largest waist circumference predicts the presence of GH deficiency in healthy premenopausal women with high sensitivity and specificity and nearly as well as CT measurement of visceral adiposity. It can be used to identify women in whom GH deficiency is likely and therefore in whom formal GH stimulation testing might be indicated. PMID:19095751

  12. Changes in anthropometry and mortality in maintenance hemodialysis patients in the HEMO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chi-Ting; Yabes, Jonathan; Pike, Francis; Weiner, Daniel E; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Burrowes, Jerrilynn D; Rocco, Michael V; Unruh, Mark L

    2013-12-01

    Poor nutritional status has been associated with worse patient survival in maintenance hemodialysis patients. Anthropometric values are important nutritional measures, incorporating muscle and fat mass. However, the association of changes in anthropometry, including midarm circumference (MAC) and skinfold measurements, with mortality in hemodialysis patients remains unknown. Accordingly, we explored this association in the Hemodialysis (HEMO) Study. Post hoc analysis of cohort data from a clinical trial. 1,846 hemodialysis patients enrolled in the HEMO Study. MAC and skinfold measurements. Longitudinal changes in MAC and skinfolds were jointly modeled using repeated measures and survival modeling. Time-to-event outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiac death and hospitalization, and infection-related death. Mean MAC was 30.1 cm, and mean baseline sum of subscapular, biceps, and triceps skinfolds was 42.4 mm. During a median follow-up of 2.5 years, there were 845 deaths. During follow-up, MAC and the skinfold measurement declined 0.26 cm and 1.1 mm per year, respectively. Declines in MAC (per cm) and skinfold (per mm) measurements were associated with higher all-cause mortality (HRs of 1.58 [95% CI, 1.29-1.94; P 85 kg. Declines in skinfold thickness were not associated significantly with outcomes except for participants with BMI ≤25 kg/m2. Declines in MAC are associated significantly with all-cause mortality and cardiac outcomes in hemodialysis patients, most notably in those with BMI ≤25 kg/m2. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anthropometry in the Prediction of Sleep Disordered Breathing in HIV-infected and -uninfected Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Todd T.; Patil, Susheel P.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Laffan, Alison M.; Godfrey, Rebecca J; Johnson, Jacquett R; Johnson-Hill, Lisette M; Reynolds, Sandra M; Schwartz, Alan R.; Smith, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and neck circumference (NC) are important screening tools for sleep disordered breathing (SDB). However, the utility of anthropometry for this purpose has not been evaluated among HIV-infected patients. Methods HIV-uninfected men (HIV−; n=60), HIV-infected men receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HIV+/HAART; n=58), and HIV-infected men not receiving HAART (HIV+/No HAART; n=41) from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study underwent a nocturnal sleep study and anthropomorphic assessment. Moderate-severe SDB was defined as an apnea/hypopnea event rate ≥15 episodes/hour. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the ability of different anthropometric measurements to predict SDB within each group. Results Moderate-severe SDB was found in 48% (HIV−:57%; HIV+/HAART: 41%; HIV+/No HAART−: 44%). The performance of BMI, WC, and NC to predict SDB was excellent among the HIV− men (ROC areas-under-the curve (AUC): 0.83, 0.88, 0.88, respectively) and fair among the HIV+/HAART group (AUCs: 0.71, 0.77, 0.77, respectively). In contrast, these measurements had no predictive value in the HIV+/No HAART group (AUCs: 0.43, 0.41, 0.45, respectively). Moreover, in the HIV+/No HAART group, moderate-severe SDB was independently associated with serum C-reactive protein ≥3.0 mg/L (Odds Ratio (OR) 6.9; p=0.04) and HIV RNA > 10,000 copies/ml (OR 7.1; p=0.05). Conclusions BMI, waist circumference, and neck circumference had better predictive value for moderate-severe SDB in HIV-uninfected men compared to HIV-infected men, and had no value among HIV-infected men not receiving HAART. Among this latter group, systemic inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of SDB. PMID:20587858

  14. Associations of anthropometry and lifestyle factors with HDL subspecies according to apolipoprotein C-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Manja; Furtado, Jeremy D; Jiang, Gordon Z; Gray, Brianna E; Cai, Tianxi; Sacks, Frank; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jensen, Majken K

    2017-06-01

    The presence of apoC-III on HDL impairs HDL's inverse association with coronary heart disease (CHD). Little is known about modifiable factors explaining variation in HDL subspecies defined according to apoC-III. The aim was to investigate cross-sectional associations of anthropometry and lifestyle with HDL subspecies in 3,631 participants from the Diet, Cancer, and Health study originally selected for a case-cohort study (36% women; age 50-65 years) who were all free of CHD. Greater adiposity and less activity were associated with higher HDL containing apoC-III and lower HDL lacking apoC-III. Per each 15 cm higher waist circumference, the level of HDL containing apoC-III was 2.8% higher (95% CI: 0.4, 5.3; P = 0.024) and the level of HDL not containing apoC-III was 4.7% lower (95% CI: -6.0, -3.4; P = <0.0001). Associations for physical activity were most robust to multivariable modeling. Each 20 metabolic equivalent task hours per week reported higher physical activity was associated with 0.9% (95% CI: -1.7, -0.1; P = 0.031) lower HDL containing apoC-III and 0.5% higher (95% CI: 0.1, 1.0; P = 0.029) HDL lacking apoC-III. Lower alcohol consumption was associated with lower HDL lacking apoC-III (percent difference per 15 g/day: 1.58 (95% CI: 0.84, 2.32; P = <0.0001). Adiposity and sedentary lifestyle were associated with a less favorable HDL subspecies profile. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Estimation of stature from radiologic anthropometry of the lumbar vertebral dimensions in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kui; Chang, Yun-feng; Fan, Fei; Deng, Zhen-hua

    2015-11-01

    The recent study was to assess the relationship between the radiologic anthropometry of the lumbar vertebral dimensions and stature in Chinese and to develop regression formulae to estimate stature from these dimensions. A total of 412 normal, healthy volunteers, comprising 206 males and 206 females, were recruited. The linear regression analysis were performed to assess the correlation between the stature and lengths of various segments of the lumbar vertebral column. Among the regression equations created for single variable, the predictive value was greatest for the reconstruction of stature from the lumbar segment in both sexes and subgroup analysis. When individual vertebral body was used, the heights of posterior vertebral body of L3 gave the most accurate results for male group, the heights of central vertebral body of L1 provided the most accurate results for female group and female group with age above 45 years, the heights of central vertebral body of L3 gave the most accurate results for the groups with age from 20-45 years for both sexes and the male group with age above 45 years. The heights of anterior vertebral body of L5 gave the less accurate results except for the heights of anterior vertebral body of L4 provided the less accurate result for the male group with age above 45 years. As expected, multiple regression equations were more successful than equations derived from a single variable. The research observations suggest lumbar vertebral dimensions to be useful in stature estimation among Chinese population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Anthropometry-Based Equations for the Estimation of the Total Body Water in Koreans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoung Woo; Kim, Gyeong A; Lim, Hee Jung; Lee, Sun Young; Park, Geun Ho; Song, Joon Ho

    2005-01-01

    For developing race-specific anthropometry-based total body water (TBW) equations, we measured TBW using bioelectrical impedance analysis (TBWBIA) in 2,943 healthy Korean adults. Among them, 2,223 were used as a reference group. Two equations (TBWK1 and TBWK2) were developed based on age, sex, height, and body weight. The adjusted R2 was 0.908 for TBWK1 and 0.910 for TBWK2. The remaining 720 subjects were used for the validation of our results. Watson (TBWW) and Hume-Weyers (TBWH) formulas were also used. In men, TBWBIA showed the highest correlation with TBWH, followed by TBWK1, TBWK2 and TBWW. TBWK1 and TBWK2 showed the lower root mean square errors (RMSE) and mean prediction errors (ME) than TBWW and TBWH. On the Bland-Altman plot, the correlations between the differences and means were smaller for TBWK2 than for TBWK1. On the contrary, TBWBIA showed the highest correlation with TBWW, followed by TBWK2, TBWK1, and TBWH in females. RMSE was smallest in TBWW, followed by TBWK2, TBWK1 and TBWH. ME was closest to zero for TBWK2, followed by TBWK1, TBWW and TBWH. The correlation coefficients between the means and differences were highest in TBWW, and lowest in TBWK2. In conclusion, TBWK2 provides better accuracy with a smaller bias than the TBWW or TBWH in males. TBWK2 shows a similar accuracy, but with a smaller bias than TBWW in females. PMID:15953867

  17. The effect of breast anthropometry on the Hybrid III 5th female chest response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylko, Suzanne; Charlebois, Dominique; Bussières, Alain; Dalmotas, Dainius

    2006-11-01

    Two manufacturers, Denton ATD and FTSS, currently produce the Hybrid III 5th percentile female dummy. In response to concerns raised by industry that differences in the anthropometry of the molded breasts between the two manufacturers may influence chest responses, Transport Canada conducted a comparative testing program. Thorax biofidelity tests were conducted to compare force-deflection characteristics; full frontal rigid-barrier tests were conducted at 40, 48 and 56 km/h to compare chest responses, and out-of-position chest on module static airbag deployment tests were conducted to compare peak chest deflections of the Denton and FTSS dummy jackets and of a prototype jacket without breasts. Differences in force-deflection characteristics were observed during biofidelity pendulum impacts of the two dummies, with much of the differences attributed to the different chest jackets. Differences of up to 11 mm in the peak sternum deflection and of the order of 15 g for the 3-ms chest acceleration clips were noted in rigid-barrier vehicle tests. In the out-of-position airbag-deployment tests, differences in the magnitude of peak chest deflections were observed. The prototype chest jacket without breasts was found to improve repeatability in the belted crash tests and in out-of-position airbag testing. Though neither the Denton nor the FTSS chest jackets fully meet the original design intent of the Hybrid III 5th percentile dummy, the Denton dummy more closely met the drawing specifications and had less manufacturing variability. The results demonstrate the importance of detailed chest flesh assembly specifications, provide evidence that a fully molded jacket design would eliminate manufacturing variability and suggest that removal of the breasts may further improve test repeatability.

  18. Use of serial ultrasound to identify periods of fetal growth restriction in relation to neonatal anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemachandra, Anusha H; Klebanoff, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    The developmental origins of the health and disease hypothesis suggests that fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a risk factor for several chronic diseases of adulthood. However, most supporting studies use birth weight as a proxy measure of FGR. To examine the relationship between birth weight and FGR, the present study used serial prenatal ultrasound to identify periods of FGR during gestation, and related these periods to birth size and shape. The data in this study included serial prenatal ultrasounds performed on 1,349 high-risk Scandinavian women enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Successive Small for Gestational Age Births. Fetal growth velocity between ultrasounds was used to identify periods of isolated FGR, and these were studied in relation to anthropometry at birth. FGR was identified in 184 subjects. A control group of 384 subjects without FGR was also identified. Infants with first-trimester FGR (n = 20) had the highest birth weight, ponderal index, and subscapular skinfold thickness. Infants with second-trimester FGR (n = 37) had the highest arm fat percentage. Infants with early third-trimester FGR (n = 55) had the lowest mean birth weight and ponderal index. When infant gender, gestational age, maternal body mass index, and smoking were controlled, birth weight was predicted only by third-trimester FGR (not first- or second-trimester FGR), and arm fat percent was predicted only by second-trimester FGR. These results suggest that birth weight is not a valid indicator of FGR occurring before the third trimester. Body composition may be a more sensitive marker of early FGR.

  19. Nutritional status among adolescent girls in children's homes: Anthropometry and dietary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Tone; Magala-Nyago, Christine; Iversen, Per Ole

    2017-03-25

    Malnutrition is widespread among disadvantaged people in low-income countries like Uganda. Children and adolescents living in children's homes are considered an especially vulnerable group, and malnutrition among girls is of particular concern since it has intergenerational consequences. Virtually no information exists about the nutritional status of adolescent girls living in children's homes in Uganda. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to assess the nutritional status by evaluating anthropometric indicators, body composition and dietary patterns. Forty-four girls aged 10-19 years living in five children's homes participated in addition to a reference group of 27 adolescent girls from three boarding schools; both in the Ugandan capital Kampala. Height and weight were measured to assess anthropometry. Body composition data was obtained by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Dietary intake was evaluated with a food frequency questionnaire, calculation of dietary diversity score, and a 24-h dietary recall. The adolescent girls living in children's homes suffered from stunting (18.6%), overweight or obesity (18.6%), and were at risk of insufficient intakes of multiple micronutrients, especially of vitamins A, B 12 , C, D, E and calcium. They also had a low intake of essential fatty acids. Dietary diversity was low with a median score of 3 out of 9 food groups. Animal products were rarely consumed. The majority of girls in children's homes consumed a less adequate diet compared to the reference group, thus being at risk of nutrient deficiency-related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Adipose tissue fatty acid patterns and changes in anthropometry: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Catherine Dahm

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diets rich in n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA, but low in n-6 LC-PUFA and 18:1 trans-fatty acids (TFA, may lower the risk of overweight and obesity. These fatty acids have often been investigated individually. We explored associations between global patterns in adipose tissue fatty acids and changes in anthropometry. METHODS: 34 fatty acid species from adipose tissue biopsies were determined in a random sample of 1100 men and women from a Danish cohort study. We used sex-specific principal component analysis and multiple linear regression to investigate the associations of adipose tissue fatty acid patterns with changes in weight, waist circumference (WC, and WC controlled for changes in body mass index (WC(BMI, adjusting for confounders. RESULTS: 7 principal components were extracted for each sex, explaining 77.6% and 78.3% of fatty acid variation in men and women, respectively. Fatty acid patterns with high levels of TFA tended to be positively associated with changes in weight and WC for both sexes. Patterns with high levels of n-6 LC-PUFA tended to be negatively associated with changes in weight and WC in men, and positively associated in women. Associations with patterns with high levels of n-3 LC-PUFA were dependent on the context of the rest of the fatty acid pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Adipose tissue fatty acid patterns with high levels of TFA may be linked to weight gain, but patterns with high n-3 LC-PUFA did not appear to be linked to weight loss. Associations depended on characteristics of the rest of the pattern.

  1. Stress and psychological constructs related to eating behavior are associated with anthropometry and body composition in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hootman, Katie C; Guertin, Kristin A; Cassano, Patricia A

    2018-01-05

    The transition to college is associated with weight gain, but the relation between eating behavior indicators and anthropometric outcomes during this period remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate sex differences in stress, emotional eating, tendency to overeat, and restrained eating behavior, and determine whether the psycho-behavioral constructs assessed immediately prior to starting college are associated with anthropometry and adiposity at the start of college, and with first-semester weight gain. A prospective study administered the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), Satter Eating Competence Inventory, and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) to 264 participants one month before college. Body composition was assessed via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the start of college, and anthropometry (weight, height, waist circumference [WC]) was collected at the beginning and end of the first semester. Ordinary least squares regression tested the cross-sectional association of baseline psychological and behavioral scales with baseline DXA and anthropometry, and the longitudinal association with change in anthropometry. Among 264 participants, 91% (241) had baseline data, and 66% (173) completed follow-up. In sex-adjusted linear regression models, baseline TFEQ disinhibited and emotional (DE; EE) eating sub-scales were positively associated with baseline weight (P = 0.003; DE, P = 0.014; EE), body mass index (BMI, P = 0.002; DE, P = 0.001; EE), WC (P = 0.004; DE, P = 0.006; EE) and DXA fat mass index (P = 0.023; DE, P = 0.014; EE). Baseline PSS was positively associated with subsequent changes in weight and WC among males only (P interaction  = 0.0268 and 0.0017 for weight and WC, respectively). College freshmen with questionnaire scores indicating a greater tendency to overeat in response to external cues and emotions tended to have greater weight, BMI, and WC at the start of college. Males with higher perceived stress at college

  2. Identifying Low Muscle Mass in Patients with Hip Fracture: Validation of Biolectrical Impedance Analysis and Anthropometry Compared to Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steihaug, O M; Gjesdal, C G; Bogen, B; Ranhoff, A H

    2016-01-01

    Older hip fracture patients often have reduced muscle mass, which is associated with adverse outcomes. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) can determine muscle mass, but is not practical in the acute phase. We investigated bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometry compared against DXA for detecting low muscle mass in hip fracture patients. This was a cross-sectional validation study at two Norwegian hospitals on 162 hip fracture patients aged ≥ 65 years. Appendicular lean mass (ALM) was determined by DXA, BIA and anthropometry 3 months after hip fracture. ALM by BIA was calculated by the Kyle, Janssen, Tengvall and Sergi equations, and ALM by anthropometry by the Heymsfield and Villani equations. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare BIA and anthropometry for determining low ALM (≤5.67 kg/m2 for women and ≤7.25kg/m2 for men). Mean age was 79 years (SD 7.9), 74% were female. Mean ALM by DXA was 14.8 kg (SD 2.3) for women and 20.8 kg (SD 4.2) for men and 45% of women and 60% of men had low ALM. BIA (Kyle) in women (AUC 0.81, 95% confidence interval 0.72-0.89) and BIA (Sergi) in men (AUC 0.89, 95% CI 0.80-0.98) were best able to discriminate between low and normal ALM. Anthropometry (Heymsfield) was less accurate than BIA in women (AUC 0.64, 95% CI 0.54-0.75), and equal to BIA in men (AUC 0.72, 95% CI 0.72 0.56-0.87). BIA (Sergi, Kyle and Tengvall) and anthropometry (Heymsfield) can identify low muscle mass in hip fracture patients.

  3. Body composition assessment in infancy and early childhood: comparison of anthropometry with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in low-income group children from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, B; Mamidi, R S; Balakrishna, N; Radhakrishna, K V

    2014-06-01

    Anthropometry is a simple, inexpensive method of body composition assessment, but its validity has not been examined adequately in young children. The study therefore compared the body composition estimates using anthropometry with those using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in infants and young children. Body composition estimates using anthropometry and DXA were assessed and compared at 6, 12 and 18 months in a cohort of 137 infants enrolled at birth. Fat mass (FM) and body fat percent (%BF) estimates by anthropometry were lower than those using DXA. Mean differences (DXA-skinfold thickness) in FM, fat free mass (FFM) and %BF were highest at 6 months (350 g, -226 g and 4%, respectively); the differences reduced with increase in age and were lowest at 18 months (46 g, 56 g and 0%, respectively). Bland-Altman analyses showed good agreement between the FM, FFM and %BF estimates by the two methods only at 18 months. Accretion of FM and FFM during follow-up, estimated by the two methods, was significantly different, with agreement between the methods seen only for increment in FFM from 6 to 12 months. Substantial differences were found in the body composition estimates by anthropometry compared with DXA and also in the longitudinally assessed tissue accretion patterns by the two methods. As the body composition patterns may be influenced by the method used for body composition assessment, results of studies assessing body composition by anthropometry during infancy should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Nutrition, anthropometry, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor I and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in children during stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, B. U.; Pærregaard, Anders; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate anthropometry, nutrition and gastrointestinal dysfunction, and to characterize the relation between these parameters and the inflammatory activity evaluated by plasma levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor I (sTNFRI) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) levels...... during stem cell transplantation (SCT) in children. Clinical assessments and blood sampling were performed on days -3, 0, +7, +15 and +31 in eight children undergoing SCT. Energy intake, anthropometry, gastrointestinal dysfunction (WHO toxicity score) and sTNFRI and IL-1Ra were evaluated. The energy...

  5. Estimation of Gestational Age, Using Neonatal Anthropometry: A Cross-sectional Study in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawani, Rajat; Faridi, M.M.A.; Arora, Shilpa Khanna; Kumar, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Prematurity is a significant contributor to neonatal mortality in India. Conventionally, assessment of gestational age of newborns is based on New Ballard Technique, for which a paediatric specialist is needed. Anthropometry of the newborn, especially birthweight, has been used in the past to predict the gestational age of the neonate in peripheral health facilities where a trained paediatrician is often not available. We aimed to determine if neonatal anthropometric parameters, viz. birthweight, crown heel-length, head-circumference, mid-upper arm-circumference, lower segment-length, foot-length, umbilical nipple distance, calf-circumference, intermammary distance, and hand-length, can reliably predict the gestational age. The study also aimed to derive an equation for the same. We also assessed if these neonatal anthropometric parameters had a better prediction of gestational age when used in combination compared to individual parameters. We evaluated 1,000 newborns in a cross-sectional study conducted in Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital in Delhi. Detailed anthropometric estimation of the neonates was done within 48 hours after birth, using standard techniques. Gestational age was estimated using New Ballard Scoring. Out of 1,250 consecutive neonates, 1,000 were included in the study. Of them, 800 randomly-selected newborns were used in devising the model, and the remaining 200 newborns were used in validating the final model. Quadratic regression analysis using stepwise selection was used in building the predictive model. Birthweight (R=0.72), head-circumference (R=0.60), and mid-upper arm-circumference (R=0.67) were found highly correlated with gestation. The final equation to assess gestational age was as follows: Gestational age (weeks)=5.437×W–0.781×W2+2.815×HC–0.041×HC2+0.285×MUAC–22.745 where W=Weight, HC=Head-circumference and MUAC=Mid-upper arm-circumference; Adjusted R=0.76. On validation, the predictability of this equation is 46% (±1 week), 75

  6. Anthropometry and head and neck cancer:a pooled analysis of cohort data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kitahara, Cari M; Newton, Christina C; Bernstein, Leslie; Reynolds, Peggy; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Kreimer, Aimée R; Yang, Gong; Adami, Hans-Olov; Alavanja, Michael C; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie; Chaturvedi, Anil; Chen, Yu; D'Aloisio, Aimee A; Freedman, Michal; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Håkansson, Niclas; Huang, Wen-Yi; Lee, I-Min; Linet, Martha S; MacInnis, Robert J; Park, Yikyung; Prizment, Anna; Purdue, Mark P; Riboli, Elio; Robien, Kim; Sandler, Dale P; Schairer, Catherine; Sesso, Howard D; Ou Shu, Xiao; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zelenuich-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Patel, Alpa V; Hartge, Patricia; Berrington de González, Amy; Gapstur, Susan M

    2015-04-01

    Associations between anthropometry and head and neck cancer (HNC) risk are inconsistent. We aimed to evaluate these associations while minimizing biases found in previous studies. We pooled data from 1,941,300 participants, including 3760 cases, in 20 cohort studies and used multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of anthropometric measures with HNC risk overall and stratified by smoking status. Greater waist circumference (per 5 cm: HR = 1.04, 95% CI 1.03-1.05, P-value for trend = <0.0001) and waist-to-hip ratio (per 0.1 unit: HR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.05-1.09, P-value for trend = <0.0001), adjusted for body mass index (BMI), were associated with higher risk and did not vary by smoking status (P-value for heterogeneity = 0.85 and 0.44, respectively). Associations with BMI (P-value for interaction = <0.0001) varied by smoking status. Larger BMI was associated with higher HNC risk in never smokers (per 5 kg/m(2): HR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.06-1.24, P-value for trend = 0.0006), but not in former smokers (per 5 kg/m(2): HR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.93-1.06, P-value for trend = 0.79) or current smokers (per 5 kg/m(2): HR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.71-0.82, P-value for trend = <0.0001). Larger hip circumference was not associated with a higher HNC risk. Greater height (per 5 cm) was associated with higher risk of HNC in never and former smokers, but not in current smokers. Waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were associated positively with HNC risk regardless of smoking status, whereas a positive association with BMI was only found in never smokers. © The Author 2015; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  7. Antropometría recumbente en personas ancianas Recumbent anthropometry in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Rodríguez-Ojea Menéndez

    2008-06-01

    statistical significance, even for the indexes calculated starting from them. Recumbent anthropometry is an easy and reliable method that may be applied to evaluate the nutritional state in the elderly, or in any other group with limitations to undergo the anthropometric evaluation standing.

  8. [Quantification of visceral adipose tissue using magnetic resonance imaging compared with anthropometry, in type 2 diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano García, Cristóbal; Barrera, Francisco; Labbé, Pilar; Liberona, Jessica; Arrese, Marco; Irarrázabal, Pablo; Tejos, Cristián; Uribe, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    Visceral fat accumulation is associated with the development of metabolic diseases. Anthropometry is one of the methods used to quantify it. to evaluate the relationship between visceral adipose tissue volume (VAT), measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and anthropometric indexes, such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), in type 2 diabetic patients (DM2). Twenty four type 2 diabetic patients aged 55 to 78 years (15 females) and weighting 61.5 to 97 kg, were included. The patients underwent MRI examination on a Philips Intera® 1.5T MR scanner. The MRI protocol included a spectral excitation sequence centered at the fat peak. The field of view included from L4-L5 to the diaphragmatic border. VAT was measured using the software Image J®. Weight, height, BMI, WC and body fat percentage (BF%), derived from the measurement of four skinfolds with the equation of Durnin and Womersley, were also measured. The association between MRIVAT measurement and anthropometry was evaluated using the Pearson's correlation coefficient. Mean VAT was 2478 ± 758 ml, mean BMI29.5 ± 4.7 kg/m², and mean WC was 100 ± 9.7 cm. There was a poor correlation between VAT, BMI (r = 0.18) and WC (r = 0.56). BMI and WC are inaccurate predictors of VAT volume in type 2 diabetic patients.

  9. Body surface assessment with 3D laser-based anthropometry: reliability, validation, and improvement of empirical surface formulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnapfel, Andreas; Ahnert, Peter; Loeffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Body surface area is a physiological quantity relevant for many medical applications. In clinical practice, it is determined by empirical formulae. 3D laser-based anthropometry provides an easy and effective way to measure body surface area but is not ubiquitously available. We used data from laser-based anthropometry from a population-based study to assess validity of published and commonly used empirical formulae. We performed a large population-based study on adults collecting classical anthropometric measurements and 3D body surface assessments (N = 1435). We determined reliability of the 3D body surface assessment and validity of 18 different empirical formulae proposed in the literature. The performance of these formulae is studied in subsets of sex and BMI. Finally, improvements of parameter settings of formulae and adjustments for sex and BMI were considered. 3D body surface measurements show excellent intra- and inter-rater reliability of 0.998 (overall concordance correlation coefficient, OCCC was used as measure of agreement). Empirical formulae of Fujimoto and Watanabe, Shuter and Aslani and Sendroy and Cecchini performed best with excellent concordance with OCCC > 0.949 even in subgroups of sex and BMI. Re-parametrization of formulae and adjustment for sex and BMI slightly improved results. In adults, 3D laser-based body surface assessment is a reliable alternative to estimation by empirical formulae. However, there are empirical formulae showing excellent results even in subgroups of sex and BMI with only little room for improvement.

  10. An overview of Space Shuttle anthropometry and biomechanics research with emphasis on STS/Mir recumbent seat system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klute, Glenn K.; Stoycos, Lara E.

    1994-01-01

    The Anthropometry and Biomechanics Laboratory (ABL) at JSC conducts multi-disciplinary research focusing on maximizing astronaut intravehicular (IVA) and extravehicular (EVA) capabilities to provide the most effective work conditions for manned space flight and exploration missions. Biomechanics involves the measurement and modeling of the strength characteristics of the human body. Current research for the Space Shuttle Program includes the measurement of torque wrench capability during weightlessness, optimization of foot restraint, and hand hold placement, measurements of the strength and dexterity of the pressure gloved hand to improve glove design, quantification of the ability to move and manipulate heavy masses (6672 N or 1500 lb) in weightlessness, and verification of the capability of EVA crewmembers to perform Hubble Space Telescope repair tasks. Anthropometry is the measurement and modeling of the dimensions of the human body. Current research for the Space Shuttle Program includes the measurement of 14 anthropometric parameters of every astronaut candidate, identification of EVA finger entrapment hazards by measuring the dimensions of the gloved hand, definition of flight deck reach envelopes during launch and landing accelerations, and measurement of anthropometric design parameters for the recumbent seat system required for the Shuttle/Mir mission (STS-71, Spacelab M) scheduled for Jun. 1995.

  11. Assessment of Body Composition Using Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis: Comparison with Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong Han; Lee, Jeong A; Kim, Jin A; Lee, Mun Woo; Chae, Hee Bok; Choi, Won Jun; Shin, Hyoung Shik; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Youn, Sei Jin; Koong, Sung Soo; Park, Seon Mee

    1999-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of body composition in cirrhotic patients. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and anthropometry were used, and the values obtained were compared. Methods Mid-arm fat and muscle areas were calculated by anthropometry in 66 cirrhotic patients and 94 healthy controls. In 37 of the cirrhotic patients and 39 of the controls, fat mass, lean soft tissue mass and bone mineral contents were measured with DEXA. Results The number of cirrhotic patients with measured values below the fifth percentile of normal controls was 21 (31.8%) by mid-arm fat area, six (9.1%) by mid-arm muscle area, 15 (40.5%) by fat mass and 0 (0%) by lean soft tissue mass. The fat mass in cirrhotic patients was less than in controls, whereas lean soft tissue mass and bone mineral content were not different. Fat depletion was severe in Child-class C patients and with severe ascites. Mid-arm fat area and fat mass showed close correlation (r = 0.85, p<0.01), but mid-arm muscle area and lean soft tissue mass showed poor correlation (r = 0.32, p<0.05). Conclusion Cirrhotic patients showed lower fat component, with preserved lean soft tissue mass and bone mineral content. In clinical practice, the measurement of mid-arm fat area was useful for the assessment of fat mass. PMID:10461427

  12. Anthropometry-corrected exposure modeling as a method to improve trunk posture assessment with a single inclinometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driel, Robin; Trask, Catherine; Johnson, Peter W; Callaghan, Jack P; Koehoorn, Mieke; Teschke, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Measuring trunk posture in the workplace commonly involves subjective observation or self-report methods or the use of costly and time-consuming motion analysis systems (current gold standard). This work compared trunk inclination measurements using a simple data-logging inclinometer with trunk flexion measurements using a motion analysis system, and evaluated adding measures of subject anthropometry to exposure prediction models to improve the agreement between the two methods. Simulated lifting tasks (n=36) were performed by eight participants, and trunk postures were simultaneously measured with each method. There were significant differences between the two methods, with the inclinometer initially explaining 47% of the variance in the motion analysis measurements. However, adding one key anthropometric parameter (lower arm length) to the inclinometer-based trunk flexion prediction model reduced the differences between the two systems and accounted for 79% of the motion analysis method's variance. Although caution must be applied when generalizing lower-arm length as a correction factor, the overall strategy of anthropometric modeling is a novel contribution. In this lifting-based study, by accounting for subject anthropometry, a single, simple data-logging inclinometer shows promise for trunk posture measurement and may have utility in larger-scale field studies where similar types of tasks are performed.

  13. Factors associated with mercury levels in human placenta and the relationship to neonatal anthropometry in Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Phylicia; Fletcher, Horace; Voutchkov, Mitko

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mercury levels in human placenta and its relationship to neonatal anthropometry for a group of selected pregnant women in Kingston and Manchester in Jamaica and St. Joseph in Trinidad & Tobago. The participants were interviewed on their fish intake. Neonatal anthropometric data were also recorded. The placental mercury concentrations ranged from 0.64±0.5μg/kg to 1.4±0.6μg/kg. The most significant associated factor for prenatal mercury exposure was maternal fish intake. Those pregnant women who regularly ate shark recorded the highest placenta mercury concentrations. Their neonates also had slightly smaller mean head circumference and lower birth weight. The mean placental mercury concentrations in this study were found to be lower than the literature values. Therefore it was difficult to detect any significant changes in neonatal anthropometry. This type of study can contribute to the extent of mercury exposure in the region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports Soccer Training Program on Anthropometry, Physical Fitness and Skilled Performance in Special Olympics Soccer Athletes and Non-Disabled Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Funda; Aktop, Abdurrahman; Ozer, Dilara; Nalbant, Sibel; Aglamis, Ece; Barak, Sharon; Hutzler, Yeshayahu

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sport (UNS) soccer program on anthropometry, physical fitness and soccer skills of male youth athletes with and without intellectual disabilities (ID) who participated in a training group (TRG) and in a comparison group (CG) without specific training. Youth with ID (WID) were…

  15. Effects of Soccer Training on Anthropometry, Body Composition, and Physical Fitness during a Soccer Season in Female Elite Young Athletes: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, Melanie; Prieske, Olaf; Helm, Norman; Granacher, Urs

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (i) describe soccer training (e.g., volume, types), anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness and (ii) compute associations between soccer training data and relative changes of anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness during a soccer season in female elite young athletes. Seasonal training (i.e., day-to-day training volume/types) as well as variations in anthropometry (e.g., body height/mass), body composition (e.g., lean body/fat mass), and physical fitness (e.g., muscle strength/power, speed, balance) were collected from 17 female elite young soccer players (15.3 ± 0.5 years) over the training periods (i.e., preparation, competition, transition) of a soccer season that resulted in the German championship title in under-17 female soccer. Training volume/types, anthropometrics, body composition, and physical fitness significantly varied over a soccer season. During the two preparation periods, higher volumes in resistance and endurance training were performed (2.00 ≤ d ≤ 18.15; p anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness outcomes throughout the different training periods over the course of a soccer season in female elite young soccer players. However, changes in components of fitness were inconsistent (e.g., power, speed, strength). Thus, training volume and/or types should be carefully considered in order to develop power-, speed- or strength-related fitness measures more efficiently throughout the soccer season. PMID:29375392

  16. Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Compared with Anthropometry in Relation to Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in a Young Adult Population: Is the 'Gold Standard' Tarnished?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Denise L; Beilin, Lawrence J; Hands, Beth; Burrows, Sally; Pennell, Craig E; Lye, Stephen J; Mountain, Jennifer A; Mori, Trevor A

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of adiposity using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has been considered more advantageous in comparison to anthropometry for predicting cardio-metabolic risk in the older population, by virtue of its ability to distinguish total and regional fat. Nonetheless, there is increasing uncertainty regarding the relative superiority of DXA and little comparative data exist in young adults. This study aimed to identify which measure of adiposity determined by either DXA or anthropometry is optimal within a range of cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults. 1138 adults aged 20 years were assessed by DXA and standard anthropometry from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Cross-sectional linear regression analyses were performed. Waist to height ratio was superior to any DXA measure with HDL-C. BMI was the superior model in relation to blood pressure than any DXA measure. Midriff fat mass (DXA) and waist circumference were comparable in relation to glucose. For all the other cardio-metabolic variables, anthropometric and DXA measures were comparable. DXA midriff fat mass compared with BMI or waist hip ratio was the superior measure for triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR. Although midriff fat mass (measured by DXA) was the superior measure with insulin sensitivity and triglycerides, the anthropometric measures were better or equal with various DXA measures for majority of the cardio-metabolic risk factors. Our findings suggest, clinical anthropometry is generally as useful as DXA in the evaluation of the individual cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults.

  17. Differential Risk of Hypertension Among Lean and Nonlean Rural Subjects in Relation to Decadal Changes in Anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande-Joshi, Sayali S; Rao, Shobha

    2018-02-09

    Assessing risk of hypertension in relation to decadal changes in anthropometry among cohort of young rural Indian men. Subjects (n = 140) were measured in 2005 and 2015 for blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), body fat (BF), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and additionally for visceral fat (VF) at follow-up. Decadal changes showed significant (p lean (baseline BMI lean but was not significant among nonlean subjects. This was also true for change in other adiposity indicators, indicating greater vulnerability of lean subjects. Further, among lean subjects, ORs reduced considerably after adjusting for VF, whereas among nonlean subjects ORs continued to remain nonsignificant but showing independent significance for VF. For similar level of change in adiposity indicators, lean subjects were at greater risk of hypertension than nonlean subjects, probably due to higher VF deposition.

  18. Nutritional status at presentation, comparison of assessment tools, and importance of arm anthropometry in children with cancer in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P; Jhaveri, U; Idhate, T B; Dhingra, S; Arolkar, P; Arora, B

    2015-01-01

    In India, approximately 40,000 new cases of cancer in children are diagnosed each year. However, there are no good studies analyzing their nutritional status. Also, since accurate and sensitive nutritional assessment is critical for optimal clinical outcomes through timely remediation of malnutrition, it is important to assess the relative sensitivity and feasibility of commonly used nutritional screening tools. This observational study analyzed height/length (cm), weight (kg), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT) as well as their Z-scores or percentiles, albumin levels and history of weight loss at diagnosis in children aged 2-15 years being treated for cancer between November 2008 to December 2013. Body mass index (BMI) and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were calculated respectively from height and weight, and MUAC and TSFT. A total of 1693 new patients were enrolled; 1187 had all anthropometric measurements performed. The prevalence of malnutrition was 38%, 57%, 76%, 69% and 81% on the basis of BMI, TSFT, MUAC, AMC, and arm TSFT + MUAC respectively with the highest prevalence in solid abdominal tumours. Addition of BMI and serum albumin to arm anthropometry increased the proportion classified as severely nutritionally depleted by a mere 2% & 1.5% respectively. Positive history of significant weight loss additionally identified 16.5% at nutritional risk over arm anthropometry. The prevalence of malnutrition in Indian children with cancer at presentation is very high ranging from 40% and 80% depending on the method used for assessment, being higher with MUAC and lowest with BMI. Either MUAC alone or TSFT + MUAC (wherever feasible) should be used for screening for malnutrition in children with cancer at diagnosis to plan timely nutritional interventions, reduce the treatment-related morbidity and optimise their chance of long-term cure.

  19. The Effect of Sex and Anthropometry on Clinical Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Complex Coronary Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yul; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Jung Sun; Kim, Byeong Keuk; Ko, Young Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong Ki

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of sex and anthropometry on clinical outcomes in patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). From three randomized trials (REal Safety and Efficacy of 3-month dual antiplatelet Therapy following Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stent implantation, Impact of intraVascular UltraSound guidance on outcomes of Xience Prime stents in Long lesions, Chronic Total Occlusion InterVention with drUg-eluting Stents), we compared 333 pairs of men and women matched by propensity scores, all of whom underwent intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided PCI for complex lesions. For 12 months, the incidence of adverse cardiac events, defined as the composite of cardiac death, target lesion-related myocardial infarction, and target lesion revascularization, was not different between women and men (2.4% vs. 2.4%, p=0.939). Using multivariable Cox's regression analysis, post-intervention minimum lumen area [MLA; hazard ratio (HR)=0.620, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.423-0.909, p=0.014] by IVUS was a predictor of adverse cardiac events. Height on anthropometry and lesions with chronic total occlusion were significantly related to post-intervention MLA. However, female sex was not independently associated with post-intervention MLA. In an age and sex-adjusted model, patients in the low tertile of height exhibited a greater risk for adverse cardiac events than those in the high tertile of height (HR=6.391, 95% CI=1.160-35.206, p=0.033). Sex does not affect clinical outcomes after PCI for complex lesions. PCI outcomes, however, may be adversely affected by height.

  20. Association of sex hormones with physical, laboratory, and imaging markers of anthropometry in men and women from the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfart, Tom; Friedrich, Nele; Kische, Hanna; Bülow, Robin; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Nauck, Matthias; Keevil, Brian G; Haring, Robin

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of sex hormones with anthropometry in a large population-based cohort, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS)-based sex hormone measurements and imaging markers. Cross-sectional data from 957 men and women from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) were used. Associations of a comprehensive panel of LCMS-measured sex hormones with anthropometric parameters, laboratory, and imaging markers were analyzed in multivariable regression models for the full sample and stratified by sex. Sex hormone measures included total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (fT), estrone and estradiol, androstenedione (ASD), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Domains of anthropometry included physical measures (body-mass-index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-height-ratio, waist-to-hip-ratio, and hip circumference), laboratory measures of adipokines (leptin and vaspin), and magnet resonance imaging-based measures (visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue). In men, inverse associations between all considered anthropometric parameters with TT were found: BMI (β-coefficient, standard error (SE): -0.159, 0.037), waist-circumference (β-coefficient, SE: -0.892, 0.292), subcutaneous adipose tissue (β-coefficient, SE: -0.156, 0.023), and leptin (β-coefficient, SE: -0.046, 0.009). In women TT (β-coefficient, SE: 1.356, 0.615) and estrone (β-coefficient, SE: 0.014, 0.005) were positively associated with BMI. In analyses of variance, BMI and leptin were inversely associated with TT, ASD, and DHEAS in men, but positively associated with estrone. In women, BMI and leptin were positively associated with all sex hormones. The present population-based study confirmed and extended previously reported sex-specific associations between sex hormones and various anthropometric markers of overweight and obesity.

  1. Anthropometry, DXA, and leptin reflect subcutaneous but not visceral abdominal adipose tissue on MRI in 197 healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinggaard, Jeanette; Hagen, Casper P; Christensen, Anders N; Mouritsen, Annette; Mieritz, Mikkel G; Wohlfahrt-Veje, Christine; Helge, Jørn W; Beck, Thomas N; Fallentin, Eva; Larsen, Rasmus; Jensen, Rikke B; Juul, Anders; Main, Katharina M

    2017-10-01

    BackgroundAbdominal fat distribution is associated with the development of cardio-metabolic disease independently of body mass index (BMI). We assessed anthropometry, serum adipokines, and DXA as markers of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).MethodsWe performed a cross-sectional study that included 197 healthy adolescents (114 boys) aged 10-15 years nested within a longitudinal population-based cohort. Clinical examination, blood sampling, DXA, and abdominal MRI were performed. SAT% and VAT% were adjusted to total abdominal volume.ResultsGirls had a higher SAT% than did boys in early and late puberty (16 vs. 13%, P<0.01 and 20 vs. 15%, P=0.001, respectively), whereas VAT% was comparable (7% in both genders, independently of puberty). DXA android fat% (standard deviation score (SDS)), suprailiac skinfold thickness (SDS), leptin, BMI (SDS), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and waist circumference (SDS) correlated strongly with SAT% (descending order: r=0.90-0.55, all P<0.001) but weakly with VAT% (r=0.49-0.06). Suprailiac skinfold was the best anthropometric marker of SAT% (girls: R 2 =48.6%, boys: R 2 =65%, P<0.001) and VAT% in boys (R 2 =16.4%, P<0.001). WHtR was the best marker of VAT% in girls (R 2 =7.6%, P=0.007).ConclusionsHealthy girls have a higher SAT% than do boys, whereas VAT% is comparable, independently of puberty. Anthropometry and circulating leptin are valid markers of SAT%, but not of VAT%.

  2. Modeling the Impact of Space Suit Components and Anthropometry on the Center of Mass of a Seated Crewmember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Blackledge, Christopher; Ferrer, Mike; Margerum, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    The designers of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) utilize an intensive simulation program in order to predict the launch and landing characteristics of the Crew Impact Attenuation System (CIAS). The CIAS is the energy absorbing strut concept that dampens loads to levels sustainable by the crew during landing and consists of the crew module seat pallet that accommodates four to six seated astronauts. An important parameter required for proper dynamic modeling of the CIAS is knowledge of the suited center of mass (COM) variations within the crew population. Significant center of mass variations across suited crew configurations would amplify the inertial effects of the pallet and potentially create unacceptable crew loading during launch and landing. Established suited, whole-body, and posture-based mass properties were not available due to the uncertainty of the final CEV seat posture and suit hardware configurations. While unsuited segmental center of mass values can be obtained via regression equations from previous studies, building them into a model that was posture dependent with custom anthropometry and integrated suit components proved cumbersome and time consuming. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify the effects of posture, suit components, and the expected range of anthropometry on the center of mass of a seated individual. Several elements are required for the COM calculation of a suited human in a seated position: anthropometry; body segment mass; suit component mass; suit component location relative to the body; and joint angles defining the seated posture. Anthropometry and body segment masses used in this study were taken from a selection of three-dimensional human body models, called boundary manikins, which were developed in a previous project. These boundary manikins represent the critical anthropometric dimension extremes for the anticipated astronaut population. Six male manikins and 6 female manikins, representing a

  3. Validity and intraobserver reliability of three-dimensional scanning compared with conventional anthropometry for children and adolescents from a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glock, Fabian; Vogel, Mandy; Naumann, Stephanie; Kuehnapfel, Andreas; Scholz, Markus; Hiemisch, Andreas; Kirsten, Toralf; Rieger, Kristin; Koerner, Antje; Loeffler, Markus; Kiess, Wieland

    2017-05-01

    Conventional anthropometric measurements are time consuming and require well trained medical staff. To use three-dimensional whole body laser scanning in daily clinical work, validity, and reliability have to be confirmed. We compared a whole body laser scanner with conventional anthropometry in a group of 473 children and adolescents from the Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Diseases (LIFE-Child). Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) were calculated separately for sex, weight, and age to assess validity. Overall CCC (OCCC) was used to analyze intraobserver reliability. Body height and the circumferences of waist, hip, upper arm, and calf had an "excellent" (CCC ≥ 0.9); neck and thigh circumference, a "good" (CCC ≥ 0.7); and head circumference, a "low" (CCC anthropometry.

  4. The Sex and Race Specific Relationship between Anthropometry and Body Fat Composition Determined from Computed Tomography: Evidence from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongraw-Chaffin, Morgana; Golden, Sherita Hill; Allison, Matthew A; Ding, Jingzhong; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Szklo, Moyses; Woodward, Mark; Young, Jeffery Hunter; Anderson, Cheryl A M

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship of anthropometric measurements with computed tomography (CT) body fat composition, and even fewer determined if these relationships differ by sex and race. CT scans from 1,851 participants in the population based Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis were assessed for visceral and subcutaneous fat areas by semi-automated segmentation of body compartments. Regression models were used to investigate relationships for anthropometry with visceral and subcutaneous fat separately by sex and race/ethnicity. Participants were 50% female, 41% Caucasian, 13% Asian, 21% African American, and 25% Hispanic. For visceral fat, the positive relationship with weight (p = 0.028), waist circumference (panthropometry and underlying adiposity differs by sex and race/ethnicity. When anthropometry is used as a proxy for visceral fat in research, sex-specific models should be used.

