WorldWideScience

Sample records for anthropology cultural

  1. Organizational culture, Anthropology of

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Anthropologists have studied organizations since the 1930s. In the 1980s, anthropologists' concepts of culture were instrumentalized by nonanthropologists to promote ‘organizational culture’ as a management tool. In subsequent decades, concern shifted to welding employees from different ‘national...... cultures’ into transnational corporations and organizations concerned with international governance. In such organizations, anthropology graduates are increasingly employed as ‘cultural experts.’ We track the anthropological research on organizational culture and argue that the sensibilities and analytical...

  2. Socio-cultural anthropology today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a history of the development of theoretical perspectives within the social and cultural anthropology from the early 20th century. Beginning with functionalism and structural functionalism, the author traces the influences of structuralism, Marxism, interpretivism, gender, cultural and post-colonial studies, concluding with a set of five themes characteristic for the contemporary anthropological research.

  3. Socio-cultural anthropology today

    OpenAIRE

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2002-01-01

    The article presents a history of the development of theoretical perspectives within the social and cultural anthropology from the early 20th century. Beginning with functionalism and structural functionalism, the author traces the influences of structuralism, Marxism, interpretivism, gender, cultural and post-colonial studies, concluding with a set of five themes characteristic for the contemporary anthropological research.

  4. Culture, Education, Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, Herve

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that the anthropology of education must focus on what people do to educate themselves outside the constraints constituting the problematics of schooling. Anthropologists must do this precisely to fulfill their public role as legitimate participants in the conversations about understanding and transforming schooling. When…

  5. Anthropological Studies of Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the questions raised at the symposium "Our World, Other Worlds. Anthropology, Science Fiction and Cultural Identity", held in Belgrade in December 2009, is how anthropology is to study contemporary art forms: how research issues are to be defined and approached; how research is to be organized in a specific semantic area, which cannot always and with absolute certainty be said not to be an anthropological construction; whether the subject of research can be said to have the shared nature of cultural communication; whether the anthropologist is to interpret the author/artist’s intention, or that which is produced as a result of that intention, etc. The aim of this paper is to suggest some answers to these questions, from the point of view of a researcher focused on cultural communication.

  6. Cultural anthropology of traditional Chinese medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Xia; Liu, Jian-ping

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Biological, psychological and sociological model of medicine substantializes the old model lacking the social humane attributes. The new medical model makes people take medical anthropology into research and highly evaluate traditional medical system. Cultural anthropology of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is part of medical anthropology with three major characteristics: wide research scope, specificity, and integration. It has developed its own research methods, such as field i...

  7. Creative Cultural Anthropology as a Methodology Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the essence and prospects of creative cultural anthropology in the context of education, economy, labor and social wealth. The anthropology in question can become the methodology principle for a new historical social model arrangement as it originates from the universal abilities of the human race, developed on the moral basis of joint existence; productive creative force of man’s integral subjectivity; and technological power reasonably combining the goals, means of production and creative forces of nature. The author outlines the prospective development ways for cultural anthropology guiding the educational system - the anthropological society basis - with the aim of developing a cultured, moral, socially and professionally competent personality; enforcing individual creative potentials; guaranteeing high status of teachers; and providing social communication forms giving place to self-activity of individuals and groups, and intellectual and cultural work. The author confirms the need for higher education available for everyone; otherwise, education, limited by the empirical level and primary vocational training, results in the rising portion of common labor in the national economy. The consequences lead to growing intellectual heterogeneity in the structure of aggregate activity; functional discord between the common and complex levels of labor; suspension of innovative technology implementation in production and management; aggravation of socio-cultural differences to the level of hostile opposition; abating competitiveness of Russia. The author makes the conclusion that, for the beneficial scenario of society development, the main emphasize should be on the socio-cultural expanded reproduction of man; the educational sphere should receive the A- group status, leaving the B-group status to material production. 

  8. Anthropology, cultural relativism and principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Manuel Conderana Cerrillo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available There exists the risk that axiological relativism make educational tasks impossible to perform. This article intends to answer the question of how this risk could be avoided: Is it possible to support the fact that there are certain issues which could be accepted as valid by any culture? Could this fact be achieved without mena- cing the so called legitimate cultural diversity due to human freedom? Professor María García Amilbury offers an answer which stands upon the Aristotelic idea of a «natural» telos of mankind. Once the deficiencies of the Aristotelic argument have been uncove- red, an alternative answer coming from the «ethic intuitionism» theory is considered by the author. Key words: Gnoseologic cultural relativism, Axiologic cultural relativism, Ethical intuitionism, Ethical principles. 

  9. Anthropology and cultural neuroscience: creating productive intersections in parallel fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R A; Seligman, R

    2009-01-01

    Partly due to the failure of anthropology to productively engage the fields of psychology and neuroscience, investigations in cultural neuroscience have occurred largely without the active involvement of anthropologists or anthropological theory. Dramatic advances in the tools and findings of social neuroscience have emerged in parallel with significant advances in anthropology that connect social and political-economic processes with fine-grained descriptions of individual experience and behavior. We describe four domains of inquiry that follow from these recent developments, and provide suggestions for intersections between anthropological tools - such as social theory, ethnography, and quantitative modeling of cultural models - and cultural neuroscience. These domains are: the sociocultural construction of emotion, status and dominance, the embodiment of social information, and the dual social and biological nature of ritual. Anthropology can help locate unique or interesting populations and phenomena for cultural neuroscience research. Anthropological tools can also help "drill down" to investigate key socialization processes accountable for cross-group differences. Furthermore, anthropological research points at meaningful underlying complexity in assumed relationships between social forces and biological outcomes. Finally, ethnographic knowledge of cultural content can aid with the development of ecologically relevant stimuli for use in experimental protocols. PMID:19874960

  10. 77 FR 5837 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... the cultural items may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum...

  11. The Cultural Constitution of Cognition: Taking the Anthropological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2011-01-01

    To what extent is cognition affected by culture? And how might cognitive science profit from an intensified collaboration with anthropology in exploring this issue? In order to answer these questions, we will first give a brief description of different perspectives on cognition, one that prevails in most cognitive sciences – particularly in cognitive psychology – and one in anthropology. Three basic assumptions of cognitive science regarding the separability of content and process, the contex...

  12. The cultural constitution of cognition: Taking the anthropological perspective

    OpenAIRE

    AndreaBender

    2011-01-01

    To what extent is cognition affected by culture? And how might cognitive science profit from an intensified collaboration with anthropology in exploring this issue? In order to answer these questions, we will first give a brief description of different perspectives on cognition, one that prevails in most cognitive sciences—particularly in cognitive psychology—and one in anthropology. Three basic assumptions of cognitive science regarding the separability of content and process, the context-in...

  13. Culturing the adolescent brain: what can neuroscience learn from anthropology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Suparna

    2010-06-01

    Cultural neuroscience is set to flourish in the next few years. As the field develops, it is necessary to reflect on what is meant by 'culture' and how this can be translated for the laboratory context. This article uses the example of the adolescent brain to discuss three aspects of culture that may help us to shape and reframe questions, interpretations and applications in cultural neuroscience: cultural contingencies of categories, cultural differences in experience and cultural context of neuroscience research. The last few years have seen a sudden increase in the study of adolescence as a period of both structural and functional plasticity, with new brain-based explanations of teenage behaviour being taken up in education, policy and medicine. However, the concept of adolescence, as an object of behavioural science, took shape relatively recently, not much more than a hundred years ago and was shaped by a number of cultural and historical factors. Moreover, research in anthropology and cross-cultural psychology has shown that the experience of adolescence, as a period of the lifespan, is variable and contingent upon culture. The emerging field of cultural neuroscience has begun to tackle the question of cultural differences in social cognitive processing in adults. In this article, I explore what a cultural neuroscience can mean in the case of adolescence. I consider how to integrate perspectives from social neuroscience and anthropology to conceptualize, and to empirically study, adolescence as a culturally variable phenomenon, which, itself, has been culturally constructed. PMID:19959484

  14. The cultural constitution of cognition: Taking the anthropological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndreaBender

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To what extent is cognition affected by culture? And how might cognitive science profit from an intensified collaboration with anthropology in exploring this issue? In order to answer these questions, we will first give a brief description of different perspectives on cognition, one that prevails in most cognitive sciences—particularly in cognitive psychology—and one in anthropology. Three basic assumptions of cognitive science regarding the separability of content and process, the context-independence of processing, and the culture-independence of processing will then be discussed. We argue that these assumptions need to be questioned and scrutinized cross-culturally. A thorough examination of these issues would profit considerably from collaboration with anthropologists, not only by enabling deeper insight into the cultures under scrutiny, but also by synergistic effects that would allow for a more comprehensive understanding of human cognition.

  15. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY AS INTEGRATOR OF HUMANITARIAN EDUCATION IN HIGHER SCHOOL

    OpenAIRE

    POROZOV ROMAN YUR'EVICH

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with urgent problems of the modern humanities in the context of modernization of pedagogical education. Cultural anthropology is viewed upon as a multi-disciplinary integrator in the process of teaching the humanities. This discipline can be used in training students of humanitarian specialties and educational fields. The author specifies the fundamental principles developed by the classical humanities cultural relativism and anthropocentricism as the key advantages of cultu...

  16. An anthropology of learning on nested frictions in cultural ecologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    This book has one explicit purpose: to present a new theory of cultural learning in organisations which combines practice-based learning with cultural models - a cognitive anthropological schema theory of taken-for-granted connections - tied to the everyday meaningful use of artefacts. The understanding of culture as emerging in a process of learning open up for new understandings, which is useful for researchers, practitioners and students interested in dynamic studies of culture and cultural studies of organisations. The new approach goes beyond culture as a static, essentialist entity and open for our possibility to learn in organisations across national cultures, across ethnicity and across the apparently insurmountable local educational differences which makes it difficult for people to communicate working together in an increasingly globalized world. The empirical examples are mainly drawn from organisations of education and science which are melting-pots of cultural encounters.

  17. An Anthropology of Learning in Epistemic Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    of analysis in cultural historical activity theory. However in relation to practice-based learning it is necessary further to explore how newcomers learn to perceive ‘epistemic objects’ in a complex process where learning concerns how material artefacts and meaning are connected in actual doing as well...... as learning what not to do. If ‘epistemic cultures’ in science create and warrant knowledge we may follow in closer detail how newcomers as physics students learn to create and warrant knowledge through everyday practices, which over time teach them new words and new meanings tied to words and bodily (re...

  18. Cultural context and consent: an anthropological view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, M Patrão

    2004-01-01

    The theme of "consent" is, without question, associated with the origins of bioethics and is one of its most significant paradigms that has remained controversial to the present, as is confirmed by the proposal for its debate during the last World Congress of Bioethics. Seen broadly as a compulsory minimum procedure in the field of biomedical ethics, even today it keeps open the issues that it has raised from the start: whether it is really necessary and whether it can be proven to be effective. My goal will be to attempt to determine the most genuine and relevant meaning of "consent," going back from its present dominant normative meaning and, from there, identifying or simply sketching other possible forms of its expression in the world we live in, so as to justify its pertinence and validity. This objective will involve three stages: (1) "'Consent' as a privileged paradigm of bioethics (the ethical-juridical sense)," (2) "The symbolic value of 'consent' (the social-cultural sense)," and (3) "'Consent' as promotion of the human (the humanistic-personal sense)". It is concluded that the common notion of normative "consent" is not the only one, nor does it hold universal validity; that, from a historical-cultural perspective, new expressions of "consent" appear, adapted to different social contexts and to possibly be implemented in developing countries; and, finally, that "consent" is strictly indispensable in situations of extreme dependence, in its symbolic relational character, in as much as it promotes ethical relationships among strangers and ensures that they remain so. PMID:15139259

  19. 77 FR 23501 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... with the cultural item may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum...

  20. Cultural anthropology approach to psychopathology of Muslim murderer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, T; Satoh, S; Morita, N; Konishi, T; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, H; Oda, S

    1994-03-01

    We report a case involving a 31-year-old Islamic male who murdered his associate under particular circumstances. We took the opportunity to test psychiatrically this man who has been diagnosed in his mother country as a schizophrenic. He came to Japan and was working as a laborer. He is an earnest practicing Muslim. We took an interest in this case because of his bizarre behavior previous to the actual crime. We are interested in the actual method of the murder in relation to Mr. A's cultural and religious background. We demonstrated the significance of the religious cultural knowledge relative to the indigenous ritual for expelling satan and the Islamic pilgrimage to Mekka (Hajj). We conclude that a cultural anthropological and religious viewpoint is necessary in objectively understanding the sources of suffering in patients with mental illness who are from foreign countries. PMID:7933719

  1. CULTURAL COMPETENCE AND PSYCHOTHERAPY: APPLYING ANTHROPOLOGICALLY INFORMED CONCEPTIONS OF CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Lakes, Kimberley; López, Steven R.; Garro, Linda C.

    2006-01-01

    The authors apply two contemporary notions of culture to advance the conceptual basis of cultural competence in psychotherapy: Kleinman’s (1995) definition of culture as what is at stake in local, social worlds, and Mattingly and Lawlor’s (2001) concept of shared narratives between practitioners and patients. The authors examine these cultural constructs within a clinical case of an immigrant family caring for a young boy with an autism-spectrum disorder. Their analysis suggests that the soci...

  2. Cultural Anthropological Perspective of Development Re-Examined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Al Mamun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available
    ‘Development” –a term that entered popular discourse in the late 1980s has certainly been become one of the most debatable buzzwords of the new millennium. The nature and philosophy of development has been the subject matter of profound debates and concerns in economic, political, cultural studies and academic circles since the mid 1980s. However, mainstream economic thought regarding development promises that it would lift the poor above poverty, dissolve dictatorship, protect the environment, integrate cultures, and reverse the growing gap between the rich and poor countries of the world. But in reality, models of the mainstream economic development has brought about the devastating destruction of the traditions, the continued subordination of poor nations and regions by richer countries of the west, environmental degradation, and posed a serious thread to indigenous and non-western cultures and economies. The conventional development thought has resulted in the penetration and expansion of western economist, media, technologies and tremendous clout to define the situation. This paper argues that through the development process, like colonization, modernization, globalization, the west is exploiting and exerting dominance over the other country’s economies, cultures and traditional way of life. The west makes space of development by identifying, defining certain problems and prescribes remedy for the “Third World” countries. Through the United Nations, the IMF, the World Bank, Donor Agencies and these institutions’ legal authority, the West along with its most advanced technologies and professional and institutional knowledge controls all major political and economic affairs of the globe. The paper argues this issue from anthropological perspective that is, holistic perspective, that encompasses economic and non-economic factors simultaneously. In fact, those who advocate development today inherit form Entitlement

  3. Culture Change in the English Classroom: An Anthropological Approach to the Education of Culturally Disadvantaged Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Helen Louise Kuster

    This library study investigated the problems of (1) what anthropological generalizations are of greatest value for English teachers of culturally disadvantaged students, and (2) how these generalizations are particularly relevant for classroom use. The theoretical and empirical research literature was surveyed and relevant sections were…

  4. Human rights and cultural rights: An anthropological critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiljević Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper starts by examining some of the key conceptual problems related to the idea of human rights, as well as some key arguments raised in defence of human rights as universal and emacipatory modern project. This is followed by a discussion on cultural rights, sometimes understood as a correction of human rights’ universalism, at other times taken as their „logical extension“; it will be shown how human rights have gradually begun to be amalgamated with cultural and collective rights. The third section of the paper continues with an overview of anthropological critique of cultural (and collective rights, with an emphasis on ethnographies critically examining the domination of the „rights talk“ in perceptions and self-perceptions of various local „cultural“ struggles. Finally, the issue of the universality of human rights is reexamined from the perspective of the particularity of citizens’ rights with the aim of questioning the validity of their conceptual demarcation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43007 i br. 41004

  5. Anthropology and International Business Research Methods in DBA Teaching: Frameworks for Cultural Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Alma

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for introducing anthropology into a doctoral-level international business research methods course. Describes three anthropological frameworks designed for the course: a cultural awareness model adapted from G. Morgan's (1980) idea of paradigmatic orthodoxy; key organizing principles; and a mapping model allowing researchers…

  6. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  7. [Biology and culture: a dimension of collaboration between anthropology and epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Leiming; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the important basis of epidemiological study. Based on biology, psychology, social and cultural factors can influence human's health and disease incidence. The medical mode has changed from "biomedical mode" to "bio-psycho-social medical model" , but culture factor was neglected somewhat during this process, so paying attention to culture factor in anthropologic study and using it as biologic basis in epidemiologic study might be a dimension of collaboration between of anthropology and epidemiology. PMID:26822659

  8. Perfectible Apes in Decadent Cultures: Rousseau's Anthropology Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokler, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Briefly discusses the views of Claude Levi-Strauss and Robert Ardrey who cite Rousseau as a personal influence even though they hold opposing anthropological ideals. The author claims that this situation is due to misinterpretations of Rousseau's work. An interpretation of Rousseau's anthropology is given reconciling the differences. (BC)

  9. Material Culture and Anthropology-An Interview with Anthropologist Michael Rowlands of the University College London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL Rowlands; BIAN Simei; ZHAO Xiuyun

    2014-01-01

    Prof.Michael Rowlands discusses how to use material culture to explore the for-mation and use of objects , the history of objects , and the relationship between objects and histo-ry .He uses examples drawn from his academic background , and his fieldwork done in Africa and China .He further gives an in-depth discussion on the relationship between material culture and anthropology as well as archaeology and anthropology .He proposes specific views on how to de-velop historical anthropology by using material culture , and the combination of archaeology with anthropology .He states that in the future , the focus of anthropology will shift or move away from America and Europe to the rest of the world , and that it is possible that the current understand-ing of anthropology that comes from European and American Anthropology will no longer be ac-cepted as being the truth .Therefore, finding new ways of thinking is necessary for the future de-velopment of anthropology .

  10. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington.... 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology at... glass beads was given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University on an unknown...

  11. 76 FR 14045 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Museum of Anthropology at Washington.... 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology at... given to the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University for intended repatriation by...

  12. 78 FR 45963 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Item: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology...: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native... the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control...

  13. 77 FR 19697 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology...: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined... Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a...

  14. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology...: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico, has... Museum of Anthropology at the address below by September 4, 2012. ADDRESSES: David Phillips, Curator...

  15. 76 FR 44947 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the... Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with...

  16. The Anthropological Perspective on Disaster and the Key Concept of Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanna Hoffman; Chen Mei; Peng Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Like Professor Anthony Oliver -Smith, I wish to speak to the theories and analyses of disaster from an anthropological perspective. While Professor Oliver -Smith's paper covers the history of the anthropological concern, the ecologi-cal paradigm, reconstruction, and other positions, the intent of mine is to zero in on what anthropolo-gists consider the foremost factor in the creation, the unfolding, prevention and mitigation of disas-ter, and that is culture.

  17. Firm Culture in Bulgaria as A Problem of the Economic Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Adelina Milanova

    2004-01-01

    Drawn are views for the conditioning between the national and firm culture in theoretical aspect and based on concrete studies for Bulgaria. Firm culture in its quality of certain management mechanism is identified and analyzed as a subject in the frames of the economic anthropology. Based on the interdisciplinary approach are applied alternative instruments as an answer of current questions concerning the firm culture. Presented are results of study of the conditioning between the national a...

  18. Culturing the adolescent brain: what can neuroscience learn from anthropology?

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, Suparna

    2009-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience is set to flourish in the next few years. As the field develops, it is necessary to reflect on what is meant by ‘culture’ and how this can be translated for the laboratory context. This article uses the example of the adolescent brain to discuss three aspects of culture that may help us to shape and reframe questions, interpretations and applications in cultural neuroscience: cultural contingencies of categories, cultural differences in experience and cultural context of...

  19. INTERROGATING GLOBALIZATION AND CULTURE IN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE THE INDIAN EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Sekh

    2012-01-01

    The present article is an attempt to examine and highlight the issues of cultural globalization and globalization of cultures with particular reference to India. To deal with these, I will discuss and analyze the concepts of globalization, cultural globalization and the nature of interrelation between global and local cultures in general and of India in particular. How the non-Indian global cultural elements are spreading among the Indians and how the Indian cultural elements are diffusing ov...

  20. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... publication in the Federal Register (62 FR 8265-8266, February 24, 1997). Since that time, two additional... Indians, Michigan. These individuals were described in a Notice published in the Federal Register (74 FR... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University...

  1. The Rise of Class Culture Theory in Educational Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    This article chronicles how the ideas of neo-Weberians, Marxists, feminists, and critical race thinkers have merged to create a new cultural production or class culture paradigm of schooling. Reviews of recent ethnographic work illustrates how the articulations among class, race, gender, and sexual identity practices in schools are studied without…

  2. Globalization, differentiation and drinking cultures, an anthropological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wilson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available L’alcool et sa consommation ne renvoient pas simplement au domaine économique. L’alcool est devenu aujourd’hui une partie intégrale des relations sociales dans différentes cultures au point où son importance globale est souvent sous-estimée par ses plus ardents critiques. En dépit de ses conséquences directes sur la santé, sa consommation a pris une certaine ampleur dans le monde industriel développé. Certainement son rôle central dans la construction des identités individuelles explique sa position clé au sein des sociétés. Que nous dit le saké à propos du Japon ou le vin de Bourgogne sur la France? Que nous dit la consommation ou l’abstinence d’alcool sur les questions d’identité individuelle, d’ethnicité, de classe et de culture? Quelle place tient l’alcool dans la définition de soi et dans la notion de résistance? Répondre à ces questions et à d’autres est le but essentiel de cet article qui examine la consommation d’alcool à travers différentes cultures et ce que boire signifie pour ceux qui choisissent de consommer ou de s’abstenir. De l’Irlande à Hong-Kong, Mexico à l’Allemagne, l’alcool occupe un certain nombre de fonctions sociales, religieuses, politiques et familiales. Les cultures du boire définissent ces consommations dans le cadre plus large des pratiques sociales et montrent comment classes sociales, ethnicité et nationalisme peuvent s’exprimer à travers cette commodité. En partant d’approches de terrain, les contributeurs analysent l’interface entre culture et pouvoir dans les bars et pubs, la signification des images publicitaires, le rôle de ces boissons dans la vie quotidienne. Le résultat est la première publication comparative sur les questions de l’impact que la consommation d’alcool a sur l’identité nationale dans le monde aujourd’hui.Alcohol is not only big business, it has become an essential part of social relations in so many cultures that

  3. A new form of collaboration in cultural anthropology: Matsutake worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. K, Choy,; Tsing, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Experiments in collaboration open new investigative possibilities for cultural anthropologists. In this report, we use our research on matsutake mushrooms to show the promise of collaborative experiments for ethnographers of scale making, global connection, and human–nonhuman relations. Anna Tsing...... introduces. Mogu Mogu (Timothy Choy and Shiho Satsuka) argue that the mushroomic figure of mycorrhizal life illuminates workings of capital and power, nature and culture. Lieba Faier examines contingency—through the effect of weather and bugs on matsutake production—as a form of self-positioning that emerges...

  4. Things we see: Portuguese anthropology on material culture

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Part of the objects that anthropologists can now find in Lisbon result from the existence of networks with rather diverse historical, social and cultural origins, linking Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Brazil and Portugal, as well as the countries which have attracted all these countries’ diasporas. The publishing of papers by Portuguese and Brazilian anthropologists in this dossier dedicated to consumption might come to generate a productive collaboration between researche...

  5. Spatial turn and animation practices inspired by cultural anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wieszaczewska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial turn is one of the cultural turns, which have recently occurred in the humanities. It stresses the importance of issues such as space and place and can be successfully used as a theoretical perspective gaining use in thought over issues such as globalisation, transnationality, mapping but also education. In the discourses of pedagogical science space and place are considered through their multidimensional impact on education and learning. As significant concepts rooting pedagogy or pedagogy of borderland. The pedagogical reflection on space could be also used in the field of animation practices, especially in activities, which are related to place somehow colonised.

  6. Globalization, differentiation and drinking cultures, an anthropological perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Wilson

    2004-01-01

    L’alcool et sa consommation ne renvoient pas simplement au domaine économique. L’alcool est devenu aujourd’hui une partie intégrale des relations sociales dans différentes cultures au point où son importance globale est souvent sous-estimée par ses plus ardents critiques. En dépit de ses conséquences directes sur la santé, sa consommation a pris une certaine ampleur dans le monde industriel développé. Certainement son rôle central dans la construction des identités individuelles explique sa p...

  7. Feminist Theory, Anthropology and Engagement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinková, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2012), s. 25-36. ISSN 1642-0977 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : engaged anthropology * feminist theory * cultural anthropology Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  8. The contribution of anthropological structuralism to the development of the concept of "cultural identity" as the object of contemporary anthropological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of "cultural identity", as a matter of anthropological consideration today – in the sense of its dynamic and relational character, but before that as a means of signifying human groups and simultaneously expressing what the members consider their contextual characteristics – is based on the process of cultural identification, which is the product of the act of division, delineation and classification as culturally cognitive operations arising from the experience of the surrounding reality. The initial anthropological interest in these acts we find in anthropological structuralism and its intention of searching for rules of logic which determine the ways in which we shape our world and the symbols we use to do it. Viewing identification as an attempt to establish logical reasons for a certain quality to be signified in this way in general, has its basis in the way in which structural anthropologists explained the establishing of symbolic connections between different human groups, or rather the meaning of the signs used for this purpose.

  9. ["Qi-Huang" Culture in the context of anthropological perspective of medicine and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huailin

    2011-05-01

    The survey of the two Chinese characters "(qi)(huang)" from the perspective of anthropology of medicine and health show that the words represent a variety of meanings. All the TCM related contents, such as physicians, medical works and official position of medicine etc. can be represented by the word. "Qi-huang" culture contained the relevant medical works and the physicians who handed down Chinese medicine, such as Qibo, Bogao, Shaoshi, Leigong, Rongcheng etc., and the contents are more abundant. Previously, less study concerned the historical relics spread extensively in Xinmi City, Henan Province, such as Qibo Shan, Limu Tai, Fenghou Ding etc. "Qi-huang" culture not only remained in the history, but also are living vividly in the present medical civilization. "Qi-huang" culture is not confined within China, but has been spread to the whole world. PMID:21781538

  10. Cultural Policy and Politics of Culture in Lithuania. Vilnius – European Capital of Culture 2009, an Anthropological View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Crisafulli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available “European Capital of Culture” is one of the most effective and productive projects of European Union’s cultural policy. In 2009  this project was hosted by Vilnius, Lithuania. The designation of Vilnius coincided  with the celebration of a national event, the millennium of the name “Lithuania”. In 2009 Lithuania was, after 20 years from the fall of USSR, on the international stage of European Union, breaking deeply with its soviet past and consolidating its EU membership. In this context European Capital of Culture’s project constitutes a mix between European instances and national rhetoric. While previous anthropological studies focused on the structural organization of the project “European Capital of Culture”, in this text more than to analyze and to evaluate the chosen programme, the events included and the costs, my point is to consider the general project in its proper historical, cultural, political and social context. Main subjects/objects of my research  are those who give official representation of the events made through official documents and public statements, I mean politicians, bureaucrats, experts, journalists, artists and people involved directly in a  different way. I also consider  the interpretation and the feeling that common people will get from this event. The   base of my research will be to keep the attention on the connection of this cultural event with political and economic field.I focus on a description of the event VECC and its role considering the general cultural policy of Lithuania and European policy to represent a common European identity based on cultural diversity. 

  11. 78 FR 19308 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that... University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it...

  12. Making sense of HIV in southeastern Nigeria: fictional narratives, cultural meanings, and methodologies in medical anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winskell, Kate; Brown, Peter J; Patterson, Amy E; Burkot, Camilla; Mbakwem, Benjamin C

    2013-06-01

    Fictional narratives have rarely been used in medical anthropological research. This article illustrates the value of such narratives by examining how young people in southeastern Nigeria navigate the cultural resources available to them to make sense of HIV in their creative writing. Using thematic data analysis and narrative-based methodologies, it analyzes a sample (N = 120) from 1,849 narratives submitted by Nigerian youth to the 2005 Scenarios from Africa scriptwriting contest on the theme of HIV. The narratives are characterized by five salient themes: tragedy arising from the incompatibility of sex outside marriage and kinship obligations; female vulnerability and blame; peer pressure and moral ambivalence; conservative Christian sexual morality; and the social and family consequences of HIV. We consider the strengths and limitations of this narrative approach from a theoretical perspective and by juxtaposing our findings with those generated by Daniel Jordan Smith using standard ethnographic research methods with a similar Igbo youth population. PMID:23804317

  13. [Drawer of boundaries: Franz Boas and the (im)possibility of the concept of culture in anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernáez, Angel

    2011-01-01

    The history of anthropology has tended towards two extremes in its analyses of the works of Franz Boas: aggrandizement or underestimation. This disparity can be explained by the author's liminal relationship with two research approaches in anthropology: universalist theories (evolutionism, difussionism, racialism, etc.) and culturalist theories, prevalent between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. With this argument in mind, the article discusses the emergence of the Boasian concept of culture and endeavors to show how this concept proves both possible and impossible within the author's own work. PMID:22012102

  14. 77 FR 5839 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... item may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology....

  15. Public science of the savage mind: contesting cultural anthropology in the Cold War classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Erika Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    "What is human about human beings? How did they get that way? How can they be made more so?" These three questions formed the basis of a fifth-grade social studies curriculum project developed in the 1960s called Man: A Course of Study, or MACOS. In the years between the curriculum's development in the 1960s and its controversial implementation in the 1970s, two separate sets of concerns served to problematize the use of anthropological materials in public school classrooms. On the one hand, MACOS designers were wary of the possibly racist interpretations of exploring so-called "primitive" cultures in the classroom. On the other, conservative textbook reformers objected to claims that all cultural solutions to biological problems were morally equivalent. Once MACOS earned a place in national news, it came to embody both hopes for the redemption of American democratic society and fears about the violent nature of humans, depending on one's political perspective. These mixed messages eventually undermined the long-term success of the program as public science. PMID:23686816

  16. Introduction: Children, development and education: a dialogue between cultural psychology and historical anthropology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kontopodis; C. Wulf; B. Fichtner

    2011-01-01

    In the following introduction to the edited volume Children, Development and Education the reader is introduced to two schools of thought: historical anthropology - a revision of the German philosophical anthropology under the influences of the French historical school of Annales and the Anglo-Saxon

  17. 78 FR 34129 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... previously listed in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register (62 FR 8265-8266... Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of... County, MI. In 1924, these items were sold to the University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology, by...

  18. BOOK REVIEW: JACK D. ELLER, FROM CULTURE, TO ETHNICITY, TO CONFLICT: AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE ON INTERNATIONAL ETHNIC CONFLICTS

    OpenAIRE

    Patty Zakaria

    2011-01-01

    From Culture, to Ethnicity, to Conflict: An Anthropological Perspective on International Ethnic Conflicts, Eller illustrates that the characteristics used to define ethnicity cannot be freely applied to all groups since group perception of what their ethnicity encompasses vary significantly. Further, Eller points out that once a group becomes self-conscious of their difference within society, this realization leads to the initiation of group mobilization, from this viewpoint a group is then ...

  19. Roy Ellen, Stephen J. Lycett, Sarah E. Johns, eds., 2013, Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology: A Critical Synthesis New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Viecelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available recensione: Roy Ellen, Stephen J. Lycett, Sarah E. Johns, eds., 2013, Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology: A Critical Synthesis New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books di Clelia Viecelli

  20. The Anthropology of Football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological interest in football has been on the rise since the beginning of the century, which can be attested to by the rising number of studies, papers, collective publications and scientific conferences on the topic. Seeing as anthropology is no longer the study of the culturally bizarre and exotic, it is clear that the first anthropological studies of football as a cultural phenomenon are linked to those environments in which football figures as an important cultural trait, which is the reason why this sub discipline thrived in Europe or in places where football was treated as an esoteric phenomenon and where there as a longer tradition of anthropological study of native cultures. From the first analogies between the game of football and its rules with rituals of so called primitive cultures, the anthropological study of football developed into a relatively encompassing approach which includes interest in all the actors who establish the game as a public, cultural good – players, experts, supporters, journalists, organizers etc. – as well as its various cultural manifestations, in the form of a tool for the construction of identity and cultural symbol, a leisure activity with ties to economy, to a specific apotheosis of the concepts of globalization and commodification of culture. Anthropological studies of football are present in Serbia as well, and their subject matter corresponds to the role and position held by football, as a cultural artefact, in Serbian society and other countries in the region.

  1. Educational and Anthropological Perspectives: An Italian View on Migration in Multi-cultural Urban Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary societies there are different ways to perceive the relation between identity and alterity and to describe the difference between “us” and “them”, residents and foreigners. Anthropologist Sandra Wallman sustains that in multi-cultural urban spaces the frontiers of diversity are not only burdensome markers of identity, but rather they could also represent new chances to define “identity” and “alterity”. These frontiers, in fact, can work like interfaces through which to build time after time, in a creative way, a relationship with the other. From this point of view, the concept of boundary can offer many opportunities to creatively define the relation with the other and to sign new options for cognitive and physical movement. On the other side, in many cases we have a plenty of mechanisms of exclusion that transforms a purely empirical distinction between “us” and “them” in an ontological contrast, as in the case when the immigrant undergoes hostilities through discriminatory language. Even though these forms of racism are undoubtedly objectionable from a theoretical point of view, they are anyway socially “real”, in the sense that they are perpetually reaffirmed and strengthened in public opinion. They are in fact implicit “truths”, realities that are considered objective, common opinions that are part of day-to-day existence. That is the reason why an anthropological prospective including the study of “common sense” should be adopted in our present day studies on migration, as pointed out by American anthropologist Michael Herzfeld. My primary goal is to analyze with such a critical approach same pre-conditions of racism and exclusion in contemporary multi-cultural urban spaces. On the other hand, this essay would also investigate positive strategies of comparing, interchanging, and negotiating alterity in social work. I suggest that this approach can offer positive solutions in coping with

  2. New Directions in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Pushing Back the Chairs, Opening the Doors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Beverly B.

    The need to prepare students for intercultural communication and understanding has stimulated interest in global studies. Within the community college, global studies have been encouraged, but also limited by uncertainties in funding and resource commitment. In this period of confusion, it is important that college anthropology instructors adopt…

  3. Islam(s) in Context: Orientalism and the Anthropology of Muslim Societies and Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Sean

    2007-01-01

    This article begins to fill a gap in recent discussions of the future of Islamic studies with an account of the nature and significance of Anthropological and Ethnographic contributions to the study of Islam and Muslims. Drawing attention to both the problem of essence in Orientalism and the dissolution of Islam's significance for Muslims in…

  4. The Self in Culture I: Person-Centered Ethnography and Psychoanalytic Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Robert A.

    Concepts and methods intended to enhance the relationship between psychoanalytic theory and psychological anthropology are proposed and illustrations of the application of these concepts and methods are given based on ethnographic data on the Gusii of Kenya. Using five minimum assumptions about the universality of personality, an ethnographic…

  5. Design Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Design anthropology is a call for a different way of involving anthropology and participatory observation within practices of designing technologies, services, policies and infrastructure that does not aim towards changing human behavior. Here design is considered the process and not the object of...... inquiry. The paper presents a short history of design anthropology, its theoretical underpinnings and methodologies. Theoretically, the emerging field is influenced by processual, critical and action orientated approaches in anthropology. I argue that by combining anthropological methodology and knowledge...... with the future orientated imaginative praxis of design skill and collaborative design processes, anthropology and design could learn from each other. I conclude by referring to what theories, methods, and approaches are in use by practitioners of design anthropology....

  6. Ways of living: Tim Ingold on culture, biology and the anthropological task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Angosto Ferrández

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Life is a university. Tim Ingold reminds us of something that we have often heard in bohemian circles. Life is fieldwork and fieldwork is life. Those who are familiar with Ingold’s oeuvre will not be surprised by this statement; for those who are not, here is an extraordinary opportunity to step into it. In this conversation, Ingold makes an overview of some of his central ideas about what makes us human, but he is also invited to critically reflect on questions of anthropological method and theory, as well as on the role of our discipline in the big contemporary debates. Along with Ingold, we welcome here an anthropology that thinks of (and not only shows diverse ways of living.

  7. Anthropology as cultural translation:Amitav Ghosh's In an Antique Land

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, Claire

    2006-01-01

    This article interprets Amitav Ghosh's generically indeterminate text, In an Antique Land (1992), as a creative exemplar of the New Anthropology pioneered from the early 1980s onwards by such theorists as James Clifford and Mary Louise Pratt. By invoking Talal Asad's identification of similarities between the practices of ethnography and translation, I argue that Ghosh attempts to "translate" the Other in a non-manipulative and dialogic way. Through a close reading of In an Antique Land along...

  8. An Anthropological View of Violences

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrándiz Martín, Francisco; Feixa Pampols, Carles

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with violences of culture and cultures of violence. After reviewing the specificity of anthropological views of violence, we propose a processual reconceptualisation of this, reflect on the forms and possible consequences of ethnographic research and representation in this field, and end by outlining the future of an anthropology of violence that can also be an anthropology of peace. An epilogue on 11 March serves to relocate this theoretical sketch in ...

  9. Medical design anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventura, Jonathan; Gunn, Wendy

    literature concerning various levels of socio-cultural influence of the medical environment through medical products. In our research we have outlined the importance of medical design anthropology (MDA) to the practice and theory of design (Ventura and Gunn, 2016). In this paper, we study the ways in which...... medical products influence the various participants in the hospital environment (medical staff, patients, families etc.). We will demonstrate our approach through several projects dealing with medical design. In this preliminary research, we will present various issues regarding the understanding of......Barnard and Spencer define medical anthropology in the Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology as "Medical anthropology is, as the phrase implies, unavoidably concerned with the paradigm of modern Western medicine, whether implicitly or explicitly" (2002: 541). Recently there is a new...

  10. Ways of living: Tim Ingold on culture, biology and the anthropological task

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Fernando Angosto Ferrández

    2013-01-01

    Life is a university. Tim Ingold reminds us of something that we have often heard in bohemian circles. Life is fieldwork and fieldwork is life. Those who are familiar with Ingold’s oeuvre will not be surprised by this statement; for those who are not, here is an extraordinary opportunity to step into it. In this conversation, Ingold makes an overview of some of his central ideas about what makes us human, but he is also invited to critically reflect on questions of anthropological method and ...

