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Sample records for anterior skull base

  1. [Anterior skull-base schwannoma].

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    Esquivel-Miranda, Miguel; De la O Ríos, Elier; Vargas-Valenciano, Emmanuelle; Moreno-Medina, Eva

    Schwannomas are nerve sheath tumours that originate in Schwann cells. They are usually solitary and sporadic and manifest on peripheral, spinal or cranial nerves. Intracranial schwannomas tend to manifest on the eighth cranial nerve, particularly in patients with neurofibromatosis type2. Anterior skull-base schwannomas represent less than 1% of all intracranial schwannomas. They are more frequent in young people and are typically benign. These tumours represent a diagnostic challenge due to their rarity and difficult differential diagnosis, and numerous theories have been postulated concerning their origin and development. In this article, we present the case of a 13-year-old male with a single anterior cranial-base tumour not associated with neurofibromatosis who presented with headache, papilloedema, eye pain and loss of visual acuity. Complete resection of the tumour was performed, which was histopathologically diagnosed as a schwannoma. The patient made a complete clinical recovery with abatement of all symptoms. We conducted a review of the literature and found 66 cases worldwide with this diagnosis. We describe the most relevant epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this kind of tumour and its relation with the recently discovered and similar olfactory schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Skull base tumours part I: Imaging technique, anatomy and anterior skull base tumours

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    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    Advances in cross-sectional imaging, surgical technique and adjuvant treatment have largely contributed to ameliorate the prognosis, lessen the morbidity and mortality of patients with skull base tumours and to the growing medical investment in the management of these patients. Because clinical assessment of the skull base is limited, cross-sectional imaging became indispensable in the diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of patients with suspected skull base pathology and the radiologist is increasingly responsible for the fate of these patients. This review will focus on the advances in imaging technique; contribution to patient's management and on the imaging features of the most common tumours affecting the anterior skull base. Emphasis is given to a systematic approach to skull base pathology based upon an anatomic division taking into account the major tissue constituents in each skull base compartment. The most relevant information that should be conveyed to surgeons and radiation oncologists involved in patient's management will be discussed.

  3. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis infiltrating anterior skull base and clivus

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    Meccariello, Giuseppe; Deganello, Alberto; Mannelli, Giuditta; Bianco, Giacomo; Ammannati, Franco; Georgalas, Christos; Gallo, Oreste

    2013-01-01

    Bone erosion and skull base invasion are often suggestive of a malignant mass in paranasal and nasal cavities. Nevertheless, forms of chronic rhinosinusitis, such as allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), could mimic malignant features. Here, we report AFRS patient with orbital, anterior cranial

  4. Recurrent mandibular ameloblastoma with anterior skull base invasion: Case report.

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    Santini, L; Varoquaux, A; Giovanni, A; Dessi, P; Michel, J

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent ameloblastoma with skull base invasion is a rare clinical entity with poor prognosis. We report a case of a mandibular ameloblastoma recurrence involving the anterior skull base. The diagnostic and therapeutic processes are presented with emphasis on the radiologic features of ameloblastoma. Another aim of this case report is to underline the importance of close and long-term follow-up after resection. Ameloblastoma recurrences are frequent and mainly occur after incomplete surgical resection. These recurrences may be diagnosed late because of lack of symptoms in the mandibular area.

  5. Fungal Infection of the Sinus and Anterior Skull Base

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    Morteza Javadi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract   Background: Invasive fungal infection is an opportunistic infection caused commonly   by mucoraccae and aspergillus. It mostly occurs in patients with underlying disease.   Since it has a high mortality and morbidity rate, considering a treatment strategy seems   necessary.   Objective: Since there has not been a clear protocol for treating these patients, we decided   to establish a protocol for fungal infection of sinus and anterior skull base management.   Methods: This retrospective and descriptive case study series included 30 patients.   After confirming the pathogen, the authors came to a proper protocol for treatment which   is mentioned later.   Results: The site involvement included nose and orbital cavity (53.3%, anterior skull   base and brain in conjunction with sinonasal (36.6% and simple nasal cavity involvement   (10%. 86.6% of the patients had underlying diseases. 56.6% of patients had diabetes   as a single underlying disease, while 13.3% had both diabetes and renal failure in   combination. Acute lymphocytic leukemia was present in 6.6%, renal failure in 3.3%, lupus   in 3.3% and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 3.3% of patients. Mortality rate was   40%. We categorized the patients into 3 groups: only sinonasal, sinonasal and orbit, and   associated anterior skull base and brain involvement.   Conclusion: Early diagnosis is an important factor in improving survival. Anterior   skull base and brain involvement has a very poor prognosis.  

  6. The anterior interhemispheric approach: a safe and effective approach to anterior skull base lesions.

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    Mielke, Dorothee; Mayfrank, Lothar; Psychogios, Marios Nikos; Rohde, Veit

    2014-04-01

    Many approaches to the anterior skull base have been reported. Frequently used are the pterional, the unilateral or bilateral frontobasal, the supraorbital and the frontolateral approach. Recently, endoscopic transnasal approaches have become more popular. The benefits of each approach has to be weighted against its complications and limitations. The aim of this study was to investigate if the anterior interhemispheric approach (AIA) could be a safe and effective alternative approach to tumorous and non-tumorous lesions of the anterior skull base. We screened the operative records of all patients with an anterior skull base lesion undergoing transcranial surgery. We have used the AIA in 61 patients. These were exclusively patients with either olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) (n = 43), ethmoidal dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) ( n = 6) or frontobasal fractures of the anterior midline with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage ( n = 12). Patient records were evaluated concerning accessibility of the lesion, realization of surgical aims (complete tumor removal, dAVF obliteration, closure of the dural tear), and approach related complications. The use of the AIA exclusively in OGMs, ethmoidal dAVFs and midline frontobasal fractures indicated that we considered lateralized frontobasal lesions not suitable to be treated successfully. If restricted to these three pathologies, the AIA is highly effective and safe. The surgical aim (complete tumor removal, complete dAVF occlusion, no rhinorrhea) was achieved in all patients. The complication rate was 11.5 % (wound infection (n = 2; 3.2 %), contusion of the genu of the corpus callosum, subdural hygroma, epileptic seizure, anosmia and asymptomatic bleed into the tumor cavity (n = 1 each). Only the contusion of the corpus callosum was directly related to the approach (1.6 %). Olfaction, if present before surgery, was preserved in all patients, except one (1.6 %). The AIA is an effective and a safe approach

  7. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

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    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per

    2014-01-01

    To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior...... skull base meningiomas and 55 patients treated with FSRT for pituitary adenomas between January 1999 and December 2009 with at least 2 years follow-up were included. Patients were followed up prospectively with magnetic resonance imaging scans, visual acuity and visual field examinations. RION was found...... in four (10%) patients with anterior skull base meningiomas and seven patients (13%) with pituitary adenomas. The five-year actuarial freedom from 25% RION visual field loss was 94% following FSRT. Actuarial 2-, 5- and 10-year tumor control rates were 100, 88.4 and 64.5% for anterior skull base...

  8. Quality-of-Life after Anterior Skull Base Surgery: A Systematic Review.

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    Kirkman, Matthew A; Borg, Anouk; Al-Mousa, Alaa; Haliasos, Nikolaos; Choi, David

    2014-04-01

    Background Improved treatment and survival of patients with skull base tumors has made the assessment of quality-of-life (QoL) in this population increasingly important. This article provides a comprehensive systematic review pertaining to QoL assessment in adults undergoing anterior skull base surgery. Methods We performed a literature search using the electronic databases of Ovid Medline and Embase. Additional articles were identified through a search using the phrase anterior skull base. Further articles were sought through hand-searching relevant journals and reference lists of identified articles. Results Our search strategy identified 29 articles for inclusion in our systematic review, with considerable variation between studies in population characteristics, methodological design and quality, follow-up length, and outcome assessment. The most commonly used QoL tools were the Karnofsky Performance Status and the Anterior Skull Base Questionnaire. QoL following anterior skull base surgery appears to improve beyond preoperative levels in the months after surgery. For patients undergoing endoscopic skull base surgery, the gain in QoL appears to be greater and may manifest earlier, with no clear long-term deleterious effect on sinonasal outcomes compared with open surgery. Conclusions QoL after anterior skull base surgery in adults appears to improve within several months of surgery, but earlier and to a larger extent if the endoscopic approach is used. Given the relative paucity and heterogeneity of anterior skull base tumors, large-scale prospective multicentre studies utilizing valid and reliable multidimensional QoL tools are required. This may result in improved patient care, by understanding patients' needs better and facilitating the provision of reliable outcome data for clinical trials.

  9. Endoscopic endonasal anatomy and approaches to the anterior skull base: a neurosurgeon's viewpoint.

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    Abuzayed, Bashar; Tanriover, Necmettin; Gazioglu, Nurperi; Sanus, Galip Zihni; Ozlen, Fatma; Biceroglu, Huseyin; Kafadar, Ali Metin; Eraslan, Berna Senel; Akar, Ziya

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to review the endoscopic anatomy of the anterior skull base, defining the pitfalls of endoscopic endonasal approaches to this region. Recently, these approaches are gaining popularity among neurosurgeons, and the details of the endoscopic anatomy and approaches are highlighted from the neurosurgeons' point of view, correlated with demonstrative cases. Twelve fresh adult cadavers were studied (n = 12). We used Karl Storz 0 and 30 degrees, 4 mm, 18- and 30-cm rod lens rigid endoscope in our dissections. After preparation of the cadaveric specimens, we approached the anterior skull base by the extended endoscopic endonasal approach. After resection of the superior portion of the nasal septum, bilateral middle and superior turbinates, and bilateral anterior and posterior ethmoidal cells, we could obtain full exposure of the anterior skull base. The distance between optic canal and the posterior ethmoidal artery ranged from 8 to 16 mm (mean, 11.08 mm), and the distance between posterior ethmoidal artery and the anterior ethmoidal artery ranged from 10 to 17 mm (mean, 13 mm). After resecting the anterior skull base bony structure and the dura between the 2 medial orbital walls, we could visualize the olfactory nerves, interhemispheric sulcus, and gyri recti. With dissecting the interhemispheric sulcus, we could expose the first (A1) and second (A2) segments of the anterior cerebral artery, anterior communicating artery, and Heubner arteries. This study showed that extended endoscopic endonasal approaches are sufficient in providing wide exposure of the bony structures, and the extradural and intradural components of the anterior skull base and the neighboring structures providing more controlled manipulation of pathologic lesions. These approaches need specific skill and learning curve to achieve more minimally invasive interventions and less postoperative complications.

  10. [Craniofacial resection for tumors of paranasal sinuses involving the anterior skull base].

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    Burduk, Paweł K; Kaźmierczak, Wojciech; Dalke, Krzysztof; Beuth, Wojciech; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Prywiński, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial resection is a treatment of choice for paranasal malignant and benign tumors invading the skull base. In this article the authors present the experience in craniofacial resection for malignant tumors invading the anterior skull base. The material consisted of four patients operated in the Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngology Oncology CM UMK between 2007 and 2010. The patients were treated for malignant neoplasms of the paranasal sinuses with anterior skull base involvement. THe age range of the group were between 60 and 75 years. Of these patients three were females and one male. We performed a lateral rhinotomy for laryngological acces for the tumor. The neurosurgeon performed anterior skull base osteotomy at and appropriate site above. The patients recovered uneventfully. The follow up period ranged between 13 and 42 months. The overall 3-year survival for all patients in our series was 66,6%. Combined craniofacial resection of tumors of the anterior skull base is an effective approach for the management of these pathologies. This type of approach in elderly patients over 70 years old could be associated with increased mortality and complications leading to poorer outcome.

  11. Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in the anterior skull base

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    Ming Jie Wang, MD, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC, especially in the anterior skull base, is an extremely rare condition. A 5-year-old boy presented with a large space-occupying lesion in the anterior skull base along with a left sided-epistaxis, proptosis and decreased vision. Radical excision of the lesion was performed by an endoscopic transnasal and transethmoidal approach. The patient recovered without any recurrence during a follow-up period of up to 28 months. Here, we review this rare case and discuss the clinical presentation and surgical treatment.

  12. Endonasal endoscopic repair of anterior skull-base fistulas: the Kuala Lumpur experience.

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    Gendeh, B S; Mazita, A; Selladurai, B M; Jegan, T; Jeevanan, J; Misiran, K

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the pattern of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhoea presenting to our tertiary referral centre in Kuala Lumpur and to assess the clinical outcomes of endonasal endoscopic surgery for repair of anterior skull base fistulas. Sixteen patients were treated between 1998 and 2004. The aetiology of the condition was spontaneous in seven and acquired in nine patients. In the acquired category, three patients had accidental trauma and this was iatrogenic in six patients (five post pituitary surgery), with one post endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Imaging included computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Endoscopic repair is less suited for defects in the frontal sinuses with prominent lateral extension and defects greater than 1.5 cm in diameter involving the skull base. Fascia lata, middle turbinate mucosa, nasal perichondrium and ear fat ('bath plug') were the preferred repair materials in the anterior skull base, whereas fascia lata, cartilage and abdominal fat obliteration was preferentially used in the sphenoid leak repair. Intrathecal sodium flourescein helped to confirm the site of CSF fistula in 81.3 per cent of the patients. Ninety per cent of the patients who underwent 'bath plug' repair were successful. The overall success rate for a primary endoscopic procedure was 87.5 per cent, although in two cases a second endoscopic procedure was required for closure. In the majority of cases endoscopic repair was successful, and this avoids many of the complications associated with craniotomy, particularly in a young population. Therefore it is our preferred option, but an alternative procedure should be utilized should this prove necessary.

  13. A prospective evaluation of short-term health-related quality of life in patients undergoing anterior skull base surgery.

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    Abergel, Abraham; Fliss, Dan M; Margalit, Nevo; Gil, Ziv

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the health-related quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing anterior skull base tumor resection. The Anterior Skull Base Surgery QOL questionnaire, a disease-specific multidimensional instrument dedicated to this population, was used to collect and prospectively analyze demographic, medical, and QOL data on 48 patients. Thirty-nine patients completed the questionnaire preoperatively and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Seventeen patients (44%) had malignant histology and 22 (56%) had benign tumors. The overall QOL score decreased significantly at 6 months postoperatively (p base tumor resection returns to baseline by 1 year after surgery. Histology and radiotherapy are significant predictors of health-related QOL in this population.

  14. Surgical Approaches to Resection of Anterior Skull Base and Paranasal Sinuses Tumors

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    Sara Abu- Ghanem

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumours of the sinonasal tract comprise approximately 3% of the malignancies that arise in the upper aerodigestive tract. Approximately 10% of tumours that arise in the sinonasal tract originate in the ethmoid and/or frontal sinuses, and are likely to involve the anterior cranial base. The route of spread of tumours originating in the anterior skull base and paranasal sinuses is determined by the complex anatomy of the craniomaxillofacial compartments. These tumours may invade laterally into the orbit and middle fossa, inferiorly into the maxillary antrum and palate, posteriorly into the nasopharynx and pterygopalatine fossa, and superiorly into the cavernous sinus and brain. Recent improvements in endoscopic technology now allow the resection of the majority of benign neoplasms and some early malignant tumours with minor dural involvement. For advanced-stage malignant tumours and benign tumours with frontal bone involvement, the classical open approaches remain viable surgical techniques. In this paper, we review the open surgical resection approaches used for resections in the craniomaxillofacial area.

  15. Skull Base Anatomy.

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    Patel, Chirag R; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Eric W

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the skull base is complex with multiple neurovascular structures in a small space. Understanding all of the intricate relationships begins with understanding the anatomy of the sphenoid bone. The cavernous sinus contains the carotid artery and some of its branches; cranial nerves III, IV, VI, and V1; and transmits venous blood from multiple sources. The anterior skull base extends to the frontal sinus and is important to understand for sinus surgery and sinonasal malignancies. The clivus protects the brainstem and posterior cranial fossa. A thorough appreciation of the anatomy of these various areas allows for endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Endonasal skull base endoscopy].

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    Simal-Julián, Juan Antonio; Miranda-Lloret, Pablo; Pancucci, Giovanni; Evangelista-Zamora, Rocío; Pérez-Borredá, Pedro; Sanromán-Álvarez, Pablo; Perez-de-Sanromán, Laila; Botella-Asunción, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal techniques used in skull base surgery have evolved greatly in recent years. Our study objective was to perform a qualitative systematic review of the likewise systematic reviews in published English language literature, to examine the evidence and conclusions reached in these studies comparing transcranial and endoscopic approaches in skull base surgery. We searched the references on the MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases selecting the systematic reviews, meta-analyses and evidence based medicine reviews on skull based pathologies published from January 2000 until January 2013. We focused on endoscopic impact and on microsurgical and endoscopic technique comparisons. Full endoscopic endonasal approaches achieved gross total removal rates of craniopharyngiomas and chordomas higher than those for transcranial approaches. In anterior skull base meningiomas, complete resections were more frequently achieved after transcranial approaches, with a trend in favour of endoscopy with respect to visual prognosis. Endoscopic endonasal approaches minimised the postoperative complications after the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, encephaloceles, meningoceles, craniopharyngiomas and chordomas, with the exception of postoperative CSF leaks. Randomized multicenter studies are necessary to resolve the controversy over endoscopic and microsurgical approaches in skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Extended endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery: from the sella to the anterior and posterior cranial fossa

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    Oostra, Amanda; van Furth, Wouter; Georgalas, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Skull base surgery has gone through significant changes with the development of extended endoscopic endonasal approaches over the last decade. Initially used for the transphenoidal removal of hypophyseal adenomas, the endoscopic transnasal approach gradually evolved into a way of accessing the whole

  18. Celebrating the golden anniversary of anterior skull base surgery: reflections on the past 50 years and its historical evolution.

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    Husain, Qasim; Patel, Smruti K; Soni, Resha S; Patel, Amit A; Liu, James K; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-01-01

    With its inception nearly half a century ago through the pioneering work of Dandy, McLean, and Smith, anterior skull base (ASB) surgery is a relatively young discipline. It became a distinct entity in 1963 when Ketcham popularized the combined transcranial transfacial approach for en bloc resection of tumors of the paranasal sinuses extending into the anterior cranial fossa. However, because these procedures resulted in major morbidities and mortalities, alternative modes of treatment were sought. Since the 1970s, the introduction and promotion of the surgical endoscope by Messerklinger, Stammberger, and Kennedy, commenced the era of endoscopic sinus surgery. Thaler and colleagues described the utility of the endoscope for ASB surgery at the turn of the century. This allowed direct visualization and safer, more accurate removal of tumors. In 2001, Casiano reported the first purely endoscopic endonasal ASB resection, a novel technique that has been adopted by major skull base centers. The success of ASB surgery can be attributed to both the development of the skull base team as well as improvements in surgical techniques, instrumentation, and visualization technology. In this article, we review the historical evolution of ASB surgery as we approach the 50th anniversary since its recognition as a distinct entity. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Extent of Endoscopic Resection for Anterior Skull Base Tumors: An MRI-Based Volumetric Analysis.

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    Koszewski, Ian J; Avey, Gregory; Ahmed, Azam; Leonhard, Lucas; Hoffman, Matthew R; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2017-06-01

    Objective  To determine the volume of ventral skull base tumor removed following endoscopic endonasal (EEA) resection using MRI-based volumetric analysis and to evaluate the inter-rater reliability of such analysis. Design  Retrospective case series. Setting  Academic tertiary care hospital. Participants  EEA patients November 2012 to August 2015. Main Outcome Measures  Volumetric analysis of pre- and immediately postoperative MR imaging was performed independently by two investigators. The percentage of total tumor resected was evaluated according to resection goal and tumor type. Results  A total of 39 patients underwent resection. Intraclass correlation coefficients between the raters were 0.9988 for preoperative and 0.9819 for postoperative images. Tumors (and average percentage removed) included 17 nonsecreting pituitary adenomas (95.3%), 8 secreting pituitary adenomas (86.2%), 4 meningiomas (81.6%), 3 olfactory neuroblastomas (100%), 2 craniopharyngiomas (100%), 1 large B-cell lymphoma (90.5%), 1 germ cell neoplasm (48.3), 1 benign fibrous connective tissue mass (93.4%), 1 epidermoid cyst (68.4%), and 1 chordoma (100%). For tumors treated with intent for gross total resection, 96.9 ± 4.8% was removed. Conclusion  EEAs achieved tumor resection rates of ∼97% when total resection was attempted. The radiographic finding of residual tumor is of uncertain clinical significance. The volumetric analysis employed in this study demonstrated high inter-rater reliability and could facilitate further study.

  20. [No-malignant lessions involving the paranasal sinuses and anterior skull base].

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    Gil-Carcedo, Elisa; Gil-Carcedo, Luis M; Vallejo, Luis A; de Campos, José M

    2009-01-01

    The lesions that involve the paranasal sinuses and the anterior cranial base at the same time are not unusual. These diseases have different features. The aim of this study is to set out the particularities of the non-malignant lesions involving both zones. Retrospective study of 32 patients between 1986 and 2007 diagnosed with: non-malignant tumours (31.2 %), tumorlike lesions (3.1 %), fibrous-osseous lesions (12.5 %), congenital or acquired malformations (18.7 %) and infection disease (34.3 %). We analyse the diagnostic imaging, the treatment and pathogen mechanism. Only 6 of 43 osteomas involved the paranasal sinuses and anterior cranial fossa (13.04 %): 3 cases have developed meningitis and 1 developed a pneumocephalus. 2 cases are meningiomas: 1 was asymptomatic and the other one caused destruction at subtotal frontal bone. 1 giant hemangioma associated with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is treated by combined craniofacial approach. The fibrous-osseous lesions were specifically fibrous dysplasia and affected the ethmoides. The encephalocele were predominating in the malformations group, 2 were diagnosed after repeated meningitis. 11 cases are included by infection: 10 cases caused osteomielitis and the eleventh is a patient with a mucormycosis. Surgery has been used in 84.3 % of the cases: frontal craniotomy 37 %, combined craniofacial approach 18.5 %, subfrontal approach 18.5 %, osteoplastic technique 18.5 %, lateronasal approach 3.7 %, endonasal microscopic resection 3.7 %. In this study the diagnosis, extension and surgical management were supported in the imaging. A closed separation between the anterior cranial fossa ant the sinus is necessary after the resection. The reconstruction was performed using a pedicled pericranial flap and titanium mesh in most of the cases.

  1. Skull base tumours

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    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  2. Brown tumors of the anterior skull base as the initial manifestation of true normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: report of three cases and review of the literature.

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    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hamidi, Mehrdokht; Moharamzad, Yashar; Setayesh, Ali; Amirjamshidi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Brown tumor is a bone lesion secondary to hyperparathyroidism of various etiologies. Skeletal involvement in primary hyperparathyroidism secondary to parathyroid adenoma is very uncommon and brown tumor has become extremely a rare clinical entity. Hyperparathyroidism is usually associated with high levels of serum calcium. Brown tumor as the only and initial symptom of normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism is extremely rare. Moreover, involvement of the skull base and the orbit is exceedingly rare. The authors would report three cases of brown tumor of the anterior skull base that were associated with true normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. Clinical manifestations, neuroimaging findings, pathological findings, diagnosis and treatment of the patients are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed.

  3. The skull base: tumoral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, Jan W.

    2005-01-01

    Many lesions occur in the anterior, central and posterior skull base. In order to detect and characterise them, one has to apply the best imaging technique. Today MR is the preferred technique, and the use of CT is more and more restricted to evaluate the presence of calcifications and involvement of thin bony walls, foramina and fissures. However, MR is only superior when the right sequences and imaging planes are used. Many lesions can be characterised by their specific signal intensity on different sequences and by their location. Nevertheless some lesions can only be characterised after biopsy. The purpose of imaging in skull base tumours remains in the first place the evaluation of the exact tumour extent, and this is again best achieved with MR. In this paper the imaging technique and the most frequent skull base tumours are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Trans-zygomatic middle cranial fossa approach to access lesions around the cavernous sinus and anterior parahippocampus: a minimally invasive skull base approach.

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    Melamed, Itay; Tubbs, R Shane; Payner, Troy D; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2009-08-01

    Exposure of the cavernous sinus or anterior parahippocampus often involves a wide exposure of the temporal lobe and mobilization of the temporalis muscle associated with temporal lobe retraction. The authors present a cadaveric study to illustrate the feasibility, advantages and landmarks necessary to perform a trans-zygomatic middle fossa approach to lesions around the cavernous sinus and anterior parahippocampus. The authors performed bilateral trans-zygomatic middle fossae exposures to reach the cavernous sinus and parahippocampus in five cadavers (10 sides). We assessed the morbidity associated with this procedure and compared the indications, advantages, and disadvantages of this method versus more extensive skull base approaches. A vertical linear incision along the middle portion of the zygomatic arch was extended one finger breadth inferior to the inferior edge of the zygomatic arch. Careful dissection inferior to the arch allowed preservation of facial nerve branches. A zygomatic osteotomy was followed via a linear incision through the temporalis muscle and exposure of the middle cranial fossa floor. A craniotomy along the inferolateral temporal bone and middle fossa floor allowed extradural dissection along the middle fossa floor and exposure of the cavernous sinus including all three divisions of the trigeminal nerve. Intradural inspection demonstrated adequate exposure of the parahippocampus. Exposure of the latter required minimal or no retraction of the temporal lobe. The trans-zygomatic middle fossa approach is a simplified skull base exposure using a linear incision, which may avoid the invasivity of more extensive skull base approaches while providing an adequate corridor for resection of cavernous sinus and parahippocampus lesions. The advantages of this approach include its efficiency, ease, minimalism, preservation of the temporalis muscle, and minimal retraction of the temporal lobe.

  5. Skull base tumor model.

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    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  6. Assessment of frontal lobe sagging after endoscopic endonasal transcribriform resection of anterior skull base tumors: is rigid structural reconstruction of the cranial base defect necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Shukla, Pratik A; Choudhry, Osamah J; Singh, Rahul; Liu, James K

    2012-12-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transcribriform approach (EETA) is a viable alternative option for resection of selected anterior skull base (ASB) tumors. However, this technique results in the creation of large cribriform defects. Some have reported the use of a rigid substitute for ASB reconstruction to prevent postoperative frontal lobe sagging. We evaluate the degree of frontal lobe sagging using our triple-layer technique [fascia lata, acellular dermal allograft, and pedicled nasoseptal flap (PNSF)] without the use of rigid structural reconstruction for large cribriform defects. Retrospective analysis. Nine patients underwent an EETA for resection of large ASB tumors from August 2010 to November 2011. The degree of frontal lobe displacement after EETA, defined as the ASB position, was calculated based on the most inferior position of the frontal lobe relative to the nasion-sellar line defined on preoperative and postoperative imaging. A positive value signified upward displacement, and a negative value represented inferior displacement of the frontal lobe. The average cribriform defect size was 9.3 cm(2) (range, 5.0-13.8 cm(2) ). The average distance of postoperative frontal lobe displacement was 0.2 mm (range, -3.9 to 2.9 mm) without any cases of significant brain sagging. The mean follow-up period was 10.1 months (range, 4-19 months). There were no postoperative CSF leaks. Rigid structural repair may not be necessary for ASB defect repair after endoscopic endonasal resection of the cribriform plate. Our technique for multilayer cranial base reconstruction appears to be satisfactory in preventing delayed frontal lobe sagging. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Difficulties of clinical radiodiagnosis of concomitant injuries of fornix and base of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutitskij, A.G.; Semisalov, S.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical radiological semiotics in 234 patients with injuries of fornix and base of the skull is studied. Among skull injuries the most critical are those of fornix and base of anterior parts of the skull. Severity of state doesn't exclude, but requires an obligatory X-ray examination, at least - review radiographs of the skull. When choosing the volume of surgical intervention the data on X-ray examination along with clinical pattern should be taken account of

  8. Dose escalation in large anterior skull-base tumors by means of IMRT. First experience with the Novalis {sup registered} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Sauer, R.; Grabenbauer, G. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Lambrecht, U.; Mueller, R. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Div. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility and tolerance of dose escalation with stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT) for skull-base tumors. Patients and Methods: between 01/2003 and 12/2004, twelve patients were treated. Nine were exclusively treated at the Novalis {sup registered} site with one planning target volume (PTV) field boost, three were administered boost IMRT treatment (two with each one PTV-shrinking field, one with single PTV) after conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. This resulted in 23 PTVs with a median volume of 93.63 cm{sup 3} (range, 88.58-125.88 cm{sup 3}). Dose calculation was done by the pencil-beam algorithm. Median total doses of 66.6, 77.4, and 63.9 Gy were prescribed for sIMRT alone, sIMRT after 3-D conformal irradiation of the nasopharynx and cervical lymph nodes with 59.4 Gy, and for reirradiation, respectively. Results: 95% isodose PTV coverage was reached in 86.5% (range, 80-93%). Homogeneity (D{sub max}/D{sup ref}) was 1.11, 1.09, and 1.08. Median total doses to 50% of chiasm, right and left optic nerve were 16.21, 16.82 and 10.23 Gy. 11/12 patients are locally controlled with a median follow-up of 11 months (range, 3-23 months), one has died of pulmonary embolism after cerebrospinal dissemination of retinal adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: SIMRT enables dose escalation to tumors located close to critical organs. Inverse planning for micro-multileaf collimator stereotactic irradiation is practicable in the daily routine irradiation program. SIMRT needs special verification and still, the following parameters have to be standardized: IMRT dose specification, dose maxima, length of radiation delivery time. (orig.)

  9. Relation of linear parameters of anterior cranial fossa with dimensional characteristics of facial part of the skull in different craniotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleshkina О.Yu.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the relation of linear parameters of the anterior cranial fossa with dimensional facial characteristics of the human skull in various craniotypes. Research Material: 100 adult skulls divided into three craniotypes have been used. Methods. Craniotopometry has been used for the measurement of the average values and the correlation model construction. Results. It has been revealed that the most significant correlation has been observed in the parameters of fleksibasilar craniotypes, in medio- and platybasilar craniotypes the multidirectional dependence of the studied parameters has been characterized as of moderate and mild degree. Conclusion. Results of research are necessary theoretical base for possible use by clinical physicians in elaboration of tactics of stereotaksichesky approach to tumoral or other pathological processes in the field of front and brain departments of a skull.

  10. Skull base development and craniosynostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaser, Susan I.; Padfield, Nancy; Chitayat, David; Forrest, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal skull shape resulting in craniofacial deformity is a relatively common clinical finding, with deformity either positional (positional plagiocephaly) or related to premature ossification and fusion of the skull sutures (craniosynostosis). Growth restriction occurring at a stenosed suture is associated with exaggerated growth at the open sutures, resulting in fairly predictable craniofacial phenotypes in single-suture non-syndromic pathologies. Multi-suture syndromic subtypes are not so easy to understand without imaging. Imaging is performed to define the site and extent of craniosynostosis, to determine the presence or absence of underlying brain anomalies, and to evaluate both pre- and postoperative complications of craniosynostosis. Evidence for intracranial hypertension may be seen both pre- and postoperatively, associated with jugular foraminal stenosis, sinovenous occlusion, hydrocephalus and Chiari 1 malformations. Following clinical assessment, imaging evaluation may include radiographs, high-frequency US of the involved sutures, low-dose (20-30 mAs) CT with three-dimensional reformatted images, MRI and nuclear medicine brain imaging. Anomalous or vigorous collateral venous drainage may be mapped preoperatively with CT or MR venography or catheter angiography. (orig.)

  11. Skull base development and craniosynostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaser, Susan I. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Neuroradiology, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Toronto (Canada); Padfield, Nancy [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Neuroradiology, Toronto (Canada); Chitayat, David [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Toronto (Canada); Mount Sinai Hospital and University of Toronto, Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Toronto (Canada); Forrest, Christopher R. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Centre for Craniofacial Care and Research, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Abnormal skull shape resulting in craniofacial deformity is a relatively common clinical finding, with deformity either positional (positional plagiocephaly) or related to premature ossification and fusion of the skull sutures (craniosynostosis). Growth restriction occurring at a stenosed suture is associated with exaggerated growth at the open sutures, resulting in fairly predictable craniofacial phenotypes in single-suture non-syndromic pathologies. Multi-suture syndromic subtypes are not so easy to understand without imaging. Imaging is performed to define the site and extent of craniosynostosis, to determine the presence or absence of underlying brain anomalies, and to evaluate both pre- and postoperative complications of craniosynostosis. Evidence for intracranial hypertension may be seen both pre- and postoperatively, associated with jugular foraminal stenosis, sinovenous occlusion, hydrocephalus and Chiari 1 malformations. Following clinical assessment, imaging evaluation may include radiographs, high-frequency US of the involved sutures, low-dose (20-30 mAs) CT with three-dimensional reformatted images, MRI and nuclear medicine brain imaging. Anomalous or vigorous collateral venous drainage may be mapped preoperatively with CT or MR venography or catheter angiography. (orig.)