  5. Association between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, & early life factors & adult measures of endothelial function: Results from the New Delhi Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Mark D; Khalil, Anita; Osmond, Clive; Fall, Caroline H D; Tandon, Nikhil; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Ramji, Siddharth; Gera, Tarun; Prabhakaran, Poornima; Dey Biswas, S K; Reddy, K Srinath; Bhargava, Santosh K; Sachdev, Harshpal S; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal endothelial function represents a preclinical marker of atherosclerosis. This study was conducted to evaluate associations between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, and early life factors and adult measures of endothelial function in a young urban Indian cohort free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Absolute changes in brachial artery diameter following cuff inflation and sublingual nitroglycerin (400 µg) were recorded to evaluate endothelium-dependent and -independent measures of endothelial function in 600 participants (362 men; 238 women) from the New Delhi Birth Cohort (2006-2009). Data on anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, medical history, socio-economic position, and lifestyle habits were collected. Height and weight were recorded at birth, two and 11 yr of age. Age- and sex-adjusted linear regression models were developed to evaluate these associations. The mean age of participants was 36±1 yr. Twenty two per cent men and 29 per cent women were obese (BMI th > 30 kg/m [2] ). Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) was 131±14 and 119±13 mmHg, and diabetes prevalence was 12 and 8 per cent for men and women, respectively. Brachial artery diameter was higher for men compared with women both before (3.48±0.37 and 2.95±0.35 cm) and after hyperaemia (3.87±0.37 vs. 3.37±0.35 cm). A similar difference was seen before and after nitroglycerin. Markers of increased adiposity, smoking, SBP, and metabolic syndrome, but not early life anthropometry, were inversely associated with endothelial function after adjustment for age and sex. The analysis of the current prospective data from a young urban Indian cohort showed that cardiometabolic risk factors, but not early life anthropometry, were associated with worse endothelial function.

  6. Associations between gestational anthropometry, maternal HIV, and fetal and early infancy growth in a prospective rural/semi-rural Tanzanian cohort, 2012-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Amanda L; Pedersen, Sarah H; Urassa, Mark; Michael, Denna; Todd, Jim; Kinung'hi, Safari; Changalucha, John; McDermid, Joann M

    2015-10-29

    Healthcare access and resources differ considerably between urban and rural settings making cross-setting generalizations difficult. In resource-restricted rural/semi-rural environments, identification of feasible screening tools is a priority. The objective of this study was to evaluate gestational anthropometry in relation to birth and infant growth in a rural/semi-rural Tanzanian prospective cohort of mothers and their infants. Mothers (n = 114: 44 HIV-positive) attending antenatal clinic visits were recruited in their second or third trimester between March and November, 2012, and followed with their infants through 6-months post-partum. Demographic, clinical, and infant feeding data were obtained using questionnaires administered by a Swahili-speaking research nurse on demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and infant feeding practices. Second or third trimester anthropometry (mid-upper arm circumference [MUAC], triceps skinfold thickness, weight, height), pregnancy outcomes, birth (weight, length, head circumference) and infant anthropometry (weight-for-age z-score [WAZ], length-for-age z-score [LAZ]) were obtained. Linear regression and mixed effect modeling were used to evaluate gestational factors in relation to pregnancy and infant outcomes. Gestational MUAC and maternal HIV status (HIV-positive mothers = 39%) were associated with infant WAZ and LAZ from birth to 6-months in multivariate models, even after adjustment for infant feeding practices. The lowest gestational MUAC tertile was associated with lower WAZ throughout early infancy, as well as lower LAZ at 3 and 6-months. In linear mixed effects models through 6-months, each 1 cm increase in gestational MUAC was associated with a 0.11 increase in both WAZ (P anthropometry through 6-months despite maternal antiretroviral access. Routine assessment of MUAC has the potential to identify at-risk women in need of additional health interventions designed to optimize pregnancy outcomes and infant growth

  7. Association between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, & early life factors & adult measures of endothelial function: Results from the New Delhi Birth Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Huffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Abnormal endothelial function represents a preclinical marker of atherosclerosis. This study was conducted to evaluate associations between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, and early life factors and adult measures of endothelial function in a young urban Indian cohort free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Methods: Absolute changes in brachial artery diameter following cuff inflation and sublingual nitroglycerin (400 µg were recorded to evaluate endothelium-dependent and -independent measures of endothelial function in 600 participants (362 men; 238 women from the New Delhi Birth Cohort (2006-2009. Data on anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, medical history, socio-economic position, and lifestyle habits were collected. Height and weight were recorded at birth, two and 11 yr of age. Age- and sex-adjusted linear regression models were developed to evaluate these associations. Results: The mean age of participants was 36±1 yr. Twenty two per cent men and 29 per cent women were obese (BMI th > 30 kg/m [2] . Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP was 131±14 and 119±13 mmHg, and diabetes prevalence was 12 and 8 per cent for men and women, respectively. Brachial artery diameter was higher for men compared with women both before (3.48±0.37 and 2.95±0.35 cm and after hyperaemia (3.87±0.37 vs. 3.37±0.35 cm. A similar difference was seen before and after nitroglycerin. Markers of increased adiposity, smoking, SBP, and metabolic syndrome, but not early life anthropometry, were inversely associated with endothelial function after adjustment for age and sex. Interpretation & conclusions: The analysis of the current prospective data from a young urban Indian cohort showed that cardiometabolic risk factors, but not early life anthropometry, were associated with worse endothelial function.

  8. Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Compared with Anthropometry in Relation to Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in a Young Adult Population: Is the 'Gold Standard' Tarnished?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L Demmer

    Full Text Available Assessment of adiposity using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA has been considered more advantageous in comparison to anthropometry for predicting cardio-metabolic risk in the older population, by virtue of its ability to distinguish total and regional fat. Nonetheless, there is increasing uncertainty regarding the relative superiority of DXA and little comparative data exist in young adults. This study aimed to identify which measure of adiposity determined by either DXA or anthropometry is optimal within a range of cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults.1138 adults aged 20 years were assessed by DXA and standard anthropometry from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine Study. Cross-sectional linear regression analyses were performed. Waist to height ratio was superior to any DXA measure with HDL-C. BMI was the superior model in relation to blood pressure than any DXA measure. Midriff fat mass (DXA and waist circumference were comparable in relation to glucose. For all the other cardio-metabolic variables, anthropometric and DXA measures were comparable. DXA midriff fat mass compared with BMI or waist hip ratio was the superior measure for triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR.Although midriff fat mass (measured by DXA was the superior measure with insulin sensitivity and triglycerides, the anthropometric measures were better or equal with various DXA measures for majority of the cardio-metabolic risk factors. Our findings suggest, clinical anthropometry is generally as useful as DXA in the evaluation of the individual cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults.

  9. Modeling the Impact of Space Suit Components and Anthropometry on the Center of Mass of a Seated Crewmember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackledge, Christopher; Margerum, Sarah; Ferrer, Mike; Morency, Richard; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    The Crew Impact Attenuation System (CIAS) is the energy-absorbing strut concept that dampens Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) landing loads to levels sustainable by the crew. Significant COM variations across suited crew configurations would amplify the inertial effects of the pallet and potentially create unacceptable crew loading during launch and landing. The objective of this study was to obtain data needed for dynamic simulation models by quantifying the effects of posture, suit components, and the expected range of anthropometry on the COM of a seated individual. Several elements are required for the COM calculation of a suited human in a seated position: anthropometry, body segment mass, suit component mass, suit component location relative to the body, and joint angles defining the seated posture. Three-dimensional (3D) human body models, suit mass data, and vector calculus were utilized to compute the COM positions for 12 boundary manikins in two different seated postures. The analysis focused on two objectives: (1) quantify how much the wholebody COM varied from the smallest to largest subject and (2) quantify the effects of the suit components on the overall COM in each seat configuration. The location of the anterior-posterior COM varied across all boundary manikins by about 7 cm, and the vertical COM varied by approximately 9 to 10 cm. The mediolateral COM varied by 1.2 cm from the midline sagittal plane for both seat configurations. The suit components caused an anterior shift of the total COM by approximately 2 cm and a shift to the right along the mediolateral axis of 0.4 cm for both seat configurations. When the seat configuration was in the standard posture the suited vertical COM shifted inferiorly by as much as 1 cm, whereas in the CEV posture the vertical COM had no appreciable change. These general differences were due to the high proportion of suit mass located in the boots and lower legs and their corresponding distance from the body COM

  10. Infant Nutritional Status and Markers of Environmental Enteric Dysfunction are Associated with Midchildhood Anthropometry and Blood Pressure in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locks, Lindsey M; Mwiru, Ramadhani S; Mtisi, Expeditho; Manji, Karim P; McDonald, Christine M; Liu, Enju; Kupka, Roland; Kisenge, Rodrick; Aboud, Said; Gosselin, Kerri; Gillman, Matthew; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Duggan, Christopher P

    2017-08-01

    To assess whether growth and biomarkers of environmental enteric dysfunction in infancy are related to health outcomes in midchildhood in Tanzania. Children who participated in 2 randomized trials of micronutrient supplements in infancy were followed up in midchildhood (4.6-9.8 years of age). Anthropometry was measured at age 6 and 52 weeks in both trials, and blood samples were available from children at 6 weeks and 6 months from 1 trial. Linear regression was used for height-for-age z-score, body mass index-for-age z-score, and weight for age z-score, and blood pressure analyses; log-binomial models were used to estimate risk of overweight, obesity, and stunting in midchildhood. One hundred thirteen children were followed-up. Length-for-age z-score at 6 weeks and delta length-for-age z-score from 6 to 52 weeks were associated independently and positively with height-for-age z-score and inversely associated with stunting in midchildhood. Delta weight-for-length and weight-for-age z-score were also positively associated with midchildhood height-for-age z-score. The 6-week and delta weight-for-length z-scores were associated independently and positively with midchildhood body mass index-for-age z-score and overweight, as was the 6-week and delta weight-for-age z-score. Delta length-for-age z-score was also associated with an increased risk of overweight in midchildhood. Body mass index-for-age z-score in midchildhood was associated positively with systolic blood pressure. Serum anti-flagellin IgA concentration at 6 weeks was also associated with increased blood pressure in midchildhood. Anthropometry at 6 weeks and growth in infancy independently predict size in midchildhood, while anti-flagellin IgA, a biomarker of environmental enteric dysfunction, in early infancy is associated with increased blood pressure in midchildhood. Interventions in early life should focus on optimizing linear growth while minimizing excess weight gain and environmental enteric

  11. IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations at 2 years: associations with anthropometry and milk consumption in an Indian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Andrea S; Joshi, Suyog M; Lubree, Himangi G; Bhat, Dattatray S; Memane, Neelam S; Raut, Deepa A; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S

    2018-04-01

    To ascertain associations between plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) and their molar ratio at 2 y with neonatal size, infant growth, body composition at 2 y, and feeding practices in an Indian cohort. A cohort of 209 newborns, with 122 followed at 2 y. Anthropometry was conducted at birth and 2 y. IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations were measured in cord blood and at 2 y. Maternal and child diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaires and maternal interviews. Multivariate regression was used to test for associations adjusting for confounding factors. Mean 2 y plasma IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 were 49.4 ng/ml (95% CI: 44.1, 54.8), 1953.8 ng/ml (CI: 1870.6, 2036.9) ng/ml, and 0.088 (CI: 0.081, 0.095), respectively. IGF-I and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 were positively associated with current length, but not body mass index or adiposity. IGF-I was higher among those with greater change in length since birth. IGF-I concentrations were higher in children who drank the most milk (>500 vs. <250 ml per day: 65.6 vs. 42.8 ng/ml, p < 0.04), received other milk <6 months compared to ≥6 months (56.3 vs. 44.8 ng/ml, p < 0.05), and in those whose mothers consumed milk daily vs. less frequently in late pregnancy (56.4 vs. 42.7 ng/ml, p < 0.01). In multivariate regression, 2 y IGF-I concentration and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 were each positively associated with current length and milk intake. IGFBP-3 was not related to anthropometry or milk intake. Plasma IGF-I concentrations and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 at 2 y are positively associated with length at 2 y and current milk intake.

  12. Specific infant feeding practices do not consistently explain variation in anthropometry at age 1 year in urban United States, Mexico, and China cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jessica G; Guerrero, M Lourdes; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; Peng, Yong-mei; Herbers, Patricia M; Yao, Wen; Ortega, Hilda; Davidson, Barbara S; McMahon, Robert J; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2013-02-01

    Infant feeding practices generally influence infant growth, but it is unclear how introduction of specific foods affects growth across global populations. We studied 3 urban populations in the Global Exploration of Human Milk study to determine the association between infant feeding and anthropometry at 1 y of age. Three hundred sixty-five breastfeeding mother-infant pairs (120 US, 120 China, and 125 Mexico) were recruited soon after the infant's birth. Enrollment required agreement to breastfeed ≥75% for at least 3 mo. Weekly, 24-h, food frequency data were conducted on infants for 1 y and exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) duration and timing of specific complementary food introduction were calculated. Weight and length were measured at age 1 y and anthropometry Z-scores calculated using WHO standards. Cohorts in the 3 urban populations (Shanghai, China; Cincinnati, USA; and Mexico City, Mexico) differed by median EBF duration (5, 14, and 7 wk, respectively; P urban, international, breast-fed cohorts, differences in specific feeding practices did not explain the significant variation in anthropometry.

  13. Comparison of anthropometry with photogrammetry based on a standardized clinical photographic technique using a cephalostat and chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kihwan; Kwon, Hyuk Joon; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Jun Hyung; Son, Daegu

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to standardize clinical photogrammetric techniques, and to compare anthropometry with photogrammetry. To standardize clinical photography, we have developed a photographic cephalostat and chair. We investigated the repeatability of the standardized clinical photogrammetric technique. Then, with 40 landmarks, a total of 96 anthropometric measurement items was obtained from 100 Koreans. Ninety six photogrammetric measurements from the same subjects were also obtained from standardized clinical photographs using Adobe Photoshop version 7.0 (Adobe Systems Corporation, San Jose, CA, USA). The photogrammetric and anthropometric measurement data (mm, degree) were then compared. A coefficient was obtained by dividing the anthropometric measurements by the photogrammetric measurements. The repeatability of the standardized photography was statistically significantly high (p=0.463). Among the 96 measurement items, 44 items were reliable; for these items the photogrammetric measurements were not different to the anthropometric measurements. The remaining 52 items must be classified as unreliable. By developing a photographic cephalostat and chair, we have standardized clinical photogrammetric techniques. The reliable set of measurement items can be used as anthropometric measurements. For unreliable measurement items, applying a suitable coefficient to the photogrammetric measurement allows the anthropometric measurement to be obtained indirectly.

  14. Can anthropometry measure gender discrimination? An analysis using WHO standards to assess the growth of Bangladeshi children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moestue, Helen

    2009-08-01

    To examine the potential of anthropometry as a tool to measure gender discrimination, with particular attention to the WHO growth standards. Surveillance data collected from 1990 to 1999 were analysed. Height-for-age Z-scores were calculated using three norms: the WHO standards, the 1978 National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) reference and the 1990 British growth reference (UK90). Bangladesh. Boys and girls aged 6-59 months (n 504 358). The three sets of growth curves provided conflicting pictures of the relative growth of girls and boys by age and over time. Conclusions on sex differences in growth depended also on the method used to analyse the curves, be it according to the shape or the relative position of the sex-specific curves. The shapes of the WHO-generated curves uniquely implied that Bangladeshi girls faltered faster or caught up slower than boys throughout their pre-school years, a finding consistent with the literature. In contrast, analysis of the relative position of the curves suggested that girls had higher WHO Z-scores than boys below 24 months of age. Further research is needed to help establish whether and how the WHO international standards can measure gender discrimination in practice, which continues to be a serious problem in many parts of the world.

  15. Prediction of fat-free body mass from bioelectrical impedance and anthropometry among 3-year-old children using DXA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejlerskov, Katrine T.; Jensen, Signe M.; Christensen, Line B.; Ritz, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Mølgaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    For 3-year-old children suitable methods to estimate body composition are sparse. We aimed to develop predictive equations for estimating fat-free mass (FFM) from bioelectrical impedance (BIA) and anthropometry using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as reference method using data from 99 healthy 3-year-old Danish children. Predictive equations were derived from two multiple linear regression models, a comprehensive model (height2/resistance (RI), six anthropometric measurements) and a simple model (RI, height, weight). Their uncertainty was quantified by means of 10-fold cross-validation approach. Prediction error of FFM was 3.0% for both equations (root mean square error: 360 and 356 g, respectively). The derived equations produced BIA-based prediction of FFM and FM near DXA scan results. We suggest that the predictive equations can be applied in similar population samples aged 2–4 years. The derived equations may prove useful for studies linking body composition to early risk factors and early onset of obesity. PMID:24463487

  16. Adjustment of interaural time difference in head related transfer functions based on listeners' anthropometry and its effect on sound localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yôiti; Watanabe, Kanji; Iwaya, Yukio; Gyoba, Jiro; Takane, Shouichi

    2005-04-01

    Because the transfer functions governing subjective sound localization (HRTFs) show strong individuality, sound localization systems based on synthesis of HRTFs require suitable HRTFs for individual listeners. However, it is impractical to obtain HRTFs for all listeners based on measurements. Improving sound localization by adjusting non-individualized HRTFs to a specific listener based on that listener's anthropometry might be a practical method. This study first developed a new method to estimate interaural time differences (ITDs) using HRTFs. Then correlations between ITDs and anthropometric parameters were analyzed using the canonical correlation method. Results indicated that parameters relating to head size, and shoulder and ear positions are significant. Consequently, it was attempted to express ITDs based on listener's anthropometric data. In this process, the change of ITDs as a function of azimuth angle was parameterized as a sum of sine functions. Then the parameters were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, in which the anthropometric parameters were used as explanatory variables. The predicted or individualized ITDs were installed in the nonindividualized HRTFs to evaluate sound localization performance. Results showed that individualization of ITDs improved horizontal sound localization.

  17. Are traditional body fat equations and anthropometry valid to estimate body fat in children and adolescents living with HIV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luiz Rodrigo Augustemak de; Martins, Priscila Custódio; Junior, Carlos Alencar Souza Alves; Castro, João Antônio Chula de; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Petroski, Edio Luiz

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity of traditional anthropometric equations and to develop predictive equations of total body and trunk fat for children and adolescents living with HIV based on anthropometric measurements. Forty-eight children and adolescents of both sexes (24 boys) aged 7-17 years, living in Santa Catarina, Brazil, participated in the study. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used as the reference method to evaluate total body and trunk fat. Height, body weight, circumferences and triceps, subscapular, abdominal and calf skinfolds were measured. The traditional equations of Lohman and Slaughter were used to estimate body fat. Multiple regression models were fitted to predict total body fat (Model 1) and trunk fat (Model 2) using a backward selection procedure. Model 1 had an R 2 =0.85 and a standard error of the estimate of 1.43. Model 2 had an R 2 =0.80 and standard error of the estimate=0.49. The traditional equations of Lohman and Slaughter showed poor performance in estimating body fat in children and adolescents living with HIV. The prediction models using anthropometry provided reliable estimates and can be used by clinicians and healthcare professionals to monitor total body and trunk fat in children and adolescents living with HIV. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of fat-free body mass from bioelectrical impedance and anthropometry among 3-year-old children using DXA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejlerskov, Katrine T; Jensen, Signe M; Christensen, Line B; Ritz, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F; Mølgaard, Christian

    2014-01-27

    For 3-year-old children suitable methods to estimate body composition are sparse. We aimed to develop predictive equations for estimating fat-free mass (FFM) from bioelectrical impedance (BIA) and anthropometry using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as reference method using data from 99 healthy 3-year-old Danish children. Predictive equations were derived from two multiple linear regression models, a comprehensive model (height(2)/resistance (RI), six anthropometric measurements) and a simple model (RI, height, weight). Their uncertainty was quantified by means of 10-fold cross-validation approach. Prediction error of FFM was 3.0% for both equations (root mean square error: 360 and 356 g, respectively). The derived equations produced BIA-based prediction of FFM and FM near DXA scan results. We suggest that the predictive equations can be applied in similar population samples aged 2-4 years. The derived equations may prove useful for studies linking body composition to early risk factors and early onset of obesity.

  19. Longitudinal Association of Anthropometry with Mammographic Breast Density in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (Swan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Katherine W.; Stone, Roslyn A.; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; Vogel, Victor G.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Habel, Laurel A.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Cauley, Jane A.

    2009-01-01

    High percent mammographic breast density is strongly associated with increased breast cancer risk. Though body mass index (BMI) is positively associated with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, BMI is negatively associated with percent breast density in cross-sectional studies. Few longitudinal studies have evaluated associations between BMI and weight and mammographic breast density. We studied the longitudinal relationships between anthropometry and breast density in a prospective cohort of 834 pre- and perimenopausal women enrolled in an ancillary study to the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Routine screening mammograms were collected and read for breast density. Random intercept regression models were used to evaluate whether annual BMI change was associated with changes over time in dense breast area and percent density. The study population was 7.4% African American, 48.8% Caucasian, 21.8% Chinese, and 21.9% Japanese. Mean follow-up was 4.8 years. Mean annual weight change was +0.32 kg/year, mean change in dense area was -0.77 cm2/year, and mean change in percent density was -1.14%/year. In fully adjusted models, annual change in BMI was not significantly associated with changes in dense breast area (-0.17 cm2, 95% CI -0.64, 0.29). Borderline significant negative associations were observed between annual BMI change and annual percent density change, with percent density decreasing 0.36% (95% CI -0.74, 0.02) for a one unit increase in BMI over a year. This longitudinal study provides modest evidence that changes in BMI are not associated with changes in dense area, yet may be negatively associated with percent density. PMID:19065651

  20. Comparison of Anthropometry and Lower Limb Power Qualities According to Different Levels and Ranking Position of Competitive Surfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gamboa, Iosu; Yanci, Javier; Granados, Cristina; Camara, Jesus

    2017-08-01

    Fernandez-Gamboa, I, Yanci, J, Granados, C, and Camara, J. Comparison of anthropometry and lower limb power qualities according to different levels and ranking position of competitive surfers. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2231-2237, 2017-The aim of this study was to compare competitive surfers' lower limb power output depending on their competitive level, and to evaluate the association between competition rankings. Twenty competitive surfers were divided according to the competitive level as follows: international (INT) or national (NAT), and competitive ranking (RANK1-50 or RANK51-100). Vertical jump and maximal peak power of the lower limbs were measured. No differences were found between INT and NAT surfers in the anthropometric variables, in the vertical jump, or in lower extremity power; although the NAT group had higher levels on the elasticity index, squat jumps (SJs), and counter movement jumps (CMJs) compared with the INT group. The RANK1-50 group had a lower biceps skinfold (p < 0.01), lower skinfolds in the legs (Front thigh: p ≤ 0.05; medial calf: p < 0.01), lower sum of skinfolds (p ≤ 0.05), higher SJ (p < 0.01), CMJ (p < 0.01), and 15 seconds vertical CMJ (p ≤ 0.05); also, maximal peak power of the right leg (MPPR) and left leg (MPPL) were higher in the RANK1-50 group. Moderate to large significant correlations were obtained between the surfers' ranking position and some skinfolds, the sum of skinfolds, and vertical jump. Results demonstrate that surfers' physical performance seems to be an accurate indicator of ranking positioning, also revealing that vertical jump capacity and anthropometric variables play an important role in their competitive performance, which may be important when considering their power training.

  1. Estimation of Stature from Footprint Anthropometry Using Regression Analysis: A Study on the Bidayuh Population of East Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nataraja Moorthy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The human foot has been studied for a variety of reasons, i.e., for forensic as well as non-forensic purposes by anatomists, forensic scientists, anthropologists, physicians, podiatrists, and numerous other groups. An aspect of human identification that has received scant attention from forensic anthropologists is the study of human feet and the footprints made by the feet. The present study, conducted during 2013-2014, aimed to derive population specific regression equations to estimate stature from the footprint anthropometry of indigenous adult Bidayuhs in the east of Malaysia. The study sample consisted of 480 bilateral footprints collected using a footprint kit from 240 Bidayuhs (120 males and 120 females, who consented to taking part in the study. Their ages ranged from 18 to 70 years. Stature was measured using a portable body meter device (SECA model 206. The data were analyzed using PASW Statistics version 20. In this investigation, better results were obtained in terms of correlation coefficient (R between stature and various footprint measurements and regression analysis in estimating the stature. The (R values showed a positive and statistically significant (p < 0.001 relationship between the two parameters. The correlation coefficients in the pooled sample (0.861–0.882 were comparatively higher than those of an individual male (0.762-0.795 and female (0.722-0.765. This study provided regression equations to estimate stature from footprints in the Bidayuh population. The result showed that the regression equations without sex indicators performed significantly better than models with gender indications. The regression equations derived for a pooled sample can be used to estimate stature, even when the sex of the footprint is unknown, as in real crime scenes.

  2. Effects of Soccer Training on Anthropometry, Body Composition, and Physical Fitness during a Soccer Season in Female Elite Young Athletes: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, Melanie; Prieske, Olaf; Helm, Norman; Granacher, Urs

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (i) describe soccer training (e.g., volume, types), anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness and (ii) compute associations between soccer training data and relative changes of anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness during a soccer season in female elite young athletes. Seasonal training (i.e., day-to-day training volume/types) as well as variations in anthropometry (e.g., body height/mass), body composition (e.g., lean body/fat mass), and physical fitness (e.g., muscle strength/power, speed, balance) were collected from 17 female elite young soccer players (15.3 ± 0.5 years) over the training periods (i.e., preparation, competition, transition) of a soccer season that resulted in the German championship title in under-17 female soccer. Training volume/types, anthropometrics, body composition, and physical fitness significantly varied over a soccer season. During the two preparation periods, higher volumes in resistance and endurance training were performed (2.00 ≤ d ≤ 18.15; p endurance, and sport-specific performance (2.52 ≤ d ≤ 3.95; p endurance, speed, and change-of-direction speed. Of note, variables of muscle strength (i.e., leg extensors) significantly decreased ( d = 2.39; p endurance, and balance (0.89 ≤ d ≤ 4.01; p speed significantly declined after the first round of the season, i.e., transition period ( d = 2.83; p speed, strength). Thus, training volume and/or types should be carefully considered in order to develop power-, speed- or strength-related fitness measures more efficiently throughout the soccer season.

  3. Predicting volumes of metabolically important whole-body adipose tissue compartments in overweight and obese adolescents by different MRI approaches and anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Fabian; Ehehalt, Stefan; Sommer, Julia; Ballweg, Verena; Machann, Jürgen; Binder, Gerhard; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate 5-slice stack/single-slice MRI approaches and anthropometric measures as predictors for metabolically relevant whole-body adipose tissue (AT) compartments in overweight/obese adolescents. Forty adolescents (22 males, age 11.4-16.1 years) were included with a BMI above the 90th percentile. Volumes of whole-body AT compartments, i.e. total AT (TAT), subcutaneous AT (SCAT) and visceral AT (VAT), were determined using a breath-hold T1-weighted-FSE-MR-sequence and semi-automated segmentation serving as the gold standard. SCAT, VAT and TAT was estimated by either axially oriented single-slices or 5-slice-stacks centred at specific anatomic landmarks (umbilicus, head of femur and humerus). Furthermore, anthropometric measures were also evaluated as predictors of whole-body AT compartments. Strong correlations were found for both genders between TAT/SCAT and single-slice evaluation (e.g. whole-body SCAT-SCAT at umbilicus level: r = 0.91 (m), r = 0.92 (f)) or anthropometry (SCAT-BMI: r = 0.93 (m, f)). VAT was correlated to VAT at umbilicus (r = 0.71 (m), r = 0.94 (f)) but only weakly to anthropometry. Anthropometric measures and single-slice MRI can accurately predict TAT/SCAT which cannot be improved by evaluation of 5-slice stacks. Prediction of VAT by 5-slice stack/single-slice MRI protocols seems only to be accurate in females. Anthropometry cannot be reliably used for prediction of VAT in both genders. Thus, MRI seems to be necessary for quantification of VAT in overweight/obese adolescents of both genders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting volumes of metabolically important whole-body adipose tissue compartments in overweight and obese adolescents by different MRI approaches and anthropometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, Fabian; Ehehalt, Stefan; Sommer, Julia; Ballweg, Verena; Machann, Jürgen; Binder, Gerhard; Claussen, Claus D.; Schick, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate 5-slice stack/single-slice MRI approaches and anthropometric measures as predictors for metabolically relevant whole-body adipose tissue (AT) compartments in overweight/obese adolescents. Methods: Forty adolescents (22 males, age 11.4–16.1 years) were included with a BMI above the 90th percentile. Volumes of whole-body AT compartments, i.e. total AT (TAT), subcutaneous AT (SCAT) and visceral AT (VAT), were determined using a breath-hold T1-weighted-FSE-MR-sequence and semi-automated segmentation serving as the gold standard. SCAT, VAT and TAT was estimated by either axially oriented single-slices or 5-slice-stacks centred at specific anatomic landmarks (umbilicus, head of femur and humerus). Furthermore, anthropometric measures were also evaluated as predictors of whole-body AT compartments. Results: Strong correlations were found for both genders between TAT/SCAT and single-slice evaluation (e.g. whole-body SCAT-SCAT at umbilicus level: r = 0.91 (m), r = 0.92 (f)) or anthropometry (SCAT-BMI: r = 0.93 (m, f)). VAT was correlated to VAT at umbilicus (r = 0.71 (m), r = 0.94 (f)) but only weakly to anthropometry. Conclusions: Anthropometric measures and single-slice MRI can accurately predict TAT/SCAT which cannot be improved by evaluation of 5-slice stacks. Prediction of VAT by 5-slice stack/single-slice MRI protocols seems only to be accurate in females. Anthropometry cannot be reliably used for prediction of VAT in both genders. Thus, MRI seems to be necessary for quantification of VAT in overweight/obese adolescents of both genders.

  5. Comparison of Organ Dosimetry for Astronaut Phantoms: Earth-Based vs. Microgravity-Based Anthropometry and Body Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBaalen, Mary; Bahadon, Amir; Shavers, Mark; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use NASA radiation transport codes to compare astronaut organ dose equivalents resulting from solar particle events (SPE), geomagnetically trapped protons, and free-space galactic cosmic rays (GCR) using phantom models representing Earth-based and microgravity-based anthropometry and positioning. Methods: The Univer sity of Florida hybrid adult phantoms were scaled to represent male and female astronauts with 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile heights and weights as measured on Earth. Another set of scaled phantoms, incorporating microgravity-induced changes, such as spinal lengthening, leg volume loss, and the assumption of the neutral body position, was also created. A ray-tracer was created and used to generate body self-shielding distributions for dose points within a voxelized phantom under isotropic irradiation conditions, which closely approximates the free-space radiation environment. Simplified external shielding consisting of an aluminum spherical shell was used to consider the influence of a spacesuit or shielding of a hull. These distributions were combined with depth dose distributions generated from the NASA radiation transport codes BRYNTRN (SPE and trapped protons) and HZETRN (GCR) to yield dose equivalent. Many points were sampled per organ. Results: The organ dos e equivalent rates were on the order of 1.5-2.5 mSv per day for GCR (1977 solar minimum) and 0.4-0.8 mSv per day for trapped proton irradiation with shielding of 2 g cm-2 aluminum equivalent. The organ dose equivalents for SPE irradiation varied considerably, with the skin and eye lens having the highest organ dose equivalents and deep-seated organs, such as the bladder, liver, and stomach having the lowest. Conclus ions: The greatest differences between the Earth-based and microgravity-based phantoms are observed for smaller ray thicknesses, since the most drastic changes involved limb repositioning and not overall phantom size. Improved self-shielding models

  6. Upper and lower limbs composition: a comparison between anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diano, Danila; Ponti, Federico; Guerri, Sara; Mercatelli, Daniele; Amadori, Michele; Aparisi Gómez, Maria Pilar; Battista, Giuseppe; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Bazzocchi, Alberto

    2017-09-18

    , anthropometry is not well representative of LM of arms in both genders, independently of age; therefore, a densitometric examination should be considered for a correct assessment of BC at limbs.

  7. Soccer Player Characteristics in English Lower-League Development Programmes: The Relationships between Relative Age, Maturation, Anthropometry and Physical Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Ric; Towlson, Chris; Parkin, Guy; Portas, Matt; Vaeyens, Roel; Cobley, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) and its relationships with maturation, anthropometry, and physical performance characteristics were examined across a representative sample of English youth soccer development programmes. Birth dates of 1,212 players, chronologically age-grouped (i.e., U9's-U18's), representing 17 professional clubs (i.e., playing in Leagues 1 & 2) were obtained and categorised into relative age quartiles from the start of the selection year (Q1 = Sep-Nov; Q2 = Dec-Feb; Q3 = Mar-May; Q4 = Jun-Aug). Players were measured for somatic maturation and performed a battery of physical tests to determine aerobic fitness (Multi-Stage Fitness Test [MSFT]), Maximal Vertical Jump (MVJ), sprint (10 & 20m), and agility (T-Test) performance capabilities. Odds ratio's (OR) revealed Q1 players were 5.3 times (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 4.08-6.83) more likely to be selected than Q4's, with a particularly strong RAE bias observed in U9 (OR: 5.56) and U13-U16 squads (OR: 5.45-6.13). Multivariate statistical models identified few between quartile differences in anthropometric and fitness characteristics, and confirmed chronological age-group and estimated age at peak height velocity (APHV) as covariates. Assessment of practical significance using magnitude-based inferences demonstrated body size advantages in relatively older players (Q1 vs. Q4) that were very-likely small (Effect Size [ES]: 0.53-0.57), and likely to very-likely moderate (ES: 0.62-0.72) in U12 and U14 squads, respectively. Relatively older U12-U14 players also demonstrated small advantages in 10m (ES: 0.31-0.45) and 20m sprint performance (ES: 0.36-0.46). The data identify a strong RAE bias at the entry-point to English soccer developmental programmes. RAE was also stronger circa-PHV, and relatively older players demonstrated anaerobic performance advantages during the pubescent period. Talent selectors should consider motor function and maturation status assessments to avoid premature and unwarranted

  8. Associations between dietary patterns and demographics, lifestyle, anthropometry and blood pressure in Chinese community-dwelling older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ruth; Chan, Dicken; Woo, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined dietary patterns, and the associations of these patterns with demographics, lifestyle, anthropometry and blood pressure in 3707 Chinese people aged 65 years and above taking part in a population-based cohort study investigating the risk factors for osteoporosis. Baseline dietary data were collected using a validated FFQ. Dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis. Scores were calculated for each pattern. Demographics, lifestyle factors and self-reported hypertension history were collected through a questionnaire. BMI, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), waist-to-hip ratio, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured. Three dietary patterns were identified, namely 'vegetables-fruit', 'snacks-drinks-milk products' and 'meat-fish'. Participants who were more physically active, more educated, non-smokers and non-drinkers were more likely to have higher 'vegetables-fruit' dietary pattern scores. Current smoking habit and alcohol use were associated with higher 'snacks-drinks-milk products' dietary pattern scores and 'meat-fish' dietary pattern scores. 'Vegetables-fruit' dietary pattern scores were inversely (unstandardised regression coefficient B = -0·60 mmHg, 95 % CI -1·04, -0·16) and 'snacks-drinks-milk products' dietary pattern scores were positively (B = 0·50 mmHg, 95 % CI 0·08, 0·92) associated with DBP in men in multiple regressions. Higher 'meat-fish' dietary pattern scores were associated with higher BMI (B = 0·19 kg/m(2), 95 % CI 0·06, 0·33), waist-to-hip ratio (B = 0·004, 95 % CI 0·002, 0·007) and WC (B = 0·57 cm, 95 % CI 0·18, 0·97) in men, and higher BMI (B = 0·40 kg/m(2), 95 % CI 0·22, 0·57), WC (B = 0·87 cm, 95 % CI 0·39, 1·36) and HC (B = 0·61 cm, 95 % CI 0·26, 0·96) in women in multiple regressions. The influence of demographic and lifestyle characteristics on dietary patterns and the health risks associated

  9. Are unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy distinguished by differences in anthropometry, body composition, or muscle strength in elite female basketball players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, J E; Cook, J L; Bass, S L; Austen, S; Kiss, Z S

    2004-10-01

    Overuse injury to the patellar tendon (patellar tendinopathy) is a major reason for interrupted training and competition for elite athletes. In both sexes, the prevalence of unilateral and bilateral tendinopathy has been shown to differ. It has been proposed that bilateral pathology may have a different aetiology from unilateral pathology. Investigation of risk factors that may be unique to unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy in female athletes may reveal insights into the aetiology of this condition. To examine whether anthropometry, body composition, or muscle strength distinguished elite female basketball players with unilateral or bilateral patellar tendinopathy. Body composition, anthropometry, and muscle strength were compared in elite female basketball players with unilateral (n = 8), bilateral (n = 7), or no (n = 24) patellar tendinopathy. Body composition was analysed using a dual energy x ray absorptiometer. Anthropometric measures were assessed using standard techniques. Knee extensor strength was measured at 180 degrees /s using an isokinetic dynamometer. z scores were calculated for the unilateral and bilateral groups (using the no tendinopathy group as controls). z scores were tested against zero. The tibia length to stature ratio was approximately 1.3 (1.3) SDs above zero in both the affected and non-affected legs in the unilateral group (ppatellar tendinopathy has identifiable risk factors whereas bilateral patellar tendinopathy may not. This suggests that the aetiology of these conditions may be different. However, interpretation must respect the limitation of small subject numbers.

  10. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations between Household Food Security and Child Anthropometry at Ages 5 and 8 Years in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Debbie L; Dearden, Kirk A; Crookston, Benjamin T; Fernald, Lia C; Stein, Aryeh D; Woldehanna, Tassew; Penny, Mary E; Behrman, Jere R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor childhood nutritional status has lifetime effects and food insecurity is associated with dietary practices that can impair nutritional status. Objectives: We assessed concurrent and subsequent associations between food insecurity and height-for-age z scores (HAZs) and body mass index–for-age z scores (BMI-Zs); evaluated associations with transitory and chronic food insecurity; and tested whether dietary diversity mediates associations between food insecurity and nutritional status. Methods: We used data from the Young Lives younger cohort composed of children in Ethiopia (n = 1757), India (n = 1825), Peru (n = 1844), and Vietnam (n = 1828) recruited in 2002 (round 1) at ∼1 y old, with subsequent data collection at 5 y in 2006 (round 2) and 8 y in 2009 (round 3). Results: Children from food-insecure households had significantly lower HAZs in all countries at 5 y (Ethiopia, −0.33; India, −0.53; Peru, −0.31; and Vietnam, −0.68 HAZ; all P anthropometry in Vietnam, but mediated to a lesser degree (8.4–19.3%) in other countries. Conclusions: In 4 countries, food insecurity at 5 y of age was associated with both HAZ and BMI-Z at age 8 y, although the association was attenuated after adjusting for other household factors and anthropometry at age 5 y, and remained significant only for the HAZ in Vietnam. PMID:26084361

  11. The influence of anthropometry and body composition on children's bone health: the childhood health, activity and motor performance school (the CHAMPS) study, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Malene; Holst, René; Schou, Anders J; Klakk, Heidi; Husby, Steffen; Wedderkopp, Niels; Mølgaard, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Overweight, physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour have become increasing problems during the past decade. Increased sedentary behaviour may change the body composition (BC) by increasing the fat mass relative to the lean mass (LM). These changes may influence bone health to describe how anthropometry and BC predict the development of the bone accruement. The longitudinal study is a part of The CHAMPS study-DK. Children were DXA scanned at baseline and at 2-year follow-up. BC (LM, BF %) and BMC, BMD and BA were measured. The relationship between bone traits, anthropometry and BC was analysed by multilevel regression analyses. Of the invited children, 742/800 (93%) accepted to participate. Of these, 682/742 (92%) participated at follow-up. Mean (range) of age at baseline was 9.5 years (7.7-12.1). Height, BMI, LM and BF % predicted bone mineral accrual and bone size positively and independently. Height and BMI are both positive predictors of bone accruement. LM is a more precise predictor of bone traits than BF % in both genders. The effects of height and BMI and LM on bone accruement are nearly identical in the two genders, while changes in BF % have different but positive effects on bone accretion in both boys and girls.

  12. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations between Household Food Security and Child Anthropometry at Ages 5 and 8 Years in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Debbie L; Dearden, Kirk A; Crookston, Benjamin T; Fernald, Lia C; Stein, Aryeh D; Woldehanna, Tassew; Penny, Mary E; Behrman, Jere R

    2015-08-01

    Poor childhood nutritional status has lifetime effects and food insecurity is associated with dietary practices that can impair nutritional status. We assessed concurrent and subsequent associations between food insecurity and height-for-age z scores (HAZs) and body mass index-for-age z scores (BMI-Zs); evaluated associations with transitory and chronic food insecurity; and tested whether dietary diversity mediates associations between food insecurity and nutritional status. We used data from the Young Lives younger cohort composed of children in Ethiopia (n = 1757), India (n = 1825), Peru (n = 1844), and Vietnam (n = 1828) recruited in 2002 (round 1) at ∼1 y old, with subsequent data collection at 5 y in 2006 (round 2) and 8 y in 2009 (round 3). Children from food-insecure households had significantly lower HAZs in all countries at 5 y (Ethiopia, -0.33; India, -0.53; Peru, -0.31; and Vietnam, -0.68 HAZ; all P anthropometry in Vietnam, but mediated to a lesser degree (8.4-19.3%) in other countries. In 4 countries, food insecurity at 5 y of age was associated with both HAZ and BMI-Z at age 8 y, although the association was attenuated after adjusting for other household factors and anthropometry at age 5 y, and remained significant only for the HAZ in Vietnam. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. The physical anthropometry, lifestyle habits and blood pressure of people presenting with a first clinical demyelinating event compared to controls: the Ausimmune study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lucas, Robyn M; Dear, Keith; van der Mei, Ingrid; Taylor, Bruce; Chapman, Caron; Coulthard, Alan; Dwyer, Terence; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; McMichael, Anthony J; Pender, Michael P; Valery, Patricia C; Williams, David

    2013-11-01

    Lifestyle factors prior to a first clinical demyelinating event (FCD), a disorder often preceding the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS), have not previously been examined in detail. Past tobacco smoking has been consistently associated with MS. This was a multicentre incident case-control study. Cases (n = 282) were aged 18-59 years with an FCD and resident within one of four Australian centres (from latitudes 27°S to 43°S), from 1 November 2003 to 31 December 2006. Controls (n = 558) were matched to cases on age, sex and study region, without CNS demyelination. Exposures measured included current and past tobacco and marijuana, alcohol and beverage use, physical activity patterns, blood pressure and physical anthropometry. A history of smoking ever was associated with FCD risk (AOR 1.89 (95%CL 1.82, 3.52)). Marijuana use was not associated with FCD risk after adjusting for confounders such as smoking ever but the estimates were imprecise because of a low prevalence of use. Alcohol consumption was common and not associated with FCD risk. No case-control differences in blood pressure or physical anthropometry were observed. Past tobacco smoking was positively associated with a risk of FCD but most other lifestyle factors were not. Prevention efforts against type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease by increasing physical activity and reducing obesity are unlikely to alter MS incidence, and more targeted campaigns will be required.

  14. A comparison of skinfold anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for the evaluation of body fat in cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, P; Merli, M; Andreoli, A; De Lorenzo, A; Masini, A; Ciuffa, L; Valeriano, V; Balotta, M T; Riggio, O

    1999-12-01

    Skinfold anthropometry has been used to evaluate the nutritional status in cirrhosis. Such estimates are based on the calculations which derive from healthy subjects and may not apply to cirrhotic patients. We aimed to calculate the limits of agreement between Skinfold anthropometry (SA) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in estimating body fat in cirrhotics. Forty cirrhotic patients were studied by both methods. The limits of agreement were estimated by the Bland and Altman method. Percentage body fat was similar when measured by DXA and SA (29.6 +/- 9.2 vs 28.9 +/- 7.5 %). Body fat mass was also similar (20.3 +/- 8.4 vs 20.3 +/- 7.7 kg). The limits of agreement between DXA and SA measurements were -7.04 (95%CI: -9.55 to -5.2) +8.56 (95%CI: +10.7 to +6.4.) in the assessment of percentage body fat and -5.32 (95%CI: -6.77 to -3.87) +5.24 (95%CI: +3.79 to +6.69) in the assessment of fat mass. Percentage body fat can be evaluated by SA or DXA with a difference of less then 5% in the majority of cirrhotic patients without overt fluid retention. This result is important when considering the large applicability of SA. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  15. Anthropometry of airline stewardesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    The report presents the body measurements of 423 stewardess trainees enrolled in the American Airlines Stewardess Training Academy in Fort Worth, Texas, between February and June 1971. It includes the means, standard deviations, coefficients of varia...