  11. 76 FR 28066 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, that meets the... Humboldt County, CA. The belt was donated to the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the...

  12. Znaczenie recepcji dorobku Bronislawa Malinowskiego dla rozwazan etyki gospodarczej nad kryzysem finansowo-gospodarczym/Cultural Anthropology of Bronis³aw Malinowski and Reflectionon the Economic Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Szulczewski

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents two theories from the area of cultural anthropology. The first is B. Malinowski, who criticized economism and moralism. I present further stages of this criticism, with special importance placed on the concept of homo oeconomicus. Malinowski also showed how moral norms are implemented in primitive cultures by means of magic, cults, customs and rituals and rites. Another important section is devoted to Malinowski’s analysis of how cultural institutions were important for sta...

  13. Cultural Policy and Politics of Culture in Lithuania. Vilnius – European Capital of Culture 2009, an Anthropological View

    OpenAIRE

    Domenico Crisafulli

    2011-01-01

    “European Capital of Culture” is one of the most effective and productive projects of European Union’s cultural policy. In 2009  this project was hosted by Vilnius, Lithuania. The designation of Vilnius coincided  with the celebration of a national event, the millennium of the name “Lithuania”. In 2009 Lithuania was, after 20 years from the fall of USSR, on the international stage of European Union, breaking deeply with its soviet past and consolidating its EU membership. In this context Euro...

  14. Business Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay outlines the overall scope and location of business anthropology within the overall field of the discipline. It outlines its foundations as an applied form of anthropology in early developments in the United States (in particular, in Western Electric's Hawthorne Project and the Human...

  15. Anthropological material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Viktor; Kujanová, M.; Strouhal, E.

    Prague : Czech Institute of Egyptology , Faculty of Arts, Charles University in Prague, 2008 - (Krejčí, J.; Callender, V.; Verner, M.), s. 235-256 ISBN 978-80-7308-181-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : egyptology * anthropology * osteology Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  16. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    Architecture and anthropology have always had a common focus on dwelling, housing, urban life and spatial organisation. Current developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore their boundaries and overlaps. Architects are inspired by anthropological insights and methods......, while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further...... collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials and...

  17. An anthropological hybrid: the pragmatic arrangement of universalism and culturalism in French mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassin, Didier; Rechtman, Richard

    2005-09-01

    As in most European countries, the mental health of immigrants in France has recently been the subject of scientific scrutiny. Since the end of World War II voluntary special mental health services for migrants and refugees have been created in France and especially in Paris, but none has been based on epidemiological data. Generally, this lack of objective data gave rise to the assumption that many immigrants might not be getting the type of services they required. The birth of a new type of service (e.g. for migrants, refugees, ethnic groups, trauma and torture victims) was a political reaction to what was, at the time, expressed as an essential unmet need regarding this very specific population. In this article we review, from an anthropological point of view, the different paradigms that have prevailed over the last 50 years. PMID:16268233

  18. Design Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This edited volume provides an introduction to the emerging field of design anthropology from the point of view of anthropologists engaging in its development. Contributors include young anthropologists with experience in the field and leading theoreticians, who combine to articulate the specific...... style of knowing involved in doing design anthropology. So far design anthropology has been developed mostly in the practice of industry and the public sector, in particular in Scandinavia and the US, and the sustained academic reflection to support this practice is still in its early stages. This book...... will contribute to this theoretical reflection and provide a reference for practitioners, teachers and students of anthropology, as well as design and innovation....

  19. An Anthropology of Luminosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2007-01-01

    luminosity in the practice of day-to-day activities. The article surveys an array of past conceptions of light within philosophy, natural science and more recent approaches to light in the fields of anthropology and material culture studies. A number of implications are discussed, and by way of three case...

  20. The Anthropology of Nepotism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    Nepotism is widespread in organizations in developing countries but has so far received scant attention in cross-cultural management research. The paper seeks to contribute to the underdeveloped research topic suggesting an anthropological explanation of nepotism. It is argued that nepotism...

  1. Culture and health : why we need medical anthropology in family medicine in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Yaphe, John

    2014-01-01

    Culture is the framework for our beliefs and practices as a society. This includes our health beliefs and behaviours. Medical anthro - pology, as the study of culture and health, has a great deal to teach us about what we value in health, how we view disease, and how we cope with changes in our health. In this editorial, I would like to reflect on how we may use this discipline to enrich teaching and learning in family medicine in Portugal.

  2. Trust in anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Corsín Jiménez, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The article explores some of the assumptions behind the current valence of the notion of trust and in particular its entanglement in discourses of social robustness, the management and reporting of (corporate) knowledge, and its underlying culture and systems of responsibility. It unfolds by contrasting classic and contemporary anthropological work on cultures of suspicion, culpability and spiritual ambiguity with the new vocabulary of capitalist corporate ethics. Finally, the argument examin...

  3. Techno Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Elgaard

    2013-01-01

    Inaugural lecture, Ph.D Torben Elgaard Jensen, professor with special responsibilities in techno anthropology and science and technology studies. The lecture addresses three questions: First, what is the unique approach that STS developed in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s? Second, what is the...... significance of the enormous growth of STS scholarship that took place in the following 2-3 decades? And third, what are the challenges today for an STS field that has come of age? Finally, the lecture offers reflections on the promises of the new techno anthropology study programme....

  4. Making assumptions, making space: an anthropological critique of cultural competency and its relevance to queer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kelly; Beagan, Brenda

    2014-12-01

    Despite increased attention to "culturally competent" practice with diverse populations, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people remain relatively invisible within medicine and other health professions. Health care providers (HCPs) frequently dismiss sexual and gender identity as irrelevant to care. This study uses interviews with 24 physicians and 38 LGBTQ-identified women to explore how routine practices in health care can perpetuate or challenge the marginalization of LGBTQ women. While physicians avoid making assumptions to reduce judgment, a "neutral" stance reinforces the hetero- and gender normative status quo. Cultural competence with LGBTQ patients requires learning with, rather than learning about, LGBTQ people's particular health care concerns as well as paying explicit attention to pervasive power relations and normative contexts. PMID:25196115

  5. The Implications of Cultural Diversity for Health Care Practice: an Anthropological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Roger

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the roots of the practical difficulties which doctors and nurses so often encounter in the course of their interactions with South Asian patients, taking issues of hygiene as its central empirical focus. It argues that many of the 'problems' which health care staff encounter in this area are ultimately of their own making, above all because their professional training has not provided them with a sufficient degree of cultural competence to match their technical skills. If ...

  6. Theory and method at the intersection of anthropology and cultural neuroscience

    OpenAIRE

    Seligman, Rebecca; Brown, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropologists have become increasingly interested in embodiment—that is, the ways that socio-cultural factors influence the form, behavior and subjective experience of human bodies. At the same time, social cognitive neuroscience has begun to reveal the mechanisms of embodiment by investigating the neural underpinnings and consequences of social experience. Despite this overlap, the two fields have barely engaged one another. We suggest three interconnected domains of inquiry in which the i...

  7. PROGRAMS FOR OVERCOMING THE CRISIS OF CIVILIZATION IN THE CULTURAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Mikhailovich VASILIEV

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have considered the religious culture in the Russian civilizational process, which involves studies of the main question - the question of what is existential mentality of Russian people and how it allows people to civilize in terms of the formation of the civil identity. Phil-osophical comparative studies or comparative philoso-phy is an area of historical and philosophical studies, which compares different levels of the hierarchy (con-cept, doctrine, system of the philosophical heritage of East and West, which we have tried to address in this article. Modern foreign (Western and Eastern philosoph-ical comparative studies as a relatively independent branch (direction of historical and philosophical studies and as an academic discipline is in our opinion at the stage of its institutional and conceptual formation. The relevance of this article is due to several factors, namely the crisis of European culture was perceived by Russian philosophers - representatives of Russian reli-gious Renaissance as the influence on the spiritual at-mosphere of Russian society and the mentality of Rus-sian creative intelligentsia. Was this crisis a local phe-nomenon, limited in spatial and temporal relation, typical for Western European tradition or not - that’s what we tried to reveal in this research. Russia no less than West-ern Europe, experienced acute crisis events in the first third of the XX century. In this regard (co-crisis of the epoch is obvious, the theme of the Western culture cri-sis becomes one of the central themes in the works of Russian philosophers of this period. With high probabil-ity we can say that all Russian thinkers of this time in varying degrees addressed the issue of social and cul-tural crisis in the West.

  8. Some Coeval Information Literacy Standards in Anthropology and Sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Yuliy Stavropolsky

    2014-01-01

    The article regards some requirements concerning information literacy and competences which have been exhaustively determined by Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). On their basis the ACRL Anthropology and Sociology Section (ANSS) has determined some indicators of the students’ information literacy development [3]. These indicators are oriented towards a research process’ methodology and tools in cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archeo...

  9. Anthropological Encounters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rutten

    2015-01-01

    In this collection of columns Mario Rutten shows how his training in anthropology has shaped his interpersonal relationships and how he learns from everyday encounters. He describes people from the state of Gujarat in north-west India whom he befriended as a young researcher. He has continued to fol

  10. Anthropology & Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The present book is no ordinary anthology, but rather a workroom in which anthropologists and philosophers initiate a dialogue on trust and hope, two important topics for both fields of study. The book combines work between scholars from different universities in the U.S. and Denmark. Thus, besid......, therefore, also inspire others to work in the productive intersection between anthropology and philosophy....

  11. Medical anthropology and Ebola in Congo: cultural models and humanistic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, B S; Epelboin, A; Hewlett, B L; Formenty, P

    2005-09-01

    Seldom have medical anthropologists been involved in efforts to control high mortality diseases such as Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) This paper describes the results of two distinct but complementary interventions during the first phases of an outbreak in the Republic of Congo in 2003. The first approach emphasized understanding local peoples cultural models and political-economic explanations for the disease while the second approach focused on providing more humanitarian care of patients by identifying and incorporating local beliefs and practices into patient care and response efforts. PMID:16267966

  12. Fatherlessness in first-century Mediterranean culture: The historical Jesus seen from the perspective of cross-cuitural anthropology and cultural psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries van Aarde

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the peasant sociey of Jesus' world the family revolved around the father. The father and the mother were the source of the family, not only in the biological sense, but because their interaction with their child rencreated the structures of society. In first-century Mediterranean culture, fatherlessness led to marginalization. Seen against the background of the patriarchal mind set of Israelites in the Second Temple period, a fatherless son would have been without social identiy. He would have been debarred from being called child of Abraham (that is child of God and from the privilege of being given a daughter in marriage. He would be denied access to the court of the Israelites in the Temple. In this article, with the help of cross-cultural anthropology and cultural psychology, the life of the historical Jesus is explained in social-scientiic terms against the background of the mariage regulations determined by the Temple. The historical Jesus is seen as someone who sufered the stigma of being fatherless but who trusted God as father.

  13. Governing the sense of belonging: An anthropological analysis of "culture"and "identity" in the Constitution of the Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čarna Brković

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this work is critical reconsideration of a cultural idea which is standardized by the highest political-legal document of the Republic of Serbia. I am starting from the assumption that if in the Constitution as a "founding legal and political document of a state", are incorporated concepts of human rights, and, particularly, the rights of the minorities (as set apart and protected, then a certain idea is standardized by it, i.e., a concept about what is Culture or what it should be. The analysis points out to three main problems which stem from writings about culture in the Constitution of the Republic of Serbia from 2006. Firstly, the concept of culture used in the Constitution is grounded in the aged anthropological idea of culture as a complete, homogenous, and authentic whole. This idea of culture carries a great potential for creating cultural conflicts. Secondly, the ways of managing cultural belonging are not carefully considered. The writers of the Constitution have not offered the mechanisms to resolve the potential cultural clashes in which all conflicted parties respect the constitutionally offered solutions. Thirdly, in the Constitution, theses of liberal and multicultural policy of identity are not carefully united. Combining the idea of free and equal citizens with the recognition of specific cultural rights of the minority’s demands developing a specific system for overcoming their contradictions. Such a system has not been offered by the Constitution.

  14. Anthropological and Cultural Features of a Skeletal Sample of Horsemen from the Medieval Necropolis of Vicenne-Campochiaro (Molise, Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    M.G. Belcastro; Facchini, F.

    2001-01-01

    In the medieval necropolis of Vicenne (Italy) among 130 skeletons, thirteen horsemen, recognized on the basis of the contextual burials with horse, have been found. This rite, rarely found in Europe, recalls an Asian rite, attested from the Iron Age to the Age of Migration in nomadic Asian populations. Local and Germanic goods were also found. In order to study the anthropological composition of this population, some morphometrical skeletal features have been analyzed. Heteroge...

  15. 人类学视野中的地域武术文化研究%Regional Wushu Culture Studies:A Perspective of Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振勇

    2016-01-01

    Taking anthropology as a perspective, this paper aims to explore regional Wushu culture studies including its research methods and perspectives, practical operation and application, cultural construction and its signifi-cance. The author proposes that the holistic view of anthropological ethnography can help redefine culture and this culture should be the logical starting point of regional Wushu culture studies;The“logic in fields” and the“fields in logic” illustrate that the learning of“local knowledge” and the interpretation of“the other” cultures are the practical basis of regional Wushu culture studies; Overcoming the regional and national boundaries to seek the universal principles of human culture and its meaning system is the ultimate goal of regional Wushu culture studies;Exploring the meaning of human practice through culture studies and highlighting cultural re-construction are the orientation of regional Wushu culture studies. On this basis, this paper puts forward that re-gional Wushu studies in the future should pay more attention to the microcosmic field investigation and case a-nalysis so as to promote the integration of Wuhsu skills and cultural studies on the academic level, and deepen the anthropological ethnographic insights into Wushu studies. These will provide theoretical enlightenments and practical guidance for conducting regional Wushu culture studies in a comprehensive way.%文章以人类学为视角,对地域武术文化在研究方法与视角、实践操作与运用、文化建构与意义等几个方面进行了探索与思考。认为人类学民族志的整体观让我们重新思考何为文化,以及逐步理解“文化”应成为地域武术文化研究的逻辑起点;“田野中的逻辑”和“逻辑中的田野”告诉我们,学习“地方性知识”以及“他者”文化解读是地域武术文化研究的实践基础;如何突破地域民族的局限,去寻求人类文化的普遍法则

  16. “Approach” and “Threshold” Effects of Large-scale Urban Events on Heritage Conservation:A Study on Heritage Conservation from Standpoint of Cultural Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale urban events like the Olympic Games,the World Expo,etc.,have brought about an "approach" leading to renewed conservation measures for old city areas.While they make many heritages receive better protection,they also create new problem of "threshold" to heritage conservation;thus,ideas about the effects of large-scale urban events on cultural heritage preservation are polarized into two opposite directions.Using cultural anthropology as the basis of analysis,this article interprets how these conflicting concepts came to be.As large-scale urban events accelerate and strengthen urban development,they also often cause the abandonment of specific cultural elements during the process of heritage conservation for the oldest city areas.This leads to a general loss of direction in cultural protection efforts.A potential solution is to unearth the cultural spirit of the old cities and preserve it through practical technologies,in considering the specific function of large-scale urban events.In so doing,it is possible to explore new directions and approaches to conserve the heritages of the old city under the guide of urban cultural development strategies.

  17. Epidemiology and Anthropology: an integrated approach dealing with bio-socio-cultural aspects as strategy for the control of endemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constança Simões Barbosa

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of endemic diseases has not attained the desired level of effectiveness in spite of the use of modern efficient thecnologies. The classic interventionist approach for the control of schistosomiasis is centered on systemic control of the snail hosts combined to large scale medical treatment and is usually carried out without social preocupation due to the assisted communities. It is easy to understand the interest and the ethical compromise of public health research while producing studies in which the biological and social determinants as well as the cultural components should be considered and also encompass the historical dimensions and symbolic representations. In face of the recent political decision in favor of decentralizations of health administration to municipal level, we suggest, in the present paper, an integrated approach for the epidemiological diagnosis of an endemic situation at local level. Theoretical and methodological aspects from both, epidemiology and anthropology are discussed. Epidemiological methods can be used to detect the dependent variables (those related to the human infection and the independent variables (demographic, economic, sanitary and social. Another methodological approach of anthropological /etnographic nature can be conducted in order to make an articulation of the knowledge on the various dimensions or determinant levels of the disease. Mutual comprehension, between researchers and the people under investigation, on the dynamic transmission process would be relevant for a joint construction, at local level, of programmed actions for the control of endemic diseases. This would extend reflections on the health/disease process as a whole.

  18. Forensic archaeology and anthropology : An Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Kate

    2005-09-01

    Forensic archaeology is an extremely powerful investigative discipline and, in combination with forensic anthropology, can provide a wealth of evidentiary information to police investigators and the forensic community. The re-emergence of forensic archaeology and anthropology within Australia relies on its diversification and cooperation with established forensic medical organizations, law enforcement forensic service divisions, and national forensic boards. This presents a unique opportunity to develop a new multidisciplinary approach to forensic archaeology/anthropology within Australia as we hold a unique set of environmental, social, and cultural conditions that diverge from overseas models and require different methodological approaches. In the current world political climate, more forensic techniques are being applied at scenes of mass disasters, genocide, and terrorism. This provides Australian forensic archaeology/anthropology with a unique opportunity to develop multidisciplinary models with contributions from psychological profiling, ballistics, sociopolitics, cultural anthropology, mortuary technicians, post-blast analysis, fire analysis, and other disciplines from the world of forensic science. PMID:25870041

  19. Between Design and Anthropology: Improvising Embodied Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    pillars Segno, Mythus and Techne. Anthropological design research is trans-disciplinary, developing in the connexion between Visual Culture (signal, in/visibility, image/void, imagination, representation), Doing Culture (act, cooperation, relation, fabrication, exchange), Material Culture (object......, artefact, thing, facing, texture), Knowledge Culture (techniques, practices, norms, beliefs, values), Narrative Culture (mythology, significance, meaning, memory, identity), Critical Culture (watching, criterion, antagonism, crisis, theory) and Aesthetic Culture (emotion, sentiment, taste, feel, sense...

  20. Contributions of Anthropology to the Study of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Alice; Hewlett, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence researchers can turn to anthropology to learn the methods of ethnography and cultural comparisons, and they can mine its large database of information on cultures worldwide. But anthropology's single most important contribution is the concept of culture, the mosaic of a group's learned and shared, or at least understood, beliefs,…

  1. Using geoinformatics and cultural anthropology to identify links between land change, driving forces and actors in the Okavango catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Achim; Stellmes, Marion; Pröpper, Michael; Schneibel, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition and Soil Science 176: 479-493. Lindemann, S. (2009). Success and failure in international river basin management - the case of Southern Africa. Facing global environmental change: environmental, human, energy, food, health and water security concepts. H.-G. Brauch, U. Oswald Spring, J. Grinet al. Berlin, Springer: 699-710. Millenium Ecosystem Assessment (2005). Ecosystems and human well-being: Synthesis. Washington, D.C., Island Press. Pröpper, M., T. Falk, et al. (2013). "Partly subsistent household economies and modern consumerism in the Namibian Kavango: Assets, income, expenditure and socio-economic stratification." Biodiversity & Ecology 5: 379-391. Rieprich, R. (2013). Mapping Environmental Valuations. An Ethnographic Case Study of Ecosystem Services and Landscape Values in Kavango, Namibia. Social and Cultural Anthropology. Hamburg, University of Hamburg. Master of Arts: 111. Röder, A., M. Stellmes, et al. (2013). "Cumulative effects of policy and management actions on ecosystem services. Challenges and methodological approaches in the Future Okavango project." Biodiversity & Ecology 5: 167-183. Röder, A., Pröpper, M., Stellmes, M., Schneibel, A. & Hill, J. (2015): Assessing urban growth and rural land use transformations in a cross-border situation in Northern Namibia and Southern Angola. Land Use Policy 42: 340-254. Rogge, D. M., B. Rivard, et al. (2006). "Iterative spectral unmixing for optimizing per-pixel endmember sets." IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 44(12): 3725-3736. Sala, O. E., F. S. Chapin III, et al. (2000). "Global biodiversity scenarios for the year 2011." Science 287: 1770-1774. Weber, M., N. Krogman, et al. (2012). "Cumulative Effects Assessment: Linking Social, Ecological, and Governance Dimensions." Ecology and Society 17(2)

  2. Anthropology and demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an outline of the relationship between anthropology and demography, sometimes depicted as "long, tortured, often ambivalent, and sometimes passionate." Although early anthropologists (primarily British social anthropologists routinely made use of demographic data, especially in their studies of kinship, the two disciplines gradually drifted away from each other. The re-approachment took place from 1960s, and the last fifteen years saw more intensive cooperation and more insights about possible mutual benefits that could be achieved through combining of methodologies and revision of some theoretical assumptions, primarily through anthropological demography. As summarized by Laura Bernardi and Inge Hutter, "Anthropological demography is a specialty within demography that uses anthropological theory and methods to provide a better understanding of demographic phenomena in current and past populations. Its genesis and ongoing growth lies at the intersection of demography and socio-cultural anthropology and with their efforts to understand population processes: mainly fertility, migration, and mortality. Both disciplines share a common research subject, namely human populations, and they focus on mutually complementary aspects" (2007: 541. In the first part of the paper, the author presents some general considerations, like the one that "demography is one of the best understood and predictable parts of human behavior, even if demographers still find themselves unable to predict accurately when parameters will change in interesting ways, such as the ′the baby boom′ or the shift to later childbeanng in the 1970s and 1980s North America" (Howell, 1986: 219. Nancy Howell also noted the importance of demographic anthropology, because, in her words "if we knew, reliably, the birth and death probability schedules of particular populations, we would know a great deal about their size, age composition, growth rate. And with just a

  3. Anthropological reading of science fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the prevalence of the analysis of science fiction literature and science fiction in other segments of popular culture in Serbian anthropology. This overview is preceded by a consideration of science fiction as a genre while keeping in mind the fluidity of the genre and the interweaving of subgenres as well as the transformations which science fiction is undergoing in certain media (books, films, TV shows and video games. In Serbian anthropology research on science fiction is more prevalent than the study of other phenomena, as the number of anthropologists whose work is represented in the paper is fairly large compared to the size of the anthropological community as a whole. The causes for this can primarily be found in a collective focus on questions such as: who are we and who the others are, what the basis of creating and building identity is or what the role of context in recognition of species is. Anthropology gives answers to these questions through the interpretation, explanation and understanding of the world around us, while science fiction does it through the literary considerations of these same questions.

  4. What kind of theory for anthropological demography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Johnson-Hanks

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that demographic anthropology has, for most part, imported rather than exported theory. Yet, the discipline has the potential to generate important rethinking of population, culture, and their interaction. After discussing the state of the field and the challenges that must be faced in developing new theoretical approaches in demographic anthropology, the paper suggests a framework for research based on the related ideas of the "demographic conjuncture" and "construal."

  5. Networks, narratives and territory in anthropological race classification: towards a more comprehensive historical geography of Europe's culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to integrate discourse analysis of politically instrumental imagined identity geographies with the relational and territorial geography of the communities of praxis and interpretation that produce them. My case study is the international community of nationalist scientists who classified Europe's biological races in the 1820s-1940s. I draw on network analysis, relational geography, historical sociology and the historical turn to problematize empirically how spatial patterns of this community's shifting disciplinary and political coalitions, communication networks and power relations emerged, were structured, persisted, changed, interacted and disappeared. I focus especially on core-periphery relations. I argue that if local historical spatial patterns affect those of later phenomena, geographies like that of European integration should be understood in the context of Europe's complex historical cultural geography. Unlike discourse deconstruction alone, this complementary relational de-essentialization of geography can identify large-scale, enduring associations of cultural patterns as well as cultural flux and ambiguity. PMID:21488429

  6. Some anthropological aspects of globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Jelena B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Awareness about the role of anthropological perspective places each anthropological research within the context of globalization, pointing at the need for making the difference between concepts of globalization as the description and as the political project. This differentiation represents a frame of the research of globalization phenomena in order to understand their influence on concrete people in a concrete situation. The importance of the role of concepts in ubiquitous transformation of human lives is also confirmed in the paper. This is the way the influence of one culture unfolds through the dominant concepts, the culture which symbolically and normatively imposes itself as 'global' in spite of the fact that it is 'local' not only (and/or not any more in territorial sense but in its materialistic approach to the values. Hence, horizontal communication (globally available via the internet could serve to the communication of values as crucial spiritual points. It could contribute not only to the widening of cultural circles, but to the evolution of consciousness about the generalization of values up to the universal. This requires transcending of particular interests, which prevent effective conceptualization of the global anthropological meaning.

  7. 渎神——血社火的人类学文化溯源%Profanation Anthropological Cultural Origin of Blood Shehuo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琼

    2012-01-01

    血社火作为陕西乃至全国民间社火中独特的一例,以阴森恐怖、鲜血淋漓的反常态形式呈现出来。根据弗雷泽的人类学观点,其理论根源正在于丰饶仪式中渎神的母题思想和交感巫术中世界象征化的方法。本文分别从渎神和象征的角度对血社火的文化内涵进行了揭示,并进一步探讨了其恐惧和狂欢的心理根源。%According to Fraser's anthropological point of view, Eerie and blood dripping Blood Shehuo, as an unique example in Shaanxi province even the national,it's theoretical roots was from the profanation of Fertility rituals and the way of Symbol the world of Sympathetic magic. The text, Respectively, from blasphemy and symbolic, reveals the culture of Blood Shehuo,and further explores its psychological roots of fear and carnival.

  8. Images of American Indians in Environmental Education: Anthropological Reflections on the Politics and History of Cultural Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willow, Anna J.

    2010-01-01

    For hundreds of years, North America's colonizers worked systematically to eradicate the indigenous cultural practices, religious beliefs, and autonomous political systems many venerate. This article illustrates that imperialist nostalgia underlies and directs portrayals of American Indians in environmental education today. Whether unconsciously…

  9. Diversity and Social Anthropology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uherek, Zdeněk

    Amsterdam : Pallas, 2011 - (Knotter, S.; De Lobel, R.; Tsipouri, L.; Stenius, V.), s. 21-41 ISBN 978-90-8555-044-0 Grant ostatní: European Commission(XE) SUS.DIV, CONTRACT No513438(CIT3) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : social anthropology * social diversity * anthropological theory Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology http://www.aup.nl/do.php?a=show_visitor_book&isbn=9789085550440&l=2

  10. The Influence of Cultural Anthropology on Zhou Zuo-ren’s Translation of Ancient Greek Literature%文化人类学对周作人译介古希腊文学的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兵

    2012-01-01

    As an important thinker during the May the Fourth Movement,Zhou Zuo-ren was greatly influenced by the concepts of cultural anthropology which,at that time,was unfolding itself in the west.Cultural anthropology exerts profound influences upon Zhou’s humane thoughts and translations,especially in the terms of translation from ancient Greek literature.This paper starts off from the aspect of Zhou’s reception of cultural anthropology,and proceeds to analyze Zhou’s purpose,accomplishments and features in translating ancient Greek literature.%作为"五四"时期重要的思想家,周作人深受当时西方方兴未艾的文化人类学的影响。文化人类学理论对周作人的人文思想和翻译活动,尤其是对古希腊文学的翻译发挥着深远的影响。他全景式地译介了希腊的神话、诗歌、戏剧,力图全面展示古希腊人的生活、思想、艺术、人生观、世界观,借以开启民众、教化大众。

  11. Archaeology and Anthropology Sites, community development cultural resource data; per sq. mi., Published in 2004, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Archaeology and Anthropology Sites dataset, published at 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of...

  12. Educational anthropology as a major approach for educational research: The beginnings and the evolution of educational anthropology, with an overview of its introduction in the Greek educational context

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis Sideris

    2013-01-01

    This article is presenting and investigating the input of social and cultural anthropology in educational research. Moreover, the cultural focus is on Greece and Greek educational institutions. Socio-cultural anthropology offers a multiplicity of alternative pathways to the investigation of ‘who we are’ and why we behave the way we do through the study of cultures and institutions different from ours. The anthropology of education investigates a number of problems such as the socialization fu...

  13. Disciplining anthropological demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Randall

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study furthers the epistemological development of anthropological demography, and its role in understanding the demography of Europe. Firstly we situate anthropological demography against the context of an evolving world of research in which boundaries between academic disciplines have become much more permeable. This is achieved via an overview of recent theoretical debates about the role and nature of disciplinarity, including interdisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. Secondly, in order to understand the current state of the art, we sketch out the evolution of anthropological demography, paying particular attention to the different knowledge claims of anthropology and demography. Finally, we flesh out some of the epistemological and theoretical debates about anthropological demography by sketching out the formative research process of our own work on low fertility in the UK.

  14. Cyber anthropology or anthropology in cyberspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2012-03-01

    As a variety of anthropology, cyber anthropology is considered to be the fastest growing sub branch in the science. It is based on synergic effects of multimedia systems and hypermedia, using their comparative advantages. One of the least researched fields of cyber anthropology is the relationship of individuals and social groups with a multimedia document in terms of their perception of such subject. This is because the foundation of social-informatics perception in the society is created based on the evidence of a real life, whereas here the perception is established at the level of virtual, i.e. online life. The rhetorical question here is whether an identical content causes the same or different user reactions, depending on whether it was perceived offline or online, i.e. to what extend does the medium (and not the information content) dictate the user perception. In this respect the research titled "Perception of online museum content creators and actual habits of Croatian online museum visitors" can be a "case study" for the impact of "cyber potential" on the classic anthropological paradigm. PMID:22816231

  15. The anthropology of music: contemporary theoretical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The anthropological study of music focuses on meanings which music hah and produces in a specific sociocultural context. Preferences toward a certain genre of music are tightly linked to the preference of certain cultural values, so music represents an important factor of identification in everyday life. In Serbian ethnology and anthropology music was long viewed as part of Serbian traditional culture, so the interests of researchers focused on “traditional music”. In the 1980’s first papers analyzing music which went outside the traditional frameworks appeared (new folk music – turbofolk, and this tendency has increased in the last ten years.

  16. [Psychoanalysis and social anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisted, Jens A

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore some subjects originated in the work of psychoanalysts and social anthropologists that generated an interesting discussion about the transmission of cultural trends along generations, as well as psychological family features from one generation to the other: we refer to the Oedipus complex model, as it was introduced by S. Freud, and to Malinowski's work on children's sexuality and incest. This text examines the emergency of fieldwork methodology (ethnography), that is, living in the place in which the research is conducted, sharing native languages and listening to the meanings attributed by the people to aspects of their lives. We also show another perspective, in which the researchers share place, language and customs but study for their own sake in order to justify a theoretical concept: resilience. This is one of the results of the transdisciplinary works -carried out by the UBA anthropology and education teams- to which we refer, together with the discussion about the category "educability" and some issues related to the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorders and Hyperactivity. This article proposes a critical approach on the ontological premises of racionalism, idealism and empiricism that preceded the researches mentioned. Finally it presents a perspective in which the imaginary institution of society and the emergency of psychism in singular subjects merge. PMID:23269971

  17. Anthropology and social theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    hopeless project of positing ‘primitive’ or ‘traditional’ society as the opposite of modernity. In contemporary debates, it is becoming increasingly recognized that social theory needs history, back to the axial age and beyond. The possible role of anthropology in theorizing modernity receives far less......This article argues that anthropology may represent untapped perspectives of relevance to social theory. The article starts by critically reviewing how anthropology has come to serve as the ‘Other’ in various branches of social theory, from Marx and Durkheim to Parsons to Habermas, engaged in a...

  18. Existential anthropology: what could it be? An interpretation of Heidegger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Piette

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on an interpretation of the work of Martin Heidegger, this article offers a shift away from social and cultural anthropology, which explores sociocultural aspects, and also from general anthropology, which aims to summarise all dimensions of human being. The author defines the specificity of existential anthropology: observing and conceiving human beings as they exist and continue to exist towards death. With a few twists in relation to Heidegger’s thought, the author discusses what is theoretically and methodologically at stake in this perspective, opening existential anthropology to a large empirical field.

  19. Ecce Homo: Science and Society Need Anthropological Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholts, Sabrina B; Bell, Joshua A; Rick, Torben C

    2016-08-01

    Scientific collections are crucial to understanding the biological and cultural diversity of the Earth. Anthropological collections document the human experience and the interactions between people, ecosystems, and organisms. Unfortunately, anthropological collections are often poorly known by the public and face a variety of threats to their permanent care and conservation. PMID:27220779

  20. New Serbian Anthropology - Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The initiators of the project have envisioned two modes of presentation of new Serbian anthropology. The first type will be the editing of thematic volumes of articles published over the course of the last four decades and comprise the basis of the transformed discipline. These volumes will be presented electronically on the website www.anthroserbia.org. The other type will be the publishing of reviews which would give the wider reading public an insight into the development of certain subgenres of anthropology. With this in mind, Issues in Ethnology and Anthropology has created a special section titled "New Serbian Anthropology" in which, in the coming issues, such reviews will be published.

  1. 77 FR 65403 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology.... Heather Edgar, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM...

  2. Letter Writing and Learning in Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheld, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Writing has special importance in anthropology. Writing fieldnotes is a central methodology for documenting and analyzing culture, and written personal reflections upon this process are viewed as providing insight into how knowledge is produced by a "situated" researcher. That said, there is little discussion in the discipline about the…

  3. Fatherlessness in first-century Mediterranean culture: The historical Jesus seen from the perspective of cross-cuitural anthropology and cultural psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Andries van Aarde

    1999-01-01

    In the peasant sociey of Jesus' world the family revolved around the father. The father and the mother were the source of the family, not only in the biological sense, but because their interaction with their child rencreated the structures of society. In first-century Mediterranean culture, fatherlessness led to marginalization. Seen against the background of the patriarchal mind set of Israelites in the Second Temple period, a fatherless son would have been without social identiy. He would ...

  4. The Colonization of Space. An Anthropological Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Tiziani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The colonization of space implies an adaptation of both physical and cultural type. The human species is characterized by a great adaptive capacity that, in a basically extreme environment, reveals all its plasticity. However, this capacity must be aided by appropriate technological solutions that identify the problems related to long stays in space, and to long space voyages. Anthropology could aid future colonizers rethinking the environment of the spacecrafts, and the habitats of future colonies. Last but not least, anthropology can prepare them to a possible encounter with alien intelligences very different from human way of thinking.

  5. Poultry studies and anthropological research strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poultry are not simply birds; they are also a human creation, a social and cultural practice. The human element is the justification for an anthropology of poultry. Such an anthropology combines the objective research strategies familiar to the natural sciences with what is often called 'subjective' or qualitative research. In the study of poultry management, it is important that both research strategies focus on differences and variation. The subjective approach is particularly useful in identifying and understanding how the motivations and strategies of local actors are dependent on the social positions, which they occupy in their specific societies. (author)

  6. Education, anthropology, ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Taddei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to analyze the relation between anthropology and education, and the relation of both with the experience of life, in a context of debates in which epistemological concerns have gradually been substituted by a reflection on the ontological dimension of existence. Starting with a discussion on the asymmetric historical relation between anthropology and education, in what concerns the analysis of sociocultural dimensions of learning, we propose the inversion of terms of the expression anthropology of education, and then discuss the paradoxes that characterize the relation between the professional education of the anthropologist, identified as an epistemological exercise, and the ontological dimension of the ethnographic experience. From this discussion, the question of the body of the ethnographer emerges as something absent in mainstream ethnographic production, which is identified as an index of the presence of one of the structuring dichotomies of Western epistemology: the separation of mind and body. The works of authors associated to the so-called ontological turn in social sciences are brought to the discussion, and from the analysis of some of their main contributions, new points of contact between education and anthropology, on more symmetric grounds, emerge. From these, it is of special interest the one that focuses on happiness and the plenitude of becomings, which, albeit an unprecedented theme in anthropology, has been part of the pedagogical debates of the last four decades.

  7. AN ANTHROPOLOGY OF THINGS: ETHNOGRAPHY AND METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    messias basques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This bibliographic essay is based on the book that resulted from a series of discussions promoted by a group of doctoral students in the Department of Social Anthropology at Cambridge University in late 1990s. Despite the diversity of ethnographic contexts, all authors share the challenge of recasting the relationship between anthropological theory and ethnographic method in relation to the study of what is conventionally called material culture. Hence the title Thinking Through Things, besides denoting an anthropological question about what informants do, and how the authors could develop versions on the ways from which they perceive and conceive of things also includes the main character of the meetings that led to the writing of this book.

  8. Tracking Porters: Learning the Craft of Techno-Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Maja Hojer; Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Saltofte, Margit

    2015-01-01

    Anthropology attempts to gain insight into people's experiential life-worlds through long-term fieldwork. The quality of anthropological knowledge production, however, does not depend solely on the duration of the stay in the field, but also on a particular way of seeing social situations. The anthropological perspective is grounded in socio-cultural theory and forged by a distinct relativist or contextualist epistemological stance. The point is to understand events, concepts and phenomena from the insiders' point of view and to show how this view relates to the particular social and cultural context. In this chapter, we argue that although anthropology has its specific methodology - including a myriad of ethnographic data-gathering tools, techniques, analytical approaches and theories - it must first and foremost be understood as a craft. Anthropology as craft requires a specific 'anthropological sensibility' that differs from the standardized procedures of normal science. To establish our points we use an example of problem-based project work conducted by a group of Techno-Anthropology students at Aalborg University, we focus on key aspects of this craft and how the students began to learn it: For two weeks the students followed the work of a group of porters. Drawing on anthropological concepts and research strategies the students gained crucial insights about the potential effects of using tracking technologies in the hospital. PMID:26249185

  9. Ontological And Anthropological Aspects of the Concept of Human Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Asha Nimali Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropology is the study of the origin of the man. It is basically concern with the concept of Homo sapiens, and it is scientifically questioning what are human physical traits as well how do men behave and the variation among different groups of  human with his social and cultural dimensions. Ontology is a subfield in traditional philosophy which is mainly focuses on the nature of being, existence or reality as such. There are some similarities and differences among these two areas. However when we deeply study the philosophical basis of the anthropology it is proof that it was derived from ontology.Anthropology discusses the social and cultural world or the physical entity of human nature. Ontology focuses the invisible aspect of human nature along with the ultimate reality. Therefore, it has a metaphysical aspect of human being; this philosophical notion has in fact, contributed to the development of the subject of anthropology. The present modern day has given very little attention to this philosophical combination of  ontolog y to anthropology, rendering further investigation into the philosophical roots of anthropology.This research paper seeks to evaluate the relationship between ontology and anthropology by paying attention to the ontological arguments about the concept of man and human nature within Greek and modern western thoughts, in comparing with modern anthropological arguments.