  12. Introduction: surgical management of skull base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zada, Gabriel; Başkaya, Mustafa K; Shah, Mitesh V

    2017-10-01

    Meningiomas represent the most common primary intracranial neoplasm treated by neurosurgeons. Although multimodal treatment of meningiomas includes surgery, radiation-based treatments, and occasionally medical therapy, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for most symptomatic meningiomas. Because of the intricate relationship of the dura mater and arachnoid mater with the central nervous system and cranial nerves, meningiomas can arise anywhere along the skull base or convexities, and occasionally even within the ventricular system, thereby mandating a catalog of surgical approaches that neurosurgeons may employ to individualize treatment for patients. Skull base meningiomas represent some of the most challenging pathology encountered by neurosurgeons, on account of their depth, invasion, vascularity, texture/consistency, and their relationship to bony anatomy, cranial nerves, and blood vessels. Resection of complex skull base meningiomas often mandates adequate bony removal to achieve sufficient exposure of the tumor and surrounding region, in order to minimize brain retraction and optimally identify, protect, control, and manipulate sensitive neurovascular structures. A variety of traditional skull base approaches has evolved to address complex skull base tumors, of which meningiomas are considered the paragon in terms of both complexity and frequency. In this supplemental video issue of Neurosurgical Focus, contributing authors from around the world provide instructional narratives demonstrating resection of a variety of skull base meningiomas arising from traditionally challenging origins, including the clinoid processes, tuberculum sellae, dorsum sellae, petroclival region, falco-tentorial region, cerebellopontine angle, and foramen magnum. In addition, two cases of extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for tuberculum sellae and dorsum sellae meningiomas are presented, representing the latest evolution in accessing the skull base for selected tumors

  13. The diagnosis of skull base metastases by radionuclide bone scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillman, J; Valeriano, J; Adatepe, M H

    1987-06-01

    The differential diagnosis of multiple cranial nerve palsies in patients with cancer includes meningeal infections, meningeal carcinomatosis, and skull base metastases. In distinguishing these, spinal fluid analysis and skull base tomography should be helpful in most cases. In circumstances when results of skull base tomography are negative, radionuclide bone scans can demonstrate metastatic disease in the base of the skull, and it should be obtained in all patients who are highly suspicious for having skull base metastasis with negative skull base tomography, including computed tomography (CT).

  14. Imaging in tuberculosis of the skull and skull-base: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sencer, S.; Aydin, K.; Poyanli, A.; Minareci, O.; Sencer, A.; Hepguel, K.

    2003-01-01

    We report a 19-year-old girl, who presented with headache and tonic/clonic seizures. Imaging revealed a lytic parietal skull lesion with an adjacent epidural mass, masses in the right parietal lobe and a posterior skull-base mass. The diagnosis of tuberculosis was made after resection of the extradural mass and later verified with culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The parenchymal and skull-base lesions resolved following antituberculous treatment. We present CT, scintigraphic, angiographic and MRI findings. (orig.)

  15. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komisar, A.; Silver, C.; Kalnicki, S.

    1985-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and base of skull are rare phenomena, usually seen after combined therapy for malignancies of the maxillary sinus. While the mandible is most commonly affected by osteoradionecrosis, the maxilla and skull base may also be affected when preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy is combined with surgery. Contributing factors may be: high radiation dosage delivered to the treatment volume (greater than 6000 rads), loss of tissue protective effects due to surgery, decreased vascularity caused by surgery and radiation, and proximity of a contaminated field. Onset of symptoms may vary. One patient presented 25 years after postoperative radiotherapy. Major symptoms were pain, trismus, and purulent discharge. The best diagnostic modality remains the history and physical exam, as the area is readily accessible. CT scans may be helpful in diagnosis and treatment planning. Therapy should follow time honored principles of local wound care. Home irrigations and hyperbaric therapy have been helpful in encouraging early sequestration and rapid healing

  17. Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisar, A.; Silver, C.; Kalnicki, S.

    1985-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and base of skull are rare phenomena, usually seen after combined therapy for malignancies of the maxillary sinus. While the mandible is most commonly affected by osteoradionecrosis, the maxilla and skull base may also be affected when preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy is combined with surgery. Contributing factors may be: high radiation dosage delivered to the treatment volume (greater than 6000 rads), loss of tissue protective effects due to surgery, decreased vascularity caused by surgery and radiation, and proximity of a contaminated field. Onset of symptoms may vary. One patient presented 25 years after postoperative radiotherapy. Major symptoms were pain, trismus, and purulent discharge. The best diagnostic modality remains the history and physical exam, as the area is readily accessible. CT scans may be helpful in diagnosis and treatment planning. Therapy should follow time honored principles of local wound care. Home irrigations and hyperbaric therapy have been helpful in encouraging early sequestration and rapid healing.

  18. Application of CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system in resection of skull base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailiang; Zhang, Haishi; Xie, Qing; Gong, Ye; Zheng, Mingzhe; Wang, Daijun; Zhu, Hongda; Chen, Xiancheng; Zhou, Liangfu

    2014-12-01

    Here, we introduced our short experience on the application of a new CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system, which was provided by Integra Lifesciences corporation, in skull base meningiomas resection. Ten patients with anterior, middle skull base and sphenoid ridge meningioma were operated using the CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system at the Neurosurgery Department of Shanghai Huashan Hospital from August 2014 to October 2014. There were six male and four female patients, aged from 38 to 61 years old (the mean age was 48.5 years old). Five cases with tumor located at anterior skull base, three cases with tumor on middle skull base, and two cases with tumor on sphenoid ridge. All the patents received total resection of meningiomas with the help of this new tool, and the critical brain vessels and nerves were preserved during operations. All the patients recovered well after operation. This new CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system has the advantage of preserving vital brain arteries and cranial nerves during skull base meningioma resection, which is very important for skull base tumor operations. This key step would ensure a well prognosis for patients. We hope the neurosurgeons would benefit from this kind of technique.

  19. Robotics in Sinus and Skull Base Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Sanjeet; Hachem, Ralph Abi; Ozer, Enver; Beer-Furlan, Andre; Prevedello, Daniel; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2017-06-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has been proven to be safe and to yield acceptable oncological and functional outcomes for surgery of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, supraglottis, and glottis. TORS has been successful at reducing morbidity, improving quality of life, and providing access to areas that previously required mandibulotomy or other more radical approaches in the past. This has changed the paradigm of management of tumors in these anatomic locations. In this article, the authors review the recent literature discussing the role of robotic surgery in managing sinonasal and skull base pathology and discuss its current advantages and limitations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Update on endoscopic endonasal resection of skull base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunworth, Joseph; Padhye, Vikram; Bassiouni, Ahmed; Psaltis, Alkis; Floreani, Stephen; Robinson, Simon; Santoreneos, Stephen; Vrodos, Nick; Parker, Andrew; Wickremesekera, Agadha; Wormald, Peter-John

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this work was to report success rates as well as potential obstacles in transnasal endoscopic resection of anterior skull base meningiomas. The study design was a case series with chart review at tertiary referral centers in South Australia and New Zealand. The patients were 37 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic resection of skull-base meningiomas between 2004 and 2013. Review of patient charts and operative details were performed. Outcomes including complications are reported. Eighty-four percent of patients were women. There were 28 primary and 9 revision cases. Tumor locations were as follows: 14 olfactory groove/subfrontal; 12 planum/jugum sphenoidale; 7 tuberculum sellae; 3 clinoidal; and 1 clival. Vision change was the most common presenting symptom. Mean tumor volume was 33.68 cm(3) , mean diameter was 2.78 cm. Average operating times decreased with an initial learning curve and then plateaued. Primary tumors larger than 60 cm(3) took an average of 10 hours to resect. Gross total removal was achieved in 29 patients. There were no perioperative deaths. Two deaths occurred within 1 year of surgery. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks occurred in 13 patients. Seventy-five percent of patients presenting with visual loss reported visual improvement. Of the 29 patients considered to have had complete resection at surgery, one was found to have residual disease on a postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and another one later developed radiological evidence of recurrence. Using a 2-team approach, meningiomas of the skull base were successfully removed via an intranasal endoscopic technique. Although complete resection is typically possible even with large tumors, the lengthy resection required time for tumors larger than 60 cm(3) (diameter ≥4 cm) may obviate some of the advantages of this approach. The rate of postoperative CSF leak decreases when a synthetic dural substitute is added but does not approach zero.

  1. Skull Base Surgery Training and Practice Patterns among Recent Otolaryngology Fellowship Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedmon, Matthew M.; Locketz, Garrett D.; Chambers, Kyle J.; Naunheim, Matthew R.; Lin, Derrick T.; Gray, Stacey T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective  To collect data on skull base surgery training experiences and practice patterns of otolaryngologists that recently completed fellowship training. Design  A 24-item survey was disseminated to physicians who completed otolaryngology fellowships in rhinology, head and neck oncology, or neurotology between 2010 and 2014. Results  During a typical year, 50% of rhinologists performed more than 20 endoscopic anterior skull base cases, 83% performed fewer than 20 open cases, and were more confident performing advanced transplanum (p = 0.02) and transclival (p = 0.03) endoscopic approaches than head and neck surgeons. Head and neck surgeons performed fewer than 20 endoscopic and fewer than 20 open cases in 100% of respondents and were more confident with open approaches than rhinologists (p = 0.02). Neurotologists performed more than 20 lateral skull base cases in 45% of respondents during a typical year, fewer than 20 endoscopic ear cases in 95%, and were very comfortable performing lateral skull base approaches. Conclusion  Many recent otolaryngology fellowship graduates are integrating skull base surgery into their practices. Respondents reported high confidence levels performing a range of cranial base approaches. Exposure to endoscopic ear techniques is minimal in neurotology training, and rhinology training appears to offer increased exposure to skull base surgery compared with head and neck training. PMID:27441153

  2. History of endonasal skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Amy J; Zaidi, Hasan A; Laws, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    While the endonasal approach to the skull base continues to advance, this paper invokes its long history. The centuries of medieval neuroanatomy and early neurosurgery enabled the conception of the first transfacial approaches in the late 1800s; Henry Schloffer performed the first transsphenoidal surgery in 1907. Although the procedure was initially met with much interest, Harvey Cushing eventually led the field of neurosurgery to abandon the transsphenoidal approach in the 1920s. The following three generations of neurosurgeons contained several key figures including Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy who were steadfast in preserving the technique as well as in addressing its shortcomings. The endoscopic approach developed simultaneously, and advances in magnifying and fiberoptics further resolved limitations previously inherent to the transsphenoidal approach. At last, in the 1960s, the transsphenoidal approach entered its renaissance. Today, the momentum of its development persists in the endoscopic endonasal approach, which has recently expanded the indications for transsphenoidal surgery across the skull base, far beyond its original jurisdiction of the sella. Continued progress must not take for granted the rich history of the transsphenoidal approach, which was developed over centuries by surgeons around the world. The authors present the evolution of modern endonasal surgery as a dynamic interplay between technology, medicine, and surgery over the past 100 years. Progress can be attributed to courageous surgeons who affirmed their contemporary practices despite gaps in technology or medicine, and to visionary individuals who produced and incorporated new elements into transsphenoidal surgery. And so while the new endoscopic technique brings forth new challenges, its development reaffirms the principles laid down by the pioneers of transsphenoidal surgery.

  3. Management of neurovascular complications in extended skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, J P; Smith, P G; Grubb, R L

    1989-05-01

    Combined oncologic approaches to the skull base now permit resection of extensive basicranial neoplasms. Despite advances in microsurgical techniques, disabling or life-threatening complications are still encountered in such surgery. Successful management of these sequelae is dependent upon meticulous intraoperative care and compulsive postoperative clinical assessment. Perioperative neurovascular complications were recorded in 154 consecutive skull base procedures. The most frequent severe complication was cerebral edema, which occasionally required surgical intervention. Dysphagia was the most common complication noted in the late postoperative period. Based upon this review, the management and methods found to minimize the incidence of various perioperative neurovascular complications related to extended skull base surgery are described.

  4. The base of the skull: Sella and temporal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, D.L.; Shaffer, K.A.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    The skull base consists of membranous bone and cartilage perforated by nerves, spinal cord, arteries and veins. The comlex anatomic relationships, especially within the sella and temporal bone, are effectively evaluated by CT or MR. CT is optimal for demonstrating the osseous structures and some veins and nerves, MR, the soft tissues, vessels and nerves. The multitude and complexity of the abnormalities at the base of the skull are presented in two parts: the sella and the temporal bones

  5. Radiological assessment of skull base changes in children with syndromic craniosynostosis: role of ''minor'' sutures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrelli, Rosalinda; D' Apolito, Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Stefanetti, Mariangela; Colosimo, Cesare [Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Massimi, Luca; Di Rocco, Concezio [Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Institute of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    This study aims to identify the premature synostosis of ''major'' and ''minor'' sutures of the four ''sutural arches'' of the skull and to perform a morphometric analysis in children with syndromic craniosynostosis in order to evaluate changes in the skull base linked with premature suture synostosis. We reviewed multiplanar high-resolution CT images, implemented with 3D reconstructions, from 18 patients with complex syndromic craniosynostosis and compared them with 18 age-matched healthy subjects. We assessed the calvarial sutures and their extension to the skull base, and then we correlated specific types of synostosis with the size, shape and symmetry of the cranial fossae. We found a marked asymmetry of the skull base growth in all patients. The synostotic involvement around the coronal ring caused a reduction in the growth of the anterior and middle fossae. The size of the posterior cranial fossa was related not only to ''major'' but also to ''minor'' suture synostosis of the lambdoid and parieto-squamosal arches. Changes in the skull base and craniofacial axis symmetry are due to structural and functional relationships between ''major'' and ''minor'' skull sutures, suggesting a structural and functional relationship between the neurocranium and basicranium. The early recognition of prematurely closed skull base sutures may help clinicians and neurosurgeons to establish correct therapeutic approaches. (orig.)

  6. [Extensive tumor of the skull base: sphenoid sinus adenocarcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Souha; Sellami, Moncef

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of adenocarcinoma of the sphenoid sinus manifesting as extended skull base tumor. The patient included in the study was a 42-year old woman presenting with unilateral right symptomatology consisting of nasal obstruction, diplopia and hemifacial neuralgias. Clinical examination showed paralysis of the cranial nerve pairs V and VI. Brain scanner showed voluminous heterogeneous sphenoid and clival mass reaching the right cavernous sinus, with a peripheral tissue component at the level of the sphenoid sinus. Biopsy was performed under general anesthesia, through endonasal sphenoidotomy approach. Histological examination showed non-intestinal adenocarcinoma. The patient died due to impaired general condition occurred during examinations. Skull base adenocarcinomas mainly occur in the ethmoid bone. Sphenoid origin is exceptional. Radiological appearance is not specific and suggests malignancy. Diagnosis should be suspected in patients with aggressive tumor, even when it occurs in the midline skull base.

  7. The lateral skull base: a vascular perspective with clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadre, A K; O'leary, M J; Zakhary, R; Linthicum, F H; House, W F

    1991-01-01

    The growing number of options in the surgical management of skull base disease has renewed interest in the microvascular anatomy of the lateral temporal region. We studied this anatomy by injecting colored solutions of methyl methacrylate into the major blood vessels of six human cadaver heads or selectively into their major branches. We used several techniques to see the vascular anatomy and to study its relationship to the layers of the scalp. Results revealed that every anatomically named blood vessel was accompanied by a finer, deeper blood vessel supplying the periosteum and outer table of the skull. These vessels arborized into a network of capillaries in the periosteum adherent to the outer bony cortex, from which we saw tiny perforators entering bone. This layered blood supply has direct implications for both ablative and reconstructive surgery for skull base disease. We also saw a previously undescribed arterial plexus accompanying the commonly described venous plexus in the infratemporal fossa.

  8. Skull-base Ewing sarcoma with multifocal extracranial metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Thakar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial occurrence of Ewing sarcoma (ES is unusual, with a skull-base location being anecdotal. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with rapidly progressive ophthalmoplegia, and was found to be harboring an infiltrative lesion involving the sphenoid sinus, sella, and clivus. He underwent trans-sphenoidal decompression of the lesion which was histologically suggestive of ES. He developed paraparesis 2 weeks after commencing adjuvant therapy. Imaging revealed two thoracic extradural lesions and florid vertebral and pulmonary metastases. This is the first report in indexed literature of a primary intracranial ES on the skull-base with disseminated extracranial disease.

  9. Epilepsy Surgery for Skull-Base Temporal Lobe Encephaloceles: Should We Spare the Hippocampus from Resection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannout, Firas; Harder, Sheri; Lee, Michael; Zouros, Alexander; Raghavan, Ravi; Fogel, Travis; De Los Reyes, Kenneth; Losey, Travis

    2018-01-01

    The neurosurgical treatment of skull base temporal encephalocele for patients with epilepsy is variable. We describe two adult cases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with spheno-temporal encephalocele, currently seizure-free for more than two years after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) and lesionectomy sparing the hippocampus without long-term intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. Encephaloceles were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirmed by maxillofacial head computed tomography (CT) scans. Seizures were captured by scalp video-EEG recording. One case underwent intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) with pathology demonstrating neuronal heterotopia. We propose that in some patients with skull base temporal encephaloceles, minimal surgical resection of herniated and adjacent temporal cortex (lesionectomy) is sufficient to render seizure freedom. In future cases, where an associated malformation of cortical development is suspected, newer techniques such as minimally invasive EEG monitoring with stereotactic-depth EEG electrodes should be considered to tailor the surrounding margins of the resected epileptogenic zone. PMID:29534521

  10. A tomographic study of the skull base in primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannetti, Alexandre Varella [Hospital das Clinicas, Service of Neurosurgery, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Guimaraes, Roberto Eustaquio S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Otorhinolaryngology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Santiago, Ana Paula M.S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Radiology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Perpetuo, Francisco Otaviano L.; Machado, Marco Antonio O. [Computed Tomography Center of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    This study aims to evaluate the existence of anatomic abnormalities in the skull base that could contribute to the origin of primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks (PSL). Twenty PSL patients were compared with 20 healthy individuals. The following features were measured through an analysis of computed tomography scans: the angles of the petrosal bones and skull base in both the sagittal and coronal planes; the anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of the anterior skull base, sella, and sphenoid sinus; the depth of the olfactory fossa; the pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus; the position of the crista galli; and the state of the dorsum sellae. Body mass index (BMI) was compared. There were no differences between the two groups with respect to the angles and diameters of the anterior cranial fossa and the sphenoid sinus or the depth of the olfactory fossa. Pneumatization of the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus was more frequent in the PSL group (55%) than in the control group (25%, p = 0.053). The dorsum sellae were eroded in 30% of the PSL patients but intact in all healthy subjects. PSL subjects showed higher sellae (1.0 versus 0.8 cm, p = 0.002). The average BMI of PSL patients was higher than that of the control group. Global alterations in the skull base of PSL patients were not found. The increase in the height of sellae and the erosion of its dorsum suggest intracranial hypertension. The higher BMI in the case group confirms the relation between obesity and PSL. (orig.)

  11. Osteochondroma of the skull base: MRI and histological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Kodera, T.; Kitai, R.; Kubota, T.

    1996-01-01

    A skull base osteochondroma (benign exostosis) in a 38-year-old man is reported. MRI was not only very useful for determining the extent of the tumour, but also showed its far content and, on contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed images, its vascularity. (orig.)

  12. A new obstetrical polyurethane versus stainless steel forceps: a comparison of forces generated to the base of the fetal skull during simulated deliveries

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, Theodore M.; Shi, Zhengzhuan; Idangodage, Hasitha; Mercado, Ray; Skupski, Daniel; Veilastegui, Zoila

    2009-01-01

    Background: Decreasing the maximum force applied during traction to the base of the fetal skull using a less rigid polyurethane forceps is the basis of this study. Our hypothesis was that less force would be generated with polyurethane forceps than with steel forceps. Objective: To test a new soft polyurethane obstetrical forceps for maximal force generated to the base of the skull during simulated occiput anterior deliveries and to compare this to a similar shaped steel forceps. Methods: A...

  13. How to perform 3D reconstruction of skull base tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, N-X; Dubrulle, F; Risoud, M; Vincent, C

    2017-04-01

    The surgical management of skull base lesions is difficult due to the complex anatomy of the region and the intimate relations between the lesion and adjacent nerves and vessels. Minimally invasive approaches are increasingly used in skull base surgery to ensure an optimal functional prognosis. Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction facilitates surgical planning by visualizing the anatomical relations of the lesions in all planes (arteries, veins, nerves, inner ear) and simulation of the surgical approach in the operating position. Helical CT angiography is performed with optimal timing of the injection in terms of tumour and vessel contrast enhancement. 3D definition of each structure is based on colour coding by automatic thresholding (bone, vessels) or manual segmentation on each slice (tumour, nerves, inner ear). Imaging is generally presented in 3 dimensions (superior, coronal, sagittal) with simulation of the surgical procedure (5 to 6 reconstructions in the operating position at different depths). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  15. Minimally Invasive Multiport Surgery of the Lateral Skull Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stenin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Minimally invasive procedures minimize iatrogenic tissue damage and lead to a lower complication rate and high patient satisfaction. To date only experimental minimally invasive single-port approaches to the lateral skull base have been attempted. The aim of this study was to verify the feasibility of a minimally invasive multiport approach for advanced manipulation capability and visual control and develop a software tool for preoperative planning. Methods. Anatomical 3D models were extracted from twenty regular temporal bone CT scans. Collision-free trajectories, targeting the internal auditory canal, round window, and petrous apex, were simulated with a specially designed planning software tool. A set of three collision-free trajectories was selected by skull base surgeons concerning the maximization of the distance to critical structures and the angles between the trajectories. Results. A set of three collision-free trajectories could be successfully simulated to the three targets in each temporal bone model without violating critical anatomical structures. Conclusion. A minimally invasive multiport approach to the lateral skull base is feasible. The developed software is the first step for preoperative planning. Further studies will focus on cadaveric and clinical translation.

  16. [Biomechanics analysis of the impact of maxillofacial injury on skull base damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; Yang, Z Y; Liu, Y; Li, Y; Tan, Y H

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the impact of maxillofacial injury on skull base. A three-dimensional(3D)finite-element model of cranio-maxillofacial bone was established by CT scan data. A lead cylinder in base diameter of 3 cm was designed as an impactor. There regions(upper right maxilla, left infraorbital margin and left zygomatic body)subjected to an impact at the speed of 8.6 m/s(about 30 km/h)was simulated. Thirteen landmarks at the skull base were selected. The values of stress at the end of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 ms were obtained, and the results were analyzed. The dynamic process of the fracture of the jaw and the stress distribution and conduction of the skull base were successfully simulated in three parts of the face. When the impact was on the right maxillary bone region, the stress values of the three points(medial foramen rotundum, medial foramen rotundum, anterior clivus reached the peak at each time point, 26.2, 22.4, 21.5 MPa(t=0.5 ms)and 70.0, 55.0, 45.0 MPa(t=1.0 ms)and 38.0, 26.5, 39.5 MPa(t=1.5 ms)and 26.0, 19.0, 23.0 MPa(t=2.0 ms), respectively. When the impact was on the left margo infraorbitalis orbitaeta region, the stress values of the two points(medial left foramen rotundum, posterior clivus)reached the peak at each time point, 8.8, 16.0 MPa(t=0.5 ms)and 10.0, 18.0 MPa(t=1.0 ms)and 5.5, 6.0 MPa(t=1.5 ms)and 11.5, 12.5 MPa(t=2.0 ms), respectively. When the impact was on the body of left zygomatic bone, the stress values of posterior clivus were 45.0 MPa(t=0.5 ms), 40.0 MPa(t=1.0 ms), 12.0 MPa(t=1.5 ms), 42.5 MPa(t= 2.0 ms), respectively. According to the difference of stress distribution and conduction of maxillofacial and skull base bone, the speed and the path of force transfer to the skull base were different. Finite-element dynamic simulation can be used for the biomechanics research on maxillofacial trauma.

  17. Endovascular treatment for arterial injuries of skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianxiao; Bai Weixing; Zai Suiting; Wang Ziliang; Xue Jiangyu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of endovascular techniques in treatment for arterial injuries of skull base. Methods: A total of 53 consecutive cases suffered from skull base arterial injuries were enrolled in our hospital from Oct 2004 to May 2007, including 44 male and 9 female cases with average age of 23.3 years. Thirty-nine cases presented with pulsatile exophthalmos and intracranial vascular murmur, cerchnus and dysphagia in another 9, epistaxis in the remaining 5 cases. Diagnosis of 39 carotid cavernous fistulae (CCF)and 14 carotid pseudoaneurysm were performed by angiography (DSA). Alternative endovascular procedures were performed depending on lesions characteristics and follow-up was done by telephone and outpatient work up. Results: Procedures were performed involving 56 carotid arteries in all 53 cases including 34 CCF with embolization of detachable balloon(33 cases), 3 with balloon and coils, and 3 by stent-graft placement. 8 carotid pseudoaneurysms were cured by parent artery occlusion with balloon, 2 experienced endovascular isolation with balloon and coils, and 4 with stent-graft. Follow-up for mean 9.5 months (range from 2 to 25 months) revealed that the chief symptoms of 45 cases (85%) were relieved within 6 months after the procedure but ocular movement and visual disorder remained in 8 cases (15%)till 12 months. Six pseudoaneurysms and 3 residual leak were found in reexamination, of which 2 cases underwent intervention again 2 and 3 months later due to dural arterial-venous fistula in cavernous sinus, respectively. Conclusions: Endovascular treatment is safe and effective therapeutic option with minimal invasion for skull base arterial injuries. Detachable balloon embolization is the first choice for CCF and carotid pseudoaneurysm. Spring coil packing and stent-graft implantation should be in alternation as combination for special cases. (authors)

  18. Operative management of skull base malignant tumors arising from the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus. Recent strategies used in 25 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimbo, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Shinetsu; Miura, Kouki; Asamoto, Shunji; Tada, Shinichiro; Endo, Takahiro; Masubuchi, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Narihiro; Fushimi, Chihiro

    2010-01-01

    Cancers of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity are the most common malignant tumors of the anterior and anterolateral skull base. The treatment of these tumors affecting the skull base is complex due to the significant anatomical features. We examined 25 patients, 17 males and 8 females with mean age 61±2 years. En bloc resections using anterior skull base resection, orbital resection, middle fossa resection, and combined procedures of these three resections were performed. Using a combination of adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy, we have achieved a 2-year disease-free survival rate of 90% in these cases. However, potential complications include cerebrospinal fluid leakage, meningitis, abscess formation, pneumocephalus, frontal brain contusion, trismus, and dysphagia as a functional complication. We believe that the optimal management of such malignant tumors involves a multimodal and multidisciplinary team approach. Here we present our recent institutional experience and treatment policy employed during the past 3 years. (author)

  19. Epilepsy Surgery for Skull-Base Temporal Lobe Encephaloceles: Should We Spare the Hippocampus from Resection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas Bannout

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The neurosurgical treatment of skull base temporal encephalocele for patients with epilepsy is variable. We describe two adult cases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with spheno-temporal encephalocele, currently seizure-free for more than two years after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL and lesionectomy sparing the hippocampus without long-term intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG monitoring. Encephaloceles were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and confirmed by maxillofacial head computed tomography (CT scans. Seizures were captured by scalp video-EEG recording. One case underwent intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG with pathology demonstrating neuronal heterotopia. We propose that in some patients with skull base temporal encephaloceles, minimal surgical resection of herniated and adjacent temporal cortex (lesionectomy is sufficient to render seizure freedom. In future cases, where an associated malformation of cortical development is suspected, newer techniques such as minimally invasive EEG monitoring with stereotactic-depth EEG electrodes should be considered to tailor the surrounding margins of the resected epileptogenic zone.

  20. Joint Use of Skull Base Surgery in a Case of Pediatric Parotid Gland Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Ueda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parotid gland carcinoma is extremely rare in children. We report a case of pediatric parotid gland carcinoma with extensive infiltration into surrounding tissues including the skin and temporomandibular joint capsule at initial examination. Total resection of the parotid gland was conducted together with skull base surgery and mandibular dissection. The patient was a 14-year-old girl. In addition to the skin and temporomandibular joint, infiltration into the anterior wall of the external auditory meatus and masseter muscle was also seen, and T4N0M0 stage IV parotid carcinoma was diagnosed. Skin was resected together with the pinna, and temporal craniotomy and skull base surgery were performed to resect the temporomandibular joint capsule and external auditory meatus en bloc, and mandible dissection was conducted. Facial nerves were resected at the same time. Level I to level IV neck dissection was also conducted. A latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap was used for reconstruction. The postoperative permanent pathology diagnosis was high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma with a low-grade component. Postoperatively, radiotherapy at 50 Gy alone has been conducted, with no recurrence or metastasis observed for over 4 years.

  1. Skull base chordomas: analysis of dose-response characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemierko, Andrzej; Terahara, Atsuro; Goitein, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To extract dose-response characteristics from dose-volume histograms and corresponding actuarial survival statistics for 115 patients with skull base chordomas. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data for 115 patients with skull base chordoma treated with combined photon and proton conformal radiotherapy to doses in the range 66.6Gy - 79.2Gy. Data set for each patient included gender, histology, age, tumor volume, prescribed dose, overall treatment time, time to recurrence or time to last observation, target dose-volume histogram, and several dosimetric parameters (minimum/mean/median/maximum target dose, percent of the target volume receiving the prescribed dose, dose to 90% of the target volume, and the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD). Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survivor function estimate, the proportional hazards (Cox) model, and parametric modeling of the actuarial probability of recurrence. Parameters of dose-response characteristics were obtained using the maximum likelihood method. Results: Local failure developed in 42 (36%) of patients, with actuarial local control rates at 5 years of 59.2%. The proportional hazards model revealed significant dependence of gender on the probability of recurrence, with female patients having significantly poorer prognosis (hazard ratio of 2.3 with the p value of 0.008). The Wilcoxon and the log-rank tests of the corresponding Kaplan-Meier recurrence-free survival curves confirmed statistical significance of this effect. The Cox model with stratification by gender showed significance of tumor volume (p=0.01), the minimum target dose (p=0.02), and the EUD (p=0.02). Other parameters were not significant at the α level of significance of 0.05, including the prescribed dose (p=0.21). Parametric analysis using a combined model of tumor control probability (to account for non-uniformity of target dose distribution) and the Weibull failure time model (to account for censoring) allowed us to estimate

  2. Reconstruction of complicated skull base defects utilizing free tissue transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djalilian, Hamid R; Gapany, Markus; Levine, Samuel C

    2002-11-01

    We managed five patients with large skull base defects complicated by complex infections with microvascular free tissue transfer. The first patient developed an infection, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, and meningitis after undergoing a translabyrinthine resection of an acoustic neuroma. The second patient had a history of a gunshot wound to the temporal bone, with a large defect and an infected cholesteatoma that caused several episodes of meningitis. The third through the fifth patients had persistent CSF leakage and infection refractory to conventional therapy. In all cases prior attempts of closure with fat grafts or regional flaps had failed. Rectus abdominis myofascial free flap, radial forearm free flap or a gracilis muscle free flap was used after debridement of the infected cavities. The CSF leaks, local infections, and meningitis were controlled within a week. In our experience, microvascular free tissue provides the necessary bulk of viable, well-vascularized tissue, which not only assures a mechanical seal but also helps clear the local infection.