  16. Personal best time and training volume, not anthropometry, is related to race performance in the 'Swiss Bike Masters' mountain bike ultramarathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Senn, Oliver

    2011-05-01

    We investigated in 73 male ultraendurance mountain bikers, with (mean and SD) age 39.1 (8.6) years, weight 74.4 (8.3) kg, height 1.78 (0.07) m, and a body mass index of 23.3 (1.9) kg·m⁻², whether variables of anthropometry, training, or prerace experience were associated with race time using bi and multivariate analysis. Our investigation was conducted at the "Swiss Bike Masters," which covers a distance of 120 km and an altitude of 5,000 m. In the bivariate analysis, body mass index (r = 0.29), circumference of upper arm (r = 0.28), sum of upper body skinfolds (r = 0.38), sum of lower body skinfolds (r = 0.25), sum of 8 skinfolds (r = 0.36), percent body fat (r = 0.41), total cycling kilometers per year (r = -0.47), yearly volume in both mountain bike (r = -0.33) and road cycling (r = -0.52), number of training units per week (r = -0.48), distance per unit in road cycling (r = -0.33), average speed during training in road cycling (r = -0.33), and personal best time in the "Swiss Bike Masters"(r = 0.67) were related to race time. In the multiple linear regression analysis, personal best time in the "Swiss Bike Masters" (p = 0.000), total yearly cycling kilometers (p = 0.004), and yearly training kilometers in road cycling (p = 0.017) were related to race time. When the personal best time was the dependent variable in a separate regression model, total yearly cycling kilometers (p = 0.002) remained the single predictor variable. We concluded that finishing a particular mountain bike ultramarathon does not seem to require a special anthropometry but rather a specific skill and experience for this selective kind of race coupled with a high training volume. For practical use, we concluded that successful athletes in a mountain bike ultramarathon, in a special environment and using sophisticated equipment, need prerace experience coupled with high training volume, rather than any special anthropometry.

  17. Effects of Soccer Training on Anthropometry, Body Composition, and Physical Fitness during a Soccer Season in Female Elite Young Athletes: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Lesinski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to (i describe soccer training (e.g., volume, types, anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness and (ii compute associations between soccer training data and relative changes of anthropometry, body composition, and physical fitness during a soccer season in female elite young athletes. Seasonal training (i.e., day-to-day training volume/types as well as variations in anthropometry (e.g., body height/mass, body composition (e.g., lean body/fat mass, and physical fitness (e.g., muscle strength/power, speed, balance were collected from 17 female elite young soccer players (15.3 ± 0.5 years over the training periods (i.e., preparation, competition, transition of a soccer season that resulted in the German championship title in under-17 female soccer. Training volume/types, anthropometrics, body composition, and physical fitness significantly varied over a soccer season. During the two preparation periods, higher volumes in resistance and endurance training were performed (2.00 ≤ d ≤ 18.15; p < 0.05, while higher sprint and tactical training volumes were applied during the two competition periods (2.22 ≤ d ≤ 11.18; p < 0.05. Body height and lean body mass increased over the season (2.50 ≤ d ≤ 3.39; p < 0.01. In terms of physical fitness, significant performance improvements were found over the soccer season in measures of balance, endurance, and sport-specific performance (2.52 ≤ d ≤ 3.95; p < 0.05. In contrast, no statistically significant changes were observed for measures of muscle power/endurance, speed, and change-of-direction speed. Of note, variables of muscle strength (i.e., leg extensors significantly decreased (d = 2.39; p < 0.01 over the entire season. Our period-specific sub-analyses revealed significant performance improvements during the first round of the season for measures of muscle power/endurance, and balance (0.89 ≤ d ≤ 4.01; p < 0.05. Moreover, change

  18. Representation of a human head with bi-cubic B-splines technique based on the laser scanning technique in 3D surface anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B; Molenbroek, J F M

    2004-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) anthropometry based on the laser scanning technique not only provides one-dimensional measurements calculated in accordance with the landmarks which are pre-located on the human body surface manually, but also the 3D shape information between the landmarks. This new technique used in recent ergonomic research has brought new challenges to resolving the application problem that was generally avoided by anthropometric experts in their researches. The current research problem is concentrating on how to shift and develop one-dimensional measurements (1D landmarks) into three-dimensional measurements (3D land-surfaces). The main purpose of this paper is to test whether the function of B-splines can be used to fit 3D scanned human heads, and to for further study to develop a computer aided ergonomic design tool (CAED). The result shows that B-splines surfaces can effectively reconstruct 3D human heads based on the laser scanning technique.

  19. Precision of three-dimensional stereo-photogrammetry (3dMD™) in anthropometry of the auricle and its application in microtia reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zung-Chung; Albdour, Mohammad Nayef; Lizardo, Jesus Ablaza; Chen, Ying-An; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting

    2015-05-01

    The advent of three-dimensional stereo-photogrammetry in recent years has vastly helped the craniomaxillofacial field improve in terms of preoperative and intraoperative decision making. With regard to the auricle though, there is paucity of research as to the application of this promising technology. A total of 20 normal adult ears were included in this study. Thirteen anthropometric measurements were taken, twice by two plastic surgeons using direct measurement (DM) and through images captured via 3dMD™. The purpose was to compare the reliability of measurements involving the two instruments. The overall mean absolute differences (MADs) of all ear anthropometries of DM and 3dMD™ were 0.52 mm (range: 0.28-0.72 mm) and 0.27 mm (range: 0.15-0.53 mm), respectively, and the grand mean relative error magnitudes (REMs) were 2.85% (range: 1.01-5.99%) and 1.57% (range: 0.48-3.62%), respectively, across observers. Thus, the precision of all ear anthropometries across observers was high in both methods, but the precision of 3dMD was better than DM irrespective of observers. In addition, the MADs were less than a millimeter across all measurements. The application of three-dimensional technology in microtia surgery for both template production and soft tissue analysis leads to improved planning and satisfactory results with fewer complications. We believe that with further refinement and enhancement, the use of this innovation will pave the way for prefabricated, individualized autologous or biocompatible alloplastic implantable frameworks based on an accurate mirror image of each patient's normal ear in unilateral cases and in bilateral cases, appropriately sized. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison between bioimpedance and anthropometry and the relationship of body indexes to resting energy expenditure and biochemistry blood markers in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Marchini

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The excess of body fat is related to the worsening of blood biochemical markers, and is also correlated with increased morbimortality. It is suggested that the anthropometry is limited to evaluated body composition with different body mass index (BMI, kg/m2. Thus, our objective was to determine if the anthropometry was comparable to bioelectric impedance (BIA and if anthropometric body indexes were correlated to blood biochemical markers and resting energy expenditure. Women ranging weight from normality to obesity (age: 18-64 years, 36±11 years, body mass index, BMI=24 to 57 kg/m2, 31±6 volunteered to participate. Body composition and body indexes were evaluated by both anthropometry and BIA. Resting energy expenditure and blood samples were obtained in the fasting state in the morning. Four blood biochemical markers were correlated with weight, waist-to-hip ratio and the sum of eight skinfolds (P RESUMO O excesso de gordura corporal é relacionado à piora dos marcadores bioquímicos sangüíneos, se associando ao aumento da morbi/mortalidade. É sugerido que a antropometria é limitada para avaliar a composição corporal de diferentes índices de massas corporais (IMC, kg/m2. Portanto, os objetivos deste estudo foram comparar à antropometria a bioimpedância e também, se os índices corporais antropométricos eram correlacionados aos marcadores bioquímicos sanguíneos e ao gasto energético de repouso. Mulheres entre normalidade e obesidade (n=48; idade: 18 a 64 anos, 36±11 anos, média e desvio padrão; IMC=24 a 57, 31±6, foram voluntárias. A composição e índices corporais foram avaliados por antropometria e bioimpedância; o gasto energético de repouso (GER por calorimetria indireta em jejum, pela manhã, e coletadas amostras sangue. Quatro fatores bioquímicos de risco foram correlacionados (P<0,05 ao peso, ao índice abdômen/quadril e a soma de oito pregas cutâneas. Cinco fatores bioquímicos de risco foram correlacionados

  1. Avaliação das medidas do comprimento peniano de crianças e adolescentes Penile anthropometry in Brazilian child and adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro N. Gabrich

    2007-10-01

    consultations are the result of patients seeking parameters for normal penis size. Additionally, the penile anthropometry of Brazilian children and adolescents has not yet been properly studied. The objective of this study is to carry out penile anthropometry of Brazilian children and adolescents, establishing references for clinical use. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out of 2,010 patients with ages varying from 0 to 18 years. Five penile measurements were taken: diameter of penile shaft; apparent and real length of flaccid penis; apparent and real (RSLmax length of flaccid penis fully stretched. Pubertal development was defined according to Tanner's criteria. RESULTS: Only RSLmax, out of all of the penile measurements, did not exhibit significant interobserver variation at all ages analyzed (p = 0.255. Results were tabulated with mean RSLmax and the values that define micropenis (mean - 2.5 standard deviations by age and by Tanner sexual maturity stages. A graph was plotted of the distribution of RSLmax results by the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles and by age. CONCLUSIONS: Out of all of the penile anthropometric measurements, only RSLmax is clinically useful. We recommend our results as a reference standard for penile anthropometry of Brazilian children and adolescents.

  2. Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Compared with Anthropometry in Relation to Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in a Young Adult Population: Is the ‘Gold Standard’ Tarnished?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Beth; Pennell, Craig E.; Lye, Stephen J.; Mountain, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Assessment of adiposity using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has been considered more advantageous in comparison to anthropometry for predicting cardio-metabolic risk in the older population, by virtue of its ability to distinguish total and regional fat. Nonetheless, there is increasing uncertainty regarding the relative superiority of DXA and little comparative data exist in young adults. This study aimed to identify which measure of adiposity determined by either DXA or anthropometry is optimal within a range of cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults. Methods and Results 1138 adults aged 20 years were assessed by DXA and standard anthropometry from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Cross-sectional linear regression analyses were performed. Waist to height ratio was superior to any DXA measure with HDL-C. BMI was the superior model in relation to blood pressure than any DXA measure. Midriff fat mass (DXA) and waist circumference were comparable in relation to glucose. For all the other cardio-metabolic variables, anthropometric and DXA measures were comparable. DXA midriff fat mass compared with BMI or waist hip ratio was the superior measure for triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR. Conclusion Although midriff fat mass (measured by DXA) was the superior measure with insulin sensitivity and triglycerides, the anthropometric measures were better or equal with various DXA measures for majority of the cardio-metabolic risk factors. Our findings suggest, clinical anthropometry is generally as useful as DXA in the evaluation of the individual cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults. PMID:27622523

  3. From palmistry to anthropometry: can 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D) predict the risk of prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomão, Layla; Figueiredo, Rui Teófilo; Oliveira Santos, Rafael; Damião, Ronaldo; da Silva, Eloisio Alexsandro

    2014-01-01

    The 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D) is inversely related to androgen exposure during the fetal period, which may represent a risk factor for several steroid-related diseases. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between 2D:4D ratio and the risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa). We assessed the 2D:4D ratio of 474 men >40 years old, stratified into three groups: group 1 (n = 222) patients with PCa, group 2 (n = 82) subjects with high risk of PCa, and group 3 (n = 170) men with low risk of PCa. Subjects were submitted to a digital picture of the ventral surface of the right hand and 2nd and 4th fingers measurements were determined by the distance from the proximal crease to the tip using computer-assisted analysis. The mean serum prostate-specific antigen level was 7.5 ng/ml in the high-risk group and 0.92 ng/ml in the low-risk group (p < 0.05). The mean 2D:4D ratios were 0.96 ± 0.04, 0.97 ± 0.04 and 0.96 ± 0.04 for the PCa, high-risk and low-risk groups, respectively, and no difference was found among the three groups (p = 0.12). Anthropometry of the hand using the 2D:4D ratio is not a predictor of PCa. 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. BMI and an Anthropometry-Based Estimate of Fat Mass Percentage Are Both Valid Discriminators of Cardiometabolic Risk: A Comparison with DXA and Bioimpedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völgyi, Eszter; Savonen, Kai; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Alén, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether categories of obesity based on BMI and an anthropometry-based estimate of fat mass percentage (FM% equation) have similar discriminative ability for markers of cardiometabolic risk as measurements of FM% by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) or bioimpedance analysis (BIA). Design and Methods. A study of 40–79-year-old male (n = 205) and female (n = 388) Finns. Weight, height, blood pressure, triacylglycerols, HDL cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose were measured. Body composition was assessed by DXA and BIA and a FM%-equation. Results. For grade 1 hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and impaired fasting glucose >6.1 mmol/L, the categories of obesity as defined by BMI and the FM% equation had 1.9% to 3.7% (P < 0.01) higher discriminative power compared to DXA. For grade 2 hypertension the FM% equation discriminated 1.2% (P = 0.05) lower than DXA and 2.8% (P < 0.01) lower than BIA. Receiver operation characteristics confirmed BIA as best predictor of grade 2 hypertension and the FM% equation as best predictor of grade 1 hypertension. All other differences in area under curve were small (≤0.04) and 95% confidence intervals included 0. Conclusions. Both BMI and FM% equations may predict cardiometabolic risk with similar discriminative ability as FM% measured by DXA or BIA. PMID:24455216

  5. Using subject-specific three-dimensional (3D) anthropometry data in digital human modelling: case study in hand motion simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Liuxing; Ma, Liang

    2016-11-01

    Digital human modelling enables ergonomists and designers to consider ergonomic concerns and design alternatives in a timely and cost-efficient manner in the early stages of design. However, the reliability of the simulation could be limited due to the percentile-based approach used in constructing the digital human model. To enhance the accuracy of the size and shape of the models, we proposed a framework to generate digital human models using three-dimensional (3D) anthropometric data. The 3D scan data from specific subjects' hands were segmented based on the estimated centres of rotation. The segments were then driven in forward kinematics to perform several functional postures. The constructed hand models were then verified, thereby validating the feasibility of the framework. The proposed framework helps generate accurate subject-specific digital human models, which can be utilised to guide product design and workspace arrangement. Practitioner Summary: Subject-specific digital human models can be constructed under the proposed framework based on three-dimensional (3D) anthropometry. This approach enables more reliable digital human simulation to guide product design and workspace arrangement.

  6. A Lack of Sexual Dimorphism in Width-to-Height Ratio in White European Faces Using 2D Photographs, 3D Scans, and Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Robin S. S.; Jones, Alex L.; Ward, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Facial width-to-height ratio has received a great deal of attention in recent research. Evidence from human skulls suggests that males have a larger relative facial width than females, and that this sexual dimorphism is an honest signal of masculinity, aggression, and related traits. However, evidence that this measure is sexually dimorphic in faces, rather than skulls, is surprisingly weak. We therefore investigated facial width-to-height ratio in three White European samples using three different methods of measurement: 2D photographs, 3D scans, and anthropometry. By measuring the same individuals with multiple methods, we demonstrated high agreement across all measures. However, we found no evidence of sexual dimorphism in the face. In our third study, we also found a link between facial width-to-height ratio and body mass index for both males and females, although this relationship did not account for the lack of dimorphism in our sample. While we showed sufficient power to detect differences between male and female width-to-height ratio, our results failed to support the general hypothesis of sexual dimorphism in the face. PMID:22880088

  7. Sprint kayaking and canoeing performance prediction based on the relationship between maturity status, anthropometry and physical fitness in young elite paddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Plaza, Daniel; Alacid, Fernando; Muyor, José María; López-Miñarro, Pedro Ángel

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to identify the maturity-related differences and its influence on the physical fitness, morphological and performance characteristics of young elite paddlers. In total, 89 kayakers and 82 canoeists, aged 13.69 ± 0.57 years (mean ± s), were allocated in three groups depending on their age relative to the age at peak height velocity (pre-APHV, circum-APHV and post-APHV) and discipline (kayak and canoe). Nine anthropometric variables, a battery of four physical fitness tests (overhead medicine ball throw, countermovement jump, sit-and-reach test and 20 m multistage shuttle run test) and three specific performance tests (1000, 500 and 200 m) were assessed. Both disciplines presented significant maturity-based differences in all anthropometric parameters (except for fat and muscle mass percentage), overhead medicine ball throw and all performance times (pre > circum > post; P anthropometry (body mass, height, sitting height and maturity status), overhead medicine ball throw and sit and reach for all distances. These findings confirm the importance of maturity status in sprint kayaking and canoeing since the more mature paddlers were also those who revealed largest body size, physical fitness level and best paddling performance. Additionally, the most important variables predicting performance times in kayaking and canoeing were maturity status and chronological age, respectively.

  8. Acceptability and impact on anthropometry of a locally developed ready-to-use therapeutic food in pre-school children in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Tran T; Nguyen, Marie; Mathisen, Roger; Hoa, Do T B; Minh, Nguyen H; Berger, Jacques; Wieringa, Frank T

    2013-08-15

    In South East Asia, concerns exist about the acceptability of peanut-based Ready-to-Use-Therapeutic-Foods (RUTF) for the treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Therefore, an alternative, culturally acceptable RUTF made from locally available ingredients and complying with local food traditions and preferences was developed. The current study evaluated its acceptability and impact on anthropometry. The study was a randomized, two-arm, cross-over intervention trial to test the acceptability of the local product (bar) against a commercially available, peanut-based RUTF paste (Plumpy'nut®). Children (n = 67) from two kindergartens in a rural area of North Vietnam were recruited. The age of the children was between 3 and 5 years. The Vietnamese RUTF was well-accepted, although overall acceptability was less than of Plumpy'nut®, with the latter scoring higher on palatability (P < 0.05). In contrast, reluctance to eat Plumpy'nut® was higher than for the Vietnamese RUTF (P < 0.05). Impact on anthropmetrical indices was similar for both RUTF. The nutritional status of the children who consumed the two RUTF over a 4 week period improved significantly, with a mean weight gain of 0.64 (SD 0.27) Kg, and increases in WHZ and HAZ z-scores of 0.48 (SD 0.30) and 0.05 (SD 0.13) respectively (P < 0.01 both). Weight gain was similar between the 2 products (0.32 kg per 2 weeks for both). Both the commercial Plumpy'nut® and the local produced RUTF were accepted although the harder consistency of the local product might have caused the lower overall acceptance. The promising increase in nutritional status needs to be confirmed in a controlled trial in children with SAM.

  9. The effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports Soccer training program on anthropometry, physical fitness and skilled performance in Special Olympics soccer athletes and non-disabled partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Funda; Aktop, Abdurrahman; Özer, Dilara; Nalbant, Sibel; Ağlamış, Ece; Barak, Sharon; Hutzler, Yeshayahu

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sport (UNS) soccer program on anthropometry, physical fitness and soccer skills of male youth athletes with and without intellectual disabilities (ID) who participated in a training group (TRG) and in a comparison group (CG) without specific training. Youth with ID (WID) were randomly selected out of all the students between the ages 12 and 15, with a diagnosis of educable mental retardation and no secondary disabilities, who were attending a special education school. Participants without ID (WoID) were randomly selected from a regular secondary school out of the same age groups of male students. All participants were given permission by their parents or guardians to participate in the study. Participants in the TRG included 23 youth WID and 23 youth WoID. Mean ages were = 14.1 (SD = 1.1) and 13.2 (SD = 0.79) respectively. Fifteen WID, and 15 WoID comprised the CG. Mean ages were 14.51 (SD = 0.81) and 13.78 (SD = 0.49) respectively. Prior to and following the program measurements were conducted, and data were collected on students' anthropometric and fitness components of the Brockport physical fitness test as well as a soccer skill performance based on the SO soccer skill test. Participants in the TRG trained 8 weeks, 1.5h per session, three times per week, in an after-school soccer program. CG did not participate in any sports program outside of the school physical education class. Dependent t tests and effect size calculations revealed that SO athletes and non-disabled partners scored significantly higher with regard to physical fitness and football skills in most variables compared with their CG. This Unified Program was successful in increasing fitness and soccer skill performance of youth WID as well as of those WoID. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimation of CT-derived abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots from anthropometry in Europeans, South Asians and African Caribbeans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie V Eastwood

    Full Text Available South Asians and African Caribbeans experience more cardiometabolic disease than Europeans. Risk factors include visceral (VAT and subcutaneous abdominal (SAT adipose tissue, which vary with ethnicity and are difficult to quantify using anthropometry.We developed and cross-validated ethnicity and gender-specific equations using anthropometrics to predict VAT and SAT.669 Europeans, 514 South Asians and 227 African Caribbeans (70 ± 7 years underwent anthropometric measurement and abdominal CT scanning. South Asian and African Caribbean participants were first-generation migrants living in London. Prediction equations were derived for CT-measured VAT and SAT using stepwise regression, then cross-validated by comparing actual and predicted means.South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less VAT than Europeans. For basic VAT prediction equations (age and waist circumference, model fit was better in men (R(2 range 0.59-0.71 than women (range 0.35-0.59. Expanded equations (+ weight, height, hip and thigh circumference improved fit for South Asian and African Caribbean women (R(2 0.35 to 0.55, and 0.43 to 0.56 respectively. For basic SAT equations, R(2 was 0.69-0.77, and for expanded equations it was 0.72-0.86. Cross-validation showed differences between actual and estimated VAT of <7%, and SAT of <8% in all groups, apart from VAT in South Asian women which disagreed by 16%.We provide ethnicity- and gender-specific VAT and SAT prediction equations, derived from a large tri-ethnic sample. Model fit was reasonable for SAT and VAT in men, while basic VAT models should be used cautiously in South Asian and African Caribbean women. These equations will aid studies of mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease in later life, where imaging data are not available.

  11. The Importance of Methodology Evaluation of School Furniture for Czech Children with Mobility Disability in Relation to Children’s Anthropometry

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    Martin Zach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research conducted under the support of the IGA LDF MENDELU project, id. No. 32/2010 (Anthropometry in Disabled Children in Relation to Furniture and the NIS MPO ČR FR-TI1/050 project (Information System for the Support of Research, Development, Innovation and Furniture Quality. It gives an account of theoretical and methodological foundations, introduces the project’s research objectives. Its major objective is to familiarise professional public with the results of the conducted research the focus of which was to determine requirements for furniture designated for children with mobility restrictions. The defined requirements then constitute the grounds of school furniture assessment methodology. These requirements are divided into three levels that are somehow interconnected. Application of the methodology as a whole is highly wide and can be directed at all educational institutions in the Czech Republic with the pupils from the target group. The evaluation outcome is a report of each evaluated product. The questions raised also belong to a broader context of the issue at hand, related to the project of protection and safety standards establishment in relation to health status of children and youth, in the context of the “Long-term programme of the improvement of health status of the Czech Republic population – Health for everybody in the 21st century” paper, objective 4: HEALTH OF YOUTH – TO BUILD CONDITIONS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE TO BECOME HEALTHIER AND APTER TO FULFILL THEIR ROLE IN THE SOCIETY BY 2020. It is recommended to make a proper definition of the dimensional characteristics of children and update their measurements for furniture design in the Czech Republic constantly (including revision of technical regulations and innovation dimensions in the literature. This can be considered as an opportunity to improve the health of future generations.

  12. Sarcopenia in liver cirrhosis: the role of computed tomography scan for the assessment of muscle mass compared with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and anthropometry.

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    Giusto, Michela; Lattanzi, Barbara; Albanese, Carlina; Galtieri, Alessia; Farcomeni, Alessio; Giannelli, Valerio; Lucidi, Cristina; Di Martino, Michele; Catalano, Carlo; Merli, Manuela

    2015-03-01

    Sarcopenia evaluated by computed tomography (CT) scan at the lumbar site has been identified as a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to compare the measurement of muscle mass through CT scan, considered the gold standard, with other reliable techniques to evaluate the rate of agreement between different available methods for the assessment of muscle mass in cirrhosis. The correlation between measurements of muscle mass and of muscle strength was also investigated. Adult patients eligible for liver transplantation were studied. Lumbar skeletal muscle cross-sectional area was measured by CT and muscle depletion was defined using previously published cut-offs. Mid-arm muscle circumference was calculated following anthropometric measures. The Fat-Free Mass Index and the Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Index were calculated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Muscle strength was evaluated using the Hand Grip test. Fifty-nine patients with cirrhosis were included. Sarcopenia was diagnosed in 76% of the patients according to CT evaluation. A significant reduction in Fat-Free Mass Index and Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Index was observed in 42-52% of the patients, whereas 52% showed a mid-arm muscle circumference less than 10th percentile. Skeletal muscle mass evaluation through CT was only weakly correlated with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and anthropometry evaluation. No correlation was observed between CT measurement of muscle mass and Hand Grip test. CT scan can identify the highest percentage of sarcopenia in cirrhosis and no other techniques are actually available as a replacement. Future efforts should focus on approaches for assessing both skeletal muscle mass and function to provide a better evaluation of sarcopenia in cirrhotic patients.

  13. Intake of Total and Subgroups of Fat Minimally Affect the Associations between Selected Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the PPARγ Pathway and Changes in Anthropometry among European Adults from Cohorts of the DiOGenes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Østergaard, Jane N; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Roswall, Nina; Mortensen, Lotte M; Nielsen, Birgit M; Tjønneland, Anne; Wareham, Nicholas J; Palli, Domenico; Masala, Giovanna; Saris, Wim H M; van der A, Daphne L; Boer, Jolanda M A; Feskens, Edith J M; Boeing, Heiner; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Loos, Ruth J F; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Overvad, Kim

    2016-03-01

    Although the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) pathway is central in adipogenesis, it remains unknown whether it influences change in body weight (BW) and whether dietary fat has a modifying effect on the association. We examined whether 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 4 genes in the PPARγ pathway are associated with the OR of being a BW gainer or with annual changes in anthropometry and whether intake of total fat, monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, or saturated fat has a modifying effect on these associations. A case-noncase study included 11,048 men and women from cohorts in the European Diet, Obesity and Genes study; 5552 were cases, defined as individuals with the greatest BW gain during follow-up, and 6548 were randomly selected, including 5496 noncases. We selected 4 genes [CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (CEBPB), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 2, PPARγ gene (PPARG), and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1] according to evidence about biologic plausibility for interactions with dietary fat in weight regulation. Diet was assessed at baseline, and anthropometry was followed for 7 y. The ORs for being a BW gainer for the 27 genetic variants ranged from 0.87 (95% CI: 0.79, 1.03) to 1.12 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.22) per additional minor allele. Uncorrected, CEBPB rs4253449 had a significant interaction with the intake of total fat and subgroups of fat. The OR for being a BW gainer for each additional rs4253449 minor allele per 100 kcal higher total fat intake was 1.07 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.12; P = 0.008), and similar associations were found for subgroups of fat. Among European men and women, the influence of dietary fat on associations between SNPs in the PPARγ pathway and anthropometry is likely to be absent or marginal. The observed interaction between rs4253449 and dietary fat needs confirmation. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. An Okinawan-based Nordic diet improves anthropometry, metabolic control, and health-related quality of life in Scandinavian patients with type 2 diabetes: a pilot trial

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    Gassan Darwiche

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our hypothesis was that a modified diet would improve blood glucose control with beneficial impact on weight management and overall health in established diabetes. Objective: This prospective interventional study investigated the clinical effect of an Okinawan-based Nordic diet on anthropometry, metabolic control, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL in Scandinavian type 2 diabetes patients. Design: Food was prepared and delivered to 30 type 2 diabetes patients. Clinical information along with data on HRQoL, blood samples, and urine samples were collected during 12 weeks of diet interventions, with follow-up 16 weeks after diet completion. Results: After 12 weeks of dietary intervention, a reduction in body weight (7% (p<0.001, body mass index (p<0.001, and waist circumference (7.0 cm (p<0.001 was seen. Improved levels of proinsulin (p=0.005, insulin (p=0.011, and fasting plasma glucose (p<0.001 were found already after 2 weeks; these improved levels remained after 12 weeks when lowered levels of C-peptide (p=0.015, triglycerides (p=0.009, total cholesterol (p=0.001, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (p=0.041 were also observed. Insulin resistance homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance was lowered throughout the study, with a 20% reduction in hemoglobin A1c levels (p<0.001 at week 12, despite reduced anti-diabetes treatment. Lowered systolic blood pressure (9.6 mmHg (p<0.001, diastolic blood pressure (2.7 mmHg (p<0.001, and heart and respiratory rates (p<0.001 were accompanied by decreased cortisol levels (p=0.015 and improvement in HRQoL. At follow-up, increased levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol were found (p=0.003. Conclusion: This interventional study demonstrates a considerable improvement of anthropometric and metabolic parameters and HRQoL in Scandinavian type 2 diabetes patients when introducing a modified Okinawan-based Nordic diet, independently of exercise or other interventions. Through

  15. Anthropometry in 5- to 9-Year-Old Greenlandic and Ukrainian Children in Relation to Prenatal Exposure to Perfluorinated Alkyl Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Vrijheid, Martine; Valvi, Damaskini; Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Zviezdai, Valentyna; Jönsson, Bo A.G.; Lindh, Christian H.; Bonde, Jens Peter; Toft, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Background In some animal studies, perfluorinated alkyl substances are suggested to induce weight gain. Human epidemiological studies investigating these associations are sparse. Objective We examined pregnancy serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and the prevalence of offspring overweight (> 1 SD) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) > 0.5 at 5–9 years of age. Methods Sera from 1,022 pregnant women enrolled in the INUENDO cohort (2002–2004) from Greenland and Kharkiv (Ukraine) were analyzed for PFOA and PFOS using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Relative risks (RR) of being overweight and having WHtR > 0.5 in relation to continuous and categorized (tertiles) PFOA and PFOS were calculated at follow-up (2010–2012) using generalized linear models. Results Pooled PFOA median (range) was 1.3 (0.2–5.1) and PFOS median (range) was 10.8 (0.8–73.0) ng/mL. For each natural logarithm-unit (ln-unit) increase of pregnancy PFOA, the adjusted RR of offspring overweight was 1.11 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82, 1.53] in Greenlandic children. In Ukrainian children, the adjusted RR of offspring overweight was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.72, 1.44) for each ln-unit increase of pregnancy PFOA. Prenatal exposure to PFOS was not associated with overweight in country-specific or pooled analysis. The adjusted RR of having WHtR > 0.5 for each ln-unit increase of prenatal exposure to PFOA was 1.30 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.74) in the pooled analysis. For 1–ln-unit increase of prenatal exposure to PFOS, the adjusted RR of having a WHtR > 0.5 was 1.38 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.82) in the pooled analysis. Conclusions The results indicate that prenatal PFOA and PFOS exposures may be associated with child waist-to-height ratio > 0.5. Prenatal PFOA and PFOS exposures were not associated with overweight. Citation Høyer BB, Ramlau-Hansen CH, Vrijheid M, Valvi D, Pedersen HS, Zviezdai V, Jönsson BA, Lindh CH, Bonde JP, Toft G. 2015. Anthropometry

  16. Effect of antenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation on anthropometry and blood pressure in mid-childhood in Nepal: follow-up of a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devakumar, Delan; Chaube, Shiva Shankar; Wells, Jonathan C K; Saville, Naomi M; Ayres, Jon G; Manandhar, Dharma S; Costello, Anthony; Osrin, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In 2002–04, we did a randomised controlled trial in southern Nepal, and reported that children born to mothers taking multiple micronutrient supplements during pregnancy had a mean birthweight 77 g greater than children born to mothers taking iron and folic acid supplements. Children born to mothers in the study group were a mean 204 g heavier at 2·5 years of age and their systolic blood pressure was a mean 2·5 mm Hg lower than children born to mothers in the control group. We aimed to follow up the same children to mid-childhood (age 8·5 years) to investigate whether these differences would be sustained. Methods For this follow-up study, we identified children from the original trial and measured anthropometry, body composition with bioelectrical impedance (with population-specific isotope calibration), blood pressure, and renal dimensions by ultrasound. We documented socioeconomic status, household food security, and air pollution. Main outcomes of the follow-up at 8 years were Z scores for weight-for-age, height-for-age, and body-mass index (BMI)-for-age according to WHO Child Growth Standards for children aged 5–19 years, and blood pressure. This study is registered with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial register, number ISRCTN88625934. Findings Between Sept 21, 2011, and Dec 7, 2012, we assessed 841 children (422 in the control group and 419 in the intervention group). Unadjusted differences (intervention minus control) in Z scores were 0·05 for weight-for-age (95% CI −0·09 to 0·19), 0·02 in height-for-age (−0·10 to 0·15), and 0·04 in BMI-for-age (−0·09 to 0·18). We recorded no difference in blood pressure. Adjusted differences were similar for all outcomes. Interpretation We recorded no differences in phenotype between children born to mothers who received antenatal multiple micronutrient or iron and folate supplements at age 8·5 years. Our findings did not extend to physiological differences or

  17. The effects of anthropometry and leg muscle power on drive and transition phase of acceleration: a longitudinal study on young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Ingebrigtsen, Jorgen; Jeffreys, Ian

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of anthropometry and leg muscle power on accelerative ability and its phases (drive and transition). Thirty-six soccer players (age 12.4±1.2 years, body mass 49.9±8.9 kg and height 154.2±10.3 cm) were tested twice, in the beginning and in the end of competitive season, for anthropometric characteristics, countermovement jump and 20-meter acceleration (split 0-10 meters and 10-20 meters, indices of drive and transition, respectively). The soccer players were grouped according to seasonal changes in 20-meter acceleration (Δacc) in responders (Δacc≤-0.10 s), control (-0.05≤Δacc≤0.08 s) and non-responders (Δacc≥0.10 s). Compared with the non-responders at baseline, the responders were younger (-2.0 years [-2.8;-1.1]), shorter (-10.1 cm [-19.4;-0.7]), with higher body fat percentage (7.7% [2.7%;12.6%]) and fat mass (4.1 kg [0.7;7.4]), and lower performance in the countermovement jump (-8.9 cm [-13.9;-4.0]) and 20 m acceleration (0.63 s [0.39;0.87]); during the season they had smaller body mass gain (-2.8 kg [-5.4;-0.1]), decreased Body Mass Index (BMI, -1.0 kg/m2 [-1.9;0]) and greater improvement in the 20-meter acceleration (-0.33 s [-0.38;-0.28]). The effect size for these between-group differences was large (η2≥0.18). The Δacc and Δ10-20 were moderately correlated with body mass difference (r=0.48 and r=0.53, P<0.01, respectively) and ΔBMI (r=0.50 and r=0.51, P<0.01, respectively), whereas the Δ0-10 was correlated with ΔBMI (r=0.34, P<0.05) and ΔCMJ (r=-0.34, P<0.05). The findings indicated that the changes in body mass had the largest effect on changes in accelerative ability and on both two phases (drive and transition). On the contrary, changes in leg muscle power had impact only on the drive phase of the acceleration.

  18. Two-year longitudinal health-related fitness, anthropometry and body composition status amongst adolescents in Tlokwe Municipality: The PAHL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriola, Oluwatoyi O; Monyeki, Makama A; Toriola, Abel L

    2015-10-30

    To evaluate a two-year longitudinal development of health-related fitness, anthropometry and body composition status amongst adolescents in Tlokwe Municipality, Potchefstroom, South Africa. A total of 283 high-school learners (111 boys and 172 girls) of ages 14 and 15 years who were part of the ongoing Physical Activity and Health Longitudinal Study (PAHLS) participated in the study. For the purpose of the present study, data collected for 2011 and 2012 for anthropometric, body composition and health-related physical fitness were used. Body mass index (BMI) classification of boys and girls for 2011 and 2012 showed that 24.3% of them were underweight compared with 21% in 2012. In 2011, 50% of boys and girls had normal bodyweight compared with 52% in 2012, whilst 25.5% of the total group of participants were overweight compared with 27% in 2012. Both boys and girls showed significant increases of 5.9% in body fat (BF) and 3.2 kg in body weight over two years' measurements, respectively. Regarding health-related fitness (i.e BAH), boys showed an increase of 14.8 seconds whilst girls gained 9.6 seconds. Significant decreases were found for sit-ups in both boys and girls. A significant VO2max increase of 2.9 mL/kg/min. was found in boys over the time period. A non-significant decrease of -0.5 mL/kg/min. was observed in girls. Regression coefficients showed that changes in BMI were inversely associated with those in health-related physical fitness. The changes in percentage BF were negatively associated with standing broad jump (SBJ), bent arm hang (BAH) and VO2 max in both boys and girls. A low significant positive association was found between changes in waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and SBJ in both genders, whilst inverse low associations were found between WHtR and BAH in girls and for VO2max in both genders. Changes in BMI, %BF and WHtR were negatively associated with strength and running performances in the participating children. The relative increase in overweight

  19. Comparison of Periorbital Anthropometry Between Beauty Pageant Contestants and Ordinary Young Women with Korean Ethnicity: A Three-Dimensional Photogrammetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Chul; Kwon, Jin Geun; Kim, Sung Chan; Huh, Chang Hun; Kim, Hee Jin; Oh, Tae Suk; Koh, Kyung S; Choi, Jong Woo; Jeong, Woo Shik

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences in the periorbital anthropometry between national Beauty Pageant Contestants and Ordinary Young Women with Korean ethnicity. Forty-three Beauty Pageant Contestants who were elected for the national beauty contest and forty-eight Ordinary Young Women underwent 3D photography. The authors analyzed 3D photogrammetric measures regarding periorbital soft tissue. The palpebral fissure width was significantly higher in the Beauty Pageant Contestants than the Ordinary Young Women (27.7 ± 1.2 vs. 26.3 ± 1.6 mm) (p Beauty Pageant Contestants (11.5. ± 1.0 vs. 9.1 ± 1.2 mm) (p Beauty Pageant Contestants (intercanthal width, 34.3 ± 1.86 mm vs. 36.7 ± 3.1 mm; upper eyelid height, 11.5 ± 1.4 mm vs. 13.4 ± 2.3 mm) (p Beauty Pageant Contestants (nasal width, 38.0 ± 1.8 vs. 39.5 ± 2.2 mm; midfacial width 144.5 ± 3.9 vs. 146.9 ± 5.2 mm) (p Beauty Pageant Contestants are wide-set eyes, larger palpebral fissure in width and height, relatively small upper eyelid height and intercanthal width, and relatively small nose and facial width compared to normal women. Our anthropometric results can be referable values for Asian eyelid surgery and help surgeons to establish individualized surgical planning. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  20. Discovery and fine-mapping of adiposity loci using high density imputation of genome-wide association studies in individuals of African ancestry: African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie C Y Ng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified >300 loci associated with measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI, but few have been identified through screening of the African ancestry genomes. We performed large scale meta-analyses and replications in up to 52,895 individuals for BMI and up to 23,095 individuals for WHRadjBMI from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC using 1000 Genomes phase 1 imputed GWAS to improve coverage of both common and low frequency variants in the low linkage disequilibrium African ancestry genomes. In the sex-combined analyses, we identified one novel locus (TCF7L2/HABP2 for WHRadjBMI and eight previously established loci at P < 5×10-8: seven for BMI, and one for WHRadjBMI in African ancestry individuals. An additional novel locus (SPRYD7/DLEU2 was identified for WHRadjBMI when combined with European GWAS. In the sex-stratified analyses, we identified three novel loci for BMI (INTS10/LPL and MLC1 in men, IRX4/IRX2 in women and four for WHRadjBMI (SSX2IP, CASC8, PDE3B and ZDHHC1/HSD11B2 in women in individuals of African ancestry or both African and European ancestry. For four of the novel variants, the minor allele frequency was low (<5%. In the trans-ethnic fine mapping of 47 BMI loci and 27 WHRadjBMI loci that were locus-wide significant (P < 0.05 adjusted for effective number of variants per locus from the African ancestry sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses, 26 BMI loci and 17 WHRadjBMI loci contained ≤ 20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% posterior probability of driving the associations. The lead variants in 13 of these loci had a high probability of being causal. As compared to our previous HapMap imputed GWAS for BMI and WHRadjBMI including up to 71,412 and 27,350 African ancestry individuals, respectively, our results suggest that 1000 Genomes imputation showed modest improvement

  1. Noninvasive computerized scanning method for the correlation between the facial soft and hard tissues for an integrated three-dimensional anthropometry and cephalometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galantucci, Luigi Maria; Percoco, Gianluca; Lavecchia, Fulvio; Di Gioia, Eliana

    2013-05-01

    The article describes a new methodology to scan and integrate facial soft tissue surface with dental hard tissue models in a three-dimensional (3D) virtual environment, for a novel diagnostic approach.The facial and the dental scans can be acquired using any optical scanning systems: the models are then aligned and integrated to obtain a full virtual navigable representation of the head of the patient. In this article, we report in detail and further implemented a method for integrating 3D digital cast models into a 3D facial image, to visualize the anatomic position of the dentition. This system uses several 3D technologies to scan and digitize, integrating them with traditional dentistry records. The acquisitions were mainly performed using photogrammetric scanners, suitable for clinics or hospitals, able to obtain high mesh resolution and optimal surface texture for the photorealistic rendering of the face. To increase the quality and the resolution of the photogrammetric scanning of the dental elements, the authors propose a new technique to enhance the texture of the dental surface. Three examples of the application of the proposed procedure are reported in this article, using first laser scanning and photogrammetry and then only photogrammetry. Using cheek retractors, it is possible to scan directly a great number of dental elements. The final results are good navigable 3D models that integrate facial soft tissue and dental hard tissues. The method is characterized by the complete absence of ionizing radiation, portability and simplicity, fast acquisition, easy alignment of the 3D models, and wide angle of view of the scanner. This method is completely noninvasive and can be repeated any time the physician needs new clinical records. The 3D virtual model is a precise representation both of the soft and the hard tissue scanned, and it is possible to make any dimensional measure directly in the virtual space, for a full integrated 3D anthropometry and

  2. Discovery and fine-mapping of adiposity loci using high density imputation of genome-wide association studies in individuals of African ancestry: African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Graff, Mariaelisa; Lu, Yingchang; Justice, Anne E; Mudgal, Poorva; Liu, Ching-Ti; Young, Kristin; Yanek, Lisa R; Feitosa, Mary F; Wojczynski, Mary K; Rand, Kristin; Brody, Jennifer A; Cade, Brian E; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Duan, Qing; Guo, Xiuqing; Lange, Leslie A; Nalls, Michael A; Okut, Hayrettin; Tajuddin, Salman M; Tayo, Bamidele O; Vedantam, Sailaja; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Chen, Guanjie; Chen, Wei-Min; Chesi, Alessandra; Irvin, Marguerite R; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Smith, Jennifer A; Zheng, Wei; Allison, Matthew A; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; Bartz, Traci M; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Bottinger, Erwin P; Carpten, John; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Conti, David V; Cooper, Richard S; Fornage, Myriam; Freedman, Barry I; Garcia, Melissa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hsu, Yu-Han H; Hu, Jennifer; Huff, Chad D; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Kittles, Rick; Klein, Eric; Li, Jin; McKnight, Barbara; Nayak, Uma; Nemesure, Barbara; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Olshan, Andrew; Press, Michael F; Rohde, Rebecca; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Salako, Babatunde; Sanderson, Maureen; Shao, Yaming; Siscovick, David S; Stanford, Janet L; Stevens, Victoria L; Stram, Alex; Strom, Sara S; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Witte, John S; Yao, Jie; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ziegler, Regina G; Zonderman, Alan B; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Ambs, Stefan; Cushman, Mary; Faul, Jessica D; Hakonarson, Hakon; Levin, Albert M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ware, Erin B; Weir, David R; Zhao, Wei; Zhi, Degui; Arnett, Donna K; Grant, Struan F A; Kardia, Sharon L R; Oloapde, Olufunmilayo I; Rao, D C; Rotimi, Charles N; Sale, Michele M; Williams, L Keoki; Zemel, Babette S; Becker, Diane M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Evans, Michele K; Harris, Tamara B; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Li, Yun; Patel, Sanjay R; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Wilson, James G; Bowden, Donald W; Cupples, L Adrienne; Haiman, Christopher A; Loos, Ruth J F; North, Kari E

    2017-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >300 loci associated with measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), but few have been identified through screening of the African ancestry genomes. We performed large scale meta-analyses and replications in up to 52,895 individuals for BMI and up to 23,095 individuals for WHRadjBMI from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC) using 1000 Genomes phase 1 imputed GWAS to improve coverage of both common and low frequency variants in the low linkage disequilibrium African ancestry genomes. In the sex-combined analyses, we identified one novel locus (TCF7L2/HABP2) for WHRadjBMI and eight previously established loci at P African ancestry individuals. An additional novel locus (SPRYD7/DLEU2) was identified for WHRadjBMI when combined with European GWAS. In the sex-stratified analyses, we identified three novel loci for BMI (INTS10/LPL and MLC1 in men, IRX4/IRX2 in women) and four for WHRadjBMI (SSX2IP, CASC8, PDE3B and ZDHHC1/HSD11B2 in women) in individuals of African ancestry or both African and European ancestry. For four of the novel variants, the minor allele frequency was low (African ancestry sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses, 26 BMI loci and 17 WHRadjBMI loci contained ≤ 20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% posterior probability of driving the associations. The lead variants in 13 of these loci had a high probability of being causal. As compared to our previous HapMap imputed GWAS for BMI and WHRadjBMI including up to 71,412 and 27,350 African ancestry individuals, respectively, our results suggest that 1000 Genomes imputation showed modest improvement in identifying GWAS loci including low frequency variants. Trans-ethnic meta-analyses further improved fine mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between the African and European ancestry populations.