  10. What is Business Anthropology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa; Larsen, Frederik; Sigurdarson, Hallur;

    2013-01-01

    The anthropology of organizations is always political; it might take place over shorter, as well as longer, time spans and in singular, pluralistic, or even virtual, settings. This paper addresses such issues by describing and analyzing fieldwork experiences of an academic workshop, which took...... place at the Copenhagen Business School in 2012 under the title of ‘The Business of Ethnography’. The purpose of the workshop was to create a forum in which to discuss business anthropology as an emerging field or sub-discipline of anthropology. The paper considers three conditions (reflexivity......, familiarity, and temporality) which give the mise en abyme configuration of the field – the site where action happens – and pose significant challenges to contemporary business ethnographers. We argue that by acknowledging these three factors one can advance easier towards the ambitious goal of rendering...

  11. Towards an Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Architecture and anthropology have always had overlapping interests regarding issues such as spatial organisation, forms of human dwellings and the interplay between social life and physical surroundings. Recent developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore and evolve their...... overlaps and collaboration. However, there are also challenging differences to take into account regarding disciplinary traditions of e.g. communication, temporality and normativity. This article explores the potentials and challenges of architectural anthropology as a distinct sub-discipline, and outlines...

  12. Neuroanthropology or simply Anthropology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Andreas; Frith, Chris D

    2012-01-01

    Neuroanthropology is a new kid on the academic block. It seems to offer a methodological and conceptual synthesis, which bridges current fault lines within anthropology, both as discipline and as departments. We are not convinced that it will deliver on these grounds. However, it has the potential...... to open up novel ways to do and think ‘experimental anthropology’, as a method, as an object of study and as a research aesthetic. This approach, we argue, is probably not neuroanthropological – it may simply be anthropological....

  13. Dutch colonial anthropology in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Buskens, L.P.H.M.; Kommers, J.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to assess the results of colonial anthropology in Indonesia faced some problems, which, until recently, have not been dealt with properly. Therefore, in a newly published comprehensive history of anthropology in the Netherlands, several studies focused on the character, rather than on the substance of colonial anthropology. In the case of Dutch colonial representations of Indonesia, 'colonial anthropology' appears to be an assemblage of various disciplines that constituted a fragment...

  14. Interconnections between theory, history and imagination in anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulić Nada

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the interconnections between theory, history and imagination in anthropology. Anthropology as academic discipline was established on the scholars΄ endeavors to raise the history above simple historiography descriptions to the level of theoretical knowledge and nomotetic science, based on the principles of rationality. Therefore, in a way, the contribution of imaginative thinking to the emergence of anthropology and its influence on the formative processes of multi-cultural exchange has been underestimated. An revised analysis of the importance of imagination in these processes makes possible revision of the history of anthropology asking for new anthropological "literacy" focused on understanding the formative aspects of imagination in constitution of knowledge.

  15. Service-Learning and Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Arthur S.; Colligan, Sumi

    2004-01-01

    This special journal issue is devoted to an exploration of the intersection of service-learning and anthropology. We are interested in the contributions that the field of anthropology can make to community service learning (CSL) and we are interested in how service-learning can and does inform anthropological practice. The assembled papers, 8 case…

  16. Anthropology and nuclear information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article is sketched a paradigm which permits to envisage nuclear information as an anthropologic problem. The author modelizes public information by a general theory of exchange. For him the most urgent problem is to refounding the circulation between the different components of social system. 3 figs,. 2 tabs,. 12 refs

  17. What is anthropological about The Perfect Human?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Line Hassall

    2015-01-01

    Jørgen Leth has classified The Perfect Human as an anthropological film. But is the film anthropological at all? This article explores Leth’s connections with anthropology and finds that he is more inspired by anthropological framing than he is by anthropological research methods.......Jørgen Leth has classified The Perfect Human as an anthropological film. But is the film anthropological at all? This article explores Leth’s connections with anthropology and finds that he is more inspired by anthropological framing than he is by anthropological research methods....

  18. Serious games: Theory in anthropology since the 1980s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Bošković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a critical overview of recent theories in anthropology, particularly following Ortner’s groundbreaking 1984 summary, as well as debates opened up by the Writing Culture symposium and the book that followed (Clifford and Marcus 1986. Beginning with Ortner’s theory of practice, the author presents basic elements of several theoretical currents that influenced anthropology’s development in the last few decades, with particular emphasis on the use of the concept of culture. Post-1980s years provided for increased visibility of other anthropologies, outside of traditional “centers” of anthropological knowledge (i.e. Anglo-American, French and German anthropologies.Some representatives of these traditions, together with certain modifications of structuralism, aided by representatives of the “deconstructionˮ movement (especially in France, additionally influenced the self-questioning in contemporary anthropology, leading gradually to what is sometimes referred to the “ontological turnˮ in contemporary anthropology, exemplified by the Brazilian anthropologist Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. Representatives of this “turn” also see themselves as successors of the theory of practice. The author points to some serious implications of this “turnˮ – including pushing anthropology into the realm of pseudo-science, and making it completely irrelevant for understanding and interpretation of the contemporary world.

  19. Anthropology for the nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anthropological approach to preparing for a turning point in the nuclear age as a result of a large-scale accident or act of terrorism suggests three areas for preliminary study: institutional changes that would reinforce international structures to be more effective in preserving the peace and would redirect military institutions toward that end; cultural changes that would deal with the fears and perceptions of citizens within each nation to find new ways of communication and conflict resolution, but keeping in mind the major class, religious, regional, and ethnic groupings; and global forces that would deal with population pressures. These preliminary studies would need revision after the nuclear event to incorporate the new circumstances. 15 references

  20. Virtual reality and anthropology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991 advanced imaging and post processing techniques were successfully applied in anthropology. Specific techniques include spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions including stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be reproduced using stereolithography, before this method was successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions were established as a routine tool for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques opened totally new insights in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without damaging or even touching them. Many of the most precious specimens from the species Autralopithecus (1.8-3.5 Myears), Homo heidelbergensis (200-600 kyears) or Homo neanderthalensis (40-100 kyears) were scanned during the last 5 years. Often the fossils are filled with a stone matrix or other materials. During the postprocessing routines highly advanced algorithms were used to remove virtually these incrustations. Thus it was possible to visualize the morphological structures that lie beneath the matrix. Some specimens were partially destroyed, so the missing parts were reconstructed on computer screen in order to get estimations of the brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover the computerized form of the data allows new descriptions of morphologic structures by the means of 'geometric morphometrics'. Some of the results may change aspects and interpretations in human evolution. The introduction of new imaging and post processing techniques created a new field of research: Virtual Anthropology

  1. Virtual reality and anthropology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recheis, Wolfgang E-mail: wolfgang.recheis@uibk.ac.at; Weber, Gerhard W.; Schaefer, Katrin; Knapp, Rudolf; Seidler, Horst; Zur Nedden, Dieter

    1999-08-01

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991 advanced imaging and post processing techniques were successfully applied in anthropology. Specific techniques include spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions including stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be reproduced using stereolithography, before this method was successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions were established as a routine tool for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques opened totally new insights in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without damaging or even touching them. Many of the most precious specimens from the species Autralopithecus (1.8-3.5 Myears), Homo heidelbergensis (200-600 kyears) or Homo neanderthalensis (40-100 kyears) were scanned during the last 5 years. Often the fossils are filled with a stone matrix or other materials. During the postprocessing routines highly advanced algorithms were used to remove virtually these incrustations. Thus it was possible to visualize the morphological structures that lie beneath the matrix. Some specimens were partially destroyed, so the missing parts were reconstructed on computer screen in order to get estimations of the brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover the computerized form of the data allows new descriptions of morphologic structures by the means of 'geometric morphometrics'. Some of the results may change aspects and interpretations in human evolution. The introduction of new imaging and post processing techniques created a new field of research: Virtual Anthropology.

  2. Virtual reality and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recheis, W; Weber, G W; Schäfer, K; Knapp, R; Seidler, H; zur Nedden, D

    1999-08-01

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991 advanced imaging and post processing techniques were successfully applied in anthropology. Specific techniques include spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions including stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be reproduced using stereolithography, before this method was successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions were established as a routine tool for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques opened totally new insights in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without damaging or even touching them. Many of the most precious specimens from the species Autralopithecus (1.8-3.5 Myears), Homo heidelbergensis (200-600 kyears) or Homo neanderthalensis (40-100 kyears) were scanned during the last 5 years. Often the fossils are filled with a stone matrix or other materials. During the postprocessing routines highly advanced algorithms were used to remove virtually these incrustations. Thus it was possible to visualize the morphological structures that lie beneath the matrix. Some specimen were partially destroyed, so the missing parts were reconstructed on computer screen in order to get estimations of the brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover the computerized form of the data allows new descriptions of morphologic structures by the means of 'geometric morphometrics'. Some of the results may change aspects and interpretations in human evolution. The introduction of new imaging and post processing techniques created a new field of research: Virtual Anthropology. PMID:10565508

  3. Anthropology and demography

    OpenAIRE

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents an outline of the relationship between anthropology and demography, sometimes depicted as "long, tortured, often ambivalent, and sometimes passionate." Although early anthropologists (primarily British social anthropologists) routinely made use of demographic data, especially in their studies of kinship, the two disciplines gradually drifted away from each other. The re-approachment took place from 1960s, and the last fifteen years saw mo...

  4. RETRATISTAS DE MARIPOSAS. ACERCA DEL LUGAR SUBORDINADO DE LA COMPARACIÓN EN LA ANTROPOLOGÍA SOCIAL Y CULTURAL CONTEMPORÁNEA / Portrayers of butterflies. The subordination of comparison in today's Social and Cultural Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alberto Balbi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available En la antropología social y/o cultural actual, la comparación tiende a ser considerada  como un recurso auxiliar de la etnografía cuya utilidad se limita a la detección y el análisis de la diversidad. En este artículo se argumenta que ello tiene efectos negativos sobre el control de los procedimientos comparativos, la productividad de la etnografía, la capacidad de los antropólogos para producir generalizaciones teóricas y, en consecuencia, la relevancia de la propia disciplina. Se sugiere que, con el objeto de recuperar la capacidad de la disciplina para formular generalizaciones, es necesario restablecer a la comparación en su condición originaria de recurso analítico por derecho propio y desnaturalizar su relación con la diversidad. Asimismo, se esbozan los fundamentos epistemológicos de dicha empresa, para finalmente pasar a delinear dos formas posibles de combinar a la comparación y la etnografía que facilitarían la producción simultánea de análisis de casos y de recursos teórico-metodológicos.  Abstract  In today’s social and/or cultural anthropology, there is a trend to consider comparison as an auxiliary resource to ethnography whose usefulness is restricted to the detection and analysis of diversity. This paper argues that such situation has negative effects on the control of comparative procedures, on ethnography’s productivity, on the ability of anthropologists to produce theoretical generalizations and, consequently, on the relevance of the discipline itself. It is suggested that, in order to recover anthropology’s ability to formulate generalizations, comparison needs to be restored to its original condition of analytical resource in its own right and overcome the naturalization of its connection with diversity. The epistemological foundations of this enterprise are outlined in order to trace two possible ways to combine comparison and ethnography which would facilitate the simultaneous production of

  5. Political Sociology and Anthropology in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Joseph Francisconi

    2008-01-01

    Political Sociology is the study of power in a social setting. Political sociology explores the everyday experiences of people and the shaping of their economic position in a particular society, and the world economy that molds most political issues. Anthropology gives this analysis a historical and cross-cultural reference point, supplementing sociology. We professors must engage in seditious sabotage within the ranks of the university and call everything into question, including higher educ...

  6. Ethnocentric ethics in anthropological research

    OpenAIRE

    Geest, van der, S.

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the application of ethnocentric ethical rules in anthropological research. The ethnocentrism lies in the fact that North American and European definitions of right and wrong are imposed on anthropological research everywhere in the world. Apparently - and ironically - some anthropological committees seem to assume that west- ern values are universally valid. The paper draws mainly on experiences of the author and of PhD researchers supervised by him.

  7. Anthropology of sexual exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalić Velibor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors observe sexual exploitation from an anthropological perspective. They analyze the rational, ethical, emotional and mythological dimensions of human sexuality. Consequently, after setting the phenomenon in a social and historical context, sexual exploitation is closely observed in the contemporary age. Based on thoughts of relevant thinkers, they make the conclusion that the elimination of sexual exploitation is not an utterly legal issue, but political and economical issues as well. Namely, legal norms are not sufficient to overcome sexual exploitation, but, political and economical relationships in contemporary societies, which will be based on sincere equal opportunities must be established.

  8. Guide to the National Anthropological Archives: Smithsonian Institution, by James R. Glenn, National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. 1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Givens

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available The historian of archaeological science will find this volume an indispensable source for culling research materials from the National Anthropological Archives. The Guide is "an overview of the documentation in the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, concerning Native Americans and other cultural groups."

  9. Guide to the National Anthropological Archives: Smithsonian Institution, by James R. Glenn, National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. 1993

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas R. Givens

    1993-01-01

    The historian of archaeological science will find this volume an indispensable source for culling research materials from the National Anthropological Archives. The Guide is "an overview of the documentation in the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, concerning Native Americans and other cultural groups."

  10. Anthropology, tooth wear, and occlusion ab origine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W G

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this essay is to emphasize that anthropology, the study of man in his environments, is a potent tool for scientific discovery and inspiration in dental science. It attempts to capture flashes of creative anthropological insight which have illuminated studies of tooth wear and occlusion in the past. While it documents contributions, understandings, and misunderstandings from Australian and New Zealand dentists, it is not a hagiography. The real saint of this essay is the Australian aborigine. For when men and women are understood in their environments, much is learned from them which challenges preconceptions of our dental science culture. The essay concludes that new, contemporary Australian culture needs to be studied by anthropological approaches if we are to understand how dental erosion is exacerbating tooth wear and damaging the occlusions of contemporary Australians. Much remains to be discovered about contemporary lifestyles, habits, and diets that lead to dental erosion, the principal cause of contemporary tooth wear in this part of the world. PMID:9823723

  11. Anthropologic principle in the management of higher education: motivational aspects of professional teacher education process

    OpenAIRE

    Рябенко, Є. М.

    2014-01-01

    The features of the philosophical principle anthropologic in the management of higher education. Investigated motivational factors teaching in modern Ukrainian universities. It is emphasized that this objective logic deployment of modern socio-political and cultural life transforms the humanism and philosophical anthropology into a new type of world - anthropocentrism. Proved that under the provisions of philosophical anthropological approach , an educational process - is primarily a person w...

  12. Towards a Class Struggle Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Menzies

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Dancing between review and argument this paper lays out a foundation for a class-struggle anthropology -that is, an anthropological practice that can be linked to the ultimate goal of achieving a classless society. To this end we will review those anthropologists who have gone before us, pulling out those works of theirs that we see as critical in (rebuilding a class-struggle anthropology. As part of this process we discuss the relationship between what has stood as Marxist anthropology in North America, the idea of socialism, the political development of the world working class during nine decades since the October Revolution, and the challenges of intellectual continuity in the face of differing generational experiences of Marxist anthropologists. Ultimately we argue that a progressive anthropology necessarily involves political activism in our work, communities, and schools.

  13. Bruner's Search for Meaning: A Conversation between Psychology and Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lutkehaus, Nancy C; Throop, C Jason

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a special issue of Ethos devoted to the work of Jerome Bruner and his careerlong attempts to seek innovative ways to foster a dialogue between psychology and anthropology. The articles in this special issue situate Bruner's meaning-centered approach to psychology and his groundbreaking work on narrative in the broader context of the developmental trajectory of both of fields of inquiry. Bruner's work has been enormously influential in the subfields of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, especially because of his important contributions to our understanding of the intimate relationship between culture and mind. We examine Bruner's past and ongoing engagement with such luminary figures as Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, Alfred Kroeber, Claude Lévi-Strauss, and Clifford Geertz to highlight points of convergence and tension between his version of cultural psychology and contemporary theorizing and practice in psychological anthropology. We also review his practical and theoretical contributions to the fields of medicine, law, and education. PMID:20706551

  14. How to Present Anthropological Disaster Research-Review on Anthropological Research on Landslide Disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan; LAN Jie

    2013-01-01

    fieldwork together with theories from academic thinking .Using the format of “ethnography”, the book gives very practical answers to these questions .It reflects on the au-thor ’ s efforts involving these discussions and knowledge with practical experience in the re-search, and has highly theoretical ambitions as well as pays deep realistic attention to the defini-tion of disaster and the research orientation of an-thropology in disaster research .Li’ s anthropolog-ical disaster research pays attention to the holistic interaction of the ecological surroundings , social structure , cultural conception and historical process .It investigates systematically the associa-tive processes regarding the causes and prevention measures of actual disasters; rescue and coping measures in disasters , and post -disaster recon-struction and restoration .At the same time , the book is also a theoretical practice of ecology , poli-tics, economics, and cultural perspective of an-thropology from the angle of research .It could be said that what the ethnography of Anthropological Research on Landslide Disasters tries to present is the three basic features and academic requirements in anthropological study on disasters .These are:a holistic view;a discussion of process , and a com-prehensive analysis . Anthropological Research on Landslide Disasters by Li Yongxiang , no matter if viewed from the methodology or from the theoretical aspect , reflects a mature trend of anthropology in disaster research .As the first chapter of the book emphasizes , the formation marker of the theory re-lated to anthropological disaster research lies in in-tegrating disasters with society , culture, politics, power, and economics, and, as a result, making disasters as a part of social culture .Hence , an-thropological disaster research aims to investigate comprehensively peoples ’ life experiences , and to reflect on human being ’ s living environment , so-cial structure, values, concepts, and

  15. Nonsecular Medical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, Ian; Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2016-01-01

    A nonsecular medical anthropology insists on the ways medicine and science have constituted 'the secular' itself through the 'secular self'-how medical knowing has been used to craft the secular political subject. As James Boon noted, too often in social theory, "religion gets safely tucked away-restricted theoretically to 'meaning' rather than power" (1998:245). The authors of the six articles in this special issue 'untuck' religiosity from within the norms and numbers of medicine itself, and examine how 'secular' medicine has relied on religious traditions to produce political secularity. These articles demonstrate that 'secular' medicine relies on religious others whose exclusion bespeaks latent religious commitments of citizenship in the modern political realm of health. PMID:26652795

  16. Space migrations: Anthropology and the humanization of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Ben R.

    1992-01-01

    Because of its broad evolutionary perspective and its focus on both technology and culture, anthropology offers a unique view of why we are going into space and what leaving Earth will mean for humanity. In addition, anthropology could help in the humanization of space through (1) overcoming socioculture barriers to working and living in space, (2) designing societies appropriate for permanent space settlement, (3) promoting understanding among differentiated branches of humankind scattered through space, (4) deciphering the cultural systems of any extraterrestrial civilizations contacted.

  17. The Study of Music in Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ristivojević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary anthropology is characterized by a wide array of research topics, with music becoming an increasingly important field of study, which still remains unexplored, at least as far as the interrelationship of music and culture is concerned. However, it should be emphasized that music has been studied within the discipline in different ways. In that sense, the aim of this paper is to point out some of these differences, through taking the dominant theoretical postulates into account. The relevance of the concept of music for anthropological study is evident in the fact that it is a socio-cultural phenomenon which functions as both a cultural artifact and an active element through which different levels of cultural identification are shaped (the individual, collective, local, ethnic, which itself points to the fact that anthropologists themselves don’t necessarily need to engage with “traditional” music. Essentially, any type of music which means something to a group of people is fair game, as evidenced by the growing interest in the phenomenon of popular music in domestic as well as foreign scientific circles.

  18. The anthropology of storytelling and the storytelling of anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Maggio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available These research notes concern what anthropologists currently do, and can do, with stories. Although pleas for narrative have become increasingly widespread in contemporary anthropology, an anthropologist of storytelling cannot but recognise that all anthropological production is to a certain extent a story. A question ensues: what kind of story is an ethnography? These research notes propose an answer by providing, first, a working definition of story tailored to this specific purpose. Secondly, they propound a brief illustration of the three main thematic interests of the anthropology of storytelling: the relational dynamics between the people involved in the storytelling situation; the content of the story, and the storytelling techniques. Thirdly, these aspects are examined in order to claim that an anthropology of storytelling among contemporary anthropologists is a necessary condition to respond concretely to the above-mentioned plea for narrative.

  19. Participant observation, anthropology methodology and design anthropology research inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy; Buch Løgstrup, Louise

    2014-01-01

    engineering students studying in an engineering faculty and engineers working in an energy company. They ask how do you generate anthropological capacities with interaction design engineering students engaged in engineering design processes and employees of an energy company setting out to reframe their......Within the design studio, and across multiple field sites, the authors compare involvement of research tools and materials during collaborative processes of designing. Their aim is to trace temporal dimensions (shifts/ movements) of where and when learning takes place along different sites of...... practice. They do so by combining participant observation, anthropology methodology and design anthropology research inquiry engaging with practice based explorations to understand if methods and methodologies, understood as being central to anthropological inquiry, can be taught to interaction design...

  20. Why all anthropology should be called techno-anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This chapter argues that if we follow a pragmatist understanding of humans and technologies, there is no reason to keep these phenomena strongly separated. The suggestion that all anthropology should be called techno-anthropology might provoke some readers, but it is first and foremost intended as...... an invitation to think in ambitious terms about what techno- anthropology might be(come). The main contribution of the chapter is to introduce Bruno Latour and John Dewey as techno-anthropologists. While these two thinkers are known for many other engagements, and wrote in different times, they share......-anthropologist moves, I turn to Dewey’s understanding of technology as inquiry, a concept that deliberately ignores the physical/psychological dichotomy. The chapter concludes with a couple of empirical examples of how the pragmatist perspective might guide techno-anthropological analysis....

  1. Techno-Anthropology for Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents the principles of anthropology-driven design, explaining and examining the ideas and motivations behind basing technology design on ethnography and user participation. That is, anthropology-driven design is presented as a design process where analytical findings derived from...... ethnographic field studies are used in combination with participatory design techniques in order to promote democratic participation as well as mobilize the users knowledge as a resource in the design process. This ‘new move’ may be said to create new types of significant proximity between Anthropology...

  2. History of Sports Events Value from Perspectire of Culture Anthropology%文化人类学视角下体育赛事价值的历史变迁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢小瑛; 黄晓灵

    2015-01-01

    Sports events has important status in the construction of sports culture,the article took sports events as a kind of cultural phenomenon of human social life of spirit and mental significance. On the basis of sports history,the development of sports events were divided into 3 stages and its value changes untangled. Reasons of sports value change in different periods were dissected by culture anthropology. The value of sports events focused on human development and needs vary reflecting in politics,economy,cul-ture,education and moral belief.%体育赛事在体育文化建设中具有举足轻重的的地位,文章将体育赛事定位为一种人类社会生活具有精神和心理表征意义的文化现象。依体育史分期将体育赛事发展分为三个阶段并对其价值变迁脉络进行梳理,结合文化人类学理论分析不同时期体育赛事价值变迁的原因;认为体育赛事围绕人的发展需要,表现在政治、经济、文化教育、道德信仰等方面的价值随历史不断向前演进在各时代体现程度不同,各有侧重。

  3. Neoliberal individualism in Dutch universities: teaching and learning anthropology in an insecure environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Bal; E. Grassiani; K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on our own experiences and that of several of our colleagues teaching social and cultural anthropology in different Dutch institutions for higher learning. We focus in particular on teaching and learning in two small liberal arts and science (LAS) colleges, where anthropology m

  4. A Non-oedipal Psychoanalysis? Clinical Anthropology of Hysteria in the works of Freud and Lacan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haute, P.I.M.M. van; Geyskens, T.A.L.

    2012-01-01

    The different psychopathologic syndromes show in an exaggerated and caricatural manner the basic structures of human existence. These structures not only characterize psychopathology, but they also determine the highest forms of culture. This is the credo of Freud's anthropology. This anthropology i

  5. 76 FR 56468 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico has completed an inventory of human remains, in... itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of...

  6. Neoliberal Individualism in Dutch Universities: Teaching and Learning Anthropology in an Insecure Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Ellen; Grassiani, Erella; Kirk, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on our own experiences and that of several of our colleagues teaching social and cultural anthropology in different Dutch institutions for higher learning. We focus in particular on teaching and learning in two small liberal arts and science (LAS) colleges, where anthropology makes up part of the social science curriculum…

  7. 77 FR 32991 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University... Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California, Davis, has completed an inventory of human... itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Department of...

  8. 77 FR 32983 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University... Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California, Davis, has completed an inventory of human... itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Department of...

  9. Anthropology in the context that produced it

    OpenAIRE

    Terence Rajivan Edward

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates a definition of anthropology at home formulated by Marilyn Strathern in her book contribution ‘The Limits of Auto-Anthropology’. According to the definition, anthropology at home is anthropology carried out in the social context that produced this discipline. I argue that this is not an adequate definition of anthropology at home.

  10. The Tourism Anthropology Research on Traditional Culture of She Minority%畲族传统文化的旅游人类学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旭

    2014-01-01

    畲族是一个历史悠久的少数民族,主要散居在我国东南山区,在社会历史发展的进程中构建了畲族的传统文化。在旅游业,特别是民族旅游被作为一种文化资本,在当今经济社会发展的体制下作为发展战略以来,畲族传统文化经历了消失、重视、再现的变迁过程。文章梳理了畲族传统文化的基本特征,就旅游开发实践过程中畲族传统文化取得的成绩和面临的问题,如何复兴与发展畲族传统文化提出了一些想法。%She is a minority with a long history, who mainly live dispersedly in southeast mountain areas in our country.The traditional culture of She is constructed in the process of social and historical development.In tourism in-dustry, especially the ethnic tourism regarded as a kind of cultural capital, the traditional culture of She minority expe-rienced a transition process of disappearing, being valued and reproducing.The paper combs the basic features of She's traditional culture.It raises some thinking of the achievements and the problems of traditional culture in the process of tourism development practice.At last, it thinks deeply how to make a revival and development of traditional culture.

  11. Culture, territories, and confidence in food: an anthropological view on health in the context of environmental pollution and socio-political tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargès, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Pollutants in the environment as well as potential risks to human health and health policies are leading to profound changes in the food chain. Whether dietary patterns and medical interventions are accepted, depends on the cultural and territorial anchorage of the populations, their socio-cultural past as well as scientific uncertainty and modalities of objectification of social actors. Controversies, debates, and the media influence governance. Local and minority experiences open up global perspectives. This paper focuses on the necessary contextualization of events at the crossroads of various social sciences. The exposure of fish-eating native people to methylmercury in Canada is used as an example. PMID:18374451

  12. Beauty and Health: Anthropological Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Edmonds, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This essay, written as a ‘teaser’ for an up-coming symposium, reflects on how human beauty can be understood from an anthropological and medical anthropological perspective. First, it considers how aesthetic and healing rationales can conflict or merge in a variety of medical technologies and health practices. Second, it discusses beauty in relation to the socioeconomic transformations of modernity and globalization. It suggests the need for a theoretical framework that departs from a strictl...

  13. Some anthropological aspects of globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Đurić Jelena B.

    2002-01-01

    Awareness about the role of anthropological perspective places each anthropological research within the context of globalization, pointing at the need for making the difference between concepts of globalization as the description and as the political project. This differentiation represents a frame of the research of globalization phenomena in order to understand their influence on concrete people in a concrete situation. The importance of the role of concepts in ubiquitous transformation of ...

  14. What Makes People Good or Bad? (MisAnthropological Essay on Searching for Social/ Cultural Reasons on Judging the Other People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss thinking of people which is informed by culture, social institutions and personal experiences, and which shows significant tendency not to operate in simply binary mode when it is about people from somebody’s imminent social surrounding. Two examples are presented form the nowadays Belgrade. It is argued that at least people of this particular social context, who tend to deploy more nuances in the judging on and labelling their neighbours seen as bringing some kind of disruption of the social order then to those people they think as of generic categories only, are informed by such social/cultural perspectives on human being which paramount it, but also suggest its capacity for serious wrong doing.

  15. What Makes People Good or Bad? (Mis)Anthropological Essay on Searching for Social/ Cultural Reasons on Judging the Other People

    OpenAIRE

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss thinking of people which is informed by culture, social institutions and personal experiences, and which shows significant tendency not to operate in simply binary mode when it is about people from somebody’s imminent social surrounding. Two examples are presented form the nowadays Belgrade. It is argued that at least people of this particular social context, who tend to deploy more nuances in the judging on and labelling their neighbours seen as bringing s...

  16. Questioning the Search for Illness Narratives in Medical Anthropology: Can we talk about actual pain experiences?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Marie Louise

    BACKGROUND: This critique stems from a self-experienced frustration with the perspectives offered by current medical anthropology, when faced with informants in severe, acute pain. AIM: By shifting between discussing former and current academic approaches to pain in anthropology and examining...... anthropological literature on pain from the 1950's up to today. RESULTS: The anthropological focus on pain has changed considerably during the last century from exotic tales of cultural codes of pain behaviour to illness narratives of pain experience. This shift in focus not only mirrors changes in our profession...... (the urge to escape cultural essentialism) but also reflects a current epistemological trend in much medical anthropology, namely the fascination by illness narratives. The illness narrative (of the patient) is said to offer unique insights into the human experience of pain, and is equally believed to...

  17. Future Horizons in Anthropology and Education: The View from 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, Robert B.

    1977-01-01

    The outgoing president of the Council on Anthropology and Education discusses "areas of substantive concern that our organization and field might wisely attempt to grow into." He focuses on cultural futuristics, global emphasis, macro approaches, quantitative methodology, political economy, dependency, exploitation, life-long and nonformal…

  18. Toward Common Ground: The Uses of Educational Anthropology in Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerath, Peter; Mattheis, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews advances of interest to multicultural educators and researchers in the complementary disciplines of multicultural education and educational anthropology including the culture concept; biological and sociological conceptions of "race;" postmodern understandings of identity and subjectivity; and ethnographic accounts…

  19. Cultural barriers to effective communication between Indigenous communities and health care providers in Northern Argentina: an anthropological contribution to Chagas disease prevention and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ninety percent of the aboriginal communities of Argentina are located in areas of endemic vectorial transmission of Chagas disease. Control activities in these communities have not been effective. The goal of this research was to explore the role played by beliefs, habits, and practices of Pilaga and Wichi indigenous communities in their interaction with the local health system in the province of Formosa. This article contributes to the understanding of the cultural barriers that affect the communication process between indigenous peoples and their health care providers. Methods Twenty-nine open ended interviews were carried out with members of four indigenous communities (Pilaga and Wichi) located in central Formosa. These interviews were used to describe and compare these communities’ approach to health and disease as they pertain to Chagas as well as their perceptions of Western medicine and its incarnation in local health practice. Results Five key findings are presented: 1) members of these communities tend to see disease as caused by other people or by the person’s violation of taboos instead of as a biological process; 2) while the Pilaga are more inclined to accept Western medicine, the Wichi often favour the indigenous approach to health care over the Western approach; 3) members of these communities do not associate the vector with the transmission of the disease and they have little awareness of the need for vector control activities; 4) indigenous individuals who undergo diagnostic tests and accept treatment often do so without full information and knowledge; 5) the clinical encounter is rife with conflict between the expectations of health care providers and those of members of these communities. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that there is a need to consider the role of the cultural patterning of health and disease when developing interventions to prevent and control Chagas disease among indigenous communities in Northern Argentina

  20. Ethics in Anthropological Research: Responsibilities to the Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Biswas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, in anthropological research, ethics has become more relevant, more meaningful as well as structured in nature. In USA, specially after World War II, American Anthropological Association enacted code of ethics for anthropological research. However, in India, we have no such ethical guidelines from any of the association of anthropology; rather promote a space where researcher can create and evolve their own code of ethics. Ethical issues for anthropologists are manifold- their relations with research participants, with institution and colleagues, with own and host government and with society and funding agency of the project. Among these, the first one is most important, and present paper intends to identify ethical issues related with research participants; which includes informed consent, privacy, confidentiality, vulnerability, risk-benefit, deception, compensation and so on. The present work also intends to identify issues for which anthropologists criticize some components of bioethics because of their abstract principles derived from arm-chair philosophy, ethnocentric view and lack of cross-cultural analysis for that they prepare a readymade ethical code of conduct which may differ significantly from culture to culture.

  1. Disciplines of Collection: Founding the Dresden Museum for Zoology, Anthropology and Ethnology in Imperial Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Petrou, Marissa Helene

    2016-01-01

    I explore three different themes in the history of science through the lens of the museum: 1) science and the public; 2) science and empire; 3) material and visual culture. The book is an institutional history of a provincial museum with international aspirations to standardize museum management and anthropological practice. The founding director of the Dresden Museum for Zoology, Anthropology and Ethnography proposed an historical, non-essentialist approach to understanding racial and cultur...

  2. Anthropology, tourism and transition: Concepts of tourism development in Knjaževac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baćević Jana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological research of tourism in Serbia has usually followed a somewhat simplified concept according to which theory translates into application or practice; that is, anthropology offers conclusions to be later applied in tourism development. The domain of anthropological expertise in this matter was traditionally considered to be "popular" or folk culture, or rather its use in tourism. However, I claim that anthropology of tourism offers a greater number of research opportunities, especially in view of development of tourism as part of transitional processes. In this paper, I present the preliminary results of research on concepts of tourism development in Knjaževac, conducted in 2003 and 2005, and point to how attitudes that people have towards tourism reflect their perception and conceptualization of wider social and economical processes such as transition and globalization. Finally, I discuss some of the implications of these concepts for the future application of anthropology in tourism research.

  3. Utopian Education and Anti-Utopian Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the connection of education, utopia and anthropology, aiming to tease out some educational implications of anti-utopian anthropological essentialism and to show why these should be staved off. It will be shown how an anthropology that tarnishes human nature operates and how it affects educational intervention in the shaping…

  4. Disciplining the Discipline: Anthropology and the Pursuit of Quality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Disciplinary knowledge in anthropology occupies a unique position in relation to quality education: anthropology in education and the anthropology of education. This essay differentiates between anthropology as a field, as a repository of content and disciplinary knowledge (anthropology in education), and anthropology as a tool, as a theoretical…

  5. Joint Attention and Anthropological Difference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2014), s. 59-70. ISSN 1718-0198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP401/10/1164 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : joint attention * anthropological difference * phenomenology * great apes * shared intentionality Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  6. Business, Anthropology, and Magical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Magic is one of the oldest subjects of discussion and theorizing in anthropology. From time to time, anthropologists, as well as other scholars from other disciplines, have suggested that magic is not specific to “primitive” societies, but is alive and well in contemporary industrialised societies...

  7. Anthropology and Multiple Modernities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    “modernities” over the last 10 years, this paper wishes to address the analytical usefulness of this conceptual development. What is it about these concepts that make them useful as we try to capture the World today? Rather than providing any substantial definitions as to what those modernities are about (or...... what they are not about), anthropologists have used ethnographies to demonstrate how modernities are lived and constructed differently in different cultural contexts. To a very large extent, anthropologists intend these multiple modernities to refer to the interplay between local and global...... configurations. However, if the current pluralizing of modernity ultimately serves to describe the variety of cultural forms that co-exist in the World today, the analytical value of the concept risks being watered down, and little is gained in perspective. Arguably, other concepts would have served the purpose...

  8. Research on Gift Alienability from Anthropology Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Economics is usually elaborate economic phenomena from an objective point of view. While Anthropologist is more related with the social and culture field, to describe the sequential change of the particular economic action and bring it to a particular social structure.As a social behavior, the characteristics of economic activity have notable humanism particularity. The economic study includes not only the data collection or logic calculation, though the universal law exists for the base of academic conjecture. The economic phenomenon also receives influence from integrated factors, full of uncertainty as other human activity. Only if we take the social and cultural background and personal experience into our consideration, the conventional and exceptional economic phenomenon might be more recognizable.The mutual influence between culture and economy will be examined. Culture has its significant impact on economic activity, and in certain condition, culture or immaterial ideology would become commodity itself. It is inaccessible to interpret these phenomenon by stereotype the classical economic rule mechanically. Besides the traditional practical value, emotional value should also be taken into account. The explanation of economic phenomena would be more thoroughly with the Anthropology perspective involved.

  9. Perspectives in Business Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on extensive fieldwork in a wide range of creative industries to argue that creativity itself is under-theorized, and should be considered as both enabled and inhibited by numerous constraints guiding the choices made by creative personnel during the course of their work. Six sets...... of constraints are outlined in the context of different forms of cultural production: material, temporal, spatial, social, representational and economic. It is argued that the performance of creative work is similar in part to Turner's concept of "communitas," when an aura of individual creativity is passed...... to other participants. This kind of liminal space is also found in creative industry ritual events, which enable participants to communicate on an equal footing and gain knowledge and connections that they can then use at work in their normal everyday lives. These in turn may have a long-term effect...

  10. Visual anthropology as a discipline of words. On the importance of the verbal in visual archives

    OpenAIRE

    Thurnherr, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Paul Hockings’ Principles of Visual Anthropology opened with Margaret Mead’s article ‘Visual Anthropology in a Discipline of Words’. In her prefatory lines Mead lamented that too many research projects “insist on continuing the hopelessly inadequate note-taking of an earlier age.” Today, some forty years after the first publication of Mead’s text, the opposition of the verbal and the visual still seems to loom over the full acceptance of the visual in cultural anthropology.

  11. Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Mette Gislev

    2015-01-01

    This focus section explores the opportunities of design anthropology in participatory design as an approach to research and design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in Participatory design to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways...... to involve people in defining user-needs and design opportunities. As the boundaries between diverse – material, digital and networked – spaces and experiences become increasingly blurred, so do the conventional distinctions between research and design. The papers presented in this focus section...... explore opportunities of using design anthropology as a holistic and critical approach to addressing societal challenges and change, and a way for anthropologists and designers to engage in participatory research and design that extend beyond the empirical....