  3. Ossification of caroticoclinoid ligament and its clinical importance in skull-based surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijit Das

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The medial end of the posterior border of the sphenoid bone presents the anterior clinoid process (ACP, which is usually accessed for operations involving the clinoid space and the cavernous sinus. The ACP is often connected to the middle clinoid process (MCP by a ligament known as the caroticoclinoid ligament (CCL, which may be ossified, forming the caroticoclinoid foramen (CCF. Variations in the ACP other than ossification are rare. The ossified CCL may have compressive effects on the internal carotid artery. Thus, anatomical and radiological knowledge of the ACP and the clinoid space is also important when operating on the internal carotid artery. Excision of the ACP may be required for many skull-based surgical procedures, and the presence of any anomalies such as ossified CCL may pose a problem for neurosurgeons. CASE REPORT: We observed the presence of ossified CCL in a skull bone. A detailed radiological study of the CCL and the CCF was conducted. Morphometric measurements were recorded and photographs were taken. The ACP was connected to the MCP and was converted into a CCF. Considering the fact that standard anatomy textbooks do not provide morphological descriptions and radiological evaluations of the CCL, the present study may be important for neurosurgeons operating in the region of the ACP.

  4. Brainstem tolerance to conformal radiotherapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debus, J.; Hug, E.B.; Liebsch, N.J.; O'Farrel, D.; Finkelstein, D.; Efird, J.; Munzenrider, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term incidence of brainstem toxicity in patients treated for skull base tumors with high dose conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 1995, 367 patients with chordomas (n = 195) and chondrosarcomas (n = 172) of the base of skull have been treated with combined megavoltage photon and 160 MeV proton radiotherapy. Following 3D treatment planning with delineation of target volumes and critical nontarget structures dose distributions and dose-volume histograms were calculated. Radiotherapy was given an 1.8 Gy or CGE (=Cobalt Gray Equivalent) dose per fraction, with prescribed target doses ranging from 63 CGE to 79.2 CGE (mean = 67.8 CGE). Doses to the brainstem surface were limited to ≤64 CGE and to the brainstem center to ≤53 CGE. Results: Follow-up time ranged from 6 months to 21.4 years (mean = 42.5 months). Brainstem toxicity was observed in 17 of 367 patients attributable to treatment, resulting in death of three patients. Actuarial rates of 5 and 10-year high-grade toxicity-free survival were 94 and 88%, respectively. Increased risk of brainstem toxicity was significantly associated with maximum dose to brainstem, volume of brainstem receiving ≥50 CGE, ≥55 CGE, and ≥60 CGE, number of surgical procedures, and prevalence of diabetes or high blood pressure. Multivariate analysis identified three independent factors as important prognosticators: number of surgical procedures (p < 0.001), volume of the brainstem receiving 60 CGE (p < 0.001), and prevalence of diabetes (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Tolerance of brainstem to fractionated radiotherapy appears to be a steep function of tissue volume included in high dose regions rather than the maximum dose of brainstem alone. In addition, presence of predisposing factors as well as extent of surgical manipulation can significantly lower brainstem tolerance in the individual patient

  5. Quality of life following endonasal skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Harshita; Bhatki, Amol M; Snyderman, Carl H; Vescan, Allan D; Carrau, Ricardo L; Gardner, Paul; Prevedello, Daniel; Kassam, Amin B

    2010-01-01

    The importance of quality of life (QOL) outcomes following treatments for head and neck tumors are now increasingly appreciated and measured to improve medical and surgical care for these patients. An understanding of the definitions in the setting of health care and the use of appropriate QOL instruments and measures are critical to obtain meaningful information that guides decision making in various aspects of patient health care. QOL outcomes following cranial base surgery is only recently being defined. In this article, we describe the current published data on QOL outcomes following cranial base surgery and provide preliminary prospective data on QOL outcomes and sinonasal morbidity in patients who underwent endonasal cranial base surgery for management of various skull base tumors at our institution. We used a disease-specific multidimensional instrument to measure QOL outcomes in these patients. Our results show that although sinonasal morbidity is increased, this is temporary, and the vast majority of patients have a very good QOL by 4 to 6 months after endonasal approach to the cranial base.

  6. The cranial base of Australopithecus afarensis: new insights from the female skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbel, William H; Rak, Yoel

    2010-10-27

    Cranial base morphology differs among hominoids in ways that are usually attributed to some combination of an enlarged brain, retracted face and upright locomotion in humans. The human foramen magnum is anteriorly inclined and, with the occipital condyles, is forwardly located on a broad, short and flexed basicranium; the petrous elements are coronally rotated; the glenoid region is topographically complex; the nuchal lines are low; and the nuchal plane is horizontal. Australopithecus afarensis (3.7-3.0 Ma) is the earliest known species of the australopith grade in which the adult cranial base can be assessed comprehensively. This region of the adult skull was known from fragments in the 1970s, but renewed fieldwork beginning in the 1990s at the Hadar site, Ethiopia (3.4-3.0 Ma), recovered two nearly complete crania and major portions of a third, each associated with a mandible. These new specimens confirm that in small-brained, bipedal Australopithecus the foramen magnum and occipital condyles were anteriorly sited, as in humans, but without the foramen's forward inclination. In the large male A.L. 444-2 this is associated with a short basal axis, a bilateral expansion of the base, and an inferiorly rotated, flexed occipital squama--all derived characters shared by later australopiths and humans. However, in A.L. 822-1 (a female) a more primitive morphology is present: although the foramen and condyles reside anteriorly on a short base, the nuchal lines are very high, the nuchal plane is very steep, and the base is as relatively narrow centrally. A.L. 822-1 illuminates fragmentary specimens in the 1970s Hadar collection that hint at aspects of this primitive suite, suggesting that it is a common pattern in the A. afarensis hypodigm. We explore the implications of these specimens for sexual dimorphism and evolutionary scenarios of functional integration in the hominin cranial base.

  7. [The Base of the Skull. Rudolf Virchow between Pathology and Anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Throughout his scientific career, the pathologist and anthropologist Rudolf Virchow (1821-1902) examined countless skulls, gradually changing his perspective on this object of research. Initially, he was mainly concerned with pathologically deformed skulls. From the 1850s onwards, he gradually developed a more anthropological approach, and anthropology increasingly came to dominate his scientific interest. This article shows how different influences became central for the establishment of his specific and dynamic model of the human skull development and its successful application in anthropology. Crucial for this process were Virchow's collaboration with his teacher Robert Froriep (1804-1861) in the department of pathology of the Charité, his research on cretinism and rickets, as well as his description of the base of the skull as the center of skull development. His research work was attended by and showed a reciprocal interaction with the buildup of large skull collections. This article uses Virchow's original publications on skull pathology as well as his still preserved skull specimens from the collection of the Berlin Museum of Medical History at the Charité for an integrated text and object based analysis.

  8. The 360 photography: a new anatomical insight of the sphenoid bone. Interest for anatomy teaching and skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquesson, Timothée; Mertens, Patrick; Berhouma, Moncef; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Simon, Emile

    2017-01-01

    Skull base architecture is tough to understand because of its 3D complex shape and its numerous foramen, reliefs or joints. It is especially true for the sphenoid bone whom central location hinged with most of skull base components is unique. Recently, technological progress has led to develop new pedagogical tools. This way, we bought a new real-time three-dimensional insight of the sphenoid bone that could be useful for the teacher, the student and the surgeon. High-definition photography was taken all around an isolated dry skull base bone prepared with Beauchêne's technique. Pictures were then computed to provide an overview with rotation and magnification on demand. From anterior, posterior, lateral or oblique views and from in out looks, anatomical landmarks and subtleties were described step by step. Thus, the sella turcica, the optic canal, the superior orbital fissure, the sphenoid sinus, the vidian canal, pterygoid plates and all foramen were clearly placed relative to the others at each face of the sphenoid bone. In addition to be the first report of the 360 Photography tool, perspectives are promising as the development of a real-time interactive tridimensional space featuring the sphenoid bone. It allows to turn around the sphenoid bone and to better understand its own special shape, numerous foramen, neurovascular contents and anatomical relationships. This new technological tool may further apply for surgical planning and mostly for strengthening a basic anatomical knowledge firstly introduced.

  9. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 μm. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 μm through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 μm of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  10. A new obstetrical polyurethane versus stainless steel forceps: a comparison of forces generated to the base of the fetal skull during simulated deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Theodore M; Shi, Zhengzhuan; Idangodage, Hasitha; Mercado, Ray; Skupski, Daniel; Veilastegui, Zoila

    2009-01-01

    Decreasing the maximum force applied during traction to the base of the fetal skull using a less rigid polyurethane forceps is the basis of this study. Our hypothesis was that less force would be generated with polyurethane forceps than with steel forceps. To test a new soft polyurethane obstetrical forceps for maximal force generated to the base of the skull during simulated occiput anterior deliveries and to compare this to a similar shaped steel forceps. After designing a prototype polyurethane forceps, we used a pelvic manikin model and a fetal manikin model. Force and load sensors were attached at the inner tips of the distal forceps blade. A Tekscan 201 (accurate for measuring 0-25 pounds of force) 0.0008 inches flexible printed circuit was used that measured contact forces. Forceps with an attached calibrated sensor were applied to the fetal head while inside the pelvic model. The median maximum traction force at the base of the fetal skull was 4.60 pounds (range 4.3-4.62) for polyurethane forceps vs. 9.52 pounds (range 9.22-9.52) for steel forceps (P=0.027). The polyurethane forceps applied 50% less overall mechanical force than the steel forceps at the tip of the forceps and base of the skull during simulated occiput anterior outlet deliveries.

  11. The Making of a Skull Base Team and the Value of Multidisciplinary Approach in the Management of Sinonasal and Ventral Skull Base Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyderman, Carl H; Wang, Eric W; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Gardner, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    The management of sinonasal and ventral skull base malignancies is best performed by a team. Although the composition of the team may vary, it is important to have multidisciplinary representation. There are multiple obstacles, both individual and institutional, that must be overcome to develop a highly functioning team. Adequate training is an important part of team-building and can be fostered with surgical telementoring. A quality improvement program should be incorporated into the activities of a skull base team. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Brainstem tolerance to conformal radiotherapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debus, J.; Hug, E.B.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J.; O'Farrell, D.; Efird, J.; Daly, W.; Suit, H.D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Brainstem tolerance to inhomogenous radiation doses applied by modern conformal radiotherapy has not yet been examined. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of brainstem toxicity in patients treated for skull base tumors with high dose conformal radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1974 and 1995, 367 patients with chordomas (n=195) and chondrosarcomas (n=172) of the base of skull have been treated with combined megavoltage photon and 160 MeV proton radiotherapy. All patients had previously undergone biopsy, subtotal or total tumor removal. 104 patients had two or more surgical procedures before radiotherapy. Following 3D treatment planning with delineation of target volumes and critical non-target structures, dose distributions and dose volume histograms were calculated [at the time of treatment delivery]. Radiotherapy was given once a day, 1.8 Gy or CGE (Cobalt Gy Equivalent: Proton Gy X 1.1) per fraction, 5 fractions per week, with prescribed target doses ranging from 63 CGE to 79.2 CGE (mean = 67.8 CGE). Doses to the brainstem surface were limited to ≤64 CGE and to the brainstem center to ≤53 CGE. Dose distributions were developed to limit dose to brainstem surface and center; current plans limit dose to surface and center to ≤64 CGE and ≤53 CGE, respectively. Brainstem toxicity was scored according to the RTOG grading system. Results: Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 21.4 years (mean = 42.5 months). Brainstem symptoms, attributable to the treatment, developed in 17 of 282 patients with local tumor control (6.0%), resulting in death of three patients. The mean time to onset of symptoms was 17 months (range: 4.5 to 177 months). These symptoms appeared in 89.5% within 3 years. Grading of the brainstem toxicity is listed in table 1. Actuarial rates of 5 and 10 year toxicity free survival were 87% and 82% respectively. Increased risk of brainstem toxicity was significantly associated with maximum brainstem dose

  13. Assessment of skull base involvement of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by bone SPECT using three detectors system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yui, Nobuharu; Togawa, Takashi; Kinoshita, Fujimi; Shimada, Fumiyuki; Akiyama, Yoshihisa (Chiba Cancer Center Hospital (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    SPECT of the skull was performed on twelve patients with histologically proven nasopharyngeal carcinoma using newly developed three detectors SPECT system (Toshiba GCA 9300A) mounted with fan-beam collimators, for the purpose of early detection of skull base involvement of the disease. This SPECT system has extremely improved resolution with FWHM of 8 mm in the center, and it provides clear tomographic images of the skull which has anatomically complex structure. SPECT image was taken 3 hours after injection of 740 MBq (20 mCi) of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP following whole body skeletal survey. In twelve patients with confirmed nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 8 patients showed positive findings on SPECT. Three of SPECT positive patients also showed destructive findings on CT. Other five positive patients did not show destructive findings on CT at their initial examinations, but in three of them CT findings turned to positive later. SPECT was superior to CT in early detection of skull base involvement. We believe that SPECT of the skull is a diagnostic tool for early detection of skull base involvement of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. (author).

  14. Skull fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... follow bicycle safety recommendations. Do not drink and drive. Do not allow yourself to be driven by someone who may have been drinking alcohol or is otherwise impaired. Alternative Names Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture Images Skull of an adult Skull ...

  15. Teamwork in skull base surgery: An avenue for improvement in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Carrau, Ricardo L; Kelly, Daniel F; Prevedello, Daniel M; Kassam, Amin B

    2013-01-01

    During the past several decades, numerous centers have acquired significant expertise in the treatment of skull base pathologies. Favorable outcomes are not only due to meticulous surgical planning and execution, but they are also related to the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines. We review the impact of teamwork on patient care, elaborate on the key processes for successful teamwork, and discuss its challenges. Pubmed and Medline databases were searched for publications from 1970 to 2012 using the following keywords: "teamwork", "multidisciplinary", "interdisciplinary", "surgery", "skull base", "neurosurgery", "tumor", and "outcome". Current literature testifies to the complexity of establishing and maintaining teamwork. To date, few reports on the impact of teamwork in the management of skull base pathologies have been published. This lack of literature is somewhat surprising given that most patients with skull base pathology receive care from multiple specialists. Common factors for success include a cohesive and well-integrated team structure with well-defined procedural organization. Although a multidisciplinary work force has clear advantages for improving today's quality of care and propelling research efforts for tomorrow's cure, teamwork is not intuitive and requires training, guidance, and executive support. Teamwork is recommended to improve quality over the full cycle of care and consequently patient outcomes. Increased recognition of the value of an integrated team approach for skull base pathologies will hopefully encourage centers, physicians, allied health caregivers, and scientists devoted to treating these patients and advancing the field of knowledge to invest the time, effort, and resources to optimize and organize their collective expertise.

  16. Solitary Osteochondroma of the Skull Base: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroki; Oya, Soichi; Abe, Atsushi; Matsui, Toru

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of an osteochondroma in the posterior clinoid process that occurred in a 43-year-old man with trochlear nerve palsy. Although the potential preoperative diagnoses based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging included other intracranial tumors such as calcified meningioma, thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography effectively differentiated osteochondroma from those possibilities. Via an orbitozygomatic approach, a subtotal resection was achieved with a good relief of symptoms. Twenty-two cases of solitary osteochondromas in the skull base have been reported that have demonstrated little risk of recurrence or malignant transformation. However, surgery for skull base osteochondromas does carry a significant risk with a reported mortality > 10%. Although some previous reports advocate complete resection as the only curative method for skull base osteochondromas, the risks of total resection should be weighed against the chance for recurrence; our review of the literature demonstrated a relatively high mortality and an extremely low incidence of recurrence.

  17. CT and MR findings of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with skull base invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Kido, Goro; Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Kida, Akinori; Tsubokawa, Takashi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-06-01

    Six patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with skull base invasion were analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution computed tomography (CT). The most common site of tumor spread was the temporal base region, especially the cavernous sinus portion, and the second most common, the posterolateral region, especially foramen lacerum. MRI was superior to CT for the demonstration of tumor extensions into the skull base or the parapharyngeal spaces, and for evaluating tumor encasement in the carotid artery and invasion of the cavernous sinus. On the other hand, bone target CT images were better for searching for subtle bone changes and especially, three-dimensional CT (3-D CT) images did provide valuable information for bone destruction of the skull base. (author).

  18. Eosinophilic granuloma of the skull base: patient with unique clinical moreover, radiographic presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Dalili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents an eight-year-old girl having periauricular swelling and severe pain during mouth opening on the right-side temporomandibular joint (TMJ. CBCT showed extensive destruction of the base of the skull and the roof of the glenoid fossa on the right side. The findings based on CT and MRI images with and without contrast are discussed herein. This report highlights a skull base eosinophilic granuloma that mimics TMJ disorder and the importance of proper evaluation of CBCT images to make an early diagnosis.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional CT reconstruction and cephalometry for lateral skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X Z; Huo, X K

    2015-10-01

    To explore the diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional CT reconstruction and cephalometry in lateral skull base tumors. Fifty-eight patients with lateral skull base tumors were randomly divided into control group (n = 29, examined with conventional diagnostic technique) or study group (n = 29, examined with three-dimensional CT reconstruction and cephalometry). The diagnostic accuracy, tumor distribution and image characteristics were compared between both patient groups. In control group, preoperative tumor diagnosis was consistent with intraoperative diagnosis in 20 patients, similar in 7 patients and discrepant in 2 patients. In study group, there were 24 consistent, 4 similar, and 1 discrepant diagnoses (p cephalometry provides accurate diagnosis of lateral skull base tumors, which is helpful for subsequent surgical treatment.

  20. Skull Base Osteomyelitis from Otitis Media Presenting as the Collet-Sicard Syndrome

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    Wong-Kein Low

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Skull base osteomyelitis can involve the jugular foramen and its associated cranial nerves resulting in specific clinical syndromes. The Collet-Sicard syndrome describes the clinical manifestations of palsies involving cranial nerves IX, X, XI, and XII. We present a rare atypical case of skull base osteomyelitis originating from infection of the middle ear and causing the Collet-Sicard syndrome. Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, this occurred in an elderly diabetic man subsequent to retention of a cotton swab in an ear with chronic suppurative otitis media. This case report illustrates the possibility of retained cotton swabs contributing to the development of otitis media, skull base osteomyelitis, and ultimately the Collet-Sicard syndrome in the ears of immune-compromised patients with chronically perforated eardrums.

  1. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide

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    Harminder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route.

  2. Comparison of SPECT and CT in detecting skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Jinchuan; Pu Nuo; Song Wenzhong; Chen Mingxi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the detecting ability of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT in skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Sixty-three patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were examined by whole body and skull base SPECT and CT of nasopharynx and skull base before radiotherapy. The results were double-blind compared and evaluated. Results: The overall positive rates of skull base invasion detected by SPECT and CT were 63.5% and 25.4%. In patients with headache, cranial nerve palsy and both, they were 87.9%, 93.3%, 92.3% and 42.4%, 46.7%, 46.2%. In patients with T 1 + T 2 and T 3 + T 4 lesions, they were 37.5%, 90.3% and 0.0%, 51.6%. In patients with N 0 + N 1 and N 2 + N 3 lesions, they were 63.9%, 63.0% and 19.4%, 33.3%. The positive rates of SPECT were higher than those of CT (McNemar Test, P < 0.05). The conformation rate between SPECT and CT was 61.9% and the dissimilitude rate was 38.1%. Binary Logistic regression analysis showed that headache and T stages were risk factors of positive SPECT rate (ORheadache = 3.864, ORTstage= 6.422) while Tstage and Nstage were the risk factors for positive CT rate (ORTstage = 48.932, ORNstage = 2.860). Conclusions: The detection sensitivity of SPECT in skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma is superior to that of CT. But its specificity is inferior to that of CT. The detecting results in SPECT are better related to symptoms, signs and stage. Combining headache and cranial nerve palsy with T and N stage, the authors may much improve the results of SPECT and CT in the detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Further study is warranted

  3. Skull-base Osteomyelitis: a Dreaded Complication after Trivial Fall and Inadequate Management

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    Kundan Mittal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Skull-based osteomyelitis is bony infection which generally originates from inadequately treated chronic infection, adjoining tissue infection or after trauma.Case: 11 month female child had a trivial fall while standing near a bucket. The child developed fracture of right clavicle and left orbital swelling which was inadequately treated. This resulted in in spread of infection to adjoining tissues, skull bones, sinuses and brain.Conclusion: Cranial base osteomyelitis is rare but dreaded condition which requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment to avoid mortality and morbidity in form of neurological deficits and permanent disability

  4. Refining the Indications for the Addition of Orbital Osteotomy during Anterior Cranial Base Approaches: Morphometric and Radiologic Study of the Anterior Cranial Base Osteology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBattista, Juan Carlos; Andaluz, Norberto; Zuccarello, Mario; Kerr, Robert G; Keller, Jeffrey T

    2014-08-01

    Objectives In anatomic and radiologic morphometric studies, we examine a predictive method, based on preoperative imaging of the anterior cranial base, to define when addition of orbital osteotomy is warranted. Design Anatomic and radiographic study. Setting In 100 dry skulls, measurements in the anterior cranial fossa included three lines and two angles based on computerized tomography (CT) scans taken in situ and validated using frameless stereotactic navigation. The medial angle (coronal plane) was the intersection between the highest point of both orbits and the midpoint between the two frontoethmoidal sutures to each orbital roof high point. The oblique angle (sagittal plane) was the intersection at the midpoint of the limbus sphenoidale. Results No identifiable morphometric patterns were found for our classification of anterior fossae; the two-tailed distribution pattern was similar for all skulls, disproving the hypothetical correlation between visual appearance and morphometry. Orbital heights (range: 6.6-18.7 mm) showed a linear relationship with medial and oblique angles, and they had a linear distribution relative to angular increments. Orbital heights > 11 mm were associated with angles ≥ 20 degrees and more likely to benefit from orbitotomy. Conclusion Preoperative CT measurement of orbital height appears feasible for predicting when orbitotomy is needed, and it warrants further testing.

  5. Surgical experience with skull base approaches for foramen magnum meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin Sanabria, Elio Arnaldo; Ehara, Kazumasa; Tamaki, Norihiko

    2002-11-01

    The surgical treatment of patients with foramen magnum meningioma remains challenging. This study evaluated the outcome of this tumor according to the evolution of surgical approaches during the last 29 years. A retrospective analysis of medical records, operative notes, and neuroimages of 492 meningioma cases from 1972 to 2001 identified seven cases of foramen magnum meningioma (1.4%). All patients showed various neurological symptoms corresponding with foramen magnum syndrome. The tumor locations were anterior in five cases and posterior in two. Surgical removal was performed through a transoral approach in one patient, the suboccipital approach in three, and the transcondylar approach in two. Total removal was achieved in all patients, except for one who refused any surgical treatment. The major complications were tetraparesis and lower cranial nerve paresis for tumors in anterior locations, and minor complications for posterior locations. One patient died of atelectasis and pneumonia after a long hospitalization. The transcondylar approach is recommended for anterior locations, and the standard suboccipital approach for posterior locations.

  6. Clinicopathological significance of p16, cyclin D1, Rb and MIB-1 levels in skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-qi Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the expression of p16, cyclin D1, retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb and MIB-1 in skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma tissues, and to determine the clinicopathological significance of the above indexes in these diseases. Methods: A total of 100 skull base chordoma, 30 chondrosarcoma, and 20 normal cartilage tissue samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of p16, cyclinD1, Rb and MIB-1 proteins were assessed for potential correlation with the clinicopathological features. Results: As compared to normal cartilage specimen (control, there was decreased expression of p16, and increased expression of cyclin D1, Rb and MIB-1 proteins, in both skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma specimens. MIB-1 LI levels were significantly increased in skull base chordoma specimens with negative expression of p16, and positive expression of cyclin D1 and Rb (P  0.05. However, p16 and MIB-1 levels correlated with the intradural invasion, and expression of p16, Rb and MIB-1 correlated with the number of tumor foci (P < 0.05. Further, the expression of p16 and MIB-1 appeared to correlate with the prognosis of patients with skull base chordoma. Conclusions: The abnormal expression of p16, cyclin D1 and Rb proteins might be associated with the tumorigenesis of skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Keywords: p16, Cyclin D1, Rb, MIB-1, Skull base chordoma, Skull base chondrosarcoma

  7. Augmented image guidance improves skull base navigation and reduces task workload in trainees: a preclinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Benjamin J; Daly, Michael J; Chan, Harley; Vescan, Allan; Witterick, Ian J; Irish, Jonathan C

    2011-10-01

    Our group has developed an augmented image guidance system that incorporates intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), virtual or augmented displays, and image registration. We assessed the potential benefits of augmented endoscopy derived from this system for use during skull base navigation. Specifically, we wished to evaluate target localization accuracy and the effect on task workload and confidence. Prospective, sequential, paired preclinical trial. A single cadaver head underwent computed tomography, and critical structures were contoured. The specimen was reimaged after endoscopic dissection and deformable registration allowed contours to be displayed on postablation CBCT imaging. A real-time virtual view including anatomical contours was provided parallel to the real endoscopic image. Twelve subjects were asked to endoscopically localize seven skull base landmarks in a conventional manner. The same exercise was then performed with augmented endoscopy. Precise three-dimensional (3D) localization was recorded with a tracked probe. The NASA task load index was completed after each exercise. A short questionnaire was also administered. The real-time augmented image guidance system aided localization in 85% of responses and increased confidence in 97%. There was a significant reduction in mental demand, effort, and frustration when the technology was employed, with an increase in perceived performance (P surgery increases accuracy and confidence in trainee surgeons and decreases task workload during skull base navigation. This technology shows great promise in assisting in skull base surgery even for experienced surgeons. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  9. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A.; Canis, M.; Alt-Epping, B.

    2014-01-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of Three Cases Using a Novel Titanium Mesh System-Skull-Fit with Orbital Wall (Skull-Fit WOW)-For Cranial Base Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Noriko; Nakajima, Hideo; Tamada, Ikkei; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Cranial base reconstructions associated with tumor resections around the orbital wall often require that both the upper and lateral orbital walls be reconstructed during a single procedure. Previously, we used titanium mesh plates that were preoperatively fabricated based on three-dimensional models. Although these plates are precise and do not increase the probability of infection, we still had to use autologous bones to reconstruct the orbital walls. Recently, we developed a new titanium mesh plate-called Skull-Fit(®)-with orbital wall (Skull-Fit WOW(®)), enabling us to reconstruct the cranial base and orbital walls without bone grafts. Here, we report on three reconstruction cases in which the novel titanium mesh-orbital wall system was used. In all three cases, the customized titanium mesh system performed satisfactorily with little, if any, complications.

  11. Evaluation of Three Cases Using a Novel Titanium Mesh System—Skull-Fit® with Orbital Wall (Skull-Fit WOW®)—For Cranial Base Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Noriko; Nakajima, Hideo; Tamada, Ikkei; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Cranial base reconstructions associated with tumor resections around the orbital wall often require that both the upper and lateral orbital walls be reconstructed during a single procedure. Previously, we used titanium mesh plates that were preoperatively fabricated based on three-dimensional models. Although these plates are precise and do not increase the probability of infection, we still had to use autologous bones to reconstruct the orbital walls. Recently, we developed a new titanium mesh plate—called Skull-Fit®—with orbital wall (Skull-Fit WOW®), enabling us to reconstruct the cranial base and orbital walls without bone grafts. Here, we report on three reconstruction cases in which the novel titanium mesh-orbital wall system was used. In all three cases, the customized titanium mesh system performed satisfactorily with little, if any, complications. PMID:22451827

  12. Knowledge of skull base anatomy and surgical implications of human sacrifice among pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Serna, Raul; Gomez-Amador, Juan Luis; Barges-Coll, Juan; Arriada-Mendicoa, Nicasio; Romero-Vargas, Samuel; Ramos-Peek, Miguel; Celis-Lopez, Miguel Angel; Revuelta-Gutierrez, Rogelio; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly

    2012-08-01

    Human sacrifice became a common cultural trait during the advanced phases of Mesoamerican civilizations. This phenomenon, influenced by complex religious beliefs, included several practices such as decapitation, cranial deformation, and the use of human cranial bones for skull mask manufacturing. Archaeological evidence suggests that all of these practices required specialized knowledge of skull base and upper cervical anatomy. The authors conducted a systematic search for information on skull base anatomical and surgical knowledge among Mesoamerican civilizations. A detailed exposition of these results is presented, along with some interesting information extracted from historical documents and pictorial codices to provide a better understanding of skull base surgical practices among these cultures. Paleoforensic evidence from the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan indicates that Aztec priests used a specialized decapitation technique, based on a deep anatomical knowledge. Trophy skulls were submitted through a stepwise technique for skull mask fabrication, based on skull base anatomical landmarks. Understanding pre-Columbian Mesoamerican religions can only be realized by considering them in their own time and according to their own perspective. Several contributions to medical practice might have arisen from anatomical knowledge emerging from human sacrifice and decapitation techniques.

  13. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

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    Jalali, Elnaz; Tadinada, Aditya [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  14. Natural history of chondroid skull base lesions - case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidinger, A.; Rosahl, S.K.; Vorkapic, P.; Samii, M.

    2002-01-01

    Long-term follow-up reports on chondroid lesions of the skull base are rarely presented in the literature. There are virtually no data on natural growth rates of these tumors based on MRI obtained over a period of 10 years or longer. We followed a patient who has had such a lesion for more than 12 years. A non-progressive, slight abducens palsy has been the only associated symptom so far. Even though the patient was operated on for an additional intracranial arterio-venous malformation, clinical features and chromosomal testing excluded Maffucci's syndrome. The MRI follow-up in this case provides an extraordinary perspective on the natural history of chondroid skull base tumors. (orig.)

  15. Radio-anatomical analysis of the pericranial flap "money box approach" for ventral skull base reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Alfonso; Langdon, Cristóbal; López-Chacon, Mauricio; Cordero, Arturo; Enseñat, Joaquim; Carrau, Ricardo; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Alobid, Isam

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the versatility of the pericranial flap (PCF) to reconstruct the ventral skull base, using the frontal sinus as a gate for its passage into the sinonasal corridor "money box approach." Anatomic-radiological study and case series. Various approaches and their respective defects (cribriform, transtuberculum, clival, and craniovertebral junction) were completed in 10 injected specimens. The PCF was introduced into the nose through the uppermost portion of the frontal sinus (money box approach). Computed tomography (CT) scans (n = 50) were used to measure the dimensions of the PCF and the skull base defects. The vertical projection of the external ear canal was used as the reference point to standardize the incisions for the PCF. The surface area and maximum length of the PCF were 121.5 ± 19.4 cm 2 and 18.3 ± 1.3 cm, respectively. Using CT scans, we determined that to reconstruct defects secondary to transcribriform, transtuberculum, clival, and craniovertebral approaches, the PCF distal incision must be placed respectively at -3.7 ± 2.0 cm (angle -17.4 ± 8.5°), -0.2 ± 2.0 cm (angle -1.0 ± 9.3°), +5.5 ± 2.3 cm (angle +24.4 ± 9.7°), +8.4 ± 2.4 cm (angle +36.6 ± 11.5°), as related to the reference point. Skull base defects in our clinical cohort (n = 6) were completely reconstructed uneventfully with the PCF. The PCF renders enough surface area to reconstruct all possible defects in the ventral and median skull base. Using the uppermost frontal sinus as a gateway into the nose (money box approach) is feasible and simple. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:2482-2489, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to skull base metastasis from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavithran, K.; Doval, D.C.; Hukku, S.; Jena, A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a 44-year-old woman who presented with an isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve paralysis caused by a skull base metastasis from breast cancer. The patient had a modified radical mastectomy followed by local radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen months later she presented with difficulty in speaking. Physical examination revealed an isolated left hypoglossal nerve paralysis. The MRI scan showed a mass lesion involving the left occipital condyle extending into hypoglossal canal. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  17. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications

  18. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  19. Postoperative otorhinolaryngologic complications in transnasal endoscopic surgery to access the skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Landini Lutaif Dolci

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The large increase in the number of transnasal endoscopic skull base surgeries is a consequence of greater knowledge of the anatomic region, the development of specific materials and instruments, and especially the use of the nasoseptal flap as a barrier between the sinus tract (contaminated cavity and the subarachnoid space (sterile area, reducing the high risk of contamination. Objective: To assess the otorhinolaryngologic complications in patients undergoing endoscopic surgery of the skull base, in which a nasoseptal flap was used. Methods: This was a retrospective study that included patients who underwent endoscopic skull base surgery with creation of a nasoseptal flap, assessing for the presence of the following post-surgical complications: cerebrospinal fluid leak, meningitis, mucocele formation, nasal synechia, septal perforation (prior to posterior septectomy, internal nasal valve failure, epistaxis, and olfactory alterations. Results: The study assessed 41 patients undergoing surgery. Of these, 35 had pituitary adenomas (macro- or micro-adenomas; sellar and suprasellar extension, three had meningiomas (two tuberculum sellae and one olfactory groove, two had craniopharyngiomas, and one had an intracranial abscess. The complications were cerebrospinal fluid leak (three patients; 7.3%, meningitis (three patients; 7.3%, nasal fossa synechia (eight patients; 19.5%, internal nasal valve failure (six patients; 14.6%, and complaints of worsening of the sense of smell (16 patients; 39%. The olfactory test showed anosmia or hyposmia in ten patients (24.3%. No patient had mucocele, epistaxis, or septal perforation. Conclusion: The use of the nasoseptal flap has revolutionized endoscopic skull base surgery, making the procedures more effective and with lower morbidity compared to the traditional route. However, although mainly transient nasal morbidities were observed, in some cases, permanent hyposmia and anosmia resulted

  20. Treatment of malignant tumors of the skull base with multi-session radiosurgery

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    Gagnon Gregory J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Malignant tumors that involve the skull base pose significant challenges to the clinician because of the proximity of critical neurovascular structures and limited effectiveness of surgical resection without major morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of multi-session radiosurgery in patients with malignancies of the skull base. Methods Clinical and radiographic data for 37 patients treated with image-guided, multi-session radiosurgery between January 2002 and December 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. Lesions were classified according to involvement with the bones of the base of the skull and proximity to the cranial nerves. Results Our cohort consisted of 37 patients. Six patients with follow-up periods less than four weeks were eliminated from statistical consideration, thus leaving the data from 31 patients to be analyzed. The median follow-up was 37 weeks. Ten patients (32% were alive at the end of the follow-up period. At last follow-up, or the time of death from systemic disease, tumor regression or stable local disease was observed in 23 lesions, representing an overall tumor control rate of 74%. For the remainder of lesions, the median time to progression was 24 weeks. The median progression-free survival was 230 weeks. The median overall survival was 39 weeks. In the absence of tumor progression, there were no cranial nerve, brainstem or vascular complications referable specifically to CyberKnife® radiosurgery. Conclusion Our experience suggests that multi-session radiosurgery for the treatment of malignant skull base tumors is comparable to other radiosurgical techniques in progression-free survival, local tumor control, and adverse effects.