  3. Frequency of fat mass and obesity-associated gene rs9939609 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 gene rs1801282 polymorphisms among Trinidadian neonates of different ethnicities and their relationship to anthropometry at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Candace E; Ramdath, D Dan; Foster, Jerome E

    2014-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) rs9939609 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 gene (PPARG2) rs1801282 polymorphisms are type 2 diabetes mellitus susceptibility gene variants associated with obesity. This study examined whether these variants are associated with anthropometry at birth among a representative multi-ethnic sample of Trinidadian neonates. Cord blood was obtained from consecutive term live births and DNA was genotyped for FTO and PPARG2 variants using polymerase chain reaction. Associations between neonate anthropometry at birth and genotype frequency were assessed using the χ(2) test and linear regression. Significant associations were observed between neonate ethnicity and PPARG2 (p = 0.005) and FTO (p = 0.017) variants: high-risk alleles were more prevalent among African than South Asian neonates for both variants. The allelic and genotypic frequencies for mixed neonates were between those for the African and those for the South Asian neonates. No significant relationship was observed between rs9939609 and rs1801282 and anthropometric measures. For both variants, the allelic and genotypic frequencies among the African and South Asian neonates mirrored those found elsewhere for similar ethnic groups. Neonates of African ethnicity possess the highest frequency of rs9939609 and rs1801282 alleles and genotypes; this may be associated with ethnic differences in the risk of lifestyle diseases. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Features of Teaching Third-Year Students the Subject «Assessment of the General State of a Child. Anthropometry. Measuring and Recording Body Temperature. Work with Newborn Children» by the Module «Nursing in Pediatrics» at the Department of Propedeut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Koniushevska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology of teaching at the department of propedeutics of pediatrics the subject «Assessment of the general state of a child. Anthropometry. Measuring and recording body temperature. Work with newborn children». Objectives of the lesson, the skills needed to achieve the goal are provided. Stages of lessons are presented.

  5. Antropometria como ferramenta de avaliação do estado nutricional coletivo de adolescentes Anthropometry as a tool for assessing the nutritional status of adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio da Silva Gomes

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A antropometria tem sido apontada como o parâmetro mais indicado para avaliar o estado nutricional coletivo. A avaliação nutricional coletiva de adolescentes possui uma dinâmica muito peculiar por se tratar de um momento de intensas mudanças fisiológicas e psicossociais, diretamente associadas à dinâmica nutricional deste grupo. O acompanhamento dessa dinâmica e de suas variáveis intervenientes e interativas é, portanto, um tema de discussão extremamente relevante. Esta revisão tem por objetivo apresentar as aplicações de parâmetros antropométricos à avaliação do estado nutricional de adolescentes. Conclui-se que, enquanto não houver metodologia simples de avaliação da composição corporal, para estudos epidemológicos deve-se manter o uso do índice de massa corporal, associado ou não às variáveis de dobra cutânea e perímetros. Apesar das dificuldades e limitações, as evidências apontam para uma fundamental incorporação das informações sobre a maturação sexual à avaliação do estado nutricional coletivo de adolescentes. Além disso, as investigações devem atentar mais aos parâmetros de definição da população que estará sendo estudada, cuidando, para permitir a comparação entre os estudos.Anthropometry is considered the most appropriate tool for assessing the nutritional status of groups of people. The nutritional assessment of adolescents has a very peculiar dynamic because adolescence is a period of intense physiological and psychosocial changes which are directly related to the nutritional dynamic of this group. The monitoring of this dynamic and its intervening and interactive variables is an extremely relevant discussion theme. This review aims to present the applications of anthropometric indicators in the assessment of the nutritional status of adolescents. While ways to determine body composition are not readily available for epidemiological studies, the use of body mass index alone or

  6. Intake of Total and Subgroups of Fat Minimally Affect the Associations between Selected Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the PPARγ Pathway and Changes in Anthropometry among European Adults from Cohorts of the DiOGenes Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Østergaard, Jane N

    2016-01-01

    for being a BW gainer for the 27 genetic variants ranged from 0.87 (95% CI: 0.79, 1.03) to 1.12 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.22) per additional minor allele. Uncorrected, CEBPB rs4253449 had a significant interaction with the intake of total fat and subgroups of fat. The OR for being a BW gainer for each additional rs......4253449 minor allele per 100 kcal higher total fat intake was 1.07 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.12; P = 0.008), and similar associations were found for subgroups of fat. CONCLUSIONS: Among European men and women, the influence of dietary fat on associations between SNPs in the PPARγ pathway and anthropometry...

  7. Effects of controlled school-based multi-component model of nutrition and lifestyle interventions on behavior modification, anthropometry and metabolic risk profile of urban Asian Indian adolescents in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, N; Misra, A; Shah, P; Gulati, S

    2010-04-01

    To study the effectiveness of a multi-component intervention model of nutrition and lifestyle education on behavior modification, anthropometry and metabolic risk profile of urban Asian-Indian adolescents in North India. Two schools matched for student strength and middle socioeconomic strata were randomly allocated to intervention and control group. Changes in nutrition-related knowledge, attitude, lifestyle practices, food frequency and body image of eleventh-grade students (15-17 years) in both schools were tested using a validated questionnaire. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were made using standard methods. Segmental body composition analysis was carried out using an 8-electrode multifrequency bioelectrical impedance method of body fat estimation. At 6 months follow-up, significant improvement in several domains of knowledge was observed in intervention children (n=99; males=60; females=39) as compared with control school children (n=102; males=61; females=41). In the intervention group, significantly lower proportion of children consumed aerated drinks (15.1%; Peating habits and lifestyle practices, and resulted in beneficial changes in anthropometric and biochemical profiles of the Asian Indian adolescents. This model should be applied on countrywide basis to prevent obesity and diabetes.

  8. Achievement report for fiscal 1999 on specified international cooperative research project. Research on anthropometry using computer mannequin; 1999 nendo computer mannequin ni kansuru jintai model no keitai suitei gijutsu no kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Studies are conducted about anthropometry using a computer mannequin for assessing the compatibility of virtual commodities and environments, fabricated by CAD (computer-aided design) or the like, with human beings, and the fiscal 1999 achievements are compiled. In the study of multidimensional equations of correlation for shape estimation, calculation of basic human model dimensions using 43 measurements has become feasible. For the construction of a human model using a computer mannequin, joint positions and distances between joints have to be determined using data which are measurements that cover human model surfaces. Such necessitates a study of shape estimating algorithm, and a basic physique calculation module and a shape estimation module have been developed. Verification is conducted using a computer mannequin, and it is found that much information is quantitatively determined prior to the manufacture of real goods, the said information involving the mechanism of a chair and the behavior of a human being in it, and the relations of the human behavior with peripheral equipment. (NEDO)

  9. Associations of vitamin D status, bone health and anthropometry, with gross motor development and performance of school-aged Indian children who were born at term with low birth weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filteau, Suzanne; Rehman, Andrea M; Yousafzai, Aisha; Chugh, Reema; Kaur, Manpreet; Sachdev, H P S; Trilok-Kumar, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is little information regarding motor development of children born at term with low birth weight (LBW), a group that constitutes a large proportion of children in South Asia. We used data from infancy and at school age from a LBW cohort to investigate children's motor performance using causal inference. Design Cross-sectional follow-up study. Setting Delhi, India. Participants We recruited 912 children aged 5 years who had participated in a trial of vitamin D for term LBW infants in the first 6 months of life. Outcome measures We focused on gross motor development, using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) gross motor scale and several measures of motor performance. We examined the effects on these of current anthropometry, vitamin D status and bone health, controlling for age, sex, season of interview, socioeconomic variables, early growth, recent morbidity, sun exposure and animal food intake. Results In adjusted analyses, stunted children (height-for-age Z (HAZ) <−2) took longer to run 20 m (0.52 s, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.70; p<0.001) and had greater odds of a failing score on the ASQ (OR 3.00, 95% CI 1.41 to 6.38, p=0.004). Greater arm muscle area was associated with faster run time, and the ability to perform more stands and squats in 15 s. Poorer vitamin D status was associated with the ability to perform more stands and squats. Lower tibia ultrasound Z score was associated with greater hand grip strength. Early growth and current body mass index had no associations with motor outcomes. Conclusions Current HAZ and arm muscle area showed the strongest associations with gross motor outcomes, likely due to a combination of simple physics and factors associated with stunting. The counterintuitive inverse associations of tibia health and vitamin D status with outcomes may require further research. PMID:26747034

  10. Characterization of college football athletes and basketball: Anthropometry and Body Composition CARACTERIZACIÓN DE DEPORTISTAS UNIVERSITARIOS DE FÚTBOL Y BALONCESTO: ANTROPOMETRÍA Y COMPOSICIÓN CORPORAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Juan Verdoy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction and Objectives. Anthropometric study of university population, comprising men and women college athletes participating in the Championships of Spain's 2008 College basketball and football. The aim of this study is to describe the body composition of male and female college athletes in football and basketball specialtiesMethods. This is a cross-sectional study with direct anthropometric measurements. These have been obtained by following the rules and techniques recommended by the International Group of Cineantropometry.Results. The college athletes generally have a higher percentage of muscle weight and fat mass and bone weight lower percentage of male college athletes. The male basketball players have a higher percentage of fat mass and bone weight and lower percentage of muscle weight in football players.  mong women, we found that basketball players have a higher percentage of bone weight and lower percentage of fat mass and muscle mass than soccer players.Conclusions. The competitive level of body composition changes substantially, primarily among females. It is important to have data on body composition at the college level.Keywords: Body Composition, Fat Mass, Muscle Mass, Weight Bone, Anthropometry.ResumenIntroducción y Objetivos. Estudio antropométrico de población universitaria, compuesta por deportistas universitarios de ambos sexos participantes en los Campeonatos de España Universitarios 2008 de baloncesto y fútbol. El objetivo de este estudio es describir la composición corporal de los deportistas universitarios de ambos sexos en las especialidades de fútbol y baloncesto.Métodos. Se trata de un estudio observacional transversal con mediciones antropométricas directas. Estas se han obtenido siguiendo las normas y técnicas recomendadas por el Grupo Internacional de Cineantropometría.Resultados. Las deportistas universitarias en general, presentan mayor porcentaje de peso muscular y de masa grasa, as

  11. Associations of vitamin D status, bone health and anthropometry, with gross motor development and performance of school-aged Indian children who were born at term with low birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filteau, Suzanne; Rehman, Andrea M; Yousafzai, Aisha; Chugh, Reema; Kaur, Manpreet; Sachdev, H P S; Trilok-Kumar, Geeta

    2016-01-08

    There is little information regarding motor development of children born at term with low birth weight (LBW), a group that constitutes a large proportion of children in South Asia. We used data from infancy and at school age from a LBW cohort to investigate children's motor performance using causal inference. Cross-sectional follow-up study. Delhi, India. We recruited 912 children aged 5 years who had participated in a trial of vitamin D for term LBW infants in the first 6 months of life. We focused on gross motor development, using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) gross motor scale and several measures of motor performance. We examined the effects on these of current anthropometry, vitamin D status and bone health, controlling for age, sex, season of interview, socioeconomic variables, early growth, recent morbidity, sun exposure and animal food intake. In adjusted analyses, stunted children (height-for-age Z (HAZ) <-2) took longer to run 20 m (0.52 s, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.70; p<0.001) and had greater odds of a failing score on the ASQ (OR 3.00, 95% CI 1.41 to 6.38, p=0.004). Greater arm muscle area was associated with faster run time, and the ability to perform more stands and squats in 15 s. Poorer vitamin D status was associated with the ability to perform more stands and squats. Lower tibia ultrasound Z score was associated with greater hand grip strength. Early growth and current body mass index had no associations with motor outcomes. Current HAZ and arm muscle area showed the strongest associations with gross motor outcomes, likely due to a combination of simple physics and factors associated with stunting. The counterintuitive inverse associations of tibia health and vitamin D status with outcomes may require further research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. University of Hawai'i Cancer Center Connection: bias in self-reported anthropometry in relation to adiposity and adulthood weight gain among postmenopausal Caucasian and Japanese American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Unhee; Wilkens, Lynne R; Albright, Cheryl L; Novotny, Rachel; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2013-12-01

    Adiposity is often approximated by body mass index (BMI) in population studies based on self-reported weight and height (kg/m(2)). However, self-reports tend to underestimate weight and overestimate height, leading to an underestimation of BMI and the prevalence of overweight and obesity. We examined a subgroup of the Multiethnic Cohort Study participants to determine how well self-reported and measured anthropometry correlate with each other, overall and by race/ethnicity, total and abdominal adiposity level, and amount of adulthood weight gain. A cross-sectional sample of 30 Caucasian and 30 Japanese American female cohort participants, between ages 60-65, was selected in such a way the two groups had a similar BMI distribution across the range (18.5-40 kg/m(2)). Subjects first reported their weight, height, and waist and hip circumferences at home and within several days underwent objective measurements by trained staff and also a whole-body scan of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at a study clinic. The women under-reported their weight by 0.93 kg, waist circumference by 3.95 cm and hip circumference by 0.10 cm and over-reported their height by 0.85 cm. This led to an under-estimation of BMI by 0.67 kg/m(2) and waist/hip ratio by 0.04. The effect of misreporting (self-report minus measurement) on BMI and waist/hip ratio was significantly greater in higher BMI groups (p-heterogeneity = 0.007 for BMI, 0.0005 for waist/hip ratio), among women with central obesity (waist circumference > 88 cm; p-heterogeneity = 0.006, 0.01) and among women who had gained higher amounts of weight since age 21 (p-heterogeneity = 0.03, 0.01) compared to their counterparts. A similar trend of greater self-report bias was found among women with higher levels of DXA-based total and abdominal adiposity. We did not observe any heterogeneity in these findings by ethnicity. Our results confirm that a small degree of under-reporting exists in self-reported BMI and waist/hip ratio values

  13. Mental health, anthropometry and blood pressure among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Both hypertension and depression are common disorders and obesity is on the rise in low and middle-income countries. Because early life changes may prove to be precursors to the development of diseases in adult, assessing the mental and physical health of younger population is crucial. This study aimed ...

  14. Penile anthropometry in Brazilian child and adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrich, Pedro N.; Vasconcelos, Juliana S. P.; Damião, Ronaldo; Silva, Eloísio A. da

    2007-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Classicamente, o pênis tem duas funções: permitir a fertilização interna e direcionar o jato miccional. Entretanto, alterações objetivas do tamanho peniano podem levar ao diagnóstico de doenças. Além disso, é motivo comum de consulta médica a busca por parâmetros de normalidade do tamanho do pênis. Contudo, a antropometria do pênis da criança e do adolescente brasileiros ainda não foi devidamente estudada. O objetivo do estudo é realizar a antropometria do pênis de crianças e adoles...

  15. Applications Of Digital Image Acquisition In Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Barbara; Lewis, James L.

    1981-10-01

    Anthropometric data on reach and mobility have traditionally been collected by time consuming and relatively inaccurate manual methods. Three dimensional digital image acquisition promises to radically increase the speed and ease of data collection and analysis. A three-camera video anthropometric system for collecting position, velocity, and force data in real time is under development for the Anthropometric Measurement Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The use of a prototype of this system for collecting data on reach capabilities and on lateral stability is described. Two extensions of this system are planned.

  16. An ellipsoidal representation of human hand anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Bryan; Armstrong, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Anthropometric data concerning the heometry of the hand's surface are presently modeled as a function of gross external hand measurements; an effort is made to evaluate the accuracy with which ellipsoids describe the geometry of the hand segments. Graphical comparisons indicate that differences between the ellipsoidal approximations and the breadth and depth measurements were greatest near the joints. On the bases of the present data, a set of overlapping ellipsoids could furnish a more accurate representation of hand geometry for adaptation to ellipsoid segment-geometry employing biomechanical models.

  17. Relationship of age, anthropometry and haemoglobin concentration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Assessment of the structural and functional effects of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) on the heart can be done using echocardiography. There has been no agreement on which indicator of body size (weight, height, and body surface area (BSA)) or age in children should be used to relate to and correct ...

  18. Penile anthropometry in North Indian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilal Bhat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physicians frequently encounter questions by parents regarding the normal size of a child′s penis. We evaluated normal variations of penile dimensions, correlation of penile length with height, weight, and body mass index (BMI of boys and analyzed the differences in penile dimensions from those reported from other countries. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at our institution during October 2012-December 2012. A total of 250 subjects (birth to 10 years were evaluated and divided into 10 groups with 1-year interval taking 25 children in each. Penile dimensions measured twice by a single observer with Vernier calipers included the length of flaccid penis fully stretched and diameters at mid-shaft and corona. Diameters were multiplied by pi (π = 3.14 to calculate circumferences. Mean, standard deviation, and range were calculated. Height, weight, and BMI were noted and statistically correlated with the penile length using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Data were compared with similar studies reported on other populations in the past and individually evaluated with every study using Student′s t-test. Results: The mean values for the penile length, mid-shaft circumference, and coronal circumference were 3.34, 3.05, 3.29 cm during infancy, 4.28, 3.86, 4.11 cm during 4-5 years, and 5.25, 4.78, 5.05 cm during 9-10 years, respectively. The penile length increased with advancing age in successive age groups, but it did not have a direct correlation with either height, weight, or BMI. Penile dimensions in North Indian children were found to be statistically smaller in comparison with most studies from other countries. Conclusion: We provide the normal range and variations of penile dimensions in North Indian children.

  19. Stature estimation using odontometry and skull anthropometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalia Shalini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the possibility of estimating height from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull for the positive identification of height in forensic investigations concerned with fragmentary human remains. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 Mysorean patients, 50 males, and 50 females. Measurements of mesiodistal widths of the six maxillary anterior teeth, circumference of the skull, and height were made directly on each patient. Anteroposterior diameter of the skull was obtained on the lateral cephalograph. The data collected were subjected to statistical methods. The known heights of the combined data, data for males, and females were regressed against the odontometric and anthropometric variables using linear regression analysis. Results: Significant sexual dimorphism was observed for the parameters studied ( P 0.05. Highly significant correlation was found between height and other parameters when combined data and data for males were regressed. The equation relating height to the combined mesiodistal width of maxillary anterior teeth was derived as height = 982.421 + 13.65 x combined mesiodistal width of maxillary anterior teeth ( P 0.0001. Similarly equations were obtained by regressing height to head circumference and skull diameter ( P 0.0001 for both. The above findings may hence provide reliable method of estimation of height from skeletal remains in the forensic setup.

  20. Anthropometry of Brazilian Air Force pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gilvan V; Halpern, Manny; Gordon, Claire C

    2017-10-01

    Anthropometric data are essential for the design of military equipment including sizing of aircraft cockpits and personal gear. Currently, there are no anthropometric databases specific to Brazilian military personnel. The aim of this study was to create a Brazilian anthropometric database of Air Force pilots. The methods, protocols, descriptions, definitions, landmarks, tools and measurements procedures followed the instructions outlined in Measurer's Handbook: US Army and Marine Corps Anthropometric Surveys, 2010-2011 - NATICK/TR-11/017. The participants were measured countrywide, in all five Brazilian Geographical Regions. Thirty-nine anthropometric measurements related to cockpit design were selected. The results of 2133 males and 206 females aged 16-52 years constitute a set of basic data for cockpit design, space arrangement issues and adjustments, protective gear and equipment design, as well as for digital human modelling. Another important implication is that this study can be considered a starting point for reducing gender bias in women's career as pilots. Practitioner Summary: This paper describes the first large-scale anthropometric survey of the Brazilian Air Force pilots and the development of the related database. This study provides critical data for improving aircraft cockpit design for ergonomics and comprehensive pilot accommodation, protective gear and uniform design, as well as digital human modelling.

  1. Anthropometry, physical and motor performance determinants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy-four girls (N=74) between ages 10 and 15 years from two di fferent farm schools were subjected to the Aust ralian Talent Search Protocol (Australian Sports Commission, 1995) to identify general sports talent. It is an existing protocol that is used to identify general sports talent and consists of 10 test. The top 50%

  2. Anthropometry and Performance in Wheelchair Basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Cristina; Yanci, Javier; Badiola, Aduna; Iturricastillo, Aitor; Otero, Montse; Olasagasti, Jurgi; Bidaurrazaga-Letona, Iraia; Gil, Susana M

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated whether anthropometric characteristics, generic and specific sprinting, agility, strength, and endurance capacity could differentiate between First-Division and Third-Division wheelchair basketball (WB) players. A First-Division WB team (n = 8; age = 36.05 ± 8.25 years, sitting body height = 91.38 ± 4.24 cm, body mass = 79.80 ± 12.63 kg) and a Third-Division WB team (n = 11; age = 31.10 ± 6.37 years, sitting body height = 85.56 ± 6.48 cm, body mass = 71.18 ± 17.63 kg) participated in the study. Wheelchair sprint, agility, strength, and endurance tests were performed. The First-Division team was faster (8.7%) in 20 m without the ball, more agile (13-22%), stronger (18-33%), covered more distance (20%) in the endurance test, and presented higher values of rate of perceived exertion for the exercise load (48%) than the Third-Division team. Moreover, the individual 20-m sprint time values correlated inversely with the individual strength/power values (from r = -0.54 to -0.77, p ≤ 0.05, n = 19). Wheelchair basketball coaches should structure strength and conditioning training to improve sprint and agility and evaluate players accordingly, so that they can receive appropriate training stimuli to match the physiological demands of their competitive level.

  3. Anthropometry of south Indian industrial workmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J E; Uppugonduri, K G

    1992-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an anthropometric survey conducted on South Indian male workers in the electronic industry. The data were collected as part of a project to modify work stations that utilized equipment from other countries. A set of 27 body dimensions were taken from a sample of 128 workmen (aged 18-35 years). The anthropometric measurements are compared with those of Indian men from Central, Western, and Northern parts of India and with those of the American, German, and Japanese men. The results indicate that in general the South Indian man is smaller than Central, Western, and Northern Indian men, as well as smaller than men in America, Germany, Japan, and Africa. This difference needs to be allowed for when considering buying and subsequently using imported equipment for the electronics industry in South India.

  4. Determinação de risco nutricional e desnutrição por antropometria em crianças e adolescentes com cirrose Nutritional risk and malnutrition determination by anthropometry in cirrhotic children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Reis Schneider

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A desnutrição é achado freqüente em adultos com cirrose, mas a prevalência de risco nutricional e de desnutrição é pouco conhecida em pacientes pediátricos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a ocorrência de risco nutricional e desnutrição em pacientes pediátricos com cirrose atendidos regularmente no Setor de Gastroenterologia Pediátrica do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, RS. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 42 crianças e adolescentes cirróticos com idades entre 3 meses e 18 anos. O estado nutricional foi determinado por escores Z de peso para idade, estatura para idade, índice de massa corporal e percentis para a prega cutânea tricipital e circunferência muscular do braço. Consideraram-se pacientes em risco nutricional aqueles com escore BACKGROUND: The malnutrition is a frequent finding in adults with cirrhosis, but the prevalence of nutritional risk and malnutrition is little known in pediatric patients. AIM: To evaluate through anthropometry the presence of nutritional risk and malnutrition in cirrhotic pediatric patients regularly attended at the Pediatric Gastroenterology Service of "Hospital de Clínicas" of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 42 cirrhotic children and adolescents aged between 3 months and 18 years. The nutritional evaluation was made by the determination of the weight/age, height/age, body mass index and triceps skinfold thickness and arm muscle circumference measurements. Patients considered in nutritional risk were < -1,28 Z score which corresponds to <10th percentile, and those under -2,0 Z and <3th percentile were in malnutrition status. According to Child-Pugh criteria, 22 patients were classified as A (mild severity, 15 (moderate B and 5 C (intense. RESULTS: The mean weight/age, height/age and body mass index Z scores were, respectively, - 0,38 ± 1,4 SD, - 0,83 ± 1,16 SD and 0,17 ± 1,3 SD. Patients in nutritional risk were 3/42 (weight/age, 8/42 (height/age, 12

  5. Reliability of 3D laser-based anthropometry and comparison with classical anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnapfel, Andreas; Ahnert, Peter; Loeffler, Markus; Broda, Anja; Scholz, Markus

    2016-05-26

    Anthropometric quantities are widely used in epidemiologic research as possible confounders, risk factors, or outcomes. 3D laser-based body scans (BS) allow evaluation of dozens of quantities in short time with minimal physical contact between observers and probands. The aim of this study was to compare BS with classical manual anthropometric (CA) assessments with respect to feasibility, reliability, and validity. We performed a study on 108 individuals with multiple measurements of BS and CA to estimate intra- and inter-rater reliabilities for both. We suggested BS equivalents of CA measurements and determined validity of BS considering CA the gold standard. Throughout the study, the overall concordance correlation coefficient (OCCC) was chosen as indicator of agreement. BS was slightly more time consuming but better accepted than CA. For CA, OCCCs for intra- and inter-rater reliability were greater than 0.8 for all nine quantities studied. For BS, 9 of 154 quantities showed reliabilities below 0.7. BS proxies for CA measurements showed good agreement (minimum OCCC > 0.77) after offset correction. Thigh length showed higher reliability in BS while upper arm length showed higher reliability in CA. Except for these issues, reliabilities of CA measurements and their BS equivalents were comparable.

  6. Young Children's Screen Activities, Sweet Drink Consumption and Anthropometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olafsdottir, Steingerdur; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Siani, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives: This longitudinal study describes the relationship between young children’s screen time, dietary habits and anthropometric measures. The hypothesis was that television viewing and other screen activities at baseline result in increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverag...

  7. Anthropometry and Standards for Wheeled Mobility: An International Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Edward; Maisel, Jordana; Feathers, David; D'Souza, Clive

    2010-01-01

    Space requirements for accommodating wheeled mobility devices and their users in the built environment are key components of standards for accessible design. These requirements typically include dimensions for clear floor areas, maneuvering clearances, seat and knee clearance heights, as well as some reference dimensions on wheeled mobility device…

  8. Conceptual design of an astronaut hand anthropometry device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmahan, Robert

    1993-01-01

    In a microgravity environment, fluid equalizes throughout the body, causing the upper body to swell. This causes the hands to swell which can cause problems for astronauts trying to do work in pressurized EVA (extravehicular activity) gloves. To better design these gloves, accurate measurements of the astronauts swollen hands are needed. Five concepts were developed in this report from an original field of 972 possible concepts. These five concepts were based on mold impression, ultrasound, laser topography, white light photography, and video imaging. From a decision matrix based on nine weighted criteria, the video imaging technique was found to be the best design to pursue.

  9. Assessing the growth of preterm infants using detailed anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, James J; Johnson, Mark J; Pond, Jenny; Crowley, Philippa; Dimitrov, Borislav D; Pearson, Freya; Beattie, R Mark

    2017-06-01

    Preterm infants display altered body composition compared to term infants, and weight gain is a crude indicator body composition. Childhood mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) is a measure of nutritional status. This study investigates MUAC and mid-thigh circumference (MTC) to monitor growth in preterm infants. Preterm infants (<30-week gestation) were recruited. MUAC, MTC, weight, length and head circumference (HC) were measured at recruitment and weekly intervals until discharge. Descriptive, correlation and regression analyses were used. Ninety-three infants were recruited. Median measurement duration was eight weeks (1-19). Median gestational age was 27 weeks (23-29). Analysis by curve estimation displayed a mean increase of 2.58 mm/week (left MUAC) (p ≤ 0.0001), 2.56 mm/week (right MUAC) (p ≤ 0.0001), 4.16 mm/week (left MTC) (p ≤ 0.0001), 4.20 mm/week (right MTC) (p ≤ 0.0001). Coefficients of determination (R 2 ) were calculated using a growth regression model for MUAC and MTC (0.866-0.917); measures were comparable to growth modelling of weight (0.913), length (0.945) and HC (0.928). High concordance between left and right MUAC and MTC generated a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.999 (MUAC) (p ≤ 0.001) and 0.994 (MTC) (p ≤ 0.001). Data demonstrate the potential utility of MUAC and MTC as additional measures of growth in preterm infants that are reproducible over time. There is potential to gain insights to improve lean-mass accretion in preterm infants. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Three-dimensional anthropometry of the adult face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    This study describes a new three-dimensional anatomical axis system based on four conventional anthropometrical face landmarks. Coincident as a coordinate (orthogonal) axis system, this reference system was developed to provide convenient orientation...

  11. Head and face anthropometry of adult U.S. civilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a total of 17 traditional and 5 new head and facial dimensions from a random composite U.S. female and male civilian population measured over a period of 30 years. The 5 new measurements, identified to describe specific anatomica...

  12. A Collation of United States Air Force Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-14

    Menton-to-Back of Head CHIN PROMINENCE-TO-WALL - see Menton-to-Back of Head CRISTALE HEIQH - see Iliocristale Height CROTCH HEIGHT - see also Gluteal...8.4 9.3 9.8 n = 345 21.34 1.37 18.4 19.0 21.4 23.6 25.0 IP HEIGHT - see Buttock Height, Trochanterion Height and Cristale Height, Standing HUMERAL

  13. Anthropometry for children’s clothing: difficulties and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, G.; Carvalho, M. A.; Rocha, M. A. V.; Xu, B.

    2017-10-01

    Children’s wear lacks an anthropometric study to better fit clothes on the body of the child, providing greater comfort for users. Initially, this thesis project in fashion design intended to measure Portuguese children between the ages of 2 to 10 years, enrolled in primary schools in the region of Minho in Portugal. During the data gathering, held in the months of June, July, October and November 2016, about 600 children were scanned and measured using a 3D body scanner. The purpose of this paper is to report the difficulties and limitations experienced during data collection of the anthropometric study and the adjustments that were needed, as well as discuss some of the data collected.

  14. Breastfeeding pattern, anthropometry and health status of infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-04-08

    Apr 8, 2010 ... The numbers that received colostrum and prelacteal feed were 118 (82.5%) and 59 (25.9%), respectively. On-demand breastfeeding was more popular than timed feeding (95.5% vs 7.5%; p < 0.05). At 24 weeks of age EBF males and females ..... who.int/child-adolescent-health/new.../tool-breast_feeding.ht ...

  15. Image analysis software versus direct anthropometry for breast measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Espírito Santo, Paulo Rogério Quieregatto do [UNIFESP; Hochman, Bernardo [UNIFESP; Furtado, Fabianne [UNIFESP; Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Sabino Neto, Miguel [UNIFESP; Ferreira, Lydia Masako [UNIFESP

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare breast measurements performed using the software packages ImageTool(r), AutoCAD(r) and Adobe Photoshop(r) with direct anthropometric measurements. METHODS: Points were marked on the breasts and arms of 40 volunteer women aged between 18 and 60 years. When connecting the points, seven linear segments and one angular measurement on each half of the body, and one medial segment common to both body halves were defined. The volunteers were photographed in a standardized ma...

  16. Weight and height : the foundation of anthropometry and body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the nature and degree of resultant errors should be known. These errors may be random and/or ... (as opposed to current weight) is strongly emerging as diagnostic criterion for malnutrition.11 This approach is also ... determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan (DEXA) is regressed on BMI, the standard deviation ...

  17. Hand Anthropometry of U.S. Army Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    stressed in most designs. ’! bird , th e greatest population differences in hand morphology do not occur am::>ng rac ial groups, but rather occur between...little, or no, biocultural variations that might influence the detennination of hard preference. ’!hese data confinn the CCilTIIOOnly held belief that

  18. Fetal metabolic influences of neonatal anthropometry and adiposity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Jean M

    2015-01-01

    Large for gestational age infants have an increased risk of obesity, cardiovascular and metabolic complications during life. Knowledge of the key predictive factors of neonatal adiposity is required to devise targeted antenatal interventions. Our objective was to determine the fetal metabolic factors that influence regional neonatal adiposity in a cohort of women with previous large for gestational age offspring.

  19. Anthropometry and Range of Motion of the Encumbered Soldier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    only enough tension on the tape to maintain contact between the tape and the measurement garment. For the encumbered measurement, the Buttock...of the tissue will inevitably occur. All efforts were made to keep this compression to a minimum, as measurers exerted only enough tension on the tape...to maintain contact between the tape and the skin. The tape measure spans the hollows between the shoulder blades and chest. The measurement is

  20. Creation of Prototype Aircrew Protection Equipment Based on Face Anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Historically the ’Frankfort Horizontal’ plane is the standard plane of reference for craniometry using a human skull. The Frankfort Horizontal plane is...three landmarks which define the Frankfort Horizontal plane for skeletal craniometry (34). 5-18 ib or J r Figure 5.16 Frankfort Horizontal Skeletal

  1. Dynamic Anthropometry – Deffning Protocols for Automatic Body Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavenka Petrak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research on possibilities of protocol development for automatic computer-based determination of measurements on a 3D body model in defined dynamic positions. Initially, two dynamic body positions were defined for the research on dimensional changes of targeted body lengths and surface segments during body movement from basic static position into a selected dynamic body position. The assumption was that during body movement, specifi c length and surface dimensions would change significantly from the aspect of clothing construction and functionality of a garment model. 3D body scanning of a female test sample was performed in basic static and two defined dynamic positions. 3D body models were processed and measurement points were defined as a starting point for the determination of characteristic body measurements. The protocol for automatic computer measurement was defined for every dynamic body position by the systematic set of activities based on determined measurement points. The verification of developed protocols was performed by automatic determination of defined measurements on the test sample and by comparing the results with the conventional manual measurement.

  2. Anthropometric Source Book. Volume 1: Anthropometry for Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-01

    constraints are required to maintain them and rapidly result in fatigue and pain . On Earth, gravity is also depended upon for stabilization, and some...largely ignored. This neglect cannot be continued unless a long, pain - ful, and inefficient period of trial and error can be afforded in the space...10.39 (4.09) 1.04 (0.41) Flexion, 900, Sitting 5,99 (2.36) 0.91 (0.36) TRUN ( Coccyx Tip to Cervicale, Sitting) Flexion, Full Anterior 10.11 (3.98) 1.88

  3. Food superstition, feeding practices and nutritional anthropometry of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food superstitions were held on foods like fufu, beans, snail, cocoa drink, okro, dika nut, etc. Conclusively, this research has revealed that 29% acknowledged that there is still an existence of food superstition among pregnant women that attend ante-natal in UNTH Ituku/Ozalla and about 19% of them still practice it.

  4. 3-D surface anthropometry ; accurate determination of body dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Body dimensions of the user population have to be the starting point of design and evaluation of many workplaces and products. Insufficient attention to these aspects may lead to uncomfortable, unhealthy, or dangerous situations. Few up-to-date anthropometric databases are available. The shortage of

  5. Fuzzy analysis and adaptive anthropometry model for object ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Computer Science and Its Application. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 20, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Anthropometry and Blood Pressure in Nigerian Children – Egbuna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For boys, weight correlated (r=0.3205) more than height (r=o.2585) with systolic blood pressures. These values were nonetheless statistically significant. For their diastolic blood pressures, it was observed that all the variables showed weak correlation; weight (r=0.1785), height (r=0.1504), Quetelet's index (r=0.0828)

  7. Anthropometry Survey of Nigeria Paraplegics | Ayodeji | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurements of body features and other physical parameters of the human body were taken by the authors of Nigeria paraplegics. Several anthropometric measurements, both static and dynamic categories were taken ranging from height, forward reach to Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC). Data collected were ...

  8. Anthropometry and body composition of school children in Bahrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, Nadia M; Rasheed, Parveen

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted because of the lack of a comprehensive nationwide assessment of data on the anthropometric status and related health problems in Bahraini school children aged 6 to 18 years. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on the anthropometric status of school children enrolled in the primary, intermediate and secondary government schools in all populated regions of Bahrain. The sample size included 2594 students (1326 girls and 1268 boys) representing 2.5% of the total student population. For sample selection, a multi-stage sampling design was chosen that combined multi-cluster and simple random sampling methods. Anthropometric measurements included height, weight, mid-arm circumference and skin fold thickness at two sites (triceps and subscapular). Anthropometric indices derived were body mass index (BMI) and arm muscle area. The WHO reference standards (2007) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2 data were used for comparison. Compared to WHO reference standards, the median height of Bahraini children and adolescents in the age range of 6 to 18 years was close to the 25th percentile or lower, while the median BMI during adolescent years was comparable in boys, but higher than WHO standards in girls, reaching the 75th percentile. The cutoff values of BMI for overweight/obesity status (85th and 95th percentile) were higher by 3-6 kg/m2 compared to WHO standards. While skin fold thicknesses were also higher in Bahraini adolescents compared to their American counterparts (NHANES 2), arm muscularity was substantially lower. Current study findings for BMI as well as skin fold thicknesses suggest an increased trend toward adiposity among Bahraini adolescents, especially in girls, which puts this age group at a high risk of adult obesity and its consequences. A need for urgent intervention program is emphasized. (author)

  9. An Annotated Bibliography of United States Air Force Engineering Anthropometry - 1946 to 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    changes were aimed at increasing comfort and reducing the possibility of injury during ejection. Changes con- sisted of including a groove for the coccyx ...clothing which must provide both physiological protection and body mobility . In addi- tion, these data can serve as a guide for determining easement...603 705 Abstract: This study attempts to establish an objective baseline for evaluat- ing the functional mobility of pressure gloves. The Purdue

  10. Prenatal Exposures to Perfluorinated Chemicals and Anthropometry at 7 Years of Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Camilla Schou; Fei, Chunyuan; Gamborg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    who provided blood samples early in pregnancy and gave birth to liveborn singletons in 1996-2002. Weight and height information at 7 years was available for 811 children. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used for analyses. Maternal PFOS and PFOA concentrations were overall inversely...

  11. Body composition of chronic renal patients: anthropometry and bioimpedance vector analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Viviane; Avelar, Ivan Silveira de; Andrade, Sara Rosa de Sousa; Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Silva, Maria Sebastiana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to compare the body composition of patients undergoing hemodialysis with that of healthy individuals using different methods. METHOD: cross-sectional study assessing male individuals using anthropometric markers, electrical bioimpedance and vector analysis. RESULTS: the healthy individuals presented larger triceps skinfold and arm circumference (p

  12. Anthropometry and pancreatic cancer risk: An illustration of the importance of microscopic verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, B.A.J.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2007-01-01

    Using data collected of a large population-based cohort study, we studied the association between anthropometric factors and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, we investigated whether these associations differ among microscopically confirmed pancreatic cancer (MCPC) cases and non-MCPC

  13. Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource (CAESAR). Volume 2: Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    body is measured over the shoulder blades , under the arms, and across the upper chest. Method: Subject stands fully erect with the weight distributed...SKINFOLD, RIGHT ISO Reference No. N/A ISO Name: Description: Thickness of skinfold overlying the shoulder blade . Method: Subject stands with the...axis of the body or one of its parts. ACROMIAL: Pertaining to the acromial process of the scapula ( shoulder blade ). ACROMION: Landmark title. ADDUCT

  14. Anthropometry of Women of the U. S. Army--1977. Report Number 1. Methodology and Survey Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    ANGLE: the inferior angle of the shoulder blade . SELLION: the point of maximum indentation where the bridge of the nose meets the forehead; the...the table or stool top. The body of anthropometer held in contact with spine between the shoulder blades . The measurement taken from the table or...SUBNASALE: the point where the base of the nasal septum meets the philtrum (groove in the upper lip). SUBSCAPULAR: inferior edge of the shoulder

  15. Anthropometry of fetal growth in rural Malawi in relation to maternal malaria and HIV status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalanda, B.F.; Buuren, S. van; Verhoeff, F.H.; Brabin, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe fetal growth centiles in relation to maternal malaria and HIV status, using cross sectional measurements at birth. Design: A cross sectional study of pregnant women and their babies. Data on maternal socioeconomic status and current pregnancy, including HIV status and newborn

  16. Are obesity and anthropometry risk factors for diabetic retinopathy? The diabetes management project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirani, Mohamed; Xie, Jing; Fenwick, Eva; Benarous, Rehab; Rees, Gwyneth; Wong, Tien Yin; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2011-06-22

    To investigate the relationship between anthropometric parameters and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adults with diabetes. Five hundred participants with diabetes were recruited prospectively from ophthalmology clinics in Melbourne, Australia. Each underwent an eye examination, anthropometric measurements, and standardized interview-administered questionnaires, and fasting blood glucose and serum lipids were analyzed. Two-field fundus photographs were taken and graded for DR. Height; weight; body mass index (BMI); waist, hip, neck, and head circumferences; and skinfold measurements were recorded. A total of 492 patients (325 men, 66.1%) aged between 26 and 90 years (median, 65) were included in the analysis: 171 (34.8%), 187 (38.0%), and 134 (27.2%) with no DR, nonproliferative DR (NPDR), and proliferative DR (PDR), respectively. After multiple adjustments, higher BMI (odds ratio [OR], 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI],1.01-1.11; P = 0.02) was significantly associated with any DR. Obese people were 6.5 times more likely to have PDR than were those with normal weight (OR, 6.52; 95% CI, 1.49-28.6; P = 0.013). Neck circumference (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.00-1.10; P = 0.03) and waist circumference (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03-1.22; P = 0.01) were significantly associated with any DR. BMI (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00-1.08; P = 0.04) and neck circumference (OR, 1.04 95% CI, 1.01-1.08; P = 0.04) were also positively associated with increasing severity levels of DR. Persons with diabetes with higher BMI and larger neck circumference are more likely to have DR and more severe stages of DR. These data suggest that obesity is an independent risk factor for DR.

  17. Associations of Sex Hormones and Anthropometry with the Speaking Voice Profile in the Adult General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Lasse; Fuchs, Michael; Loeffler, Markus; Thiery, Joachim; Kratzsch, Juergen; Berger, Thomas; Engel, Christoph

    2017-07-21

    There is evidence that sexual hormone concentrations and anthropometric factors influence the human voice. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent body mass index (BMI), body height, body weight, breast-to-abdomen-ratio, testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone are associated with the sound pressure level and the fundamental frequency of the speaking voice in a cross-sectional approach among adults in the general population. Speaking voice profiles with four different intensity levels, hormone concentrations, and anthropometric parameters were assessed for 2,381 individuals aged 40-79 years, who were randomly sampled from the population of a large city in Germany. Multivariate analysis was performed, adjusting for age and stratified by sex. Taller body height was associated with lower frequencies. Higher body weight was associated with lower frequencies and higher sound pressure levels. The ratio of chest to abdominal circumference was associated with the sound pressure levels in males and females: participants with larger breast-to-abdomen-ratio were found to have higher sound pressure levels. Among the sexual hormones, higher concentrations of DHEA-S were associated with lower fundamental frequencies of the voice while using the normal speaking voice. In addition, bioavailable testosterone was associated with the sound pressure level of the normal speaking voice in men and the softest speaking voice in women. Our findings suggest that BMI, body height, body weight, breast-to-abdomen-ratio, bioavailable testosterone, and DHEA-S are associated with the speaking voice in adults. No associations between testosterone and the frequency of the speaking voice were found. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutrient-rich foods in relation to various measures of anthropometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streppel, M.T.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Nutrient quality systems, for example the nutrient-rich foods (NRF) index, measure the nutrient quality of individual foods and may be used to assess the nutrient density of the overall diet. It is not yet known whether the NRF index is helpful in weight management. We hypothesize that a

  19. Body composition of chronic renal patients: anthropometry and bioimpedance vector analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Soares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to compare the body composition of patients undergoing hemodialysis with that of healthy individuals using different methods. METHOD: cross-sectional study assessing male individuals using anthropometric markers, electrical bioimpedance and vector analysis. RESULTS: the healthy individuals presented larger triceps skinfold and arm circumference (p<0.001. The bioimpedance variables also presented significant higher values in this group. Significant difference was found in the confidence interval of the vector analysis performed for both the patients and healthy individuals (p<0.0001. The tolerance intervals showed that 55.20% of the patients were dehydrated, 10.30% presented visible edema, and 34.50% were within normal levels of hydration. Bioimpedance and vector analysis revealed that 52% of the patients presented decreased cell mass while 14.00% presented increased cell mass. CONCLUSIONS: the differences in the body composition of patients and healthy individuals were revealed through bioimpedance and vector analysis but not through their measures of arm circumference and arm muscle area.

  20. Design method for multi-user workstations utilizing anthropometry and preference data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Joseph M; Kurczewski, Nicolas A; Froede, Erick W

    2015-01-01

    Past efforts have been made to design single-user workstations to accommodate users' anthropometric and preference distributions. However, there is a lack of methods for designing workstations for group interaction. This paper introduces a method for sizing workstations to allow for a personal work area for each user and a shared space for adjacent users. We first create a virtual population with the same anthropometric and preference distributions as an intended demographic of college-aged students. Members of the virtual population are randomly paired to test if their extended reaches overlap but their normal reaches do not. This process is repeated in a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the total percentage of groups in the population that will be accommodated for a workstation size. We apply our method to two test cases: in the first, we size polygonal workstations for two populations and, in the second, we dimension circular workstations for different group sizes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Anthropometry of Mexican American Children in the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Bobby

    1988-01-01

    Compares height, weight, and triceps skinfold of Mexican American (MA) children, ages 10-14, in Texas with reference data on American children. Heights were below reference means while weights about same. Boys' triceps skinfold measurements were significantly greater than means. Girls' were similar, indicating positive energy balance. (Author/TES)

  2. Equations based on anthropometry to predict body fat measured by absorptiometry in schoolchildren and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hernández, Luis; Vega López, A Valeria; Ramos-Ibáñez, Norma; Cázares Lara, L Joana; Medina Gómez, R Joab; Pérez-Salgado, Diana

    To develop and validate equations to estimate the percentage of body fat of children and adolescents from Mexico using anthropometric measurements. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 601 children and adolescents from Mexico aged 5-19 years. The participants were randomly divided into the following two groups: the development sample (n=398) and the validation sample (n=203). The validity of previously published equations (e.g., Slaughter) was also assessed. The percentage of body fat was estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The anthropometric measurements included height, sitting height, weight, waist and arm circumferences, skinfolds (triceps, biceps, subscapular, supra-iliac, and calf), and elbow and bitrochanteric breadth. Linear regression models were estimated with the percentage of body fat as the dependent variable and the anthropometric measurements as the independent variables. Equations were created based on combinations of six to nine anthropometric variables and had coefficients of determination (r 2 ) equal to or higher than 92.4% for boys and 85.8% for girls. In the validation sample, the developed equations had high r 2 values (≥85.6% in boys and ≥78.1% in girls) in all age groups, low standard errors (SE≤3.05% in boys and ≤3.52% in girls), and the intercepts were not different from the origin (p>0.050). Using the previously published equations, the coefficients of determination were lower, and/or the intercepts were different from the origin. The equations developed in this study can be used to assess the percentage of body fat of Mexican schoolchildren and adolescents, as they demonstrate greater validity and lower error compared with previously published equations. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes Associated with Using Anthropometry Activities in High School Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightburn, Millard E.; Fraser, Barry J.