  12. Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Gislev Kjærsgaard, Mette

    2014-01-01

    In this workshop we explore the opportunities of ethnography and design anthropology in Participatory Design (PD) as an approach to design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in PD to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways to...... involve people in defining user-needs and design opportunities. As the boundaries between physical, digital and hybrid spaces and experiences become increasingly blurred, so do conventional distinctions between research and design. This half-day workshop invites participant to discuss and explore...... opportunities of using design anthropology as a holistic and critical approach to societal challenges, and a way for anthropologists and designers to engage in design that extends beyond the empirical....

  13. The Theoretical Background of Understanding Urban Identity in the Anthropological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Karpovets, Maksym

    2014-01-01

    In the article, the theoretical background of the interpretation of urban identity is given using examples from anthropological studies. Urban identity is interpreted in terms of corporeality, memory and history of the city, and community. It is interpreted as a conflict of own and alien, anonymous and public, unique and secondary parts inside the cultural space of identity. The anthropology of the city offers a range of perspectives in the interpretation of identity, particularly in the cont...

  14. On the Other Side of Hyperactivity: an Anthropology of ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Marc

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation, On the Other Side of Hyperactivity: an Anthropology of ADHD, provides a meta-historical and cultural perspective on the emergence and proliferation of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the United States over the last three decades. Through in-depth multi-sited ethnography (15 months in the San Francisco Bay Area) with doctors, educators, parents, and children as well as detailed archival research into the disorder's antecedents, my research explores how ADH...

  15. Bruner's Search for Meaning: A Conversation between Psychology and Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lutkehaus, Nancy C.; Throop, C. Jason

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a special issue of Ethos devoted to the work of Jerome Bruner and his careerlong attempts to seek innovative ways to foster a dialogue between psychology and anthropology. The articles in this special issue situate Bruner's meaning-centered approach to psychology and his groundbreaking work on narrative in the broader context of the developmental trajectory of both of fields of inquiry. Bruner's work has been enormously influential in the subfields of cultural psychology and psyc...

  16. Riflessioni antropologiche sulla religione - Some anthropological reflections on religion

    OpenAIRE

    Antonino Colajanni

    2015-01-01

    A series of general, theoretical and methodological reflections on the different forms of religious ideas and practices diffused among all human cultures is here proposed from an anthropological point of view. The first step is based on the consideration that the most diffused idea within very different social contexts is that of the existence of spiritual not-human invisible beings, capable of influencing the lives of the humans, if addressed in certain forms and in certain times. A commo...

  17. Anthropological Component of Descartes’ Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to outline and comprehend the Descartes’ theory about anthropological component of ontology as the most important part of his philosophy. The accomplishment of this purpose covers the successive solution of the following tasks: 1 review of the research literature concerning the problem of human’s presence and the individual nature of truth; 2 emphasize the ambivalence of the basic intention of his legacy; 3 justify the thesis about constitutivity of human’s presence and comprehend passions as the form of disclosure of ontology’s anthropological component. Methodology. The use of the euristic potential of phenomenology, postpositivism and postmodernism makes it possible to emphasize the multiple-layer and multiple-meaning classical philosophy works, to comprehend the limitation and scarcity of the naïve-enlightening vision of human nature and to look for a new reception of European classics that provides the overcoming of established nihilism and pessimism concerning the interpretation of human nature. Scientific novelty. It is the first time that anthropological component of Descartes’ ontology became an object of particular attention. It previously lacked attention because of following main reasons: 1 traditional underestimating of the fact of Descartes’ legacy incompleteness as an unrealized anthropological project and 2 lack of proper attention to the individual nature of truth. The premise for its constructive overcoming is the attention to ambivalence of the basic intention and the significance of ethics in the philosopher’s legacy. His texts and research literature allow confirming the constitutive nature of human’s presence and passions as the key form of disclosure of the ontology anthropological component. Conclusions. The established tradition of interpretation the Descartes’ philosophizing nature as the filiation process of impersonal knowledge loses its cogency these days. The

  18. 76 FR 48178 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr., Hamilton, NY 13346.... Jordan Kerber, Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,...

  19. 77 FR 52058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Museum of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr... Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr., Hamilton, NY...

  20. Applying anthropology in the development of former colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ribić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available From the sixth to the eight decade of the twentieth century, horizontally integrated and sector approach intermingled, and the renewed interest for the influence of development on the poor in the second half of the seventies, brought about the larger than ever engagement of anthropologists in developmental projects. In the twenties “sustainable” became the credo for development, and for anthropologists, cultural ecologists and human rights representatives, sustainability meant the capability of the people to preserve and maintained their mode of life. The usual stance is that developmental anthropology as a profession is constituted upon the general anthropology, and that one of its perspectives in relation to the development planning arises from the understanding of the process of birocratic decision making and the use of profound knowledge of cultures, institutions and historical trends in a particular country, as well as from the insights obtained from comparative studies of comparable institutions in other countries. The objective is to arrive to an unambiguous and anticipatory assessment of decisions-consequences relating to the distribution of resources, and the foremost trait of such perspective is the focus on, in a cultural pattern based, perceptions, goals, interests, strategies and organizations of the planned clients and members of other groups, including the elite and the administrators, whose cooperation is a precondition of change. On the other hand, anthropologists who reject such understandings of developmental anthropology, rebuff an occidental view of development as a historical necessity.

  1. 兴起中的技术人类学%The Rising of Technological Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王皓

    2015-01-01

    技术人类学可分为微观和宏观两种,微观技术人类学以物质文化研究为基础,宏观技术人类学则关注技术与社会的交互作用。技术人类学兴起的标志是莱蒙里尔和普法芬伯格对这两种理解进行总结,提出以社会技术系统为核心的技术人类学。传统人类学危机、科学与技术的区别、技术哲学经验转向和技术人类学的参与者视角是技术人类学得以兴起的四大原因。当前的技术人类学研究存在着学科建制不健全、研究范式不完善和个案研究不足三大问题。%Technological anthropology can be divided into microscopic anthropology and macroscopic anthropology.The former takes the studies of material culture as its basis while the latter is concerned with the interaction between technology and society.The rising sign of technological anthropology is that Pierre Lemonnier and Bryan Pfaffenberger summarized the two types of understanding,and put forward a new anthropology of technology by taking the social technology system as its core. The rising of technological anthropology can be attributed to the four factors—crises of traditional anthropology, differences between science and technology, empirical turning of technological philosophy, and participants’ perspectives of technological anthropology. As to the current research of technological anthropology,such problems do exist as incomplete discipline system,imperfect research paradigm and inadequate case studies.

  2. Rethinking Anthropologies in Central Europe for Global Imaginaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinková, Hana; Uherek, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 12, 1/2 (2014), s. 89-90. ISSN 1212-4923 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : rethinking anthropology * European anthropology * Prague * ethnography Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology , Ethnology

  3. Engaged anthropology and corporate volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Blahová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present engaged anthropology and its methodological tools with a specific perspective of the research field and the position of the researcher with regard to research subjects. The study focuses on corporate volunteering as one of the forms of collaboration between the non-profit and the private sectors seeking solutions to social problems and community development. Volunteering projects contribute to the interlinking of the knowledge, skills, experience and resources of corporate employees and the representatives of the non-profit or the public sector. It is a part of the philanthropic strategy of companies which are willing to present themselves as entities responsible towards the environment in which they run their business, and towards their employees, partners and customers. Engaged anthropology can bring, through its methodological tools, a new perspective of corporate volunteering. Community-based participatory research on the process of knowledge creation includes all partners on an equal basis and identifies their unique contribution to problem solution and community development.

  4. Anthropology and/with/as Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Call for Contributions to HAU Journal of Ethnographic Theory, Special Issue 2017 Working Title: Anthropology and/with/as Education. Editors Suna Christensen and Jennifer Clarke. This HAU international competition for special issues will be published in 2017; selected special issues, after...... publication in the journal, will be made available in paperback by HAU BOOKS, printed and distributed by the University of Chicago Press. We are proposing a special issue for the above competition that considers the theme of anthropology and, with, or as education. In doing so our hope is to develop...... and education. This volume thus seeks to situate an anthropology of/through learning as a self-transformational process. Tim Ingold has argued that the role of anthropology is educational (2014). This is presented as an argument against predominant approaches to relationships between education and anthropology...

  5. Czech národopisci and socio-cultural anthropologists in a changing environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uherek, Zdeněk

    1. Halle/Saale: Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, 2007 - (Mann, B.), s. 41-48. (Working Papers. 90) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : socio - cultural anthropology * Czech Republic * East European Anthropology * Czech ethnography Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  6. INFORMATIZATION: PHILOSOPHICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kosolapov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.Computerization and informatization in recent decades gave the mankind automated electronic document management systems, automated process of production, Internet and network information resources WWW, expanded the communications capabilities and led to the globalization of the information society. At the same time gives rise to a number of processes of informatization philosophical and anthropological problems, that has become an existential character. It is necessary to identify and understanding of these issues on the basis of the gnoseological model of the evolution informatization paradigms and determine their main characteristics. Methodology. The system-activity approach was used; it allowed identifying and analyzing the impact of the main components of information and communication technologies (ICT for educational activities. And further to present them as a unified system of human activity in conditions computerization/informatization. The philosophical principles: a comprehensive review of the subject, the unity of the logical and historical, ascending from the abstract to the concrete was used. The general scientific principles: unity and development of the system, the decomposition hierarchy, individualization and cooperation, diversity and taxonomy were applied. Findings.The three-stage gnoseological model of the paradigms computerization/informatization evolution was proposed by the author. It is based on three information system characteristics: speed, interface and data access. The seven-bar anthrop-centric model, which is called the architecture of information systems (AIS, which describes the changes in their types of procuring, was proposed for each paradigm. The philosophical-anthropological problems that affect negatively its progress were formulated for each stage of modern information society transformation. Originality. The gnoseological model of development processes of informatization in the form of three

  7. African widows: anthropological and historical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, Maria G

    2003-01-01

    Variety characterizes widows' experiences around the world and in Africa south of the Sahara. This article explores the socioeconomic and cultural contexts of African widowhood, using anthropological studies in a number of African societies, including the author's research among Abaluyia of western Kenya. Some features of African widowhood are characteristic of African women's lives regardless of their marital status: their embeddedness in kinship systems and dependence on those systems for claims to productive resources, their economic self-reliance (which does not mean prosperity), strongly gendered divisions of labor, and the pervasiveness of patriarchal gender relations. Other features are specific to widowhood, including remarriage, issues of personal autonomy, and loss of status, access to productive resources and social support. Colonial and postcolonial historical transformations, including Africa's current dire economic situation and the AIDS epidemic, are considered in relation to widows' lives. An interesting question (given the theme of this edited volume) is whether a husband' s death puts African widows "on their own again," and whether, given African systems of kinship and marriage, most African women (and indeed men, too) can ever be said to be "on their own." PMID:14604001

  8. A sociologist's apprentice of social anthropology perplexities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Humberto Lapa Caria

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is the systematization of Communication presented in thematic panel on "Ethnography" at the Third Congress of Portuguese Anthropology, which took place in Lisbon, ISCTE / ICS, in April 2006. Bring therefore a few critical contributions to the reflection of Sociology in Anthropology in Portugal, only wanting to limit myself to a vision that results of my journey of learning between these two disciplines and at the same time, demand respect certain principles of the method anthropological So that my short words here, a contribution may be interesting for reflection between anthropologists.

  9. Digital-Visual-Sensory-Design Anthropology: Ethnography, Imagination and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In this article I outline how a digital-visual-sensory approach to anthropological ethnography might participate in the making of relationship between design and anthropology. While design anthropology is itself coming of age, the potential of its relationship with applied visual anthropology methodology and theory has not been considered in the…

  10. Anthropology and/as an applied ethics:Theory and methods "hidden" in the Code of Ethics of the American Anthropology Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the forthcoming reactivation of the Serbian Ethnology and Anthropology Association and the normalization of the work of professional associa- tions, as well as their occasional adoption of their ethical codes in Serbia, we are analyzing the Code of ethics of the wolrd’sargest professional anthropological associ- ation – that of American Anthropological Association (AAA. Starting from the as- sumption that ethic codes are not "pure" moral algorithms of what is desirable/correct, but that they are laden by "hidden" theoretical and methodological assumptions, whether by their direct authors, or on the level of the tacit disciplinary knowledge, we are examining what can Serbian ethnological/anthropological community learn out of the genesis, structure, function and critique directed at AAA Code of Ethics. We are also considering the thesis that such codes could be approached as legitimizing narra- tive practices, not unlike those of magic, through which the discipline is attempting to transform itself from the status of fluid and generally socially unrecognized (and even obscure occupation into a generally recognized, formally licensed and respecta- ble profession. We suggest for anthropology in Serbia to construct its professional sta- tus by forming an alliance with applied ethics offering the services of customization of ethic codes to other professions, through cultural analysis of moral decision-ma- king, instead of legitimizing itself by a contradictory code of ethics, burdened with hollow magic principles and theoretical and methodological issues.

  11. From a political anthropology to an anthropology of policy: interview with Cris Shore

    OpenAIRE

    Shore, Cris; Durão, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Cris Shore is one of the few anthropologists who have been studying “the makings of politics” and has put forward creative bridges connecting anthropology, political science, organisational studies and sociology. Shore is currently Chair of Anthropology and Head of Department at the University of Auckland (New Zealand), after lecturing at the Goldsmiths College, University of ­London (UK), between 1990 and 2003. Shore’s works include titles such as Anthropology of Policy: Critical Perspective...

  12. Anthropology as multi-natural ontology?

    OpenAIRE

    Ratner, Helene

    2013-01-01

    As her title indicates, Marianne de Laet suggests that social epistemology could be thought of as anthropology, in terms of how this mode of knowing has helped flesh out the social dimensions of scientific knowledge. She does so firstly, by accounting for how anthropological methods and concepts have contributed to science and technology studies (STS) by providing an alternative to “believing the natives” i.e., scientists, hence challenging positivist and objectivist accounts o...

  13. [Historical development of anthropology in Basel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, R

    1986-12-01

    The author reports on the history of physical anthropology in Basel (Switzerland). The anthropological research activities of Carl Gustav Jung (1794-1864), Wilhelm His-Vischer (1831-1904), Ludwig Rütimeyer (1825-1895), Julius Kollmann (1834-1918), Paul and Fritz Sarasin (P.: 1856-1924; F.: 1859-1942), Felix Speiser (1880-1949) and the author himself (b. 1909) are described in detail. PMID:3548583

  14. [Anthropology and oral health projects in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasveld, A E

    2016-07-01

    The mouth and teeth play an important role in social interactions around the world. The way people deal with their teeth and mouth, however, is determined culturally. When oral healthcare projects are being carried out in developing countries, differing cultural worldviews can cause misunderstandings between oral healthcare providers and their patients. The oral healthcare volunteer often has to try to understand the local assumptions about teeth and oral hygiene first, before he or she can bring about a change of behaviour, increase therapy compliance and make the oral healthcare project sustainable. Anthropology can be helpful in this respect. In 2014, in a pilot project commissioned by the Dutch Dental Care Foundation, in which oral healthcare was provided in combination with anthropological research, an oral healthcare project in Kwale (Kenia) was evaluated. The study identified 6 primary themes that indicate the most important factors influencing the oral health of school children in Kwale. Research into the local culture by oral healthcare providers would appear to be an important prerequisite to meaningful work in developing countries. PMID:27430039

  15. Deep Mapping and Spatial Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Roberts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an introduction to the Humanities Special Issue on “Deep Mapping”. It sets out the rationale for the collection and explores the broad-ranging nature of perspectives and practices that fall within the “undisciplined” interdisciplinary domain of spatial humanities. Sketching a cross-current of ideas that have begun to coalesce around the concept of “deep mapping”, the paper argues that rather than attempting to outline a set of defining characteristics and “deep” cartographic features, a more instructive approach is to pay closer attention to the multivalent ways deep mapping is performatively put to work. Casting a critical and reflexive gaze over the developing discourse of deep mapping, it is argued that what deep mapping “is” cannot be reduced to the otherwise a-spatial and a-temporal fixity of the “deep map”. In this respect, as an undisciplined survey of this increasing expansive field of study and practice, the paper explores the ways in which deep mapping can engage broader discussion around questions of spatial anthropology.

  16. As mulheres muçulmanas precisam realmente de salvação?: reflexões antropológicas sobre o relativismo cultural e seus outros Do Muslim women really need to be saved?: anthropologic considerations on the cultural relativism and its others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Abu-Lughod

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo explora a ética da atual "Guerra ao Terrorismo", perguntando se a antropologia, disciplina dedicada a entender a diferença cultural e a lidar com ela, pode nos fornecer apoio crítico para as justificações feitas sobre a intervenção no Afeganistão em termos de liberar ou salvar mulheres afegãs. Eu observo primeiramente os perigos da cultura de reificação, aparente nas tendências de afixar ícones culturais claros como as mulheres muçulmanas sobre confusas dinâmicas históricas e políticas. Posteriormente, chamando atenção para as ressonâncias entre discursos contemporâneos sobre igualdade, liberdade e direitos com antigos discursos coloniais e retórica missionária sobre mulheres muçulmanas, eu argumento que, em vez disso, nós precisamos desenvolver uma séria avaliação das diferenças entre as mulheres no mundo - como produtos de histórias diferentes, expressões de diferentes circunstâncias e manifestações de desejos distintamente estruturados. Além disso, eu argumento que, em vez de buscar "salvar" outros (com a superioridade que isso implica e as violências que acarretaria, talvez fosse melhor pensarmos em termos de (1 trabalhar com elas nas situações que reconhecemos como sempre sujeitas a transformações históricas e (2 considerar nossas próprias e maiores responsabilidades para indicar as formas de injustiça global que são poderosas formadoras dos mundos nas quais elas se encontram. Eu desenvolvo muito desses argumentos a respeito dos limites do "relativismo cultural" através de uma consideração da burca e dos vários significados dos véus no mundo muçulmano.This article explores the ethics of the current "War on Terrorism", asking whether anthropology, the discipline devoted to understanding and dealing with cultural difference, can provide us with critical purchase on the justifications made for American intervention in Afghanistan in terms of liberating, or saving, Afghan women. I

  17. Informal Kinship-Based Fostering Around the World: Anthropological Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinaweaver, Jessaca

    2015-01-01

    Anthropological research around the world has documented informal, kinship-based foster care cross culturally. That research suggests that children are more likely to benefit from informal kinship-based fostering in cultural contexts where fostering expands the pool of relatives rather than substituting one parent for another, fostering is expected to provide children with positive opportunities for learning and development, and/or children are granted some autonomy or decision-making power. However, informal kinship-based fostering seems to place children at risk in cultural contexts where the process of children’s attachment to caregivers resembles the Western child development model, communities are highly stratified along socioeconomic lines, and/or exploitation of children is permitted. The article concludes with a discussion of implications for both research and policy. PMID:26973709

  18. 76 FR 28078 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    .... Based on skeletal and dental morphology, as well as cultural materials associated with the Harrington II Site (including two ceramic pots that are not part of the museum collection), the site dates to circa A... Anthropology, have determined that: Based on skeletal and dental morphology, and a radiocarbon date...

  19. Marxist theory and anthropological practice : the application of French Marxist anthropology in field-work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Geschiere, P.L.; Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Geschiere, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Contents: 1. Introduction (is there a case for a Marxist approach in anthropological fieldwork - the structure of our argument). 2. The level of production as a problem in anthropological fieldwork (data on production - the concept of 'mode of production' - variations in the 'lineage mode of product

  20. RURAL STUDIES BY THE LIGHT OF OTHER POSSIBILITIES: CLUES FROM SYMMETRICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Schneider

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay seeks to reflect about few possibilities of contribution of Symmetrical Anthropology for rural studies. At first, elements of the route traversed by field of knowledge dedicated to study the groups of peasants in Brazil are rescued, especially for the community studies and for the hermeneutical ethnographies. Following, we seek to discuss the concepts of culture and society as understood by some anthropological currents, while "all systemic", ontologically separate from nature. It also performed some considerations about relations between human and non-human. Ultimately, some possibilities of approaching phenomena observed in the rural environment from notions, such as networks and cosmologies, are considered.

  1. Antropologia e educação: culturas e identidades na escola (Antropología y educación: culturas e identidades en la escuela (Anthropology and Education: Cultures and Identities at School (Anthropologie et éducation: cultures et identités à l'école

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pereira-Tosta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumoEste artigo aborda a interdisciplinaridade entre os campos da antropologia e da educação, consideran- do-a necessária para se compreender uma das ques- tões fundamentais na escola: as culturas e as constru- ções de identidades que permeiam os processos de aprendizagem e socialização. Nessa perspectiva, é fei- ta uma discussão sobre as categorias de cultura e de identidade e como elas estão presentes e se expressam na escola, tomando como pretexto cenas recorrentes no cotidiano dessa instituição que envolve professores e alunos e nos desafia a pensar sobre as dimensões da formação e do trabalho docente na contempora- neidade.ResumenEste artículo aborda la interdisciplina- ridad entre los campos de la antropo- logía y de la educación, considerándola necesaria para la comprensión de una de las cuestiones fundamentales en la escuela: las culturas y las construc- ciones de identidades presentes en los procesos de aprendizaje y socia- lización. En esa perspectiva, se hace una discusión sobre las categorías de cultura y de identidad y cómo ellas están presentes y se expresan en la escuela, tomando como base situa- ciones frecuentes del cotidiano de esa institución, en donde están profesores y alumnos, y que nos desafían a pensar sobre las dimensiones de la formación y del trabajo docente en la contempo- raneidad.AbstractThis paper discusses interdisciplinarity between the fields of anthropology and education, which is found to be necessary in order to understand one of the fundamental issues at school: cultures and the construction of iden- tities as a part of the learning and socialization processes. From this per- spective, a discussion of the categories of culture and identity, and their pres- ence at school, is put forward. This dis- cussion is based on frequent situations involving teachers and pupils, chal- lenging us to think about the dimen- sions of training and teaching today.RésuméCet article aborde l

  2. Camera as Cultural Critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    What does the use of cameras entail for the production of cultural critique in anthropology? Visual anthropological analysis and cultural critique starts at the very moment a camera is brought into the field or existing visual images are engaged. The framing, distances, and interactions between...... researchers, cameras, and filmed subjects already inherently comprise analytical decisions. It is these ethnographic qualities inherent in audiovisual and photographic imagery that make it of particular value to a participatory anthropological enterprise that seeks to resist analytic closure and seeks instead...

  3. Global Health, Medical Anthropology, and Social Marketing: Steps to the Ecology of Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Anthropology and global health have long been a focus of research for both biological and medical anthropologists. Research has looked at physiological adaptations to high altitudes, community responses to water-borne diseases, the integration of traditional and biomedical approaches to health, global responses to HIV/AIDS, and more recently, to the application of cultural approaches to the control of the Ebola epidemic. Academic anthropology has employed theory and methods to extend knowledge, but less often to apply that knowledge. However, anthropologists outside of the academy have tackled global health issues such as family planning and breast-feeding by bringing together applied medical anthropology and social marketing. In 2014, that potent and provocative combination resulted in the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida being made the home of an innovative center designed to combine academic and applied anthropology with social marketing in order to facilitate social change. This article discusses how inter- and intra-disciplinary research/application has led to the development of Florida's first World Health Organization Collaborating Center (WHO CC), and the first such center to focus on social marketing, social change and non-communicable diseases. This article explains the genesis of the Center and presents readers with a brief overview, basic principles and applications of social marketing by reviewing a case study of a water conservation project. The article concludes with thoughts on the ecology of collaboration among global health, medical anthropology and social marketing practitioners. PMID:26753444

  4. Insights and models from medical anthropology for understanding the healing activity of the Historical Jesus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Pilch

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay sketches a basic introdution to medical anthropology as a key to understanding and interpreting  the healing activity of the historical Jesus described in the gospels. It presents select literature, leading experts, fundamental concepts, and insights and models of special value to biblical specialists. Only a cross-cultural discipline like medical anthropology allows the investigator to  interpret texts and events from other cultures with respect for their distinctive cultural contexts in order to draw more appropriate conclusions and applications in other cultures. Applications to biblical texts are not included in this essay but may be found in other articles published by the author and listed in the bibliography.

  5. 历史人类学简论%A Brief Introduction to Historical Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝达居

    2001-01-01

    Historical anthropology is the historied anthropology, that is, to inspect history from the viewpoint of culture. This subject emphasizes the historical orientation of culture, the multi - nature of history as well as the importance of cultural interpretation and memory of history to the making of history. The significance of historical anthropology lies in the exposure of historical faults of some main determinism of history. The reinterpretation of concrete cases in the light of historical anthropology will endow us with the value of introspection about the process of history itself.%历史人类学即人类学的“历史化”,是从文化的角度考察历史。历史人类学强调文化的历史向度,强调历史的多元特征、历史的文化解释和记忆对于历史制作的重要性。历史人类学的意义在于指出一些主流的历史决定论自身的历史缺陷。从历史人类学出发对具体个案进行重新解读,使他们有可能赋予历史过程本身一定的反思价值。

  6. Techno-Anthropological Sensibilities in Health Informatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    What kind of knowledges, skills and competences may be required by Techno-Anthropology engaging with health informatics? If we understand Techno-Anthropology to mean conducting anthropological analyses of the interwoven and mutually shaping relationship between organizing, technologies and actors...... cause and determine social development, whereas detailed studies reveal that determinants and causes are both technical and social. The challenges include the one of making one's knowledge and skills legitimate and relevant to health informatics. Having a degree from arts or social sciences is not...... necessarily impressive for people with similar degrees in medicine, computer science, and business administration. Another challenge is to design an engagement with health informatics that will generate insights which often requires time, while also providing quick results for project sponsors or...

  7. Welcome home, Descartes! rethinking the anthropology of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecks, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    For many scholars, the Cartesian mind/body split is one of the fundamental mistakes of the Western scientific tradition. Anthropologists who study notions of the body in cultures around the world regularly take Descartes as their point of departure. Many also suggest that breaking free from Descartes is politically liberating: if the mindful body could be rediscovered, society could move away from its materialist, positivist, and commodity-fetishizing ways. Beyond the Body Proper is anthropology's best and most comprehensive anti-Cartesian manifesto to date. This volume brings together some of the finest studies on the cultural and historical diversity of bodies and minds. Yet anthropologists' blanket rejection of the mind/body dualism seems politically self-defeating. If anthropologists want to criticize racism, gender hierarchies, or discrimination against disabled people, they need to believe that the mind is independent from the body. In other words, they need to uphold the Cartesian split. PMID:19271351

  8. Depression, osteoporosis, serotonin and cell membrane viscosity between biology and philosophical anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrielli Fabio; Tonello Lucio; Cocchi Massimo; Pregnolato Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Due to the relationship between biology and culture, we believe that depression, understood as a cultural and existential phenomenon, has clear markers in molecular biology. We begin from an existential analysis of depression constituting the human condition and then shift to analysis of biological data confirming, according to our judgment, its original (ontological) structure. In this way philosophy is involved at the anthropological level, in as much as it detects the underlying m...

  9. OSL properties of anthropological bone and tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meric, Niyazi [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: meric@ankara.edu.tr; Kosal, Mehmet [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: kosal@eng.ankara.edu.tr; Altay Atlihan, M. [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: atlihan@eng.ankara.edu.tr; Rabia Yuece, Ulkue [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ulku.yuce@taek.gov.tr

    2008-06-15

    The aim of present work was to investigate whether anthropological bone and teeth can be used in dosimetric and dating studies. The radiation dose responses of anthropological human bone and pig teeth were obtained and studied using infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). The radiation dose responses of these materials were found to be compatible with commonly used feldspar and quartz compounds. The IRSL signal was shown to be linear with a radiation dose until {approx}200 Gy and stable at ambient temperature, which may allow the use of such materials for dating.

  10. OSL properties of anthropological bone and tooth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of present work was to investigate whether anthropological bone and teeth can be used in dosimetric and dating studies. The radiation dose responses of anthropological human bone and pig teeth were obtained and studied using infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). The radiation dose responses of these materials were found to be compatible with commonly used feldspar and quartz compounds. The IRSL signal was shown to be linear with a radiation dose until ∼200 Gy and stable at ambient temperature, which may allow the use of such materials for dating

  11. Anthropological perspectives on democratic citizenship education and globalization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinková, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, č. 27 (2013), s. 253-262. ISSN 1233-6688 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : citizenship education * anthropology of education * action research * youth * participation * globalization Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  12. Ethnographic Encounters: The Processes of Cultural Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Shirley Ann

    2002-01-01

    Explores some of the ways in which the contested concept of cultural translation has been interpreted in anthropology. Describes what cultural translation now involves for practitioners who research and teach within interdisciplinary frameworks--particularly those constituted by the interface between anthropology and modern language learning.…

  13. ASPECTS OF BIOLOGICAL NEWS IN ANTHROPOLOGY OF EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-Peter Herm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 9th International Congress of the “Gesellschaft of Anthropology” (GfA has been held in Gottorf during September 2011.The content of lectures and posters were Palaeoanthropology, Archaeology, Pre-historic Anthropology, Humanethology, Forensic Anthropology, Prevention and Clinical Anthropology, Gender studies, Ergonomics, Pedagogic, Mathematics and patent law.

  14. ASPECTS OF BIOLOGICAL NEWS IN ANTHROPOLOGY OF EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus-Peter Herm

    2012-01-01

    The 9th International Congress of the “Gesellschaft of Anthropology” (GfA) has been held in Gottorf during September 2011.The content of lectures and posters were Palaeoanthropology, Archaeology, Pre-historic Anthropology, Humanethology, Forensic Anthropology, Prevention and Clinical Anthropology, Gender studies, Ergonomics, Pedagogic, Mathematics and patent law.

  15. Biomedical psychiatry and its concealed metaphors: an anthropological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernáez, Angel

    2013-09-01

    The idea that power relations structure social life is self-evident to most anthropologists. Western medical knowledge or biomedicine, and by extension science or scientific knowledge, however, has until relatively recently been exempt from anthropological scrutiny in political terms. An understanding of biomedicine as a system of knowledge that is not a copy of facts but a representation of them has entailed a break with the traditional separation of folk knowledge and scientific knowledge in anthropology, making it possible to include biomedicine in the repertoire of ethnographic objects. The peculiarity of biomedicine as a cultural system, seen from this perspective, lies in a paradox: its self-characterization as a set of non-ideological discourses and practices is a representation that conceals its ideological and power-saturated nature. Through an analysis of DSM-IV-TR, this article explores some of the representational strategies through which this concealment takes place in biomedical psychiatry: the asocial and universal character of mental illness categories; the neutrality of clinical practice; and the non-moral nature of clinical criteria and judgment. These are concealed metaphors in the true sense, for not only do they speak of something without naming it but they also deny their own existence as metaphors. PMID:24308254

  16. The Theological Anthropology of Thomas Groome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Theological anthropology in the work of Thomas Groome can be understood by exploring the relationship between subjectivity and knowledge in his major works. This relationship is constituted by five fundamental elements: the knowing subject in religious education as existential, liberational, pedagogical, theological, and critical. A comprehension…

  17. Anthropology in Kant\\'s Thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m Rohani Ravari

    2012-03-01

    Therefore, anthropology can be defined, from Kant’s point of view, as a global empirical science and practical philosophy which would like to recognize, by prudential reason and observation method, human nature with pragmatic approach. In addition, this philosophy wants to educate persons who can not only acquire speculative knowledge but also be considered as a citizen of the world.

  18. Anthropology with Activism: Settling Its Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Glynda A.

    2014-01-01

    This response to Katherine Schultz's Presidential Address to the Council on Anthropology and Education explores the themes of temporality and reflexivity in activist scholarship, with Schultz's research as prime example. The need to take action to address a crisis, juxtaposed to the counter need to take time for scholarly reflection and…

  19. Between archaeology and anthropology: imagining Neolithic settlements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Květina, Petr; Hrnčíř, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2013), s. 323-347. ISSN 0323-1119. [Theory and method in the prehistoric archaeology of Central Europe. Mikulov, 24.10.2012-26.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF12P01OVV032 Keywords : Neolithic longhouse * ethnographic analogy * settlement patterns Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  20. Anthropological epistemology as knowledge of man: The rol of anthropology of technoscience

    OpenAIRE

    Arellano Hernández, Antonio; Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México

    2014-01-01

    The project of an epistemology of anthropological sustenance similar ideas akin to those who have expressed solidarity between epistemology and social theory. In the present case, the theory of knowledge is symbolized by an idea in the political epistemology, understood as political epistemology and a theory of human scale represented society, understood as anthropology.This article will visit the elements of this relationship conceptual and epistemological issues in some authors founders of ...

  1. The Cultural Response of the Community to the March 11 Big Earthquake in Japan and an Anthropological Analysis---Focusing on The Community’s Response to Tsunami Damage-the Regional Principle of the Otuchicyo Refuge and Its Relationship with Others

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Rui

    2015-01-01

    The anthropological study of disas-ter originated from the West’s reflection on and dis-cussion of problems which happened after World War II. The research focused on disaster behavior during that time,that is,the instantaneousness re-action to the stress and psychological research. It was a kind of fragmented research approach which did not use a holistic view to study or understand the disaster. With the rise of the concept of“fra-gility”in 1970s,the research on disasters was not limited to independent segments,such as behavior and reaction anymore. Instead,those factors which increased or slowed down the influence of disasters received attention. The pre-disaster social back-ground,the behavioral reaction to a disaster,the recovery of the post - disaster community and so forth have been combined together to form a com-prehensive totality. However,the quantitative re-search of fragility is from a kind of etic and elite perspective,which totally ignores the positive initi-atives of the people themselves in the place where the disaster occurred. Hence,the understanding of and response to disasters in specific places require scholars to research the disasters more from the cultural concepts and life experiences of a specific place.

  2. Eight Formulas for Fieldwork:Anthropological Fieldwork Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xudong

    2015-01-01

    In anthropological research,meth-odology is very important,especially the methodol-ogy of fieldwork which we discuss in this article—it has become the modern anthropologists’ skill. Re-garding the methodology of fieldwork,the author states that the best methods and tools should be created by oneself. However,there are also some common questions in methodology. Among them, one of the most important is“what is anthropologi-cal fieldwork?”Actually it is very simple—name-ly,you must be“on the spot”. This is a basic principle of anthropology, especially for modern anthropology.

  3. Threads of continuity and change. Fabricating unity in anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brumfiel, Elizabeth M.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I compare backstrap-loom weaving in three cultural contexts: the ancient Maya, the ancient Aztecs, and 20th century Mesoamerica. Although continuities are present, important differences exist in the ways that weaving was situated historically. Among the Classic Maya, weaving defined class; in Aztec Mexico, weaving defined gender; and in 20th-century Mesoamerica, weaving defined ethnicity. A comparison of these cases suggests that historical study is a useful tool for both archaeologists and ethnographers. It promotes recognition of the diversity of practice and belief in ancient societies. It helps to define the scope of contemporary ethnographic study. It combats cultural essentialism and injects agency into our accounts. It enables us to acknowledge both the rich heritage of indigenous peoples and the fact of culture change. Comparative historical study provides a strong rationale for the continued association of archaeology and cultural anthropology as parts of a wider anthropological whole.

    En este artículo comparo el proceso de tejido en telares de cintura de tres contextos culturales: los Maya, los antiguos aztecas y la Mesoamérica del siglo XX. Aunque existen evidentes continuidades, también hay importantes diferencias en sus contextos históricos. En el Maya Clásico el tejido marcó la clase social, el género entre los Azteca de México y el origen étnico en la Mesoamérica del siglo XX. El análisis comparativo de estos casos históricos sugiere que la comparación es una herramienta útil tanto para arqueólogos como para los etnógrafos: promueve el reconocimiento de la diversidad de las prácticas y las creencias de las sociedades antiguas; contribuye a definir el alcance del estudio etnográfico contemporáneo; combate el esencialismo cultural y carga a nuestras narrativas de capacidad transformadora; nos permite reconocer el rico patrimonio de los pueblos indígenas y el hecho cultural del cambio. El

  4. The ethnological/anthropological production in the period transition in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukić-Krstanović Miroslava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethnological/anthropological production in the period 2002 - 2008, is the reflection of the complex social, economic, political and bureaucratic situations and strategies. To establish a clear picture of ethnological/anthropological production, our analyses are concentrated on the distinguished fields, themes, those who realize them, particularly in the publishing work. At the same time, we confront science and society to point out to an interconnection of proximity and distance. Ethnological networks are continuously taking place in the scope of research programs, education programs, museum programs, research programs and scientific presentation and communication programs. These programs are part of institutional and team strategies, but they are primarily instigated by individual initiatives. The principal mainstays and coordinators of research programs are the Ethnographic Institute of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (EI SANU in the scope of which important and diverse projects are being realized for the last 60 years; the Ethnology and Anthropology Department of the Faculty of Philosophy in Belgrade (OEA FF, which is, in addition to pedagogic activities, also implementing scientific projects. The Ethnographic Museum in Belgrade (EM and the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (SANU Balkanology Institute, as well as regional museums and cultural institutions are also implementing research projects. Most research program focus on the dynamics of contemporary societal and cultural processes, but also on the continuity and transformation of traditional elements. In this document we will focus more on the scientific and research results through the publishing activity of ethnological/anthropological institutions, based on which one may observe the overall ethnological/anthropological activities in the last eight years.

  5. Theorizing Mediation: Lessons Learned from Legal Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Simon Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, there has been an increasing interest in mediation in the Netherlands, as part of a set of ‘alternative dispute resolution’ methods. Politicians, lawyers and practitioners have embraced mediation as a legitimate method for settling disputes, alongside the adjudication of conflicts in courts of law. However, there is a striking lack of literature aimed at theorizing mediation from a legal perspective. This article argues that the legal anthropology literature on disputes and dispute settlement offers useful insights for understanding mediation from a ‘legal research’ point of view. This is because a lot of current common knowledge on mediation has its roots in a legal anthropological understanding. The argument that is set forth in this article is that the most important lesson that can be learned is that mediation should not be seen in isolation, but as part of a social process.

  6. Spider web anthropologies: ecologies, infrastructures, entanglements

    OpenAIRE

    Corsín Jiménez, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Ecologies, infrastructures, entanglements. Anthropology and STS have recently found some unsuspected common groundings in the relational, emergent and self-organizational affordances of these three conceptual systems. Vibrant yet fragile, interactive and responsive whilst simultaneously resilient and solicitous, the earthy and muddled and tenacious engagements afforded by ‘ecologies’, ‘infrastructures’ and ‘entanglements’ have brought new sources of analytical vitality and valence to social t...