  1. Burkitt's lymphoma of the skull base presenting as cavernous sinus syndrome in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalina, P; Black, K; Woldenberg, R

    1996-01-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the skull base presenting with neuro-ophthalmologic abnormalities or cavernous sinus involvement is very rare in children. We have found only 13 reported cases of cavernous sinus involvement by lymphoma [1]. We report the case of the youngest child diagnosed with Burkitt's lymphoma of the cavernous sinus and sphenoid sinus, whose first presentation was cavernous sinus syndrome with neuro-ophthalmologic findings.

  2. Normal age-related conversion of bone marrow in the skull base. Assessment with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Koki; Tomura, Noriaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Izumi, Junichi; Kurosawa, Ryo; Sashi, Ryuji; Watarai, Jiro

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the normal age-related sequence of conversion from hematopoietic to fatty marrow in the skull base by means of MR imaging. We retrospectively reviewed T1-weighted MR images of the skull base for the distribution of hematopoietic and fatty marrow. The subjects consisted of 169 MR examinations that were performed with the spin-echo technique. The age of the subjects ranged from 0 months to 20 years old. Patients with known marrow abnormalities were excluded from this study. Marrow conversion was assessed in the presphenoid, postsphenoid, basiocciput, petrous apex, clivus, zygomatic bone, and condyle of the mandible. The signal intensity was visually graded, and the signal intensity ratio was determined on the basis of the intensities of the subcutaneous fat and air. The signal intensity of all observed regions was as low as that of muscles until 3 months of age. Conversion of hematopoietic to fatty marrow first occurred in the zygomatic bone until 6 months of age. The presphenoid increased in signal intensity from 5 months to 2 years of age, and the sphenoid sinus began to be pneumatic at this age. Marrow conversion of the postsphenoid and basiocciput was later than that of the presphenoid. Most of the bone marrow of the skull base appeared as fatty conversion until 3 years of age, although some mandibular condyles appeared hematopoietic at 3 years of age. The normal age-related conversion from hematopoietic to fatty marrow in the skull base followed a well-defined sequence. Knowledge of the normal bone marrow conversion by MR imaging is essential for the recognition of pathologic marrow processes. (author)

  3. SKULL BASE LEIOMYOSARCOMA METASTASIS MANIFESTING ITSELF AS OCCIPITAL CONDYLE SYNDROME. A CASE REPORT

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    M. A. Stepanyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  The occipital condyle syndrome (OCS is a rare and little-known neurological syndrome pathognomonic of metastatic involvement of the occipital condyle. OCS is the first significant sign of secondary involvement of the atlantooccipital joint in patients with a history of cancer. The early detection of skull base metastases permits timely use of radiation treatments and avoidance of surgical interventions.

  4. Recurrent and self-remitting sixth cranial nerve palsy: pathophysiological insight from skull base chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassanito, Paolo; Massimi, Luca; Rigante, Mario; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Conforti, Giulio; Di Rocco, Concezio; Caldarelli, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    Palsy of the abducens nerve is a neurological sign that has a wide range of causes due to the nerve's extreme vulnerability. Need of immediate neuroimaging is a matter of debate in the literature, despite the risks of delaying the diagnosis of a skull base tumor. The authors present 2 cases of skull base tumors in which the patients presented with recurrent and self-remitting episodes of sixth cranial nerve palsy (SCNP). In both cases the clinical history exceeded 1 year. In a 17-year-old boy the diagnosis was made because of the onset of headache when the tumor reached a very large size. In a 12-year-old boy the tumor was incidentally diagnosed when it was still small. In both patients surgery was performed and the postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological diagnosis of the tumor was consistent with that of a chondrosarcoma in both cases. Recurrent self-remitting episodes of SCNP, resembling transitory ischemic attacks, may be the presenting sign of a skull base tumor due to the anatomical relationships of these lesions with the petroclival segment of the sixth cranial nerve. Physicians should promptly recommend neuroimaging studies if SCNP presents with this peculiar course.

  5. Improving visualization of intracranial arteries at the skull base for CT angiography with calcified plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Adam; Lee, Chung-Wei; Yang, Chung-Yi; Liu, Hon-Man

    2010-03-01

    Bony structures at the skull base were the main obstacle to detection and estimation of arterial stenoses and aneurysms for CT angiography in the brain. Direct subtraction and the matched mask bone elimination (MMBE) have become two standard methods for removing bony structures. However, clinicians regularly find that calcified plaques at or near the carotid canal cannot be removed satisfactorily by existing methods. The blood-plaque boundary tends to be blurred by subtraction operation while plaque size is constantly overestimated by the bone mask dilation operation in the MMBE approach. In this study, we propose using the level of enhancement to adjust the MMBE bone mask more intelligently on the artery- and tissue-bone/plaque boundaries. The original MMBE method is only applied to the tissue-bone boundary voxels; while the artery-bone/blood-plaque boundary voxels, identified by a higher enhancement level, are processed by direct subtraction instead. A dataset of 6 patients (3 scanned with a regular dose and 3 scanned with a reduced dose) with calcified plaques at or near the skull base is used to examine our new method. Preliminary results indicate that the visualization of intracranial arteries with calcified plaques at the skull base can be improved effectively and efficiently.

  6. Lateral skull base approaches in the management of benign parapharyngeal space tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sampath Chandra; Piccirillo, Enrico; Chovanec, Martin; La Melia, Claudio; De Donato, Giuseppe; Sanna, Mario

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the role of lateral skull base approaches in the management of benign parapharyngeal space tumors and to propose an algorithm for their surgical approach. Retrospective study of patients with benign parapharyngeal space tumors. The clinical features, radiology and preoperative management of skull base neurovasculature, the surgical approaches and overall results were recorded. 46 patients presented with 48 tumors. 12 were prestyloid and 36 poststyloid. 19 (39.6%) tumors were paragangliomas, 15 (31.25%) were schwannomas and 11 (23%) were pleomorphic adenomas. Preoperative embolization was performed in 19, stenting of the internal carotid artery in 4 and permanent balloon occlusion in 2 patients. 19 tumors were approached by the transcervical, 13 by transcervical-transparotid, 5 by transcervical-transmastoid, 6, 1 and 2 tumors by the infratemporal fossa approach types A, B and D, respectively. Total radical tumor removal was achieved in 46 (96%) of the cases. Lateral skull base approaches have an advantage over other approaches in the management of benign tumors of the parapharyngeal space due to the fact that they provide excellent exposure with less morbidity. The use of microscope combined with bipolar cautery reduces morbidity. Stenting of internal carotid artery gives a chance for complete tumor removal with arterial preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A case of generalized lymphatic anomaly causing skull-base leakage and bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Kenichi; Goji, Aya; Inoue, Miki; Kawahito, Masami; Taki, Masako; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2017-05-01

    Generalized lymphatic anomaly is a multifocal lymphatic malformation that affects the skin, thoracic viscera, and bones. A 3year-old Japanese boy presented with right facial palsy due to cystic tumors in the ipsilateral petrous bone. Pericardial effusion had been found incidentally and generalized lymphatic anomaly had been diagnosed by pericardial biopsy. Petrous bone tumor had been followed up without surgery. At the age of seven he presented with fever and disturbance of consciousness, and bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae was diagnosed. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed middle skull-base leakage due to lymphatic malformation. He achieved complete recovery under intensive care with antibiotics and mechanical ventilation. One year later, he presented with multiple cystic formations in bilateral femora. At the 3-year follow-up, the patient was healthy with no recurrence of meningitis and osteolytic lesions in the femora were non-progressive. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful for demonstration of skull-base leakage by generalized lymphatic anomaly. We should consider generalized lymphatic anomaly among the differential diagnoses for skull-base leakage. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. REPAIR OF LARGE SKULL BASE DEFECT FOLLOWING EXCISION OF BASALOID SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF MAXILLO - ETHMOID REGION : A CASE REPORT

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    Monoj Mukherjee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To present a case of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of maxillo - ethmoid region with intracranial extradural extention and its surgical management including repair of the skull base defect. MATERIAL : A 30 year female presented with progressive bilateral nasal obstruction, facial deformity for 5 years duration. She developed blindness in last 6 months. Recent CT s can showed large heterogeneous enhancing soft tissue mass in right maxillary sinus, nasal cavity and right ethmoid sinus invading the skull base . INTERVENTION : She underwent excision of the mass by modified weber ferguson incision and repair of skull base defect with temporalis muscle flap. Skin defect over the face and nose was repaired by median forehead flap. RESULT : There was total tumor clearance and no CSF leakage following surgery. CONCLUSION : Sinonasal malignancy with intracranial extradural extenti on is not a contraindication for successful surgical management. Resultant skull base defect can be repaired by a temporalis muscle flap to prevent CSF leak and intracranial infection

  9. Computed tomography in neoplastic diseases of the skull base and adjacent areas using EMI scanner CT-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Yoshimi; Ohtake, Eiji; Asakura, Koichi; Tanohata, Kazunori; Ito, Otomasa

    1980-01-01

    CT-findings of 145 patients with and without neoplastic diseases of the skull base were evaluated using EMI CT-1000. Analysis of 64 patients without any lesion at the skull base showed more artifacts compared with that of higher slices, so that good or fair images were obtained only in 64% of this groups of patients. The most important factor in producing artifacts are considered to be caused by patient's movement. We also evaluated the tumor extension to the skull base in 81 patients. They were 24 brain tumors, 21 pituitary adenomas, and 36 nasopharyngeal and paranasal cancers. Four out of 24 brain tumors showed extracranial extension, 12 pituitary adenomas infiltrating outside of the sella turcica, and 10 cases of nasopharyngeal cancers showed intracranial extension. It was concluded that CT presented an excellent information in evaluating the degree of extension of neoplasms which invading to the skull base. (author)

  10. Building a Successful Endoscopic Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindwani, Raj; Woodard, Troy D; Recinos, Pablo F

    2016-02-01

    Building an endoscopic cranial base practice can be challenging and is predicated on the right team. Successful outcomes stem from an efficient and talented team that improves its skills experientially in a supportive environment. As with most new endeavors that are beyond the traditional approach, there is a great deal of up-front effort and investment required. This article explores some of the key building blocks necessary for a successful endoscopic cranial base and pituitary program and highlights some of the lessons learned during the authors' journey at the Cleveland Clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality assurance of multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery at the lateral skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau-Hermes, Maria; Schmitt, Robert; Becker, Meike; El-Hakimi, Wissam; Hansen, Stefan; Klenzner, Thomas; Schipper, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    For multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery at the lateral skull base a quality management is necessary to avoid the damage of closely spaced critical neurovascular structures. So far there is no standardized method applicable independently from the surgery. Therefore, we adapt a quality management method, the quality gates (QG), which is well established in, for example, the automotive industry and apply it to multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery. QG divide a process into different sections. Passing between sections can only be achieved if previously defined requirements are fulfilled which secures the process chain. An interdisciplinary team of otosurgeons, computer scientists, and engineers has worked together to define the quality gates and the corresponding criteria that need to be fulfilled before passing each quality gate. In order to evaluate the defined QG and their criteria, the new surgery method was applied with a first prototype at a human skull cadaver model. We show that the QG method can ensure a safe multiport minimally invasive surgical process at the lateral skull base. Therewith, we present an approach towards the standardization of quality assurance of surgical processes.

  12. Quality Assurance of Multiport Image-Guided Minimally Invasive Surgery at the Lateral Skull Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Nau-Hermes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery at the lateral skull base a quality management is necessary to avoid the damage of closely spaced critical neurovascular structures. So far there is no standardized method applicable independently from the surgery. Therefore, we adapt a quality management method, the quality gates (QG, which is well established in, for example, the automotive industry and apply it to multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery. QG divide a process into different sections. Passing between sections can only be achieved if previously defined requirements are fulfilled which secures the process chain. An interdisciplinary team of otosurgeons, computer scientists, and engineers has worked together to define the quality gates and the corresponding criteria that need to be fulfilled before passing each quality gate. In order to evaluate the defined QG and their criteria, the new surgery method was applied with a first prototype at a human skull cadaver model. We show that the QG method can ensure a safe multiport minimally invasive surgical process at the lateral skull base. Therewith, we present an approach towards the standardization of quality assurance of surgical processes.

  13. Chordomas of the Skull Base, Mobile Spine, and Sacrum: An Epidemiologic Investigation of Presentation, Treatment, and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya

    2018-02-25

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors that arise from the axial skeleton. Our objective was to analyze trends in radiation and surgery over time and determine location-based survival predictors for chordomas of the skull base, mobile spine, and sacrum. A retrospective cohort study of the SEER (Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results) database from 1973 to 2013 was conducted. All patients had histologically confirmed chordomas. The principal outcome measure was overall survival (OS). The cohort included 1616 patients: skull base (664), mobile spine (444), and sacrum (508). Skull base tumors presented earliest in life (47.4 years) and sacral tumors presented latest (62.7 years). Rates of radiation remained stable for skull base and mobile spine tumors but declined for sacral tumors (P = 0.006). Rates of surgical resection remained stable for skull base and sacral tumors but declined for mobile spine tumors (P = 0.046). Skull base chordomas had the longest median survival (162 months) compared with mobile spine (94 months) and sacral tumors (87 months). Being married was independently associated with improved OS for skull base tumors (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.99; P = 0.044). Surgical resection was independently associated with improved OS for sacral chordomas (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.69; P mobile spine chordomas and radiation for sacral chordomas decreased over time. Patients with skull base tumors survived longer than did patients with mobile spine and sacral chordomas, and surgical resection was associated with improved survival in sacral chordomas only. Understanding the behavior of these tumors can help cranial and spinal surgeons improve treatment in this patient population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Computed tomographic findings of skull base bony changes after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: implications for local recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuan-Miao; Liu, Xue-Wen; Li, Hui; Zhang, Rong; Mo, Yun-Xian; Li, Jian-Peng; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Zheng, Lie; Lv, Yan-Chun; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate bony changes in the skull base after radiotherapy by computed tomography (CT) and their correlation with local recurrence in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) without previous involvement of the skull base. Retrospective study. Sun-Yat Sen University Cancer Center. The records of 80 patients with NPC during the period from January 1992 to December 2005 were reviewed. All patients had been treated with radical radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy at standard doses and were followed up with plain and contrast-enhanced CT every 6 months for 45.5 (range 12-108) months. The types, areas, time of the first occurrence after radiotherapy and development of the postradiation bony changes of the skull base, and local recurrence rates of NPC were measured. Eighteen patients (22.5%) had sclerosis in some area of the skull base, and the sclerosis in 5 (27.8%) of these patients changed into osteoporosis in 1 to 5 years after its appearance. Seventeen patients (21.3%) had osteolysis. The local recurrence rate of patients with osteolysis was observed to be significantly higher than that of patients with sclerosis (p < .0001). The appearance of osteolytic changes in the skull base during follow-up of patients with NPC who had normal skull base morphology before treatment was associated with tumour recurrence.

  15. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  16. Efficacy of navigation in skull base surgery using composite computer graphics of magnetic resonance and computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Kurimoto, Masanori; Hirashima, Yutaka; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takashi; Tomita, Takahiro; Endo, Shunro

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a neurosurgical navigation system using three-dimensional composite computer graphics (CGs) of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images was evaluated in skull base surgery. Three-point transformation was used for integration of MR and CT images. MR and CT image data were obtained with three skin markers placed on the patient's scalp. Volume-rendering manipulations of the data produced three-dimensional CGs of the scalp, brain, and lesions from the MR images, and the scalp and skull from the CT. Composite CGs of the scalp, skull, brain, and lesion were created by registering the three markers on the three-dimensional rendered scalp images obtained from MR imaging and CT in the system. This system was used for 14 patients with skull base lesions. Three-point transformation using three-dimensional CGs was easily performed for multimodal registration. Simulation of surgical procedures on composite CGs aided in comprehension of the skull base anatomy and selection of the optimal approaches. Intraoperative navigation aided in determination of actual spatial position in the skull base and the optimal trajectory to the tumor during surgical procedures. (author)

  17. State-of-the-art treatment alternatives for base of skull meningiomas: complementing and controversial indications for neurosurgery, stereotactic and robotic based radiosurgery or modern fractionated radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Ganswindt, Ute; Foote, Robert L; Kondziolka, Douglas; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-01-01

    For skull base meningiomas, several treatment paradigms are available: Observation with serial imaging, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery, radiation therapy or some combination of both. The choice depends on several factors. In this review we evaluate different treatment options, the outcome of modern irradiation techniques as well as the clinical results available, and establish recommendations for the treatment of patients with skull-base meningiomas

  18. State-of-the-art treatment alternatives for base of skull meningiomas: complementing and controversial indications for neurosurgery, stereotactic and robotic based radiosurgery or modern fractionated radiation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Ganswindt, Ute; Foote, Robert L; Kondziolka, Douglas; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-12-29

    For skull base meningiomas, several treatment paradigms are available: Observation with serial imaging, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery, radiation therapy or some combination of both. The choice depends on several factors. In this review we evaluate different treatment options, the outcome of modern irradiation techniques as well as the clinical results available, and establish recommendations for the treatment of patients with skull-base meningiomas.

  19. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Jian; Chu, Yakui; Wu, Wenbo; Xue, Jin; Liang, Ping; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. Materials and Methods In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems. Results The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D) virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons. Conclusion The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon’s skills and knowledge, not as a substitute. PMID:26757365

  20. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    Full Text Available To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery.In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems.The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons.The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon's skills and knowledge, not as a substitute.

  1. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Jian; Chu, Yakui; Wu, Wenbo; Xue, Jin; Liang, Ping; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems. The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D) virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons. The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon's skills and knowledge, not as a substitute.

  2. [Laser-based quality assurance for robot-assisted milling at the base of the skull].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maassen, M M; Malthan, D; Stallkamp, J; Schäfer, A; Dammann, F; Schwaderer, E; Zenner, H P

    2006-02-01

    Implanting active hearing devices in the lateral base of the skull requires high-precision, secure fixation of the electromagnetic transducer and long-life anchorage using osteosynthetic fixation plates referred to as mountain brackets. Nonlinear distortion in the acoustic signal path and consecutive implant loosening can only be avoided by exact osseous milling to create the necessary cavity bed while avoiding excessive milling. Robot technology is ideal for high-precision milling. However, safety measures are necessary in order to prevent errors from occurring during the reduction process. Ideally, a robot should be guided by a navigation system. However, robotic systems so far available do not yet have an integrated global navigation system. We used an animal model under laboratory conditions to examine the extent to which the semiautomatic ROBIN assistant system developed could be expected to increase osseous milling accuracy before implanting active electronic hearing devices into the recipient tissue in the cranium. An existing prototype system for robot-assisted skull base surgery was equipped with laser sensors for geometric measurement of the operation site. The three-dimensional measurement data was compared with CT simulation data before, during, and after the robot-assisted operation. The experiments were conducted on test objects as well as on animal models. Under ideal conditions, the operation site could be measured at a spatial resolution of better than 0.02 mm in each dimension. However, reflections and impurities in the operation site from bleeding and rinsing fluids did have a considerable effect on data collection, necessitating specialised registering procedures. Using an error-tolerant procedure specifically developed, the effective registering error could be kept under 0.3 mm. After milling, the resulting shape matched the intended form at an accuracy level of 0.8 mm. The results show that robot systems can reach the accuracy required for

  3. The radiological and histopathological differential diagnosis of chordoid neoplasms in skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Bin-cai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chordoid neoplasms refer to tumors appearing to have histological features of embryonic notochord, which is characterized by cords and lobules of neoplastic cells arranged within myxoid matrix. Because of radiological and histological similarities with myxoid matrix and overlapping immunohistochemical profile, chordoma, chordoid meningioma, chordoid glioma, and rare extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma enter in the radiological and histological differential diagnosis at the site of skull base. However, there is always a great challenge for histopathologists to make an accurate diagnosis when encountering a chordoid neoplasm within or near the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to investigate and summarize the radiological, histological features and immunohistochemical profiles of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, and to find a judicious panel of immunostains to unquestionably help in diagnostically challenging cases. Methods A total of 23 cases of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, including 10 chordomas, 5 chordoid meningiomas, 3 chordoid gliomas and 5 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and Guangdong Tongjiang Hospital. MRI examination was performed on the patients before surgical treatment. Microscopical examination and immunohistochemical staining study using vimentin (Vim, pan-cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, S?100 protein (S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, D2-40, Galectin-3, CD3, CD20, Ki-67 were performed on the samples of cases. The clinicopathological data of the patients was also analyzed retrospectively. Results Most of chordomas were localized in the clivus with heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2WI scanning. The breakage of clivus was observed in most cases. Histologically, the tumor cells of chordoma exhibited bland nuclear features and some contained abundant vacuolated cytoplasm (the so

  4. Required Reading: The Most Impactful Articles in Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael; Singh, Harminder; Almodovar-Mercado, Gustavo J; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2016-08-01

    Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery has become widely accepted in neurosurgery and otolaryngology over the last 15 years. However, there has yet to be a formal curation of the most impactful articles for an introductory curriculum to its technical evolution. The Science Citation Index Expanded was used to generate a citation rank list (October 2015) on articles relevant to endoscopic skull base surgery. The top 35 cited articles overall, as well as the top 15 since 2009, were identified. Journal, year, author, study population, article format, and level of evidence were compiled. Additional surgeon experts were polled and made recommendations for significant contributions to the literature. The top 35 publications ranged from 98 to 467 citations and were published in 10 different journals. Four articles had more than 250 citations. A period of frequent contribution occurred between 2005 and 2009, when 21/35 reports were published. 18/35 articles were case series, and 13/35 were technical reports. There were 11/35 articles focused primarily on pituitary surgery and 10/35 on extrasellar lesions. The top 15 articles since 2009 had 8/15 articles focused on extrasellar lesions. Polled surgeons consistently identified the most prominently cited articles, and their recommendations drew attention to cerebrospinal fluid leak as well as extrasellar management. Identification of the most cited works within endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery shows greater anatomic access and safety over the last 2 decades. These articles can serve as an educational tool for novices or midlevel practitioners wishing to obtain a greater understanding of the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Health-related quality of life in patients with skull base tumours.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, M O

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the investigation was to report on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients diagnosed with skull base tumours using the Short Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36). Those patients suffering with vestibular schwannoma were examined to determine the effect facial nerve function had on their quality of life. It took place at the tertiary referral centre at the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh. A prospective study of 70 consecutive patients was taken, who harboured the following tumours: 54 vestibular schwannomas, 13 meningiomas, two haemangioblastomas and one hypoglossal schwannoma. Patients were interviewed using the short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Facial nerve function was assessed in those patients who had vestibular schwannomas. The entire cohort of live skull base patients were assessed after a median follow-up time of 38.4 months. Patients with vestibular schwannoma treated conservatively with interval MRI had a quality of life similar to t he normal population. Those who underwent surgery had a significant difference in two of the SF-36 domains. No statistically significant correlation was found at final assessment between the degree of facial nerve functioning and any of the domains of SF-36. Patients with non-vestibular tumours had an impaired HRQoL in seven of the eight domains. Patients with skull base tumours have a significant impairment of their HRQoL. A conservative policy of follow up with interval MRI for patients with small vestibular schwannomas may therefore be more appropriate to preserve their HRQoL. Facial nerve outcome has little influence on quality of life in vestibular schwannoma patients.

  6. Augmented real-time navigation with critical structure proximity alerts for endoscopic skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Benjamin J; Daly, Michael J; Chan, Harley; Vescan, Allan; Witterick, Ian J; Irish, Jonathan C

    2014-04-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) systems are frequently utilized during cranial base surgery to aid in orientation and facilitate targeted surgery. We wished to assess the performance of our recently developed localized intraoperative virtual endoscopy (LIVE)-IGS prototype in a preclinical setting prior to deployment in the operating room. This system combines real-time ablative instrument tracking, critical structure proximity alerts, three-dimensional virtual endoscopic views, and intraoperative cone-beam computed tomographic image updates. Randomized-controlled trial plus qualitative analysis. Skull base procedures were performed on 14 cadaver specimens by seven fellowship-trained skull base surgeons. Each subject performed two endoscopic transclival approaches; one with LIVE-IGS and one using a conventional IGS system in random order. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) scores were documented for each dissection, and a semistructured interview was recorded for qualitative assessment. The NASA-TLX scores for mental demand, effort, and frustration were significantly reduced with the LIVE-IGS system in comparison to conventional navigation (P surgery. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Sexual dimorphism of pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra p. pyrenaica based on skull morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-González, R.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dimorphism in skull characteristics of Pyrenean chamois is studied in a sample of 85 adults (36 males and 49 females by means of 26 quantitative variables. Skull variables were analised by multiple regression and principal component techniques. The Pyrenean chamois shows one of the smallest sexual skull dimorphisms of the Rupicapra subspecies. Only length, thickness, and related variables of horns present significant differences between sexes. Nevertheless, horn height was statistically identical in both sexes. Ecological implications of skull variability and skull variables relationships are discussed. Several discriminant functions were developed by means of discriminant analysis. Those that better identified sexes include horn core diameters. We also developed other functions based on upper skull variables that could be used to identify incomplete specimens or archaeological remains.

    [fr]
    Nous avons étudié les dimorphismes sexuels de l'isard en travaillant sur 26 mesures cranéométriques issues d'un échantillon de 85 crânes adultes (soit 36 mâles et 49 femelles. Les analyses ont porté sur la comparaison des moyennes, la régression multiple et l'analyse en composante principale. Il s'avère que l'isard pyrénéen présente un des plus bas dimorphisme craneal du genre Rupicapra. Seuls la longueur et l'épaisseur des cornes et leurs variables associées ont montré des différences significatives entre les sexes. Les implications écologiques de la variabilité entre les crânes et des relations entre les variables cranéométriques sont discutées. En utilisant l'analyse discriminante, nous arrivons à développer quelques fonctions nous permettant d'identifier le sexe des exemplaires complets ou incomplets. Les fonctions se basant sur l'épaisseur des cornes ont permis une meilleure classification.
    [es]
    Se ha estudiado el dimorfismo sexual del sarrio a partir de 26 medidas craneométricas tomadas en una

  8. Optimization of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment Delivery Technique for Base-Of-Skull Meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Brenda G.; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm 3 ) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p 3 , the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm 3 , there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p 3 , due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe

  9. Extended maxillotomy for skull base access in contemporary management of chordomas: Rationale and technical aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Story, Rowan D; Rogers, Myron

    2017-05-01

    Minimally invasive approaches to the central skull base have been popularized over the last decade and have to a large extent displaced 'open' procedures. However, traditional skull base surgery still has its role especially when dealing with a large clival chordoma where maximal surgical resection is the principal goal to maximize patient survival. In this paper, we present a case of a 25year-old male patient with chordoma in the inferior clivus which was initially debulked via a transnasal endoscopic approach. He unfortunately had a large recurrence of tumor requiring re-do resection. With the aim to achieve maximal surgical resection, we then chose the technique of a transoral approach with Le Fort 1 maxillotomy and midline palatal split. Post-operative course for the patient was uneventful and post-operative MRI confirmed significant debulking of the clival lesion. The technique employed for the surgical procedure is presented here in detail as is our experience over two decades using this technique for tumors, inflammatory lesions and congenital abnormalities at the cranio-cervical junction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Eichberg, Daniel; Zamani, Amir; Golby, Alexandra; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge. To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull base tumors underwent preoperative 3T magnetic resonance imaging, which included thin section three-dimensional (3D) space T2, 3D time of flight, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in the neuronavigation system for segmentation and preoperative planning. Five different neurovascular landmarks were identified in each case and measured for accuracy using the neuronavigation system. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured. Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases and helped the surgeon localize involved cranial nerves in all cases. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients.

  11. CT-diagnosed severe skull base bone destruction predicts distant bone metastasis in early N-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi W

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wei Yi,1,* Zhi-Gang Liu,2,3,* Xian Li,4 Jiao Tang,2,3 Chang-Bin Jiang,1 Jing-Ye Hu,5 Zi-Wei Tu,5 Hui Wang,2,3 Dao-Li Niu,1 Yun-Fei Xia5 1Department of Radiotherapy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Department of Radiotherapy, Hunan Cancer Hospital, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, 3Key Laboratory of Translational Radiation Oncology, Hunan Province, 4Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, 5State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Department of Radiotherapy, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Bone metastasis is the most frequent type of distant metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. In this study, we investigated the correlation between the skull base bone destruction and the distant bone metastasis in patients with NPC. A total of 449 cases with NPC who were diagnosed and had definitive radiotherapy from 2001 to 2006 were enrolled in this study. The skull base bone destruction was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT in all cases, and 191 patients also underwent magnetic resonance imaging scan. Kaplan–Meier method was adopted to perform the univariate analysis; Cox regression model was used to perform multivariate analysis to determine whether the skull base bone destruction when diagnosed by CT was an independent impact factor of the distant bone metastases. The group with skull base bone destruction had a distant bone metastases rate of 9.0% (14/155, whereas the group without skull base bone destruction had rate of 4.1% (12/294. The multivariate analysis showed that the skull base bone destruction, when diagnosed by CT, was an independent impact factor of the distant bone metastases-free survival in the early N-staging cases, but was not an independent impact factor when

  12. Expression study of the target receptor tyrosine kinase of Imatinib mesylate in skull base chordomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzan, Francesca; Terreni, Maria Rosa; Longoni, Mauro; Boari, Nicola; Mortini, Pietro; Doglioni, Claudio; Riva, Paola

    2007-07-01

    Chordomas are rare neoplasms arising along the axial skeleton. Up to now, the most suitable therapeutic approach is based on a combination of surgical excision and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy in not applied due to its reported low efficacy. Recently, evidence on the efficacy of Imatinib mesylate in two patients has been reported. We analyzed 14 chordoma samples for the expression of the Imatinib mesylate targets by means of RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry and found that PDGFR alpha and PDGFR beta are in some cases expressed in neoplastic cells, while the stromal counterpart of the same tumor shows the above receptors. Findings on the PDGFA/PDGFB expression suggest a receptor-activated status. Our study provides new insights into the specific localization of Imatinib mesylate targets in skull base chordomas that could be taken into account for the setting up of a pharmacological treatment for this tumor.