    The study involved implementing and evaluating activities that actively engage students in the process of gathering, processing and analyzing data derived from human body measurements, with students using their prior knowledge acquired in science, mathematics, and computer classes to interpret this information. In the classroom activities…

  4. Maternal serum markers of lipid metabolism in relation to neonatal anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghossian, N S; Mendola, P; Liu, A; Robledo, C; Yeung, E H

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study is to examine associations between lipids (high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglycerides and lipoprotein (a)) measured on average three time points during pregnancy and neonatal anthropometrics. Stored samples from a preeclampsia trial measured as part of a case-control study from five US centers (1992 to 1995) were used. The sample included women without pregnancy complications (n=136) and cases of gestational diabetes (n=93), abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT; n=76), gestational hypertension (n=170) and preeclampsia (n=177). Linear regression and linear mixed-effects models estimated adjusted associations between lipids and birth weight z-score, ponderal index (PI), length and head circumference. Among women without complications, cross-sectional associations between total cholesterol measured at different gestational ages increased PI 2.23 to 2.55 kg m -3 per-unit increase in cholesterol. HDL was inversely associated with birth length (β's=-2.21 and -2.56 cm). For gestational hypertension, triglycerides were associated with birth weight z-score (β's=0.24 to 0.31). For preeclampsia, HDL was associated with lower birth weight z-scores (β's=-0.49 and -0.82). Women with gestational diabetes or AGT had inconsistent associations. Examining the level changes across pregnancy, each 0.0037 mmol l -1 increase in HDL was associated with decreased birth weight z-score (β=-0.22), length (β=-0.24 cm) and head circumference (β=-0.24 cm), whereas each 0.028 mmol l -1 increase in triglycerides was associated with increased birth weight z-score (β=0.13) and head circumference (β=0.19 cm). Although associations varied by complications, in general, growth-promoting fuels such as total cholesterol and triglycerides were associated with increased neonatal size, whereas high HDL was associated with smaller size. Maternal HDL that failed to decrease over pregnancy was associated with smaller neonate size.

  5. Occupant seating anthropometry: body ellipses and contact zones for side-impact protection research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Clyde C.; Viano, David C.

    The study has developed an anthropometric description of seated occupants and determined body regions representing major paths in side-impact crashes. The study has identified five major body ellipses defining the head, shoulder, chest, abdomen and pelvis of seated occupants of various sizes, including the six-year-old child. Body contact zones have been determined for front-seated occupants. These templates provide information for the design of side interiors to improve occupant protection in side-impact crashes by load-transfer and energy-absorption characteristics of biocompatible interiors.

  6. Stature Estimation from Lower Limb Anthropometry using Linear Regression Analysis: A Study on the Malaysian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, S N; Aspalilah, A; AbdelNasser, I; Nurliza, A; Hairuliza, M J; Swarhib, M; Das, S; Mohd Nor, F

    2017-01-01

    Stature is one of the characteristics that could be used to identify human, besides age, sex and racial affiliation. This is useful when the body found is either dismembered, mutilated or even decomposed, and helps in narrowing down the missing person's identity. The main aim of the present study was to construct regression functions for stature estimation by using lower limb bones in the Malaysian population. The sample comprised 87 adult individuals (81 males, 6 females) aged between 20 to 79 years. The parameters such as thigh length, lower leg length, leg length, foot length, foot height and foot breadth were measured. They were measured by a ruler and measuring tape. Statistical analysis involved independent t-test to analyse the difference between lower limbs in male and female. The Pearson's correlation test was used to analyse correlations between lower limb parameters and stature, and the linear regressions were used to form equations. The paired t-test was used to compare between actual stature and estimated stature by using the equations formed. Using independent t-test, there was a significant difference (p< 0.05) in the measurement between males and females with regard to leg length, thigh length, lower leg length, foot length and foot breadth. The thigh length, leg length and foot length were observed to have strong correlations with stature with p= 0.75, p= 0.81 and p= 0.69, respectively. Linear regressions were formulated for stature estimation. Paired t-test showed no significant difference between actual stature and estimated stature. It is concluded that regression functions can be used to estimate stature to identify skeletal remains in the Malaysia population.

  7. Neonatal anthropometry at 3400 m above sea level compared with INTERGROWTH 21st standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamonte-Calanche, Wilfredo; Manrique-Corazao, Federico; Jerí-Palomino, Maria; De-La-Torre, Cleto; Roque-Roque, Joel Sack; Wilson, Nathan Andrew

    2017-01-01

    To determine the 3rd, 10th, 50th, 90th and 97th percentile of weight, length and head circumference (HC) of male and female neonates born at 3400 m above sea level and compare with published INTERGROWTH 21st standards. Observational, transverse analytical study conducted in the National Hospital Adolfo Guevara Velazco of the ESSALUD hospital system in Cusco, Peru, at 3400 m altitude, during the period of January 2005 to December 2010. Using inclusion criteria, 7635 newborns were selected. The 3rd, 10th, 50th, 90th and 97th percentiles for the anthropometric measurements of birthweight, length and HC were determined for each sex and the results analyzed via polynomial regression for each percentile in order to compare the results with INTERGROWTH 21st standards. No statistically significant difference was observed with the exception of female HC at the 97th percentile when compared with the INTERGROWTH 21st standards. Based on tables generated in the present study, neonatal anthropometric percentiles at term at 3400 m above sea level demonstrate no appreciable difference with INTERGROWTH 21st standards with the exception of female HC at the 97th percentile.

  8. Anthropometry of Infants, Children, and Youths to Age 18 for Product Safety Design. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Richard G.; And Others

    A total of 87 traditional and functional body measurements were taken on a sample of 4,127 infants, children, and youths representing the U.S. population aged two weeks through 18 years. Measurements were taken throughout the United States by two teams of anthropometrists using an automated anthropometric data acquisition system. Standard…

  9. Fetal growth and birth size is associated with maternal anthropometry and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thame, Minerva; Osmond, Clive; Trotman, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to investigate the association of maternal weight, height and body composition with fetal growth. We recruited 425 women at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica, who had singleton pregnancies, were less than 15 weeks gestation and had no systemic illness. Maternal weight, height and skinfold thicknesses were measured at the first antenatal visit and lean mass was calculated. Sonographic measurements of the fetus were made at 15, 25 and 35 weeks gestation. Weight, crown-heel length and head circumference were measured at birth. Analyses were confined to 360 (85%) women; 65 women did not complete the study. Maternal height was positively associated with femoral length at 25 and 35 weeks gestation and with head circumference at 35 weeks (all P < 0.02). Maternal weight was positively associated with abdominal circumference and femoral length at 25 weeks, and with larger head and abdominal circumference and longer femur at 35 weeks (all P < 0.02). Maternal lean mass had similar associations to maternal weight and they were both positively associated with estimated fetal weight (all P < 0.02). All three maternal measurements were positively associated with birthweight, length and head circumference. Maternal size was associated with fetal size as early as 25 weeks gestation, with height strongly associated with femoral length, and with weight and lean mass strongly associated with abdominal circumference. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Anthropometry of Arabian Arthritic Knees: Comparison to Other Ethnic Groups and Implant Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mahmoud A; Sheikhedrees, Sharafeldin M; Saweeres, Emad S B

    2016-05-01

    We aim to measure the proximal tibia and distal femur of the osteoarthritic knees of Arab patients and to compare these measurements with data on other ethnic groups available in literature and with the dimensions of 6 knee implants. Anteroposterior and mediolateral measurements of tibia and femur were done on 3-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions of 124 osteoarthritic knees undergoing total knee arthroplasty with patient-specific instruments. Average mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions of the tibia for Arab knees were 74.36 ± 6 mm and 48.94 ± 4.57 mm, respectively, whereas for femur, 72.04 ± 6.6 and 68.1 ± 7.75, respectively. Average aspect ratio for tibial was 152.62 ± 12.66 and for femur 106.37 ± 14.34. The size of Arab knees was generally smaller than Caucasian and larger than Asian. There is significant asymmetry of proximal tibial plateau and femur condyles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ergonomic Models of Anthropometry, Human Biomechanics and Operator-Equipment Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemer, Karl H. E. (Editor); Snook, Stover H. (Editor); Meadows, Susan K. (Editor); Deutsch, Stanley (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Committee on Human Factors was established in October 1980 by the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Council. The committee is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation. The workshop discussed the following: anthropometric models; biomechanical models; human-machine interface models; and research recommendations. A 17-page bibliography is included.

  12. Sex estimation using anthropometry of feet and footprints in a Western Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemy, Naomi; Flavel, Ambika; Ishak, Nur-Intaniah; Franklin, Daniel

    2013-09-10

    An important component of forensic investigation is the identification of deceased (and increasingly living) individuals, which is often the role of the forensic anthropologist. One of the most valuable steps towards identification is via a biological profile, developed through the application of population specific standards. In disaster victim identification scenarios, fleshed feet are often recovered in footwear; footprints are another potential source of trace evidence found at crime scenes. In medico-legal investigations, feet and footprints can be useful for extrapolating living height, it is thus expedient to determine whether sex can be estimated from the same anthropometric data. The aim of the present study is to develop accurate sex estimation standards for a contemporary Western Australian population from measurements of the feet and footprints. The sample comprises 200 adults (90 males, 110 females). Three bilateral linear measurements were taken from each foot and seven bilateral measurements were acquired from static footprints obtained using a Podograph. A precision test was first conducted to assess data accuracy and reliability. Measurement data are then analysed using a range of parametric statistical tests. Results show that males were significantly (P±5%), this study provides viable alternatives for estimating sex in Western Australian individuals with accuracy equivalent to established standards developed from foot bones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Satiety quotient linked to food intake and changes in anthropometry during menopause: a MONET Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, J; Prud'homme, D; Strychar, I; Rabasa-Lhoret, R; Brochu, M; Lavoie, J-M; Doucet, E

    2014-08-01

    It is unknown whether the satiety quotient (SQ) differs across the menopausal transition, and whether changes in SQ are related to changes in anthropometric/body composition variables. The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in SQ and its association with energy intake and changes in anthropometric/body composition variables across the menopausal transition. At baseline, 102 premenopausal women (aged 49.9 ± 1.9 years, body mass index 23.3 ± 2.2 kg/m(2)) took part in a 5-year observational, longitudinal study. Body composition (DXA), appetite (visual analog scales), energy and macronutrient intakes (ad libitum lunch and 7-day food diary) were assessed annually. The SQ (mm/100 kcal) was calculated at 60 and 180 min post-breakfast consumption. Overall, the SQ increased at years 3 and 4 (p = 0.01-0.0001), despite no significant differences between menopausal status groups. Lower fullness, prospective food consumption and mean SQ values predicted overall increases in lunch energy and macronutrient intakes (p = 0.04-0.01), whereas only prospective food consumption and fullness SQ predicted energy intake and carbohydrate intake, respectively, when assessed with food diaries (p = 0.01). Delta SQs were negatively correlated with changes in waist circumference (p = 0.03-0.02), whereas delta SQs were positively (p = 0.04) and negatively (p = 0.02) associated with delta fat mass between years 1 and 5, and years 4 and 5, respectively. These results suggest that variations in SQ across the menopausal transition are related to energy and macronutrient intakes and coincide with changes in body composition and waist circumference.

  14. Changes in anthropometry with testosterone therapy in a female with gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Hideki; Douchi, Tsutomu; Nagata, Yukihiro

    2003-12-01

    A 31-year-old regularly menstruating Japanese female was referred to our outpatient clinic by a psychiatrist. She had been diagnosed as having gender identity disorder by detailed counseling and clinical intervention 3 years earlier. After obtaining fully informed written consent, we treated her with 125 mg of testosterone enanthate, intramuscularly, every 2 weeks for 4 months. Serum testosterone levels increased to the normal male value (from 28 to 432 ng/dL). Although menstrual cycle remained regular, her voice became lower after 4 months of therapy. Body weight, body mass index, and lean body mass increased, while body fat mass and percentage of body fat decreased. However, trunk-leg fat ratio did not change during the observation period. During testosterone therapy, a disproportionate increase in lean body mass and decrease in body fat mass are early onset events, while the shift toward upper body fat distribution may be a late onset event along with increase in BMD.

  15. Use of upper-arm anthropometry as measure of body-composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anthropometric measurements of height, weight, triceps and mid-upper-arm circumference were recorded. The upper-arm composition was assessed using standard equations. Nutritional status was assessed using standard classification of upper-arm muscle-area by height (UAMAH) and thinness (low BMI-for-age).

  16. Utilization of Anthropometry in the Sphere of Sitting and Bed Furniture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Dvouletá

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimensions of furniture shall respond to current anthropometrical dimensions and ergonomic requirements which are recommended typological group of products. With relevance to the changes of population’s height and enlargement of body proportions (according to the last measuring from 1985, it is necessary to revise the majority of dimensions of human – furniture and standards (based on updated measuring of 375 men and women. The proper furniture designing will be dependent on that.The aim is a statistical evaluation of data from the anthropometrical measuring, acquired within the NIS grant and creating optimal dimensions of sitting and lying furniture so that they respond to the needs of current population. Graphical simulations created in ergonomic software Tecnomatix Jack are intended to illustrate the dimension requirements. The result are processed in a form of charts which are classified XS–XL. The outputs are compared to data in professional literature and standards. According to preliminary results, the optimal dimensions were designed and those will be further specified and verified. For future, it will be necessary to state the dimensions approximatively to expected population growth.

  17. Anthropometry of Iranian Guidance School Students with Different Ethnicities: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Houshang Mehrparvar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We measured some anthropometric dimensions of Iranian guidance school students selected from different ethnicities. Background. Anthropometric dimensions are used for design of equipment, furniture, and clothing. Furniture with inappropriate design not fulfilling the users’ anthropometric dimensions may have a negative effect on health. Method. A total of 7400 Iranian guidance school students aged 12–14 years entered the study and their static anthropometric dimensions were measured. Descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, and key percentiles were calculated. All dimensions were compared among different ethnicities and different genders. Results. This study showed significant differences in a set of 22 anthropometric dimensions regarding gender, age, and ethnicity. Conclusion. According to the results of this study, difference between genders and among different ethnicities should be taken into account by designers and manufacturers of guidance school furniture. Application. This study has prepared a data bank of anthropometric dimensions of 12–14-year-old students which can be used as basic information to find appropriate dimensions of school furniture.

  18. Match between classroom dimensions and students' anthropometry: re-equipment according to European educational furniture standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Angela C; Morais, André V; Martins, Henriqueta F; Martins, João C; Pais, Silvina M; Mayan, Olga S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate mismatch between students and classroom furniture dimensions and evaluate the improvement in implementing the European furniture standard. In Portugal, school furniture does not meet any national ergonomic criteria, so it cannot fit students' anthropometric measures. A total of 893 students belonging to third (7th through 9th grades) and secondary (10th through 12th grades) cycles participated in the study. Anthropometric measurements of the students were gathered in several physical education classes. The furniture dimensions were measured for two models of tables and seats. Several two-way equations for match criteria based on published studies were applied to data. The percentage of students who match with classroom furniture dimensions is low (24% and 44% between table and students, 4% and 9% between seat and students at 7th and 12th grades, respectively). Table is high for the third cycle, seat is high for both cycles, and seat depth fits well to students. No significant relationship was found between ergonomic mismatch and prevalence of pain. For each cycle, at least two different sizes indicated in the European standard should be available to students, considering the large variability in body dimensions within each cycle. The match criteria used gives a large percentage of students without pain in a mismatch situation. Future measures applying to secondary schools should revise the decision of selecting a single size of classroom furniture and improve the implementation of the European standard. New criteria for ergonomic mismatch are needed that more closely model the responses about discomfort/pain.

  19. Differences in Anthropometry, Biological Age and Physical Fitness Between Young Elite Kayakers and Canoeists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Plaza Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the anthropometric and physical characteristics of youth elite paddlers and to identify the differences between kayakers and canoeists. A total of 171 male paddlers (eighty-nine kayakers and eighty-two canoeists, aged 13.69 ± 0.57 years (mean ± SD volunteered to participate in this study. The participants completed basic anthropometric assessments (body mass, stretch stature, sitting height, body mass index, maturity level, sum of 6 skinfolds and fat mass percentage as well as a battery of physical fitness tests (overhead medicine ball throw, counter movement jump, sit-and-reach and 20 m multi-stage shuttle run tests. The anthropometric results revealed a significantly larger body size (stretch stature and sitting height and body mass in the kayakers (p < 0.01 as well as a more mature biological status (p = 0.003. The physical fitness level exhibited by the kayakers was likewise significantly greater than that of the canoeists, both in the counter movement jump and estimated VO2max (p < 0.05, as well as in the overhead medicine ball throw and sit-and-reach test (p < 0.01. These findings confirm the more robust and mature profile of youth kayakers that might be associated with the superior fitness level observed and the specific requirements of this sport discipline.

  20. Comparison of anthropometry and parent-reported height and weight among nine year olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Alayna; Wade, Terrance J; Cairney, John; Hay, John A; Faught, Brent E; O'Leary, Deborah D

    2007-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children is reaching epidemic proportions in North America. We compared parent-report vs. measured BMI overweight and obesity prevalence estimates among 9 year olds using the 1996 NLSCY reports published by Willms et al. (2003) and anthropometric measurements from a regional population of public school children. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated for 1,497 9-year-old children (males N = 734; females N = 763) from 75 public schools in the Niagara Region of Ontario, Canada. BMI from the 1996 NLSCY was based on parental reports of height and weight of 879 nine year olds. To define overweight and obese children, we used internationally accepted age- and gender-specific cut-offs as defined by Cole et al. (2000). The NLSCY overweight prevalence estimates of boys and girls may overestimate overweight boys and girls by 17% and 10%, respectively. Measured obesity prevalence estimates were similar to parent-reports. Our results suggest that parental reports of height and weight may inflate prevalence estimates of overweight children, but appear reasonably accurate for estimating obesity. Since prevalence of overweight and obesity are often combined to form a global estimate, reliance on parent-reported height and weight may overstate the magnitude of the problem.

  1. Development of Methodology to Gather Seated Anthropometry Data in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Young, Karen; Mesloh, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    The Constellation Program is designing a new vehicle based off of new anthropometric requirements. These requirements specify the need to account for a spinal elongation factor for anthropometric measurements involving the spine, such as eye height and seated height. However, to date there is no data relating spinal elongation to a seated posture. Only data relating spinal elongation to stature has been collected in microgravity. Therefore, it was proposed to collect seated height in microgravity to provide the Constellation designers appropriate data for their analyses. This document will describe the process in which the best method to collect seated height in microgravity was developed.

  2. Prediction Equation for Lower Limbs Lean Soft Tissue in Circumpubertal Boys Using Anthropometry and Biological Maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente-dos-Santos, Joao; Coelho-e-Silva, Manuel J.; Machado-Rodrigues, Aristides M.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Malina, Robert M.; Petroski, Edio L.; Minderico, Claudia S.; Silva, Analiza M.; Baptista, Fatima; Sardinha, Luis B.

    2014-01-01

    Lean soft tissue (LST), a surrogate of skeletal muscle mass, is largely limited to appendicular body regions. Simple and accurate methods to estimate lower limbs LST are often used in attempts to partition out the influence of body size on performance outputs. The aim of the current study was to

  3. Prediction equation for lower limbs lean soft tissue in circumpubertal boys using anthropometry and biological maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Valente-dos-Santos

    Full Text Available Lean soft tissue (LST, a surrogate of skeletal muscle mass, is largely limited to appendicular body regions. Simple and accurate methods to estimate lower limbs LST are often used in attempts to partition out the influence of body size on performance outputs. The aim of the current study was to develop and cross-validate a new model to predict lower limbs LST in boys aged 10-13 years, using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA as the reference method. Total body and segmental (lower limbs composition were assessed with a Hologic Explorer-W QDR DXA scanner in a cross-sectional sample of 75 Portuguese boys (144.8±6.4 cm; 40.2±9.0 kg. Skinfolds were measured at the anterior and posterior mid-thigh, and medial calf. Circumferences were measured at the proximal, mid and distal thigh. Leg length was estimated as stature minus sitting height. Current stature expressed as a percentage of attained predicted mature stature (PMS was used as an estimate of biological maturity status. Backward proportional allometric models were used to identify the model with the best statistical fit: ln (lower limbs LST  = 0.838× ln (body mass +0.476× ln (leg length - 0.135× ln (mid-thigh circumference - 0.053× ln (anterior mid-thigh skinfold - 0.098× ln (medial calf skinfold - 2.680+0.010× (percentage of attained PMS (R = 0.95. The obtained equation was cross-validated using the predicted residuals sum of squares statistics (PRESS method (R2PRESS = 0.90. Deming repression analysis between predicted and current lower limbs LST showed a standard error of estimation of 0.52 kg (95% limits of agreement: 0.77 to -1.27 kg. The new model accurately predicts lower limbs LST in circumpubertal boys.

  4. Impact of hemodialysis on dual X-ray absorptiometry, bioelectrical impedance measurements, and anthropometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Hansen, T B; Høgsberg, I M

    1996-01-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) performs noninvasive assessment of bone and soft tissue with high precision. However, soft tissue algorithms assume that 73.2% of the lean body mass is water, a potential source of error in fluid retention. We evaluated DXA (model QDR-2000; Hologic Inc, Waltham, MA...

  5. Abdominal fat indicators: anthropometry vs dual energy x-ray absortometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Glaner

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive abdominal fat contributes to the development of chronic nontransmissible diseases. Dual emission X Ray absorptiometry (DXA is a simple to administer technique that allows abdominal fat percentage (%abdominalFDXA to be determined. Anthropometric measurements, which have been validated and are of low cost, such as the abdominal circumferences 2.5cm above the umbilical scar (ABC2,5 and level with the umbilical scar (ABCum, are used as indicators of abdominal fat. Skin folds (SF are little used for this purpose. The objective of this study was to verify which of these anthropometric indicators best correlates with and best explains abdominalFDXA. The sample was made up of 22 women (43.9±11.6 years; 34.7±8.3 %G totalDXA and 18 men (31.9±11.6 years; 19.0±8.0 %G totalDXA who were measured for ABC2.5, ABCum, suprailiac SF (SI, midaxillary SF (AM and abdominal SF (AB, while abdominalF (L1-L4 was measured by DXA. Pearson’s correlation and multivariate linear regression (“enter” method were employed to verify the anthropometric measurements’ correlations and percentage of explanation with relation to abdominalFDXA. Strong correlations and significant levels of explanation (pResumoO excesso de gordura abdominal contribui no desenvolvimento de doenças crônicas não-transmissíveis. A absortometria de raio-X de dupla energia (AXDE é uma técnica de simples aplicação, que permite a mensuração do percentual de gordura abdominal (%G abdominalAXDE. As medidas antropométricas, validadas e de baixo custo, como os perímetros abdominal 2,5cm acima da cicatriz umbilical (PAB2,5 e ao nível da cicatriz umbilical (PABum, são empregadas como indicadores de gordura abdominal. As dobras cutâneas (DC são pouco estudadas nesse sentido. Assim, o objetivo desse estudo foi verificar quais destes indicadores antropométricos mais se correlacionam e explicam o %G abdominalAXDE. A amostra foi composta por 22 mulheres (43,9±11,6 anos; 34,7±8,3 %G totalAXDE e 18 homens (31,9±11,6 anos; 19,0±8,0 %G totalAXDE submetidos à mensuração dos PAB2,5, PABum, DC suprailíaca (SI, axilar medial (AM, abdominal (AB, e %G abdominal (L1-L4 por AXDE. Correlação de Pearson e a regressão linear múltipla (método enter foram empregadas para verificar a correlação e o percentual de explicação das medidas antropométricas em relação ao %G abdominalAXDE. Correlações fortes e explicações significativas (p<0,05 foram encontradas, para mulheres e homens para o PAB2,5 (0,90; 81% e 0,89; 78%, PABum (0,90; 83% e 0,83; 69%, DC AB (0,82; 67% e DC AM (0,81; 66% - homens e moderadas para DC SI (0,51; 26% e 0,73; 53% e AM (0,74; 54% - mulheres. Conclui-se que o PAB2,5, PABum e a dobra cutânea abdominal podem ser empregados como indicadores de obesidade abdominal, uma vez que apresentaram as melhores correlações e maior poder de explicação para o %G abdominalAXDE.

  6. Equations based on anthropometry to predict body fat measured by absorptiometry in schoolchildren and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ortiz-Hernández

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To develop and validate equations to estimate the percentage of body fat of children and adolescents from Mexico using anthropometric measurements. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out with 601 children and adolescents from Mexico aged 5-19 years. The participants were randomly divided into the following two groups: the development sample (n = 398 and the validation sample (n = 203. The validity of previously published equations (e.g., Slaughter was also assessed. The percentage of body fat was estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The anthropometric measurements included height, sitting height, weight, waist and arm circumferences, skinfolds (triceps, biceps, subscapular, supra-iliac, and calf, and elbow and bitrochanteric breadth. Linear regression models were estimated with the percentage of body fat as the dependent variable and the anthropometric measurements as the independent variables. Results: Equations were created based on combinations of six to nine anthropometric variables and had coefficients of determination (r2 equal to or higher than 92.4% for boys and 85.8% for girls. In the validation sample, the developed equations had high r2 values (≥85.6% in boys and ≥78.1% in girls in all age groups, low standard errors (SE ≤ 3.05% in boys and ≤3.52% in girls, and the intercepts were not different from the origin (p > 0.050. Using the previously published equations, the coefficients of determination were lower, and/or the intercepts were different from the origin. Conclusions: The equations developed in this study can be used to assess the percentage of body fat of Mexican schoolchildren and adolescents, as they demonstrate greater validity and lower error compared with previously published equations.

  7. Relationships of blood pressure to fibrinolysis : influence of anthropometry, metabolic profile and behavioural variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cigolini, M; Targher, G; Seidell, J C; Tonoli, M; Schiavon, R; Agostino, G; de Sandre, G

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between blood pressure and the plasma fibrinolytic system and to verify whether this association was independent or mediated by one or more potential confounding factor. DESIGN: A random sample of 94 males aged 38 years subdivided into normotensives,

  8. Anthropometry and Prevalence of Common Health Problems among School Going Children in Surathkal, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroor, Amitha Rao; Airody, Sathyajith Karanth; Mahale, Ramnath; Sr, Ravikiran; Shetty, Suresh; Rao, Aarathi R

    2014-12-01

    To measure the anthropometric data of school children and to compare with the CDC and Agarwal centile Growth charts. The prevalence of thinness, stunting, overweight and obesity were estimated. Children were also screened for hypertension, refractory errors, dental problems, skin disease and other abnormalities. Study was conducted in November in a central school in Surathkal, Dakshina Kannada, Karnataka, India. All children from nursery up to 10(th) standard were screened. Weight and Height were measured using standard equipment and plotted on CDC and Agarwal Charts. BMI was calculated and plotted on both charts. Blood Pressure (BP) was taken using mercury sphygmomanometer by a trained nurse. Vision was tested using Snellens chart by refractionist. Dental evaluation was done by dentist. Chi-square test and Student's unpaired t test were used for statistical analysis. A statistical package SPSS version 17.0 were used. p<0.05 was considered as significant. Total 755 children were screened. Among these 392 (51.9%) were females and 363 (48.1%) were males. Eighty five (11.3%) children had short stature and 283 (37.5%) had under nutrition when plotted on CDC chart. Values were lower when plotted on Agarwal charts. Thinness was more prevalent than obesity and overweight. Majority were normotensive though hypertension was noted in 6(0.8%) children and prehypertension in 14(1.9%).112 children (16.3%) had undetected refractory error. Common skin disease noted was T.Versicolor in 27 children. Common dental problem noted was Caries teeth (22.9%). Weight and height were below the CDC centile charts. Under nutrition was more prevalent than overweight and obesity. Majority were normotensive. High prevalence of undetected refractory error and caries teeth were noted. Prevalence of skin disease was low.

  9. Dietary Patterns and Maternal Anthropometry in HIV-Infected, Pregnant Malawian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan T. Ramlal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diet is a modifiable factor that can contribute to the health of pregnant women. In a sample of 577 HIV-positive pregnant women who completed baseline interviews for the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition Study in Lilongwe, Malawi, cluster analysis was used to derive dietary patterns. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify associations between the dietary patterns and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC, arm muscle area (AMA, arm fat area (AFA, and hemoglobin at baseline. Three key dietary patterns were identified: animal-based, plant-based, and grain-based. Women with relatively greater wealth were more likely to consume the animal-based diet, which had the highest intake of energy, protein, and fat and was associated with higher hemoglobin levels compared to the other diets. Women with the lowest wealth were more likely to consume the grain-based diet with the lowest intake of energy, protein, fat, and iron and were more likely to have lower AFA than women on the animal-based and plant-based diets, but higher AMA compared to women on the animal-based diet. Pregnant, HIV-infected women in Malawi could benefit from nutritional support to ensure greater nutrient diversity during pregnancy, when women face increased nutrient demands to support fetal growth and development.

  10. [ABDOMINAL BIOELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE ANALYSIS AND ANTHROPOMETRY FOR PREDICTING METABOLIC SYNDROME IN MIDDLE AGED MEN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vázquez, Rosalía; Millán Romero, Ángel; Barbancho, Miguel Ángel; Alvero-Cruz, José Ramón

    2015-09-01

    central obesity has a higher risk of metabolic syndrome. The present work aimed to study the relationship of trunk fat and the visceral fat index, and other anthropometric indices in relation to the metabolic syndrome in middle aged male Methods: design: transversal descriptive and correlational study. 75 male, volunteers who have access to a medical assessment, with an age range of 21 to 59 years, from different professions. Weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference, gluteal circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio, trunk fat and visceral fat level by bioelectrical abdominal impedance analysis with Tanita AB-140 (ViScan) and biochemical markers: fasting glucose, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Likewise, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure was measured. there are significant correlations of anthropometric measurements with trunk fat and visceral fat level and the same with biochemical variables. Receptor-operator curves (ROC curve) analysis shows that the cutoff points from which arises the metabolic syndrome are 32.7% of trunk fat and a level of visceral fat of 13 with a high sensitivity and specificity, attaining the same cut-off points for the metabolic syndrome and obesity status. trunk fat and visceral fat levels determined by bioelectrical abdominal impedance analysis, values are variables very sensitive and specific for the detection of metabolic syndrome and obesity, though not over the variables and anthropometric indices. In the condition of the overweight, trunk fat and visceral fat level are more predictive than anthropometric measures. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. Anthropometry of Women of the U.S. Army--1977. Report Number 4. Correlation Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    758 .740 .719 .7L.4 o670 330 BICEPS CIRC, FLXD .777 ,780 .718 o698 o693 .725 &578 ,788 34C ELBOW CIRCO FLXD ,596 o579 e487 e512 e494 .522 .534 ,645 35C...486 32C ARM CIRC AT SCYE .(72 .363 .440 .679 .693 .625 .242 .364 33C BICEPS CIRCo FLXD .122 .377 .’*27 .653 .68C .669 .145 .289 340 ELBOW CIRC, FLXO...339 340 ELBOW CIRCO FLXD .381 .562 .578 .440 .467 .491 .5o5 .429 350 FOREARM CIRCO FLXD o291 .584 ,618 .357 .411 .416 .560 .445 40 TABLE 2 CONTINUED

  12. Prediction of percentage body fat from anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance in Singaporean and Beijing Chinese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, P.; Deurenberg-Yap, M.; Jingzhong Wang,; Fu Po Lin,; Schmidt, G.

    2000-01-01

    Body composition was measured in 205 male and female Beijing Chinese and in 148 male and female Singaporean Chinese, age 34 (mean) (range 18-68) years and body mass index (BMI) 22.3 (15.9-38.5) kg/m 2. In Beijing Siri's two-compartment model based on densitometry was used as a reference technique

  13. 3-D breast anthropometry of plus-sized women in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pandarum, R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Exploratory retail studies in South Africa indicate that plus-sized women experience problems and dissatisfaction with poorly fitting bras. The lack of 3-D anthropometric studies for the plus-size women's bra market initiated this research. 3-D body...

  14. [Assessment of body fat in physically active young people: anthropometry vs bioimpedance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portao, J; Bescós, R; Irurtia, A; Cacciatori, E; Vallejo, L

    2009-01-01

    To assess the level of agreement between the anthropometrical method and several bioimpedance (BIA) devices to estimate the fat mass in a group of physically active young people. 55 students of Physical Activity Sciences and Sports of the INEFC of Barcelona; 29 men (age: 24.7 +/- 4.7 years; BMI: 23.4 +/- 1.8) and 26 women (age: 22.9 +/- 3.5; BMI: 21.5 +/- 1.9). All of them voluntarily gave their informed consent. Anthropometrical assessment was done according to the International Society for the Advancement Kinanthropometry (ISAK) protocol, the fat % was calculated by the Siri's equation and was compared with that obtained by 4 different BIA devices: Biospace Inbody 720, Tanita BC400, Tanita TBF-521, and Omron BF-300. To assess the level of agreement of the results, the interclass correlation coefficient and the Bland Aldman method were used. The estimated fat mass, in men, by the anthropometrical method was 7 +/- 2.2 kg. The results by the BIA systems were: 7.4 +/- 3 kg; 5.6 +/- 2.2 kg; 5.7 +/- 2.5 kg, and 7.4 +/- 3 kg for Biospace Inbody 720, Tanita BC400, Tanita TBF521, and Omron BF300, respectively. In women, the results were 10.4 +/- 2.7 kg of fat mass by means of the anthropometrical method and 10.3 +/- 2.9 kg, 11 +/- 3.3 kg, 11.5 +/- 3.0 kg, and 10 +/- 2.9 kg for Biospace Inbody 720, Tanita BC400, Tanita TBF521, and Omron BF300, respectively. In the male group, the level of agreement between anthropometrics and BIA devices was moderate-poor, whereas in women there was a good correlation between both techniques for estimating the body fat when the Biospace Inbody 720 and Tanita BC400 devices were used.

  15. Anthropometry of children with cerebral palsy at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titilayo Olubunmi Adekoje

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy (CP is one the most common causes of disability among children in developing countries and is often associated with poor growth. The assessment of growth and nutrition of children is an important aspect of health monitoring and is one of the determinants of child survival. Aim: To assess the nutritional status of children with CP as seen in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH. Subjects and Methods: A prospective case-control study was conducted on children with CP attending the weekly pediatric neurology clinic of the LUTH between April 2005 and March 2006. Controls were apparently healthy children being followed up at the children′s out-patient clinic of LUTH for acute illness that had resolved. Anthropometric measurements of weight, length/height, mid-upper arm circumference, and skinfold thickness were taken according to the protocols recommended by the International Society of the Advancement of Kinanthropometry. Statistical Analysis: EPI-INFO (version 6.04 was used for analysis. Chi-square test was used to determine associations. Student′s t-test was used to compare means of patients and matched controls. Probability P < 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Results: The controls had higher weight than the patients with mean weight (standard deviation of 13.7 (4.8 kg, and 12.0 (4.5 kg, respectively (P = 0.01. There were also statistically significant differences in the subscapular and biceps skinfold measurements between the patient and control groups (P = 0.00004 and 0.000008, respectively. Twenty-four (25.8% and 5 (5.4% of the patients had moderate and severe undernutrition compared to 6 (6.1% and none, respectively, in the control group (P = 0.00005. Conclusion: Children with CP had significantly lower mean anthropometric parameters and were more malnourished compared with the control group of children matched for age, sex, and social class.

  16. Cervical Footprint Anthropometry in Indian Population: Implications on Design of Artificial Disc Replacement Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Arvind Gopalrao; Patil, Vishwanath Mahabaleshwar; Bangalore, Shashidhar Kantharajanna; Saraf, Abhishek

    2016-02-01

    Cross-sectional study. To accurately measure the dimensions of cervical endplates based on computed tomography (CT) scans in Indian population and assess accuracy of match with currently available cervical disc prostheses. The dimensions of currently available cervical disc replacement implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae endplates for Caucasian population. To author's knowledge, similar study has not been published for patients from Indian subcontinent. CT scans of cervical spine of patients from Indian subcontinent were collected and reviewed. Seventy patients (54 men and 16 women; aged 18-56 years with average of 37 years) who underwent CT scans of cervical spine were included in study. 3D CT scans of sub axial cervical spine (C3 to C7) were analyzed. The anterior-posterior (AP) and central mediolateral (CML) dimensions of superior and inferior endplates from C3 to C7 were measured using digital measuring system. A total of 560 endplates of 70 patients were included in the study. The AP diameter of cervical endplates ranged from 0.87 to 2.47 cm. The CML diameters ranged from 0.84 to 2.98 cm. For levels C3/C4 and C4/C5 for AP dimension Prestige-LP (90.5%) and Prodisc-C (89%) discs showed higher percentage of matching than Discover discs (58.5%). For CML diameter, Prestige-LP (69.5%), Prodisc-C (70%) and Discover (39.5%) discs showed almost similar matching with measured endplates. For levels C5/C6 and C6/C7 for AP dimension, Prestige-LP (67.25%), Prodisc-C (49.35%) and Discover (51.5%) discs showed similar matching. For CML diameter Prestige-LP (32%), Prodisc-C (27.5%) and Discover (42.2%) discs showed poor matching with measured endplates. This study indicates need for redesign of cervical disc prostheses to match Indian patients. The collected anthropometric dimensions from this study may be used to design and develop indigenous artificial total disc replacement prosthesis and even cervical cages in India. With the present study being a small pilot study, the authors recommend anthropometric CT measurements in larger number of Indian patients in order to validate footprint dimensions for designing better-matched prosthesis.

  17. [Social stratification and nutritional anthropometry in children under 15 years old La Escalera, Lara State, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Villanueva, Mario; Dellán-Rodríguez, Graciela; Papale-Centofanti, Jham; Rodríguez, Dioslibeth; Mendoza, Norelis; Berné, Yelitza

    2007-09-01

    Malnutrition is a public health problem for underdeveloped countries. From the 852 million of undernourished estimated by FAO between 2000 and 2002, 815 million belonged to underdeveloped countries, 28 million to countries in transition and 9 million to developed countries. Malnutrition in Venezuela had a 6% raise between 2000 and 2002, when it went from 11% to 17%. This work was done with children under 15 years old from La Escalera, using classic indicators and their combination, relating them with socioeconomic conditions, through the NBI and Graffar Méndez Castellano methods, as to consider the population nutritional profile. The higher prevalence corresponded to normal nutritional values, which oscillated between 55,7% and 80,7% in the 7-14 years old group and the 2-6 years old group, respectively. Malnutrition was found in the under 2 years old group and 7-14 years old group, with values ranging between 12,5 and 41,0% respectively. The least prevalence was found for excess malnutrition. 100% of the families in this study are poor, according to NBI; although the Graffar Mendez Castellano method established that poverty was about 60%, while 40% belonged to a medium-low status. Relating nutritional diagnosis with social stratification and the mother's educational level, three patterns were observed: III, IV and V, prevailing normal diagnosis, followed by malnutrition by deficit and malnutrition by excess, respectively. The predominating mother's educational level corresponded to incomplete high school, followed by analphabetism and the least prevalent has complete basic elementary education. It should be noted that the nutrition deficit was inversely related to the socioeconomic stratification and the mother's educational level.

  18. Anthropometry, somatotypes, and aerobic power in ballet, contemporary dance, and dancesport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liiv, Helena; Wyon, Matthew A; Jürimäe, Toivo; Saar, Meeli; Mäestu, Jarek; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2013-12-01

    This study compared anthropometric variables, somatotypes, and aerobic capacity between three groups of dancers: classical ballet dancers (M 33, F 56), contemporary dancers (M 28, F 109), and dancesport dancers (M 30, F 30). The assumption was that different functional requirements should produce differences in the anthropometric and aerobic capacity variables among the three groups. Anthropometric data for body mass index (BMI) and somatotypes were measured. Body fat percentage was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Maximal oxygen consumption and aerobic power were measured during an incremental treadmill test until exhaustion. Dancesport athletes were taller compared with same gender contemporary dancers (pballet dancers had a lower body mass and BMI compared with their contemporary dance and dancesport equivalents (pballet counterparts, while dancesport dancers are taller and heavier, less muscular, with slightly greater adioposity compared to the classical ballet dancers. Ballet dancers had the lowest body fat percentage, weight, and BMI values. Dancesport dancers had greater aerobic capacity than the ballet dancers. Based on this study, we conclude that dancers in these three styles differ in some aspects of anthropometric variables, somatotypes, and aerobic capacity, but we cannot say is it because of the training or selection or both.

  19. Estimation of stature from maxillo-facial anthropometry in a central Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankhede, Kanchankumar P; Kamdi, Namdeo Y; Parchand, Madhukar P; Anjankar, Vaibhav P; Bardale, Rajesh V

    2012-01-01

    For establishing identity, stature is an important parameter in medico-legal and forensic examination. To estimate stature from facial parameters. Prospective study conducted from December 2007 to September 2008 in the Department of Anatomy, Government Medical College, Nagpur. A total of 470 healthy medical students were taken, comprising 260 males and 210 females in the age group of 18 to 24 years. The data were analyzed using regression analysis and correlation coefficient. The average height of males and females was 170.97 (± 6.80) cm and 156.89 (± 5.89) cm respectively. It was observed that in males the total facial height had greater correlation with stature (r = 0.19) and had standard error of ±6.68 cm. In females, nasal height had greater correlation with stature (r = 0.19) and had standard error of ±5.78 cm It can be stated that percutaneous facial dimensions are not good predictors of accurate stature estimation and can be used when other parameters are not available.

  20. Neonatal anthropometry: thin-fat phenotype in fourth to fifth generation South Asian neonates in Surinam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steijn, L; Karamali, N S; Kanhai, H H H; Ariëns, G A M; Fall, C H D; Yajnik, C S; Middelkoop, B J C; Tamsma, J T

    2009-11-01

    We assessed whether the earlier described 'thin-fat phenotype' is present in Surinam South Asian babies of the fourth to fifth generation after migration from India. In this observational study we collected data from 39 South Asian term neonates and their mothers in Paramaribo, Surinam. We compared the following data with data from an earlier study in Southampton, UK (338 neonates) and in Pune, India (631 neonates): maternal body mass index, neonatal weight, length, head, mid-upper arm and abdominal circumferences and subscapular skinfold thickness. The mothers in Paramaribo were older than the Southampton mothers; their body mass index was comparable. Mean birth weight was 3159 g (Southampton: 3494 g; Pune: 2666 g). Compared with Southampton babies, the Paramaribo babies were smaller in nearly all body measurements, the smallest being abdominal circumference at the umbilicus level (s.d. score: -1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI): -2.07 to -1.16) and mid-upper arm circumference (s.d. score: -1.08; 95% CI: -1.46 to -0.69). In contrast, subscapular skinfold thickness was similar (s.d. score: +0.08; 95% CI: -0.24 to +0.55). Except for subscapular skinfold thickness and length, all neonatal measurements were intermediate between those from Southampton and Pune. The thin-fat phenotype is preserved in Surinam South Asian neonates of the fourth to fifth generation after migration from India.

  1. Anthropometry of the distal femur in a Kenyan population and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distal femur dimensions were greater than those reported in studies on Indian, Chinese and Malay populations, but lesser than the dimensions reported in studies on Greek femora. Comparison with femoral components of eight total knee replacement implants showed that three of the components had dimensions that ...

  2. anthropometry of the distal femur in a kenyan population and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femur dimensions were greater than those reported in studies on Indian, Chinese and Malay populations, but lesser than the dimensions reported in studies on Greek femora. Comparison with femoral components of eight total knee replacement implants showed that three of the components had dimensions that closely ...