  7. Notes towards an anthropology of the internet

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Hart

    2004-01-01

    What might an anthropology of the internet look like? It require a combination of introspection, personal judgment and world history to explore the universe of cyberspace. This world is not sufficient to itself, nor is it 'the world'. People bring their offline circumstances to behaviour online. The virtual and the real constitute a dialectic in which neither can be reduced to the other and 'virtual reality' is their temporary synthesis. Heidegger's metaphysics are drawn on to illuminate this...

  8. Anthropological foundations of John Rawls' political theory

    OpenAIRE

    Chaly V. A.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of Rawls’ anthropological model, underlying his theory of justice, reveals its complex basis: on one hand, it is an attempt to attach broader and deeper Kantian philosophical foundations to “ratonal egoist” of classical utilitarianism (idea of autonomy, ability of self-determination through moral law); on the other hand, the notion of “life plan”, emphasizing rationality of human interests and actions and opening a possibility for happiness, connects Rawls’ theory to Aristotle’s ...

  9. Globalization and the Future of Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-LoupAmselle

    2004-01-01

    As we well know, anthropology traditionally defined itself as the study of ‘primitive' or ‘exotic' societies-including such sectors of Western societies as rural communities or ethnic minorities. Ever since the Malinowskian revolution, the legitimacy of the discipline has rested on a single foundation; the technique of long-term participant-observation within a clearly-bounded field site. And although

  10. New methods and techniques in anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recheis, W; Weber, G W; Schäfer, K; Prossinger, H; Knapp, R; Seidler, H; zur Nedden, D

    1999-12-01

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991, advanced imaging and post-processing techniques have been successfully applied to anthropological research. Among the specific techniques are spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions, which include stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be produced using stereolithography; subsequently, it has been successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end performance graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions have become established as routine tools for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques enabled dramatically new insights to be gained in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without even touching--let alone damaging--them. Among the most precious are specimens from the genus Australopithecus (1.8 Myr-3.5 Myr), as well as representatives of Homo heidelbergensis (200 kyr-600 kyr) and Homo neanderthalensis (40 kyr-100 kyr); such fossils have been CT-scanned during the last five years. The fossils often are filled with a stone matrix or other encrustations. During the post-processing routines, highly advanced algorithms were used to remove these encrustations virtually (the concrete fossils remain untouched). Thus it has been possible to visualize the morphological structures that are hidden by the matrix layer. Some specimens have been partially destroyed, but it has been possible for the missing parts were reconstructed on the computer screen in order to get estimations of brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover, the data in computerized form allows new descriptions of morphological structures using geometric morphometrics. Some of the results may change aspects and

  11. Introducing the New Evolutionary Paradigm in Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Baćević

    2016-01-01

    Why evolutionary psychology now? There is a number of answers to this question. The first and the most obvious one is that this approach is, and, for some years now, has consistently been, gaining prominence in the anthropological circles. However, what I hope the present papers will convey are theoretical, methodological and/or interpretive tendencies that are more inclined towards cognitive science than "psychology" in the general sense.

  12. Outcomes and Processes in Economics and Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Isha

    2006-01-01

    The premise of this article is that outcomes of economic models and process analyses of anthropology are both essential for understanding social phenomena, including those surrounding the commons. An explanation of any model outcome is invariably about process and structure--the outcomes of several models are compatible with many different causal processes. Anthropologists also pay equal attention to exclusions and inclusions, to the said as well as the unsaid. In that spirit, one must ask if...

  13. Laying Claim to Authenticity: Five Anthropological Dilemmas

    OpenAIRE

    THEODOSSOPOULOS, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    The introduction to this special collection examines five dilemmas about the use of the concept of authenticity in anthropological analysis. These relate to 1) the expectation of a singular authenticity “deep” in oneself or beyond the surface of social reality, 2) the contradictions emerging from the opposition of authenticity with inauthenticity, 3) the irony of the notion of invention of tradition (which deconstructs, but also offends), 4) the criteria involved in the auth...

  14. Adam Smith: Anthropology and Moral Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro-Cantero, R. (Raquel)

    2010-01-01

    Adam Smith was a moral philosopher. His economic and legal thought can't be separated from his moral psychology which frames his anthropological and social proposal. Experimental Newtonian methodology and Hume's empirism feed his approximation to the reality of human being. In this new context the traditional categories of society are defined and combined in a new way. In this paper I try to argue that the assumed optimism which sometimes is attributed to Smith about the proper functioning of...

  15. The Conception of Anthropological Complementarism. An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Hoche, Prof. em. Dr. Hans-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The aims of 'Anthropological Complementarism' in a nutshell(sect. 1). Against a watered-down conception of psychophysical complementarity (sect. 2). Linguistic and logical problems of identity and non-identity (sect. 3). A 'noematic' approach to consciousness (sect. 4). A plea for a pure noematics (sect. 5). My own consciousness as experienced by myself is not a part of nature (sect. 6). The major ontological tenets of mine (sect. 7). Complementarism proper (sect. 8). Suitable and unsuitable ...

  16. The anthropological finds. Context and taphonomy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jiří

    Praha : Academia, 2008 - (Velemínská, J.; Brůžek, J.), s. 21-33 ISBN 978-80-200-1586-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/04/1498 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80010507 Keywords : Modern humans * human remains (paleoanthropology) * Předmostí * burials * taphonomy Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  17. Critical Medical Anthropology – a voice for just and equitable healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Witeska-Młynarczyk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a paradigm current in contemporary medical anthropology – Critical Medical Anthropology (CMA, which merges political-economic approaches with a culturally sensitive analysis of human behaviour grounded in anthropological methods. It is characterized by a strongly applied orientation and a devotion to improving population health and promoting health equity. The beginning of CMA dates back to the 1970s when the interdisciplinary movement called [i]the political economy of health [/i]was developed. Today, CMA has grown into one of three major perspectives used in anthropological research devoted to health, illness and wellbeing. The author discusses the origins, key concepts and CMA’s usefulness for social research, and its significance for the design of effective policies in the realm of public health. Examplary interventions and ethnographic researches are introduced and wider usage is advocated of such works and methods by bureaucrats and medical staff for understanding the patients’ behavior, and the influence of social, economic and political factors on the workings of particular health systems.

  18. A Review of Renleixue Tonglun (A Comprehensive Introduction to Anthropology) edited by Prof. Zhuang Kongshao%《人类学通论》评介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周泓; 雷亮中

    2002-01-01

    @@ 一门学科的成熟总是与成熟的教科书相伴随的.在人类学最发达的美国,系统而完整的人类学教科书已有10多种,其中,基辛(R. Keesing)编写的(Cultural Anthropology)以及恩伯夫妇(Carol and Melvin Ember)编写的(Anthropology)均已出到第七版.

  19. Pour une anthropologie de la libération For an Anthropology of the Liberation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Singleton

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Foncièrement constructiviste, l’Anthropologie elle-même (à supposer, dato non concesso, que le singulier substantiel soit de mise n’est pas moins le “fait” d’une culture à l’exclusion, en dernière analyse, de toute autre. Néanmoins, produit en surface, mais processus en profondeur, bien que née et grandie dans un certain Occident, rien ne l’empêche d’inventer une identité inédite. D’où l’émergence à l’Université Catholique de Louvain d’une Anthropologie Prospective dont l’intentionnalité identitaire, impliquée jusqu’à l’indignation, rend libératrice. La Culture l’abhorrant autant sinon plus que la Nature, le vide laissé par la théologie de la libération, morte avec Dieu lui-même, pourrait être rempli par son pendant anthropo-logique.Fundamentally constructivist, Anthropology itself (supposing, but “dato non concesso”, that such a substantial singularity exists is no less the “fact” of one culture to the exclusion, in the last analysis, of all others.  However, seemingly a product but basically a process, though born and bred in the West, there is nothing to prevent anthropology from reinventing its identity.  Hence the emergence in the Catholic University of Louvain, of a Prospective Anthropology whose committed and at times indignant intentionality makes for freedom. Culture abhorring it as much if not more than Nature, the vacuum left by the demise of liberation theology subsequent to the Death of God himself, could be filled by an anthropo-logical equivalent.

  20. On the hidden curriculum of the mouse click: An anthropologically drama

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias Werler

    2008-01-01

    Any process of education is media based. But the advent of computer based media in the classroom caused a qualitative change. This new type of media serves as a bodily and cognitive extension of man. The aim of the article is to demonstrate educational consequences of these new anthropologically premises. The article discusses the structure and concept of digital communication culture as it denies the existence of spatial distance. The click option of the mouse will be framed as digital commu...

  1. CATEGORIZATION OF PORNOGRAPHIC VIDEO CLIPS ON THE INTERNET: A COGNITIVE ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Vucurovic Vasic, Milica; Zikic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Anthropological study of the Internet pornography can refer to the cultural communication between the creators of the contents and authors of pornographic sites, as well as between the authors of sites and users, the latter being more relevant to this work as it assumes supracultural activities on the Internet and comprises the pornography users as a distinct population. The aim of this study is to determine, through the categorization of porn clips in the Internet, cognitive schemes and cult...

  2. Deliberate ante-mortem dental modification and its implications in archaeology, ethnography and anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Jim P. Mower

    1999-01-01

    This paper will focus on the variation in deliberate ante-mortem tooth modification through archaeological, anthropological and ethnographic examples. Non-deliberate dental alteration will be discussed as a means of differentiating deliberate, culturally driven modifications, from accidental or occupationally related change. Teeth will often survive better than bone in archaeological contexts. With this in mind, this work will consider the classification and appearance of dental modification ...

  3. Water insecurity in 3 dimensions: An anthropological perspective on water and women's psychosocial distress in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Edward G. J.; Greene, Leslie E.; Maes, Kenneth C; Ambelu, Argaw; Tesfaye, Yihenew Alemu; Rheingans, Richard; Hadley, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Water insecurity is a primary underlying determinant of global health disparities. While public health research on water insecurity has focused mainly on two dimensions, water access and adequacy, an anthropological perspective highlights the cultural or lifestyle dimension of water insecurity, and its implications for access / adequacy and for the phenomenology of water insecurity. Recent work in Bolivia has shown that scores on a water insecurity scale derived from ethnographic observations...

  4. The Perils of Public Anthropology? Quiescent Anthropology in Neo-Nationalist Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    the Scandinavia countries during the last decade. Public anthropology, it is argued, is not an obligation that is to be confused with publicity of research findings but to engage seriously as individuals and departments through research projects and investing expertise in public issues, for instance......Nordic anthropologists were remarkably absent from the news media in Scandinavia during the Muhammad Cartoon issue of 2005/6. This chapter discusses perils of public anthropology as seen in the research engagement with the lopsided and simplified representation of ethnic and religious minorities in...

  5. Who’s studying Anthropology? Towawards a n Anthropology students profile in Southern Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Mora Nawrath, Héctor; Departamento de Antropología, Universidad Católica de Temuco; Carrasco Henríquez, Noelia; Departamento de Sociología y Antropología, Universidad de Concepción

    2012-01-01

    The present work shows the preliminary results of the first phase of a research conducted in the ucTemuco (Chili) to characterize the students who choose to study Anthropology in this university. This research is orientated to know the motivations that led them to the choice of studying Anthropology, as well as their attitudes towards two key aspects of the habitus of any student who joins to this field: a wide and integrating vision recounted to “social others” and an opening towards the tra...

  6. THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE EVOLUTION OF EMPIRICISM

    OpenAIRE

    Misztal, Dawid

    2012-01-01

    [The text examines methodological consequences of anti-metaphysical turn of British empiricism in the field of anthropology. I argue that this shift reinforces anthropology in its descriptive and interdisciplinary form, because destruction of metaphysically grounded subjectivity carried out in the course of evolution of empiricism provides epistemological legitimization of the idea of anthropological research as morally neutral and religiously indifferent procedure. In the final part of the a...

  7. In-between places: anthropology and education in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Neusa Maria Mendes de Gusmão

    2009-01-01

    Anthropology has a theoretical and methodological apparatus that is used when it comes to action in other fields of knowledge. This apparatus implements a cross-curricular dialogue and shows how anthropology is part of different courses and areas of knowledge in curricular contexts. In this text, some debates in biannual ABA – Sociedade Brasileira de Antropologia and restrictions of “Anthropology of Education” in Brazil and the objects, methods and topics it involves. Along the period of five...

  8. Marcelijaus Martinaičio poezijos antropologiškumas | Anthropological poetry of Marcelijus Martinaitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akvilė Rėklaitytė

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Artists, philosophers, and cultural anthropologists claim that a human being is defined by the innate ability and aptitude to represent the world and oneself symbolically; this opens up an exclusive possibility of self-reflection, perception of the world, and creation of meanings. Clifford Geertz draws attention to the fact how a human being himself explicates and comments his culture – a net of meanings and their relationships spun by himself, where, as if suspended in a web, a man lives, speaks, bleeds, wages wars, loves, jokes, and creates poems. The method of the interpretation of culture “thick description” by Geertz “is focused not on the recording of external parameters, but namely on that far more sophisticated net of relationships of meanings and perceptive structures upon the grasping whereof one could approximate to the “essence” – i.e. a system of meanings, world outlook, and culture of the other. This article analyses the creation of Marcelijus Martinaitis, a narrator, one of the most famous Lithuanian poets of the “outgoing generation”, descendant and successor of the declining ethnic community culture, increasingly distancing from the experience of a modern man in terms of cross-disciplinary literature anthropology. Also, a model of experimental anthropology, the so-called anthropological poetics that has not yet been discussed in Lithuanian, is presented. It treats poetry as an interpretation of ambivalent, complicated experience of an anthropologist. The article states that he is a peculiar cultural anthropologist, a witness, an intermediary of experience, whereas his poetry acts as Geertz’s “thick description”. Essayistic works of Martinaitis are read as an articulation of his ethnographic self-creation covering personality formation, testimony, and transfer of cultural meanings.

  9. ANTHROPOLOGICAL BASIS OF HUMAN DIMENSION IN SPORT AS THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A PERSON'S GENERIC ESSENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ye. Bilogur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to make the theoretical framework of a sportsman dimension concept as the realization of a person's generic essence that is a basis of a new scientific direction formation of sports anthropology and philosophy of sport. Methodology. The understanding of human nature problems, human existence in the form of sports activity, the potential of anthropological picture of the sporting world. In this case sport is considered as a culture which gives a chance to define it as an activity which involves positive results aimed at the realization of human essence as well as destructive ones that are aimed at the destruction of a sportsman personality. Scientific novelty is in the research of insufficiently studied theme of sportsman-dimension from the anthropological point of view. Practical value of the work is in elaborating the theme in context of scientific research performance at the department of theory and physical training methods and sports and the disciplines of Melitopol state pedagogical university named after Bogdan Khmelnitskiy. Philosophy of sport is a new subject and a new scientific direction, in the context of which the problems of sport, development of sporting values and outlook of the youth, their socialization in the sports activity are explored. Conclusions the introduction of the anthropological basis of sportsman-dimension essence in sport promotes the possibility to show entire human nature, its creativity in sporting life, therefore it leads an individual to a self-formation. The anthropological basis of the sportsman-dimension is aimed at the realization of a person's generic essence for increasing the human potential, physical health of young generation due to physical training and sports.

  10. Unity through Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Ethnographic film, Moesgård Film, Royal Anthropological Institute (59 min, 2011) Soanin Kilangit is determined to unite the people and attract international tourism through the revival of culture on Baluan Island in the South Pacific. He organizes the largest cultural festival ever held on the is...

  11. ON ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF INFORMATION SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Leonidovich Karavaev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In article, the author envisages the anthropological problems of the modern information society. There is a new definition of information society, the main factor of which is the automatization of information processes. Different types of information technology impacts (informational and technological impacts on human being are considered. In addition, the author shows the primary transformation of human being due to modern information technologies, based on computer and telecommunication technique.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-17

  12. Techno-anthropology and the digital natives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The ethnographic field guide was a short-lived genre in the annals of anthropology. In this chapter I experimentally attempt to revive it. The original guides provided the ethnographer with a set of practical pointers on how to organise fieldwork, set up camp, maintain relations, and negotiate...... straightforward analogy, and although a guide turns out to be somewhat impossible the attempt at writing it casts of all kinds of interesting contradictions. What is highlighted in the process is that the Web is distinctly spatial in ways that must be taken seriously, that it is home to a very special breed of...

  13. Modernism and structuralism: Serbian ethnology/anthropology in the last twenty five years of the twentieth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Modernisation of Serbian ethnology/anthropology in the second quarter of the twentieth century was marked by structuralism. More precisely, structural analysis that became a must of the analytical interpretation was based on the work of Claude Levi-Strauss, but also on those of the predecessors of structural analysis, like Van Gennep and Prop; British followers of structuralism like E. Leach and M. Douglas, as well as on the Russian semiotic school and Barth’s semiology. Taking aside predecessors of structural analysis, main sources of Serbian structural-semiotic revolution came from Levi-Strauss structural anthropology. When in the 1970s Serbian readers faced anthropological books coming from different intellectual backgrounds and representing major theoretical trends in anthropology, Serbian ethnology, firmly based on its hundred years old romantic roots, gave equally opportunities to all theoretical approaches that fought for the intellectual domination in the discipline. This paper tries to answer the question why structural analysis played a crucial part in the modernisation of Serbian ethnology/anthropology, while the ideas coming from functionalism, culture and personality school, or neo-evolutionism did not have the same revolutionary and deep impact.

  14. The contribution of teachers of the second half of XIX - early XX century in the development of anthropological ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionova O.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Identified and systematized group of leading anthropological ideas: the idea of self-worth of the human person, humanization of education, universal education; the idea of the holistic development of the child, educating and developing training; the idea of self-development and self-realization, the child’s activity in the learning process; the idea of correspondence with nature of child development, and the nation, correspondence with culture and nationality in pedagogy; the idea of free education; the idea of the influence of the teacher’s personality on the development of the child. The contribution of teachers of observable period in the development of anthropological ideas: anthropological study of universalism as the foundation of the theory and practice of pedagogy; identifying goals, objectives, principles, conditions of humanely and anthropological education; identify requirements for teacher as anthropologist; the development of psychological and pedagogical foundations of holistic development and self-identity, concepts of national schools, the content of anthropo-oriented primary education, organizational forms and methods of implementation; extension of terminological field of research problem. Justified the stages of development of anthropological ideas in domestic pedagogy of observable period.

  15. 76 FR 36145 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary... may contact Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human...

  16. 75 FR 36671 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department... Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI. The human remains and associated funerary... and associated funerary objects should contact LouAnn Wurst, Department of Anthropology,...

  17. 78 FR 59962 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Anthropology, Amherst, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated... request to the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology. If no...

  18. 76 FR 28075 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI. The human remains and associated funerary objects... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  19. 75 FR 67998 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department... Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI. The human remains and associated funerary... condition. Dr. Robert Sundick, a physical anthropologist in the Anthropology Department at Western...

  20. 75 FR 14462 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington... of Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum... Henebry-DeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Department of Anthropology, Central Washington...

  1. 76 FR 14058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY. The human remains were..., Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation with representatives...

  2. An anthropological analysis of the perspectives of Somali women in the West and their obstetric care providers on caesarean birth

    OpenAIRE

    Essén, Birgitta; Binder, Pauline; Johnsdotter, Sara

    2011-01-01

    We explored the perceptions of 39 Somali women and 62 obstetric care providers in London in relation to caesarean birth, as borne out of a paradox we recognised from evidence-based information about the Somali group. Socio-cultural factors potentially leading to adverse obstetric outcome were identified using in-depth and focus group interviews with semi-structured, open-ended questions. A cultural anthropology model, the emic/etic model, was used for analysis. Somali women expressed fear and...

  3. Anthropology - Ecology. [Project ECOLogy ELE Pak, Skidmore Pak].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Margaret

    This is one of a series of units for environmental education developed by the Highline Public Schools. The unit may be used as an introduction to the study of anthropology, the influence of ecology on the study of anthropology, and an introduction to the physical school environment. For best results, it should be used at the beginning of the…

  4. Medical anthropology: essays and reflections from an Amsterdam graduate programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geest; T. Gerrits; J. Challinor

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of twenty articles by graduates of the Amsterdam Master’s in Medical Anthropology (AMMA) at the University of Amsterdam. The university is known for outstanding and innovative work in the field of medical anthropology and teaching combines a strong ethnographic basis with

  5. The Anthropology of Suicide: Ethnography and the Tension of Agency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Münster, D.; Brož, Luděk

    Farnham: Ashgate, 2015 - (Broz, L.; Münster, D.), s. 3-23. ( Studies in death, materiality and the origin of time). ISBN 978-1-4724-5791-2 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : anthropology of suicide * tension of agency * personhood * critical suicidology Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  6. A Program for High School Social Studies: Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Pam

    GRADES OR AGES: High School. SUBJECT MATTER: Anthropology. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide covers three units: 1) "The Study of Man"; 2) "Introduction to Physical Anthropology," including the process of evolution, descent and change in time, chronology of events, dawn of man, fossil man, race, and definitions of race; and 3)…

  7. Public Anthropology as Public Pedagogy: An Autobiographical Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This autobiographical account provides a historical map of landmarks in the author's personal and professional life that led him to his present understanding of public anthropology as public pedagogy and vice versa. He indicates that his experiences led him to study sociocultural anthropology to investigate learning from experience, a foundational…

  8. [Anthropology play a key role in simulated portrait].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Biao

    2006-08-15

    The technology of simulated portrait played a key role in criminal cases' deterction recently, while anthropology is attached to it tightly. This paper analyzed and discussed the impact of anthropology in simulated portrait by means of studying the relationship between races, regions figures skeletons and physiognomy. PMID:17080677

  9. Anthropology, Culture, and COIN in a Hybrid Warfare World

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, Anna

    2011-01-01

    in Paul Brister, William Natter, and Robert Tomes (eds.), Hybrid Warfare and Transnational Threats: Perspectives for an Era of Persistent Conflict. New York: Council for Emerging National Security Studies, 2011.

  10. The urgency of outer territories anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of transforming a part of Serbian anthropology into social theoretic management of identity, I suggest both comparative historiographic and ethnographic learning from societies with similar post-colonial experience, with the aim to include the discipline into an urgent defense of Serbia and Belgrade from further ethno-profiteering interests of elites in/from outer territories, left over on the ruins of our ill judged, resource incompatible, exaggerated or immoral twentieth century adventures. Serbian anthropology, written by anthropologists to whom Serbia and Belgrade are "homeland" by origin or civilized choice, should play the key role in the defense of Serbian citizens from the interest of elites in/from the outer "homelands", particularly by revealing the processes for which it is, as a discipline, most expert at – the professionalization of ethnicity, interactive and hybrid nature of identity, instrumental nature of tradition and the identity politics in general. Having in mind the latest attempt, a particularly successful one, conducted by the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century that the lives, health, well-being, dignity and future of persons born in and loyal to the interest of Serbia and Belgrade, in large scale, thoroughly and long term be sacrificed and dedicated to the interests of ethno-profiteering elites in/from outer territories, in this article I point to the possibility to, along with the comparative learning from the above mentioned post-colonial experiences, delicate experiences of urgent anthropology be applied as well as the rich tradition of collective research. This text analyzes the results of first such research, that represenst the initial, praiseworthy and a brave step in the wise striving to engage social sciences and humanities in a search of expert and not mythical/daily-political solutions of the key problem of the Serbian nation – that of how to settle the interests of the

  11. Radiotherapy care experience: an anthropological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anthropological study has been carried out in order to evaluate the need expressed by patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment. The study was mostly qualitative and based on the radiotherapy experiences of 13 women with breast cancer and six men with head and neck cancer. A 24-year-old female anthropologist spent one year in the department of radiotherapy at the Bergonie Institute in Bordeaux. She collected data on patients' needs through the observation of their experience of treatment and personal interviews. These were put in context, analyzed both by qualitative and quantitative methods. The results pointed out the need for more information on the different steps of treatment and the patient's need 'for a smile'front the medical team; in other words, emphatic support. (author)

  12. Dismemberment and disarticulation: A forensic anthropological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Davide; Amadasi, Alberto; Cappella, Annalisa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Magli, Francesca; Gibelli, Daniele; Rizzi, Agostino; Picozzi, Massimo; Gentilomo, Andrea; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    The dismemberment of a corpse is fairly rare in forensic medicine. It is usually performed with different types of sharp tools and used as a method of concealing the body and thus erasing proof of murder. In this context, the disarticulation of body parts is an even rarer event. The authors present the analysis of six dismemberment cases (well-preserved corpses or skeletonized remains with clear signs of dismemberment), arising from different contexts and in which different types of sharp tools were used. Two cases in particular showed peculiar features where separation of the forearms and limbs from the rest of the body was performed not by cutting through bones but through a meticulous disarticulation. The importance of a thorough anthropological investigation is thus highlighted, since it provides crucial information on the manner of dismemberment/disarticulation, the types of tools used and the general context in which the crime was perpetrated. PMID:26708349

  13. Anthropology and the peasant class: the pertinence of the persistent. Anthropological reflections on peasant internationalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Hernán Contreras Román

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article develops an initial discussion on the persistence of the peasant class in anthropology as an awkward object, which since it has become asubject for the discipline has  obliged anthropologists to re-examine their disciplinary identity and re-think their theoretical  bases. We start from the idea that both the emergence and the decline of peasant studies in the discipline have corresponded with localizable social, intellectual and political contexts. For this  reason we present the current struggle of peasant internationalism, represented by the international movement Vía Campesina, for food sovereignty and international recognition of the  rights of peasant men and women. These struggles are considered to constitute a politically novel space which has the potential to generate political opportunities for peasant claims in the face of  neoliberal despoliation. Finally, we reflect on how these struggles again present the peasant class as an awkward object for anthropology and demand anthropological discussion of the subject.

  14. Death in the Vision of Doctors. An Anthropological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona DAMIAN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research fits a cultural anthropology context, pursuing, at this level, the identification of particular views on death, as reported by doctors from various specialties. The current research took into consideration the meaning of death from the point of view of such doctors, without worrying that the way in which death is regarded will reflect upon the medical practice itself. This topic may be the object of further research. The research was conducted through means of a constructive methodology, using the semi-structured individual interview as the main technique, the questions being asked in an non-specific order. The data interpretation was realized through the successive induction method, correlated with the explorative generative character of the research. The chosen methodology implies a systematic generation process with regard to concepts and theories based on the collected data. The role of data management theory in the research is emphasized in order to provide ways of conceptualizing explanations and descriptions. Respondents usually have a spiritual orientation and don’t accept the idea of death as an ending. The continuity of life after death gives sense to the entire existence and the idea of moral life. The human dimension of medical practice makes the respondents adhere to the need for humanizing existence through the guarantee of a post-existence dimension. Classification-JEL: A23, I18

  15. Culture shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Furham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the popular concept of culture shock. From the academic perspective co-researchers from different disciplines (anthropology, education, psychiatry, psychology, sociology have attempted to operationalise the concept and understand the process behind it. It represents fifty years of research using different methodologies and trying to answer different questions about the experience of travel for many reasons. This paper also considers issues concerned with the “overseas” student, of which there are ever more, travelling abroad to study. They can have serious culture shock difficulties. Implications of this research are considered

  16. The guide from Omelas: Action anthropology with miracle icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Literary piece by Ursula Le Guin, a science fiction author, is linked with theoretical, as well as practical anthropology, in several ways. Her life, education, prose production and reception of her work create a whole, which is in many ways related with anthropology on the one, and the changes in the modern world on the other side. Her work has, owing to its great popularity, contributed to a great extent to the adoption of some primarily anthropological thesis with the broadest population (not only among Americans and thus significantly influenced the change of the public discourse-the shaping of the contemporary ideal picture of the world.

  17. Culturalizing Achievement Goal Theory and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusho, Akane; Clayton, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article is primarily designed to provide a cultural analysis of the literature on achievement goals. First, an overview of the four dominant approaches to the study of culture--namely, cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, indigenous psychology, and psychological anthropology--is offered. Second, we analyze the extant body of…

  18. 77 FR 23502 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, has completed...

  19. 78 FR 36239 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Wayne State University Gordon L. Grosscup Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Anthropology, Detroit, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Wayne State University Gordon L. Grosscup Museum of Anthropology (hereafter WSU Museum) has completed an inventory of... Anthropology, Wayne State University Gordon L. Grosscup Museum of Anthropology, 3056 F/AB, Detroit, MI...

  20. La enseñanza de la antropología médica y la salud intercultural en México: del indigenismo culturalista del siglo XX a la interculturalidad en salud del siglo XXI Education on medical anthropology and intercultural health in Mexico: from the 20th century cultural indigenism to the 21st century interculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Campos-Navarro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available El estudio del proceso salud/enfermedad/atención, abordado desde el punto de vista médico y social, es desarrollado de forma especializada por la Antropología Médica. En México esta especialidad tiene sus inicios a finales del siglo XIX. Desde entonces han existido muchas reformas educativas, relacionadas con los propios procesos políticos y el entendimiento y reconocimiento de la pluriculturalidad mexicana, lo que ha permitido ampliar, diversificar y consolidar esta especialidad. En la siguiente se hace una revisión de la evolución histórica de los cursos dedicados a esta materia, los docentes que influyeron en su consolidación, y una presentación sobre el estado actual de los programas académicos que se brindan, destacando la diversidad de otras especialidades en ciencias de la salud que se ven involucradas.The study of the health/disease/healthcare process from the socio-medical aspect is the field of the medical anthropology. In Mexico, this medical specialty had its origins at the end of the 19th century. Since then, many educational reforms occurred associated to the political processes and the recognition and better understanding of Mexican pluricultural society; allowing expansion, diversification and consolidation of medical anthropology as an specialty. This review presents the historical evolution of the academic courses on this field, the educators that influenced its consolidation, and the current situation of the available academic programs on medical anthropology. The diversity of specialties from those health sciences that are associated to medical anthropology is emphasized.

  1. An Anthropological Perspective: Another Dimension to Modern Dental Wear Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Kaidonis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, research on tooth wear by dental academics has been diametrically opposite to that of anthropological research, with each discipline having a different understanding as to the nature of the wear processes. Dental focus revolved around preventive and restorative considerations while the anthropological focus was a biological understanding related to human evolution, diet, environment, form, and function and included all the craniofacial structures. Introducing the anthropological perspective into modern dentistry gives an insight into the “bigger picture” of the nature and extent of tooth wear. By combining anthropological evidence with clinical knowledge and experience, it is most likely to provide the best-informed and biologically based approach to the management of tooth wear in modern societies.

  2. A Social Anthropology of Education: The Case of Chiapas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, John C.

    1977-01-01

    Social anthropological theory is used to analyze the relationship of education to sociocultural change resulting from the interaction of the local ecological system and national influences in two rural regions of the Chiapas. (Author/AM)

  3. Robust Methods for Image Processing in Anthropology and Biomedicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan

    -, č. 86 (2011), s. 53-53. ISSN 0926-4981 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : image analysis * robust estimation * forensic anthropology Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  4. Ethnography and public categories: the making of compatible agendas in contemporary anthropological practices

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Susana de Matos

    2013-01-01

    This article is a debate on research that deals with categories pre-defined in the public agenda. It is supported by an experience of doing an anthropological study for the Tupinambá of Olivença aimed at the identification of a juridical category of “indigenous land” defined by the 1988 Constitution of Brazil. The main argument developed in this article starts with the assumption that in the contemporary situation the definition of public categories that involves cultural and social rights of...

  5. Anthropology and Anarchy: their elective affinity. GARP11

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This essay brings together anthropology and anarchism, first by an examination of anthropologists who have expressed an interest in anarchism, then by discussion of classical anarchist thinkers who have drawn upon anthropological literature to develop their ideas. The second part of the essay offers some reflections on anarchism as a political tradition and deals with certain misconceptions that have been forwarded by its liberal and Marxist critics.

  6. Darkness’s Descent on the American Anthropological Association

    OpenAIRE

    Dreger, Alice

    2011-01-01

    In September 2000, the self-styled “anthropological journalist” Patrick Tierney began to make public his work claiming that the Yanomamö people of South America had been actively—indeed brutally—harmed by the sociobiological anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon and the geneticist-physician James Neel. Following a florid summary of Tierney’s claims by the anthropologists Terence Turner and Leslie Sponsel, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) saw fit to take Tierney’s claims seriously by c...

  7. Introduction to Practice What You Teach: Activist Anthropology at the Sites of Cross-Talk and Cross-Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L. Anderson-Lazo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Constructed as a consciously transnational and interdisciplinary dialogue among eight anthropologists, this group of essays compares methods, strategies and outcomes of expressly political research, collaborative networks, participatory projects, and activist teaching. Here, projected against the backdrop of the 2007 Society for Applied Anthropology meetings’ theme which focused on Global Insecurities, each contributor revisits and updates an ongoing conversation about anthropology as an agent of social transformation. Our written collaboration holds up teaching as a central practice of activist anthropology; and thus our essays taken as a whole reveal how we imagine, construct and inhabit relationships of thinking and learning collectively, across and outside of mainstream political orthodoxies, disciplinary epistemologies, cultural registers, as well as physical, sexual and civil normativities. The moments of convergence, overlap and disjuncture among our various projects, then, offer a broad description of an engaged anthropology that draws on an historical approach, situated perspectives, decolonizing critiques, and embodied practices that include everything from empathetic listening to social disruption. Thus, looking at ourselves through this lens, this collection of essays which might be compared to a reflexive, group ethnography reconsiders and refashions our best practices over time.

  8. Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the research methods and approaches used in the multidisciplinary field of applied language studies or language education over the last fourty years. Drawing on insights gained in psycho- and sociolinguistics, educational linguistics and linguistic anthropology with regard to language and culture, it is organized around five…

  9. Rule-governed behavior and behavioral anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Malott, Richard W

    1988-01-01

    According to cultural materialism, cultural practices result from the materialistic outcomes of those practices, not from sociobiological, mentalistic, or mystical predispositions (e.g., Hindus worship cows because, in the long run, that worship results in more food, not less food). However, according to behavior analysis, such materialistic outcomes do not reinforce or punish the cultural practices, because such outcomes are too delayed, too improbable, or individually too small to directly ...

  10. Choosing a Field: How Graduate Student Choices of Field Sites Reflect Different Ideas of "Real" Anthropology in Colombia and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macia, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the decisions and motivations of graduate students in cultural anthropology when defining the field sites and topics of their final projects. The decisions among students at the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia are contrasted with those at the University of Pittsburgh in the United States. A review of recent final projects…

  11. Notes towards an anthropology of the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Hart

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available What might an anthropology of the internet look like? It require a combination of introspection, personal judgment and world history to explore the universe of cyberspace. This world is not sufficient to itself, nor is it 'the world'. People bring their offline circumstances to behaviour online. The virtual and the real constitute a dialectic in which neither can be reduced to the other and 'virtual reality' is their temporary synthesis. Heidegger's metaphysics are drawn on to illuminate this dialectic. Before this, the internet is examines in the light of the history of communications, from speech and writing to books and the radio. The digital revolution of our time is marked by the convergence of telephones, television and computing. It is the third stage in a machine revolution lasting just 200 years. The paper analyses the political economy of the internet in terms of the original three classes controlling respectively increase in the environment (land, money (capital and human creativity (labour. It ends with a consideration of Kant's great example for a future anthropology capable of placing human subjectivity in world history.Como poderia ser uma antropologia da Internet? Uma tal antropologia exigiria uma combinação de introspecção, de opiniões pessoais e de história mundial para se explorar o universo do ciberespaço. Afinal, esse mundo não é um mundo auto-suficiente, nem mesmo esse é "um mundo". As pessoas carregam consigo suas circunstâncias off-line para junto do seu comportamento on-line. Constitui-se uma dialética do virtual e do real, na qual nenhuma das duas partes pode ser reduzida à outra e na qual a "realidade virtual" é a sua síntese temporária. A metafísica heideggeriana é aqui acionada para esclarecer melhor essa dialética. Antes disso, entretanto, a Internet é examinada sob a luz da história das comunicações, desde a fala e a escrita de livros até o rádio. A revolução digital de nosso tempo est

  12. Riflessioni antropologiche sulla religione - Some anthropological reflections on religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Colajanni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of general, theoretical and methodological reflections on the different forms of religious ideas and practices diffused among all human cultures is here proposed from an anthropological point of view. The first step is based on the consideration that the most diffused idea within very different social contexts is that of the existence of spiritual not-human invisible beings, capable of influencing the lives of the humans, if addressed in certain forms and in certain times. A common character of the religious ideas (in particular within the religious systems of the three monotheisms is that they do not accept a normal and ordinary way of confutation and critical discussion about the principles and central ideas. They show a case of undisputable statements on reality and are founded on a trust in certain ideas and beliefs received from others, respected person or sacred texts, without a particular sensibility to accept the recourse to empirical evidences. Their principal concern is about some “elementary aspects of human life”, normally impossible to be controlled by the humans in a technical and operational way. The fundamental methodological aspect to be taken into consideration is that the religious ideas and practices have to be studied historically, because they are connected with concrete and historical problems of the human societies that produced them, and that they change continually in time, owing to different circumstances. The comparative method is another indispensable instrument for the study of the religious phenomena; every religious system has to be examined in the context of the numerous analogies and differences existing between the various societies of men living in the same and in different times, which have been continually in contact among them, which generated influences and reciprocal loans. On a more general level, it appears necessary, for the theoretical and comparative study of religious phenomena, to

  13. XXIth Century Cannibalism: Popular Interest on an Old Anthropological Concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López García, Julián

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I analise the dialogue between western and non-western indigenous cannibalism. I make reference to the cannibal evidences from a western point of view, and to the ideological fight not only to expel it from our culture but also to invest in it the role of fundametal marker or fetish condensing of all evils of Otherness. Yet, starting in the XXth Century, we find a number of episodes approaching cannibalism (real and symbolic to western popular culture, thus refashioning the former relationship between cannibalism and evil to the point of losing its diacritic place as fundamental marker of cultural differences. This paves the way to artistic eccentricities, but also to organ trafficking. I end with a reference to the ways in which the anthropology of ths last century contributed both the the making and unmaking of the myth of cannibalism.