  13. Computer-aided surgery of the paranasal sinuses and skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah K; DelGaudio, John M

    2005-07-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures in otolaryngology. However, the location of the orbit and intracranial contents in close proximity to the paranasal sinuses makes endoscopic sinus surgery potentially hazardous. Otolaryngologists have employed computer-aided surgery, or image-guided surgery, over the past two decades to enhance surgeon confidence, allow more thorough surgical dissections and possibly reduce the complication rate of endoscopic sinus surgery. Computer-aided surgery utilizes preoperative imaging to provide real-time localization of surgical instruments in the surgical field. Although computer-aided surgery originated in the neurosurgical realm, otolaryngologists soon appreciated that this technology could assist in identifying critical orbital or intracranial structures surrounding the paranasal sinuses, and potentially aid in decreasing complications. In this article, the history of image-guidance systems and their application to surgery of the paranasal sinuses and skull base will be reviewed. The components of computer-aided surgery systems and the currently available technologies for surgical instrument tracking are discussed, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each of the tracking technologies. In addition, issues relating to the accuracy of image-guidance systems are examined. A number of institutional series noting surgeon experience with computer-aided surgery in the domain of paranasal sinus surgery are reviewed. Furthermore, the authors evaluate the utility of image-guidance technology beyond the paranasal sinuses and skull base, such as its use in surgery of the pituitary gland and pterygopalatine fossa, research and resident education. Finally, potential future applications of computer-aided surgery technology are discussed.

  14. Nonmelanoma cutaneous cancers involving the skull base: outcomes of aggressive multimodal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Shaan M; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Weber, Randal S; Kupferman, Michael E; Gidley, Paul W; Hanna, Ehab Y; DeMonte, Franco

    2015-09-01

    A relative paucity of information exists regarding outcomes from craniofacial resection for advanced nonmelanoma skin cancers involving the skull base. In light of advances in surgical technique and adjuvant therapy protocols, the authors reviewed their surgical experience to determine disease control rates, overall survival (OS), morbidity, and mortality. A retrospective review of 24 patients with nonmelanoma cutaneous cancers with skull base involvement treated with craniofacial resection at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1994 to 2012 was performed. Of these patients, 19 (79%) had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 4 (17%) had basosquamous carcinoma (BSCC), and 1 patient (4%) had adenocarcinoma. Factors as assessed were prior treatment, TNM staging, tumor involvement, extent of intracranial extension, margin status, postoperative complications, recurrence, disease status at last follow-up, and long-term survival. The majority of tumors were T4 (67%) according to the TNM classification; perineural extension was noted in 58%, cavernous sinus involvement in 25%, and dural involvement in 29%. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 patients (17%) including 1 death. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated for OS and progression-free survival (PFS). Median OS was 43.2 months with an 82% 1-year OS and 37% 5-year OS; the median PFS was 91.2 months. Margin status was positively associated with median OS in SCC (91 months [for negative margins] vs 57 months, p = 0.8) and in BSCC (23.7 vs 3.2 months, p management with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy can positively impact locoregional control and OS. With improvements in technique and adjuvant therapy protocols, treatment can still be considered in situations of perineural disease and cavernous sinus involvement and as a salvage option for patients in whom prior treatment has failed. As patients with advanced NMSCs often have few options, craniofacial resection, as part of a coordinated multimodal

  15. Benchmarking Distance Control and Virtual Drilling for Lateral Skull Base Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voormolen, Eduard H J; Diederen, Sander; van Stralen, Marijn; Woerdeman, Peter A; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Viergever, Max A; Regli, Luca; Robe, Pierre A; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem

    2018-01-01

    Novel audiovisual feedback methods were developed to improve image guidance during skull base surgery by providing audiovisual warnings when the drill tip enters a protective perimeter set at a distance around anatomic structures ("distance control") and visualizing bone drilling ("virtual drilling"). To benchmark the drill damage risk reduction provided by distance control, to quantify the accuracy of virtual drilling, and to investigate whether the proposed feedback methods are clinically feasible. In a simulated surgical scenario using human cadavers, 12 unexperienced users (medical students) drilled 12 mastoidectomies. Users were divided into a control group using standard image guidance and 3 groups using distance control with protective perimeters of 1, 2, or 3 mm. Damage to critical structures (sigmoid sinus, semicircular canals, facial nerve) was assessed. Neurosurgeons performed another 6 mastoidectomy/trans-labyrinthine and retro-labyrinthine approaches. Virtual errors as compared with real postoperative drill cavities were calculated. In a clinical setting, 3 patients received lateral skull base surgery with the proposed feedback methods. Users drilling with distance control protective perimeters of 3 mm did not damage structures, whereas the groups using smaller protective perimeters and the control group injured structures. Virtual drilling maximum cavity underestimations and overestimations were 2.8 ± 0.1 and 3.3 ± 0.4 mm, respectively. Feedback methods functioned properly in the clinical setting. Distance control reduced the risks of drill damage proportional to the protective perimeter distance. Errors in virtual drilling reflect spatial errors of the image guidance system. These feedback methods are clinically feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoscopic Resection of Skull Base Teratoma in Klippel-Feil Syndrome through Use of Combined Ultrasonic and Bipolar Diathermy Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS is associated with numerous craniofacial abnormalities but rarely with skull base tumor formation. We report an unusual and dramatic case of a symptomatic, mature skull base teratoma in an adult patient with KFS, with extension through the basisphenoid to obstruct the nasopharynx. This benign lesion was associated with midline palatal and cerebral defects, most notably pituitary and vertebrobasilar arteriolar duplications. A multidisciplinary workup and a complete endoscopic, transnasal surgical approach between otolaryngology and neurosurgery were undertaken. Out of concern for vascular control of the fibrofatty dense tumor stalk at the skull base and need for complete teratoma resection, we successfully employed a tissue resection tool with combined ultrasonic and bipolar diathermy to the tumor pedicle at the sphenoid/clivus junction. No CSF leak or major hemorrhage was noted using this endonasal approach, and no concerning postoperative sequelae were encountered. The patient continues to do well now 3 years after tumor extirpation, with resolution of all preoperative symptoms and absence of teratoma recurrence. KFS, teratoma biology, endocrine gland duplication, and the complex considerations required for successfully addressing this type of advanced skull base pathology are all reviewed herein.

  17. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Ryan M., E-mail: rmjones@sri.utoronto.ca [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); O’Reilly, Meaghan A. [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981–5005 (2013)]. Methods: A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11–0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. Results: For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors’ previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O’Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285–1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position

  18. The frontal bone skull post for image guided surgery of the nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlantis, Alexander C; Chan, H S; Hung, Terry; Tong, Michael C F; Van Hasselt, C Andrew

    2008-05-01

    To describe the use of the mastoid skull post of a surgical image guidance system for image guided surgery and intraoperative navigation of the nasopharynx. This adaptation overcomes the limitations of a headset frame or head clamp and can be applied to open and closed surgery of the nasal cavities, sinuses, orbits, midface and anterior skull base. A sterile mastoid skull post of a surgical image guidance system was securely screwed into the outer table of the frontal bone and a passive reference frame fixed to it. The position of the reference frame relative to the patient's head remained constant during surgery. Between August 2002 and November 2006, 22 patients underwent a surgical nasopharyngectomy using an image guidance system and frontal bone skull post. No surgical complications or complications of the frontal bone skull post occurred. Using the skull post of a surgical image guidance system anchored to the frontal bone to carry a passive reference frame provides real-time visual information about the relationship of relevant anatomy to the surgical field on a fully mobile head in open or closed procedures of the midface and anterior skull base while accuracy and sterility are maintained. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Superior interhemispheric approach for midline meningioma from the anterior cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, S; Derrey, S; Martinaud, O; Gérardin, E; Langlois, O; Fréger, P; Hannequin, D; Castel, H; Proust, F

    2011-07-01

    For suprasellar meningioma, the fronto-basal exposure is considered the standard approach. The superior interhemispheric (IH) approach is less described in the literature. To assess the surgical complications, functional outcome (visual, olfaction), morbidity and mortality rates and late recurrence, after resection by superior IH approach of midline skull base meningioma. Between 1998 and 2008, 52 consecutive patients with midline meningioma on the anterior portion of the skull base (mean age: 63.8 ± 13.1; sex ratio F/M: 3.7) were operated on via the superior IH approach. After a mean follow-up of 56.9 ± 32.9 months, an independent neurosurgeon proposed a prospective examination of functional outcome to each patient, as well as a visual and olfactory function assessment. Fifty-two patients were divided into a group with olfactory groove meningioma (n=34) and another with tuberculum sellae meningioma (n=18). The outcome was characterized by postoperative complications in 13 patients (25%), mortality rate in two (3.8%) and long-term morbidity at in 17 (37%) of 50 surviving patients. Based on multivariate analysis, no prognosis factor was significant as regards the favorable outcome. The mean postoperative KPS score (86.6 ± 9.4) was significantly improved. However, dysexecutive syndrome was observed in four patients (8%), hyposmia-anosmia in 34 (68%) and visual acuity deteriorated in one (2%). The superior IH approach could be considered a safe anteriorly orientated midline approach for removal OGM and TSM meningioma. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Properties and architecture of the sperm whale skull amphitheatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Parvez; Amini, Shahrouz; Tadayon, Maryam; Miserez, Ali; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2016-02-01

    The sperm whale skull amphitheatre cradles an enormous two-tonne spermaceti organ. The amphitheatre separates this organ from the cranium and the cervical vertebrae that lie in close proximity to the base of the skull. Here, we elucidate that this skull amphitheatre is an elastic, flexible, triple-layered structure with mechanical properties that are conjointly guided by bone histology and the characteristics of pore space. We contend that the amphitheatre will flex elastically to equilibrate forces transmitted via the spermaceti organ that arise through diving. We find that collisions from sperm whale aggression do not cause the amphitheatre to bend, but rather localise stress to the base of the amphitheatre on its anterior face. We consider, therefore, that the uniquely thin and extended construction of the amphitheatre, has relevance as an energy absorptive structure in diving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Automatic Sex Determination of Skulls Based on a Statistical Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination from skeletons is an important research subject in forensic medicine. Previous skeletal sex assessments are through subjective visual analysis by anthropologists or metric analysis of sexually dimorphic features. In this work, we present an automatic sex determination method for 3D digital skulls, in which a statistical shape model for skulls is constructed, which projects the high-dimensional skull data into a low-dimensional shape space, and Fisher discriminant analysis is used to classify skulls in the shape space. This method combines the advantages of metrical and morphological methods. It is easy to use without professional qualification and tedious manual measurement. With a group of Chinese skulls including 127 males and 81 females, we choose 92 males and 58 females to establish the discriminant model and validate the model with the other skulls. The correct rate is 95.7% and 91.4% for females and males, respectively. Leave-one-out test also shows that the method has a high accuracy.

  2. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Calley, Cynthia S.J. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated patient and treatment parameters correlated with development of temporal lobe radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 66 patients treated for skull base chordoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or sinonasal malignancies between 2005 and 2012, who had at least 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The median radiation dose was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Analyzed factors included gender, age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, use of chemotherapy, and the absolute dose:volume data for both the right and left temporal lobes, considered separately. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis evaluated potential predictors of radiation necrosis, and the median effective concentration (EC50) model estimated dose–volume parameters associated with radiation necrosis. Results: Median follow-up time was 31 months (range 6-96 months) and was 34 months in patients who were alive. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at 3 years was 84.9%. The 3-year estimate of any grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis was 12.4%, and for grade 2 or higher radiation necrosis was 5.7%. On multivariate GEE, only dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of radiation necrosis. In the EC50 model, all dose levels from 10 to 70 Gy (RBE) were highly correlated with radiation necrosis, with a 15% 3-year risk of any-grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis when the absolute volume of a temporal lobe receiving 60 Gy (RBE) (aV60) exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3}, or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Dose–volume parameters are highly correlated with the risk of developing temporal lobe radiation necrosis. In this study the risk of radiation necrosis increased sharply when the temporal lobe aV60 exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3} or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Treatment planning goals should include constraints on the volume of temporal lobes receiving

  3. Trautmann's triangle anatomy with application to posterior transpetrosal and other related skull base procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Griessenauer, Christoph; Loukas, Marios; Ansari, Shaheryar F; Fritsch, Michael H; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-10-01

    Trautmann's triangle (TT) faces the cerebellopontine angle and is exposed during posterior transpetrosal approaches. However, reports on the morphometric analysis of this structure are lacking in the literature. The goal was to better understand this important operative corridor. TT was exposed from an external approach (transmastoid) in ten cadavers (20 sides) and from an internal approach on 20 dry adult temporal bones. Measurements included calculation of the area of TT and the distance of the endolymphatic sac from the anterior border of the sigmoid sinus. The area range of TT was 45-210 mm(2) (mean 151 mm(2); SD 37 mm(2)). Three types of triangles were identified based on area. Type I triangles had areas less than 75 mm(2), Type II areas were 75-149 mm(2), and Type III areas were 150 mm(2) and greater. These types were observed in 37.5%, 35%, and 27.5% of sides, respectively. The distance from the jugular bulb's anterior border to the posterior border of the posterior semicircular canal ranged from 6 to 11 mm (mean 8.5 mm). The endolymphatic sac was located in the inferior portion of TT and traveled anterior to the sigmoid sinus. The horizontal distance from the anterior edge of the sigmoid sinus to the posterior edge of the endolymphatic sac ranged from 0 to 13.5 mm (mean 9 mm). Additional anatomic knowledge regarding TT may improve neurosurgical procedures in this region by avoiding intrusion into the endolymphatic sac and sigmoid sinus. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A skull-based multiple dipole phantom for EEG and MEG studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, M.E.; Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    A versatile phantom for use in evaluating forward and inverse methods for MEG and EEG has been designed and is currently being constructed. The phantom consists of three major components: (i) a 32-element cur- rent dipole array, (ii) a PC-controlled dipole driver with 32 isolated channels allowing independent control of each dipole, (iii) spherical and human-skull mounts in which the dipole array is placed. Materials were selected throughout the phantom to produce minimal field distortions and artifacts to enable acquisition of high quality EEG and MEG data. The dipoles are made from a rigid narrow (0.84 mm) stainless steel coax cable. The dipole drivers can be configured as either current or voltage sources, are independently programmable and fully isolated, and are capable of producing arbitrary bipolar waveforms up to a 200 Hz bandwidth. The spherical mount is a single shell sphere filled with conductive gelatin. The human skull mount has three shells: ``brain`` (conducting gelatin), ``skull`` (the skull is impregnated with a low conductivity conducting gelatin), and ``scalp`` (a thin layer of rubber latex mixed with NaCl to achieve a conductivity matched to the brain). The conductivities will be adjusted to achieve approximately an 80:1:80 ratio. Data collected to date from the spherical phantom shows excellent agreement between measured surface potentials and that predicted from theory (27 of the 32 dipoles give better than 99.9% rms fit) and negligible leakage between dipoles. We are currently completing construction of the skull mount.

  5. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm 3 ), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose ≥105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm 3 ) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm 3 ), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm 3 ). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities

  6. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buch, Karen; Nguyen, Thanh; Norbash, Alex; Mian, Asim; Mahoney, Eric; Burke, Peter; Libby, Brandon; Calner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6 %). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87 %, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2 %, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. (orig.)

  7. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buch, Karen; Nguyen, Thanh; Norbash, Alex; Mian, Asim [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Mahoney, Eric; Burke, Peter [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Libby, Brandon; Calner, Paul [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6 %). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87 %, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2 %, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. (orig.)

  8. Radiation for skull base meningiomas: review of the literature on the approach to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Fabio Y; Chung, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    Skull base meningiomas (SBM) pose unique challenges for radiotherapy as these tumors are often in close proximity to a number of critical structures and may not be surgically addressed in many cases, leaving the question about the tumor grade and expected biological behaviour. External beam radiotherapy and radiosurgery are longstanding treatments for meningioma that are typically used as upfront primary therapy, for recurrent tumors and as adjuvant therapy following surgical resection. There is controversy regarding the optimal timing and approach for radiation therapy in various clinical settings such as the role of adjuvant radiotherapy for completely resected grade 2 tumours. Despite the use of radiotherapy for many decades, the evidence to guide optimal radiation treatment is limited largely to single institution series of EBRT, SRS and particle therapy. In this article, we review the published data to clarify the role of external beam radiotherapy, proton radiotherapy and single and multi-fraction radiosurgery for SBM. We also highlight the areas of potential research and need for clinical improvement, including the growing awareness and effort to improve cognitive function in this patient population, who typically have long life expectancy following their meningioma diagnosis.

  9. Immunophenotypic features of dedifferentiated skull base chordoma: An insight into the intratumoural heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin Manuel Pińa Batista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chordomas are rare and low-grade malignant solid tumours, despite their histologically benign appearance, that arise in the bone from embryonic notochordal vestiges of the axial skeleton, a mesoderm-derived structure that is involved in the process of neurulation and embryonic development. Chordomas occurring in the skull base tend to arise in the basiocciput along the clivus. Three major morphological variants have been described (classical, chondroid, and atypical/dedifferentiated. The pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms involved in chordoma development remain uncertain. From a pathological standpoint, the microenvironment of a chordoma is heterogeneous, showing a dual epithelial-mesenchymal differentiation. These tumours are characterised by slow modality of biologic growth, local recurrence, low incidence of metastasis rates, and cancer stem cell (CSC phenotype. The main molecular findings are connected with brachyury immunoexpression and activation of the downstream Akt and mTOR signalling pathways. The differentiation between typical and atypical chordomas is relevant because the tumoural microenvironment and prognosis are partially different. This review provides an insight into the recent and relevant concepts and histochemical markers expressed in chordomas, with special emphasis on dedifferentiated chordomas and their prognostic implications.

  10. Neuropsychological function in adults after high dose fractionated radiation therapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glosser, Guila; McManus, Pat; Munzenrider, John; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Fullerton, Barbara; Adams, Judy; Urie, Marcia M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long term effects of high dose fractionated radiation therapy on brain functioning prospectively in adults without primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with histologically confirmed chordomas and low grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base were evaluated with neuropsychological measures of intelligence, language, memory, attention, motor function and mood following surgical resection/biopsy of the tumor prior to irradiation, and then at about 6 months, 2 years and 4 years following completion of treatment. None received chemotherapy. Results: In the patients without tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis, there were no indications of adverse effects on cognitive functioning in the post-acute through the late stages after brain irradiation. Even in patients who received doses of radiation up to 66 Cobalt Gy equivalent through nondiseased (temporal lobe) brain tissue, memory and cognitive functioning remained stable for up to 5 years after treatment. A mild decline in psycho-motor speed was seen in more than half of the patients, and motor slowing was related to higher radiation doses in midline and temporal lobe brain structures. Conclusion: Results suggest that in adults, tolerance for focused radiation is relatively high in cortical brain structures

  11. Clinical efficacy and safety of surface imaging guided radiosurgery (SIG-RS) in the treatment of benign skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Steven K M; Patel, Kunal; Kim, Teddy; Knipprath, Erik; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Cerviño, Laura I; Lawson, Joshua D; Murphy, Kevin T; Sanghvi, Parag; Carter, Bob S; Chen, Clark C

    2017-04-01

    Frameless, surface imaging guided radiosurgery (SIG-RS) is a novel platform for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) wherein patient positioning is monitored in real-time through infra-red camera tracking of facial topography. Here we describe our initial clinical experience with SIG-RS for the treatment of benign neoplasms of the skull base. We identified 48 patients with benign skull base tumors consecutively treated with SIG-RS at a single institution between 2009 and 2011. Patients were diagnosed with meningioma (n = 22), vestibular schwannoma (n = 20), or nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (n = 6). Local control and treatment-related toxicity were retrospectively assessed. Median follow-up was 65 months (range 61-72 months). Prescription doses were 12-13 Gy in a single fraction (n = 18), 8 Gy × 3 fractions (n = 6), and 5 Gy × 5 fractions (n = 24). Actuarial tumor control rate at 5 years was 98%. No grade ≥3 treatment-related toxicity was observed. Grade ≤2 toxicity was associated with symptomatic lesions (p = 0.049) and single fraction treatment (p = 0.005). SIG-RS for benign skull base tumors produces clinical outcomes comparable to conventional frame-based SRS techniques while enhancing patient comfort.

  12. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy improves cranial neuropathies in patients with skull base meningiomas: a retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base meningiomas commonly present with cranial neuropathies. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) has been used to treat these tumors with excellent local control, but rates of improvement in cranial neuropathies have not been well defined. We review the experience at Thomas Jefferson University using FSRT in the management of these patients with a focus on symptom outcomes. We identified 225 cases of skull base meningiomas treated with FSRT at Thomas Jefferson University from 1994 through 2009. The target volume was the enhancing tumor, treated to a standard prescription dose of 54 Gy. Symptoms at the time of RT were classified based on the cranial nerve affected. Logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of symptom improvement after FSRT. The median follow-up time was 4.4 years. In 92% of cases, patients were symptomatic at the time of RT; the most common were impaired visual field/acuity (58%) or extraocular movements (34%). After FSRT, durable improvement of at least one symptom occurred in 57% of cases, including 40% of visual acuity/visual field deficits, and 40% of diplopia/ptosis deficits. Of all symptomatic patients, 27% experienced improvement of at least one symptom within 2 months of the end of RT. FSRT is very effective in achieving improvement of cranial neuropathies from skull base meningiomas, particularly visual symptoms. Over half of treated patients experience a durable improvement of at least one symptom, frequently within 2 months from the end of RT

  13. Early microsurgery in a paradigm of “intervention first” for skull base Cognard grade IV dural arteriovenous fistulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Bernard, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Surgical occlusion of skull base Cognard IV DAVFs yields excellent exclusion rate. However, complete occlusion of the shunt may not lead to clinical improvement if symptoms had been progressing for an excessively long period of time before curative treatment was initiated. Hence the patient remains at risk of rebleeding as long as the shunt is open. We do believe that a single stage endovascular attempt can be decided, but a failed procedure should lead to immediate surgery.

  14. Base of the skull morphology and Class III malocclusion in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Maciel Tinano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to determine the morphological differences in the base of the skull of individuals with cleft lip and palate and Class III malocclusion in comparison to control groups with Class I and Class III malocclusion. METHODS: A total of 89 individuals (males and females aged between 5 and 27 years old (Class I, n = 32; Class III, n = 29; and Class III individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate, n = 28 attending PUC-MG Dental Center and Cleft Lip/Palate Care Center of Baleia Hospital and PUC-MG (CENTRARE were selected. Linear and angular measurements of the base of the skull, maxilla and mandible were performed and assessed by a single calibrated examiner by means of cephalometric radiographs. Statistical analysis involved ANCOVA and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS: No significant differences with regard to the base of the skull were found between the control group (Class I and individuals with cleft lip and palate (P > 0.017. The cleft lip/palate group differed from the Class III group only with regard to CI.Sp.Ba (P = 0.015. Individuals with cleft lip and palate had a significantly shorter maxillary length (Co-A in comparison to the control group (P < 0.001. No significant differences were found in the mandible (Co-Gn of the control group and individuals with cleft lip and palate (P = 1.000. CONCLUSION: The present findings suggest that there are no significant differences in the base of the skull of individuals Class I or Class III and individuals with cleft lip and palate and Class III malocclusion.

  15. [Application of computer-aided design and navigation technology in skull base and infratemporal fossa tumor surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-xing; Peng, Xin; Liu, Xiao-jing; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Guang-yan; Guo, Chuan-bin

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the application of computer-aided design and navigation technology in skull base and infratemporal fossa tumor surgery and to analyze its advantages and disadvantages. Twenty-nine cases with tumor of skull base and infratemporal fossa were treated with computer-aided design and navigation surgery. The Parameters of age, gender, primary or recurrent tumor, tumor nature and surgical approach were recorded. En bloc resection was performed in 20 cases and subtotal resection in 9 cases. The margin status was negative margin in 8 cases, near-tumor margin in 17 cases and positive resection margin in 4 cases. Postoperative complication rate was 14% (4/29). During the follow-up period, 2 benign cases recurred.In the malignant group, there were 7 cases of recurrence, 2 cases of metastasis and 3 deaths. The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival rate were 69% and 40% respectively. Navigation technology can enhance the confidence of the surgeons and operation safety in handling malignant tumors in skull base and infratemporal fossa.

  16. Usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base: comparison with FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Shin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choline is a new PET tracer that is useful for the detection of malignant tumor. Choline is a precursor of the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid in the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells. Malignant tumors have an elevated level of phosphatidylcholine in cell membrane. Thus, choline is a marker of tumor malignancy. Method The patient was a 51-year-old man with repeated recurrent hemangiopericytoma in the skull base. We performed Choline-PET in this patient after various treatments and compared findings with those of FDG-PET. Results Choline accumulated in this tumor, but FDG did not accumulate. We diagnosed this tumor as residual hemangiopericytoma and performed the resection of the residual tumor. FDG-PET is not appropriate for skull base tumor detection because uptake in the brain is very strong. Conclusion We emphasize the usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base after various treatments, compared with FDG-PET.

  17. High-resolution Whole-Genome Analysis of Skull Base Chordomas Implicates FHIT Loss in Chordoma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Jose Diaz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare tumor arising in the sacrum, clivus, or vertebrae. It is often not completely resectable and shows a high incidence of recurrence and progression with shortened patient survival and impaired quality of life. Chemotherapeutic options are limited to investigational therapies at present. Therefore, adjuvant therapy for control of tumor recurrence and progression is of great interest, especially in skull base lesions where complete tumor resection is often not possible because of the proximity of cranial nerves. To understand the extent of genetic instability and associated chromosomal and gene losses or gains in skull base chordoma, we undertook whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis of flash frozen surgical chordoma specimens, 21 from the clivus and 1 from C1 to C2 vertebrae. We confirm the presence of a deletion at 9p involving CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP but at a much lower rate (22% than previously reported for sacral chordoma. At a similar frequency (21%, we found aneuploidy of chromosome 3. Tissue microarray immunohistochemistry demonstrated absent or reduced fragile histidine triad (FHIT protein expression in 98% of sacral chordomas and 67%of skull base chordomas. Our data suggest that chromosome 3 aneuploidy and epigenetic regulation of FHIT contribute to loss of the FHIT tumor suppressor in chordoma. The finding that FHIT is lost in a majority of chordomas provides new insight into chordoma pathogenesis and points to a potential new therapeutic target for this challenging neoplasm.

  18. Anatomy of the inferior petro-occipital vein and its relation to the base of the skull: application to surgical and endovascular procedures of the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Watanabe, Koichi; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-07-01

    Although the inferior petro-occipital vein has been recently used for vascular access to the cavernous sinus, few detailed descriptions of its anatomy are in the literature. We aimed to investigate the morphology and relationships of this vessel. Twelve latex-injected cadaveric heads (24 sides) were dissected to identify the inferior petro-occipital vein and anatomic details documented. The petro-occipital vein was identified on 83.3% of sides. Generally this vein united the internal carotid venous plexus to the superior jugular bulb. However, on 10% of sides, the anterior part of this vein communicated directly with the cavernous sinus, and on 15%, the posterior vein drained into the inferior petrosal sinus at its termination into the superior jugular bulb. The petro-occipital vein was separated from the overlying inferior petrosal sinus by a thin plate of bone. On 40% of sides, small venous connections were found between these two venous structures. The vein was usually larger if a nondominant transverse sinus was present. The overlying inferior petrosal sinus was smaller in diameter when an underlying inferior petro-occipital vein was present. On 20% of sides, the posterior aspect of the vein communicated with the hypoglossal canal veins. On three sides, diploic veins from the clivus drained into the inferior petro-occipital vein. The inferior petro-occipital vein is present in most humans. This primarily extracranial vessel communicates with intracranial venous sinuses and should be considered an emissary vein. Knowledge of this vessel's exact anatomy may be useful to cranial base surgeons and endovascular specialists. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Compensation of skull motion and breathing motion in CT using data-based and image-based metrics, respectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, H.; Rohkohl, C.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel reconstruction for motion correction of non-cardiac organs. With non-cooperative patients or in emergency case, breathing motion or motion of the skull may compromise image quality. Our algorithm is based on the optimization of either motion artefact metrics or data-driven metrics. This approach was successfully applied in cardiac CTA [1]. While motion correction of the coronary vessels requires a local motion model, global motion models are sufficient for organs like the lung or the skull. The parameter vector for the global affine motion is estimated iteratively, using the open source optimization library NLOPT. The image is updated using motion compensated reconstruction in each of the iterations. Evaluation of the metric value, e.g. the image entropy, provides information for the next iteration loop. After reaching the fixed point of the iteration, the final motion parameters are used for a motion-compensated full quality reconstruction. In head imaging the motion model is based on translation and rotation, in thoracic imaging the rotation is replaced by non-isotropic scaling in all three dimensions. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in thoracic imaging by evaluating PET-CT data from free-breathing patients. In neuro imaging, data from stroke patients showing skull tremor were analyzed. It was shown that motion artefacts can be largely reduced and spatial resolution was restored. In head imaging, similar results can be obtained using motion artefact metrics or data-driven metrics. In case of image-based metrics, the entropy of the image proved to be superior. Breathing motion could also be significantly reduced using entropy metric. However, in this case data driven metrics cannot be applied because the line integrals associated to the ROI of the lung have to be computed using the local ROI mechanism [2] It was shown that the lung signal is corrupted by signals originating from the complement of the lung. Thus a meaningful

  20. Clinical role of the skull base with increased uptake of 99mTc-MDP on SPECT/CT fused imaging with patients of nasopharyngeal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hongxia; Zhang Jinshan; Liu Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical role of the fused skull single photon emission computed tomographic and computed tomographic images (SPECT/CT) when there was 'hot' in the skull base of patients with NPC. Methods: 99 mTc-MDP SPECT/ CT and MRI were performed in a week in 44 patients (30 with first-visited cases and 14 with return-visited, 38 cases of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and 6 cases of undifferentiated cancer, 14 with headache). Region of interests (ROI) were drawn on the area of the suspected skull base and the upper cervical vertebral body on the same slice. A lesion-to-spine (L/S) ratio was interpreted on SPECT/CT as normal, benign, or malignant. L/S>1 indicated malignant skull base bone involvement (SBBI). Ten patients were studied as controls. Results: (1)Of the 44 study patients, 24 had SBBI (55%) based on SPECT/CT detecting skull base bone lesions with L/S =1.83±0.69. Twenty patients had normal or benign bone lesions on SPECT/CT with L/S =0.68±0.13. There was statistic significance compared SBBI with no SBBI subgroups (P 0.05). The numbers of SBBI had no relationship with positive rate of SPECT/CT (P >0.05). (3)There was no obviously increased uptake in the skull base in the 10 control patients (L/S<1). Conclusion: The skull SPECT/CT was recommended as one of clinical diagnosis tool for SBBI from NPC. Patients with headache should be highly suspected whether tumor cells involved the skull base bone or not. Further accumulation of other clinical factors would clarify the values of SPECT/CT. (authors)

  1. Diseases of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Different forms of skull diseases viz. inflammatory diseases, skull tumors, primary and secondary bone tumors, are considered. Roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  2. Improved methods for chronic light-based motor mapping in mice: automated movement tracking with accelerometers, and chronic EEG recording in a bilateral thin-skull preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silasi, Gergely; Boyd, Jamie D; Ledue, Jeff; Murphy, Timothy H

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic stimulation of the mouse cortex can be used to generate motor maps that are similar to maps derived from electrode-based stimulation. Here we present a refined set of procedures for repeated light-based motor mapping in ChR2-expressing mice implanted with a bilateral thinned-skull chronic window and a chronically implanted electroencephalogram (EEG) electrode. Light stimulation is delivered sequentially to over 400 points across the cortex, and evoked movements are quantified on-line with a three-axis accelerometer attached to each forelimb. Bilateral maps of forelimb movement amplitude and movement direction were generated at weekly intervals after recovery from cranial window implantation. We found that light pulses of ~2 mW produced well-defined maps that were centered approximately 0.7 mm anterior and 1.6 mm lateral from bregma. Map borders were defined by sites where light stimulation evoked EEG deflections, but not movements. Motor maps were similar in size and location between mice, and maps were stable over weeks in terms of the number of responsive sites, and the direction of evoked movements. We suggest that our method may be used to chronically assess evoked motor output in mice, and may be combined with other imaging tools to assess cortical reorganization or sensory-motor integration.