  3. Blood mercury concentration, fish consumption and anthropometry in Chinese children: A national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhen-Yan; Li, Min-Ming; Wang, Ju; Yan, Jin; Zhou, Can-Can; Yan, Chong-Huai

    2018-01-01

    This study sought to obtain national cross-sectional data for blood mercury levels and risk factors for mercury exposure in Chinese children aged 0 to 6years to provide evidence to support preventive measures for reducing childhood blood mercury levels. A multi-stage, stratified, clustered random sampling survey was conducted May 2013-Mar 2015. Shanghai, Jilin, Shanxi, Guangdong, Qinghai, Yunnan and Hubei, which are located in seven different geographical regions in China, were selected as the study field. A total of 14,202 children aged 0-6years participated in the study. Whole-blood venous samples (3ml) were collected from the subjects for mercury exposure assessment. The DMA-80 was applied for mercury detection, and a health questionnaire gathering information on related confounders was completed by the subjects' parents of the subjects after they received guidance from the investigators. A general linear model was used for the primary descriptive statistical analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95%CIs for the risk factors were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. A total of 14,202 eligible samples were collected. The mean mercury level was 1.39μg/L. Other results were as follows: median 1.23μg/L, p25 0.86μg/L, p75 1.73μg/L, and GM 1.10μg/L. Of the seven geographical regions, Qinghai, in northwestern China, had a median mercury level of 0.37μg/L, which was significantly lower than the mercury level in Guangdong, in southeastern China (2.01μg/L). The median blood mercury level of children in suburban areas was 1.34μg/L, which was remarkably higher than that of children in rural areas (1.09μg/L). Dichotomous subgroups were generated using the median mercury concentration. Unconditional logistic regression analysis revealed that fish consumption may contribute to increased blood mercury levels (pmercury concentrations and the children's anthropometric characteristics (BMI; pmercury concentrations among Chinese children aged 0-6years were considered low, and children who consumed more marine fish, freshwater fish and shellfish tended to have higher mercury concentrations. Our study suggests that children's growth is likely affected by the positive effects of mercury, which may have implications concerning the positive effects of fish consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The association between maternal dietary micronutrient intake and neonatal anthropometry - secondary analysis from the ROLO study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horan, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are necessary for fetal growth. However increasingly pregnant women are nutritionally replete and little is known about the effect of maternal micronutrient intakes on fetal adiposity in mothers with increased BMI. The aim of this study was to examine the association of maternal dietary micronutrient intake with neonatal size and adiposity in a cohort at risk of macrosomia.

  5. Added Sugar, Macro- and Micronutrient Intakes and Anthropometry of Children in a Developing World Context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni M W Maunder

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between added sugar and dietary diversity, micronutrient intakes and anthropometric status in a nationally representative study of children, 1-8.9 years of age in South Africa.Secondary analysis of a national survey of children (weighted n = 2,200; non weighted n = 2818 was undertaken. Validated 24-hour recalls of children were collected from mothers/caregivers and stratified into quartiles of percentage energy from added sugar (% EAS. A dietary diversity score (DDS using 9 food groups, a food variety score (FVS of individual food items, and a mean adequacy ratio (MAR based on 11 micronutrients were calculated. The prevalence of stunting and overweight/obesity was also determined.Added sugar intake varied from 7.5-10.3% of energy intake for rural and urban areas, respectively. Mean added sugar intake ranged from 1.0% of energy intake in Quartile 1 (1-3 years (Q1 to 19.3% in Q4 (4-8 years. Main sources of added sugar were white sugar (60.1%, cool drinks (squash type (10.4% and carbonated cool drinks (6.0%. Added sugar intake, correlated positively with most micronutrient intakes, DDS, FVS, and MAR. Significant negative partial correlations, adjusted for energy intake, were found between added sugar intake and intakes of protein, fibre, thiamin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin E, calcium (1-3 years, phosphorus, iron (4-8 years, magnesium and zinc. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was higher in children aged 4-8 years in Q4 of %EAS than in other quartiles [mean (95%CI % prevalence overweight 23.0 (16.2-29.8% in Q4 compared to 13.0 (8.7-17.3% in Q1, p = 0.0063].Although DDS, FVS, MAR and micronutrient intakes were positively correlated with added sugar intakes, overall negative associations between micronutrients and added sugar intakes, adjusted for dietary energy, indicate micronutrient dilution. Overweight/obesity was increased with higher added sugar intakes in the 4-8 year old children.

  6. Association between anthropometry and high blood pressure in a representative sample of preschoolers in madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Beneit, Gloria; Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Pocock, Stuart; Redondo, Juliana; Fuster, Valentín; Peñalvo, José L

    2015-06-01

    Program SI! is a multi-level, school-based intervention for the promotion of cardiovascular health from early childhood. The aim of this paper is to characterize the prevalence of obesity and high blood pressure in the preschoolers enrolled in the study, and to compare various criteria for classifying obesity. The study was a cluster-randomized controlled intervention trial including 24 state schools in Madrid (Spain). Weight, height, triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured in 2011 children (1009 boys and 1002 girls) aged 3 to 5 years (3.7 [0.9]). Body mass index and blood pressure were classified by corresponding task force criteria. Obesity was studied by 6 different criteria. Associations of body mass index, body weight, body fat, and waist circumference on blood pressure were examined, and the risk of high blood pressure in relation to tertiles of body mass index was calculated. The prevalence of obesity according to the International Obesity Task Force varied from 2% at age 3 to 8% at age 5, and the overall prevalence of high blood pressure (≥ 90th percentile) was 20%. Sex- and age-specific criteria for obesity showed better agreement with the reference than a single generalized cutoff. The risk of high blood pressure was higher for the highest tertile of body mass index distribution. The highest prevalence of obesity and high blood pressure was found among older children. The classification of obesity in children was more accurate using sex- and age-specific cutoffs. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Food intake, nutritional anthropometry and blood chemical parameters in 3 selected Dutch schoolchildren populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, van der F.; Kromhout, D.

    1978-01-01

    The major health problems in populations of economically developed countries at the present time are of a chronic nature with, as their main clinical characteristic, the frequently occurring premature coronary heart disease. When food intake data are to be evaluated, it would be incorrect

  8. Stable isotopes (carbon, nitrogen, sulfur), diet, and anthropometry in urban Colombian women: investigating socioeconomic differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Richard L; Dufour, Darna L; Valenzuela, Luciano O; Cerling, Thure E; Sponheimer, Matt; Reina, Julio C; Ehleringer, James R

    2015-01-01

    We conducted stable isotope and dietary analyses of women from higher and lower socioeconomic status (SES) groups in Cali, Colombia. The objectives were to test between-group differences in stable isotope, dietary, and anthropometric characteristics, and to evaluate relationships between diet and stable isotope values. Hair samples from 38 women (mean age 33.4) from higher and lower SES groups were analyzed for δ(13) C, δ(15) N, and δ(34) S values. Dietary intake was assessed via 24-h recalls. Anthropometric variables measured were body mass index, five body circumferences, and six skinfold thicknesses. Mean δ(13) C and δ(15) N values of the higher SES group (-16.4 and 10.3‰) were significantly greater than those of the lower SES group (-17.2 and 9.6‰; P stable isotope values (P Stable isotope values revealed a difference between SES groups that was not explained by the dietary data. The relationship between diet and stable isotope composition is complex. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A coaches' perspective on the contribution of anthropometry, physical performance, and motor coordination in racquet sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kamasha; Pion, Johan; Mostaert, Mireille; Norjali Wazir, Mohd Rozilee Wazir; Kramer, Tamara; Faber, Irene Renate; Vansteenkiste, Pieter; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2018-02-21

    Differences and similarities between table tennis and other racquet sports exist, but are not well documented in the literature, in spite of the relevance for talent identification. In this study we aimed at identifying the key characteristics of table tennis in comparison with tennis and badminton based upon a survey in coaches. A total of 177 licensed coaches from all across the world and with diverse professional backgrounds completed a survey on anthropometric measures, physical performance, and motor coordination skills. On a scale from 1 to 10, coaches indicated to what extent a talent characteristic was important for their sport. MANOVA identified key differences as well as similarities between all three racquet sports and a subsequent discriminant analysis allocated coaches correctly for table tennis, tennis, and badminton 81.01%, 55.6%, and 71.4% respectively. Our results show that table tennis and other racquet sport coaches are well aware of differences between the racquet sports and also the importance and value of testing and assortment of skill components. These findings can assist coaches in future talent orientation and transfer in racquet sports.

  10. The paediatric flat foot and general anthropometry in 140 Australian school children aged 7 - 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angela M

    2011-04-22

    Many studies have found a positive relationship between increased body weight and flat foot posture in children. From a study population of 140 children aged seven to 10 years, a sample of 31 children with flat feet was identified by screening with the FPI-6. Basic anthropometric measures were compared between subjects with and without flat feet as designated. The results of this study, in contrast to many others, question the association of flat feet and heavy children. A significant relationship between foot posture and weight (FPI (L) r = -0.186 (p foot posture. In contrast to previous studies, the implication of these results is that heavy children have less flat feet. Further investigation is warranted using a standardized approach to assessment and a larger sample of children to test this apparent contradiction.

  11. The paediatric flat foot and general anthropometry in 140 Australian school children aged 7 - 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Angela M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have found a positive relationship between increased body weight and flat foot posture in children. Methods From a study population of 140 children aged seven to 10 years, a sample of 31 children with flat feet was identified by screening with the FPI-6. Basic anthropometric measures were compared between subjects with and without flat feet as designated. Results The results of this study, in contrast to many others, question the association of flat feet and heavy children. A significant relationship between foot posture and weight (FPI (L r = -0.186 (p Conclusions This study presents results which conflict with those of many previous investigations addressing the relationship between children's weight and foot posture. In contrast to previous studies, the implication of these results is that heavy children have less flat feet. Further investigation is warranted using a standardized approach to assessment and a larger sample of children to test this apparent contradiction.

  12. Household economic strategies and nutritional anthropometry of women in American Samoa and highland Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindon, James R; Vitzthum, Virginia J

    2002-04-01

    This study compares findings from research projects involving different genetic, environmental, and cultural contexts: a study of lifestyle and health from American Samoa (ASLS) and the Bolivian project. Reproduction and Ecology in Provincia Aroma (REPA). This paper presents analyses of varying economic strategies and their association with nutritional status indicators in each population. The ASLS sample includes 66 Samoan women and the REPA sample includes 210 Aymara women. Principle components analysis of household economic resources within each sample extracted two significant factors: one represents modernizing influences including education and occupational status, and the other represents ethnographically salient traditional economic behavior. The traditional pattern includes adding household members in Samoa and selling agricultural products in Bolivia. This analysis places each woman along two continua, traditional and modern, based on her household mobilization of economic resources, permitting an understanding of the patterns underlying household economic behavior that is not possible in univariate analyses of socioeconomic variables. For the Bolivian women the strategy involving more education and higher occupational status was associated with higher measures of several nutritional status indicators, including body mass index, arm muscle area, and peripheral skinfolds. But among the Samoan women, where substantial obesity was the norm, there were no significant differences in anthropometric measurements based on economic strategies. These data argue for the importance of directly measuring the potential consequences of variation in household economic strategies rather than merely inferring such, and of assessing ethnographically relevant aspects of household economic production rather than limiting analyses to non-context-specific economic indicators such as income. This focus on household strategy is likely to be fruitful especially where economic and nutritional conditions are marginal. The findings from Bolivia also support efforts in developing countries to improve girls' education, and thereby occupational prospects, as a means to improve their health status as women.

  13. Anthropometry of Malawian live births between 35 and 41 weeks of gestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalanda, B. F.; van Buuren, S.; Verhoeff, F. H.; Brabin, B. J.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to construct cross-sectional gestational age specific percentile curves for birthweight, length, head and mid-arm circumference for Malawian babies, and to compare these percentiles with reference values for babies born to women with normal pregnancies, from a developed

  14. Insulin Like Growth Factor System: How Does it Affect Neonatal Anthropometry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Kacar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aims to clarify the role of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3, ghrelin, and insulin in fetal growth. Material and Method: Based on Turkish standards, 14 newborns were defined as small for gestational age (SGA, 33 newborns were described as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, and 13 newborns were identified as large for gestational age (LGA. IGF-1, IGFBP-3, ghrelin, and insulin levels were measured in umbilical cord and maternal serum. Results: The LGA group had significantly higher levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-3, ghrelin, and insulin in umbilical cord and maternal serum than the SGA group. Umbilical cord and maternal serum levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 correlated significantly and positively with body weight, body length, head circumference, and abdominal circumference of the neonates. Discussion: Based on the findings of the present study, it may be postulated that insulin like growth factor system has a role in fetal growth.

  15. Energy intake and anthropometry: A case study of families in Zaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food samples were analyzed by the standard AOAC methods to determine their energy and proximate composition while nutritional status was determined by anthropometric measurements. The mean energy intake (EI) of the subjects from the families were 2435-4558 kj/d for age groups 1-5 years; 4446-4996 kj/d for age ...

  16. Ecogeographical associations between climate and human body composition: analyses based on anthropometry and skinfolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathan C K

    2012-02-01

    In the 19th century, two "ecogeographical rules" were proposed hypothesizing associations of climate with mammalian body size and proportions. Data on human body weight and relative leg length support these rules; however, it is unknown whether such associations are attributable to lean tissue (the heat-producing component) or fat (energy stores). Data on weight, height, and two skinfold thickness were obtained from the literature for 137 nonindustrialized populations, providing 145 male and 115 female individual samples. A variety of indices of adiposity and lean mass were analyzed. Preliminary analyses indicated secular increases in skinfolds in men but not women, and associations of age and height with lean mass in both sexes. Decreasing annual temperature was associated with increasing body mass index (BMI), and increasing triceps but not subscapular skinfold. After adjusting for skinfolds, decreasing temperature remained associated with increasing BMI. These results indicate that colder environments favor both greater peripheral energy stores, and greater lean mass. Contrasting results for triceps and subscapular skinfolds might be due to adaptive strategies either constraining central adiposity in cold environments to reduce cardiovascular risk, or favoring central adiposity in warmer environments to maintain energetic support of the immune system. Polynesian populations were analyzed separately and contradicted all of the climate trends, indicating support for the hypothesis that they are cold-adapted despite occupying a tropical region. It is unclear whether such associations emerge through natural selection or through trans-generational and life-course plasticity. These findings nevertheless aid understanding of the wide variability in human physique and adiposity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Anthropometry-based equations overestimate the urea distribution volume in hemodialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenburg, Wybe; Stegeman, CA; de Jong, PE; Huisman, P.

    Background. Protein intake in hemodialysis patients can be estimated indirectly from the protein equivalent of total nitrogen appearance (PNA) during the interdialytic period. A reliable estimate of the patient's urea distribution volume (UDV) is required to assess protein intake from PNA values.

  18. Effect of Endurance Training on Physical Capacity and Anthropometry of Cardiac Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Nikou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to measure of cardiac rehabilitation program (Endurance & Resistance training effect on physical functioning as well as its exact effect on lipid profile and fasting blood sugar of cardiovascular patients. Materials & Methods: In this quasi experimental and interventional study 20 patients who arrived to phase II cardiac rehabilitation after their first cardiovascular accident were selected conveniently and participated in this prospective study. Anthropometrics' measurements, FBS and blood lipid, 6–MWT were performed at the beginning and at the end of 8 weeks program (3 days per week for 24 sessions. Data were analyzed by Paired T test. Results: Except for low–density lipoprotein (LDL (P=0.087 and FBS (P=0.072, all other biochemical indices [total cholesterol (TC (P=0.019, high–density lipoprotein (HDL (P=0.019, and triglyceride (TG (P=0.009], functional capacity (6MWT (P<0.001 and measurment of rate pressure product with Borg scale (P=0.008, and also obesity indices including weight (P=0.031 and subcutaneus fat (P=0.017 had significant response to cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP. Conclusion: These results support the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation program such as endurance and resistance training to reduce overall risk in obese patients with coronary heart disease, and increase physical capacity.

  19. Numerical simulation of spatial whole-body vibration behaviour of sitting man taking into account individual anthropometry and position; Numerische Simulation des raeumlichen Ganzkoerperschwingungsverhaltens des sitzenden Menschen unter Beruecksichtigung der individuellen Anthropometrie und Haltung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankoke, S.

    2003-07-01

    A dynamic FE model of the anatomy of humans in sitting position is presented for assessing the dynamic internal response of the human body to the effect of external vibrations. The model can be adapted to individual body measures, different positions and different spatial orientation. It was verified on the basis of extensive measured data. The problem of contact between the human body and the driver seat is solved by a simplified static description. The model comprises a sub-model of the lumbar vertebral column for assessing the spatial load distributions in this body region. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein dynamisches, an der menschlichen Anatomie orientiertes Finite-Elemente-Modell des sitzenden Menschen vorgestellt, das es gestaltet, dynamische innere Antworten des Koerpers auf von aussen auf den Menschen einwirkende Schwingungen zu ermitteln. Das Modell ist ueber eine Auswahl anthropometrischer Masse an das Schwingungsverhalten eines Individuums anpassbar und ermoeglicht zudem die Simulation von Schwingungseinwirkungen in unterschiedlichen Haltungen und in allen Raumrichtungen. Die Modellverifikation erfolgte an umfangreichen Messdatenbestaenden. Das Kontaktproblem des Menschen zum Fahrzeugsitz ist durch eine vereinfachte statische Beschreibung abgebildet. Ferner beinhaltet das Ganzkoerpermodell ein Submodell der Lendenwirbelsaeule, mit dessen Hilfe die aus den Ganzkoerperschwingungen folgenden raeumlichen Beanspruchungsverteilungen in der Lendenwirbelsaeule ermittelt werden koennen. (orig.)

  20. Police, anthropometry, and fingerprinting: the transnational history of identification systems from Rio de la Plata to Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mercedes García; Galeano, Diego

    2016-12-01

    The article explores the transnational circulation of methods for identifying people in South America. It analyzes both the implementation of the anthropometric system at police departments in Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil starting in the 1890s, as well as the criticisms that were aimed at this method when fingerprinting took hold in the region in the early twentieth century. In a context of a heavy worldwide flow of ideas, experts, and technologies in policing, "bertillonage" was discussed and underwent hybridization in Latin America. The history of the anthropometric system in these three countries involved many travels by physicians, jurists, and police agents to Paris, debates over its suitability to local contexts, and an open controversy about identification techniques.

  1. Comparison of the anogenital distance and anthropometry of the perineum in patients with and without pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ferrer, M L; Moya-Jiménez, L C; Mendiola, J

    2016-12-01

    To determine whether there are differences in the anthropometric measures of the perineum for women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse who are candidates for surgery, with or without urinary incontinence, and for patients without pelvic floor dysfunction. The main objective was to measure the anogenital distance in its 2 variants: anoclitoral and anofourchette. The anogenital distance appears to be determined prenatally and is influenced by the intrauterine hormonal environment. The secondary objective was to measure the length of the genital hiatus, the perineal body and the distance between the 2 ischial tuberosities. An observational case-control study was conducted with 58 patients. The cases (n=22) were patients with stages >II 2 in the Baden-Walker classification system. The controls were patients with normal pelvic floors. Measurements were performed with a digital calliper. The patients' tocogynecological history, lifestyle habits and risk factors were recorded. The case patients had a significantly shorter anogenital anofourchette distance than that of the control patients (P=.001), a significantly longer anogenital anoclitoral distance than the control patients (P=.0001) and a significantly longer genital hiatus length than the control patients (P=.02). This was an observational study with a small sample. We cannot determine whether the difference in these distances are caused by or are the result of this disease. Given that the anogenital distance appears to be determined prenatally, we question whether this changed distance could be a risk factor for developing pelvic floor dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Anthropometry, physical performance, and ultrasound patellar tendon abnormality in elite junior basketball players: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Kiss, Z S; Khan, K M; Purdam, C R; Webster, K E

    2004-04-01

    Patellar tendinopathy has been reported to be associated with many intrinsic risk factors. Few have been fully investigated. This cross-sectional study examined the anthropometric and physical performance results of elite junior basketball players with normal or abnormal patellar tendons to see if any measures were associated with changes in tendon morphology. Agility, leg strength, endurance, and flexibility were measured in 71 male and 64 female players. A blinded radiologist ultrasonographically examined their patellar tendons and athletes were grouped as having normal or abnormal tendons. One-way ANOVA was used to test for differences in anthropometric and physical performance data for athletes whose tendons were normal or abnormal (unilateral or bilateral tendinopathy) on ultrasound. Results show that females with abnormalities in their tendons had a significantly better vertical jump (50.9+/-6.8 cm) than those with normal tendons (46.1+/-5.4 cm) (p = 0.02). This was not found in males. In males, the mean sit and reach in those with normal tendons (13.2+/-6.7 cm) was greater (ptendinopathy (10.3+/-6.2 cm) or in bilateral tendinopathy (7.8+/-8.3 cm). In females, those with normal tendons (13.3+/-4.8 cm) and bilateral tendinopathy (15.8+/-6.2 cm) were distinctly different from those with unilateral tendinopathy (7.9+/-6.6 cm). Flexibility and vertical jump ability are associated with patellar tendinopathy and the findings warrant consideration when managing young, jumping athletes.

  3. Anthropometry, physical performance, and ultrasound patellar tendon abnormality in elite junior basketball players: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, J; Kiss, Z; Khan, K; Purdam, C; Webster, K

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Patellar tendinopathy has been reported to be associated with many intrinsic risk factors. Few have been fully investigated. This cross-sectional study examined the anthropometric and physical performance results of elite junior basketball players with normal or abnormal patellar tendons to see if any measures were associated with changes in tendon morphology.

  4. Measures of excess body weight and anthropometry among adult Albertans: cross-sectional results from Alberta's tomorrow project cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Darren R; Poirier, Abbey E; Haig, Tiffany R; Akawung, Alianu; Friedenreich, Christine M; Robson, Paula J

    2017-11-25

    Excess body weight during adulthood has been consistently associated with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at multiple sites among other chronic diseases. We describe the prevalence of excess body weight and abdominal obesity reported by participants enrolled in Alberta's Tomorrow Project (ATP). ATP is a geographically-based cohort study conducted among adults aged 35-69 years from across the province of Alberta. Participants completed anthropometric measures and health and lifestyle questionnaires at enrolment. Overweight and obese were categorized as a body mass index (BMI) of 25.0-29.9 kg/m 2 and ≥30 kg/m 2 , respectively. Abdominal obesity was categorized using cut-offs of waist circumference of >94 cm for men and >80 cm for women and waist-tp-hip ratio cut-offs of >0.90 for men and >0.85 for women. BMI and hip and waist circumference data were obtained from 12,062 men and 18,853 women enrolled between 2001 and 2009. Overall, 76.8% of men and 59.5% of women reported a BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 . The proportions of overweight and obese were significantly higher in older age groups (p overweight and obese was higher among lower education (p obesity. Overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity were all associated with a history of several cardiometabolic chronic conditions including hypertension, heart attack, angina, high cholesterol, stroke and diabetes. A large majority of ATP participants were overweight and carried excess abdominal fat. Strategies to improve energy balance among Albertans are encouraged and may have a notable impact on future chronic disease burden.

  5. A Contrast between Mothers' Assessments of Child Malnutrition and Physical Anthropometry in Rural Mexico: A Mixed Methods Community Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Bernardo; Martinez-Andrade, Gloria; Huerfano, Nazly; Ryan, Gery W.; Martinez, Homero

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare mothers' assessments of nutritional status with anthropometric measures and gain further insights into mothers' reasons for their judgment. Design: Each mother was asked to assess the nutritional status of her child and 2 other children and to compare all 3. Rates for "hits" and "misses" between mothers'…

  6. Total body height estimation using sacrum height in Anatolian Caucasians: multidetector computed tomography-based virtual anthropometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakas, Hakki Muammer [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Malatya (Turkey); Celbis, Osman [Inonu University Medical Faculty Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Forensic Medicine, Malatya (Turkey); Harma, Ahmet [Inonu University Medical Faculty Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Malatya (Turkey); Alicioglu, Banu [Trakya University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Edirne (Turkey); Trakya University Health Sciences Institute, Department of Anatomy, Edirne (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    Estimation of total body height is a major step when a subject has to be identified from his/her skeletal structures. In the presence of decomposed skeletons and missing bones, estimation is usually based on regression equation for intact long bones. If these bones are fragmented or missing, alternative structures must be used. In this study, the value of sacrum height (SH) in total body height (TBH) estimation was investigated in a contemporary population of adult Anatolian Caucasians. Sixty-six men (41.6 {+-} 14.9 years) and 43 women (41.1 {+-} 14.2 years) were scanned with 64-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to obtain high-resolution anthropometric data. SH of midsagittal sections was electronically measured. The technique and methodology were validated on a standard skeletal model. Sacrum height was 111.2 {+-} 12.6 mm (77-138 mm) in men and 104.7 {+-} 8.2 (89-125 mm) in women. The difference between the two sexes regarding SH was significant (p < 0.0001). SH did not significantly correlate with age in men, whereas the correlation was significant in women (p < 0.03). The correlation between SH and the stature was significant in men (r = 0.427, p < 0.0001) and was insignificant in women. For men the regression equation was [Stature = (0.306 x SH)+137.9] (r = 0.54, SEE = 56.9, p < 0.0001). Sacrum height is not susceptible to sex, or to age in men. In the presence of incomplete male skeletons, SH helps to determine the stature. This study is also one of the initial applications of MDCT in virtual anthropometric research. (orig.)

  7. Total body height estimation using sacrum height in Anatolian Caucasians: multidetector computed tomography-based virtual anthropometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakas, Hakki Muammer; Celbis, Osman; Harma, Ahmet; Alicioglu, Banu

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of total body height is a major step when a subject has to be identified from his/her skeletal structures. In the presence of decomposed skeletons and missing bones, estimation is usually based on regression equation for intact long bones. If these bones are fragmented or missing, alternative structures must be used. In this study, the value of sacrum height (SH) in total body height (TBH) estimation was investigated in a contemporary population of adult Anatolian Caucasians. Sixty-six men (41.6 ± 14.9 years) and 43 women (41.1 ± 14.2 years) were scanned with 64-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to obtain high-resolution anthropometric data. SH of midsagittal sections was electronically measured. The technique and methodology were validated on a standard skeletal model. Sacrum height was 111.2 ± 12.6 mm (77-138 mm) in men and 104.7 ± 8.2 (89-125 mm) in women. The difference between the two sexes regarding SH was significant (p < 0.0001). SH did not significantly correlate with age in men, whereas the correlation was significant in women (p < 0.03). The correlation between SH and the stature was significant in men (r = 0.427, p < 0.0001) and was insignificant in women. For men the regression equation was [Stature = (0.306 x SH)+137.9] (r = 0.54, SEE = 56.9, p < 0.0001). Sacrum height is not susceptible to sex, or to age in men. In the presence of incomplete male skeletons, SH helps to determine the stature. This study is also one of the initial applications of MDCT in virtual anthropometric research. (orig.)

  8. Prediction of Stature from Hand Anthropometry: A Comparative Study in the Three Major Ethnic Groups in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Numan, A. I.; Idris, M. O.; Zirahei, J. V.; Amaza, D. S.; Dalori, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The study was carried out to establish standard anthropometric values for stature estimation by using hand length in the three major ethnic groups in Nigeria. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria between January - April 2010. Methodology: A total of 407 right hand dominant students (210 males and 197 females) aged 18 – 35 years who were purely of Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba origin by both parents and grandparents, are...

  9. Heart Rate Variability in Shift Workers: Responses to Orthostatism and Relationships with Anthropometry, Body Composition, and Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteze, Nayara Mussi; Souza, Breno Bernardes; Alves, Henrique José de Paula; de Oliveira, Fernando Luiz Pereira; de Oliveira, José Magalhães; de Freitas, Silvia Nascimento; do Nascimento Neto, Raimundo Marques; Sales, Maria Lilian; Souza, Gabriela Guerra Leal

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the response of heart rate variability (HRV) components to postural change and their association with cardiovascular risk factors in shift workers, a cross-sectional study with 438 Brazilian males rotating shift workers was done. Anthropometric, body composition, and clinical measures were collected. Electrocardiogram was recorded for 3 minutes, in the supine and orthostatic position, and HRV components were extracted. Descriptive analyses showed that mean values of body mass index, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio, visceral fat area (VFA), and blood pressure (BP) were higher than the reference values. In the regression model, age, WC, VFA, and systolic BP showed negative association with HRV components. These findings suggest the need for determining effective strategies for the evaluation and promotion of health among shift workers focused on the altered variables. PMID:26495293

  10. Blood pressure and anthropometry in children treated with stimulants: a longitudinal cohort study with an individual approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landgren M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnus Landgren,1,2 Salmir Nasic,3 Mats Johnson,1,2 Trygve Lövoll,1 Daniel Holmgren,4,5 Elisabeth Fernell2 1Department of Pediatrics, Unit of Developmental Disorders, Skaraborg’s Hospital, Mariestad, 2Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 3Research and Development Centre, 4Department of Pediatrics, Skaraborg’s Hospital, Skövde, 5University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Background: Knowledge about the long-term effects on blood pressure (BP and body mass index (BMI when treating young patients for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD with stimulants is limited. Most of the studies have reported mean and not individual values for anthropometrics and BP in treatment with stimulants. This seems to be the first study of changes based on the analyses of individual data measured over time. Patients and methods: Seventy young patients (aged 8–18 years diagnosed with AD/HD and responding well to treatment with stimulants were followed for a mean period of 3 years and 3 months. BP, heart rate, height, weight, and BMI were transformed to standard deviations or z-scores from before treatment to the last registered visit. Results: The mean dose of methylphenidate was 0.95 mg/kg. The mean increase of systolic and diastolic BP was 0.4 z-score and 0.1 z-score, respectively. The systolic BP was associated with BMI; a higher BMI at baseline increased the risk for an increase in systolic BP. Ten percent of the total group had a weight at follow-up of <-1.5 standard deviation (SD and 12% had a height of <-1.5 SD. Mean height at follow-up was -0.2 SD, but 40% had a reduced height of at least 0.5 SD during the treatment period. BMI on a group level was reduced from +0.8 SD to +0.3 SD. Of the 19 patients with a BMI >+1.5 SD at baseline, 50% had a significantly reduced BMI. Conclusion: Consequences of stimulant treatment must be evaluated individually. Besides significant effects on core AD/HD symptoms, some patients have lower BMI and BP and some increase/maintain their BMI and/or increase their systolic BP. The risk of reduced height trajectory needs further research. Keywords: AD/HD, treatment, heart rate, long-term follow-up, methylphenidate, improvement, cardiovascular, overweight, height, BMI, health

  11. Crescimento e antropometria em pacientes com paralisia cerebral hemiplégica Growth and anthropometry in hemiplegic cerebral palsy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marise Bueno Zonta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar o crescimento linear, o perímetro cefálico e as diferenças antropométricas entre o lado envolvido e o não-envolvido de 24 crianças com paralisia cerebral (PC hemiplégica, comparados à média para a idade. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com amostragem consecutiva de crianças com PC, classificadas clinicamente como hemiplegia espástica. As medidas antropométricas incluíram: peso, estatura, perímetro cefálico, comprimento total de membro superior, comprimento da mão, largura da palma da mão, comprimento total do membro inferior, comprimento do pé e a circunferência dos membros (braço, coxa e panturrilha. As diferenças antropométricas entre os dimídios foram calculadas em centímetros e como porcentagem de encurtamento, comparando o lado envolvido com o não-envolvido. Dois referenciais populacionais, tabelas de crescimento e o software ABase®, desenvolvido para sistema PalmOS, foram comparados na classificação das medidas do comprimento da mão e do pé. A análise estatística utilizou o coeficiente de correlação de Spearman para avaliar a associação entre variáveis quantitativas e o teste não-paramétrico de Wilcoxon para comparar as medidas do lado envolvido e não-envolvido. RESULTADOS: As médias de peso, estatura e perímetro cefálico se mostraram dentro dos limites normais para a idade e 21% dos pacientes apresentaram microcefalia. A discrepância entre os dimídios foi evidente em todos os casos, sendo maior na largura e comprimento da mão. Houve correlação da dis observada entre os membros superiores e inferiores no lado envolvido (r=0,48 e a discrepância aumenta com a idade (r=0,44. CONCLUSÕES: O maior comprometimento no crescimento das crianças com paralisia cerebral estudadas ocorreu nos membros envolvidos pela hemiplegia e, em menor proporção, no perímetro cefálico.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the linear growth, the head circumference and the anthropometric differences between involved and non-involved sides of 24 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy, comparing them to standard values for age. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 24 consecutive children with cerebral palsy clinically classified as spastic hemiplegia. The anthropometric measures included: weight, lenght, head circumference, total upper limb length, hand length, palm width, total lower limb length, foot length, and limb circumference of upper-arm, thigh and calf. The anthropometric differences between both sides were calculated in centimeters and a comparison of the involved and non-involved sides was made. Two different reference values were used to compare the measures of hand and foot length: growth charts and the software ABase® (a PalmOS-based software. The Spearman's correlation coefficient was estimated for the association between quantitative variables and the Wilcoxon non-parametric test was used for age comparisons between involved and noninvolved sides. RESULTS: The mean values of weight, length and head circumference were within the normal range for age and 21% of the children presented microcephaly. Discrepancy was noted between both sides in all cases, being the largest discrepancy in hand length and width. There was a positive correlation between the discrepancy observed in superior and inferior affected limbs (r=0.48, and discrepancy increases with age (r=0.44. CONCLUSION: Growth impairment in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was observed on the affected limbs and in smaller proportion in head circumference.

  12. Long-term adherence to the New Nordic Diet and the effects on body weight, anthropometry and blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sanne Kellebjerg; Crone, Charlotte; Astrup, Arne

    2015-01-01

    The New Nordic Diet (NND) has induced weight loss in a 26-week controlled intervention. We aim to investigate whether high compliance and satisfaction can be maintained after the active intervention is discontinued thereby maintaining the health effects....

  13. Comparison of anthropometry of U.S. electric utility field-workers with North American general populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklin, Richard W; Saginus, Kyle A; Seeley, Patricia; Freier, Stephen H

    2010-12-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether conventional anthropometric databases of the U.S. general population are applicable to the population of U.S. electric utility field-workers. On the basis of anecdotal observations, field-workers for electric power utilities were thought to be generally taller and larger than the general population. However, there were no anthropometric data available on this population, and it was not known whether the conventional anthropometric databases could be used to design for this population. For this study, 3 standing and II sitting anthropometric measurements were taken from 187 male field-workers from three electric power utilities located in the upper Midwest of the United States and Southern California. The mean and percentile anthropometric data from field-workers were compared with seven well-known conventional anthropometric databases for North American males (United States, Canada, and Mexico). In general, the male field-workers were taller and heavier than the people in the reference databases for U.S. males. The field-workers were up to 2.3 cm taller and 10 kg to 18 kg heavier than the averages of the reference databases. This study was justified, as it showed that the conventional anthropometric databases of the general population underestimated the size of electric utility field-workers, particularly with respect to weight. When designing vehicles and tools for electric utility field-workers, designers and ergonomists should consider the population being designed for and the data from this study to maximize safety, minimize risk of injuries, and optimize performance.

  14. Defense Safety Oversight Council (DSOC) Reducing Vehicular Vibration and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-10

    Aeromedical Research Laboratory Fort Rucker, Alabama Anthropometry neck and back pain study Problem • Anthropometry recommendations are often ignored...Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory Fort Rucker, Alabama Anthropometry neck and back pain study • Study to evaluate anthropometric measures as

  15. Relationship between the Nutritional Status of Vitamin A per Trimester of Pregnancy with Maternal Anthropometry and Anemia after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Sabrina; Matos, Andréa; da Cruz, Suelem Pereira; Pereira, Silvia; Saboya, Carlos; Ramalho, Andréa

    2017-09-08

    The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional status of vitamin A per trimester of pregnancy, as well as to assess its influence on pre-pregnancy BMI, total gestational weight gain (TGWG) and presence of anemia in women who had previously undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). An analytical, longitudinal and retrospective study comprising 30 pregnant women who had previously undergone RYGB was undertaken. In all trimesters of pregnancy, the serum concentrations of retinol, β-carotene, stages of vitamin A deficiency (VAD), night blindness (NB), anemia and anthropometric variables were assessed. VAD in pregnancy affected 90% of women, 86.7% developed NB and 82.8% had mild VAD. TGWG above/below the recommended range was related to the low serum concentrations of β-carotene ( p = 0.045) in the second trimester and women with TGWG above the recommended range showed 100% of inadequacy of this nutrient in the third trimester. Among the pregnant women with anemia, 90.9% had VAD and 86.4% had NB. This study highlights the importance of monitoring the nutritional status of vitamin A in prenatal care, due to its relationship with TGWG and the high percentage of VAD and NB found since the beginning of pregnancy. It also reaffirms the use of the cut-off <1.05 μmol/L for determining VAD.

  16. Using a Bayesian Network to Predict L5/S1 Spinal Compression Force from Posture, Hand Load, Anthropometry, and Disc Injury Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Hughes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic biomechanical modeling has become a useful tool most commonly implemented using Monte Carlo simulation, advanced mean value theorem, or Markov chain modeling. Bayesian networks are a novel method for probabilistic modeling in artificial intelligence, risk modeling, and machine learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of Bayesian networks for biomechanical modeling using a static biomechanical model of spinal forces during lifting. A 20-node Bayesian network model was used to implement a well-established static two-dimensional biomechanical model for predicting L5/S1 compression and shear forces. The model was also implemented as a Monte Carlo simulation in MATLAB. Mean L5/S1 spinal compression force estimates differed by 0.8%, and shear force estimates were the same. The model was extended to incorporate evidence about disc injury, which can modify the prior probability estimates to provide posterior probability estimates of spinal compression force. An example showed that changing disc injury status from false to true increased the estimate of mean L5/S1 compression force by 14.7%. This work shows that Bayesian networks can be used to implement a whole-body biomechanical model used in occupational biomechanics and incorporate disc injury.

  17. Using a Bayesian Network to Predict L5/S1 Spinal Compression Force from Posture, Hand Load, Anthropometry, and Disc Injury Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard E

    2017-01-01

    Stochastic biomechanical modeling has become a useful tool most commonly implemented using Monte Carlo simulation, advanced mean value theorem, or Markov chain modeling. Bayesian networks are a novel method for probabilistic modeling in artificial intelligence, risk modeling, and machine learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of Bayesian networks for biomechanical modeling using a static biomechanical model of spinal forces during lifting. A 20-node Bayesian network model was used to implement a well-established static two-dimensional biomechanical model for predicting L5/S1 compression and shear forces. The model was also implemented as a Monte Carlo simulation in MATLAB. Mean L5/S1 spinal compression force estimates differed by 0.8%, and shear force estimates were the same. The model was extended to incorporate evidence about disc injury, which can modify the prior probability estimates to provide posterior probability estimates of spinal compression force. An example showed that changing disc injury status from false to true increased the estimate of mean L5/S1 compression force by 14.7%. This work shows that Bayesian networks can be used to implement a whole-body biomechanical model used in occupational biomechanics and incorporate disc injury.

  18. [Physical activity of 9 and 15 year old Icelandic children - Public health objectives and relations of physical activity to gender, age, anthropometry and area of living].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Kristjan Thor; Arngrimsson, Sigurbjorn Arni; Sveinsson, Thorarinn; Johannsson, Erling

    2011-02-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess to what degree nine and fifteen year old Icelandic children followed the national physical activity (PA) guidelines for children set forth by the Icelandic Public Health Institute, which recommend no less than 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity a day (MVPA). The study was conducted between September 2003 and January 2004 at eighteen randomly selected schools in the capital area of Reykjavik and towns and rural areas in the northeast. All nine years old (N=662) and fifteen years old (N=661) students were offered to participate. Half of the children were randomly chosen to partake in the PA part of the study where 176 nine-year-old and 162 fifteen-year-old children yielded usable data. We measured participants' height, weight and skinfold thickness and their PA by ActiGraph™ with respect to moderate-to-vigorous intensity (defined as counts >3400 cpm) and average volume. Only 5% of 9-year-old and 9% of 15 year-old students followed the recommended PA guidelines of at least 60 minutes a day of MVPA. MVPA was positively associated with sex (being a boy) and age, but negatively associated with skinfold thickness. Those living in the capital area of Reykjavik rather than in smaller towns and rural areas were likelier to accrue more minutes of MVPA per day. The results highlight the importance of developing PA interventions targeting children of school age. It is important to research and evaluate different ways as to how these interventions should best be conducted. Key words: physical activity, children, body composition, accelerometers.

  19. Obesity in young-adult Nigerians: variations in prevalence determined by anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis, and the development of % body fat prediction equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejike Chukwunonso ECC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overweight/obesity is a growing global public health concern. The variations in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, defined by Body Mass Index (BMI, Waist Circumference (WC, Waist-to-Height Ratio (WHtR, Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHpR and Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA, were studied and a prediction equation for % body fat (%BF developed. Methods A total of 1584 subjects (56.4% males were recruited for the study. Data on age, gender, height, weight, hip circumference and WC were collected from the subjects using standard protocols. BMI, WHtR and WHpR were derived using standard equations. %BF was measured using a BIA device (Omron BF-400. Appropriate statistical tools were used for the data analysis. Results The prevalence of overweight/obesity in the population was 28.4% (36.3% for males; 22.6% for females (BIA; 20.7% (17.5% for males; 24.8% for females (BMI; 7.5% (1.3% for males; 16.1% for females (WC; 2.9% (4.3% for males; 1.2% for females (WHpR; and 15.4% (14.8% for males; 16.2% females (WHtR. Taking BIA as the reference point, WC misclassified overweight/obesity the most for males (35%, while for the females, WHpR misclassified both disorders the most (21.4%. Correlation studies showed that only BMI correlated significantly, albeit weakly, with %BF among the males, whereas all the anthropometric measures, but WHpR correlated significantly with % body fat in females. Two prediction equations for %BF were generated, and %BF predicted with the two equations correlated significantly (P  Conclusion The prevalence of overweight/obesity in this population vary widely depending on the definition used. The developed prediction equations could be useful in resource-poor settings, but require validation.

  20. Are unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy distinguished by differences in anthropometry, body composition, or muscle strength in elite female basketball players?

    OpenAIRE

    Gaida, J; Cook, J; Bass, S; Austen, S; Kiss, Z

    2004-01-01

    Background: Overuse injury to the patellar tendon (patellar tendinopathy) is a major reason for interrupted training and competition for elite athletes. In both sexes, the prevalence of unilateral and bilateral tendinopathy has been shown to differ. It has been proposed that bilateral pathology may have a different aetiology from unilateral pathology. Investigation of risk factors that may be unique to unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy in female athletes may reveal insights into ...

  1. Maternal anthropometry and feeding behavior toward preschool children: association with childhood body mass index in an observational study of Chilean families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corvalán Camila

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better understanding of the link between eating behavior and maternal feeding practices with childhood and maternal weight status is of great interest. Objective To assess the association between childhood anthropometric measures with mothers' Body Mass Index (BMI and their feeding practices toward preschool children in Chile. Methods 1029 children (504 boys, 4.3 ± 0.3 years and their mothers were selected from public nurseries located in low income neighborhoods in Santiago. Mothers' BMI, children's BMI and waist-to-height ratios were registered. Maternal feeding practices towards their children's nutritional habits were measured using an adapted version of the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ. Results We found a direct correlation (p Conclusion Mothers' BMI and children's BMI z-scores are highly correlated. We found significant associations between mothers' behaviour subscales and children's BMI z-score. It is not possible to establish a causal link between mother's CFQ scores and children's nutritional status, given the cross-sectional nature of this study and the bidirectional influences that exist between mothers and their children.

  2. Measures of excess body weight and anthropometry among adult Albertans: cross-sectional results from Alberta’s tomorrow project cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Darren R.; Poirier, Abbey E.; Haig, Tiffany R.; Akawung, Alianu; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Robson, Paula J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Excess body weight during adulthood has been consistently associated with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at multiple sites among other chronic diseases. We describe the prevalence of excess body weight and abdominal obesity reported by participants enrolled in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project (ATP). Methods ATP is a geographically-based cohort study conducted among adults aged 35–69 years from across the province of Alberta. Participants completed anthropometric ...

  3. Measures of excess body weight and anthropometry among adult Albertans: cross-sectional results from Alberta’s tomorrow project cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren R. Brenner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excess body weight during adulthood has been consistently associated with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at multiple sites among other chronic diseases. We describe the prevalence of excess body weight and abdominal obesity reported by participants enrolled in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project (ATP. Methods ATP is a geographically-based cohort study conducted among adults aged 35–69 years from across the province of Alberta. Participants completed anthropometric measures and health and lifestyle questionnaires at enrolment. Overweight and obese were categorized as a body mass index (BMI of 25.0–29.9 kg/m2 and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Abdominal obesity was categorized using cut-offs of waist circumference of >94 cm for men and >80 cm for women and waist-tp-hip ratio cut-offs of >0.90 for men and >0.85 for women. Results BMI and hip and waist circumference data were obtained from 12,062 men and 18,853 women enrolled between 2001 and 2009. Overall, 76.8% of men and 59.5% of women reported a BMI ≥25 kg/m2. The proportions of overweight and obese were significantly higher in older age groups (p < 0.001. In addition, the proportion of participants reporting being overweight and obese was higher among lower education (p < 0.001 and lower income groups (p < 0.001. Overall, approximately two thirds of men and women in ATP cohort reported abdominal obesity. Overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity were all associated with a history of several cardiometabolic chronic conditions including hypertension, heart attack, angina, high cholesterol, stroke and diabetes. Conclusion A large majority of ATP participants were overweight and carried excess abdominal fat. Strategies to improve energy balance among Albertans are encouraged and may have a notable impact on future chronic disease burden.

  4. [Food consumption and anthropometry related to the frailty syndrome in low-income community-living elderly in a large city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Amanda de Carvalho; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Alves, Luciana Correia; Gomes, Viviane Pereira; Engstrom, Elyne Montenegro

    2017-08-21

    The aim of this study was to describe anthropometric and food intake data related to the frailty syndrome in the elderly. This was a cross-sectional study in individuals ≥ 60 years of age in a household survey in the Manguinhos neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (n = 137). Frailty syndrome was diagnosed according to Fried et al., anthropometric measures were taken, and a food frequency questionnaire was applied and the results compared to Brazilian Ministry of Health guidelines. In the pre-frail and frail groups, body mass index and measures of central adiposity showed higher levels, while lean muscle parameters showed lower values, proportional to the syndrome's gradation. Frail elderly consumed higher amounts of grains and lower amounts of beans and fruit; pre-frail elderly consumed more vegetables, dairy products, and high-sugar and high-fat foods; the two groups consumed similar amounts of meat. Thus, diagnosis of the syndrome, anthropometric evaluation, and dietary assessment should be included in health policies for the elderly, since they assist in early identification of risk and favor interventions for disease prevention and health and nutritional promotion.