    En el artículo analizo el diálogo entre canibalismo occidental y canibalismo de indígenas no occidentales. Aludo a la contracción entre las evidencias caníbales de inspiración occidental y la lucha ideológica no sólo por expulsarlo fuera de nuestra cultura sino por otorgarle un papel fetiche, condensador de todos los males de la diferencia. Sin embargo a partir del siglo XX asistimos a distintos episodios que acercan el canibalismo (real y simbólico a la cultura popular occidental de manera que se va matizando la relación entre canibalismo y mal y por tanto se va diluyendo su papel como signo diacrítico de la diferencia: eso abona el terreno para excentricidades artísticas pero también para el tráfico de órganos. Termino con una alusión al papel de la Antropología en este último siglo construyendo y destruyendo el mito del canibalismo.

  14. The Internet as a field and a means in contemporary ethnological and anthropological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyber culture (synonyms for this term are: virtual culture, digital culture, net culture and the like represents a multidisciplinary field of research. This paper focuses on the ways in which contemporary Internet technologies are used in ethnological and anthropological research. While studying cyber culture one needs to take into consideration the relativity of the division into virtual and real. The so-called virtual communities are often more real to their users than certain constructed communities from the so-called real reality. The Internet can be observed as a field and as a means for conducting research. Anthropologists introduced virtual ethnography as a conceptual and methodological approach to studying cyber culture. However, if we speak of actual scientific research, the term virtual ethnography is not an adequate one. The examined contents and communication with examinees are real. The other possible term is ethnography of the virtual world, but this term is not precise enough either, since the 'virtual world' is not limited only to the Internet. In my opinion, the most adequate terms are ethnography of the Internet and anthropology of the Internet. The Internet as a terrain for ethnological and anthropological research can be observed on several levels. Available information can be used as a data base, but also as material for analysis of existing textual, visual and audio contents. Previous research results show that in analyzing Internet phenomena one needs to take into consideration their physical background as well. Otherwise, the total context is lost. People with many different local identities enter the global cyber space. In this way cyber communities often portray the existing structures of relations. The Internet can be used both for establishing contacts with distance examinees and collecting data by methods of polls (by using electronic mail and interviews (by using a camera and Skype. Theoretically speaking, a

  15. A Historical Masterpiece of Anthropology%既是历史学的,又是人类学的——再读《雪球:汉民族的人类学分析》有感

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄世杰

    2001-01-01

    Hitorical anthropology promises a bright future of wide application in China. Snowball - anthropological analysis of the Han Nationality edited mainly by professor Xu Jie - shun is the masterpiece of the application of theories and methodology of historical anthropology in the research of history and culture of Han nationality. Its academic value lies in its anthropological analysis of the Han nationality and the emphasis of historical orientation of the culture of Han nationality as well as the detailed analysis of the culture of Han nationality with the method of anthropology. As a historical masterpiece of anthropology, its publication marks a good start of historical anthropology in China and expands the influence of anthropologi cal theories in the field of history.%历史人类学在中国有着广泛的应用前景。由徐杰舜教授主编的《雪球:汉民族的人类学分析》即是应用历史人类学的理论与方法来研究汉族历史和文化的创新之作,从学术上来说,《雪球》在对汉民族作人类学分析时,既强调汉民族文化的历史向度,也用人类学理论对汉族文化作了详细的分析,它既是历史学的,又是人类学的。《雪球》一书的出版,标志着历史人类学在中国有了良好的开端,扩大了人类学理论在历史学界的影响。

  16. History, research and practice of forensic anthropology in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traithepchanapai, Pongpon; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Kranioti, Elena F

    2016-04-01

    Forensic anthropology is an increasingly developing discipline born about a century ago in the United States with the objective to contribute the knowledge of bone biology and physical anthropology to the emerging needs of the court of law. The development of research in biological and forensic anthropology has made rapid progress worldwide in the past few years, however, in most countries - with the exception of the United States - forensic anthropology work is still considered within the duties of the forensic pathologist. This paper attempts to summarise the history and development of forensic anthropology in Thailand by providing information on past and current research and practice that can help forensic practitioners to apply existing methods in forensic cases and mass disasters. It is hoped that the lessons learned from the tsunami catastrophe and the emerging need for positive identification in medicolegal settings will lead to rapid advances in education, training and professional engagement of anthropologists from the forensic departments and the law enforcement agencies in Thailand. PMID:26949023

  17. History in the gene: negotiations between molecular and organismal anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the study of primate phylogeny and human evolution on the molecular level, asserted its claim to the privilege of interpretation regarding hominoid, hominid, and human phylogeny and evolution vis-à-vis other historical sciences such as evolutionary biology, physical anthropology, and paleoanthropology. This process will be discussed on the basis of three key conferences on primate classification and evolution that brought together exponents of the respective fields and that were held in approximately ten-years intervals between the early 1960s and the 1980s. I show how the anthropological gene and genome gained their status as the most fundamental, clean, and direct records of historical information, and how the prioritizing of these epistemic objects was part of a complex involving the objectivity of numbers, logic, and mathematics, the objectivity of machines and instruments, and the objectivity seen to reside in the epistemic objects themselves. PMID:19244721

  18. Popular Culture in the Junior College Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, David; Ayers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Popular culture is extremely influential in both academe and society at large. However, formal disciplinary study of popular culture lags far behind that influence. Anthropology, film studies, history, musicology, and sociology are only some of the disciplines that frequently include popular culture as a research focus. This article advises on how…

  19. Culture and Cognition in Information Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvikivi, Jaana

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims at explaining the outcomes of information technology education for international students using anthropological theories of cultural schemas. Even though computer science and engineering are usually assumed to be culture-independent, the practice in classrooms seems to indicate that learning patterns depend on culture. The…

  20. "The First Twenty Years," by Bernard J. Siegel. Annual Review of Anthropology, 22 (1993, pp. 1-34, Annual Reviews, Inc, Palo Alto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Delle

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available After twenty years as editor of the Annual Review ofAnthropology (ARA, Professor Siegel took on a daunting task with this article. In his words, he set out to "ponder the developments in the several subfields of anthropol­ogy over this period of time, as reflected in the topics selected for review in this enterprise" (p. 8. To this end Siegel, a cultural anthropologist, mined the collective knowledge contained within twenty years of the ARA. In his presentation, he considers the intellectual developments within each of the five subdisciplines separately (he includes applied anthropology, concluding with some brief remarks on the importance of maintaining a four or five field approach to anthropology. For our purposes here, I will limit my comments to his section on archaeology.

  1. The Study on Disciplinary Development of Educational Anthropology%教育人类学学科发展审思:差异化视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴洪亮

    2015-01-01

    Following the difference principle of“difference thinking”and“knowledge of difference method”, the paper explores the common points and differences of educational anthropology disciplinary development,which is“ethnic pedagogy and educational anthropology”、“educational anthropology and educational sociology”、“cultural educational anthropology and Philosophical educational anthropology”、“anthropology position and educational posi-tion of educational anthropology”. Abased on the above analysis ,the study takes thoughts on the disciplinary devel-opment of educational anthropology.%遵循差异性原理提供的“差异性思维”或“识差法”,探求教育人类学学科发展中四对关系的“同中之异与异中之同”:教育人类学与民族教育学,教育人类学与教育社会学,“文化教育人类学”流派与“哲学教育人类学”流派,以及教育人类学中的“教育学立场”与“人类学立场”,在“求同存异”中对教育人类学学科发展进行审思。

  2. On the Linguistic Anthropology and its Development in China%论语言人类学的起源及其在中国的发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵泽琳

    2015-01-01

    Linguistic anthropology is the interdisciplinary subject of linguistics and anthropology. The study of language has been one of the most important fields ever since the field of anthropology developed. At the same time, the research of linguistics has always been under the discussion of anthropology. Linguistic anthropology which studies the relationship of language, culture and human society was establishing its own disciplinary position in the interaction between the two subjects gradually.%语言人类学是语言学与人类学的交叉学科。自人类学发端开始,在人类学视野下的语言研究就成为人类学研究的重要命题之一,而语言学的研究亦从未离开过人类学关乎文化命题的讨论。语言人类学就是在两个学科的交错互动中逐步确立了自己的学科定位,即研究语言、文化及人类社会的关系。

  3. MORAL TECHNIQUES. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY AND ITS ARTIFACTS FOR DOING GOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIEL GATTI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many of its applications forensic anthropology is a singular discipline, midway between a bare techno-scientific exercise and a militant involvement in overcoming situations marked by human rights violations. Today, riding on an intense and transnational wave of humanitarian sensitivity, forensic anthropology has acquired a significant scientific, moral and media status, and has become a front line scientific-technical practice in the human rights field at the planetary level. This text, which analyzes some of the artifacts with which forensic anthropology represents and works on its object, aims to understand this discipline through the concept of moral technique, which, in my understanding, captures the particular tensions of this form of working for good.

  4. Applications of Space-Age Technology in Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The papers in this volume were presented at a conference entitled, 'Applications of Space-Age Technology in Anthropology,' held November 28, 1990, at NASA's Science and Technology Laboratory. One reason for this conference was to facilitate information exchange among a diverse group of anthropologists. Much of the research in anthropology that has made use of satellite image processing, geographical information systems, and global positioning systems has been known to only a small group of practitioners. A second reason for this conference was to promote scientific dialogue between anthropologists and professionals outside of anthropology. It is certain that both the development and proper application of new technologies will only result from greater cooperation between technicians and 'end-users.' Anthropologists can provide many useful applications to justify the costs of new technological development.

  5. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  6. Anthropology as an inspiration to food studies: building theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Siewicz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show the role of anthropological inquiry in the development of a new, interdisciplinary approach to food in culture - namely: food studies. Early anthropologists, for example, Bronislaw Malinowski and Edward Evans-Pritchard, stressed the social meaning of food while analyzing the outcome of their fieldwork. When the functional approach had been replaced by structuralism, the symbolic meaning of food was given priority. Therefore, Claude Lévi-Strauss constructed his famous culinary triangle to show the connection between culture and nature in human thought; however, the triangle was not based on his own fieldwork, but rather many examples from other works were used to support this theoretical approach. This paper shows that without the theoretical and practical contribution of these three anthropologists, the flourishing of food studies as a new discipline would have been seriously delayed.

  7. Medical anthropology as an antidote for ethnocentrism in Jesus research? Putting the illness–disease distinction into perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter F. Craffert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Medicine often has side-effects or unintended consequences that are more harmful than the original disease. Medical anthropology in general and the illness–disease distinction in particular has been introduced into historical Jesus research with the intent to protect it from medicocentrism and thus to offer ways of comprehending sickness and healing in the world of Jesus and his first followers without distorting these phenomena by imposing the biomedical framework onto the texts. In particular the illness–disease distinction is used for making sense of healing accounts whilst claiming to cross the cultural gap. Based on an analysis of the illness–disease distinction in medical anthropology and its use in historical Jesus research this article suggests that instead of protecting from ethnocentrism this distinction actually increases the risk of ethnocentrism and consequently distorts in many instances the healing accounts of the New Testament.

  8. Rule-governed behavior and behavioral anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malott, R W

    1988-01-01

    According to cultural materialism, cultural practices result from the materialistic outcomes of those practices, not from sociobiological, mentalistic, or mystical predispositions (e.g., Hindus worship cows because, in the long run, that worship results in more food, not less food). However, according to behavior analysis, such materialistic outcomes do not reinforce or punish the cultural practices, because such outcomes are too delayed, too improbable, or individually too small to directly reinforce or punish the cultural practices (e.g., the food increase is too delayed to reinforce the cow worship). Therefore, the molar, materialistic contingencies need the support of molecular, behavioral contingencies. And according to the present theory of rule-governed behavior, the statement of rules describing those molar, materialistic contingencies can establish the needed molecular contingencies. Given the proper behavioral history, such rule statements combine with noncompliance to produce a learned aversive condition (often labeled fear, anxiety, or guilt). The termination of this aversive condition reinforces compliance, just as its presentation punishes noncompliance (e.g., the termination of guilt reinforces the tending to a sick cow). In addition, supernatural rules often supplement these materialistic rules. Furthermore, the production of both materialistic and supernatural rules needs cultural designers who understand the molar, materialistic contingencies. PMID:22478012

  9. Cultural mosaics and mental models of nature

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Megan; Medin, Douglas; Atran, Scott

    2007-01-01

    For much of their history, the relationship between anthropology and psychology has been well captured by Robert Frost's poem, “Mending Wall,” which ends with the ironic line, “good fences make good neighbors.” The congenial fence was that anthropology studied what people think and psychology studied how people think. Recent research, however, shows that content and process cannot be neatly segregated, because cultural differences in what people think affect how people think. To achieve a dee...

  10. Recent Trend and Perspectives in Forensic Anthropology: A Bibliometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela; Fonti, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates research in Forensic Anthropology (FA) in order to report on the state of this field of science. In particular, we carried out a review of all PubMed-listed scientific studies in the past decades using »forensic anthropology « as the keyword. In our »meta-analysis«, we observed variation in the number of publications per 2-year interval throughout the study period. In total, 1589 studies were found in the database and 1292 of them were published in the period 2000–2009...

  11. Contribution of anthropology to the study of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jessica; Dove, Michael; Lahsen, Myanna; Mathews, Andrew; McElwee, Pamela; McIntosh, Roderick; Moore, Frances; O'Reilly, Jessica; Orlove, Ben; Puri, Rajindra; Weiss, Harvey; Yager, Karina

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the challenge that climate change poses and crafting appropriate adaptation and mitigation mechanisms requires input from the breadth of the natural and social sciences. Anthropology's in-depth fieldwork methodology, long engagement in questions of society-environment interactions and broad, holistic view of society yields valuable insights into the science, impacts and policy of climate change. Yet the discipline's voice in climate change debates has remained a relatively marginal one until now. Here, we identify three key ways that anthropological research can enrich and deepen contemporary understandings of climate change.

  12. 77 FR 34987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... & Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology has completed an...: Dr. Richard Hodges, Director, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology &...

  13. 75 FR 5108 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... possession and control of the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository... notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Wyoming,...

  14. 76 FR 28077 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Western Michigan University, Department of...

  15. We Need to be Relevant : An Ethnography of Kenyan Anthropology Students

    OpenAIRE

    Grøvik, Ida Skjong

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is based on seven months of ethnographic fieldwork among Kenyan anthropology students at the Institute of Anthropology, Gender & African Studies (IAGAS) at the University of Nairobi. I explore anthropology students 1) everyday life, interests, aspirations and motivations; 2) the relationship between their personal background and approach to anthropology; and 3) how they interpret society and assess their potential to contribute to it as social scientists. A prevalent theme of thi...

  16. Deviance as Pedagogy: From Nondominant Cultural Capital to Deviantly Marked Cultural Repertoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Román, Ezekiel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Pierre Bourdieu's concept of cultural capital has been employed extensively in sociological, educational, and anthropological research. However, Bourdieu's conceptualization of cultural capital has often been misread to refer only to "high status" or dominant cultural norms and resources at the cost of…

  17. 78 FR 11673 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in..., Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the...

  18. 75 FR 52364 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies, University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies... in possession of the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las... made by the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas,...

  19. 78 FR 19298 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... Washington, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  20. 76 FR 28073 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit... of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit... Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional staff in consultation with representatives...

  1. 75 FR 435 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of... completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Department of Anthropology... assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, University of...

  2. 75 FR 57493 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies... ] object in the possession of the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University of Nevada Las... assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology & Ethnic Studies, University...

  3. 78 FR 45961 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver... of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the...

  4. 78 FR 19297 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... Burke Museum acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology....

  5. 77 FR 46116 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... Museum of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate... Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the address below by September 4, 2012. ADDRESSES: Heather...

  6. 77 FR 11582 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Central Washington University Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated... Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Indian tribe stated...

  7. 78 FR 45962 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver... of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... of Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human...

  8. 78 FR 56733 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Logan Museum of Anthropology... Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer...

  9. 76 FR 73664 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology... University, Museum of Anthropology (WSU) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary... Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA 99164-4910,...

  10. 78 FR 22286 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology. If no additional...

  11. 78 FR 25471 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... Burke Museum acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology....

  12. 78 FR 5200 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... Burke Museum acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology....

  13. 77 FR 74871 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State... Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with... associated funerary objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

  14. 77 FR 74868 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of... Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation..., Department of Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below may occur...

  15. 78 FR 78379 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology... the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. If no additional requestors come...

  16. 75 FR 14463 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology... Anthropology, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from Huckleberry Island, Skagit County, WA. This... assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology...

  17. 78 FR 19301 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains... Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian...

  18. 77 FR 51563 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains...

  19. 78 FR 5198 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains to...

  20. 78 FR 2429 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State... Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with... associated funerary objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

  1. 76 FR 28073 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University... the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA. The human remains and... made by the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University professional staff in...

  2. 76 FR 36151 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Museum of Anthropology, University of...

  3. 78 FR 2432 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State... Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with... associated funerary objects may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State...

  4. 78 FR 5201 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... Washington, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  5. Culture-Specific Counseling: An Alternative Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachuku, Uchenna T.; Ivey, Allen E.

    1991-01-01

    Promotes culture-specific counseling approach, which starts with the culture and its people and searches out natural helping styles. Uses case model drawn from African-Igbo culture and applies anthropological constructs that seek to discover more culturally sensitive approach to counseling theory, to training in counseling skills and knowledge,…

  6. If only Derrida missed that flight... About the assessment of the "academic achievements" of the so-called "American Anthropology" by Belgrade Structural-semiotic School of Folklore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Leach, Needham, Schneider and representatives of ethnoscience and cognitive anthropology had already adapted Levi-Strauss’s ideas about mind and science to ethnographic phenomenology. Transformation of Levi-Strauss’s analysis and limited success of its adaptation to the analysis of phenomena that usually concern anthropology happened simultaneously with the development of the critique of structuralism as a theory of culture in the American academic scene. This proves a theory that there is at least one "Atlantic split", analogue to that in philosophy, more than it makes a relevant context for measuring of the comparative ’academic achievements’ of the specific and unconnected disciplinary traditions. Indirectly, this paper explains that Levi-Strauss’s work has contradictory functions in the history of ideas in anthropology, serving as a starting point for ‘postmodern’ neo-romantic and positivistic critique of imperial realism (in USA, as well as ‘enlightened’, realistic and anti-tribal critique of ethnology as positivistic, nationalistic and national science (in Serbia. In this paper, special emphasis is placed on the local context in which structuralism as a founding discourse of anthropology is opposed to ethnology as national prose. As such it had completely different role in comparison to structuralism in a the history of American anthropology and b in the history of interdisciplinary/ postmodern Theory.

  7. Early Medieval Muslim Graves in France: First Archaeological, Anthropological and Palaeogenomic Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemonge, Marie-Hélène; Hubert, Christophe; Groppi, Alexis; Houix, Bertrand; Deguilloux, Marie-France; Breuil, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The rapid Arab-Islamic conquest during the early Middle Ages led to major political and cultural changes in the Mediterranean world. Although the early medieval Muslim presence in the Iberian Peninsula is now well documented, based in the evaluation of archeological and historical sources, the Muslim expansion in the area north of the Pyrenees has only been documented so far through textual sources or rare archaeological data. Our study provides the first archaeo-anthropological testimony of the Muslim establishment in South of France through the multidisciplinary analysis of three graves excavated at Nimes. First, we argue in favor of burials that followed Islamic rites and then note the presence of a community practicing Muslim traditions in Nimes. Second, the radiometric dates obtained from all three human skeletons (between the 7th and the 9th centuries AD) echo historical sources documenting an early Muslim presence in southern Gaul (i.e., the first half of 8th century AD). Finally, palaeogenomic analyses conducted on the human remains provide arguments in favor of a North African ancestry of the three individuals, at least considering the paternal lineages. Given all of these data, we propose that the skeletons from the Nimes burials belonged to Berbers integrated into the Umayyad army during the Arab expansion in North Africa. Our discovery not only discusses the first anthropological and genetic data concerning the Muslim occupation of the Visigothic territory of Septimania but also highlights the complexity of the relationship between the two communities during this period. PMID:26910855

  8. Early Medieval Muslim Graves in France: First Archaeological, Anthropological and Palaeogenomic Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleize, Yves; Mendisco, Fanny; Pemonge, Marie-Hélène; Hubert, Christophe; Groppi, Alexis; Houix, Bertrand; Deguilloux, Marie-France; Breuil, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The rapid Arab-Islamic conquest during the early Middle Ages led to major political and cultural changes in the Mediterranean world. Although the early medieval Muslim presence in the Iberian Peninsula is now well documented, based in the evaluation of archeological and historical sources, the Muslim expansion in the area north of the Pyrenees has only been documented so far through textual sources or rare archaeological data. Our study provides the first archaeo-anthropological testimony of the Muslim establishment in South of France through the multidisciplinary analysis of three graves excavated at Nimes. First, we argue in favor of burials that followed Islamic rites and then note the presence of a community practicing Muslim traditions in Nimes. Second, the radiometric dates obtained from all three human skeletons (between the 7th and the 9th centuries AD) echo historical sources documenting an early Muslim presence in southern Gaul (i.e., the first half of 8th century AD). Finally, palaeogenomic analyses conducted on the human remains provide arguments in favor of a North African ancestry of the three individuals, at least considering the paternal lineages. Given all of these data, we propose that the skeletons from the Nimes burials belonged to Berbers integrated into the Umayyad army during the Arab expansion in North Africa. Our discovery not only discusses the first anthropological and genetic data concerning the Muslim occupation of the Visigothic territory of Septimania but also highlights the complexity of the relationship between the two communities during this period. PMID:26910855

  9. Acculturation and Its Discontents: A Case for Bringing Anthropology Back into the Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Peter J.; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Anthropologists’ contribution to the study of cultural change is urgent in light of the increasing number of people of different backgrounds who are migrating around the globe and settling in new communities, and the opportunities and challenges that come along with that process. By examining the anthropological literature on acculturation going back to the 1936 Memorandum by Redfield, Linton and Herskovits, this paper reviews and assesses the discipline’s perspective on acculturation, and lays out the case for why it is critical for anthropologists to re-engage the concept. Although other disciplines, particularly psychology and sociology, have dominated the field of acculturation research more recently, they mostly have done so with a narrow focus. While it is important to acknowledge the pitfalls of anthropology’s past study of acculturation, there are important features of the acculturation construct that continue to be relevant. Among these are the study of acculturation as a process that is multidimensional; the investigation of how different kinds of power affect the acculturation process; the impacts of attitudes, actions and policies of the receiving group on how acculturation proceeds; the role of “real history” in understanding processes of acculturation; and the global perspective on these processes. We suggest ways in which anthropologists can reignite the field of acculturation research by engaging with Redfield, Linton and Herskovits’ framework and subsequent anthropological literature.

  10. THE ANTHROPOLOGY CURRICULUM PROJECT--GRADES TWO AND FIVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAILEY, WILFRID C.; CLUNE, FRANCIS J.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A SECOND-YEAR PROJECT REPORT OF A 5-YEAR EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM TO DEVELOP AN ANTHROPOLOGY CURRICULUM FOR GRADES 1 THROUGH 7. THE MATERIAL IS IN A SELF-CONTAINED UNIT PACKAGE FOR EACH GRADE, REQUIRES 4 TO 5 WEEKS PER UNIT, AND IS DESIGNED TO FIT INTO A SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE WITHOUT DISRUPTION OF NORMAL SCHOOL ACTIVITIES. EACH UNIT…

  11. Winds from the North: Tewa Origins and Historical Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Dombrosky

    2014-01-01

    Review of Winds from the North: Tewa Origins and Historical Anthropology. Scott G. Ortman. 2012. The University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City. Pp. 520, 51 illustrations, 25 maps, 54 tables. $70.00 (hardcover). ISBN  978-1-60781-172-5.

  12. Research Summary of Chinese Ecological Anthropology in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shan

    2014-01-01

    The year 2013 was a fruitful year for the study of Ecological Anthropology in China . More than one hundred related papers were been published in 2013 . They can be roughly divided into three categories: research review; theoretical discussion; and case analysis .Among these pa-pers, the research about disaster anthropology was the most significant .However , there are also prob-lems regarding the development of Ecological An-thropology.For example, the concept of the disci-pline is still unclear and theoretical discussion as to what it means continues even today .In addition, the number of results has increased by leaps and bounds, but the areas of study are still unbal-anced.Furthermore, while localized studies have been promoted , professional exchanges with for-eign countries and scholars are still inadequate . Finally, although publishing platforms have in-creased , even one professional journal of Ecologi-cal Anthropology in China is still lacking .With the advancement of the construction of an ecological civilization in China , Ecological Anthropology will usher in a new development opportunity in future .

  13. REALISM AND THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PRINCIPLE IN RUSSIAN PHILOSOPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobkova S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anthropologism is traditionally considered the main feature of Russian philosophy. The article reviews some anthropological ideas that have received natural development in such direction of thought as philosophical realism in the 2nd part of XIX century. Philosophical realism is positioned as a trend that has emerged within the mainstream of the basic traditions of Russian philosophy. It is noted that this direction is defined as an independent, in the wake of the strengthening of Russian science as a new cognitive paradigm. Substantively, philosophical realism is presented with the theories and concepts of the natural sciences developed in the 2nd part of XIX century. The realistic outlook, ripening in the Science environment, not only supported the anthropological tradition of Russian thought but put them on a scientific basis. It was dominated by the view that only by using scientific methods can reveal the objective laws of coexistence between man, nature and society. The article deals with the anthropological theories of Russian thinkers such as A.N. Radishchev, A.I. Galich, N.G. Chernyshevsky. The anaysis shows that realistic outlook in the natural sciences in the area of human theory relies on the principles of integrity, panmoralizm, cosmism. The conclusion is that the philosophical concepts by realistic scientists are out of attention of modern scholars. In the meantime, the study of these theories can make a significant contribution to the practical experience of comprehension of reality, as well as help to discover new sides of the domestic, national philosophy

  14. Anthropology, Development and Modernities: Exploring discourses, counter tendencies and violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, N.; Arce, A.

    2000-01-01

    This collection uses anthropological perspectives to explore the diverse interpretations of modernity and development in today's world. For some, modernity and development has brought prosperity, optimism and opportunity, but for others it has brought poverty and a falling quality of life. This book

  15. Digital technologies, dreams and disconcertment in anthropological worldmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waltorp, Karen

    2017-01-01

    In this article I explore dreaming and sharing of images in social media (such as Snapchat and Instagram), as future-making action. I propose to view them similarly as techniques to research the future anthropologically. Through my 14-month fieldwork among young Muslim women in Copenhagen, it bec...

  16. Anthropology, Dance, and Education: Integrated Curriculum in Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karli; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Vissicaro, Pegge; Fredrickson, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    The integration of dance into K-12 curriculum can help students to learn better, encouraging deeper exploration and active engagement with content knowledge. The purpose of this intervention study was to determine how the integration of dance and social studies with an anthropological framework affects student learning of content knowledge in…

  17. "The Good Child": Anthropological Perspectives on Morality and Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Anne-Meike

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no clearly delineated field that could be described as "the anthropology of morality". There exists, however, an increasingly visible and vocal interest in issues of morality among anthropologists. Although there has been a lack of explicit study, it has become clear that anthropologists have, in fact, been concerned…

  18. Anthropology with an Agenda: Four Forgotten Dance Anthropologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Katrina

    2010-01-01

    In response to postcolonial, feminist and subaltern critiques of anthropology, this article seeks to answer the question, "For whom should research be conducted, and by whom should it be used?" by examining the lives and works of four female dance anthropologists. Franziska Boas, Zora Neale Hurston, Katherine Dunham and Pearl Primus used…

  19. Transforming Conflict Resolution Education: Applying Anthropology alongside Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avruch, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the role graduate students can play in transforming their education in the emergent field of Conflict Analysis and Resolution, as occurs at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR), at George Mason University, Washington, DC. It also unpacks how anthropology plays a role in the education of these students at…

  20. Ecological anthropology of households in East Madura, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, W.G.

    2011-01-01

      This dissertation is the result of diachronic and comparative anthropological study of rural households in Northeast Madura, Indonesia, carried out on eight separate visits between August 1985 and March 2009. The aim is to bring time-structured data to bear on key questions regarding the evo

  1. Dolphins Who Blow Bubbles: Anthropological Machines and Native Informants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Lord

    2011-01-01

    "Dolphins Who Blow Bubbles: Anthropological Machines and Native Informants" engages a reading between an Oscar winning and now ‘cult’ activist film The Cove (Louise Psihoyos 2009) and classical texts on the human-animal threshold. Giorgio Agamben’s The Open (2002) and Jacques Derrida’s "The Animal t

  2. 遵义“红军菩萨”民间信仰文化生成的文化人类学考察%Investigation of Cultural Phenomenon "Local Folk Belief of "Bodhisattva of the Red Army" in Zunyi from the Perspective of Cultural Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢东莉

    2012-01-01

    The history of "Bodhisattva of the Red Army" in Zunyi was back to the historical event that the Central Red Army Long March when they passed Guizhou province in the 1930' s. By making the field survey and historical data analysis, this paper performed an investigation and study about the present situation of "Red Army grave" and cultural phenomenon of local folk belief of "Bodhisattva of the Red Army" in Zunyi, and to interpret and read the influence of different factors in forming the belief of " Bodhisattva of the Red Army "%遵义“红军菩萨”的历史源于20世纪30年代的中央红军长征经过贵州的历史事件。通过田野调查和史料分析等方式,对遵义“红军坟”及“红军菩萨”的民间信仰现状进行调查研究,诠释和解读“红军菩萨”信仰在时空背景中生成流传的合力过程。

  3. Why Rajput Practice Exogamy: Anthropological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    D. Atifa

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at the exogamous nature of marriage in Rajput community of subcontinent in general. The tradition of exogamy is still being practiced in Indo–Pakistan subcontinent within this ethnic group. This paper tries to explore historically a number of possible assumptions that can be employed to define the reasons for practicing the exogamous marriage type. Exogamy is explored through its biological and socio cultural aspect in relation to the Indian subcontinent that ultimately lea...

  4. Research on Gift Alienability from Anthropology Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Liu; Yanbin Qin

    2009-01-01

    Economics is usually elaborate economic phenomena from an objective point of view. While Anthropologist is more related with the social and culture field, to describe the sequential change of the particular economic action and bring it to a particular social structure.As a social behavior, the characteristics of economic activity have notable humanism particularity. The economic study includes not only the data collection or logic calculation, though the universal law exists for the base of a...

  5. The anthropology of death or the new anthropology and the religious complex connected to death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors give a review of new anthropological work pertaining to dying, death and beliefs in life after death. Dying and the valorization of ways of dying are the subject of a paper by sociologist Todor Kuljić, while other relevant texts commented on by the authors are the results of the work done by anthropologists. Thus, the traditional belief in “prikoljiš” is analyzed in the text of Ivan Kovačević, while the folk belief in dying after death was analyzed by Dušan Bandić, and modern forms of grief in obituaries are analyzed by Ivan Čolović. The traditional belief in the vampire is the subject of analysis in papers by Dušan Bandić and Lidija Radulović, while the analysis of beliefs in immortality, present in a new religion, is the topic of a paper by Danijel Sinani.

  6. Psicopatologia, exotismo e diversidade: ensaio de antropologia da psicopatologia Psychopathology, exoticism and diversity: some remarks on the anthropology of psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Holanda

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O texto se propõe a uma reflexão em torno de uma perspectiva antropológica da questão da psicopatologia. Partindo da análise antropológica de Tzvetan Todorov, perpassa o ensaio histórico de Theodore Zeldin, alcançando a crítica de Thomas Szasz e a abordagem histórico-antropológica de Michel Foucault, na tentativa de clarear a compreensão do fenômeno psicopatológico. Nesta perspectiva crítico-histórica, a psicopatologia é vista como um fenômeno contextualizado, inserido na construção das mentalidades específicas da cultura ocidental.The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon an anthropological approach of psychopathology. It intends to throw some light upon the phenomenon of the "psychopathologic". It begins with some remarks on the anthropological concept of Tzevan Todorov. It also analyses Theodore Zeldin’s historical essay, Thomas Szasz’s critical reflections and Michel Foucault’s historic-anthropological approach. In this historical perspective, "Psychopathology" is conceived as a rather contextualized phenomenon, part of the specific mentalities constructed by the Western culture.

  7. Information on radiation protection: an anthropological approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to prepare the messages on radiation protection before a nuclear accident arises, i.e. in a normal radiological situation. The approach discussed in this paper is based on hypothesis that any communication is a relationship between different actors (such as a transmitter and a receiver) whose semantic frames of reference, mainly defined by social and cultural determinants of knowledge, cannot be completely identical. To work out messages correctly intended for a given receiver, one has consequently to bring out the common semantic references to both the transmitter and the receiver. (author)

  8. Postmodern Anthropology: Reflections from Andean Ethnohistory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villarías-Robles, Juan J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The postmodern perspective, which began its influence on studies of Prehispanic Peru in the 1980s, has resulted —as chief positive effect— in reflection and debate concerning the written sources for apprehending such cultural otherness, the so-called “Chronicles of the West Indies”: a perspective accompanied by new editions of these texts. The author of the present article expresses his own reflection on such change in theory and method. He argues that, with regard to self-reflectivity on its epistemological foundations, the new perspective is not entirely original in the long history of Andean ethnohistory; in effect, this approach is almost as old as the field itself. What is indeed original is the cognitive relativism that surfaced in some extreme forms of the discussion. It was an unfortunate development, however: when not denying, as a matter of principle, the very possibility of understanding that cultural otherness, arguments masked actual interpretations or explanations of its features that were protected, ipso facto, from a rigorous process of validation.

    La perspectiva posmoderna, que empezó a ser influyente en los estudios del Perú prehispánico en la década de 1980, ha tenido como principal efecto positivo la reflexión y el debate sobre las fuentes originales de conocimiento de esa alteridad cultural, las llamadas genéricamente “Crónicas de Indias”: una perspectiva acompañada de nuevas ediciones de tales textos. El autor del presente artículo hace aquí su propia reflexión sobre este cambio teórico y metodológico. Plantea que, en lo que tiene de discusión sobre sus bases epistemológicas, no es del todo original en la larga historia de la etnohistoria peruanista. Es, de hecho, casi tan antiguo como ella. Lo que sí ha sido original es el relativismo cognitivo que ha acompañado a algunas expresiones extremas de la discusión. Pero fue ésta una novedad desafortunada: cuando no negaba por principio la

  9. Cultural variations in emotion: A review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mesquita; N.H. Frijda

    1992-01-01

    The psychological and anthropological literature on cultural variations in emotions is reviewed. The literature has been interpreted within the framework of a cognitive-process model of emotions. Both cross-cultural differences and similarities were identified in each phase of the emotion process; s

  10. Claiming space for an engaged anthropology: spatial inequality and social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Setha M

    2011-01-01

    I use the concept of “engaged anthropology” to frame a discussion of how “spatializing culture” uncovers systems of exclusion that are hidden or naturalized and thus rendered invisible to other methodological approaches. “Claiming Space for an Engaged Anthropology” is doubly meant: to claim more intellectual and professional space for engagement and to propose that anthropology include the dimension of space as a theoretical construct. I draw on three fieldwork examples to illustrate the value of the approach: (1) a Spanish American plaza, reclaimed from a Eurocentric past, for indigenous groups and contemporary cultural interpretation; (2) Moore Street Market, an enclosed Latino food market in Brooklyn, New York, reclaimed for a translocal set of social relations rather than a gentrified redevelopment project; (3) gated communities in Texas and New York and cooperatives in New York, reclaiming public space and confronting race and class segregation created by neoliberal enclosure and securitization. PMID:22145154

  11. Making connections through foodways: contemporary issues in anthropological and sociological studies of food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Debevec

    Full Text Available This article is an introductory discussion of a special collection of articles on food, all based on research that looks at the world through the food lens, exploring the role of food as a medium for addressing ‘controversies’ that are not necessarily about food. The authors highlight major theoretical concepts from anthropology and the sociology of food and eating which arise out of seven research articles based on ethnographies from Malta, Great Britain, Spain, Indonesia, Central America and Slovenia. The first part of this article discusses the concept of a proper meal and related subjects, such as homemade food, health and the medicalisation of the everyday diet; the second part introduces theoretical accounts of the role of food in the perpetuation of social and ethnic differences, the appropriation of foreign foods into local cultures, and the revival of ‘authentic’food practices through the process of inventing traditions.

  12. On the hidden curriculum of the mouse click: An anthropologically drama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Werler

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Any process of education is media based. But the advent of computer based media in the classroom caused a qualitative change. This new type of media serves as a bodily and cognitive extension of man. The aim of the article is to demonstrate educational consequences of these new anthropologically premises. The article discusses the structure and concept of digital communication culture as it denies the existence of spatial distance. The click option of the mouse will be framed as digital communications hidden curriculum. In order to navigate in the digital world of education the texts concludes with that man has to develop sign-literacy to be able to master the iconic turn in education.

  13. Cultural Studies and Sociology of Culture in Germany: Relations and Interrelations

    OpenAIRE

    Udo Göttlich

    2013-01-01

    Over the last three decades, attitudes towards cultural studies in Germany have developed within contexts of contact and conflict with a variety of disciplines, e.g. ethnology, anthropology, sociology, as well as the sociology of culture, liter-ary studies and Kulturwissenschaft(en). On the one hand there is a strong academ-ic interest in how cultural studies perceives and analyzes media culture, popular culture and everyday life. On the other hand boundaries with humanities and so-cial scien...

  14. The Cultural Frames Approach as an Alternative View to the Ethnocratic Idea of Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Martí Pérez, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To the current important question of intercultural relations and communication, the concept of culture undoubtedly belongs. It is not only because of its importance as a technical analytical tool but because today the idea of culture -in the anthropological sense- goes beyond the interest of the academic milieu. The concept of culture has powerfully erupted in the political arena; discourses about preservation of determined cultural traits or about the need for cultural integration of immigra...