  3. Osteoradionecrosis of the skull base after radiotherapy for nasopharynx cancer; Osteoradionecrose de la base du crane apres radiotherapie pour cancer du nasopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mnejja, W.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Oncologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Boudawara, T. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, A. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' ORL, Sfax (Tunisia); Frikha, M. [CHU Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this work was to study the incidence and the risk factors of osteoradionecrosis occurrence at the skull base after radiotherapy for nasopharynx cancer. It is often asymptomatic. Its incidence is not low. The systematic realisation of radiological examinations during the surveillance allows to detect the asymptomatic forms. No factor of risk was identified in the study. (N.C.)

  4. Minimally invasive endoscopic repair of refractory lateral skull base cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Brown, Erik C; Cetas, Justin S; Dogan, Aclan; Gupta, Sachin; Hullar, Timothy E; Smith, Timothy L; Ciporen, Jeremy N

    2018-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks occur in approximately 10% of patients undergoing a translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid, or middle fossa approach for vestibular schwannoma resection. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea also results from trauma, neoplasms, and congenital defects. A high degree of difficulty in repair sometimes requires repetitive microsurgical revisions-a rate of 10% of cases is often cited. This can not only lead to morbidity but is also costly and burdensome to the health care system. In this case-based theoretical analysis, the authors summarize the literature regarding endoscopic endonasal techniques to obliterate the eustachian tube (ET) as well as compare endoscopic endonasal versus open approaches for repair. Given the results of their analysis, they recommend endoscopic endonasal ET obliteration (EEETO) as a first- or second-line technique for the repair of CSF rhinorrhea from a lateral skull base source refractory to spontaneous healing and CSF diversion. They present a case in which EEETO resolved refractory CSF rhinorrhea over a 10-month follow-up after CSF diversions, wound reexploration, revised packing of the ET via a lateral microscopic translabyrinthine approach, and the use of a vascularized flap had failed. They further summarize the literature regarding studies that describe various iterations of EEETO. By its minimally invasive nature, EEETO imposes less morbidity as well as less risk to the patient. It can be readily implemented into algorithms once CSF diversion (for example, lumbar drain) has failed, prior to considering open surgery for repair. Additional studies are warranted to further demonstrate the outcome and cost-saving benefits of EEETO as the data until now have been largely empirical yet very hopeful. The summaries and technical notes described in this paper may serve as a resource for those skull base teams faced with similar challenging and otherwise refractory CSF leaks from a lateral skull base source.

  5. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenital in a child manifesting phenotypic features resembling dysosteosclerosis/osteosclerosis malformation complex; 3DCT scan analysis of the skull base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Introduction A boy presented with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) associated with severe central nervous system dysfunction. The clinical history and the distinctive radiographic/tomographic features were consistent but not completely diagnostic for dysosteosclerosis. Case presentation A 5-year-old boy from a consanguineous family in Austria was born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita in connection with central nervous system dysfunction. Recently he was referred to the orthopaedic department for further clinical assessment. Radiographic documentation showed significant sclerosis and thickening at the skull base with further extension to involve the craniocervical junction. Spinal radiographs showed platyspondyly of the thoracic vertebral bodies associated with widening of the intervertebral spaces. Long bones were not sclerotic as usually seen in the classical dysosteosclerosis phenotype. It is highly likely that long-term immobilization because of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita was the main reason behind this. 3 DCT scans showed significant hypertrophy of the clivus. The latter occupied the major space of the skull base. The overall radiographic and scanning images were compatible but not fully diagnostic with dysosteosclerosis/osteosclerosis malformation complex. Conclusion The skull base malformation complex in patients with dysosteosclerosis/osteosclerosis requires careful evaluation. 3DCT scanning of the skull base and the vertebrae could be useful tools for early recognition of the pathophysiological mechanism in patients with dysosteosclerosis/osteosclerosis/multiple contractures spectrum Previously, radiographs only have assessed the skull base pathology in patients with dysosteosclerosis, here we further characterize the pathology via 3DCT scan. Our patient illustrates extensive sclerosis of the skull base, associated with extremely hypertrophied clivus. The latter occupied the whole space of the skull base and the craniocervical

  6. A clinical pilot study of a modular video-CT augmentation system for image-guided skull base surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen P.; Mirota, Daniel J.; Uneri, Ali; Otake, Yoshito; Hager, Gregory; Reh, Douglas D.; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-02-01

    Augmentation of endoscopic video with preoperative or intraoperative image data [e.g., planning data and/or anatomical segmentations defined in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], can improve navigation, spatial orientation, confidence, and tissue resection in skull base surgery, especially with respect to critical neurovascular structures that may be difficult to visualize in the video scene. This paper presents the engineering and evaluation of a video augmentation system for endoscopic skull base surgery translated to use in a clinical study. Extension of previous research yielded a practical system with a modular design that can be applied to other endoscopic surgeries, including orthopedic, abdominal, and thoracic procedures. A clinical pilot study is underway to assess feasibility and benefit to surgical performance by overlaying CT or MR planning data in realtime, high-definition endoscopic video. Preoperative planning included segmentation of the carotid arteries, optic nerves, and surgical target volume (e.g., tumor). An automated camera calibration process was developed that demonstrates mean re-projection accuracy (0.7+/-0.3) pixels and mean target registration error of (2.3+/-1.5) mm. An IRB-approved clinical study involving fifteen patients undergoing skull base tumor surgery is underway in which each surgery includes the experimental video-CT system deployed in parallel to the standard-of-care (unaugmented) video display. Questionnaires distributed to one neurosurgeon and two otolaryngologists are used to assess primary outcome measures regarding the benefit to surgical confidence in localizing critical structures and targets by means of video overlay during surgical approach, resection, and reconstruction.

  7. Cranial morphology of Australopithecus afarensis: a comparative study based on a composite reconstruction of the adult skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbel, W H; White, T D; Johanson, D C

    1984-08-01

    The Pliocene hominid species Australopithecus afarensis is represented by cranial, dental, and mandibular remains from Hadar, Ethiopia, and Laetoli, Tanzania. These fossils provide important information about the cranial anatomy of the earliest known hominids. Because complete crania or skulls are not known, we produced a composite reconstruction of an adult male skull based on 13 specimens from the Hadar Formation. The reconstruction serves as a testable hypothesis regarding functional relationships in the A. afarensis skull and is the basis for the comparative study presented here. We examine six major aspects of cranial and mandibular anatomy. We combine our results with those of White et al. (1981) in a discussion of alternate hypotheses of early hominid phylogeny. In the cranium, jaws, and teeth A. afarensis exhibits a morphological pattern that we interpret as primitive for the Hominidae. Homo habilis retains a number of these primitive features for which A. africanus, A. robustus, and A. boisei share derived character states, particularly in the masticatory apparatus. Homo and "robust" species of Australopithecus share a suite of derived cranial base features. These shared traits may relate to upper facial orthognathium which is also common to these taxa and are probably indicative of parallelism rather than a close phylogenetic relationship. The cranial base characteristics of A.L. 333-45 do not, contrary to Olson's (1981) claims, provide evidence for an A. afarensis--"robust" Australopithecus sister group. When the range of mastoid variation in extant African pongids and A. afarensis is examined thoroughly, the Pliocene hominid appears to retain a primitive, rather than derived, morphology.

  8. Feasibility of combined operation and perioperative intensity-modulated brachytherapy of advanced/recurrent malignancies involving the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strege, R.J.; Eichmann, T.; Mehdorn, H.M. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kovacs, G.; Niehoff, P. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Interdisciplinary Brachytherapy Center; Maune, S. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Otolaryngology; Holland, D. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Ophthalmology

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical feasibility and toxicity of combined operation and perioperative intensity-modulated fractionated interstitial brachytherapy (IMBT) in advanced-stage malignancies involving the skull base with the goal of preserving the patients' senses of sight. Patients and Methods: This series consisted of 18 consecutive cases: ten patients with paranasal sinus carcinomas, five with sarcomas, two with primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs), and one with parotid gland carcinoma. After, in most cases, subtotal surgical resection (R1-R2: carried out so that the patients' senses of sight were preserved), two to twelve (mean five) afterloading plastic tubes were placed into the tumor bed. IMBT was performed with an iridium-192 stepping source in pulsed-dose-rate/high-dose-rate (PDR/HDR) afterloading technique. The total IMBT dose, ranging from 10 to 30 Gy, was administered in a fractionated manner (3-5 Gy/day, 5 days/week). Results: Perioperative fractionated IMBT was performed in 15 out of 18 patients and was well tolerated. Complications that partially prevented or delayed IMBT in some cases included cerebrospinal fluid leakage (twice), meningitis (twice), frontal brain syndrome (twice), afterloading tube displacement (twice), seizure (once), and general morbidity (once). No surgery- or radiation-induced injuries to the cranial nerves or eyes occurred. Median survival times were 33 months after diagnosis and 16 months after combined operation and IMBT. Conclusion: Perioperative fractionated IMBT after extensive but vision-preserving tumor resection seems to be a safe and well-tolerated treatment of advanced/recurrent malignancies involving the skull base. These preliminary state suggest that combined operation and perioperative fractionated IMBT is a palliative therapeutic option in the management of fatal malignancies involving the base of the skull, a strategy which leaves the patients' visual acuity intact. (orig.)

  9. Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging; Anatomie der Schaedelbasis und Hirnnerven in der Schnittbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bink, A.; Berkefeld, J.; Zanella, F. [Klinikum der Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples. (orig.) [German] Zur Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis sind sowohl die Computertomographie (CT) als auch Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) geeignet. Waehrend mittels CT vorzugsweise die exakte knoecherne Ausbreitung von Pathologien z. B. zur operativen Therapieplanung erfasst werden, dient die MRT sowohl der Darstellung von Pathologien bzgl. ihrer Ausbreitung im Weichteilgewebe als auch dem Nachweis knoecherner Infiltration. Bei der Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis wird eine hochaufloesende Darstellung mit geringer Schichtdicke fuer beide Modalitaeten angestrebt. Die genaue Kenntnis der Anatomie ist bereits bei der Untersuchungsplanung notwendig. Sie ist zudem Voraussetzung fuer das Erkennen und die korrekte Interpretation von Pathologien. Die MRT ist die bildgebende Methode der Wahl zur Abklaerung von Pathologien der Hirnnerven. Dabei ist es durch gezielte Sequenzauswahl, die sich nach den die Hirnnerven umgebenen Strukturen richtet, moeglich, den gesamten Verlauf der Hirnnerven zu beurteilen. Dieser Artikel beschreibt die Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis

  10. Computed tomography findings of bony regeneration after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with skull base destruction: implications for local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Fumin; Leung, Stephen Wan; Wang Chongjong; Su Chihying; Lui Chunchung; Chen Huichun; Sun Limin; Lin Tsungmin

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response of bony destruction (BD) of the skull base following radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and investigate the implications of bony regeneration (BR) on local control and its related factors. Methods and Materials: Ninety patients with NPC with skull base destruction clearly demonstrated on computed tomography (CT) were reviewed. These patients have completed the prescribed treatment and received regular CT follow-up. A total of 338 sets of CT images of the head and neck were reviewed. The tumor response and the appearance of BR in the previous destructive part of the skull base were recorded and analyzed. The tumor response was divided into complete, partial, or no response. BR was defined as recalcification or sclerotic change with partial or complete healing in the previous osteolytic bony defect. Local failure was confirmed either by pathological or merely by imaging studies showing progression of tumor in consecutive radiological pictures. Results: The distribution of specific sites of bony destruction (BD) in these patients included the sphenoid bone (68%), paracavernous sinus area (48%), petrous apex (47%), clivus (44%), pterygoid plates (20%), and others (7%). The CT showed 57 patients (63%) had BR. All were observed within 1 year after treatment. Sixty-two patients (69%) had complete tumor response after treatment. Analyzed by logistic regression method, tumor response after treatment was found to have a statistically significant correlation with BR (p = 0.0004). Most BR (55/57) was demonstrated in patients with complete tumor response. The 3-year actuarial local control rate was 54 % in these patients. The local control was quite different in the comparison of patients with BR versus those with persistent BD (77% vs. 21%, p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that patients with complete tumor response or with BR on imaging had statistically better local control than those without either of the two findings (p

  11. Management of the Facial Nerve in Lateral Skull Base Surgery Analytic Retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. El Shazly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Surgical approaches to the jugular foramen are often complex and lengthy procedures associated with significant morbidity based on the anatomic and tumor characteristics. In addition to the risk of intra-operative hemorrhage from vascular tumors, lower cranial nerves deficits are frequently increased after intra-operative manipulation. Accordingly, modifications in the surgical techniques have been developed to minimize these risks. Preoperative embolization and intra-operative ligation of the external carotid artery have decreased the intraoperative blood loss. Accurate identification and exposure of the cranial nerves extracranially allows for their preservation during tumor resection. The modification of facial nerve mobilization provides widened infratemporal exposure with less postoperative facial weakness. The ideal approach should enable complete, one stage tumor resection with excellent infratemporal and posterior fossa exposure and would not aggravate or cause neurologic deficit. The aim of this study is to present our experience in handling jugular foramen lesions (mainly glomus jugulare without the need for anterior facial nerve transposition. Methods In this series we present our experience in Kasr ElEini University hospital (Cairo–-Egypt in handling 36 patients with jugular foramen lesions over a period of 20 years where the previously mentioned preoperative and operative rules were followed. The clinical status, operative technique and postoperative care and outcome are detailed and analyzed in relation to the outcome. Results Complete cure without complications was achieved in four cases of congenital cholesteatoma and four cases with class B glomus. In advanced cases of glomus jugulare (28 patients (C and D stages complete cure was achieved in 21 of them (75%. The operative complications were also related to this group of 28 patients, in the form of facial paralysis in 20 of them (55.6% and symptomatic vagal

  12. Neuropsychological outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for base of skull meningiomas: a prospective 1-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinvorth, Sarah; Welzel, Grit; Fuss, Martin; Debus, Juergen; Wildermuth, Susanne; Wannenmacher, Michael; Wenz, Frederik

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cognitive outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with base of skull meningiomas. Methods and material: A total of 40 patients with base of skull meningiomas were neuro psychologically evaluated before, after the first fraction (1.8 Gy), at the end of FSRT (n=37), 6 weeks (n=24), 6 (n=18) and 12 months (n=14) after FSRT. A comprehensive test battery including assessment of general intelligence, attention and memory functions was used. Alternate forms were used and current mood state was controlled. Results: After the first fraction a transient decline in memory function and simultaneous improvements in attention functions were observed. No cognitive deteriorations were seen during further follow-up, but increases in attention and memory functions were observed. Mood state improved after the first fraction, at the end of radiotherapy and 6 weeks after radiotherapy. Conclusion: The present data support the conclusion that the probability for the development of permanent cognitive dysfunctions appears to be very low after FSRT. The transient memory impairments on day 1 are interpreted as most likely related to an increase of a preexisting peritumoral edema, whereas the significant acute improvements in attention functions are interpreted as practice effects. An analysis of localization specific effects of radiation failed to show clear hemisphere specific cognitive changes

  13. Three-dimensional fracture visualisation of multidetector CT of the skull base in trauma patients: comparison of three reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringl, Helmut; Schernthaner, Ruediger; Philipp, Marcel O.; Metz-Schimmerl, Sylvia; Czerny, Christian; Weber, Michael; Steiner-Ringl, Andrea; Peloschek, Philipp; Herold, Christian J.; Schima, Wolfgang; Gaebler, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the detection rate of skull-base fractures for three different three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction methods of cranial CT examinations in trauma patients. A total of 130 cranial CT examinations of patients with previous head trauma were subjected to 3D reconstruction of the skull base, using solid (SVR) and transparent (TVR) volume-rendering technique and maximum intensity projection (MIP). Three radiologists independently evaluated all reconstructions as well as standard high-resolution multiplanar reformations (HR-MPRs). Mean fracture detection rates for all readers reading rotating reconstructions were 39, 36, 61 and 64% for SVR, TVR, MIP and HR-MPR respectively. Although not significantly different from HR-MPR with respect to sensitivity (P = 0.9), MIP visualised 18% of fractures that were not reported in HR-MPR. Because of the relatively low detection rate using HR-MPRs alone, we recommend reading MIP reconstructions in addition to the obligatory HR-MPRs to improve fracture detection. (orig.)

  14. The Extended Subfrontal and Fronto-Orbito-Zygomatic Approach in Skull Base Meningioma Surgery: Clinical, Radiologic, and Cosmetic Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleman, Jehuda; Leiggener, Christoph; Schlaeppi, Ai-Jeanine; Kienzler, Jenny; Fathi, Ali-Reza; Fandino, Javier

    2016-03-01

    To review the outcome and cosmetic results of patients undergoing extended subfrontal and fronto-orbito-zygomatic craniotomy for resection of skull base meningiomas. All surgeries were performed in cooperation with an oral and maxillofacial surgeon between 2006 and 2012. Clinical presentation, surgical techniques and complications, cosmetic, clinical, and radiologic outcomes are presented. This study included 25 consecutive patients with 26 operations. Total and subtotal tumor removal was obtained in 19 (73.1%) and 7 (26.9%) patients, respectively. Permanent postoperative complications were seen in 5 (19.2%) patients. Eight of 10 patients with preoperative visual impairment showed recovery at 6 months follow-up. Anosmia was improved in 50% and no worsening was seen in any case of hyposmia. All patients showed improved or complete correction of exophthalmos, cognitive deficits, and epilepsy. One patient (3.8%) developed a postoperative ptosis. No mortality was documented. All patients reported a favorable cosmetic satisfactory score over 6 (8.67 ± 1.6). Tumor recurrence rate was 7.7% (n = 2). The extended subfrontal and fronto-orbito-zygomatic approach, used for resection of meningiomas located in the orbita and the skull base can provide better visibility of the tumor. In addition, these approaches lead to highly satisfying cosmetic and clinical results.

  15. Prediction of the microsurgical window for skull-base tumors by advanced three-dimensional multi-fusion volumetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Saito, Akihiko; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko; Ishida, Go

    2011-01-01

    The surgery of skull base tumors (SBTs) is difficult due to the complex and narrow surgical window that is restricted by the cranium and important structures. The utility of three-dimensional multi-fusion volumetric imaging (3-D MFVI) for visualizing the predicted window for SBTs was evaluated. Presurgical simulation using 3-D MFVI was performed in 32 patients with SBTs. Imaging data were collected from computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and digital subtraction angiography. Skull data was processed to imitate actual bone resection and integrated with various structures extracted from appropriate imaging modalities by image-analyzing software. The simulated views were compared with the views obtained during surgery. All craniotomies and bone resections except opening of the acoustic canal in 2 patients were performed as simulated. The simulated window allowed observation of the expected microsurgical anatomies including tumors, vasculatures, and cranial nerves, through the predicted operative window. We could not achieve the planned tumor removal in only 3 patients. 3-D MFVI afforded high quality images of the relevant microsurgical anatomies during the surgery of SBTs. The intraoperative deja-vu effect of the simulation increased the confidence of the surgeon in the planned surgical procedures. (author)

  16. Expanded endonasal endoscopic approach for resection of a large skull base aneurysmal bone cyst in a pediatric patient with extensive cranial fibrous dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, Vafi; Blitz, Ari M; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L

    2011-04-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are uncommon non-neoplastic, hemorrhagic, and expansile osseous lesions. These lesions most commonly occur in the first two decades of life and affect the long bones and spinal column. Skull base involvement is rare. The authors report the case of a 16-year-old boy who presented with acute visual decline and was found to have a large skull base ABC centered in the sphenoid sinus. In addition, the patient had extensive cranial fibrous dysplasia. The patient underwent a staged expanded endonasal endoscopic approach for complete resection of this lesion with excellent return of his vision. This case adds to the growing body of evidence supporting a role for expanded endonasal endoscopic procedures in pediatric patients with skull base pathologies.

  17. Avian skull morphological evolution: exploring exo- and endocranial covariation with two-block partial least squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Buscalioni, Angela D

    2006-01-01

    While rostral variation has been the subject of detailed avian evolutionary research, avian skull organization, characterized by a flexed or extended appearance of the skull, has eventually become neglected by mainstream evolutionary inquiries. This study aims to recapture its significance, evaluating possible functional, phylogenetic and developmental factors that may be underlying it. In order to estimate which, and how, elements of the skull intervene in patterning the skull we tested the statistical interplay between a series of old mid-sagittal angular measurements (mostly endocranial) in combination with newly obtained skull metrics based on landmark superimposition methods (exclusively exocranial shape), by means of the statistic-morphometric technique of two-block partial least squares. As classic literature anticipated, we found that the external appearance of the skull corresponds to the way in which the plane of the caudal cranial base is oriented, in connection with the orientations of the plane of the foramen magnum and of the lateral semicircular canal. The pattern of covariation found between metrics conveys flexed or extended appearances of the skull implicitly within a single and statistically significant dimension of covariation. Marked shape changes with which angles covary concentrate at the supraoccipital bone, the cranial base and the antorbital window, whereas the plane measuring the orientation of the anterior portion of the rostrum does not intervene. Statistical covariance between elements of the caudal cranial base and the occiput inplies that morphological integration underlies avian skull macroevolutionary organization as a by-product of the regional concordance of such correlated elements within the early embryonic chordal domain of mesodermic origin.

  18. Multiple hydatid cysts of the neck, the nasopharynx and the skull base revealing cervical vertebral hydatid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kohen, Asma; Benjelloun, Abdelaziz; El Quessar, Abdeljalil; Derraz, Said; Lazrak, Abdenasser; Jazouli, Nezha; Kzadri, Mohamed

    2003-06-01

    Hydatid disease is caused by the parasitic tapeworm Echinococcus. This parasite in larval stage can thrive in many parts of the body, most commonly in the liver and the lung. Hydatid disease in the head and neck is uncommon and hydatid cyst presents rarely as a cervical mass. Cervical vertebral echinococcosis is rare. We report a 14-year-old girl with multiple cervical spine hydatid cysts of the C1-C2 vertebrae that spread into the surrounding paravertebral tissues and involve the nasopharynx and the skull base particularly the left jugular foramen. This process has caused a progressive swelling in the left side of the neck located in the retrostyloid compartment of the parapharyngeal space with paralysis of cranial nerves (VI, IX, X, XI, XII). The diagnosis was made based on the image obtained from CT and MRI examinations. Characteristics of this rare disease, diagnosis and treatment difficulty are discussed.

  19. Analysis of the relationship between tumor dose inhomogeneity and local control in patients with skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terahara, Atsuro; Niemierko, Andrzej; Goitein, Michael; Finkelstein, Dianne; Hug, Eugen; Liebsch, Norbert; O'Farrell, Desmond; Lyons, Sue; Munzenrider, John

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: When irradiating a tumor that abuts or displaces any normal structures, the dose constraints to those structures (if lower than the prescribed dose) may cause dose inhomogeneity in the tumor volume at the tumor-critical structure interface. The low-dose region in the tumor volume may be one of the reasons for local failure. The aim of this study is to quantitate the effect of tumor dose inhomogeneity on local control and recurrence-free survival in patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and Materials: 132 patients with skull base chordoma were treated with combined photon and proton irradiation between 1978 and 1993. This study reviews 115 patients whose dose-volume data and follow-up data are available. The prescribed doses ranged from 66.6 Cobalt-Gray-Equivalent (CGE) to 79.2 CGE (median of 68.9 CGE). The dose to the optic structures (optic nerves and chiasma), the brain stem surface, and the brain stem center was limited to 60, 64, and 53 CGE, respectively. We used the dose-volume histogram data derived with the three-dimensional treatment planning system to evaluate several dose-volume parameters including the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD). We also analyzed several other patient and treatment factors in relation to local control and recurrence-free survival. Results: Local failure developed in 42 of 115 patients, with the actuarial local control rates at 5 and 10 years being 59% and 44%. Gender was a significant predictor for local control with the prognosis in males being significantly better than that in females (P 0.004, hazard ratio = 2.3). In a Cox univariate analysis, with stratification by gender, the significant predictors for local control (at the probability level of 0.05) were EUD, the target volume, the minimum dose, and the D 5cc dose. The prescribed dose, histology, age, the maximum dose, the mean dose, the median dose, the D 90% dose, and the overall treatment time were not significant factors. In a Cox multivariate analysis, the

  20. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  1. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Chris N; Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab's learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab's scientific process. Third, the lab's exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom's taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects.

  2. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris N Bayer

    Full Text Available Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab's learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab's scientific process. Third, the lab's exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom's taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects.

  3. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab’s learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab’s scientific process. Third, the lab’s exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom’s taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects. PMID:27513927

  4. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS-MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF A SKULL BASE CHORDOMA IN A CAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocal, Josep; Gamino, Virginia; Guevar, Julien; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Marchesi, Francesco; Hammond, Gawain; Stalin, Catherine

    2017-03-01

    An 8-year-old domestic short-haired cat was presented with anorexia, lethargy, ataxia and one episode of consciousness loss. A midline vertically orientated, biconcave, extra-axial mass originating from the basioccipital bone was detected on magnetic resonance images of the head. The mass was T1W iso- to hypointense when compared with normal grey matter, T2W hyperintense with small areas of isointensity and heterogeneously enhanced with contrast. Multiple signal voids were observed on T2 * images. Histopathological evaluation confirmed a chordoma. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of the imaging characteristics of a chordoma affecting the skull base in a cat. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  5. A Bullet Entered through the Open Mouth and Ended Up in the Parapharyngeal Space and Skull Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saileswar Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shot from a revolver from a close range, a bullet pierced the chest of a policeman and entered through the open mouth of a young male person standing behind. The entry wound was found in the cheek mucosa adjacent to the left lower third molar. After hitting and fracturing the body and the ramus of the mandible, the bullet was deflected and was finally lodged in the parapharyngeal space and skull base, anterolateral to the transverse process of the atlas. The great vessels of the neck were not injured. The patient’s condition was very critical but his life could be saved. The bullet was approached through a modified Blair’s incision and was found to be lying over the carotid sheath. It was removed safely and the patient recovered completely.

  6. En bloc resection of skull base tumor including internal carotid artery. Preoperative evaluation of cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Matsuzaki, Zensei; Kamijo, Atsushi; Ogino, Jun; Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Nukui, Hideaki; Yokomizo, Michinori; Togawa, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    Carotid artery resection yields a possibility of cure in patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery. However, the criteria for the identification of those who are vulnerable to neurologic injury after resection have not been established. Interposition graft covered with a well-vascularized flap could minimize the rate of perioperative morbidity. Particularly, when an extensive resection of the skull base including carotid artery and sigmoid vein, is planned, extracranial-intracranial bypass should be considered to minimize the risks of neurologic morbidity, even if preresection positron emission tomography during balloon test occlusion of internal carotid artery suggested the adequacy of hemispheric collateral blood flow. In these cases, the temporary occlusion of the carotid artery is not an accurate prediction of the morbidity after permanent occlusion. (author)

  7. Skull base and craniocervical bone pneumatisation: two case reports of differing presentations and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francies, Olivia; Morley, Simon; Beale, Tim

    2017-11-01

    We report two patients with increased central skull base and craniocervical junction bone pneumatisation complicated by extra-osseous gas. One patient presented with symptoms of increasing nasal blockage and 'sinus pressure' on a background of extensive nasal polyposis. He was subsequently found to have a history of repeated Valsalva's manoeuvre, the cessation of which resulted in a rapid decrease in the amount of extra-osseous gas on imaging. The second patient presented following a minor head trauma with dysarthria from a hypoglossal nerve palsy and neck pain, with extensive intra- and extra-cranial gas including within the spinal canal (pneumorrhachis). These radiological findings have been reported previously in patients with Eustachian tube dysfunction and/or activities leading to frequently raised middle ear pressures. We review the possible aetiologies, reported risk factors, and the range of associated imaging abnormalities that may be encountered with this rare appearance.

  8. A panoramic view of the skull base: systematic review of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffeo, Christopher S; Dietrich, August R; Grobelny, Bartosz; Zhang, Meng; Goldberg, Judith D; Golfinos, John G; Lebowitz, Richard; Kleinberg, David; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2014-08-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgery has been established as the safest approach to pituitary tumors, yet its role in other common skull base lesions has not been established. To answer this question, we carried out a systematic review of reported series of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four major skull base tumors: olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM), tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSM), craniopharyngiomas (CRA), and clival chordomas (CHO). Data from 162 studies containing 5,701 patients were combined and compared for differences in perioperative mortality, gross total resection (GTR), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, neurological morbidity, post-operative visual function, post-operative anosmia, post-operative diabetes insipidus (DI), and post-operative obesity/hyperphagia. Weighted average rates for each outcome were calculated using relative study size. Our findings indicate similar rates of GTR and perioperative mortality between open and endoscopic approaches for all tumor types. CSF leak was increased after endoscopic surgery. Visual function symptoms were more likely to improve after endoscopic surgery for TSM, CRA, and CHO. Post-operative DI and obesity/hyperphagia were significantly increased after open resection in CRA. Recurrence rates per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up were higher in endoscopy for OGM, TSM, and CHO. Trends for open and endoscopic surgery suggested modest improvement in all outcomes over time. Our observations suggest that endonasal endoscopy is a safe alternative to craniotomy and may be preferred for certain tumor types. However, endoscopic surgery is associated with higher rates of CSF leak, and possibly increased recurrence rates. Prospective study with long-term follow-up is required to verify these preliminary observations.

  9. A novel classification of frontal bone fractures: The prognostic significance of vertical fracture trajectory and skull base extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravi K; Afifi, Ahmed M; Gassner, Jennifer; Hartman, Michael J; Leverson, Glen; King, Timothy W; Bentz, Michael L; Gentry, Lindell R

    2015-05-01

    The broad spectrum of frontal bone fractures, including those with orbital and skull base extension, is poorly understood. We propose a novel classification scheme for frontal bone fractures. Maxillofacial CT scans of trauma patients were reviewed over a five year period, and frontal bone fractures were classified: Type 1: Frontal sinus fracture without vertical extension. Type 2: Vertical fracture through the orbit without frontal sinus involvement. Type 3: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus without orbit involvement. Type 4: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus and ipsilateral orbit. Type 5: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus and contralateral or bilateral orbits. We also identified the depth of skull base extension, and performed a chart review to identify associated complications. 149 frontal bone fractures, including 51 non-vertical frontal sinus (Type 1, 34.2%) and 98 vertical (Types 2-5, 65.8%) fractures were identified. Vertical fractures penetrated the middle or posterior cranial fossa significantly more often than non-vertical fractures (62.2 v. 15.7%, p = 0.0001) and had a significantly higher mortality rate (18.4 v. 0%, p fractures with frontal sinus and orbital extension, and fractures that penetrated the middle or posterior cranial fossa had the strongest association with intracranial injuries, optic neuropathy, disability, and death (p fractures carry a worse prognosis than frontal bone fractures without a vertical pattern. In addition, vertical fractures with extension into the frontal sinus and orbit, or with extension into the middle or posterior cranial fossa have the highest complication rate and mortality. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiological and acetomorphine analysis of the symmetry and direction of evolution of skulls from some historic populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawlikowska-Sroka, A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Asymmetry is a common phenomenon in nature. It is typical for the human body and for the skull as its part. Knowledge of asymmetry and normal anatomy, especially of variability which does not represent pathology but distinguishes individuals is the basis for correct interpretation of radiological findings concerning the skull both in research and diagnostic examinations widely performed in surgery, neurology, neurosurgery, internal medicine, or pediatrics. Analysis of fluctuating asymmetry reveals the influence of stress factors on human development and the ability of the organism to defend itself against stress.The aim of this work was to analyse the asymmetry of skulls from some historic populations and to describe changes in their anatomy over the ages. Material and methods: The material consisted of three skull groups: one contemporary with 82 skulls and two mediaeval (52 skulls from Cedynia and 77 skulls from Grodek on Bug). Direct measurements were done and the skull was X-rayed in the Posterior-Anterior and skull-base projections. Images were scanned and calibrated with MicroStation 95 Academic Edition software. Helmert's transformation with first-order polynomial was done to attain a suitable geometry. Vectorisation of axes and areas was performed on reference material. Using tools for measurement of vector elements, the distance between bilateral points of both sides of the skull were obtained. Data were analysed statistically. Results: The results of measurements were used to study the directional and fluctuating asymmetry. It was found that asymmetry of the skull was present in both historic populations. The following conclusions were drawn: changes in the distribution of directional and fluctuating asymmetry for individual dimensions have taken place over the ages. A high level of directional asymmetry in the facial part and fluctuating asymmetry in the calvaria is typical for contemporary skulls. The reverse is true for relations in the

  11. Ocular Neuromyotonia Noted after Recent Botulinum Toxin Injection for Sixth Nerve Palsy Following Resection of a Posterior Fossa Skull Base Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubert, Jacquelyn; Hariharan, Luxme; Pasol, Joshua; McKeown, Craig; Cavuoto, Kara

    2015-02-01

    A 56-year-old female complained of diplopia immediately after surgical excision of a recurrent left skull base tuberculum meningioma. She was found to have a left sixth nerve palsy, which was subsequently treated with botulinum toxin injection to the medial rectus muscle. Three months post injection, the patient had partial recovery of the sixth nerve palsy and new-onset ocular neuromyotonia.