  5. Use of upper-arm anthropometry as measure of body-composition and nutritional assessment in children and adolescents (6-20 years) of Assam, Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswant, Singh; Nitish, Mondal

    2014-07-01

    Upper-arm muscle area (UMA), upper-arm fat area (UFA), arm-fat index (AFI), upper-arm fat estimate (UFE) and upper-arm muscle estimate (UME) was introduced for the assessment of body-composition. This cross-sectional study assessed age-sex specific upper-arm composition and nutritional status among children and adolescents. The present cross-sectional study was conducted among 1545 (770 boys; 775 girls) Sonowal Kacharis of Dibrugarh District, Assam, Northeast-India, using multi-stage stratified random sampling method. The anthropometric measurements of height, weight, triceps and mid-upper-arm circumference were recorded. The upper-arm composition was assessed using standard equations. Nutritional status was assessed using standard classification of upper-arm muscle-area by height (UAMAH) and thinness (low BMI-for-age). Age and sex-specific muscularity were found significantly greater among boys than girls (p0.05). Body-composition and nutritional status of these children and adolescents were found markedly unsatisfactory using upper-arm composition, UAMAH and thinness. The combination of upper-arm composition and conventional anthropometric measures appear to be useful for body-composition and nutritional status assessment.

  6. Diet and anthropometry at 2 years of age following an oral health promotion programme for Australian Aboriginal children and their carers: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers, Lisa G; Lynch, John; Hedges, Joanne; Jamieson, Lisa M

    2017-12-01

    There are marked disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous children's diets and oral health. Both diet and oral health are linked to longer-term health problems. We aimed to investigate whether a culturally appropriate multi-faceted oral health promotion intervention reduced Aboriginal children's intake of sugars from discretionary foods at 2 years of age. We conducted a single-blind, parallel-arm randomised controlled trial involving women who were pregnant or had given birth to an Aboriginal child in the previous 6 weeks. The treatment group received anticipatory guidance, Motivational Interviewing, health and dental care for mothers during pregnancy and children at 6, 12 and 18 months. The control group received usual care. The key dietary outcome was the percent energy intake from sugars in discretionary foods (%EI), collected from up to three 24-h dietary recalls by trained research officers who were blind to intervention group. Secondary outcomes included intake of macronutrients, food groups, anthropometric z scores (weight, height, BMI and mid-upper arm circumference) and blood pressure. We enrolled 224 children to the treatment group and 230 to the control group. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that the %EI of sugars in discretionary foods was 1·6 % lower in the treatment group compared with control (95 % CI -3·4, 0·2). This culturally appropriate intervention at four time-points from pregnancy to 18 months resulted in small changes to 2-year-old Aboriginal children's diets, which was insufficient to warrant broader implementation of the intervention. Further consultation with Aboriginal communities is necessary for understanding how to improve the diet and diet-related health outcomes of young Aboriginal children.

  7. The prediction of visceral fat by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the elderly : a comparison with computed tomography and anthropometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, M B; Visser, M; Dekker, J M; Seidell, J C; Fuerst, T.; Tylavsky, F.; Cauley, J.; Lang, T.; Nevitt, M.; Harris, Tamara B

    INTRODUCTION: Effective methods for assessing visceral fat are important to investigate the role of visceral fat for the increased health risks in obesity. Techniques for direct measurement of soft tissue composition such as CT or MRI are expensive, time-consuming or require a relatively high

  8. Results of soy-based meal replacement formula on weight, anthropometry, serum lipids & blood pressure during a 40-week clinical weight loss trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heo Moonseong

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the intermediate-term health outcomes associated with a soy-based meal replacement, and to compare the weight loss efficacy of two distinct patterns of caloric restriction. Methods Ninety overweight/obese (28 2 adults received a single session of dietary counseling and were randomized to either 12 weeks at 1200 kcal/day, 16 weeks at 1500 kcal/d and 12 weeks at 1800 kcal/d (i.e., the 12/15/18 diet group, or 28 weeks at 1500 kcal/d and 12 weeks at 1800 kcal/d (i.e., the 15/18 diet group. Weight, body fat, waist circumference, blood pressure and serum lipid concentrations were measured at 4-week intervals throughout the 40-week trial. Results Subjects in both treatments showed statistically significant improvements in outcomes. A regression model for weight change suggests that subjects with larger baseline weights tended to lose more weight and subjects in the 12/15/18 group tended to experience, on average, an additional 0.9 kg of weight loss compared with subjects in the 15/18 group. Conclusion Both treatments using the soy-based meal replacement program were associated with significant and comparable weight loss and improvements on selected health variables.

  9. Results of soy-based meal replacement formula on weight, anthropometry, serum lipids & blood pressure during a 40-week clinical weight loss trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Kevin R; Yang, Dongyan; Gadbury, Gary L; Heshka, Stanley; Schwartz, Linda G; Murugesan, Radha; Kraker, Jennifer L; Heo, Moonseong; Heymsfield, Steven B; Allison, David B

    2003-01-01

    Background To evaluate the intermediate-term health outcomes associated with a soy-based meal replacement, and to compare the weight loss efficacy of two distinct patterns of caloric restriction. Methods Ninety overweight/obese (28 < BMI ≤ 41 kg/m2) adults received a single session of dietary counseling and were randomized to either 12 weeks at 1200 kcal/day, 16 weeks at 1500 kcal/d and 12 weeks at 1800 kcal/d (i.e., the 12/15/18 diet group), or 28 weeks at 1500 kcal/d and 12 weeks at 1800 kcal/d (i.e., the 15/18 diet group). Weight, body fat, waist circumference, blood pressure and serum lipid concentrations were measured at 4-week intervals throughout the 40-week trial. Results Subjects in both treatments showed statistically significant improvements in outcomes. A regression model for weight change suggests that subjects with larger baseline weights tended to lose more weight and subjects in the 12/15/18 group tended to experience, on average, an additional 0.9 kg of weight loss compared with subjects in the 15/18 group. Conclusion Both treatments using the soy-based meal replacement program were associated with significant and comparable weight loss and improvements on selected health variables. PMID:14624699

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor gene haplotypes are not associated with birth anthropometry, blood pressure, glucose and insulin concentrations, and body composition in subjects born small for gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Manenschijn (Laura); E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica); W.A. Ester (Wietske); R.W.J. Leunissen (Ralph); R.H. Willemsen (Ruben); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth); J.W. Koper (Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Smaller size at birth has been associated with an increased risk of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in adult life. Fetal programing of the hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal axis has been suggested as a possible explanation. Fetal glucocorticoid (GC) overexposure has

  11. Effects on anthropometry and appetite of vitamins and minerals given in lipid nutritional supplements for malnourished HIV-infected adults referred for antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Andrea M; Woodd, Susannah; PrayGod, George

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive. OBJECTIVE:: We hypothesised that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain in malnouris......BACKGROUND:: The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive. OBJECTIVE:: We hypothesised that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain...... in malnourished patients starting ART and that vitamin and mineral supplementation would improve appetite and permit nutritional recovery. DESIGN:: The randomised controlled Nutritional Support for Africans Starting Antiretroviral Therapy (NUSTART) trial was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania and Lusaka, Zambia. ART......-naïve adults referred for ART and with body mass index (BMI)vitamins and minerals (LNS-VM), beginning prior to ART initiation. Participants were given 30 g/day LNS from recruitment until 2 weeks after starting ART...

  12. Antropometria de atletas culturistas em relação à referência populacional Anthropometry of body builders in relation to the population standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naílza MAESTÁ

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Atletas de culturismo têm como alvo de treinamento a hipertrofia muscular e a redução da adiposidade. A falta de referências antropométricas apropriadas pode levar esses indivíduos a serem erroneamente considerados em situação de sobrepeso ou desnutrição. Portanto, objetivamos comparar a composição corporal de atletas de culturismo com os padrões populacionais. Foram avaliados 36 atletas, de ambos os sexos, 26 do sexo masculino (27,2 ± 7,2 anos e 10 do sexo feminino (30,0 ± 6,1 anos, por ocasião da competição nacional, quanto aos indicadores antropométricos de peso, estatura, índice de massa corpórea, pregas cutâneas, adiposidade corpórea e circunferência muscular do braço. Os resultados foram referidos quanto à posição percentual ou de desvios-padrão (pelo escore Z tendo como referências padrões populacionais locais. Como resultado, encontramos que os indicadores com menor contraste com os padrões adotados foram peso e estatura e os maiores contrastes foram encontrados na circunferência muscular do braço para os homens, e pregas cutâneas tricipital para as mulheres. Pelo indicador muscular todos foram classificados como obesos ou sobrepeso, enquanto que pela prega cutânea tricipital e adiposidade corpórea, a desnutrição esteve presente em 100,0% das mulheres e 88,5% dos homens. Fica evidenciada a inadequação da utilização do padrão antropométrico populacional para a classificação nutricional de atletas de força, em particular culturistas, sendo assim necessário o estabelecimento de padrões próprios para esse tipo de treinamento (modalidade.Body builders have as their training goals the maximum muscle hypertrophy with minimum adiposity. However, the scarcity of specific standards implies often in framing wrongly those athletes either as overweight (by their BMI or energy malnourished (by their fat stores. The objective of this study was to compare the body composition of body builders with population standards. Thirty-six adults, 26 male (27.2 ± 7.2 years and 10 female (30 ± 6.1 years nationwide competitive body builders, were assessed considering weight, height, body mass index, adiposity, arm and leg circumferences and skinfolds. The data were referred either as percentile or standard deviations (Z score of population standards. Body weight and height were among the closest values from the populational mean whereas upper arm muscle circumference (for men and body adiposity (for women were the farterest. By using fat parameters as indicators of their protein-energy status, the undernourishment was found in 88.5% of men and 100.0% of women. Thus, it seems that body builders deserve their own anthropometric standards to avoid nutritional status misplacements.

  13. Antropometria de idosos residentes em instituições geriátricas, Fortaleza, CE Anthropometry of elderly people living in geriatric institutions, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarciana Nobre de Menezes

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Fornecer informações antropométricas e de composição corporal de idosos residentes em instituições geriátricas. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 305 idosos, de ambos os sexos, residentes em seis instituições geriátricas de Fortaleza, Estado do Ceará. As variáveis antropométricas utilizadas foram: peso, estatura, índice de massa corporal, perímetro do braço, dobra cutânea tricipital, circunferência muscular do braço e área muscular do braço corrigida. O índice de massa corporal foi calculado a partir de equação que utiliza as variáveis peso e estatura. A circunferência muscular do braço e área muscular do braço corrigida foram calculadas utilizando-se equações específicas. Os dados são apresentados sob a forma de média, desvio-padrão e percentil (P5, P10, P25, P50, P75, P90 e P95. Foi realizado o teste t-Student para verificar a diferença dos valores médios das variáveis entre os sexos. Foi realizada análise de variância (ANOVA para verificar o efeito da idade nas variáveis. RESULTADOS: Em todas as variáveis, o valor médio dos homens foi superior ao das mulheres, exceto para dobra cutânea tricipital. As diferenças de média das variáveis índice de massa corporal e perímetro do braço entre os sexos não foram estatisticamente significativas (p>0,05. A idade mostrou ser fator importante na diminuição dos valores de algumas variáveis, o que implica a necessidade de padrões de referência específicos para idosos. CONCLUSÕES: Apesar da população estudada ser institucionalizada, a tendência de diminuição das variáveis antropométricas segue a mesma de outros estudos com população idosa, no entanto os valores diferem. Dessa forma, sugere-se que esses valores possam ser usados para auxiliar na avaliação nutricional de idosos institucionalizados.OBJECTIVE: To provide anthropometric and body composition information on elderly people living in geriatric institutions. METHODS: Three-hundred and five elderly people, of both sexes, living in six geriatric institutions in Fortaleza were assessed. The following anthropometric variables were studied: weight, height, body mass index, mid-arm circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference, and corrected arm-muscle area. The body mass index was calculated as weight divided by the square of the height (m². The arm muscle circumference and corrected arm-muscle area were calculated using specific equations. The results are presented as means, standard deviations and percentiles (5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 95th. The analyses included Student t-test to detect differences in mean values of the variables between both sexes. Age impact was investigated by ANOVA. RESULTS: In all variables, mean values in men were higher than those in women, except for triceps skinfold thickness . The mean difference of the variables body mass index and mid-arm circumference for both sexes were not statistically significant (p>0.05. Age has significantly contributed to reducing the variables' values. This means that specific reference standards are needed for elderly people. CONCLUSIONS: Despite being institutionalized, there was seen a trend of decreasing anthropometric values in the study population similar to that found in other studies of elderly people but with different values. Thereby, such values could be useful in the nutritional assessment of institutionalized elderly people.

  14. Obesity in young-adult Nigerians: variations in prevalence determined by anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis, and the development of % body fat prediction equations

    OpenAIRE

    Ejike, Chukwunonso ECC; Ijeh, Ifeoma I

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Overweight/obesity is a growing global public health concern. The variations in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, defined by Body Mass Index (BMI), Waist Circumference (WC), Waist-to-Height Ratio (WHtR), Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHpR) and Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA), were studied and a prediction equation for % body fat (%BF) developed. Methods A total of 1584 subjects (56.4% males) were recruited for the study. Data on age, gender, height, weight, hip circumfere...

  15. Long-term adherence to the New Nordic Diet and the effects on body weight, anthropometry and blood pressure: a 12-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Sanne Kellebjerg; Crone, Charlotte; Astrup, Arne; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2015-02-01

    The New Nordic Diet (NND) has induced weight loss in a 26-week controlled intervention. We aim to investigate whether high compliance and satisfaction can be maintained after the active intervention is discontinued thereby maintaining the health effects. After 26 weeks of intervention with NND or Average Danish Diet (ADD), 147 participants (mean age 43 years and mean BMI 29.1 kg/m²) were followed for further 52 weeks. All participants were encouraged to follow NND but without further guidance. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, study id NCT01195610. One hundred and ten participants (75%) completed the follow-up. Among participants previously randomised to NND (NND group), dietary compliance and satisfaction decreased from 4.3 to 3.0 and from 4.8 to 4.0, respectively (both p diet groups, every 1 score higher in compliance with NND was associated with 0.90 kg less body weight regain (p = 0.026) and those who increased physical activity regained 3.4 kg less compared to those who did not (p < 0.0001). NND provides higher satisfaction, and body weight regain is reduced with higher compliance with NND and increased physical activity.

  16. Bioelectrical impedance analysis and anthropometry for the determination of body composition in rats: effects of high-fat and high-sucrose diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Rodrigues Neto Angéloco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to determine the impedance of Wistar rats treated with high-fat and high-sucrose diets and correlate their biochemical and anthropometric parameters with chemical analysis of the carcass. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were fed a standard (AIN-93, high-fat (50% fat or high-sucrose (59% of sucrose diet for 4 weeks. Abdominal and thoracic circumference and body length were measured. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to determine resistance and reactance. Final body composition was determined by chemical analysis. RESULTS: Higher fat intake led to a high percentage of liver fat and cholesterol and low total body water in the High-Fat group, but these changes in the biochemical profile were not reflected by the anthropometric measurements or bioelectrical impedance analysis variables. Anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance analysis changes were not observed in the High-Sucrose group. However, a positive association was found between body fat and three anthropometric variables: body mass index, Lee index and abdominal circumference. CONCLUSION: Bioelectrical impedance analysis did not prove to be sensitive for detecting changes in body composition, but body mass index, Lee index and abdominal circumference can be used for estimating the body composition of rats.

  17. Comparison of malnutrition inflammation score, anthropometry and biochemical parameters in assessing the difference in protein-energy wasting between normal weight and obese patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipoor, Elham; Hosseinzadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad; Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra; Yaseri, Mehdi; Zahed, Narges S

    2017-07-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is prevalent in haemodialysis. Obesity is an independent risk factor of kidney insufficiency, but it is proposed to have beneficial roles in better outcomes in the final stage of disease. Better nutritional status and body reserves are among probable mechanisms, but direct examinations are limited. The present study aimed to investigate whether obese patients have preferable nutritional status compared to normal weight patients based on malnutrition inflammation score (MIS) and other PEW parameters in haemodialysis. This case-control study investigated 52 normal weight (18.5 < body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m 2 ) and 48 obese (BMI≥30 kg/m 2 ) patients on regular haemodialysis. PEW was assessed based on anthropometric and biochemical factors, recent weight changes, appetite, anorexia, dietary intake and MIS. Obese patients had better MIS compared with the normal weight group (P < 0.001), although varying degrees of wasting were prevalent among this group too (75% mild and 25% moderate wasting). The obese group had less significant weight loss (4.2 vs 8%) and anorexia and better appetite. However, a considerable percentage of patients in both groups showed muscle (94.6% of normal weight and 19.5% of obese) and peripheral fat tissue (89.2% of normal weight and 31.7% of obese) losses compared to the 50th percentile. Biochemical parameters were not significantly different between groups except for triglyceride (P = 0.001), transferrin and total iron-binding capacity (P = 0.028). MIS was significantly better in obese patients; however, both groups showed degrees of wasting based on MIS and other PEW parameters. Nutritional status of obese haemodialysis patients should be monitored regularly because of high risk of PEW like other BMI categories. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  18. Anthropometry in 5- to 9-Year-Old Greenlandic and Ukrainian Children in Relation to Prenatal Exposure to Perfluorinated Alkyl Substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Birgit Bjerre; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H; Vrijheid, Martine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In some animal studies, perfluorinated alkyl substances are suggested to induce weight gain. Human epidemiological studies investigating these associations are sparse. OBJECTIVE: We examined pregnancy serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFO...

  19. Body composition by bioelectrical-impedance analysis compared with deuterium dilution and skinfold anthropometry in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schols, A.M.; Wouters, E.F.; Soeters, P.B.; Westerterp, K.R. (Univ. of Limburg, Maastricht (Netherlands))

    1991-02-01

    Body composition is an important measure of nutritional status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We generated a regression model for bioelectrical impedance (BI) by using deuterium dilution (2H2O) as a reference method in 32 COPD patients, aged 63 +/- 9 y (mean +/- SD), in stable pulmonary and cardiac condition. Height squared divided by resistance (Ht2/Res) correlated well with total body water (TBW) as measured by 2H2O (r = 0.93, P less than 0.001, SEE = 1.9 L). The best-fitting regression equation to predict TBW comprised Ht2/Res and body weight (r2 = 0.89, SEE = 1.8 L, P less than 0.001). BI-predicted TBW was used to estimate BI-fat-free mass (FFM) that was compared with skinfold-thickness-based FFM predictions (Anthr-FFM). Relative to BI-FFM a significant overestimation of 4.4 +/- 0.8 kg was found by Anthr-FFM. Our results suggest that BI is a useful measure of body composition in patients with severe COPD.

  20. Integration Evaluation of the Advanced Mission Extender Device Max

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-04

    2 Anthropometry ...and two female, were selected to participate in the test based on their broad range of anthropometry . Both of the male participants were rated Army...6 Anthropometry The height and weight of the participants were assessed against the 1988 Anthropometry Survey of U.S. Army Pilots

  1. Short Bi-Iliac Distance in Prenatal Ullrich-Turner Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Ulla B.; Hansen, Birgit Fischer; Keeling, Jean W.

    2002-01-01

    prenatal; Ullrich-Turner syndrome; pelvis; iliac bone; vertebral column; X chromosome; anthropometry; radiography......prenatal; Ullrich-Turner syndrome; pelvis; iliac bone; vertebral column; X chromosome; anthropometry; radiography...

  2. The Seated Soldier Study: Posture and Body Shape in Vehicle Seats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-28

    vehicle interior layout Current design guidance is based on outdated anthropometry Previous studies of seated anthropometry have not included the...personal protective equipment (PPE) for seat and vehicle interior layout • Current design guidance is based on outdated anthropometry • Previous...studies of seated anthropometry have not included the effects of PPE on posture and body shape • Detailed anthropometric data needed for the design

  3. Aeromedical Evacuation Enroute Critical Care Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-27

    119 Figure G-1. Anthropometry for chest depth...123 Figure G-2. Encumbered anthropometry for depth dimensions, driver, and SAW gunner ......... 124 Figure G-3. Nude...requires consideration of several factors: patient vertical location, patient anthropometry (e.g., abdominal and thoracic anterior-posterior depth

  4. Testing of Hand-Held Mine Detection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-08

    participants (user population). Sufficient data will be acquired to establish the demographics, anthropometry , skills, grades, experience, gender...the operators (e.g., Operator A, Operator B, etc.), and correlate the demographics, anthropometry , and other information to the operator’s code ID...Record demographics and anthropometry elements of test participants, to include corresponding apparel (Mission Oriented Protective Posture (MOPP

  5. Investigation of the Human Response to Upper Torso Retraction with Weighted Helmets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    5 Table 3. Human Subject Anthropometry ...Table 3. Human Subject Anthropometry Male (n=21) Female (n=9) Variable N Mean Std Min Max N Mean Std Min Max Weight (lbs) 21 182 37 127 261...369) Responses by gender were compared using the t-test without consideration for subject anthropometry . It is possible that the

  6. Reassessing the Representative Heuristic of the Plywood Ballistic Mannequin Used in Live-Fire Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    with the 1988 US Army Anthropometry Survey (ANSUR I) using 2 anthropometric doublets (stature and crotch height...74 Fig. H-2 A simple comparison with the 1988 US Army Anthropometry Survey (ANSUR I...75 Fig. H-3 A simple comparison with the 1988 US Army Anthropometry Survey (ANSUR I) using 2 anthropometric doublets (standing waist

  7. Soldier-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-27

    Anthropometry kit. e. Timer. ** Superscript numbers correspond to Appendix G, References. TOP 01-1-059A 27 January 2015 3 f. Event counter...1.75 lbs (0 to 1112 N ± 7.8 N) Anthropometry Anthropometry kit ± 0.1 centimeter (cm) Performance Digital timer ± .001% R Multiple event counter

  8. A Method to Develop Neck Injury Criteria to Aid Design and Test of Escape Systems Incorporating Helmet Mounted Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Comparison Against AFLCMC Escape Office Requirements ....................... 61 Table 7. Human Subject Anthropometry and Peak Instantaneous Upper Neck...at Various Risk Percentages ... 124 Table 14. PMHS Peak Tensile Neck Load and Anthropometry ...145 Table 17. MANIC(Gx) Human Subject Anthropometry and Peak Instantaneous Upper Neck Loads . 169 Table 18. MANIC(Gx) Post

  9. Aircrew Sizing Survey 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    the aircrew population is growing heavier and exhibiting some increased measurements related to increased mass. 15. SUBJECT TERMS anthropometry , body...LIST ACSS Aircrew Sizing Survey AFB Air Force Base ANSUR Army Anthropometric Survey CAESAR Civilian American & European Surface Anthropometry ...Surface Anthropometry Resource (CAESAR) was developed for the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program. The ACSS was intended to replace the JSF-CAESAR

  10. 2010 Anthropometric Survey of U.S. Marine Corps Personnel: Methods and Summary Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    ANTHROPOMETRY CLOTHING DEMOGRAPHY SIZES(DIMENSIONS) MARINE CORPS PERSONNEL WHOLE BODY SCAN ACCURACY HUMAN BODY FREQUENCY...Scanning ...................................................... 331 7.3 Traditional Anthropometry and 3-D Scanning .......................... 332...sample Marine database had been created from Army data in 1994. To the extent that the current anthropometry is different from those previous

  11. Antropometría y composición corporal en personas mayores de 60 años. Importancia de la actividad física Anthropometry and body composition in elderly people. Importance of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliodoro Alemán-Mateo

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Medir los indicadores antropométricos de composición corporal por bioimpedancia eléctrica y la actividad física, así como la glucosa sanguínea y la presión arterial en personas mayores de 60 años de una región rural. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Por muestreo intencional no probabilístico se seleccionaron 54 sujetos mayores de 60 años, quienes se sometieron al protocolo estandarizado para las mediciones antropométricas y composición corporal por bioimpedancia eléctrica (BIE y actividad física mediante el cuestionario de actividades. Asimismo, se midió la presión arterial y se realizó la prueba de tolerancia a la glucosa. Los valores promedio se analizaron por sexo mediante la prueba t de Student, y la asociación de la actividad física y la composición corporal con otras variables, por regresión lineal simple y el coeficiente de correlación de Pearson. RESULTADOS. La actividad física correlacionó negativamente con el porcentaje de grasa (r= -0.36; p= 0.007; la presión arterial diastólica (r= -0.36; p= 0.006 y sistólica (r= -0.32; p= 0.018 y el índice de masa corporal, con la glucosa posdosis (r= 0.31; p= 0.024. CONCLUSIONES. La actividad física en este grupo de personas puede tener un impacto favorable respecto a los indicadores de salud tan importantes que se mencionaron.OBJECTIVE. To measure anthropometric indicators of body composition by electric bioimpedence, as well as physical activity, blood glucose and arterial pressure in rural people over 60 years of age. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A total of 54 subjects over 60 years old were selected by intentional non-probabilistic sampling. They were subjected to a standardized protocol to measure anthropometric indicators, body composition by electric bioimpedance (EBI, and physical activity was determined by an activity questionnaire. Arterial pressure and glucose tolerance levels were also measured. Analysis included Student's t test to detect differences by sex and the association of physical activity, body composition and other variables by simple linear regression and Pearson's correlation coefficient. RESULTS. Physical activity correlated negatively with percent fat (r= -0.36; p= 0.007 and diastolic (r= -0.36; p= 0.006 and systolic blood pressure (r= -0.32; p= 0.018, and body mass index with post dose glucose (r= 0.31; p= 0.024. CONCLUSIONS. Physical activity in this age group may have a favorable impact with respect to the mentioned health indicators.

  12. Anthropometry, body image, self-esteem and dietary quality of Brazilian female flamenco dancers. Antropometría, imagen corporal, autoestima y calidad de la dieta de brasileñas practicantes de baile flamenco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Sayumi Nakamura

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the nutritional profile, the body image perception and self-esteem of 17 Brazilian adult female flamenco dancers. The methods used were: Body Mass Index (BMI, fat percentage, waist circumference, the Stunkard Figure Rating Scale for body perception and the Rosemberg Scale for self-esteem. Food intake was classified by the Healthy Eating Index (HEI. The average values found were: age 39.2 ± 8.3 years, practice time of 16 ± 11.5 months and 2.2 ± 0.9 hours a week. Although the majority of women (76.5% had an adequate BMI, 88.2% they showed a high percentage of fat. The BMI was related to the percentage of fat (r=0,681; IC [0.298-0.875] and associated with the current silhouette (p=0.018. Even though all dancers had a high self-esteem, 64.7% were not satisfied with their body. Underreporting was identified in 41.2% of the cases and it was not related to self-esteem or BMI. According to the HEI, the diet of 88.2% was classified as healthy. It was concluded that the women correctly evaluate their BMI and, despite their high self-esteem, they are not fully satisfied with their body.Los objetivos de este estudio fueron evaluar el perfil nutricional, la percepción de la imagen corporal y la autoestima de 17 brasileñas adultas practicantes de flamenco. Los métodos utilizados fueron: índice de masa corporal (IMC, circunferencia abdominal y porcentaje de grasa corporal, la Escala de Siluetas de Stunkardt para la percepción corporal y la Escala de Rosemberg para la autoestima. La ingesta de alimentos fue clasificada según el Índice de Calidad de la Dieta (ICD. Los valores promedios encontrados fueron: edad de 39,2 ± 8,3 años, tiempo de practica de 16 ± 11,5 meses y 2,2 ± 0,9 horas/semanales. La mayoría (76,5% fue clasificada como eutrófica, sin embargo 88,2% presentaron porcentaje de grasa elevado. El IMC está correlacionado con el porcentaje de grasa (r=0,681; IC [0,298-0,875] y asociado a la silueta actual (p=0,018. Aunque todas las practicantes presentaron elevada autoestima, se encontró que 64,7% presentaron insatisfacción corporal. El consumo energético habitual fue subestimado en 41,2% de la muestra y no se correlacionó a la autoestima o al IMC. La dieta del 88,2% de la muestra fue calificada como sana según el ICD. Se concluyó que las mujeres se autoevalúan correctamente según el IMC y que, aunque presenten elevada autoestima, hay insatisfacción corporal.

  13. Comparison of hand-to-hand bioimpedance and anthropometry equations versus dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for the assessment of body fat percentage in 17-18-year-old conscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintsi, Mart; Kaarma, Helje; Kull, Ingrid

    2004-03-01

    In the present study, hand-to-hand bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), skinfold (SKF) thickness and height-weight (body mass index, BMI)-based equations and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), as a criterion method, were compared with each other in the assessment of body fat percentage (BF%) in 17-18-year-old Estonian conscripts (n = 32). The Omron BF body fat monitor estimated that BF% was lower than that of the criterion method DEXA. The difference between DEXA and Omron BF 300 (III) was higher (1.1 +/- 3.0%; P = 0.04) and that between DEXA and Omron BF 306 lower (0.2 +/- 3.0%; P>0.05). Omron BF 300 (I) and (II) (series 8) had intermediate difference (0.9 +/- 3.0 and 0.9 +/- 3.0; P>0.05) when compared with DEXA. Three anthropometric equations estimated a higher BF% than cthat of DEXA. The Durnin & Womersley SKF equation BF% (1.0 +/- 2.4; P = 0.03) was higher than that of the DEXA. Deurenberg et al. and Gallagher et al. BMI-based equations overestimation yielded 0.9 +/- 3.7 and 0.6 +/- 3.8 BF% (P>0.05). From the anthropometric equations, only the Deurenberg et al. SKF equation slightly underestimated 0.5 +/- 3.4 BF% (P>0.05). DEXA-assessed BF% had highest correlation with SKF equations (r = 0.93), less so with BIA (r = 0.88-0.89) and lowest with BMI equation-assessed BF% (r = 0.81-0.84). All values were significant at Pequation yielded results close to the DEXA BF%.

  14. Child anthropometry data quality from Demographic and Health Surveys, Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, and National Nutrition Surveys in the West Central Africa region: are we comparing apples and oranges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Daniel J; Perkins, Jessica M; Subramanian, S V

    2017-01-01

    There has been limited work comparing survey characteristics and assessing the quality of child anthropometric data from population-based surveys. To investigate survey characteristics and indicators of quality of anthropometric data in children aged 0-59 months from 23 countries in the West Central Africa region. Using established methodologies and criteria to examine child age, sex, height, and weight, we conducted a comprehensive assessment and scoring of the quality of anthropometric data collected in 100 national surveys. The Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) and Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) collected data from a greater number of younger children than older children while the opposite was found for the National Nutrition Surveys (NNS). Missing or implausible height/weight data proportions were 12% and 8% in MICS and DHS compared to 3% in NNS. Average data quality scores were 14 in NNS, 33 in DHS, and 41 in MICS. Although our metric of data quality suggests that data from the NNS appear more consistent and robust, it is equally important to consider its disadvantages related to access and lack of broader socioeconomic information. In comparison, the DHS and MICS are publicly-accessable for research and provide socioeconomic context essential for assessing and addressing the burden of undernutrition within and between countries. The strengths and weaknesses of data from these three sources should be carefully considered when seeking to determine the burden of child undernutrition and its variation within countries.

  15. Effects on anthropometry and appetite of vitamins and minerals given in lipid nutritional supplements for malnourished HIV-infected adults referred for antiretroviral therapy: results from the NUSTART randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Andrea M; Woodd, Susannah; PrayGod, George; Chisenga, Molly; Siame, Joshua; Koethe, John R; Heimburger, Douglas C; Kelly, Paul; Friis, Henrik; Filteau, Suzanne

    2015-04-01

    The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive. We hypothesized that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain in malnourished patients starting ART and that vitamin and mineral supplementation would improve appetite and permit nutritional recovery. The randomized controlled Nutritional Support for Africans Starting Antiretroviral Therapy trial was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania, and Lusaka, Zambia. ART-naive adults referred for ART and with body mass index vitamins and minerals (LNS-VM), beginning before ART initiation. Participants were given 30 g/d LNS from recruitment until 2 weeks after starting ART and 250 g/d from weeks 2 to 6 of ART. Of 1815 patients recruited, 365 (20%) died during the study and 813 (45%) provided data at 12 weeks. Controlling for baseline values, anthropometric measures were consistently higher at 12-week ART in the LNS-VM than in the LNS group but statistically significant only for calf and mid-upper arm circumferences and triceps skinfold. Appetite did not differ between groups. Using piecewise mixed-effects quadratic models including all patients and time points, the main effects of LNS-VM were seen after starting ART and were significant for weight, body mass index, and mid-upper arm circumference. Provision of high levels of vitamins and minerals to patients referred for ART, delivered with substantial macronutrients, increased nutritional recovery but did not seem to act through treatment group differences in appetite.

  16. Associação entre a antropometria e a leptina circulante nos compartimentos materno, fetal e placentário, na gravidez normal Association between anthropometry and circulating leptin in maternal, fetal and placental compartments, in healthy pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Cipriano Castro

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a importância da leptina materna e fetal circulantes na gestação saudável por meio da avaliação de sua associação com variáveis antropométricas materna, placentária e fetal ao nascimento e as relações entre os compartimentos avaliados. MÉTODOS: em estudo transversal foi incluída amostra de 33 gestações únicas, a termo, com fetos saudáveis. As variáveis avaliadas foram idade materna, peso materno, índice de massa corporal, peso do recém-nascido, peso placentário e índice placentário. Amostras de sangue materno foram obtidas imediatamente antes do parto e em sangue do cordão umbilical ao nascimento. A dosagem da leptina sérica foi realizada por meio de radioimunoensaio convencional. As relações entre as concentrações de leptina sérica materna e da artéria e veia umbilicais com as variáveis de estudo foram verificadas através da regressão linear. RESULTADOS: a leptina foi detectada no sangue de todas as 33 gestantes e seus respectivos recém-nascidos, sendo a concentração no sangue materno (17,1±1,77 ng/ml superior à dos vasos umbilicais (veia 9,0±1,16 ng/mL; artéria 8,2±1,02 ng/mL, pPURPOSE: to evaluate the importance of circulating maternal and fetal leptin in the healthy gestation, using its association with maternal, placental and fetal anthropometric variables, obtained at birth, and the relationship between the evaluated compartments. METHODS: in a transversal study a population of 33 single, healthy and term gestations was studied. The evaluated variables were maternal age, maternal weight, body mass index (BMF, weight of the newborn, placental weight, and placental index. Samples of maternal blood were immediately obtained before birth and from fetal umbilical cord blood at birth. Determination of serum leptin was performed using conventional radioimmunoassay. The relationships between serum leptin concentrations in maternal blood, umbilical artery and vein and the studied variables were assessed through linear regression. RESULTS: leptin levels were detected in the blood of all 33 pregnant women and their respective newborns, with maternal blood concentration (17.1±1.77 ng/mL higher than that of umbilical vessels (vein: 9.0±1.16 ng/mL; artery: 8.23±1.02 ng/mL, p<0.0001. Leptin concentrations in the maternal blood were correlated with leptin concentrations in fetal blood (artery: coef. 0.63, p=0.037; vein: coef. 0.72, p=0.006. Regarding the anthropometric variables, leptin measured in the maternal blood was associated with initial and final maternal BMF (coef. 1.13; p=0.002; coef. 1,18, p=0.001 and cord leptin levels were correlated with the fetal weight at birth (vein: coef. 0.007, p=0.02; artery: coef. 0.006, p=0.02. CONCLUSION: there was a correlation between maternal and fetal leptin production and probably by the action of similar stimuli during gestation. Serum leptin was associated with the weight of the compartment where it circulates.

  17. Cálculo do erro técnico de medição em antropometria Cálculo del error técnico en la medición de antropometria Technical error of measurement in anthropometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Adão Perini

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available As medidas antropométricas estão sendo amplamente utilizadas para o acompanhamento e desenvolvimento de crianças, na verificação das adaptações em resposta ao treinamento, na seleção de atletas e em estudos de caracterização étnica, entre várias outras áreas. O controle da qualidade dessas medidas vai resultar em dados mais confiáveis e medidas antropométricas mais precisas. O propósito do presente estudo é difundir a estratégia para a obtenção do erro técnico de medição (ETM, segundo a metodologia de Kevin Norton e Tim Olds (2000, e avaliar o desempenho de estagiários de laboratório. Três antropometristas iniciantes do Laboratório de Fisiologia do Exercício (Labofise da Universidade do Brasil foram avaliados. Eles realizaram as medidas de dobras cutâneas (Cescorf, 0,1mm em nove diferentes pontos antropométricos de 35 voluntários (25,45 ± 9,96 anos. Para as medidas, foi adotada a padronização da International Society for Advancement in Kinanthropometry (ISAK. Para a verificação do ETM intra-avaliador, as medidas foram realizadas nos mesmos voluntários em dois dias diferentes; e, para a obtenção do ETM interavaliador, as medidas foram feitas em um mesmo grupo de voluntários, no mesmo dia, pelos três antropometristas. Os resultados apontaram ETMs não aceitáveis apenas para dois avaliadores na análise intra-avaliador. Os demais ETMs alcançaram resultados aceitáveis. Os ETMs não aceitáveis demonstram a necessidade de treinamento técnico dos antropometristas, de modo a minimizar a variabilidade constatada.Las medidas antropométricas están siendo ampliamente utilizadas para el acompañamiento y el desenvolvimiento de niños, en la verificación de las adaptaciones en respuesta a entrenamiento, en la seleción de atletas y en estudios de caracterización étnica, entre várias otras áreas. El control da la calidad de esas medidas va a resultar en datos mas confiables y medidas antropométricas mas precisas. El propósito del presente estudio es el de difundir la estrategia para la obtención del error técnico de medición (ETM, siguiendo la metodología de Kevin Norton y Tim Olds (2000 y evaluar el desempeño de empleados de laboratorio. Tres antropometristas del Laboratorio de Fisiologia del Ejercicio (Labofise de la Universidad del Brasil fueron evaluados. Ellos realizaron las medidas de pliegues cutáneos (Cescorf, 0.1mm en nueve diferentes puntos antropométricos de 35 voluntarios (25,45 ± 9,96 años. Para las medidas, fue adoptada la padronización de la International Society for Advancement in Kinanthropometry (ISAK. Para la verificación del ETM intra-evaluador, las medidas fueron realizadas en los mismos voluntarios en dos días diferentes; y, para la obtención del ETM inter-avaliador, las medidas fueron hechas en un mismo grupo de voluntarios, en el mesmo dia, por los tres antropometristas. Los resultados apuntaron ETMs no aceptables apenas para dos evaluadores en el análisis intra-evaluador. Los demás ETMs alcanzaron resultados aceptables. Los ETMs no aceptables demostraron la necesidad de entrenamiento técnico de los antropometristas, de modo de minimizar la variabilidad constatada.The anthropometrical measurements have been widely utilized to follow children's development, in the verification of the adaptations to the physical training in the athletes' selection, in studies of ethnic characterization, among others. The control of the precision and accuracy of the measurements will result in more reliable data. The objective of the present study was to diffuse the strategies to compute the technical error of measurement (TEM according to Kevin Norton's and Tim Olds methodology (2000 and to analyze the laboratory' trainees performance. Three beginner observers (anthropometrists of the Exercise Physiology Laboratory (Labofise of the University of Brazil were analyzed. They accomplished measures of skin folds thickness (Cescorf, 0.1 mm in nine different anthropometric points in 35 volunteers (25.45 ± 9.96 years. To accomplish the measures the International Society for Advancement in Kinanthropometry (ISAK was adopted. For the TEM intra-evaluator verification, the measures were accomplished in the same volunteers in two different days and, to obtain the inter-observers TEM, the measures were accomplished in a same group of volunteers, in the same day by the three evaluators. The results indicated not acceptable TEMs only for two evaluators in the intra-evaluator analysis. The other TEMs reached acceptable results. Not acceptable TEMs demonstrated the need of technical training of evaluators in order to minimize the variability verified.

  18. Medidas antropométricas segundo aptidão cardiorrespiratória em militares da ativa, Brasil Anthropometry and cardiorespiratory fitness of military men in active duty, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Almeida Magalhães Oliveira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as diferenças no índice de massa corporal (IMC e no perímetro da cintura segundo a aptidão cardiorrespiratória em militares do sexo masculino. MÉTODOS: A amostra constituiu-se de 50.523 homens da ativa do exército brasileiro. Os dados antropométricos (massa corporal, estatura e perímetro da cintura e de consumo máximo de oxigênio (VO2max, estimado por meio do teste de corrida de 12 minutos, foram obtidos no teste de aptidão física do ano 2001. RESULTADOS: A idade variou de 18 a 52 anos, porém foi composta em sua maioria por indivíduos jovens (média + DP = 25,8 + 6,6 anos de idade. A faixa de aptidão cardiorrespiratória variou de 22,2 a 82,5 mL O2.kg-1.min-1. Os valores médios do perímetro da cintura foram significativamente menores nos grupos de melhor aptidão cardiorrespiratória, quando comparados com os grupos com menor aptidão (pOBJECTIVE: To analyze differences in body mass index (BMI and waist circumference according to cardiorespiratory fitness in active military men. METHODS: The study sample comprised 50,523 active military men of the Brazilian army. Anthropometric measures (body mass, height, and waist circumference and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max information, estimated in a 12-min run, were obtained in a fitness test in 2001. RESULTS: Subjects' age ranged between 18 and 52 years, but most were young (mean + SD 25.8 + 6.6 years. Cardiorespiratory fitness varied from 22.2 to 82.5 mL.O2.kg-1.min-1. Waist circumference mean values were significantly lower in those subjects in the highest fitness level compared to those in the lowest level (p<0.001 even after adjusting for age, BMI, and both together. CONCLUSIONS: For the same BMI, military men with better cardiorespiratory fitness have significantly lower waist circumference measures compared to those with lower fitness. These findings suggest that military with better physical fitness have lower abdominal fat accumulation.

  19. A research for the improvement of the HF-010 anthropomentry data guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, In Seok; Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea); Lee, Dhong Ha [Suwon University, Whasung (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we forecasted Korean anthropometry data of 2010 year, that SinGori 1 and 2 will operate, using Korean physical condition survey data. To estimate anthropometry data of 2010 year, we extracted design elements (examples, standing type console, seating type console, leg space, workstation height, and etc) of Control Room regarding anthropometry data. Next we also extracted the design parameter(examples, benchboard depth, benchboard height, area of control layout on benchboard, area of display layout) from the design elements. Also, we extracted the anthropometry data measurement items regarding design parameters, and calculated the forecasting anthropometry data of the 2010 using Korean physical condition data of 1980, 1986, 1992 and 1997 year. Finally, we developed anthropometry design guidelines using forecasting anthropometry data. 8 refs., 6 figs., 23 tabs. (Author)

  20. The Accuracy Of Fuzzy Sugeno Method With Antropometry On Determination Natural Patient Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahputra, Dinur; Tulus; Sawaluddin

    2017-12-01

    Anthropometry is one of the processes that can be used to assess nutritional status. In general anthropometry is defined as body size in terms of nutrition, then anthropometry is reviewed from various age levels and nutritional levels. Nutritional status is a description of the balance between nutritional intake with the needs of the body individually. Fuzzy logic is a logic that has a vagueness between right and wrong or between 0 and 1. Sugeno method is used because in the process of calculating nutritional status so far is still done by anthropometry. Currently information technology is growing in any aspect, one of them in the aspect of calculation with data taken from anthropometry. In this case the calculation can use the Fuzzy Sugeno Method, in order to know the great accuracy obtained. Then the results obtained using fuzzy sugeno integrated with anthropometry has an accuracy of 81.48%.

  1. Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and anthropometry as cardiovascular risk factors and their association with dietary intakes in children from rural Cofimvaba, Eastern Cape, South Africa.

  2. JUST Vol 10 No. 3, December 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ben

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... However, for any of such utilities to effectively serve them, proper anthropometry of target users must be taken. The importance of anthropometry to designs of facilities, workspace and equipments for human use can not be overemphasized. This has neces- sitated a lot of researchers to carry out activities.

  3. Case Study: Match between School Furniture dimensions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The design of tools, equipment, machines, furniture, clothing and facility layout depends on the principles of anthropometry. This is to reduce accident and overuse syndromes in order to promote productivity as well as safety and wellbeing. Meanwhile the anthropometry data are not readily available. This study examined ...

  4. Chronic malnutrition in pregnant adolescents in rural Malawi: an anthropometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalanda, Boniface F.; Verhoeff, Francine H.; Brabin, Bernard J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The anthropometry of adolescent pregnancy has been little described in developing countries. This paper outlines the anthropometry of adolescents living in poor rural communities in southern Malawi. METHODS: A cross-sectional descriptive analysis of 991 women who attended for their first

  5. Nutritional management of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During this time, he received a semi- diet, oral nutritional supplements and a trial of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN). Anthropometry. At baseline, the patients' pre- and post-dialysis weight was recorded, including his measured weight loss over six months. The anthropometry measurements are summarised in Table I.