  15. FREUD, JUNG AND BOAS: THE PSYCHOANALYTIC ENGAGEMENT WITH ANTHROPOLOGY REVISITED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Robert

    2015-06-20

    Sigmund Freud's and C. G. Jung's turn to evolutionist anthropological material after 1909 is usually seen as a logical progression of their long-term interest in such material. It is also seen that they used this material ignorant of the significant challenges to the evolutionist paradigm underpinning such material, in particular the challenges led by Franz Boas. This paper argues otherwise: that both psychologists' turnings to such material was a new development, that neither had shown great interest in such material before 1909, and that their turnings to such material, far from being taken in ignorance of the challenges to evolutionist anthropology, were engagements with those challenges, because the evolutionist paradigm lay at the base of psychoanalysis. It argues that it is no coincidence that this engagement occurred after their return from America in 1909, where they had come into first-hand contact with the challenges of Franz Boas. PMID:26665301

  16. Epistemological and Anthropological Thoughts About Neurophilosophy: An Initial Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia París Albert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE At the dawn of the twenty-first century, neurophilosophy appears as a branch of neurosciences. The aim of this article is to review critically some of the epistemological and anthropological debates which neurophilosophy is putting on question again. In this sense the philosophical research conducted by the UNESCO Chair of Philosophy for Peace will be used as the main thread of the analysis. To accomplish this critical review, the article has been organized into two parts: the first is of epistemological nature, and the second has an anthropological perspective. This analysis will lead us to question the significance of the contributions of neurophilosophy to a better understanding of the human being.

  17. Towards an Anthropology of Infinitude: Badiou and the Political Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Power

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In the English-language reception of Alain Badiou#39;s work, he has often been one-sidedly positioned as a direct heir to the antihumanist projects of Lacan, Althusser and Foucault. Whilst there is much to this claim, this paper argues that the retention of a notion of the #39;political subject#39; in Badiou#39;s work necessarily also depends upon a commitment to a much-underexamined notion of a minimal philosophical anthropology that puts Badiou in a tradition with thinkers such as Ludwig Feuerbach. It is further argued that Badiou#39;s minimal philosophical anthropology is opposed in essence to apparently similar phenomenological projects because it aligns humanity with infinity and not finitude.nbsp;

  18. Indigenous AIDS Organizing and the Anthropology of Activist Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L. Morgensen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous AIDS activists join AIDS activists worldwide today in theorizing the AIDS pandemic as a construct of social relations of power. Their anti-colonial and transnational activism holds scholars accountable to studying how power structures the production of knowledge about AIDS. This essay first examines how Indigenous AIDS activists theorize the colonial and transnational conditions of AIDS, and challenge states and international agencies to respect the sovereignty of Indigenous communities and knowledges. The essay then cites Indigenous activist knowledge as inspiration for revisiting critiques of coloniality in anthropology, and their implications for the anthropology of AIDS. Anthropologists studying AIDS can respond to AIDS activists by addressing how colonial legacies shape the processes and products of research and writing. By working within intersubjective and reflexive relationships with people and communities affected by AIDS, anthropologists can enter accountable dialogue with AIDS activists and on that basis produce anti-colonial and transnational knowledge about AIDS.

  19. Hana Cervinkova, Playing Soldiers in Bohemia: An Ethnography of NATO Membership. Prague Studies in Sociocultural Anthropology 4, 2006, 161 pages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marybeth Peterson Ulrich

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Hana Cervinkova’s ethnographic portrait of the Czech military in its “post-socialist” moment is a fascinating contribution to the literature on post-communist transitions. Not merely concerned with the provision of several anthropological descriptions of disappearing cultures, such as the obsolescent enlisted ranks and Air Force technicians expert in the mechanics of moth-balled Soviet aircraft, Cervinkova is determined to link the military’s post-socialist story to the Czech state’s own fort...

  20. L’eco dall’abisso. Antropologia, letteratura e follia - The echo of the abyss. Anthropology, literature and madness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi Bortoluzzi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The human being is morphologically lacking and ontologically indeterminate and is therefore obliged to build a cultural identity. In this effort narrative performs a fundamental role, that psychologists (Bruner and philosophers (Ricoeur call “narrative identity”. This ability to tell stories gives man a secure and organized world where he can live as part of it. But what happens when this talent fails and the world and the Self lose their meaning? This paper aims to study the consequences of this crisis of the storytelling comparing narratological (Genette, sychopathological (Freud, Binswanger, Lacan and philosophical concepts (Heidegger from an anthropological point of view.

  1. Cultural Heritage in a Digital Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte

    Advanced digital technologies and shifting paradigms of communication are challenging contemporary cultural heritage institutions to provide new forms of representations and experiences that include modern consumers as active co-creators in, rather than passive consumers of, cultural heritage...... communication. From a theoretical anthropological premise of culture and identity as dynamic and transformational, I explore potential new understandings and conceptualisations of cultural heritage and its representations in relation to a research experiment into interactive technologies....

  2. Culture and neuroscience: additive or synergistic?

    OpenAIRE

    Losin, Elizabeth A. Reynolds; DAPRETTO, MIRELLA; Iacoboni, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of cultural phenomena using neuroscientific methods—cultural neuroscience (CN)—is receiving increasing attention. Yet it is unclear whether the integration of cultural study and neuroscience is merely additive, providing additional evidence of neural plasticity in the human brain, or truly synergistic, yielding discoveries that neither discipline could have achieved alone. We discuss how the parent fields to CN: cross-cultural psychology, psychological anthropology and cogni...

  3. Teocentli: An Anthropological Newsletter, Ever Since 1926

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B. Woodbury

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available An elitist anachronism (a semi-private old boys' and girls' network? Or a unique window on the past (what archaeologists said informally, year by year, about what they were doing and thinking? Or both? The Teocentli ("The" was later dropped began in May 1926 when Carl E. Guthe of the University of Michigan, sent a mimeographed letter to 45 friends and col­leagues, proposing an informal newsletter or round-robin to provide periodic communication among archaeologists and others "who are working in various phases of those Indian cultures which came to owe their development to a knowledge of maize cultivation." He took the name 'Teocentli' from the "native Mexican grass from which maize is supposed to have developed."He began his letter by asking "How many of you can give the details of the work…[of] each of the forty-five men listed on the second sheet of this letter? I'll wager few of you can.. Yet every one of them is working on archaeological problems which are related to those upon which you are working. Suppose we could get... together for a meeting... Would you want to tell them of your work and listen to their reports? ... Since such a meeting 'in the flesh' is out of the question. the next best thing would be a note from each one, wouldn't it?"

  4. Solution Technologies as a Techno-Anthropological Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margit Saltofte

    2015-01-01

    presented. The implicit and embedded definition of business and innovation has influence on the types of possible “problems” and potential “solutions” (Jöhncke et al., 2004) this practice creates and on which students’ background fit the criteria. The “solution technology” of Wofie constitutes exclusion of...... possible solutions in so far as it poses implicit criteria for forming and presenting an innovative idea. Engaged anthropology, solution technology, user agency...

  5. Dietary intake methods in the anthropology of food and nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Ulijaszek, Stanley J; Macbeth, Helen; MacClancy, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Dietary and nutritional studies in anthropology may attempt to address issues in which food and nutrition are central, or where diet may be a peripheral or contributory component of a complex of problems within a group, population or society. Studies may be concerned with nutritional factors or they may be concerned with food symbolism, the perception of food, or the role of food in forging and maintaining identity. Dietary intake studies can be used to inform the study of food consumption, n...

  6. Anthropological dualism in Korean church education / Kyong Ho Kwon

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Kyong Ho

    2007-01-01

    The Christian church was begun in 19Ih century in the traditionally multi-religious society in Korea. Christianity holds a major position in Korea today and has for the past 20 years been growing rapidly in numbers. Despite its phenomenal growth, the churches. and Christianity in general, have been suffering from several ailments, of which dualistic thinking is not the least. Anthropological dualism amounts to not only distinguishing between soul and body, but also ascribing a ...

  7. Anthropology and ecotourism in European wetlands : bubbles, babies and bathwater.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent literature, particularly in social anthropology, has focused on `bursting the bubble' of ecotourism, arguing that it has become a meaningless umbrella term for too many practices that are essentially `irresponsible' in their nature. This article proposes that, although scepticism is entirely appropriate, such arguments cannot be allowed to negate the value of ecotourism entirely. Based on research conducted in three European wetlands of marginal economic status in Greece, Lithuania and...

  8. Ecological anthropology of households in East Madura, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, W. G.

    2011-01-01

      This dissertation is the result of diachronic and comparative anthropological study of rural households in Northeast Madura, Indonesia, carried out on eight separate visits between August 1985 and March 2009. The aim is to bring time-structured data to bear on key questions regarding the evolution of this rural community. My initial research from 1985 to 1987 focused on animal husbandry, household budgets, and time allocation, subjects central to Madurese society that had not been stud...

  9. Bringing together Anthropology, Ethnology and Folklore: From Factions to Union

    OpenAIRE

    Fournier, Laurent Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I first focus on the foundation of the AFEA (Association Française d’Ethnologie et d’Anthropologie) and I try to find out how this new association has been managing (or not) to bring together anthropology and folklore since its foundation in 2009. Using this French example, I also try to shed light on more global discussions going on between folklorists, ethnologists and anthropologists worldwide. I present different models of possible cooperation between anthropologists and fol...

  10. [Theories of stages of life within the anthropology of romanticism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Pia-Johanna; Schweizer, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    The essay discusses the importance and prominence of theories about different stages of life in the anthropological and medical discourse of romanticism. This discourse has clearly a stabilising and restaurative function, favouring the age of moderate manhood. The political and social regulative implications of these theories demand a restaurative roll-back. The essay is based on a concept of sociology of knowledge formation. PMID:17575867

  11. Epistemological and Anthropological Thoughts About Neurophilosophy: An Initial Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia París Albert; Irene Comins Mingol

    2013-01-01

    At the dawn of the twenty-first century, neurophilosophy appears as a branch of neurosciences. The aim of this article is to review critically some of the epistemological and anthropological debates which neurophilosophy is putting on question again. In this sense the philosophical research conducted by the UNESCO Chair of Philosophy for Peace will be used as the main thread of the analysis. To accomplish this critical review, the article has been organized into two parts: the first is of ep...

  12. O ensino de Antropologia da Saúde na graduação: uma experiência Teaching medical Anthropology to undergraduate students: an experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Cohn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Esse texto apresenta uma reflexão sobre o ensino de antropologia na formação de profissionais da saúde a partir da experiência de ministrar uma disciplina em Antropologia da Saúde em nível de graduação na Universidade Federal de São Carlos, em que é parte da grade curricular dos cursos de saúde, estando a cargo do Departamento de Ciências Sociais. A disciplina busca apresentar a teoria e a pesquisa em antropologia e propõe debater pesquisas sobre fenômenos da saúde em antropologia, de modo a melhor introduzir a pesquisa antropológica e, principalmente, a promover uma reflexão sobre a diferença cultural e o exercício profissional em saúde. Essa experiência suscita questões sobre a importância das ciências sociais e humanas, em especial a antropologia, para a formação desses profissionais, e sobre sua aceitação por parte deles, tendo em vista promover uma reflexão no modo como percebem sua própria prática profissional. Discute-se aqui, a partir de uma proposta de programa de curso que tem sido posta em prática há alguns anos, os debates possíveis entre ciências humanas e saúde na graduação e seu impacto na formação de profissionais de saúde.In this paper we develop a reflection on teaching anthropology to health professionals based on the experience of teaching Medical Anthropology to undergraduate students at Universidade Federal de São Carlos (Federal University of São Carlos. The discipline of Medical Anthropology aims to introduce theory and research in Anthropology, and proposes to debate research into health phenomena in anthropology, so as to better introduce anthropological research and, mainly, promote a reflection on cultural differences and professional exercise in the area of health. This experience raises issues concerning the value of social and human sciences, especially anthropology, in the education of those professionals, as well as their acceptance or rejection of these sciences, in

  13. The Anthropology of Science Education Reform: An Alabama Model for Building an Integrated Stakeholder Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, R. L.; Cox, G. N.

    2004-12-01

    Anthropologists are concerned with every aspect of the culture they are investigating. One of the five main branches of anthropology, socio-cultural anthropology, concerns itself with studying the relationship between behavior and culture. This paper explores the concept that changing the behavior of our culture - its beliefs and values - towards science is at the heart of science education reform. There are five institutions that socio-cultural anthropologists use to study the social organization of cultures: the educational system is only one of them. Its function - across all cultures - is to serve as a mechanism for implementing change in cultural beliefs and values. As leaders of science education reform, the Alabama model contends that we must stop the struggle with our purpose and get on with the business of leading culture change through an integrated stakeholder systems approach. This model stresses the need for the interaction of agencies other than education - including government, industry, the media and our health communities to operate in an integrated and systemic fashion to address the issues of living among a technically literate society. Twenty-five years of science education reform needs being voiced and programs being developed has not produced the desired results from within the educational system. This is too limited a focus to affect any real cultural change. It is when we acknowledge that students spend only an average of 12 percent of their life time in schools, that we can begin to ask ourselves what are our students learning the other 88 percent of their time - from their peers, their parents and the media - and what should we be doing to address this cultural crisis in these other arenas in addition to the educational system? The Alabama Math, Science and Technology Education Coalition (AMSTEC) is a non-profit 501c(3) organization operating in the state of Alabama to provide leadership in improving mathematics, science, and technology

  14. Two Paradigmatic Waves of Public Discourse on Nuclear Waste in the United States, 1945-2009: Understanding a Magnitudinal and Longitudinal Phenomenon in Anthropological Terms

    OpenAIRE

    Pajo, Judi

    2016-01-01

    This project set out to illuminate the discursive existence of nuclear waste in American culture. Given the significant temporal dimension of the phenomenon as well as the challenging size of the United States setting, the project adapted key methodological elements of the sociocultural anthropology tradition and produced proxies for ethnographic fieldnotes and key informant interviews through sampling the digital archives of the New York Times over a 64-year period that starts with the first...

  15. Book review of ‘Extraordinary anthropology : transformations in the field’ by Jean-Guy A. Goulet and Bruce Granville Miller, Lincoln, NE : University of Nebraska Press, 2007.

    OpenAIRE

    Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeb

    2010-01-01

    Just as diverse as cultures in the world with which anthropologists spend time being ‘‘participants’’, so varied are the experiences of these anthropologists, depending upon the circumstances in which they work. In sixteen essays of Extraordinary Anthropology: Transformations in the Field Jean-Guy A. Goulet of Saint Paul University in Ottawa and Bruce Granville Miller of the University of British Columbia have compiled experiential accounts of many anthropologists while encountering diverse c...

  16. Thinking the World, Practicing the Social Environment: Ethnographies and Reflections from an Anthropology of Territorialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nates Cruz, Beatriz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article will anthropologically present and analyze the configurations and the forms taken by the definition and location of the world and the social environment as philosophical postulates, and as physical and geographical objectivations among different cultures: the natives and Yanaconas of the Colombian Massif, the “paisas” of the Central Colombian Andes, and the southern France and northern Spain inhabitants in their relationship with immigrants of northern Europe. Even though there is a cultural, physical and social distance, the contents will frequently have relational postures.

    Este artículo mostrará y analizará desde una visión antropológica la configuración y las formas que toman la definición y ubicación del mundo y el entorno, tanto como posturas filosóficas, que como objetivaciones físicas y geográficas entre culturas diferentes: los indígenas y yanaconas del Macizo Colombiano, los llamados “paisas” de los Andes centrales de Colombia y los habitantes del sur de Francia y norte de España en su relación con los inmigrantes del norte de Europa. Aunque haya distancia cultural, física y social, los contenidos tendrán a menudo posturas relacionales.

  17. Depression, osteoporosis, serotonin and cell membrane viscosity between biology and philosophical anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielli Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to the relationship between biology and culture, we believe that depression, understood as a cultural and existential phenomenon, has clear markers in molecular biology. We begin from an existential analysis of depression constituting the human condition and then shift to analysis of biological data confirming, according to our judgment, its original (ontological structure. In this way philosophy is involved at the anthropological level, in as much as it detects the underlying meanings of depression in the original biological-cultural horizon of human life. Considering the integration of knowledge it is the task of molecular biology to identify the aforementioned markers, to which the existential aspects of depression are linked to. In particular, recent works show the existence of a link between serotonin and osteoporosis as a result of a modified expression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene. Moreover, it is believed that the hereditary or acquired involvement of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2 or 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT is responsible for the reduced concentration of serotonin in the central nervous system, causing depression and affective disorders. This work studies the depression-osteoporosis relationship, with the aim of focusing on depressive disorders that concern the quantitative dynamic of platelet membrane viscosity and interactome cytoskeleton modifications (in particular Tubulin and Gsα protein as a possible condition of the involvement of the serotonin axis (gut, brain and platelet, not only in depression but also in connection with osteoporosis.

  18. Political myths and totalitarianism: an anthropological analysis of their causal interrelationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa; Maldini, Pero

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses the key political, anthropological and socio-cultural functions of political myths in the appearance and functioning of totalitarian regimes. A special emphasis is put on structural elements of the myth (mythemes) and the mythic content (narratives) in the processes of artificial construction of a new society (community) based on the myth-inspired ideological postulates. The paper argues that the establishment of totalitarianism marked a certain anthropological devolution. This devolution, in turn, proceeds through the deconstruction of civil society as an organic social sphere and the artificial construction of a new political community based on ideological postulates and political myths. In support of this assertion, it is first shown how the mythical narratives--transformed into political concepts and programs--were the basis of (re)interpretation of the world, society and individual, and essentially determined the nature and functioning of the totalitarian regimes. Then, the specific political myths are analyzed and compared, as well as their content and origin, and particularly their dual function. It in turn is analyzed in the framework of the classical society-community dichotomy, where the (civil) society is founded socio-politically on the social contract, and the (political) community socio-anthropologically on political myth. In a situation of identity and legitimacy crisis, anomie and the weakening of social cohesion--the characteristic conditions of the great economic and political crisis of the early twentieth century that enabled the emergence of totalitarianism--society as a contracting community does not work. A strong need for meaning (at the individual and societal level) affects the citizens' susceptibility to (political) concepts of (re)constitution of (political) community with which they can identify. Right there, totalitarian movements use the cohesive power of the political myth that replaces the rationally based

  19. Ethnography and the Production of Anthropological Knowledge : Essays in honour of Nicolas Peterson

    OpenAIRE

    Musharbash, Yasmine; Barber, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Professor Nicolas Peterson is a central figure in the anthropology of Aboriginal Australia. This volume honours his anthropological body of work, his commitment to ethnographic fieldwork as a source of knowledge, his exemplary mentorship of generations of younger scholars and his generosity in facilitating the progress of others. The diverse collection produced by former students, current colleagues and long-term peers provides reflections on his legacy as well as fresh anthropological insigh...

  20. Geographies of Difference: Dutch Physical Anthropology in the Colonies and the Netherlands, ca. 1900-1940

    OpenAIRE

    Fenneke Sysling

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses how physical anthropologists created scientific circuitsbetween the Netherlands and their colonies in the East Indies. It shows that national and imperial anthropology were not two separate spheres and that the movement of anthropologists and their objects was important both for the making of anthropology as a scientific discipline and for making anthropological ideas. Trying to define the physical features of people in Dutch fishing villages and in East Indies inland re...

  1. Macro-evolutionary studies of cultural diversity: a review of empirical studies of cultural transmission and cultural adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Mace, R.; Jordan, F

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of theoretical and empirical research has examined cultural transmission and adaptive cultural behaviour at the individual, within-group level. However, relatively few studies have tried to examine proximate transmission or test ultimate adaptive hypotheses about behavioural or cultural diversity at a between-societies macro-level. In both the history of anthropology and in present-day work, a common approach to examining adaptive behaviour at the macro-level has been through c...

  2. ‘Old custom’. Shakespeare’s ambivalent anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Laroque, François

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I argue that, up to a certain extent, Shakespeare’s dramatic works partake of an anthropological interpretation of society. In As You Like It the old rustic way of life is presented by Duke Senior as quite preferable to the artificial pomp of the court, while in King Lear Edmund inveighs against “the plague of custom” which prevents him from accomplishing himself and from satisfying his ambition as well as his desires. If, in Romeo and Juliet, the Nurse still refers to the old c...

  3. Biobanks and informed consent : An anthropological contribution to medical ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Background: 1985 saw the beginnings of a population-based biobank in Västerbotten County, Sweden. In 1999, a start-up genomics company, UmanGenomics, obtained ‘all commercial rights’ to the biobank. The company introduced an ethics policy, which was well received in prestigious journals, focusing on public oversight and informed consent. Aims: To explore how social anthropology can aid understanding of the challenges posed by the new role of the biobank in Västerbotten, and thus complement mo...

  4. Antropologia da medicina: uma revisão teórica Anthropology of medicine: a theoretical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos de Souza Queiroz

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available Foi feita revisão e análise da literatura antropológica mais importantes sobre representações de saúde e doença e práticas de cura, tendo a Inglaterra, os Estados Unidos da América e a França como referência. Tendo representantes nas principais escolas dentro do pensamento antropológico (tais como o funcionalismo, o funcional-estruturalismo, o estruturalismo, a teoria do rótulo, o interacionismo simbólico, a etnometodologia, o criticismo cultural, a história da antropologia da medicina se confunde com a própria história da antropologia. Além de analisar a contribuição que essas várias escolas fizeram para esse campo de estudo, aponta-se o impasse atual que se está nele verificando. Atribui-se como principal razão para esse impasse à ausência de uma teoria capaz de explicar como os processos sociais de pequena escala (apropriados à metodologia antropológica subordinam-se aos processos sociais recorrentes na sociedade capitalista.An analysis was made of the most representative literature on both curing practices of cure and health and illness representations, taking England, the United State of America and France as references. With representatives of the main schools of anthropological thought (such as functionalism. functional-structuralism, structuralism, labelling theory, symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology and cultural criticism, the history of Anthropology of Medicine runs into the history of Anthropology itself. Besides analysing the contribution these various schools have made to this area of study, the current deadlock which is arising within, it is also indicated by this article. It is considered that the absence of a theory capable of explaining how small scale social process (which are appropriate to anthropological methodology are subordinated to the large-scale social processes which are recurrent in capitalist society is the main reason for this deadlock.

  5. 民族文化传承与教育方式的适应性创新--兰州市回族业余教育的田野调查与思考%The Inheritance of Ethnical Culture And the Adaptive Innovation of Educational Mode-Anthropological Perspectives on Hui Amateur Education in Lanzhou City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李媚宇; 王平

    2013-01-01

    Based on the field works on the Chinese Hui Amateur education of Lanzhou in Northwest China , combined with case studies , questionnaire investigation and supplemented by depth interviews of Hui ethnic groups in urban commu -nity, to analyze Hui ethnic groups how to inherit and protect their traditional culture efficiently , In addition, the Hui tradi-tional culture as an important part of Chinese Culture , how to adapt itself to today ’ s Chinese society ,It has a very impor-tant significance not only for the effective protection of traditional culture in our country ,but for the construction of cultural diversity , harmony and unity of the Chinese Socialistic Culture .%教育作为文化的生命机制,以其特有的方式作用于文化,同时教育也深受文化氛围、文化价值观的影响。近年来,在西北回族聚居地区形成了一种新型的教育模式---回族业余教育,是回族传统文化与社会主义文化相适应的产物,是回族传统教育与现代学校教育相适应的结果,是回族群体为了进一步提高群体成员的综合素质以及加强民族文化传承的一种有效探索。

  6. A socio-anthropological analysis of deficits of transition process in Serbia 2005-2006 and possibilities for elaborating alternative projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Zagorka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an outline of the author’s research project to be undertaken in 2006. It is focused on the process of transition from authoritarian to democratic order in Serbia after 2000. Starting from the findings of previous studies of transition, in Serbia and in other post socialist countries, the research will adopt a socio-anthropological approach and deal with the following topics: the model of transition being applied in Serbia preconditions for democratic transformation; a balance sheet of positive achievements accomplished and, on the other hand, "lost chances"; socio economic, political and cultural obstacles to articulating a coherent strategy of democratic development; psychological and anthropological aspects of current processes; alternative paths of democratic development feasible within given conditions. A central question the research will aim at resolving is why the current situation in Serbia is often described as suffering from a "democratic deficit".

  7. 农业社会和农民经济的人类学分析%Anthropological Analysis of Agricultural Society and Peasant Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈庆德

    2001-01-01

    As a case study of the typology of social economy,the analysis of agricultural society and peasant economy has been controlled by the evolutional discourse over a long period of time. Although many concepts such as political economy, tribal economy and peasant economy do not belong in the field of anthropology, they are the theories that anthropology has to diseuss.These abstract concepts have often helped people to put forward the range and limitation of a discussion and to find accurate clues for investigation,but on the other hand these concepts have often hidden the understanding of concrete situations. If the typological analysis of social economy could find that economy expresses various types when combined with various cultural conditions,this analysis may give us an enlightened perspective to look closely at the diversified developments of human beings.

  8. An anthropological approach to voluntarily single motherhood in Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Jordana-Pröpper

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the research I did for my doctoral thesis about voluntarily single motherhood in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain. It is an anthropological approach to the appearance and the development of voluntarily single motherhood, which is when a woman becomes a mother through adoption or conception previously planned without partner. Within a framework of study carried out from October 2001 to October 2007 in the Barcelona Metropolitan Area, my research is based on in-depth interviews with twelve women from April 2002 to April 2006. The aim of the paper is to understand why women in Barcelona choose to be voluntarily single mothers. The purpose is to point out that the voluntarily single motherhood is a new way of understanding between women and men, resulting from the progressive changes in their respective gender roles. This anthropological research is grounded in a full vital process: from the personal decision of the women to become single mothers to the daily interaction with their children.

  9. Theoretical orientation and validity of observation in sociology and anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ilić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses closely related issues of the theoretical orientation and the validity of the application of the method of observation in sociology and anthropology. It was preceded by a text which discussed issues of meeting the principles of objectivity, systematicity and reliability when using observation as a research method. General problem of the relationship between theory and research in the application of observation will be analyzed in the subsequent article. Introductory section shows the general framework of a hypothetical - deductive conception of science and the role of the method of observation in this context. The next section of the article analyzes the effort of finding denying cases and discusses the limits of the method of analytical induction. This section deals with the influence of data analysis in qualitative form obtained by (usually participatory observation and constructing explanations on the validity of the observation. The next section of the article shows the possibility of increasing the validity of the observation by including other sources and methods of data collection. The final section shows the impact of over-emphasizing the epistemological difference between qualitative and quantitative orientation in sociology and anthropology on the possibility of increasing the validity of the observation as a research method.

  10. L’histoire du malade. Croisement de deux anthropologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Labey

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available L’histoire des malades peut intégrer l’anthropologie de deux manières. Tout d’abord, elle peut utiliser l’anthropologie comme source de méthode et de questionnement. En écrivant une histoire de l’homme malade, l’historien se doit de saisir une situation corporelle individuelle et ses conséquences sociales dans un quotidien. Il interroge donc une société sur son rapport au corps, lorsqu’il est atteint par le mal, et sur son rapport à la norme, lorsqu’on s’en écarte. Ensuite, l’histoire des malades peut porter sur l’anthropologie comme discours, produit dans une période donnée. L’anthropologie est dès lors abordée en tant qu’objet de recherche. En croisant pratique et discours, il est possible de saisir les conséquences individuelles de l’évènement maladie. Pour le Moyen Age central, enjeux spirituels et enjeux institutionnels peuvent s’éclairer, grâce à cette double utilisation de l’anthropologie.The history of those who suffer from illness may integrate anthropology in two ways. First, anthropology can be used as method and a mode of questioning. In writing history of the sick, the historian must grasp a particular physiological situation and its social consequences in everyday life. He must question a society about its relationship with the body when it is affected by illness, and about what happens when an individual departs from the norm of health. Second, a history of the sick can use anthropology as a discourse, the product of a given period. In this case, anthropology is used as a subject of research. Combining practice and discourse, it is possible to apprehend individual consequences of an illness-event. This dual use of anthropology may clarify the spiritual and institutional consequences of illness in the central Middle Ages.La storia dei malati può integrare l’antropologia in due modi. In primo luogo, può utilizzare l’antropologia come fonte di metodi e di interrogativi

  11. Fitnesskulturen som socialt konstrueret fænomen. Anmeldelse af: Christina Hedblom: "The Body is Made to Move": Gym and Fitness Culture in Sweden. 201 sidor, hft.Stockholm: Stockholm University 2009 (Stockholm Studies in Social Anthropology N.S. 1) ISBN 978-91-86071-20-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kasper Lund

    2010-01-01

    Fitnessindustriens sammensatte træningskultur er flere gange i de senere år blevet endevendt i akademiske afhandlinger og rapporter fra både Norge, Sverige og Danmark. I rækken af udgivelser er Christina Hedbloms doktorafhandling 'The Body is Made to Move - Gym and fitness Culture in Sweden' endn...

  12. Thomas Hylland Eriksen, 1993. Ethnicity and Nationalism: Anthropological Perspectives (London: Pluto Press), 179 pp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uherek, Zdeněk

    1. Eastbourne: Sussex Academic Press, 2009 - (Küchler, S.; Wallman, S.), s. 57-58 ISBN 978-1-84519-317-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : ethnicity * social anthropology * nationalism * minorities * social processes Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  13. To Mould or to Bring Out? Human Nature, Anthropology and Educational Utopianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Against narrow understandings of educational research, this article defends the relevance of philosophical anthropology to ethico-political education and contests its lack of space in the philosophy of education. My approximation of this topic begins with comments on philosophical anthropology; proceeds with examples from the history of…

  14. Islamic Pedagogy and Embodiment: An Anthropological Study of a British Madrasah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardaker, Glenn; Sabki, Aishah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This anthropological study of a higher education British Madrasah was undertaken to increase our awareness of the spectrum of sensory experiences that shape Islamic pedagogy. We started our anthropological study from an Islamic premise of the inseparable nature of knowledge and the sacred. Pedagogy is defined as not a matter of simple methods and…

  15. On Rethinking Ethnography in Central Europe: Toward Cosmopolitan Anthropologies in the "Peripheries"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchowski, M.; Červinková, Hana

    New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 - (Cervinkova, H.; Buchowski, M.; Uherek, Z.), s. 1-20 ISBN 978-1-137-52448-5 Grant ostatní: International Visegrad Fund(XE) 21320085 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : anthropology of Central Europe * postsocialism * ethnology * knowledge hierarchies * Mitteleuropa Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  16. Anthropology of El-Hayz: Morphological and genetic contributions to the Egyptian Western Desert population history

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kujanová, M.; Černý, Viktor

    Prague : Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Arts, 2013 - (Dospěl, M.; Suková, L.), s. 131-148 ISBN 978-80-7308-457-8 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-37998S Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : archaeogenetics * anthropology * ancient Egypt Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  17. Durkheimian anthropology and religion: going in and out of each other’s bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Bloch, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    This is a reprint of Bloch, Maurice. 2007. “Durkheimian anthropology and religion: Going in and out of each other's bodies.” In Religion, anthropology, and cognitive science, edited by Harvey Whitehouse and James Laidlaw, 63–88. Ritual studies monograph series. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press.

  18. The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Hunter-Gatherers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cummings, Vicky; Jordan, Peter; Zvelebil, Marek

    2014-01-01

    For more than a century, the study of hunting and gathering societies has been central to the development of both archaeology and anthropology as academic disciplines, and has also generated widespread public interest and debate. The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Hunter-Gath

  19. 76 FR 28076 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... FR 41883- 41884, July 19, 2010). After repatriation and reburial, a re-evaluation of inventory... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University... were in possession of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA. The...

  20. 76 FR 28072 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in... Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA. The human remains were removed from St. Mary Parish (formerly... assessment of the human remains was made by University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and...

  1. 78 FR 45957 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Columbia University, Department of Anthropology, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Columbia University, Department of Anthropology, New..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... in this notice by August 29, 2013. ADDRESSES: Dr. Nan Rothschild, Department of...

  2. A Flexible Pre-Major Model for British Columbia Departments of Anthropology. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinbest, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The Sociology/Anthropology Articulation Committee has engaged in a project resulting in tandem reports for each of the respective disciplines, which identify flexible pre-majors for both Sociology and Anthropology and summarize the specific types of courses that must be taken by students to allow them to transfer into third year of a major. A…

  3. 76 FR 43716 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology... Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact ] the Oregon State University Department of...

  4. 76 FR 43714 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology... Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Oregon State University Department of...

  5. 77 FR 15802 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Federal Register for site 45-GH-15 (72 FR 27845-27846, May 17, 2007, and 73 FR 49484-49485, August 21... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Central Washington University Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in...

  6. 76 FR 80401 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Gila Plain Sites. In the Federal Register (66 FR 55957-55958, Monday, November 5, 2001) paragraph... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION:...

  7. 75 FR 41883 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University Pullman, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University... and control of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA. The human remains... in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Museum of...

  8. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts presented illustrate…

  9. "Staging encounters" through anthropological and pedagogical practices in urban central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinková, Hana; Golden, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 1 (2014), s. 19-34. ISSN 0009-0794 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : ethnography * educational anthropology * participatory action research * pedagogy * memory * urban laboratory Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 0.094, year: 2012

  10. Making Anthropology Matter. Osobnosti evropské antropologie ve vile Lanna

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uherek, Zdeněk

    -, č. 11 (2015), s. 14-15. ISSN 1210-9525 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : conference * social anthropology * European Association for Social Anthropologists (EASA) Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology , Ethnology http://abicko.avcr.cz/2015/11/08/index.html

  11. The Intradisciplinary Affinities of Postmodern Anthropology Part I. The Consequences of Merging Ethics, Politics and Methodology in 1960s Critical Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-01-01

    The paper offers an alternative interpretation of the genesis of the literary turn in anthropology, as an "interim solution" in the context of the ideological incorrectness of radical anti-colonial theories in a liberal democracy. Critical anthropology in the 1960s and 1970s drew considerable inspiration from reformational currents in neo-Marxist sociology and social philosophy, arousing ideological opposition among the numerous participants of methodological debates. This opposition would pr...

  12. A Review on the Study of Ethnic Minorities’ Cultural Identity Influenced by Different Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Dan; Liu Yi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the rich content of cultural iden ̄tity, the research related to this aspect involves many disciplines, including anthropology, sociolo ̄gy, psychology, philosophy, literature, religion and education,etc. Based on their own academic back ̄ground,scholars have done a lot of research on va ̄rious aspects of the cultural identity of ethnic mi ̄norities. This article classifies cultural identity in ̄fluenced by different cultures, and focuses on a study of the impact and role of different cultural forms on the ethnic minorities’ cultural identity. The influences on the cultural identity of ethnic mi ̄norities include the following.

  13. The significance of Calvin' s anthropology for preaching on ethical themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O.K. Lategan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author highlights Calvin's anthropology. A main feature of this anthropology is his dualistic view on man. Calvin was very much influenced by the ancient Greek philosophy, which argued that man had two parts: a superior soul and an inferior body. The author argues that this perception is at odds with a Biblical image of man. According to the Bible no part of man is inferior or superior to any other part of his personhood. The article indicates that a Biblical perspective on anthropology will draw different conclusions in ethics compared to a dualistic perception of the nature of man. A correct appreciation of the anthropology of man is therefore needed to guide decisions in ethics, where the focus is constantly anthropological.

  14. The anthropological difference: What can philosophers do to identify the differences between human and non-human animals?

    OpenAIRE

    Glock, Hans Johann

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the question of whether there is a human-animal or ‘anthropological difference’. It starts with a historical introduction to the project of philosophical anthropology (sct. 1). Section 2 explains the philosophical quest for an anthropological difference. Sections 3–4 are methodological and explain how philosophical anthropology should be pursued in my view, namely as impure conceptual analysis. The following two sections discuss two fundamental objections to the very idea...

  15. Fredrik Barth (ed.), 1969. Ethnic Groups and Boundaries: the Social Organization of Culture Difference (Bergen: Universitetsforlaget; London: Allen & Unwin), 153 pp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uherek, Zdeněk

    1. Eastbourne: Sussex Academic Press, 2009 - (Küchler, S.; Wallman, S.), s. 23-24 ISBN 978-1-84519-317-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : ethnicity * social anthropology * social organization * culture Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  16. ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROBLEMS IN THE PHILOSOPHICAL WORKS OF RUSSIAN SPIRITUAL ACADEMIES’ TEACHERS OF THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ershova

    2014-01-01

    knowledge necessary to base their intellectual efforts on the personal experience of the struggle against the passions; therefore, they see the new basis of theology in asceticism. Professor S. V. Troitsky considers marriage as the key problem for religion and philosophy of the early 20th century. Professor S. S. Glagolev sees the descent of a man as the crossing point of religion and science. The author mentions that despite some heterogeneity of the proposed concepts, there is an obvious General anthropological orientation that had an impact on the educational process changes in theological academies (seminaries. Scientific novelty. The author systemizes and sums up anthropologic views of the most recognizable ecclesiastical academics in the early 20th century. Representation and analysis of anthropologic problematics in philosophical and religious papers of the Russian ecclesiastical education stage of development signify essential agreement among Russian and Western sophists; they had been discussing the same problem – a human being. The author points out that their discussions were not absolutely the same, but it gives the reason to regard the anthropology of the early 20th century as modern Philosophy; and this difference allows academic anthropology to avoid classic and non-classic types of philosophy. Practical significance. The research outcomes can be used for further understanding development of the all European searching process of the early 20th century. Received by the author of the study findings provide its scientific innovation. The results of this study can be used in assessing the role of theological academies in European cultural processes and culture of the Russian society of the early 20th century; research findings can enrich the content of the lectures on the History of Philosophy, Russian History, European History, Cultural Studies and other Humanities (non-science disciplines.

  17. 76 FR 54485 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the... Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, has completed an... Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. Repatriation of...

  18. The Paradox of Culture in a Globalized World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rodney H.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the work in intercultural communication studies in the past decade, especially in the field of applied linguistics, has been devoted to "disinventing" the notion of culture. The problem with the word "culture" as it has been used in anthropology, sociology, and in everyday life, it has been pointed out, is that it is…

  19. Collaborative Researchers or Cold Warriors? The Origins, Activities, and Legacy of the Smithsonian’s Institute of Social Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peter Castro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available International research collaboration is increasingly popular, providing many scholarly and practical benefits. These collaborative endeavors also encounter obstacles and costs, including ones involving issues of power and professional ethics. My study seeks to widen our understanding of international collaborative social science research by examining the complex origins, diverse activities, and clouded legacy of the Smithsonian Institution’s Institute of Social Anthropology (ISA. The ISA was an innovative collaborative teaching and research program founded by Julian Steward during World War II to meet many goals, including increasing social science capacity in Latin America, expanding knowledge about contemporary cultural change, strengthening area expertise among U.S. scholars, and promoting closer relations among the peoples of the Americas. The ISA provided career-enhancing opportunities for U.S. and Latin American scholars, while helping to pioneer applied medical anthropology. I take issue with recent analysts who portray the ISA as promoting, including through covert research, U.S. hegemonic interests seeking to control rural Latin America.