  12. Sinonasal metallic foreign body penetration of the anterior cranial fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine B. Samuelson

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Intracranial metallic foreign bodies may have significant potential morbidity. Recent advances in endonasal techniques for anterior skull base access may enhance outcomes through reduced morbidity and mortality, improved speed and precision, shorter hospital stays, and lower post-operative pain [1,2,4]. Technical nuances of these approaches and medical decision-making in the context of various neurosurgical considerations are discussed.

  13. [Endoscopic transnasal surgery for giant fibrous dysplasia of the skull base, spreading to the right orbital cavity and nasopharynx (a case report and literature review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkarubo, A N; Lubnin, A Yu; Bukharin, E Yu; Shishkina, L V; Andreev, D N; Koval', K V; Chernov, I V; Karnaukhov, V V

    An extended endoscopic endonasal approach is increasingly used in surgical treatment of space-occupying skull base lesions. The international literature reports only 20 cases of surgical treatment for fibrous dysplasia (PD) of the skull base using the endoscopic endonasal approach. We present our experience with the endoscopic endonasal approach in surgical treatment for giant fibrous dysplasia of the skull base, spreading to the right orbital cavity and nasopharynx. A 26-year-old male patient presented with cranial pain, Vth nerve dysfunction on the right, right keratopathy. OD=0.2 (near acuity - 0.3), OS=1.0, OD - incomplete eyelid closure of 2 mm, conjunctival injection, mucous discharge, corneal opacity in the lower pole and paracentrally, OS - normal appearance. Severe right-sided exophthalmos (more than 15 mm), impaired nasal breathing on the right, nasal (hemorrhagic) discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging and spiral computed tomography scans revealed a bone density lesion located in the area of the orbit, nasal cavity, maxillary sinus on the right, and labyrinth of the ethmoid bone. The patient underwent endonasal endoscopic resection of the lesion. The lesion was resected totally, which was confirmed by control SCT. Right-sided exophthalmos partially regressed (on the right: exophthalmos of 8 mm; protrusion: OD=23 mm, OS=15 mm; the eyeball was displaced downward and outward). The visual and oculomotor functions did not change. The neurological status remained at the preoperative level. Fibrous dysplasia of the skull base is an extremely rare disease. Modern techniques expand the indications for surgery of giant tumors of the skull base using minimally invasive approaches, in particular the endoscopic endonasal approach.

  14. Skull Thickness Morphing for an Age and Sex Specific FE Model of the Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Derek A; Urban, Jillian E; Lillie, Elizabeth M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, skull thickness is thought to be an important factor governing deformation of the skull and its susceptibility to fracture. Although many studies have been done to understand the mechanisms of brain injury and skull fracture, the majority of the cadaveric and finite element (FE) modeling efforts are comprised of older males and 50th percentile male skulls, respectively, which do not accurately represent the population as a whole. This study employed a set of skull table thickness regressions defined at homologous landmarks on the skull which were calculated from 123 pre-existing head CT scans (ages 20-100) using a cortical density-based algorithm. A method was developed to morph the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) 50th percentile male skull model to age and gender specific geometries based on the full thickness regressions using a Thin Plate Spline algorithm. A quantitative measure of morphing error was devised and measured using the morphed and desired full thickness values at the homologous landmark locations. This methodology can be used to create gender and age-specific FE models of the skull and will ultimately be used to understand the relationship between cortical thickness, skull deformation, and head injury.

  15. Congenital muscle dystrophy and diet consistency affect mouse skull shape differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassov, Alexander; Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Krautwald, Mirjam; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2017-11-01

    The bones of the mammalian skull respond plastically to changes in masticatory function. However, the extent to which muscle function affects the growth and development of the skull, whose regions have different maturity patterns, remains unclear. Using muscle dissection and 3D landmark-based geometric morphometrics we investigated the effect of changes in muscle function established either before or after weaning, on skull shape and muscle mass in adult mice. We compared temporalis and masseter mass and skull shape in mice with a congenital muscle dystrophy (mdx) and wild type (wt) mice fed on either a hard or a soft diet. We found that dystrophy and diet have distinct effects on the morphology of the skull and the masticatory muscles. Mdx mice show a flattened neurocranium with a more dorsally displaced foramen magnum and an anteriorly placed mandibular condyle compared with wt mice. Compared with hard diet mice, soft diet mice had lower masseter mass and a face with more gracile features as well as labially inclined incisors, suggesting reduced bite strength. Thus, while the early-maturing neurocranium and the posterior portion of the mandible are affected by the congenital dystrophy, the late-maturing face including the anterior part of the mandible responds to dietary differences irrespective of the mdx mutation. Our study confirms a hierarchical, tripartite organisation of the skull (comprising neurocranium, face and mandible) with a modular division based on development and function. Moreover, we provide further experimental evidence that masticatory loading is one of the main environmental stimuli that generate craniofacial variation. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  16. High anterior cervical approach to the clivus and foramen magnum: a microsurgical anatomy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Vittorio M; Graziano, Francesca; Russo, Antonino; Albanese, Erminia; Ulm, Arthur J

    2011-09-01

    Surgical exposure of lesions located along the ventral foramen magnum (FM) and clivus poses a unique set of challenges to neurosurgeons. Several approaches have been developed to access these regions with varying degrees of exposure and approach-related morbidity. To describe the microsurgical anatomy of the high anterior cervical approach to the clivus and foramen magnum, and describe novel skull base extensions of the approach. Eight adult cadaveric specimens were included in this study. The high anterior cervical approach includes a minimal anterior clivectomy and its lateral skull base extensions: the extended anterior far-lateral clivectomy and the inferior petrosectomy. The microsurgical anatomy and exposure of the various extensions of the approach were analyzed. In addition, the capability of complementary endoscopy was evaluated. With proper positioning, the minimal anterior clivectomy exposed the vertebrobasilar junction, proximal basilar artery, anteroinferior cerebellar arteries, and 6th cranial nerve. The lateral skull base extensions provided access to the anterior FM, mid-lower clivus, and petroclival region, up to the Meckel cave, contralateral to the side of the surgical approach. The high anterior cervical approach with skull base extensions is an alternative to the classic approaches to the ventral FM and mid-lower clivus. A minimal anterior clivectomy provides access to the midline mid-lower clivus. The addition of an extended anterior far-lateral clivectomy and an inferior petrosectomy extends the exposure to the anterior FM and cerebellopontine angle lying anterior to the cranial nerves. The approach is also ideally suited for endoscopic-assisted techniques.

  17. Stature estimation using odontometry and skull anthropometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalia Shalini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the possibility of estimating height from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull for the positive identification of height in forensic investigations concerned with fragmentary human remains. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 Mysorean patients, 50 males, and 50 females. Measurements of mesiodistal widths of the six maxillary anterior teeth, circumference of the skull, and height were made directly on each patient. Anteroposterior diameter of the skull was obtained on the lateral cephalograph. The data collected were subjected to statistical methods. The known heights of the combined data, data for males, and females were regressed against the odontometric and anthropometric variables using linear regression analysis. Results: Significant sexual dimorphism was observed for the parameters studied ( P 0.05. Highly significant correlation was found between height and other parameters when combined data and data for males were regressed. The equation relating height to the combined mesiodistal width of maxillary anterior teeth was derived as height = 982.421 + 13.65 x combined mesiodistal width of maxillary anterior teeth ( P 0.0001. Similarly equations were obtained by regressing height to head circumference and skull diameter ( P 0.0001 for both. The above findings may hence provide reliable method of estimation of height from skeletal remains in the forensic setup.

  18. Preliminary experience with 4K ultra-high definition endoscope: analysis of pros and cons in skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, M; La Rocca, G; Lauretti, L; D'Alessandris, G Q; Mangiola, A; Anile, C; Olivi, A; Paludetti, G

    2017-06-01

    During the last two decades endoscopic skull base surgery observed a continuous technical and technological development 3D endoscopy and ultra High Definition (HD) endoscopy have provided great advances in terms of visualisation and spatial resolution. Ultra-high definition (UHD) 4K systems, recently introduced in the clinical practice, will shape next steps forward especially in skull base surgery field. Patients were operated on through transnasal transsphenoidal endoscopic approaches performed using Olympus NBI 4K UHD endoscope with a 4 mm 0° Ultra Telescope, 300 W xenon lamp (CLV-S400) predisposed for narrow band imaging (NBI) technology connected through a camera head to a high-quality control unit (OTV-S400 - VISERA 4K UHD) (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). Two screens are used, one 31" Monitor - (LMD-X310S) and one main ultra-HD 55" screen optimised for UHD image reproduction (LMD-X550S). In selected cases, we used a navigation system (Stealthstation S7, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, US). We evaluated 22 pituitary adenomas (86.3% macroadenomas; 13.7% microadenomas). 50% were not functional (NF), 22.8% GH, 18.2% ACTH, 9% PRL-secreting. Three of 22 were recurrences. In 91% of cases we achieved total removal, while in 9% near total resection. A mean follow-up of 187 days and average length of hospitalisation was 3.09 ± 0.61 days. Surgical duration was 128.18± 30.74 minutes. We experienced only 1 case of intraoperative low flow fistula with no further complications. None of the cases required any post- or intraoperative blood transfusion. The visualisation and high resolution of the operative field provided a very detailed view of all anatomical structures and pathologies allowing an improvement in safety and efficacy of the surgical procedure. The operative time was similar to the standard 2D HD and 3D procedures and the physical strain was also comparable to others in terms of ergonomics and weight. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia

  19. Two-Dimensional High Definition Versus Three-Dimensional Endoscopy in Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: A Comparative Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampinelli, Vittorio; Doglietto, Francesco; Mattavelli, Davide; Qiu, Jimmy; Raffetti, Elena; Schreiber, Alberto; Villaret, Andrea Bolzoni; Kucharczyk, Walter; Donato, Francesco; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Nicolai, Piero

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) endoscopy has been recently introduced in endonasal skull base surgery. Only a relatively limited number of studies have compared it to 2-dimensional, high definition technology. The objective was to compare, in a preclinical setting for endonasal endoscopic surgery, the surgical maneuverability of 2-dimensional, high definition and 3D endoscopy. A group of 68 volunteers, novice and experienced surgeons, were asked to perform 2 tasks, namely simulating grasping and dissection surgical maneuvers, in a model of the nasal cavities. Time to complete the tasks was recorded. A questionnaire to investigate subjective feelings during tasks was filled by each participant. In 25 subjects, the surgeons' movements were continuously tracked by a magnetic-based neuronavigator coupled with dedicated software (ApproachViewer, part of GTx-UHN) and the recorded trajectories were analyzed by comparing jitter, sum of square differences, and funnel index. Total execution time was significantly lower with 3D technology (P technology appears to confer an advantage in terms of time of execution and precision of surgical maneuvers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fibrous dysplasia of the sphenoid sinus and skull base presents in an adult with localized temporal headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmani, Ziane; Aitasalo, Kalle; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2004-03-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) of the sphenoidal sinus is a rare disease, especially during adulthood. We report a case of FD of the right sphenoidal sinus in an adult male patient who presented with nonspecific symptoms limited to headache localized to the right temporal area and to the inferior orbital rim of both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dense mass that occupied the entire right sphenoidal sinus and skull base with typical ground-glass opacification and bony sclerosis of the whole sphenoidal wall. The diagnosis of FD was confirmed on pathological examination of a biopsy taken through sphenotomy. The patient underwent a subcranial craniotomy for tumor resection. After more than 4 years of follow-up, the patient was disease-free. On the basis of these clinical features, it is important to consider sphenoidal FD in both young and adult patients complaining of an unexplained headache, because it may present unusually with headache localized to the temporal region or the inferior orbital rim.

  1. Immunohistochemical expression of receptor tyrosine kinase PDGFR-α, c-Met, and EGFR in skull base chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan-Sigari, R; Abili, M; Gaab, M R; Rohde, V; Zafar, N; Emami, P; Ostertag, H

    2015-01-01

    Chordomas are rare, locally aggressive malignancies that often exhibit an insidious natural history and are difficult to eradicate. Surgery and radiotherapy are the treatment mainstays of chordoma, but the chance of local recurrence remains high. Reports of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) expression in chordoma suggest that these tumors may respond to kinase inhibitor therapy. Currently, there are no effective chemotherapeutic protocols for chordoma. A tissue microarray containing 74 tumor specimens from primary chordoma patients and 71 from their recurrent tumors for a total of 145 tumor specimens was immunohistochemically analyzed for expression of a number of proteins involved in signal transduction from RTKs. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFR-α), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), c-Met, and CD-34 were detected in 100, 92, 100, and 59% of cases, respectively. PDGFR-α and c-Met staining was of moderate to strong intensity in all cases. In contrast, total EGFR staining was variable; weak staining was detected in 10 cases. Our results contribute to the understanding of the expression of RTKs in skull base chordomas and support the development of targeted therapies that inhibit RTKs, which may have a synergistic effect for chemotherapy in patients. There were statistically significant correlations between the expression of PDGFR-α, c-Met, and EGFR and disease-free survival. The results nonetheless suggest that chordomas may respond to RTK inhibitors or modulators of other downstream signaling.

  2. CASE REPORT: Assimilation of Atlas in Indian Dry Skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha D Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A congenital fusion of the atlas to the base of the occiput is defined as assimilation of atlas. It may produce narrowingof foramen magnum which may compress the spinal cord or brain stem. Rarely, it also results in vertebral artery compression, leading todizziness, seizures and syncope. Multiple variations of partial assimilation have been reported and may involve any aspect of atlantooccipital articulation. Therefore the knowledge of such anomaly is essential for orthopedic, anesthetist, and clinician.Aims and Objectives: Aim of the present study was to find the incidence of assimilation of atlas in Indian dry adult skulls of unknown sex and age for which 150 skulls were examined. Results: Only in one skull, we observed fusion of atlas vertebra with occipital bone. The posterior arch and two superior facets of atlashad completely fused with the occipital condyles. The anterior arch had incompletely fused with occipital bone, showing nonunion inthe midline. Only right transverse process was fused with occipital bone. Conclusions: Assimilation of atlas may cause orthopedic problems and occasionally it produces neurological effects especially when the lumen of foramen magnum is reduced. Therefore, improved knowledge on the fusion of the atlas with the occipital bone is important in clinical practice as it shows multiple variations and combinations.

  3. A dual resolution measurement based Monte Carlo simulation technique for detailed dose analysis of small volume organs in the skull base region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Chi-Yuan; Tung, Chuan-Jung; Chao, Tsi-Chain; Lin, Mu-Han; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine dose distribution of a skull base tumor and surrounding critical structures in response to high dose intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a dual resolution sandwich phantom. The measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method (Lin et al., 2009) was adopted for the study. The major components of the MBMC technique involve (1) the BEAMnrc code for beam transport through the treatment head of a Varian 21EX linear accelerator, (2) the DOSXYZnrc code for patient dose simulation and (3) an EPID-measured efficiency map which describes non-uniform fluence distribution of the IMRS treatment beam. For the simulated case, five isocentric 6 MV photon beams were designed to deliver a total dose of 1200 cGy in two fractions to the skull base tumor. A sandwich phantom for the MBMC simulation was created based on the patient's CT scan of a skull base tumor [gross tumor volume (GTV)=8.4 cm 3 ] near the right 8th cranial nerve. The phantom, consisted of a 1.2-cm thick skull base region, had a voxel resolution of 0.05×0.05×0.1 cm 3 and was sandwiched in between 0.05×0.05×0.3 cm 3 slices of a head phantom. A coarser 0.2×0.2×0.3 cm 3 single resolution (SR) phantom was also created for comparison with the sandwich phantom. A particle history of 3×10 8 for each beam was used for simulations of both the SR and the sandwich phantoms to achieve a statistical uncertainty of <2%. Our study showed that the planning target volume (PTV) receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (VPTV95) was 96.9%, 96.7% and 99.9% for the TPS, SR, and sandwich phantom, respectively. The maximum and mean doses to large organs such as the PTV, brain stem, and parotid gland for the TPS, SR and sandwich MC simulations did not show any significant difference; however, significant dose differences were observed for very small structures like the right 8th cranial nerve, right cochlea, right malleus and right semicircular

  4. Assessment of skull base involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: comparisons of single-photon emission tomography with planar bone scintigraphy and X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Chianghsuan [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung Medical Coll., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China); Wang Peiwen [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung Medical Coll., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen Hueyong [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung Medical Coll., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China); Lui Chunchung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung Medical Coll., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China); Su Chihying [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung Medical Coll., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1995-06-01

    The diagnostic contribution of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) to the detection of bone lesions of the skull base was explored in 200 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Comparison of SPET with planar bone scintigraphy showed that SPET improved the contrast and better defined the lesions in 107 out of the 200 patients. Comparison of SPET with X-ray computed tomography (CT) showed that SPET did not miss the lesions detected by CT while CT missed 49% of the lesions detected by SPET. The only false-positive lesion with SPET was detected in the mastoid bone. SPET detected skull base lesions in all of the 35 patients with cranial nerve involvement, while CT missed eight and planar bone scintigraphy missed four. The findings suggest that SPET should be included in the routine check-up examinations of patients with NPC. (orig.)

  5. Assessment of tumor blood flow and its correlation with histopathologic features in skull base meningiomas and schwannomas by using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya, E-mail: yamatatu_01eik@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Takeuchi, Hiroaki, E-mail: takeu@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Kinoshita, Kazuyuki, E-mail: kkino@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Kosaka, Nobuyuki, E-mail: nkosaka@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Kimura, Hirohiko, E-mail: kimura@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Objective: We aimed to investigate whether pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL)-MRI can adequately evaluate tumor perfusion even if the tumors are located in the skull base region and evaluate the correlation between tumor blood flow (TBF) and the histopathologic features of skull base meningiomas and schwannomas. Materials and methods: We enrolled 31 patients with skull base meningioma (n = 14) and schwannoma (n = 17) who underwent surgical resection. TBF was calculated from pcASL. Tissue sections were stained with CD34 to evaluate microvessel area (MVA). TBF and MVA ratio were compared between meningiomas and schwannomas using Mann–Whitney U-test. The correlations between MVA ratio and TBF were evaluated in each tumor by using single linear regression analysis and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (r{sub s}). Results: MVA ratio and TBF were significantly higher in meningioma than in schwannoma (both p < 0.01). Correlation analyses revealed significant positive correlations between MVA ratio and both mean and max TBF for meningiomas (r{sub s} = 0.89, 0.81, both p < 0.01). There was a weak positive correlation between MVA ratio and mean TBF for schwannomas (r{sub s} = 0.43, p = 0.04). However, no significant correlation was found between MVA ratio and max TBF for schwannoma. Conclusions: pcASL-MRI is useful for evaluating tumor perfusion even if the tumors are located in the skull base region. Moreover, pcASL-TBF was significantly higher in most meningiomas compared to schwannomas, which can help in the differential diagnosis of the 2 tumor types even without the use of contrast material.

  6. Skull base meningiomas: Long-term results and patient self-reported outcome in 507 patients treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Adeberg, Sebastian; Dittmar, Jan-Oliver; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome of high-precision photon radiotherapy in 507 patients with skull base meningiomas. Methods and materials: At the time of radiation therapy, most patients presented with clinical symptoms including double vision, headache, nausea, trigeminal or facial nerve dysfunction or exophthalmus. In general tumors extended into several regions of the skull base. In 54%, prior neurosurgical intervention was performed, which was a partial resection or biopsy in 266 patients. Treatment was delivered using a 6 MV linear accelerator or the tomotherapy system. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) was applied in 376 patients (74%) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in 131 patients (26%). A median total dose of 57.6 Gy (range 25–68 Gy) was prescribed in median (range 1.6–5 Gy). To evaluate long-term toxicity as well as quality of life (QOL), we sent out a detailed questionnaire put together with special questions regarding the skull base location of the tumors. Special focus was long-term sequelae including visual deficits, cranial nerve deficits, headaches, fatigue or any other symptoms impairing overall QOL. The median follow-up time was 107 months (range 1–270 months). Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated. Local control for the whole cohort was 95% at 5 years and 88% at 10 years. Patients with benign histology had significant higher local control than high-grade meningiomas. For benign meningiomas, local control was 91% at 10 years. For high-risk meningiomas, local control was 81% at 5 years and 53% at 10 years. QOL was unchanged in 47.7% of the patients, and 37.5% showed improvement. Most patients reported an improvement of symptoms or steady state; in only few patients disorders worsened over time or side effects developed. Conclusion: Precision photon radiotherapy leads to long-term tumor control with minimal side effects, but also with preservation of QOL in patients with skull base meningiomas

  7. [Further study of the model of a human skull as a cupola with a plane base].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherneĭkin, V A; Sholpo, L N

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of the base deformation of isolated human scull under conditions of scull collision with an obstacle has been carried out. The findings are compared with human cerebrospinal traums phenomena. An earlier suggested continuous scull model is modified on the basis of the data obtained. It is shown that the modified model (a part of spherical shell with the flat base) resembles scull behaviour in statics and dynamics better than the scull model in the form of spherical shell.

  8. Applied anatomy of the anterior cranial fossa: what can fracture patterns tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J R; Holmes, S; Evans, B T

    2016-03-01

    The skull base is uniquely placed to absorb anteriorly directed forces imparted either via the midfacial skeleton or cranial vault. A variety of skull base fracture classifications exist. Less well understood, however, is fracture extension beyond the anterior cranial fossa (ACF) into the middle and posterior cranial fossae. The cases of 81 patients from two UK major trauma centres were studied to examine the distribution of fractures across the skull base and any relationship between the vector of force and extent of skull base injury. It was found that predominantly lateral force to the craniofacial skeleton produced a fracture that propagated beyond the ACF into the middle cranial fossa in 77.4% of cases, significantly more (Panterior force (12.0%). Fractures were significantly more likely to propagate into the posterior fossa with a lateral vector of impact compared to an anterior vector (P=0.049). This difference in energy transfer across the skull base may, in part, be explained by the local anatomy. The more delicate central ACF acts as a 'crumple zone' in order to absorb force. Conversely, no collapsible interface exists in the lateral aspect of the ACF, thus the lateral ACF behaves like a 'buttress', resulting in increased energy transfer. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A landmark analysis-based approach to age and sex classification of the skull of the Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus monachus) (Hermann, 1779).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, C; Mo, G; Zotti, A; Giurisato, M; Salmaso, L; Cozzi, B

    2009-10-01

    This work aimed at applying geometric morphometric analysis techniques to the skull of the Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus monachus, Hermann, 1779). Inferential analyses were performed using a non-parameteric permutation framework based on a series of skulls of different age classes belonging to individuals of both sexes. Our goal was to establish whether a statistical approach based on osteometric measurements and surface analysis of photographs of the left lateral plane of the skull may lead to a different and scientifically sound method of age and sex classification in this critically endangered marine mammal. Our data indicate that non-parametric combination methodology enables the researcher to give local assessment using a combination with domains. Developing geometric morphometric techniques in a non-parametric permutation framework could be useful in solving high dimensional and small sample size problems as well as classification problems, including zoological classification of specimens within a specific population. The Mediterranean monk seal is believed to be the world's rarest pinniped and one of the most endangered mammals of the world, with fewer than 600 individuals currently surviving. The use of shape analysis would allow new insights into the biological characteristics of the monk seal by simply extracting potentially new information on age and size from museal specimens.

  10. Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery during transnasal endoscopic skull base surgery performed in controlled hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieskiewicz, Andrzej; Lyson, Tomasz; Drozdowski, Andrzej; Piszczatowski, Bartosz; Rutkowski, Robert; Turek, Grzegorz; Lewczuk, Anna; Rogowski, Marek; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    To assess blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during transnasal endoscopic procedures performed with decreased hemodynamic parameters. In 40 patients who underwent endoscopic skull base surgery in controlled hypotension (studied group) and in 13 patients operated without reduction of hemodynamic parameters (control group), blood flow velocity in MCA was assessed with transcranial color Doppler sonography. Blood flow velocity in MCA remained within the range of age-specific reference values in all patients before operation. It decreased significantly in both groups after induction of anesthesia and then dropped even further in studied group of patients when hemodynamic parameters were reduced; the systolic velocity fell below the normal reference values in 25% of patients, the mean velocity in 50% and the diastolic velocity in 57% of patients. The diastolic velocity was much more heavily influenced by diminished hemodynamic parameters than systolic velocity in the studied group as opposed to the control group where reduction of blood flow velocity pertained equally systolic and diastolic velocity. During transnasal endoscopic procedures performed in moderate hypotension, in addition to significant drop of blood flow velocity to values well below the normal reference range, a divergent reduction of systolic and diastolic velocity was detected. Since divergent systolic and diastolic velocity may indicate an early phase of cerebral autoregulation compromise, and the decrease of mean blood flow velocity in MCA corresponds with a decrease of cerebral blood flow, further investigations in this field seem warranted. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. Skull Base Clear Cell Carcinoma, Metastasis of Renal Primary Tumor: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilson Sepúlveda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient who presented with cranial nerve VI bilateral paresis, absence of pharyngeal reflex, dysarthria, right tongue deviation, and right facial paralysis. Imaging studies showed an expansive process in the cranial base with clivus and petrous apex osteolysis. A biopsy confirmed the presence of clear cell adenocarcinoma and suspicion of renal tumor metastases. Abdominal imaging studies revealed a mass in the right kidney. Consequently, radiotherapy was performed, and the patient was enrolled in a palliative care and pain control program.

  12. MRI-detected skull-base invasion. Prognostic value and therapeutic implication in intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yi-Kan; Jiang, Ning; Yue, Dan; Tang, Ling-Long; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Li; Liu, Xu; Chen, Lei; Ma, Jun [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Li-Zhi [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-10-15

    With advances in imaging and radiotherapy, the prognostic value of skull-base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) needs to be reassessed. We aimed to define a classification system and evaluate the prognostic value of the classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected skull-base invasion in NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed 749 patients who underwent MRI and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated NPC and treated with IMRT. MRI-detected skull-base invasion was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), or disease-free survival (DFS; p > 0.05 for all). Skull-base invasion was classified according to the incidence of each site (type I sites inside pharyngobasilar fascia and clivus vs. type II sites outside pharyngobasilar fascia). The 5-year OS, DMFS, LRFS, and DFS rates in the classification of skull-base invasion in NPC were 83 vs. 67 %, 85 vs.75 %, 95 vs. 88 %, and 76 vs. 62 %, respectively (p < 0.05 for all). Multivariate analysis indicated the classification of skull-base invasion was an independent prognostic factor. MRI-detected skull-base invasion is not an independent prognostic factor in patients with NPC treated with IMRT. However, classification according to the site of invasion has prognostic value. Therefore, patients with various subclassifications of stage T3 disease may receive treatment with different intensities; however, further studies are warranted to prove this. (orig.) [German] Aufgrund der Fortschritte der bildgebenden Verfahren und der Strahlentherapie muss der prognostische Wert der Invasion des nasopharyngealen Karzinoms (NPC) in die Schaedelbasis erneut bewertet werden. Unser Ziel ist die Definition eines Klassifikationssystems und die Untersuchung des prognostischen Werts der Klassifikation der MRT-ermittelten Invasion des mit

  13. Objective Validation of Perfusion-Based Human Cadaveric Simulation Training Model for Management of Internal Carotid Artery Injury in Endoscopic Endonasal Sinus and Skull Base Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jasper; Hur, Kevin; Zhang, Zhipeng; Minneti, Michael; Pham, Martin; Wrobel, Bozena; Zada, Gabriel

    2017-12-29

    The emergence of minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery has necessitated reproducible and realistic simulators of rare vascular injuries. To assess the face and content validity of an innovative perfusion-based cadaveric model developed to simulate internal carotid artery (ICA) injury during endoscopic surgery. Otolaryngology and neurosurgery trainees attempted 3 consecutive trials of endoscopic control of a parasellar ICA injury, with standardized technical feedback. Time to hemostasis (TTH) and blood loss were trended. All participants completed validated questionnaires using a 5-point Likert scale to assess the domains of confidence gain, face validity, content validity, and curriculum applicability. Among all participants (n = 35), TTH and mean blood loss significantly decreased between first vs second attempt (P = .005), and first vs third attempt (P = .03). Following the first attempt, trainees experienced an average 63% reduction in blood loss and 59% reduction in TTH. In the quartile of most improved participants, average blood loss reduction was 1115 mL (84% reduction) and TTH of 259 s (84% reduction). There were no significant differences between trainees of varying postgraduate year or specialty. Average pre and postprocedural confidence scores were 1.38 and 3.16, respectively (P < .0001). All trainees reported model realism, which achieved mean face validity 4.82 ± 0.41 and content validity 4.88 ± 0.33. The perfusion-based human cadaveric ICA injury model achieves high ratings of face and content validity across all levels of surgical trainees, and enables safe, realistic simulation for standardized skull base simulation and future curriculum development. Objective improvements in performance metrics may translate to improved patient outcomes.

  14. Brachyury, SOX-9, and Podoplanin, New Markers in the Skull Base Chordoma Vs Chondrosarcoma Differential: A Tissue Microarray Based Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, GJ; Fuhrer, K; Seethala, RR

    2014-01-01

    The distinction between chondrosarcoma and chordoma of the skull base/head and neck is prognostically important; however, both have sufficient morphologic overlap to make distinction difficult. As a result of gene expression studies, additional candidate markers have been proposed to help in this distinction. Hence, we sought to evaluate the performance of new markers: brachyury, SOX-9, and podoplanin alongside the more traditional markers glial fibrillary acid protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, CD24 and epithelial membrane antigen. Paraffin blocks from 103 skull base/head and neck chondroid tumors from 70 patients were retrieved (1969-2007). Diagnoses were made based on morphology and/or whole section immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin and S100 protein yielding 79 chordomas (comprising 45 chondroid chordomas and 34 conventional chordomas), and 24 chondrosarcomas. A tissue microarray containing 0.6 mm cores of each tumor in triplicate was constructed using a manual array (MTA-1, Beecher Instruments). For visualization of staining, the ImmPRESS detection system (Vector Laboratories) with 2 - diaminobenzidine substrate was used. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated for each marker. Core loss from the microarray ranged from 25-29% yielding 66-78 viable cases per stain. The classic marker, cytokeratin, still has the best performance characteristics. When combined with brachyury, accuracy improves slightly (sensitivity and specificity for detection of chordoma 98% and 100%, respectively). Positivity for both epithelial membrane antigen and AE1/AE3 had a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 100% for detecting chordoma in this study. SOX-9 is apparently common to both notochordal and cartilaginous differentiation, and is not useful in the chordoma-chondrosarcoma differential diagnosis. Glial fibrillary acid protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, CD24, and epithelial membrane antigen did not outperform other markers, and are less useful in the diagnosis of

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Adjuvant Proton Therapy Combined With Surgery for Chondrosarcoma of the Skull Base: A Retrospective, Population-Based Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuvret, Loïc, E-mail: loic.feuvret@psl.aphp.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Groupe Hospitalier La Pitié-Salpêtrière–Charles Foix (Assistance Publique–Hôpitaux de Paris), Paris (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie–Centre de protonthérapie d' Orsay (CPO), Orsay (France); Bracci, Stefano [Institute of Radiation Oncology, Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Calugaru, Valentin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie–Centre de protonthérapie d' Orsay (CPO), Orsay (France); Bolle, Stéphanie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Mammar, Hamid; De Marzi, Ludovic [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie–Centre de protonthérapie d' Orsay (CPO), Orsay (France); Bresson, Damien [Department of Neurosurgery, Hôpital Lariboisière (Assistance Publique–Hôpitaux de Paris), Paris (France); Habrand, Jean-Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre François Baclesse, Caen (France); Mazeron, Jean-Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, Groupe Hospitalier La Pitié-Salpêtrière–Charles Foix (Assistance Publique–Hôpitaux de Paris), Paris (France); Dendale, Rémi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie–Centre de protonthérapie d' Orsay (CPO), Orsay (France); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of the cartilage affecting young adults. Surgery, followed by charged-particle irradiation, is considered the reference standard for the treatment of patients with grade I to II skull base chondrosarcoma. The present study was conducted to assess the effect of the quality of surgery and radiation therapy parameters on local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2013, 159 patients (median age 40 years, range 12-83) were treated with either protons alone or a combination of protons and photons. The median total dose delivered was 70.2 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]; range 67-71). Debulking and biopsy were performed in 133 and 13 patients, respectively. Results: With a median follow-up of 77 months (range 2-214), 5 tumors relapsed based on the initial gross tumor volume. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were 96.4% and 93.5%, respectively, and the 5- and 10-year OS rates were 94.9% and 87%, respectively. A total of 16 patients died (13 of intercurrent disease, 3 of disease progression). On multivariate analysis, age <40 years and primary disease status were independent favorable prognostic factors for progression-free survival and OS, and local tumor control was an independent favorable predictor of OS. In contrast, the extent of surgery, dosimetric parameters, and adjacent organs at risk were not prognostic factors for LC or OS. Conclusions: Systematic high-dose postoperative proton therapy for skull base chondrosarcoma can achieve a high LC rate with a low toxicity profile. Maximal safe surgery, followed by high-dose conformal proton therapy, is therefore recommended.