  6. Calf muscle volume estimates: Implications for Botulinum toxin treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Thomsen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    An optimal botulinum toxin dose may be related to the volume of the targeted muscle. We investigated the suitability of using ultrasound and anthropometry to estimate gastrocnemius and soleus muscle volume. Gastrocnemius and soleus muscle thickness was measured in 11 cadaveric human legs, using...... the volume of individual plantar flexor muscles using ultrasound and anthropometry. This possibility should be investigated further in living humans....

  7. Influence of maternal pelvis height and other anthropometric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In low resource settings, maternal anthropometry may complicate time based monitoring of childbirth. We set out to determine the effect of maternal anthropometry and foetal birth weight on the duration of childbirth. Birth related secondary data from 987 mothers with pregnancies of ≥ 37 weeks, singleton baby and a normal ...

  8. Antropometria de escolares ao ingresso no ensino fundamental na cidade de Belém, Pará, 2001 School aged anthropometry when enrolling in the first grade of elementary school in the city of Belém, Pará, 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Maria Domingues das Neves

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: realizar a antropometria em escolares da primeira série da rede pública estadual em Belém, Pará, como instrumento de vigilância nutricional e estudar as associações entre o estado nutricional e características biológicas e socioeconômicas. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados nutricionalmente 793 escolares, pelos escores z de estatura/idade e peso/estatura, segundo a Organização Mundial da Saúde. As variáveis biológicas e socioeconômicas foram: sexo, idade, naturalidade, idade de ingresso da criança na escola e escolaridade materna. Utilizou-se o teste qui-quadrado ao relacionar o estado nutricional com as variáveis. RESULTADOS: em 637 escolares observamos 16,6% de baixa estatura e risco de baixa estatura, 4,5% de desnutrição e risco de desnutrição, 7,4% de sobrepeso e obesidade. Não houve associação significante entre estado nutricional e sexo. A maioria das crianças nasceu na capital, ingressou tardiamente na escola e tinham mães com escolaridade >4 anos. Observou-se correlação significante entre obesidade e baixa estatura com menor escolaridade materna; risco de desnutrição e baixa estatura com o ingresso escolar tardio; e obesidade e estatura normal com o ingresso regular. CONCLUSÕES: a menor escolaridade materna e o ingresso tardio escolar estão associados à presença de desvios nutricionais. A vigilância nutricional escolar é importante para avaliar, tratar e prevenir os riscos para saúde e nutrição infantil.OBJECTIVES: to perform anthropometric measurements in elementary school students of the public school system of the State of Belém, Pará, as a tool for nutritional surveillance and to study associations between nutritional status and biological, social and economic characteristics. METHODS: 793 students were assessed for their nutritional status, by z scores of height/age and weight /height according to the World Health Organization criteria. Biological, social and economic variables were: gender, age, place of birth, age of school enrolment and maternal education level. The chi square test was used to relate nutritional status to variables. RESULTS: of the 637 students assessed, 16.6% were of low stature or in risk of low stature, 4.5% malnourished or in risk of malnourishment, 7.4% were overweight or obese. There was no significant association between nutritional status and gender. The majority of the children was born in the capital, was enrolled late in school and had mothers with education level of >4 years. There was a significant correlation between obesity and low stature with low maternal education level; malnutrition risk and low stature with late school enrolment; and obesity and normal stature with regular enrollment. CONCLUSIONS: low maternal school level and late school enrollment are associated to nutritional problems. School nutritional surveillance is important to assess, treat and prevent children's health and nutrition risks.

  9. Análise da aptidão física, da antropometria e da prevalência de sintomas osteomusculares na categoria infanto-juvenil do voleibol Analysis of physical fitness, anthropometry and prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the youth volleyball category

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Anza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O controle da ocorrência de lesões durante todo o processo de treinamento possui expressiva importância para o atleta, bem como o monitoramento das adaptações físicas decorrentes do programa de exercícios. OBJETIVOS: Descrever o perfil antropométrico e a aptidão física dos times de voleibol infanto-juvenil e determinar a prevalência de sintomas osteomusculares. Métodos: Estudo longitudinal. Participaram 38 atletas da categoria infanto-juvenil do voleibol monitorados por quatro meses através de testes de aptidão física, mensurações antropométricas e do questionário de sintomas osteomusculares. Foram utilizadas análises descritivas e comparativas através de médias e desvio padrão e teste t de Student. RESULTADOS: Os principais indicadores estatisticamente significativos observaram-se nas variáveis: estatura (p = 0,001 para o sexo masculino e 0,003 para o feminino envergadura para os meninos (p INTRODUCTION: The control of the occurrence of injuries throughout the training process and the monitoring of physical adaptations resulting from the exercise program present significant importance for the athlete. Objective: To describe the anthropometric profile and physical capacity of youth volleyball teams and determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms. METHODS: A longitudinal study where 38 athletes participated in the Children and Youth Volleyball category monitored for four months through physical fitness and anthropometric tests and questionnaire of musculoskeletal symptoms. Descriptive analysis and comparative means and standard deviations and t test were applied. RESULTS: The main statistically significant indicators observed were in the variables: height (p = 0.001 for males and 0.003 for females scale for males (p <0.001, pitch (p = 0.003 for boys and p <0.001 for girls, abdominal for girls (p = 0.001. The most prevalent symptoms were found in the back (56.5%, shoulder (52.2%, hips/thighs (52.2% and knees (52.2%. CONCLUSION: The profile of the athletes presented as main characteristics: increase in height, scale and explosive strength of upper limbs, abdominal strength and agility. The high frequency of affirmative responses to pain complaint on the back, upper and lower parts, shoulders, hips/thighs, knees and ankle reinforces the need for long-term monitoring of young athletes response to training and promotes prevention strategies.

  10. Statistical Analysis to Develop a Three-Dimensional Surface Model of a Midsize-Male Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    Anthropometry , Posture, Vehicle Occupants, Statistical Shape Analysis, Safety 16...Statement  A.  Approved  for  Public  Release    4   INTRODUCTION   Three-­‐dimensional   anthropometry  has  been  widely...analysis  methods.  A  sample  of  foot  scans  was  drawn  from  a  much   larger  study  of  soldier   anthropometry

  11. Estimation of hand index for male industrial workers of Haryana State

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1*Department of Mechanical Engineering, Krishna Institute of Engineering & Technology Ghaziabad, INDIA. 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Kurukshetra, INDIA. 3Department of Civil ...... Anthropometry of elderly people in the Netherlands: research and applications. Applied ...

  12. Validity of anthropometric measurements to assess body composition, including muscle mass, in 3-year-old children from the SKOT cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Marie; Mølgaard, Christian; Ejlerskov, Katrine Tschentscher

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional status of children is commonly assessed by anthropometry both in under and overnutrition. The link between anthropometry and body fat, the body compartment most affected by overnutrition, is well known, but the link with muscle mass, the body compartment most depleted in undernutrition...... to estimate muscle mass. Overall, anthropometric measures were more effective to measure absolute size of fat, lean and muscle mass than their relative sizes. Proportion of the variance explained by anthropometry was 79% for lean mass, 76% for fat mass and 74% for muscle mass. For fat mass and lean mass......, which included only mid-upper arm circumference and subscapular skinfold. The power of height in the weight-to-height ratio to determine fat mass proportion was 1.71 with a 95% confidence interval (0.83-2.60) including the value of 2 used in body mass index (BMI). Limitations of anthropometry to assess...

  13. Factor Analysis of Measures of Nutritional Status of Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, H. A.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    On the basis of the findings of this study, it is reasonable to recommend elimination of some of the demography, anthropometry, and biochemical indices commonly evaluated in nutritional surveys of U.S. preschool children. (DM)

  14. Biochemical and anthropometric correlates of bio-electrical impedance parameters in severely malnourished children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girma, Tsinuel; Nielsen, Anne-Louise Hother; Kæstel, Pernille

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite expanding use of bio-impedance (BI), little is known about its pathophysiologic significance and biological correlates OBJECTIVE: Determine correlations of BI parameters with anthropometry and biomarkers of electrolyte homeostasis, inflammation and liver function in children...

  15. Food Insecurity, Malnutrition and Crude Oil Spillage in a Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , external control group study design, with a semi-structured questionnaire and anthropometry as the study tools. The study ... Keywords: Pipeline oil spill, household food security, malnutrition, rural community, Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of ...

  16. Morbidity and nutrition status of rural drug-naïve Kenyan women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CD4, CD8, and total lymphocyte counts), anaemia, malaria, and pregnancy status. Intradermal skin testing with tuberculin (PPD), candida, and tetanus toxoid antigens was also performed to evaluate cell-mediated immunity. Anthropometry was ...

  17. Validation of a simple method for measuring cranial deformities (plagiocephalometry)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Adrichem, Léon N. A.; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Cadanová, Dominika; Helders, Paul J. M.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.; van Neck, Han J. W.; Koning, Anton H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial measuring is essential for diagnosis or evaluation of growth and therapies. Skull deformities in children are mainly caused by craniosynostosis or by external pressure in positional skull deformations. Traditional anthropometry does not sufficiently analyze craniofacial shape. In

  18. Genetics of dietary habits and obesity - a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Ann Louise

    2010-01-01

    mass, but only limited evidence for associations between habitual dietary intake and anthropometry exists. Differences in habitual dietary intake are also partly determined by differences in genes influencing smell and taste preferences. But, so far, only few studies have investigated genetic...... exposures as well as genetic differences between individuals, resulting in differentiated susceptibility to environmental exposures. The evidence for genetic influence on anthropometry has previously been established and has been estimated to be 60-70% based on twin studies. These inter...... influences on dietary intake in adults and the interplay between diet, genes and obesity. The focus of the thesis was to investigate the genetic and environmental influence on habitual diet and obesity as well as the association between habitual diet and anthropometry. The thesis is based on structural...

  19. Predicting total, abdominal, visceral and hepatic adiposity with circulating biomarkers in Caucasian and Japanese American women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unhee Lim

    Full Text Available Characterization of abdominal and intra-abdominal fat requires imaging, and thus is not feasible in large epidemiologic studies.We investigated whether biomarkers may complement anthropometry (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference [WC], and waist-hip ratio [WHR] in predicting the size of the body fat compartments by analyzing blood biomarkers, including adipocytokines, insulin resistance markers, sex steroid hormones, lipids, liver enzymes and gastro-neuropeptides.Fasting levels of 58 blood markers were analyzed in 60 healthy, Caucasian or Japanese American postmenopausal women who underwent anthropometric measurements, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. Total, abdominal, visceral and hepatic adiposity were predicted based on anthropometry and the biomarkers using Random Forest models.Total body fat was well predicted by anthropometry alone (R(2 = 0.85, by the 5 best predictors from the biomarker model alone (leptin, leptin-adiponectin ratio [LAR], free estradiol, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI1], alanine transaminase [ALT]; R(2 = 0.69, or by combining these 5 biomarkers with anthropometry (R(2 = 0.91. Abdominal adiposity (DXA trunk-to-periphery fat ratio was better predicted by combining the two types of predictors (R(2 = 0.58 than by anthropometry alone (R(2 = 0.53 or the 5 best biomarkers alone (25(OH-vitamin D(3, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 [IGFBP1], uric acid, soluble leptin receptor [sLEPR], Coenzyme Q10; R(2 = 0.35. Similarly, visceral fat was slightly better predicted by combining the predictors (R(2 = 0.68 than by anthropometry alone (R(2 = 0.65 or the 5 best biomarker predictors alone (leptin, C-reactive protein [CRP], LAR, lycopene, vitamin D(3; R(2 = 0.58. Percent liver fat was predicted better by the 5 best biomarker predictors (insulin, sex hormone binding globulin [SHBG], LAR, alpha-tocopherol, PAI1; R(2 = 0.42 or by combining the predictors (R(2 = 0

  20. Nutritional knowledge, nutrients intake and nutritional status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at assessing the anthropometry, dietary intake and micronutrient status of hypertensive patients attending specialist hospitals in Ondo State, Nigeria. A descriptive case control study was conducted among subjects attending two specialist hospitals located in Akure and Ondo towns. A total of 452 subjects ...

  1. Biomechanical, anthropometrical and physical profile of elite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literature indicates that deficiencies of certain parameters such as biomechanics, anthropometry, physical and motor abilities, may influence a netball players susceptibility to injury, as well as the players physical performance during a game. The primary aim of this study was to determine the physical profile of elite netball ...

  2. Low-Income, African American Adolescent Mothers and Their Toddlers Exhibit Similar Dietary Variety Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Mia A.; Hurley, Kristen M.; Quigg, Anna M.; Oberlander, Sarah E.; Black, Maureen M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between maternal and toddler dietary variety. Design: Longitudinal; maternal and toddler dietary data were collected at 13 months; anthropometry was collected at 13 and 24 months. Setting: Data were collected in homes. Participants: 109 primiparous, low-income, African American adolescent mothers and…

  3. Personal Equipment and Clothing Correction Factors for the Australian Army: A Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Functional Limitations Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine, No.96-CR-22. [3] Paquette, S.P., Case, H.W, Annis., J.F., Mayfield...Anthropometry, Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte, Vol. 11, No 1 – Jan/Feb. [13] Norton, I. N, Olds, T and Australian Sports Commission (1996

  4. Abiola-Ogedengbe, AK

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abiola-Ogedengbe, AK. Vol 28, No 3 (2008) - Articles Anthropometry Survey of Nigeria Paraplegics Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0855-0395. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL ...

  5. Nutritional status of primary school children in Enugu, Nigeria using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition in children can co-exist as under- and over-nutrition in the same population with varying attendant medical risks. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the nutritional status of primary school children in Enugu North LGA, using anthropometry. Methodology: This was a cross sectional descriptive study ...

  6. Body composition indicators of 7-14 year Andibila children in Oju ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropometry provides a useful indicator, both for growth and nutritional assessment. The Andibila is an isolated population living at the Andibila mountain characterized by aboriginal lifestyle. Their anthropometrical profile is undocumented. This study presents the anthropometric and body composition profiles of Andibila ...

  7. Modelling Developmental Changes in Repeated-Sprint Ability by Chronological and Skeletal Ages in Young Soccer Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente-dos-Santos, J.; Coelho-e-Silva, M. J.; Martins, R. A.; Figueiredo, A. J.; Cyrino, E. S.; Sherar, L. B.; Vaeyens, R.; Huijgen, B. C. H.; Elferink-Gemser, M. T.; Malina, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of chronological (CA) and skeletal ages (SA), anthropometry, aerobic endurance and lower limb explosive strength on developmental changes in repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in soccer players aged 11-17 years. Participants were annually followed over 5 years,

  8. Plain Radiographic Cephalometry of the Sella turcica : An Overview ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The simplest of the parameters in anthropometry, including, height, weight, length, thickness and widths of various parts of the body vary from tribe to tribe and from one race to the other, and measurements of these parameters also differ amongst different age groups and between the two sexes as well. Method: ...

  9. Cohort profile: Mysore parthenon birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Veena, Sargoor R; Hill, Jacqueline C; Karat, Samuel C; Fall, Caroline H D

    2015-02-01

    The Mysore Parthenon Birth Cohort was established to examine the long-term effects of maternal glucose tolerance and nutritional status on cardiovascular disease risk factors in the offspring. During 1997-98, 830 of 1233 women recruited from the antenatal clinics of the Holdsworth Memorial Hospital (HMH), Mysore, India, underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Of these, 667 women delivered live babies at HMH. Four babies with major congenital anomalies were excluded, and the remaining 663 were included for further follow-up. The babies had detailed anthropometry at birth and at 6-12-monthly intervals subsequently. Detailed cardiovascular investigations were done at ages 5, 9.5 and 13.5 years in the children, and in the parents at the 5-year and 9.5-year follow-ups. This ongoing study provides extensive data on serial anthropometry and body composition, physiological and biochemical measures, dietary intake, nutritional status, physical activity measures, stress reactivity measures and cognitive function, and socio-demographic parameters for the offspring. Data on anthropometry, cardiovascular risk factors and nutritional status are available for mothers during pregnancy. Anthropometry and risk factor measures are available for both parents at follow-up. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  10. Anthropometric, fitness and technical skill characteristics of elite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The information may have important implications for the success of soccer players and teams and could guide coaches in the selection process. Keywords: Soccer, aerobic fitness, anaerobic fitness, technical skills, anthropometry. African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance(AJPHERD) Vol. 18, No.

  11. EVALUASI DATA ANTROPOMETRI ANAK-ANAK USIA 4-6 TAHUN DI JAWA TIMUR DAN APLIKASI PADA PERANCANGAN FASILITAS BELAJAR DI SEKOLAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Herawati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometry data realy important towards learning facilities design. Comfortness and functional of table an chair have correlation with physical structure of the user. Many study for 6-18 years old in anthropometry data, but for 4-6 years old children there’s no specific anthropometry data.in this research, anthropometry data for 4-6 years old child were analyze and applied to the school facilities design. 550 children from 50 schools in East Java were measured, they consist of 259 girls and 291 boys. Average weight of the boys is 21.40kg with 9.23 standard deviation; the girls average weight is 19,91kg with 5.5 standard deviation. From the body dimension gathered from this research could be applied in desigining learning facilities, such as computer table and chair. Another body dimension also used to determine seat’s width, back support’s height, etc, considering the percentile which is appropriate for each adjustment.

  12. Interaction between Genetic Predisposition to Adiposity and Dietary Protein in Relation to Subsequent Change in Body Weight and Waist Circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Larsen, Sofus C; Angquist, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic predisposition to adiposity may interact with dietary protein in relation to changes of anthropometry. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interaction between genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI...

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compared across groups using Student's t-test, association between anthropometry and PSA was by Spearman's correlation .... incidence, aggressiveness, and fatality of. CaP have been inconsistent.9 A study of a very lean ... indices of early life hormonal milieu, are reported risk factors for aggressive and metastatic CaP.

  14. RJHS 3(4b).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Methods: 173 students (109 females and 64 males) students aged 18 – 30 years with no prior diagnosis of any component trait of MetS participated in the study. We obtained anthropometry, blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and complete lipid profile of the participants. MetS was defined using the modified ...

  15. Which Food Patterns Are Predictors of Obesity in Tehranian Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Djazaieri, Seyed-Abolghasem; Mirmiran, Parvin; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether changes in food patterns over a period of 6 years were related to obesity in Tehranian adults. Design: Data on dietary intake, using the food frequency questionnaire, and anthropometry were obtained in 2 periods of the survey (1999-2001 and 2005-2007). Setting: Participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.…

  16. Guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.; Bocast, A. K.; Stewart, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The anthropometry, workstation design, and environmental design of control rooms are outlined. The automated interface and VDTs and displays and various modes of communication between the system and the human operator using VDTs are discussed. The man in the loop is examined, the single controller single task framework and multiple controller multiple tasks issues are considered.

  17. lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and anthropometry as cardiovascular risk factors and their association with dietary .... Training included sessions on ethical and general research philosophies applicable to ... the training sessions whereby the fieldworkers had to interview and complete multiple 24-hour.

  18. Physical Activity, Dietary Intake and Anthropometric Indices of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moruf

    studies, weight loss in subjects that consumed a low-fat, high-fibre diet (3.4 kg ... moderate-intensity PA is also well-established as an important .... of fat. This proportionality in normalcy of body anthropometry and fat consumption could be explained in light of the fact that the high energy density of fat may promote excess ...

  19. Paradigm shift: efficient and cost effective real-time nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For several decades, nutritional anthropometry has been used in the assessment of nutritional status and growth monitoring for individuals and at population level. Techniques, equipment and standardization procedures endorsed by The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and The World Health Organization (WHO) ...

  20. Echocardiographic evaluation of the heart repercussions of different sport modalities in athletes of high yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, Angel Maria; Melo, German; Conde, Carlos Arturo; Vesga, Boris Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    The paper compares anthropometry and echocardiographic changes secondary to longest training in elite athletes. They were not differences in the ejection fraction, stroke volume and systolic wall stress. Differences were found in septum thickness, posterior wall thickness in dynamic and combined groups. This finding suggest morphological changes similar to left ventricular hypertrophy

  1. Intravascular catheter related infections in children admitted on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peripheral venous intravascular catheters uncoated with no antibiotic or antiseptic, was done. Social demographic characteristics, anthropometry, clinical examination including the catheter site were determined at enrollment. The children had their blood, catheter tip and hub samples taken off for culture and sensitivity as ...

  2. Physical Education, Sports and the Sciences: Papers Presented in Honor of H. Harrison Clarke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhoff, Jan, Ed.

    The papers included in this publication encompass research studies in physical fitness, the physiology of exercise, anthropometry, motor learning, teaching methodology, and personality. Many of these papers accentuate physical components; others identify different variables in the composite of personality such as the mental, social, and emotional…

  3. Comfort, experience, physiology and car seat innovation : Theory, Design and Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    The development process of car seats is very complex and many factors have to be considered in the development, such as anthropometry, physiology, safety, design and comfort. A factor making it more complex is the fact that future cars should be more sustainable, making the need for weight reduction

  4. Screening Obesity by Direct and Derived Anthropometric Indices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and/or awful consequences of obesity on female health particularly, during the reproductive years. ... female undergraduates of Kolkata. Keywords: Anthropometry, Blood pressure, Body mass index, Conicity index, Obesity, Physical fitness,. Waist‑to‑hip ratio ..... spermatogenesis and oxidative stress markers in adult rats.

  5. Transposed intrathoracic stomach: Functional evaluation | Jain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients and Methods: Children who had undergone gastric transposition more than 5 years ago were evaluated for symptoms, anthropometry, anaemia, duodenogastric refl ux, pulmonary function, gastric emptying, gastric pH, gastroesophageal refl ux and stricture, gastric motility, and gastritis and atrophy on histological

  6. Anthropometric comparison of Anthropometric Test Device (ATD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropometric test device (ATD) is surrogate used in automotive crash testing. Female ATDs used worldwide in the evaluation of vehicle safety performance was produced based on anthropometry of U.S. population. This work is aimed at assessing the difference between the anthropometric dimensions of Nigerian female ...

  7. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ebenebe, EU. Vol 23, No 4 (2010) - Articles Breastfeeding pattern, anthropometry and health status of infants attending child welfare clinics of a teaching hospital in Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2078-6204. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about ...

  8. Age specific sex differences in BMI and skin fold thickness among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An important phenomenon occurring in human population is the variation in their physical morphology. The physical dimensions of human body are influenced by geographical, racial, age and gender factors. Physical anthropometry provides the technique by which human body dimensions can be evaluated and measured.

  9. OpenSimulator Interoperability with DRDC Simulation Tools: Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    equipment work with the human body and the brain’s cognitive abilities. It incorporates the disciplines of engineering and psychology , anthropometry...default colours provided. Figure 10 shows the clothing textures used to customize the avatar in Figure 8. Figure 8: Default “Ruth” Avatar (left

  10. comparison of clinical and laboratory profile of haart adherent and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    HAART. Adherence was measured using an adapted adult AIDS clinical trial group (AACTG) with optimal adherence set at ≥95%. Clinical stage, anthropometry, CD4, total lymphocyte and haemoglobin were used to monitor clinical, immunological and haematological outcome of adherence. Result: The mean (SD) age of ...

  11. Prevalence of obesity among undergraduate students, living in halls ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the prevalence of obesity among undergraduate students was conducted at University of. Nigeria Nsukka campus, Enugu, State, in the South Eastern partof Nigeria. A tota of 620 male andfemale students were randomly selected for the study. A structured and validated questionnaire and anthropometry were used ...

  12. Sex and age specific prediction formulas for estimating body composition from bioelectrical impedance : a cross-validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, P.; van der Kooy, K; Leenen, R; Weststrate, J A; Seidell, J C

    In 827 male and female subjects, with a large variation in body composition and an age range of 7-83 years, body composition was measured by densitometry, anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance. The relationship between densitometrically determined fat free mass (FFM) with body impedance (R),

  13. Evaluation of a Family-Centred Children's Weight Management Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinks, Annette; English, Sue; Coufopoulos, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in-depth quantitative and qualitative evaluation of a family-based weight loss and healthy life style programme for clinically obese children in England. Design/methodology/approach: The mixed method case study evaluation used included obtaining pre and post measurements of anthropometry and a…

  14. growth and nutrition in south african children with cystic fibrosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population. Thirty-eight children and adolescents attending the CF clinic at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital,. Cape Town. Methods. Standard anthropometry and a 3-day weighed food record. Results. Median percentage expected weight for height. (WFH) was 93 (interquartile range 84 - 101). Sixteen per cent.

  15. Growth and nutrition in South African children with cystic fibrosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population. Thirty-eight children and adolescents attending the CF clinic at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town. Methods. Standard anthropometry and a 3-day weighed food record. Results. Median percentage expected weight for height (WFH) was 93 (interquartile range 84 - 101). Sixteen per cent of ...

  16. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition - Vol 23, No 4 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breastfeeding pattern, anthropometry and health status of infants attending child welfare clinics of a teaching hospital in Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AU Ukegbu, EU Ebenebe, PO Ukegbu ...

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship of age, anthropometry and haemoglobin concentration with echocardiographic findings in Nigerian children with sickle cell anaemia. Abstract PDF · Vol 40, No 2 ... Age and gender-related fat mass index and fat- free mass index patterns among adolescents in Surulere LGA, Lagos Abstract PDF · Vol 41, No 4 ...

  18. The current pattern of gestational age-related anthropometric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current pattern of gestational age-related anthropometric parameters of term Nigerian neonates. O Oluwafemi,1 FWACP; F Njokanma,2 FWACP; E Disu,2 ... Weight and length at birth reflect the quality of intra-uterine growth and exert a strong influence on postnatal survival. ..... Neonatal anthropometry: The thin-fat.

  19. Health impact assessment of Solar Disinfection (SODIS) of drinking water in three African countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    du Preez, M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available ...................................................................... 50 2.6.1.2 Anthropometry.................................................................... 51 2.7 PHASE 5: POST-SURVEY COMPLIANCE .................................................... 53 2.8 PHASE 6: DATA ANALYSIS... .......................................................................................... 62 3.8 ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH OUTCOMES ..................................................... 64 3.8.1 Analysis Approach............................................................................. 64 3.8.2 Data summary...

  20. Relation of height, body mass, energy intake, and physical activity to risk of renal cell carcinoma: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, B.A.C. van; Schouten, L.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Data from the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer were used to investigate the association between anthropometry, energy intake, and physical activity and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer consists of 120,852 men and women aged 55-69 years

  1. Height, weight, weight change, and ovarian cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted to investigate the relation between anthropometry and the risk of ovarian cancer, their results have been inconsistent. The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer was initiated in 1986. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk

  2. Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Rivera, C.; Hunter, D.J.; Spiegelman, D.; Adami, H.-O.; Arslan, A.; Beeson, W.L.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Buring, J.E.; Folsom, A.R.; Fraser, G.E.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Hankinson, S.E.; Lacey Jr., J.V.; Leitzmann, M.; Lukanova, A.; Marshall, J.R.; Miller, A.B.; Patel, A.V.; Rodriguez, C.; Rohan, T.E.; Ross, J.A.; Wolk, A.; Zhang, S.M.; Smith-Warner, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although many studies have investigated the association between anthropometry and ovarian cancer risk, results have been inconsistent. Methods: The associations of height, body mass index (BMI), and ovarian cancer risk were examined in a pooled analysis of primary data from 12

  3. Spinal complications in osteogenesis imperfecta: 47 patients 1-16 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, R. H.; Gerver, W. J.; Breslau-Siderius, L. J.; van der Graaf, Y.; Pruijs, H. E.; van Doorne, J. M.; Beemer, F. A.; Helders, P. J.

    1998-01-01

    We examined in a cross-sectional study, 47 children (mean age 7.7 (1-16) years) with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) to find the prevalence of spinal deformities and to correlate these observations with anthropometry. The associations between dentinogenesis imperfecta, joint hypermobility and spinal

  4. All projects related to | Page 428 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2008-06-30

    Start Date: June 30, 2008. End Date: June 30, 2009. Topic: ANTHROPOMETRY, DIAGNOSIS, MALNUTRITION, EARLY CHILDHOOD. Region: India, Central Asia, Far East Asia, South Asia. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 41,300.00. Sensitive Index to Assess Risk of Morbidity in Undernutrition.

  5. Identification of obesity and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Preetha L

    2014-02-01

    Obesity in the child and adolescent population is a growing problem. This article discusses the identification of obesity and overweight youth using body mass index and anthropometry and reviews literature to show the relationship between obesity and premature cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exclusive breastfeedingand postnatal changes in maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To evaluate the impact of exclusive breastfeeding (EBFing) practice on maternal anthropometry during the first 6months of birth. Measurement of weight, height, triceps skin-fold thickness (TST), and mid-arm circumference (MAC) was carried out in a matched cohort of women practicing EBFing and those using other ...

  7. Comfort and human factors in office and residential settings. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning human factors engineering, anthropometry, and ergonomics as they relate to human comfort in the office and home. Human requirements, including ventilation, temperature control, and lighting, are considered. Research regarding environmental architecture, and engineering, safety, and convenience aspects are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 142 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Correlation of Anthropometric Measurements with Renal Sizes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Renal dimensions are important for diagnosis and prognosis of nephropathies. These dimensions may be dependent on age and growth parameters. Is there any relationship between renal size and the derivatives of anthropometry? To determine the renal sizes in children sonographically and to correlate ...

  9. Anthropometric Evaluation of Nutritional Status for Patients with End ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition affecting 40 to 70% of patients with end-stage renal disease. Cause of malnutrition in patients with chronic renal disease include of a lower food intake, decreased intestinal absorption and digestion, and metabolic acidosis. The presence of malnutrition is usually suspected from anthropometry or ...

  10. The influence of maternal socio-economic status on infant feeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive, cross sectional survey was to determine whether maternal socio-economic status has any influence on infant feeding practices and infant anthropometry of HIV exposed infants. Information was collected from 125 mother-infant pairs who presented at the health clinic with infants ...

  11. Evaluation of Anthropometric Status of Hausas of Northern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropometry is a branch of anthropology that deals with the measurements of various parts of human body which are expected to grow predictably and proportionately. The aim of this work was to study some of the anthropometric parameters of the Hausa people residing in Kano, northwestern Nigeria. Anthropometric ...

  12. Platelet function, anthropometric and metabolic variables in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Platelet function, anthropometric and metabolic variables in Nigerian Type 2 Diabetic patients. ... (BSA) were assessed as indices of anthropometry, fasting blood sugar (FBS), plasma cholesterol and triglycerides (TAG) were determined using standard method and platelet aggregation test was done on the whole blood.

  13. Orbital measurements among the ethnic groups of Plateau State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cephalomerty is a branch of anthropometry that describes measurement of head and face in cadaveric, living, or radiological specimen. This aspect of physical anthropology has been widely used in a substantial aspect of medicine. Of particular relevance in this study is its application in the field of ophthalmology and ...

  14. Immunization and Nutritional Status Survey of Children in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We therefore, studied the anthropometry, and the coverage of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) vaccines in randomly selected rural communities of Sokoto State. Design: Cross-sectional randomized study. Method: One hundred and fifteen mothers of children present at the randomly chosen sites on the ...

  15. The role of diabetes co-morbidity for tuberculosis treatment outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George

    2012-01-01

    Due to the association between diabetes and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), diabetes may threaten the control of TB. In a prospective cohort study nested in a nutrition trial, we investigated the role of diabetes on changes in anthropometry, grip strength, and clinical parameters over a five months...

  16. The Effect of Gravidity on Anthropometric Indices of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropometry in pregnancy is a comparative measure of size, proportion and composition of the body in relation to pregnancy. Anthropometric indices are useful in the assessment of nutritional status of pregnant women and predicting pregnancy outcome. To determine the effect of gravidity on anthropometric indices of ...

  17. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr Olusoji

    Table 6 shows that all obese subjects (100%) had adolescence, 581 (67.2%) were in mid-adolescence attained menarche, while the underweight category while 139 (16.1%) were in late adolescence. had the least proportion (88.9%) of post menarcheal subjects. This relationship was. Anthropometry of the subjects.

  18. Birth by cesarean section in relation to adult offspring overweight and biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Halldorsson, T I; Olsen, S F

    2018-01-01

    : The Danish Fetal Origins Cohort enrolled 965 pregnant women in 1988-1989. In 2008, a follow-up study of the offspring was completed. The offspring were invited to participate in a clinical examination with measurements of anthropometry and a fasting blood sample (n=443). In addition, 252 offspring completed...

  19. Bone mineral density and body composition in Noonan's syndrome: effects of growth hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, C.; Span, J.; van Rijn, R. R.; Gomes-Jardin, E.; van Kuijk, C.; Otten, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition in children with Noonan's syndrome (NS) before and during growth hormone (GH) treatment. Sixteen children (12 boys, 4 girls) with NS aged 5.8-14.2 (mean 10.0) years were studied for 2 years. Anthropometry, BMD measurements by radiographic

  20. Hemoglobin, Growth, and Attention of Infants in Southern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubuchon-Endsley, Nicki L.; Grant, Stephanie L.; Berhanu, Getenesh; Thomas, David G.; Schrader, Sarah E.; Eldridge, Devon; Kennedy, Tay; Hambidge, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Male and female infants from rural Ethiopia were tested to investigate relations among hemoglobin (Hb), anthropometry, and attention. A longitudinal design was used to examine differences in attention performance from 6 (M = 24.9 weeks, n = 89) to 9 months of age (M = 40.6 weeks, n = 85), differences hypothesized to be related to changes in iron…

  1. Whole-Grain Intake, Reflected by Dietary Records and Biomarkers, Is Inversely Associated with Circulating Insulin and Other Cardiometabolic Markers in 8- to 11-Year-Old Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla T.; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Tetens, Inge

    2017-01-01

    in children.Methods: We collected cross-sectional data on parental education, puberty, diet by 7-d records, and physical activity by accelerometry and measured anthropometry, fat mass index by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and blood pressure in 713 Danish children aged 8-11 y. Fasting blood samples were...

  2. High prevalence of abnormal liver enzymes in South African patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of liver function test abnormalities in South African black and Indian adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending a tertiary diabetes clinic. iabetes clinic. Recorded data included the past medical and drug history, history of alcohol abuse, anthropometry, lipid profile and liver ...

  3. Prenatal pesticide exposure and PON1 genotype associated with adolescent body fat distribution evaluated by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinggaard, Jeanette; Wohlfahrt-Veje, C.; Husby, S

    2016-01-01

    Many modern pesticides have endocrine disrupting abilities and early-life exposure may affect growth and disease risk later in life. Previously, we reported associations between prenatal pesticide exposure and higher childhood body fat content measured by anthropometry. The associations were...... affected by child PON1 Q192R genotype. We aimed to study whether prenatal pesticide exposure was still associated with body fat content and distribution in the children at puberty and the potential impact of both maternal and child PON1 Q192R genotype. In this prospective cohort study of 247 children born...... by occupationally exposed or unexposed women (greenhouse workers and controls) two follow-up examinations (age 10-15 and 11-16 years) including simple anthropometry, skinfold measurements, pubertal staging and blood sampling were performed. Total and regional fat% was determined by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA...

  4. Iron deficiency anemia in an urban slum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumante, N M; Kanvinde, S; Sanwalka, N J; Vaidya, M V; Khadilkar, A V

    2008-04-01

    Of this pilot study was to assess the iron status and dietary intake of 1-3 year-old apparently healthy toddlers of the lower socio-economic class, and the effect of eight weeks intervention with liquid oral iron in an urban slum in Pune, India. 50 toddlers (M= 25, F= 25) with mean age of 2.4 years (SD 0.82) were evaluated. Anthropometry, Food Frequency Questionnaire, a hemogram and ferritin were measured. Twenty mg of elemental iron was given to all toddlers. After 8 weeks clinical examination, anthropometry, hemoglobin (HGB) and Ferritin were measured. Prevalence of anemia was 66% (HGB fight against anemia and prescribe iron to all toddlers when they are seen for minor ailments.

  5. 1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonvig, Cilius Esmann; Chabanova, Elizaveta; Andersson, Ehm Astrid

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children. METHODS: Fasting plasma...... glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years. RESULTS: In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences...... associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol. CONCLUSION: Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased...

  6. An analysis of structure strength and ergonomic value of mechanical systems of integrated kidney and thyroid diagnosis device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M-Awwaluddin Tri Hardjanto; Abdul Jalil

    2016-01-01

    The has been performed to ensure the security of the device, understand the patient's as well as operator problem and complaints, as part of the efforts to improve the performance of these devices. The analysis is done by calculating the strength of arm, the main frame chairs, and frame backrest patients, as well as analyzing the static anthropometry data for Indonesian man to determine the size of the dental chair and adjusting the size of the seat. We also use the dynamic anthropometry data for Indonesian man to determine the layout and range of movement of the operator while operating the integrated device The analysis showed that the structure is safe because the actual stress that occurs is still below the limit value of 248 MPa. The device also has good ergonomic value so that it can be bulk produced. (author)

  7. Validation of bioelectrical-impedance analysis as a measurement of change in body composition in obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, R.F.; Kunigk, A.; Alspaugh, M.; Andronis, P.T.; Leitch, C.A.; Schoeller, D.A. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The bioelectrical-impedance-analysis (BIA) method accurately measures body composition in weight-stable subjects. This study validates the use of BIA to measure change in body composition. Twelve obese females underwent weight loss at a mean rate of 1.16 kg/wk. Body composition was measured by deuterium oxide dilution (D2O), BIA, and skinfold anthropometry (SFA) at baseline and at 5% decrements in weight. Highly significant correlations were obtained between D2O and BIA (r = 0.971) and between D2O and SFA (r = 0.932). Overall, BIA predicted change in fat-free mass with greater accuracy (to 0.4 kg) and precision (+/- 1.28 kg) than did anthropometry (to 0.8 kg and +/- 2.58 kg, respectively). We conclude that BIA is a useful clinical method for measuring change in body composition.

  8. Spacesuit Glove-Induced Hand Trauma and Analysis of Potentially Related Risk Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvat, Chacqueline M.; Norcross, Jason; Reid, Christopher R.; McFarland, Shane M.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity (EVA). When the gloves are pressurized, they restrict movement and create pressure points during tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally more severe injuries such as onycholysis. Glove injuries, both anecdotal and recorded, have been reported during EVA training and flight persistently through NASA's history regardless of mission or glove model. Theories as to causation such as glove-hand fit are common but often lacking in supporting evidence. Previous statistical analysis has evaluated onycholysis in the context of crew anthropometry only. The purpose of this study was to analyze all injuries (as documented in the medical records) and available risk factor variables with the goal to determine engineering and operational controls that may reduce hand injuries due to the EVA glove in the future. A literature review and data mining study were conducted between 2012 and 2014. This study included 179 US NASA crew who trained or completed an EVA between 1981 and 2010 (crossing both Shuttle and ISS eras) and wore either the 4000 Series or Phase VI glove during Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit EVA training and flight. All injuries recorded in medical records were analyzed in their association to candidate risk factor variables. Those risk factor variables included demographic characteristics, hand anthropometry, glove fit characteristics, and training/EVA characteristics. Utilizing literature, medical records and anecdotal causation comments recorded in crewmember injury data, investigators were able to identify several risk factors associated with increased risk of glove related injuries. Prime among them were smaller hand anthropometry, duration of individual suited exposures, and improper glove-hand fit as calculated by the difference in the anthropometry middle finger length compared to the baseline EVA glove middle finger length.

  9. Medición volumétrica de grasa visceral abdominal con resonancia magnética y su relación con antropometría, en una población diabética

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano García,Cristóbal; Barrera,Francisco; Labbé,Pilar; Liberona,Jessica; Arrese,Marco; Irarrázabal,Pablo; Tejos,Cristián; Uribe,Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Background: Visceral fat accumulation is associated with the development of metabolic diseases. Anthropometry is one of the methods used to quantify it. aim: to evaluate the relationship between visceral adipose tissue volume (VAT), measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and anthropometric indexes, such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), in type 2 diabetic patients (DM2). Patients and Methods: Twenty four type 2 diabetic patients aged 55 to 78 years (15 females) a...

  10. Defense of Defense Human Factors Engineering Technical Advisory Group Meeting Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE JUL 2012 2. REPORT TYPE...Ford, J; Human Systems Integration Considerations for Multi-Aircraft Control (MAC) of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) • Bryant, AR; Empirical...Survivability ( Plaga ) • Wright, N; OSD and DSOC Helicopter Seating Studies Zehner, G; An Overview of USAF Anthropometry Plaga , J & Hill; SAFE Association

  11. Liggaamsamestelling, groeivertraging en fisieke aktiwiteit van swart adolessente in 'n dorpsgemeenskap : PLAY studie / D. Naude

    OpenAIRE

    Naude, Dollien

    2010-01-01

    In South Africa a remarkable weight gain is found in black adolescent girls during mid-adolescence, which is not necessarily the case among boys (Kalk, 2001:577) . Anthropometry is one of the most basic methods for determining over-nutrition and malnutrition status. A considerable amount of research is indeed done on obesity, and quite an amount on growth stunting (OS), but few interventions exist for prevention and treatment of OS. The World Health Organization (WHO) has determined that appr...

  12. : tous les projets | Page 387 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: ANTHROPOMETRY, DIAGNOSIS, MALNUTRITION, EARLY CHILDHOOD. Région: India, Central Asia, Far East Asia, South Asia. Programme: Santé des mères et des enfants. Financement total : CA$ 41,300.00. Mise au point d'un indice précis pour évaluer le risque de morbidité associé à la sous-alimentation. Projet.

  13. The comparison of 7 different classes (4th grade, from 7 different countries (fitness tests in a comenius project - ted´s project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Amoroso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 9 testswere performed to check whether there are statistically significant differences among the seven countries studied. The countries with the best results are those where children are more autonomous, with a more active lifestyle. In terms of anthropometry, we did not get results with great differences. But we have learned, the countries who have more hour of PE during the year, have best results.

  14. The status of diabetes care in Mexican population: are we making a difference? Results of the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 El cuidado de la diabetes en población mexicana: ¿estamos siguiendo la estrategia correcta? Resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Clicerio González-Villalpando; Ruy López-Ridaura; Julio César Campuzano; María Elena González-Villalpando

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Examine clinical indicators to evaluate diabetes care in Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Diabetics (self reported, with therapy) were examined with standardized questionnaires, anthropometry, glucose, lipids and glycohemoglobin. Data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: There were 2 644 patients, 677 cases without access to medical care (73% women), most lived in rural communities and spoke aboriginal dialect. Prevalence of obesity for private access group was 21.2%, for other or no...

  15. Overuse Injury Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    bones in celiac disease patients." Am J Gastroenterol 98(2): 382-390. Ferretti, J. L. 1997. "Noninvasive Assessment of Bone Architecture and...altered gait pretest anthropometry diet and nutrition genetics endocrine status and hormones bone disease (pathology) age initial bone health state...and between subjects can be expected. Consequently large numbers of subject are required to obtain statistically significant results. Even with

  16. Intrauterine exposure to maternal diabetes is associated with higher adiposity and insulin resistance and clustering of cardiovascular risk markers in Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Veena, Sargoor R; Hill, Jacqueline C; Kehoe, Sarah; Karat, Samuel C; Fall, Caroline H D

    2010-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that maternal gestational diabetes increases cardiovascular risk markers in Indian children. Anthropometry, blood pressure, and glucose/insulin concentrations were measured in 514 children at 5 and 9.5 years of age (35 offspring of diabetic mothers [ODMs], 39 offspring of diabetic fathers [ODFs]). Children of nondiabetic parents were control subjects. At age 9.5 years, female ODMs had larger skinfolds (P risk over genetic factors; the effects strengthen during childhood.

  17. Influence of Regular Exercise on Body Fat and Eating Patterns of Patients with Intermittent Claudication

    OpenAIRE

    Leicht, Anthony; Crowther, Robert; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of regular supervised exercise on body fat, assessed via anthropometry, and eating patterns of peripheral arterial disease patients with intermittent claudication (IC). Body fat, eating patterns and walking ability were assessed in 11 healthy adults (Control) and age- and mass-matched IC patients undertaking usual care (n = 10; IC-Con) or supervised exercise (12-months; n = 10; IC-Ex). At entry, all groups exhibited similar body fat and eating patterns. Maximal ...

  18. The seated bus passenger--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, J A

    1978-09-01

    The paper describes the inter-relationship of anthropometry, rig studies and dynamic testing of aspects related to problems of the seated bus passenger. It seeks to draw together sub-sections of a very large study sponsored by the government through the Transport and Road Research Laboratory and undertaken by the Human Factors Group of Leyland Truck and Bus. It is relevant to all those designing passenger carrying transport systems.

  19. Microalbuminuria in relation to the metabolic syndrome and its components in a Chinese population

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Hu, Bang-Chuan; Fan, Wang-Xiang; Zou, Jun; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We investigated the prevalence of microalbuminuria and its association with the metabolic syndrome and its components in a Chinese population. Methods The study subjects were recruited from a newly established residential area in the suburb of Shanghai. We measured anthropometry, blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose, and serum lipids, and collected spot urine samples for the determination of albumin-creatinine ratio. We defined microalbuminuria as a urinary albumin-...

  20. Quantitative assessment of the morphology of the pig's head used as a model in surgical experimentation. Part 1: Methods of Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, L G; Munro, I R; Vanderby, B M

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-two surface measurements were described for assessment of the effect of complex surgical operations on the skeleton of the face in pigs. The methods of measurements imitate those of anthropometry. The surface measurements can complement cephalometry with data about the changes in the soft tissue and thus improve the documentation of the effect of surgery. This paper can help in the evaluation of complicated osteotomy procedures using the pig as the animal model, for facial reconstruction research in humans. PMID:1000401