  20. Socio-cultural viability of international peacebuilding : An inquiry based on cultural theory

    OpenAIRE

    Sahovic, Dzenan

    2007-01-01

    A socio-anthropological theoretical framework of the so-called Grid-Group Cultural Theory provides a typological model for understanding and mapping of cultural biases (shared values and beliefs), corresponding social relations and strategic behaviours. The starting argument of this paper is that this model can be used to illuminate and investigate the socio-cultural differences in peacebuilding approaches as the four theoretical ideal-types of individualism, egalitarianism, hierarchy and fat...

  1. What Do Artifacts Do?-An Anthropological Approach to Materiality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Rowlands; Tang Yun; Zhang Lisheng

    2015-01-01

    I rather deliberately use artifact and object in my title rather than thing and thingness. My aim is to emphasise the ars/artis element of making/fabricating and facts /objects as outcomes/realities. Bruno Latour has made an elegant pas-tiche of the terms fetish and fact to create hybrid factiches - which I am certainly taking advantage of. My focus is also Theodore Adorno’s use of the term object to characterise why it is so often used negatively as the decontextualised object. The quote I want to use is from the beginning of his article Valery Proust Museum in the collection Prisms –“The German word museal ( museum like ) has un-pleasant overtones. It describes objects to which the observer no longer has any vital relationship and which are in the process of dying. They owe their preservation more to historical respect than to the needs of the present.” Thankfully a little later he goes on to say:“One cannot be content,however, with the general recognition of a negative situation. An intellectual dispute like this must be fought out with specific arguments.” So I want to present one to retrieve the value of de-contextualised objects. In the back of my mind is that other dispute on this theme in archaeological dialogues. Tim In-gold takes materials seriously and accuses the ma-terial culture bunch at UCL ( University College London) of reducing materials to social relations or sociality. A seemingly unlikely hero for Tim Ingold is Henry Hodges who wrote a book Artifacts. Ingold advocates the autonomy of the object/ materials separately from peoples’ intentions towards them. In his response to Tim Ingold, Danny Miller accused him of primitivism - a desire to naturalise the world – see us all inhabiting it through natural processes of self-making - making things /doing things for ourselves. Instead of the Stone Age–he says –we live in a Plastic Age - we encounter the material world already made – and we re-sponds as consumers in acts of

  2. Gender Inequality as Cultural Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn Jones

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe an anthropological and interdisciplinary field school, primary involving female undergraduates. Our field program was conducted in 2009 and 2010 on a remote island in Fijian archipelago, in the context of a patriarchal society where gender avoidance is practiced. We had two broad objectives for this program: to conduct research on the understanding of cultural and marine biological resources; and to evaluate the effectiveness of the field experience in promoting anthropological and scientific learning principles. We summarize qualitative and quantitative outcomes of the educational evaluation of the student learning experience. We also discuss educational aims and the unique gender-associated challenges of conducting this program in a patriarchal cultural setting.

  3. Medical Anthropology in Africa: The Trouble with a Single Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhwanazi, Nolwazi

    2016-01-01

    In the growing number of publications in medical anthropology about sub-Saharan Africa, there is a tendency to tell a single story of medicine, health, and health-seeking behavior. The heavy reliance on telling this singular story means that there is very little exposure to other stories. In this article, I draw on five books published in the past five years to illustrate the various components that make up this dominant narrative. I then provide examples of two accounts about medicine, health, and health-seeking behavior in Africa that deviate from this dominant narrative, in order to show the themes that alternative accounts have foregrounded. Ultimately, I make a plea to medical anthropologists to be mindful of the existence of this singular story and to resist the tendency to use its components as scaffolding in their accounts of medicine, health, and health-seeking behavior in Africa. PMID:26457563

  4. Career development: domestic display as imperial, anthropological, and social trophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintle, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Analyzing the dynamics of collection and display in the colonial context, this essay considers the South Asian artifacts collected by Sir Richard Carnac Temple, Chief Commissioner of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands from 1894-1904. Temple exhibited the teak carvings, body adornments, and hunting tools that he amassed throughout his career in his home, The Nash, which became the foundation of his public persona as a triumphant colonial chief, a "shining light" in the emerging discipline of anthropology, and a wealthy, upper-class lord of the manor. The politics of consumption, decoration, and self-creation converge in The Nash, offering a glimpse into how material objects removed from India during the late nineteenth century were consumed in Britain and how domestic display contributed to the formation of British identity. PMID:19069005

  5. Some reflections on anthropology of the risk of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since any scientific result is, in the view of K. Popper, nothing else but a provisional truth, it is idle and unintelligent to claim than any given model is the best. It is true that some models are closer to reality than others, mainly because they are not sectarian, and as they are open to this reality which always partly escapes us, they reflect it better despite their implacable weaknesses. Man has to face the reality that involves radiological risk. The scientific study of man, anthropology, cannot confine it to a reductive and unilateral paradigm. Rather than taking the easy and wrong way by reducing man's part solely to the answers to an artificial questionnaire, social scientists have to question man's condition; and the human condition cannot be brought into scale. This paper examines these problems through the way various human groups define and treat the nuclear dangers. (author)

  6. African Cultural Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Jarita C; Medupe, R. Thebe; Current Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy research in Africa

    2008-01-01

    Astronomy is the science of studying the sky using telescopes and light collectors such as photographic plates or CCD detectors. However, people have always studied the sky and continue to study the sky without the aid of instruments this is the realm of cultural astronomy. This is the first scholarly collection of articles focused on the cultural astronomy of Africans. It weaves together astronomy, anthropology, and Africa. The volume includes African myths and legends about the sky, alignments to celestial bodies found at archaeological sites and at places of worship, rock art with celestial imagery, and scientific thinking revealed in local astronomy traditions including ethnomathematics and the creation of calendars. Authors include astronomers Kim Malville, Johnson Urama, and Thebe Medupe; archaeologist Felix Chami, and geographer Michael Bonine, and many new authors. As an emerging subfield of cultural astronomy, African cultural astronomy researchers are focused on training students specifically for do...

  7. The Intradisciplinary Affinities of Postmodern Anthropology Part I. The Consequences of Merging Ethics, Politics and Methodology in 1960s Critical Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers an alternative interpretation of the genesis of the literary turn in anthropology, as an "interim solution" in the context of the ideological incorrectness of radical anti-colonial theories in a liberal democracy. Critical anthropology in the 1960s and 1970s drew considerable inspiration from reformational currents in neo-Marxist sociology and social philosophy, arousing ideological opposition among the numerous participants of methodological debates. This opposition would prove crucial for their subsequent modest development. This activistic ideological ballast actually slowed down the development of potent externalist analyses of the social determination of anthropology and academe in general, leaving room for studies of ethnographic writing. Anticipating, in terms of themes and trends, "nonmethodological" solutions to methodological problems, it had a direct effect on the substitution of poetics and contextual reflection for methodological regulation. Thus, paradoxically, extremely externalistically oriented analyses, which attempted to merge ethical, political and methodological debates, reduced the methodological focus of the disciplinary community from issues of research objectivity and the reliability of ethnographic records to issues concerning style and the writing of anthropology. In this context, debates on relativism, realism, representation, authority and reflexivity, typical of 1980s postmodern anthropology, have become a socially acceptable alternative to the critical and neo-Marxist anthropology of Afro-Americans, feminists or of the otherwise oppressed/studied when they in turn become nativistic anthropologists. The "literary turn" in postmodern anthropology is generally interpreted as an externalist critique of traditional ethnographic realism, offering an ethical and political interpretation of reflexivity as per se more correct than traditional positivist ethnography.

  8. When I grow up: Culturally sensitive graphic design explorations

    OpenAIRE

    Schutte, Grace

    2013-01-01

    With a global village that is growing and a world that is getting smaller it becomes evermore important for graphic designers to successfully cross cultural borders, yet this is easier said than done. My theoretical work aims at making these cross-cultural design experiences easier for graphic designers, as well as creating higher awareness of the differences that exist within cultural constructions. An amalgamation of design practices, cultural and anthropological research, the theory e...

  9. Anthropological rabbits” and “positivistic ducks”: An experiential reflection on Pieter Craffert’s “shamanic Jesus”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries van Aarde

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at conversing with aspects of the contribution Pieter Craffert (New Testament scholar from the University of South Africa has made in his book on the historical Jesus, The life of a Galilean shaman: Jesus of Nazareth in anthropological-historical perspective (2008. In the book traits of the “shamanic complex” are heuristically used to explain the layering of traditions as reconfigurations of each other within the same cultural area and to argue for continuity from the cultural constitution of a social personage to the communication and enscripturation of that social personage within the same cultural system. Jesus’ healings and his encountering of spirits are understood in terms of the notion of alternate states of consciousness as polyphased consciousness. The book’s point of departure is the conviction that an anthropological- sensitive reading scenario represents an epistemological alternative to that of scholars who emphasize the historical-critical analysis of strata in the development of the Jesus tradition. The article consists of an appraisal and a critique. It argues for a different judgment rather than posing a thesis of a paradigm shift. The approach of some scholars who consider the investigation into the stratification of overlays in the Jesus tradition as central to historical Jesus studies is evaluated as complementary to a cultural-sensitive reading scenario.

  10. Anthropologic Interpretation of the Dragon Myth And the Repetitive Motifof Dragon-Slaying in Mythology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    فرزاد قائمی

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Dragon and the Hero's battle with it is one of the most important and most repeated motifs in epic-mythological narratives about goddess and athlete's initiation, which is found in many of the mythical cultures of the world. The repeat of this motif symbolizes the repeat of a pattern to forge the holy order for the world after the era of turbulence. Victory's hero in this battle ensures the return of light and rain to the nature and enunciates the good tidings and blessings, as well as fundamental frequency and security to the people. In this paper, we analyze the dragon myth in external and internal dimensions: the external dimension of the dragon myth is based on the natural-historical symptoms and is focused on the central role of a "snake"; a natural showing of death and destruction and an animistic interpretation of phenomena like flood, earthquake and geyser. In anthropologic approach – especially from psychological Jung's analysis– the internal dimension of the dragon's myth represents the dark side of the unconscious that has been displayed outwards. While the hero overcomes his "shadow," he achieves the transcendental individuality and perfection of human and he will save the nature and their people. Key words: Dragon, Hero, Unconscious, Myth, Zahhak (AziDahaka, Jung.

  11. Stories with and about wall carpets. An anthropological account on the inhabitation of Ursari Romanian Roma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Racleş

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss the ways in which objects assist us in telling small stories about our positions in relation to our inhabited space, but also in relation to perceived dichotomised categories like us-others, the modern-the outmoded, civilized-backward. Acknowledging that narratives emerge from interactions between people, this paper is an attempt to show that an important role in the emergence of stories is played by interactions between people and objects. The wall carpets hung by Ursari Roma from a north-eastern Romanian town and the stories developed with and about these items constitute the main focus of this analysis. From an anthropological and material culture perspective, wall carpets are discussed as material presences in storytelling events and as objects of experience-centred stories that assist Roma people in negotiating and enacting their identities and belongings. Taking a cue from Georgakopoulou, who argues that narratives count on both discourses and activities (2007, home making practices and domestic activities (such as those related to the maintenance of the wall carpets are essential to this paper, as they enable an understanding of the “performative narrative of daily life” (Langellier 2004. The analysis is based on ethnographic material collected in 2014 in the aforementioned community, while the unit of analysis consists of excerpts from discussions with two Roma families, which became storytelling episodes.

  12. Color, race, and genomic ancestry in Brazil: dialogues between anthropology and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ricardo Ventura; Fry, Peter H; Monteiro, Simone; Maio, Marcos Chor; Rodrigues, José Carlos; Bastos-Rodrigues, Luciana; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2009-12-01

    In the contemporary world, "race" narratives are so multifaceted that at times, different views of the concept appear mutually incompatible. In recent decades biologists, especially geneticists, have repeatedly stated that the notion of race does not apply to the human species. On the other hand, social scientists claim that race is highly significant in cultural, historical, and socioeconomic terms because it molds everyday social relations and because it is a powerful motivator for social and political movements based on race differences. In this paper we present the results of an interdisciplinary research project incorporating approaches from genetics and anthropology. Our objective is to explore the interface between information about biology/genetics and perceptions about color/ race in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We argue that the data and interpretation of our research resonate far beyond the local level, stimulating discussion about methodological, theoretical, and political issues of wider national and international relevance. Topics addressed include the complex terminology of color/race classification in Brazil, perceptions about ancestry in the context of ideologies of Brazilian national identity, and the relationship between genetic information about the Brazilian population and a sociopolitical agenda that turns on questions of race and racism. PMID:20614657

  13. "Your time or mine?" An anthropological view of the tragic temporal contradictions of biomedical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberg, R

    1988-01-01

    The symbolic construction and use of time in health care is examined both in relation to social control of patients and to the power/powers accorded to and claimed by physicians. After reviewing classical medical sociology approaches of Zerubavel and Roth, it is suggested that an anthropological approach using concepts of disease, illness, and sickness and especially the last make it possible to produce a more adequate analysis. The cultural performance of sickness is seen in a framework of power, space, and time, and comparisons drawn between preindustrial and industrial patterns of healing (including Hahn's detailed ethnographic account of the practice of an internist in the United States). It is argued that medicine as it is at present practiced in industrial society inevitably requires health workers and especially physicians to distance themselves in time from the experience of their patients by taking the present-tense account of perceived illness (the history), which they initially share, and translating it into timeless, almost disembodied, disease. The physicians' special position in relation to time makes symbolically possible their control not only over patients' access to space and use of time but also over patients' autonomy in controlling the body and its boundaries. Finally, it is proposed that, although the contradiction arises from the theory and practice of biomedicine itself, the ability of health workers to overcome it is related to the extent to which the exercise of power within medicine reinforces (or is reinforced by) the ideology of the society in which it operates. PMID:3278988

  14. Rumour of angels and heavenly midwives: anthropology of transpersonal events and childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahood, Gregg

    2007-03-01

    Some contemporary women can experience non-ordinary states of consciousness when childbearing. The purpose of this paper is to bring a 'transpersonal' frame to these non-ordinary states of consciousness (hereafter: NOSC). Transpersonal psychology is an interdisciplinary movement in Western science that studies 'religious', 'peak' or 'healing' experiences in different cultures and social contexts. Between 2001 and 2006 in Auckland, New Zealand, while engaged in anthropological fieldwork, I collected stories from mothers, fathers, and midwives who had participated in transpersonal events during childbirth. I will compare the local women's NOSC with ethnographic accounts of spirit-possession and its relationship to indigenous midwifery then revisit and reconstruct the witch-hunts of Medieval Europe from this perspective. Midwives are encouraged to learn to identify and support women's NOSC during labour and birth as many women find strength and wisdom by passing through these states in labour. The subject is also critical to men, whether they are present with women and birth as fathers or health professionals. The hoped for result of this inquiry is to revalorise NOSC among birth-giving mothers, and to educate birth attendants in this field. PMID:17127114

  15. The State and Modernity as Anthropological Topics: A Very Short Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Simić

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to offer a brief introduction to anthropological studies of modernity and the state. I try to introduce some of the most important theoretical works in this field, built up in different ethnographic contexts ranging from Turkey to Latin America. I was trying to show some of the possibilities of the research of modernity and the state in anthropology emphasizing what anthropology can offer to wider debates on these topics. I argue that the ideas of modernity and the state are f...

  16. Anthropology, social change and the reconstruction of South African society1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Jansen van Rensburg

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article it is argued that, since the abuse of anthropology in the colonial and apartheid eras, the responsive relationship between anthropology and society has been re-emphasised. In the reconstruction of South African society, therefore, anthropologists will not be allowed the luxury of evading their social responsibility. In their re-invention of anthropology as a humane science, and the reiteration of their commitment to accountability and relevance, these scientists ought to build their discipline upon the investigation of the major consequences of differential power and inequality. This could be helpful in creating new forms of co-existence in South Africa

  17. 人类学与民族学都应为一级学科%Anthropology and Ethnology Should Both be Listed as Superordinate Disciplines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石奕龙

    2012-01-01

    Ethnology in our country is the discipline which focuses on ethnic issue while anthropology focuses on the evolution and interpretation of human beings and cultures.Besides,due to the differences of their histories,they should not be mixed or one replaces the other.Therefore,the best policy for the Academic Degree Office of the State Council is to extract anthropology from sociology as another superordinate discipline.In the classification of degrees by the Academic Degree Office,anthropology should be listed as an independent superordinate discipline,and its secondary disciplines are yet to be established and developed.Those anthropology subjects subordinated to other superordinate disciplines can be allowed to coexist or gradually transferred to the superordinate level.%中国国内的民族学主要是民族问题之学,而人类学则是人及其文化的演进与阐释之学,两者不应该混为一谈,同时由于历史的关系,由人类学替代民族学也不太妥当。因此,目前最佳的方法是:在国务院学位办的分类中,把人类学从社会学的一级学科中分离出来;在教育部学位办的学科分类中,增加独立的人类学,即都把人类学提升为所谓的一级学科,并建构其二级学科。至于原在其他一级学科下属的人类学二级学科,可以并存,或逐步转到人类学的一级学科中。

  18. Sociocultural Characteristics of Psychological Education in the Context of Systemic-Anthropological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Loginova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The problem of moving from economic efficiency of the social one in the modern society is actualized. It is pointed out that the methodological basis for the solving questions of psychological education development are considered to be an anthropological psychology as a new scientific branch, which reflects the tendencies of development of psychology now a days. It is shown that there are various points of view on psychological education: self-organization as adaptation, self-organization as self-regulation and self-organization as self-determination. On the basis of these points of view psychology educational opportunities of a human being are considered as an individual life strategy aimed at success. Approach: The possibilities of different sociocultural environments and their contribution to psychological education of a person have been analyzed. The attention has been drawn to the fact, that sociocultural environment is the complex of social conditions of a person’s life, that allow to act in accordance with the structure and functions of the environment, choosing from the variety of possibilities those, which can be realized. The question of free choice of possible alternatives and creating of one’s own life story is discussed. Results: The motivation of achievement has qualitative differences depending on character of socio-cultural identity. If socio-cultural identity is positive, motivation of achieving the successes is a general life line. The revealed connection of components of positive functioning and showing the motivation of achievement has been considered in the context of our research as a full, subjective experience, which is of great importance for the person himself, as it is connected to basic human values and such everyday notions as happiness, happy life. When characterized the experience of psychological well-being by a person, it is necessary to mention that it supposes comparison of one

  19. Anthropological perspectives on water availability, water quality and water managament in the IMPETUS research areas of Benin and Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirscht, H.; Bollig, M.; Casciarri, B.; Casimir, M.; Rössler, M.; Bako-Arifari, N.

    2003-04-01

    The anthropological research in the framework of the interdisciplinary IMPETUS West Africa-project focuses on water availability, water quality and on social problems and conflicts concerning the management of this sometimes scarce or polluted resource. The northern project area, the catchment of the Drâa river in Southern Moroco, is characterised by a very low precipitation rate and an overall shortage of available water, a situation which has been aggravated by a drought in recent years. But even in the much moister southern research region, the catchment of the river Ouémé in Benin, water is not always available in the required quantity and quality. Although Morocco and Benin share no common cultural or ethnic identities, local 'traditional' water management institutions exist in both countries. The common objective of anthropological research is to identify and analyse these institutions on a micro- or mezzo-level, and to look into the social and cultural processes which lead to a sustainable - or ineffective - use of water. The prime research unit for anthropologists is the household, which is in general congruent with the basic economic unit. It is obvious that gender relations are an important aspect to consider if one looks into the management of water resources. Women are often in charge of supplying the household with drinking water, and in Benin many women are farmers, who, according to local concepts, spend more time on the fields than men. In addition, social changes caused by the shortage of water and their consequences for water management systems are investigated. In Morocco, the emigration of young men is a reaction to the recent droughts, transforming the household structure and gender relations in rural settlements. In return, the investment of the remittances into agriculture, for instance the purchase of motor-pumps for irrigation, affects the water management by circumventing traditional social and politically accepted water distribution

  20. The Œdipus complex, crystallizer of the debate between psychoanalysis and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadja, Eric

    2011-08-01

    The way that anthropologists understand the Oedipus complex, in particular, is a good example of how they understand psychoanalysis in general. Indeed, it has crystallized a set of reactions marked by ignorance, misunderstanding, distortion and screening out and at the same time has provoked suspicion among anthropologists as to psychoanalysis, according to the preconceptions of the various schools of thought and authors implied, and this from the very first contacts up to nowadays. In what way did the psychoanalysts contribute to this and what representation did they, in turn, elaborate of anthropology? The purpose of this paper is to expose the epistemological and historical conditions of the emergence of this debate, and then to develop it by following chronology up to the 1950s and 1960s, while differentiating three major cultural areas, Great Britain, the USA and France, in order to get a clearer picture. From that point on, we will try to diversify our inquiry and to formulate some interpretative hypotheses. In particular, we think that a traumatic event may have inaugurated and organized the history of the relationship between the two disciplines, producing a situation of acculturation with multiple impacts, if we identify them with two cultures coming into contact: what is at stake here is Totem and Taboo in which Freud carries through the first major psychoanalytical approach of the interpretation of ethnographic facts, that leads him to transplant the universality of the Oedipus complex to the very root of the first social institutions and to pinpoint the presence of unconscious processes in their genesis. PMID:21843245

  1. Martial Arts Anthropology for Sport Pedagogy and Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech J. CYNARSKI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss the subject as well as the problem of corporeality and spirituality in the anthropology of martial arts. The authors attempt to show the vision of a new psychophysical education on the way of martial arts and the taking of personal patterns here. Analysies are made in the perspective of the holistic pedagogy and humanistic theory of martial arts.Qualitative methods, such as studying literature, direct interview and long-term participant observation were used. The authors wish to begin with the concept of corporeality as it is found in the available literature on the subject.The first author has been active in an environment of martial arts for over 30 years. Interviews and discussions were conducted with 9 martial arts masters of the highest rank.Results and conclusions. Psychophysical system of self-realization is an educational programme – a way which relates to spiritual development through physical and mental exercise, according to teaching by a particular master-teacher. Within the context of martial arts being used as a psycho-educational form of education, the body fulfills, above all, the role of a tool to be used on the way towards enlightenment and wisdom. It is utilized specifically in spiritual progress. Improving one’s physical abilities is therefore an ascetic journey of physical perfectionism and technical accomplishment all towards achieving spiritual mastery. In some cases, spiritual development is described in terms of energy (qi, ki and connected with the capacity of one’s health.Traditional understanding of martial arts is often mixed with combat sports or systems of meditation are numbered among movement forms. The opportunity to avoid similar mistakes is to adopt a theoretical perspective of the anthropology of psychophysical progress. Paradigm of systematic approach and integral outlook on the human allow for understanding of the sense of being involved in ascetic and

  2. El Museo Nacional de Antropologia de Mexico. (The Mexican National Museum of Anthropology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gilberto

    1970-01-01

    Designed as a potential attraction of tourist income and for popular education, the National Museum of Anthropology provides instruction for children and adults, publications, public lectures, library services, and other educational services. (LY)

  3. A critical analysis of intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke; Lauring, Jakob; Klitmøller, Anders

    2009-01-01

    understanding intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management (CCM). Design/methodology/approach - The paper analyzes the established approaches to the cultural underpinnings of intercultural communication in CCM and examines how newer developments in anthropology may contribute to this...... anthropology from which it originated. This theory gap between intercultural communication research in CCM and anthropology tends to exclude from CCM an understanding of how the context of social, organizational and power relationships shapes the role of culture in communication. Practical implications - The...... paper proposes to substitute the view of culture as comprising of abstract values and codes as determinants of communication with concepts of culture as dynamically enfolded in practice and socially situated in specific contexts, in order to give new directions to theories on intercultural communication...

  4. The Morphology of Culture in Romania. Lucian Blaga (1895-1965 – The Passage from Axiology to the Ontology of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HORIA PATRASCU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the inter-war Romania the philosophy of culture rejoices over a high prestige. The questions regarding the birth and becoming of culture, as well as those regarding the role of culture and the possible classifications of cultures, occupy a large space in the Romanian philosophers’ writings. We are in the epoch in which the psychology of peoples is an actual issue, while anthropology, together with the history of religions, exploits unknown and exotic cultural areas.

  5. The Morphology of Culture in Romania. Lucian Blaga (1895-1965) – The Passage from Axiology to the Ontology of Culture

    OpenAIRE

    HORIA PATRASCU

    2013-01-01

    In the inter-war Romania the philosophy of culture rejoices over a high prestige. The questions regarding the birth and becoming of culture, as well as those regarding the role of culture and the possible classifications of cultures, occupy a large space in the Romanian philosophers’ writings. We are in the epoch in which the psychology of peoples is an actual issue, while anthropology, together with the history of religions, exploits unknown and exotic cultural areas.

  6. Cyberspace, citizenship, academic capitalism: everyday student life and the teaching of anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Krotz, Esteban; Unidad de Ciencias Sociales Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa / Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán

    2012-01-01

    The present study deals with three characteristics of the current Mexican students of Anthropology and their personal and institutional surroundings, which are increasingly different from the conditions in which the majority of today’s anthropology professors were trained. The first of these characteristics is the growing but unequal access to the vast amount of digitalized information, which is related with new forms of communication that have an impact on the abilities that are traditionall...

  7. Listening to disembodied voices: anthropological and psychiatric challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Helene

    2014-12-01

    What is the role of the voice in Indian explanatory models of madness and psychiatric nosology? Anthropological and psychiatric challenges, it is argued, are crystallised in the voice, a medium that signifies the intersection of models of occult madness and schizophrenia. The psychiatry and religious healing practised at a Sufi shrine in Gujarat differed in terms of the status accorded to the voice: psychiatry interpreted the voice as a symptom of mental disorder, whereas religious healing used the medium in ambiguous practices of possession trance, combining performances of madness and healing. Although 'doing trance' is considered an essential part in the process of healing, patients diagnosed with schizophrenia do not experience trance. Their patiency is displaced onto a caretaker. Psychiatric theories resting on the somatised mind partly converge with theories of madness based on sorcery and possession in so far as both posit a direct link between the brain and behaviour. Against the background of the contested religious healing sites that are currently debated in Indian public mental health, attention to multiple dimensions of the voice reveals its significance as an alternative to the psychiatric institutionalisation of people coping with mental disorder. The voice reconciles the dichotomy between scientific psychiatry and traditional ritual healing, partly by making sense of madness by engaging with the sense of hearing. PMID:24962129

  8. Effect of Ramadan fasting on anthropological and physiological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaista Saiyad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: All over the world Muslims, during Islamic month of Ramadan observe fast. The aim of this study is to evaluate and study different anthropological and physiological changes taking place in healthy subjects who fast during ramadan. If beneficial effects are found, modified Ramadan diet can be advised to patients to prevent risk of developing lifestyle diseases like coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes etc. Materials and methods: This is a prospective study in which 50 fasting Muslim healthy subjects both males and females in the age group 18-65 were included. Detailed history and anthropometric measurements was carried out in all the subjects, twice: once, a week before Ramadan and thereafter, after Ramadan month. A detailed questionnaire was provided to all the subjects regarding their mental status and sleep pattern. Observation: Fasting caused significant reduction in weight, basal metabolic index, waist circumference in males as well as females. Neither systolic nor diastolic blood pressure changed significantly during Ramadan fasting. There is decrease in anxiety levels, however, there is day time sleepiness during this month. Conclusion: Ramadan fasting is beneficial in a way that it caused significant reduction in weight, waist circumference, basal metabolic index and anxiety in people those who fast.

  9. The Anthropological Study of “Insect Society” in Evolutionism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bian Quanqin; Zhang Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionism is the first discipline paradigm in the history of anthropology.As early as 1801, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, a French naturalist clearly put forward the notion of evolution.Howev-er,it was not until C.R.Darwin published his book The Origin of Species in 1859,that the theory of evo-lution became widely regarded by the world.In ad-dition to the field of biology, evolutionism also broadly and deeply influenced the fields of anthro-pology,philosophy and psychology,etc.In the study of evolutionism,a comparative investigation between insect society and human society has attracted the special interest of many scholars.In addition to Charles Robert Darwin,Aldous Leonard Huxley,Jo-ham Jakob Bochofen and Henri Bergson published special works on this aspect.These scholars not only lived during the era of evolutionism, their thinking and research were more or less connected with evo-lutionism and insect society.Their research spawned a series of new theoretical thinking on the division of labor,ethics and morality,matrilineal society,and the creation of evolution,etc.Clarifying the research on“insect society” in evolutionism is necessary and important for us to understand the construction of social theories during that time.Hence, this article seeks to review“insect society”in the eyes of these scholars and make comparisons among them.

  10. Giving an account of one's pain in the anthropological interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, I analyze the illness stories narrated by a mother and her 13-year-old son as part of an ethnographic study of child chronic pain sufferers and their families. In examining some of the moral, relational and communicative challenges of giving an account of one's pain, I focus on what is left out of some accounts of illness and suffering and explore some possible reasons for these elisions. Drawing on recent work by Judith Butler (Giving an Account of Oneself, 2005), I investigate how the pragmatic context of interviews can introduce a form of symbolic violence to narrative accounts. Specifically, I use the term "genre of complaint" to highlight how anthropological research interviews in biomedical settings invoke certain typified forms of suffering that call for the rectification of perceived injustices. Interview narratives articulated in the genre of complaint privilege specific types of pain and suffering and cast others into the background. Giving an account of one's pain is thus a strategic and selective process, creating interruptions and silences as much as moments of clarity. Therefore, I argue that medical anthropologists ought to attend more closely to the institutional structures and relations that shape the production of illness narratives in interview encounters. PMID:19957024

  11. Cultural Studies and Sociology of Culture in Germany: Relations and Interrelations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Göttlich

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, attitudes towards cultural studies in Germany have developed within contexts of contact and conflict with a variety of disciplines, e.g. ethnology, anthropology, sociology, as well as the sociology of culture, liter-ary studies and Kulturwissenschaft(en. On the one hand there is a strong academ-ic interest in how cultural studies perceives and analyzes media culture, popular culture and everyday life. On the other hand boundaries with humanities and so-cial science remain, which leads to criticism and conflicts with cultural studies and its achievements.I will discuss some of the problems concerning the perception and reception of cultural studies among representatives of Kulturwissenschaft(en and sociology of culture. Furthermore I will draw on the role of cultural studies in thematizing cul-tural change and conflicts, and its ability to do so in a way that shows the im-portance of culture and politics.

  12. The diffusion of food culture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oddy, D. J.; Petráňová, Lydia

    Prague : ACADEMIA, Institute of Ethnology of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 2005 - (Oddy, D.; Petráňová, L.), s. 18-28 ISBN 80-200-1325-3. [Diffusion of Food Culture: Cookery and Food Education in Europe since the eighteenth century. Symposium of the International Commission for Research into European Food History (ICREFH) /8./. Prague (CZ), 30.09.2003-05.10.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z9058907 Keywords : Food culture * Cookery * Food education Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  13. Developing a New Dynamic Model for Cultural Waste Management

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Aftab Azari; Mohsen Ghadami; Morad Kordi; Hamed Ahmadinia

    2013-01-01

    As it stands, there is a dramatic increase on cultural management studies, although majorities of them are related to ecology, sociology, anthropology. In this case, the present study examined the most important factors in cultural development via cause-effect method. Consequently, the aim of this study is presenting a comprehensive model for cultural development management based on elite opinions. In order to build a community which has been developed based upon the perspective document "dev...

  14. Dubbing: adapting cultures in the global communication era

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Canu

    2012-01-01

    Adapting translation for dubbing is not a mere linguistic fact: it is mainly the adaptation of cultures. In fact, audiovisual translation and adaptation implicitly takes into account the importance of the historical background behind the multiplicity of languages and cultures, and by doing so, it becomes a means of cultural diffusion. That peculiarity enables what we can describe as the “socio-anthropological function” of the adaptation of translation for dubbing, which is the obj...

  15. On the Transcendence of Psychological Anthropology to Scientific Psychology%论心理人类学对科学心理学的超越

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田营; 彭运石

    2015-01-01

    心理人类学是相对人文化的领域,但与(科学)心理学在主题上相近且同样强调经验研究,因此心理学可将其作为“他者”加以了解、比照和借鉴。在人的理解层面,心理人类学重视人的社会、文化、生态、整体和意义维度,建构出了不同于心理学过分个体和还原的人的形象;在研究方式层面,心理人类学拓展出了一条迥异于心理学自然科学模式的合理道路,即强调异域-跨文化研究、本地人视角、民族志方法论、跨学科与伦理。未来,整个心理学可在“整合视野”的关照下,重审当前取向的合理性范围,并辩证吸收心理人类学等“他者”的智慧。%Psychological Anthropology relatively belongs to humanities. However, it shares the similarities of themes with (scientific) psychology,and both stress empirical research. Therefore it can be regarded as the "other" of psychology for studying,contrast and reference. At the level of understanding of human being,psychological anthropology,with em-phasis on socio-cultural, ecological, holism and meaning dimensions, constructs a pattern different from the psychology which is overly individualism and reductionism;At the level of research model,psychological anthropology provides a rea-sonable way quite different from the natural sci ence model of psychology, which focuses on the other-cultural and cross-cultural study,native perspective,ethnographic methodology,interdisciplinary and ethics. In future,guided by theory of“Integrated Horizon”,the whole psychology should review the rationality range of current paradigm and dialectically ab-sorb many others wisdom,such as psychological anthropology etc.

  16. Mediating Expectations and Encounters: Community-Based Tourism Protocols- Cultural Tourism Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Lena Mortensen

    2013-01-01

    Across the world an increasing number of communities are embracing cultural tourism as a means to strengthen or build local economies, to revitalize cultural traditions, and also to complement the management of local and cultural resources. The potential for cultural tourism to build cross cultural understanding and the importance of considering the human context of tourism is explored in this presentation by Lena Mortensen (Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto) an...

  17. Revisioning Clinical Psychology: Integrating Cultural Psychology into Clinical Research and Practice with Portuguese Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Susan eJames; Sara eHarris; Gary eFoster; Juanne eClarke; Anne eGadermann; Marie eMorrison; Birdie Jane Bezanson

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a model for conducting psychotherapy with people of diverse cultural backgrounds. The theoretical foundation for the model is based on clinical and cultural psychology. Cultural psychology integrates psychology and anthropology in order to provide a complex understanding of both culture and the individual within his or her cultural context. The model proposed in this article is also based on our clinical experience and mixed method research with the Portuguese communi...

  18. The Role of Culture in Social Development Over the Life Span : An Interpersonal Relations Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, Isabelle; Trommsdorff, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to illustrate the role of culture for individual development throughout the life span. First, theoretical approaches how culture affects the ontogenesis is presented, starting from early anthropological to recent eco-cultural and culture-informed approaches. Then, culture-specific conceptualizations of development over the life span are discussed, focusing on development in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age. Finally, we concentrate on selected areas of social de...

  19. The Concepts of “Corridor” and “Channel”:Anthropological Reconstruction of Area Studies in Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The historically complicated eth-nic migration and cultural interaction , as well as present day multi -ethnic interactive symbiosis in the “corridors” and “channels” of Southwest China constitutes a great challenge to the tradition-al “taxonomic-style” ethnic research and modern“mosaic-style” understanding of the region . Mo-reover , it also stimulates those in Southwest stud-ies to pay more attention to a regional model of“cross-cutting” and integration . Different from the “single ethnic group” research model , area studies in Southwest China emphasizes the break-down of administrative divisions , and the tran-scendence of ethnic boundaries .It attempts to ex-plore the feature of mobility and structure of rela-tionships contained in the “Southwest” itself based on the characteristics of the ethnic “corri-dors” and migration “channels” in this region. The rise of the topics , such as the zangyi zoulang ( Tibetan-Yi Corridor ) , the xinan sichou zhilu ( Southwest Silk Road ) , and the chama gudao ( the Ancient Tea Caravan Road ) in current aca-demic circles is pushing areas studies in Southwest China to a higher academic level and theoretical cognition .Based on a review and forecast of this academic trend , this article tries to give some thoughts on the future development , and possible breakthroughs , of contemporary anthropological studies in Southwest China from the aspects of re-search subjects , problem consciousness , and methodology . 1.The “ Corridor” Doctrine: A Model ofArea Studies in Southwest ChinaSince the 1980s, the direction of SouthwestStudies could be summarized into two aspects : 1)the creation of a comprehensive area studies pattern,for instances, the emergence of the researchon the “Tibetan-Yi Corridor”, and “Ancient TeaCaravan Route”; 2) the gradual development ofspecial research on a single ethnic group, for instance,the founding of various associations whichaimto study a specific ethnic group

  20. Greek Anthropological Thought at the End of the Classical Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benéitez Prudencio, José Javier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aristotle’s interest in human nature ranges impressively over a large number of disciplines. In the last few years there has been an explosion of fresh research into this thinker’s representation of the human being; but above all it is the knowledge of different areas of Corpus aristotelicum —which for long was badly neglected— that has proved the most rewarding. Thus, some specialists have come to realize that Aristotle’s biological works are as interesting and important as his Politics, his Ethics or his Metaphysics for understanding his anthropological thought. The scope of the paper is these neglected areas of Corpus aristotelicum. Aristotle’s model, however, was not the only and decisive anthropological theory available at the end of the Classical Age. The author also discusses the historian and physician Ctesias —who had written a History of India one generation before, yet was very influential in Aristotelian times— as well as the Peripatetic philosopher Theophrastos.

    El interés de Aristóteles por la naturaleza humana abarca un cúmulo impresionante de disciplinas. En los últimos años se ha dado un avance importante en la investigación que sobre la idea del ser humano tenía este pensador, mostrándose reveladora en el conocimiento de diferentes partes del Corpus aristotelicum que durante mucho tiempo han estado postergadas. Por esta razón, algunos especialistas convienen en afirmar que, para la comprensión del pensamiento antropológico de Aristóteles, sus tratados biológicos se muestran de tanto interés y tienen tanta importancia como la Política, las Éticas o la Metafísica. El centro de atención del artículo lo constituyen dichas partes más olvidadas del Corpus. Con todo, el modelo aristotélico no fue la única explicación antropológica que se dio a finales de la época clásica, ni tampoco la más decisiva. El autor