  16. Comparison of CT and MRI in diagnosis of cerebrospinal leak induced by multiple fractures of skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuhui; Xu, Minhui; Liang, Hong; Xu, Lunshan

    2011-01-01

    Multiple basilar skull fracture and cerebrospinal leak are common complications of traumatic brain injury, which required a surgical repair. But due to the complexity of basilar skull fracture after severe trauma, preoperatively an exact radiological location is always difficult. Multi-row spiral CT and MRI are currently widely applied in the clinical diagnosis. The present study was performed to compare the accuracy of cisternography by multi-row spiral CT and MRI in the diagnosis of cerebrospinal leak. A total of 23 patients with multiple basilar skull fracture after traumatic brain injury were included. The radiological and surgical data were retrospectively analyzed. 64-row CT (mm/row) scan and three-dimensional reconstruction were performed in 12 patients, while MR plain scan and cisternography were performed in another 11 patients. The location of cerebrospinal leak was diagnosed by 2 experienced physicians majoring neurological radiology. Surgery was performed in all patients. The cerebrospinal leak location was confirmed and repaired during surgery. The result was considered as accurate when cerebrospinal leak was absent after surgery. According to the surgical exploration, the preoperative diagnosis of the active cerebrospinal leak location was accurate in 9 out of 12 patients with CT scan. The location could not be confirmed by CT because of multiple fractures in 2 patients and the missed diagnosis occurred in 1 patient. The preoperative diagnosis was accurate in 10 out of 11 patients with MRI examination. MRI cisternography is more advanced than multi-row CT scan in multiple basilar skull fracture. The combination of the two examinations may increase the diagnostic ratio of active cerebrospinal leak

  17. Clinical outcome after high-precision radiotherapy for skull base meningiomas: Pooled data from three large German centers for radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Farzin, Mostafa; Boehmer, Julia; Oehlke, Oliver; Molls, Michael; Debus, Jürgen; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2018-03-26

    To evaluate outcome in patients with base of skull meningiomas treated with modern high precision radiation therapy (RT) techniques. 927 patients from three centers were treated with either radiosurgery or fractionated high-precision RT for meningiomas. Treatment planning was based on CT and MRI following institutional guidelines. For radiosurgery, a median dose of 13 Gy was applied, for fractionated treatments, a median dose of 54 Gy in 1.8 Gy single fractions was prescribed. Follow-up included a clinical examination as well as contrast-enhanced imaging. All patients were followed up prospectively after radiotherapy in the three departments within a strict follow-up regimen. The median follow-up time was 81 months (range 1-348 months). Median local control was 79 months (range 1-348 months). Local control (LC) was 98% at 1 year, 94% at 3 years, 92% at 5 years and 86% at 10 years. There was no difference between radiosurgery and fractionated RT. We analyzed the influence of higher doses on LC and could show that dose did not impact LC. Moreover, there was no difference between 54 Gy and 57.6 Gy in the fractionated group. Side effects were below 5% in both groups without any severe treatment-related complications. Based on the pooled data analysis this manuscript provides a large series of meningiomas of the skull base treated with modern high precision RT demonstrating excellent local control and low rates of side effects. Such data support the recommendation of RT for skull base meningiomas in the interdisciplinary tumor board discussions. The strong role of RT must influence treatment recommendations keeping in mind the individual risk-benefit profile of treatment alternatives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Geometric and mechanical evaluation of 3D-printing materials for skull base anatomical education and endoscopic surgery simulation - A first step to create reliable customized simulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Favier

    Full Text Available Endoscopic skull base surgery allows minimal invasive therapy through the nostrils to treat infectious or tumorous diseases. Surgical and anatomical education in this field is limited by the lack of validated training models in terms of geometric and mechanical accuracy. We choose to evaluate several consumer-grade materials to create a patient-specific 3D-printed skull base model for anatomical learning and surgical training.Four 3D-printed consumer-grade materials were compared to human cadaver bone: calcium sulfate hemihydrate (named Multicolor, polyamide, resin and polycarbonate. We compared the geometric accuracy, forces required to break thin walls of materials and forces required during drilling.All materials had an acceptable global geometric accuracy (from 0.083mm to 0.203mm of global error. Local accuracy was better in polycarbonate (0.09mm and polyamide (0.15mm than in Multicolor (0.90mm and resin (0.86mm. Resin and polyamide thin walls were not broken at 200N. Forces needed to break Multicolor thin walls were 1.6-3.5 times higher than in bone. For polycarbonate, forces applied were 1.6-2.5 times higher. Polycarbonate had a mode of fracture similar to the cadaver bone. Forces applied on materials during drilling followed a normal distribution except for the polyamide which was melted. Energy spent during drilling was respectively 1.6 and 2.6 times higher on bone than on PC and Multicolor.Polycarbonate is a good substitute of human cadaver bone for skull base surgery simulation. Thanks to short lead times and reasonable production costs, patient-specific 3D printed models can be used in clinical practice for pre-operative training, improving patient safety.

  19. Geometric and mechanical evaluation of 3D-printing materials for skull base anatomical education and endoscopic surgery simulation - A first step to create reliable customized simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Valentin; Zemiti, Nabil; Caravaca Mora, Oscar; Subsol, Gérard; Captier, Guillaume; Lebrun, Renaud; Crampette, Louis; Mondain, Michel; Gilles, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery allows minimal invasive therapy through the nostrils to treat infectious or tumorous diseases. Surgical and anatomical education in this field is limited by the lack of validated training models in terms of geometric and mechanical accuracy. We choose to evaluate several consumer-grade materials to create a patient-specific 3D-printed skull base model for anatomical learning and surgical training. Four 3D-printed consumer-grade materials were compared to human cadaver bone: calcium sulfate hemihydrate (named Multicolor), polyamide, resin and polycarbonate. We compared the geometric accuracy, forces required to break thin walls of materials and forces required during drilling. All materials had an acceptable global geometric accuracy (from 0.083mm to 0.203mm of global error). Local accuracy was better in polycarbonate (0.09mm) and polyamide (0.15mm) than in Multicolor (0.90mm) and resin (0.86mm). Resin and polyamide thin walls were not broken at 200N. Forces needed to break Multicolor thin walls were 1.6-3.5 times higher than in bone. For polycarbonate, forces applied were 1.6-2.5 times higher. Polycarbonate had a mode of fracture similar to the cadaver bone. Forces applied on materials during drilling followed a normal distribution except for the polyamide which was melted. Energy spent during drilling was respectively 1.6 and 2.6 times higher on bone than on PC and Multicolor. Polycarbonate is a good substitute of human cadaver bone for skull base surgery simulation. Thanks to short lead times and reasonable production costs, patient-specific 3D printed models can be used in clinical practice for pre-operative training, improving patient safety.

  20. Development of the cetacean nasal skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, M

    1999-01-01

    The adaptation of cetaceans to aquatic life habits is reflected, in their nasal region, in three marked changes from the original relations found in land mammals. These changes include (1) the loss of the sense of smell, (2) translocation of the nostrils from the tip of the rostrum to the vertex of the head, and (3) elongation of the anterior head to form a rostrum protruding far towards anterior. The morphogenetic processes taking place during embryogenesis of the nasal skull play a decisive part in the development of all these changes. The lateral parts of the embryonic nasal capsule, encompassing the nasal passages, change their position from horizontal to vertical. At the same time, the structures of the original nasal floor (the solum nasi) are shifted in front of the nasal passages towards the rostrum. The structures of the original nasal roof (the tectum nasi) and of the nasal side wall (the paries nasi) are translocated behind the nasal passages towards the neurocranium. The medial nasal septum (the septum nasi) mostly loses its connection to the nasal passages and is produced into a point protruding far towards anterior. The transformed embryonic nasal skull of the Cetacea can be divided into three sections: 1. The median structures. These include the cartilaginous structures, viz., the rostrum nasi, the septum interorbitale and the spina mesethmoidalis, which are accompanied by the dermal bones, the vomer and the praemaxillare. In adult cetaceans the rostrum nasi is mostly preserved as a robust cartilage of the skull, which may possibly serve as a sound transmitting structure of the sonar system, or it may be responsible for the sensing of water streams and vibrations. 2. The posterior side wall structures. These include the following cartilaginous structures that are mostly heavily reduced or mutually fused: the cupula nasi anterior, the tectum nasi, the lamina cribrosa, the paries nasi, the commissura orbitonasalis, the cupula nasi posterior, the

  1. Diffusely increased uptake in the skull in normal bone scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suematsu, Toru; Yoshida, Shoji; Motohara, Tomofumi; Fujiwara, Hirofumi; Nishii, Hironori; Komiyama, Toyozo; Yanase, Masakazu; Mizutani, Masahiro (Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan))

    1992-05-01

    Diffusely increased skull uptake (a hot skull) is often seen in patients with bone metastases and metabolic disease. This finding is also, however, noticed in normal bone scans of aged women. To determine whether the hot skull could be considered a normal variant in elderly women and is associated to menopause, we studied 282 normal bone scans (166 women and 116 men without metabolic and hormonal disease; age range 11 to 84 yr). We divided the patients into eight age groups--ages 10-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, and 80-89 yrs. Measurements of skull uptake were obtained from anterior total body views using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). CNR for the skull was calculated using an equation. The sex dependent difference in skull uptake began to develop in the age group 30-39 yrs (p<0.05). The skull showed greater activity in women than in men for age groups from 30-39 to 80-89 yrs. In the age groups 50-59 and 60-69, the difference was particularly large (p<0.001). For women, the 50-59 yr age group had a significantly higher CNR than the 40-49 yr (p<0.01), 30-39 yr (p<0.05), and 20-29 yr age group (p<0.05). On the other hand, there was no significant difference between the 20-29 yr, 30-39 yr and 40-49 yr age groups. For men, the skull uptake was virtually unchanged with age. Our data strongly suggested that the hot skull in normal bone scan is related to menopausal estrogen deficiency. One should not necessarily regard it abnormal that elderly women suffer hot skull. (J.P.N.).

  2. Diffusely increased uptake in the skull in normal bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, Toru; Yoshida, Shoji; Motohara, Tomofumi; Fujiwara, Hirofumi; Nishii, Hironori; Komiyama, Toyozo; Yanase, Masakazu; Mizutani, Masahiro

    1992-01-01

    Diffusely increased skull uptake (a hot skull) is often seen in patients with bone metastases and metabolic disease. This finding is also, however, noticed in normal bone scans of aged women. To determine whether the hot skull could be considered a normal variant in elderly women and is associated to menopause, we studied 282 normal bone scans (166 women and 116 men without metabolic and hormonal disease; age range 11 to 84 yr). We divided the patients into eight age groups--ages 10-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, and 80-89 yrs. Measurements of skull uptake were obtained from anterior total body views using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). CNR for the skull was calculated using an equation. The sex dependent difference in skull uptake began to develop in the age group 30-39 yrs (p<0.05). The skull showed greater activity in women than in men for age groups from 30-39 to 80-89 yrs. In the age groups 50-59 and 60-69, the difference was particularly large (p<0.001). For women, the 50-59 yr age group had a significantly higher CNR than the 40-49 yr (p<0.01), 30-39 yr (p<0.05), and 20-29 yr age group (p<0.05). On the other hand, there was no significant difference between the 20-29 yr, 30-39 yr and 40-49 yr age groups. For men, the skull uptake was virtually unchanged with age. Our data strongly suggested that the hot skull in normal bone scan is related to menopausal estrogen deficiency. One should not necessarily regard it abnormal that elderly women suffer hot skull. (J.P.N.)

  3. Predicting Patient-specific Dosimetric Benefits of Proton Therapy for Skull-base Tumors Using a Geometric Knowledge-based Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, David C.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Winey, Brian A.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Paganetti, Harald, E-mail: hpaganetti@mgh.harvard.edu

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To predict the organ at risk (OAR) dose levels achievable with proton beam therapy (PBT), solely based on the geometric arrangement of the target volume in relation to the OARs. A comparison with an alternative therapy yields a prediction of the patient-specific benefits offered by PBT. This could enable physicians at hospitals without proton capabilities to make a better-informed referral decision or aid patient selection in model-based clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Skull-base tumors were chosen to test the method, owing to their geometric complexity and multitude of nearby OARs. By exploiting the correlations between the dose and distance-to-target in existing PBT plans, the models were independently trained for 6 types of OARs: brainstem, cochlea, optic chiasm, optic nerve, parotid gland, and spinal cord. Once trained, the models could estimate the feasible dose–volume histogram and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for OAR structures of new patients. The models were trained using 20 patients and validated using an additional 21 patients. Validation was achieved by comparing the predicted gEUD to that of the actual PBT plan. Results: The predicted and planned gEUD were in good agreement. Considering all OARs, the prediction error was +1.4 ± 5.1 Gy (mean ± standard deviation), and Pearson's correlation coefficient was 93%. By comparing with an intensity modulated photon treatment plan, the model could classify whether an OAR structure would experience a gain, with a sensitivity of 93% (95% confidence interval: 87%-97%) and specificity of 63% (95% confidence interval: 38%-84%). Conclusions: We trained and validated models that could quickly and accurately predict the patient-specific benefits of PBT for skull-base tumors. Similar models could be developed for other tumor sites. Such models will be useful when an estimation of the feasible benefits of PBT is desired but the experience and/or resources required for treatment

  4. MSCT versus CBCT: evaluation of high-resolution acquisition modes for dento-maxillary and skull-base imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillenseger, Jean-Philippe; Goetz, Christian [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Matern, Jean-Francois [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Gros, Catherine-Isabelle; Bornert, Fabien [Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire, Strasbourg (France); Le Minor, Jean-Marie [Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Institut d' Anatomie Normale, Strasbourg (France); Constantinesco, Andre [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Choquet, Philippe [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Hopital de Hautepierre, Imagerie Preclinique, Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2014-09-24

    Our aim was to conduct a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of high-resolution skull-bone imaging for dentistry and otolaryngology using different architectures of recent X-ray computed tomography systems. Three multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) systems and one Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system were used in this study. All apparatuses were tested with installed acquisition modes and proprietary reconstruction software enabling high-resolution bone imaging. Quantitative analyses were performed with small fields of view with the preclinical vmCT phantom, which permits to measure spatial resolution, geometrical accuracy, linearity and homogeneity. Ten operators performed visual qualitative analyses on the vmCT phantom images, and on dry human skull images. Quantitative analysis showed no significant differences between protocols in terms of linearity and geometric accuracy. All MSCT systems present a better homogeneity than the CBCT. Both quantitative and visual analyses demonstrate that CBCT acquisitions are not better than the collimated helical MSCT mode. Our results demonstrate that current high-resolution MSCT protocols could exceed the performance of a previous generation CBCT system for spatial resolution and image homogeneity. (orig.)

  5. Leg length, skull circumference, and the incidence of dementia in Latin America and China: A 10/66 population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Martin J; Acosta, Daisy; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jimenez-Velazquez, Ivonne Z; Llibre Rodriguez, Juan J; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Dewey, Michael E; Guerchet, Maelenn M; Liu, Zhaorui; Llibre Guerra, Jorge J; Prina, A Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Adult leg length is influenced by nutrition in the first few years of life. Adult head circumference is an indicator of brain growth. Cross-sectional studies indicate inverse associations with dementia risk, but there have been few prospective studies. Population-based cohort studies in urban sites in Cuba, Dominican Republic Puerto Rico and Venezuela, and rural and urban sites in Peru, Mexico and China. Sociodemographic and risk factor questionnaires were administered to all participants, and anthropometric measures taken, with ascertainment of incident dementia, and mortality, three to five years later. Of the original at risk cohort of 13,587 persons aged 65 years and over, 2,443 (18.0%) were lost to follow-up; 10,540 persons with skull circumference assessments were followed up for 40,466 person years, and 10,400 with leg length assessments were followed up for 39,954 person years. There were 1,009 cases of incident dementia, and 1,605 dementia free deaths. The fixed effect pooled meta-analysed adjusted subhazard ratio (ASHR) for leg length (highest vs. lowest quarter) was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.66-0.97) and for skull circumference was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.84-1.25), with no heterogeneity of effect between sites (I2 = 0%). Leg length measurements tended to be shorter at follow-up, particularly for those with baseline cognitive impairment and dementia. However, leg length change was not associated with dementia incidence (ASHR, per cm 1.006, 95% CI 0.992-1.020), and the effect of leg length was little altered after adjusting for baseline frailty (ASHR 0.82, 95% CI 0.67-0.99). A priori hypotheses regarding effect modification by gender or educational level were not supported. However, the effect of skull circumference was modified by gender (M vs F ASHR 0.86, 95% CI 0.75-0.98), but in the opposite direction to that hypothesized with a greater protective effect of larger skull dimensions in men. Consistent findings across settings provide quite strong support for an

  6. Robotic Transnasal Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery: Systematic Review of the Literature and Report of a Novel Prototype for a Hybrid System (Brescia Endoscope Assistant Robotic Holder).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea; Doglietto, Francesco; Carobbio, Andrea; Schreiber, Alberto; Panni, Camilla; Piantoni, Enrico; Guida, Giovanni; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Nicolai, Piero; Cassinis, Riccardo

    2017-09-01

    Although robotics has already been applied to several surgical fields, available systems are not designed for endoscopic skull base surgery (ESBS). New conception prototypes have been recently described for ESBS. The aim of this study was to provide a systematic literature review of robotics for ESBS and describe a novel prototype developed at the University of Brescia. PubMed and Scopus databases were searched using a combination of terms, including Robotics OR Robot and Surgery OR Otolaryngology OR Skull Base OR Holder. The retrieved papers were analyzed, recording the following features: interface, tools under robotic control, force feedback, safety systems, setup time, and operative time. A novel hybrid robotic system has been developed and tested in a preclinical setting at the University of Brescia, using an industrial manipulator and readily available off-the-shelf components. A total of 11 robotic prototypes for ESBS were identified. Almost all prototypes present a difficult emergency management as one of the main limits. The Brescia Endoscope Assistant Robotic holder has proven the feasibility of an intuitive robotic movement, using the surgeon's head position: a 6 degree of freedom sensor was used and 2 light sources were added to glasses that were therefore recognized by a commercially available sensor. Robotic system prototypes designed for ESBS and reported in the literature still present significant technical limitations. Hybrid robot assistance has a huge potential and might soon be feasible in ESBS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Using an autologous fibrin sealant in the preventing of cerebrospinal fluid leak with large skull base defect following endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dursun, Engin; Ozdol, Cagatay; Divanlioglu, Denizhan; Nacar, Osman Arikan; Koyun, Oguz Kara; Ilmaz, Adil Ery; Belen, Ahmed Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak following endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (EETS) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This prospective study is the first evaluation of using autologous fibrin sealant for preventing postoperative CSF leak and related complications. 200 endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches were included in the study and reviewed retrospectively from September 2010 to June 2012. A total of 55 patients who have large skull base and diafragma sella defects, connected with basal cisterns or ventricles, were chosen for the study. The patients were operated via extended or classical endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. The skull base has been repaired using AFS combined with multilayer reconstruction in all cases. The incidence of CSF leak as a complication of EETS was analyzed. The ages of the patients ranged from 20 to 83 years (mean 49.3 years). There were 25 (46%) male patients and 30 (54%) females. All patients had tumors with suprasellar or parasellar extension. Postoperative CSF leak was determined in 2 patients (3.6%). There were no complications and allergic reactions associated with the use of AFS. Using of AFS combined with multilayer reconstruction technique is a safe and effective method to prevent CSF leak in large defects following EETS.

  8. Quality criteria in diagnostic radiology of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, G.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic survey radiology of the skull relies on pictures to be taken if indicated and to meet all conceivable requirements. Those radiograph directions and projections were selected out of the profusion of known and described ones which allow both as small a number of pictures and as comprehensive a demonstration of all skull sections and1structures as possible. With this in mind, quality criteria for plain radiographs of the skull taken laterally and sagittably, for partial radiographs of the visceral cranium including orbit and of the base of the skull including petrons bone are described. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for skull base tumors: analysis of treatment accuracy using a stereotactic mask fixation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagnoli Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT using a stereotactic mask fixation system. Patients and Methods Sixteen patients treated with FSRT were involved in the study. A commercial stereotactic mask fixation system (BrainLAB AG was used for patient immobilization. Serial CT scans obtained before and during FSRT were used to assess the accuracy of patient immobilization by comparing the isocenter position. Daily portal imaging were acquired to establish day to day patient position variation. Displacement errors along the different directions were calculated as combination of systematic and random errors. Results The mean isocenter displacements based on localization and verification CT imaging were 0.1 mm (SD 0.3 mm in the lateral direction, 0.1 mm (SD 0.4 mm in the anteroposterior, and 0.3 mm (SD 0.4 mm in craniocaudal direction. The mean 3D displacement was 0.5 mm (SD 0.4 mm, being maximum 1.4 mm. No significant differences were found during the treatment (P = 0.4. The overall isocenter displacement as calculated by 456 anterior and lateral portal images were 0.3 mm (SD 0.9 mm in the mediolateral direction, -0.2 mm (SD 1 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 0.2 mm (SD 1.1 mm in the craniocaudal direction. The largest displacement of 2.7 mm was seen in the cranio-caudal direction, with 95% of displacements Conclusions The results indicate that the setup error of the presented mask system evaluated by CT verification scans and portal imaging are minimal. Reproducibility of the isocenter position is in the best range of positioning reproducibility reported for other stereotactic systems.

  10. Anterior and middle cranial fossa in traumatic brain injury: relevant neuroanatomy and neuropathology in the study of neuropsychological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2007-09-01

    The frontal and temporal lobe regions of the brain have a high vulnerability to injury as a consequence of cerebral trauma. One reason for this selective vulnerability is how the frontal and temporal regions are situated in the anterior and cranial fossa of the skull. These concavities of the skull base cup the frontal and temporal lobes which create surface areas of contact between the dura, brain, and skull where mechanical deformation injures the brain. In particular, the sphenoid ridge and the free-edge of the tentorium cerebelli are uniquely situated to facilitate injury to the posterior base of the frontal lobe and the anterior pole and medial surface area of the temporal lobe. Three-dimensional image reconstruction with computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are used to demonstrate the vulnerability of these regions. How neuropsychological deficits result from damage to these areas is reviewed and discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Contribution to speech development of the right anterior putamen revealed with multivariate tensor-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Roza; Yalin Wang; Dirks, Holly; Dean, Douglas; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Gonzalez, Sara; Binh Kien Nguyen; Nelson, Marvin D; Deoni, Sean; Lepore, Natasha

    2017-07-01

    In our previous study1, we suggested that the difference between tensor-based metrics in the anterior part of the right putamen between 21 and 18 months age groups associated with speech development during this ages. Here we used a correlational analysis between verbal scores and determinant of the Jacobian matrix to confirm our hypothesis. Significant correlations in anterior part of the right putamen between verbal scores and surface metric were revealed in the 18 and 21 age groups.

  12. International Frontal Sinus Anatomy Classification and anatomic predictors of low-lying anterior ethmoidal arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, Phayvanh P; Waghela, Rajendra; Ashby, Shaelene; Wiggins, Richard H; Orlandi, Richard R; Alt, Jeremiah A

    2017-05-01

    The International Frontal Sinus Anatomy Classification (IFAC) was introduced to more accurately characterize ethmoid and frontal sinus pneumatization patterns. The prevalence of IFAC cells and their anatomic associations have not been described. The goal was to examine the prevalence of IFAC cells and determine radiologic features associated with a low-lying anterior ethmoidal artery (LAEA). Imaging of adult patients who underwent computed tomographies from January 2015 to March 2016 were retrospectively reviewed by using the IFAC classification. We also measured the distance from the skull base to the anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA), the height of the lateral lamella of the cribriform plate, and anterior-posterior diameter from the anterior wall of the frontal sinus to the skull base (APF). Patients with a history of sinus surgery, trauma, malignancy, or congenital anomaly were excluded. Statistical analysis was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficients and χ2 tests. A total of 95 patients met the inclusion criteria. There was a significant association between supraorbital ethmoid cells and an LAEA (p < 0.001), with a significant effect size (φ = 0.276, p = 0.007). An inverse relationship was observed between Keros type I classification I and an LAEA (p < 0.001), with a significant effect size (φ = -0.414, p = 0.000). Significant associations were found between the AEA distance from the skull base and the cribriform lateral lamella height (R = 0.576, p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant association between the AEA distance from the skull base and the APF (R = 0.497, p < 0.001). The presence of a supraorbital ethmoid cell and a wide APF were associated with an LAEA. There was a significant relationship between Keros type I classification and the AEA adjacent to the skull base. Delineation of these anatomic relationships may be helpful during endoscopic sinus surgery to avoid complications.

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS): Longitudinal MRI-based whole joint assessment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, L Stefan; Niu, Jingbo; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. Baseline and follow-up 1.5 T MRI examinations from 20 patients of the KANON study, a randomized controlled study comparing a surgical and non-surgical treatment strategy, were assessed for up to six longitudinal visits using a novel MRI scoring system incorporating acute structural tissue damage and longitudinal changes including osteoarthritis (OA) features. Joint features assessed were acute osteochondral injury, traumatic and degenerative bone marrow lesions (BMLs), meniscus morphology and extrusion, osteophytes, collateral and cruciate ligaments including ACL graft, Hoffa-synovitis and effusion-synovitis. Cross-sectional (baseline) and longitudinal (all time points and change) intra- and inter-observer reliability was calculated using weighted (w) kappa statistics and overall percent agreement on a compartmental basis (medial tibio-femoral, lateral tibio-femoral, patello-femoral). Altogether 87 time points were evaluated. Intra-observer reliability ranged between 0.52 (baseline, Hoffa-synovitis) and 1.00 (several features), percent agreement between 52% (all time points, Hoffa-synovitis) and 100% (several features). Inter-observer reliability ranged between 0.00 and 1.00, which is explained by low frequency of some of the features. Altogether, 73% of all assessed 142 parameters showed w-kappa values between 0.80 and 1.00 and 92% showed agreement above 80%. ACLOAS allows reliable scoring of acute ACL injury and longitudinal changes. This novel scoring system incorporates features that may be relevant for structural outcome not covered by established OA scoring instruments. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reward-based contextual learning supported by anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Akina; HajiHosseini, Azadeh; Yates, Michael E; Holroyd, Clay B

    2017-06-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is commonly associated with cognitive control and decision making, but its specific function is highly debated. To explore a recent theory that the ACC learns the reward values of task contexts (Holroyd & McClure in Psychological Review, 122, 54-83, 2015; Holroyd & Yeung in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 16, 122-128, 2012), we recorded the event-related brain potentials (ERPs) from participants as they played a novel gambling task. The participants were first required to select from among three games in one "virtual casino," and subsequently they were required to select from among three different games in a different virtual casino; unbeknownst to them, the payoffs for the games were higher in one casino than in the other. Analysis of the reward positivity, an ERP component believed to reflect reward-related signals carried to the ACC by the midbrain dopamine system, revealed that the ACC is sensitive to differences in the reward values associated with both the casinos and the games inside the casinos, indicating that participants learned the values of the contexts in which rewards were delivered. These results highlight the importance of the ACC in learning the reward values of task contexts in order to guide action selection.

  15. [Apical petrositis, osteomyelitis of the base of the skull bones and of the first cervical vertebra in a 5 year-old children following chicken pox].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomil'sky, M R; Polunin, M M; Zelikovich, E I; Soldatsky, Yu L; Burova, O V

    2016-01-01

    This publication was designed to describe a rare case of development of apicalpetrositis in a child presenting with acute otitis mediafollowing chicken pox experienced in the preceding period. We carried out the study with the use of computed tomography (CT) that demonstrated destruction of the temporal bone, bones of the base of the skull and of the first cervical vertebra. The treatment strategy chosen for the management of this condition that included antibiotic therapy and expectant observation proved justified and can be recommended as an algorithm of choice taking into consideration the difficulty of surgical approach to the apex of the petrous pyramid. However, this approach is associated with the high risk of disability arising from the potential injury to the craniocerebral nerves.

  16. Aggressive surgery and focal radiation in the management of meningiomas of the skull base: preservation of function with maintenance of local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, P.McL.; Loeffler, J.S.; Villavicencio, A.T.; Rhouddou, C.

    2001-01-01

    Background: recent study series have reported that post-operative external beam radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery with the linear accelerator or gamma knife improves long-term local control of sub-totally resected or recurrent meningiomas. Methods: analysis of treatment results in 100 consecutive patients with skull base meningiomas managed by one surgeon with a median follow-up of five years. Treatment principles included observation for asymptomatic tumors; surgery for progressive or symptomatic tumors unless surgery was medically contraindicated or refused by the patient; to make surgery as aggressive as possible but with the goal of presenting full function of the patient; and to use radiosurgery or conformal fractionated radiation therapy if residual tumor was demonstrated. Preoperative, postoperative, and observational data were prospectively accumulated and stored in a large database system. Median follow up was 5 years with a range from 2 to 10 years. Findings: the most frequent presenting symptoms were headache (45 %) and changes in vision (29 %). Cranial nerve deficits (49 %) and cerebellar signs (24 %) were the most common physical findings. Seventy-two patients had surgical resection. Of these, 93 % had greater than 50 % resection and 47 % had radiographically complete resection. There were no perioperative deaths and there were five surgical complications for a rate of 7 %. Complications included nemiparesis (2.8 %) new cranial nerve palsy (2.8%), and indolent osteomyelitis (1.4 %). Fifteen patients had observation only; none of who progressed. Thirteen patients had radiation only, primarily because of patient preference or medical contraindications to surgery in the setting of substantial symptoms. There were no complications of this therapy. With a median five-year follow-up, only one patient (1 %) demonstrated tumor progression using the treatment paradigm outlined here. Interpretation. These results demonstrate that skull base

  17. SU-F-T-221: An Assessment of the Potential for Improved Local Control of Skull- Base Chordomas Via Reduction of the Proton Beam Range Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, L; Soldner, A; Kirk, M; Fager, M; Solberg, T; Robert, L; Dolney, D [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The beam range uncertainty presents a special challenge for proton therapy. Novel technologies currently under development offer strategies to reduce the range uncertainty [1,2]. This work quantifies the potential advantages that could be realized by such a reduction for dosimetrically challenging chordomas at the base of skull. Therapeutic improvement was assessed by evaluating tumor control probabilities (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods: Treatment plans were made for a modulated-scanned proton delivery technique using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The prescription dose was 7920 cGy to the CTV. Three different range uncertainty scenarios were considered: 5 mm (3.5% of the beam range + 1 mm, representing current clinical practice, “Curr”), 2 mm (1.3%), and 1 mm (0.7%). For each of 4 patients, 3 different PTVs were defined via uniform expansion of the CTV by the value of the range uncertainty. Tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for organs-at-risk (OARs) were calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman[3] formalism and published model parameters [ref Terahara[4], quantec S10, Burman Red Journal v21 pp 123]. Our plan optimization strategy was to achieve PTV close to prescription while maintaining OAR NTCP values at or better than the Curr plan. Results: The average TCP values for the 5, 2, and 1 mm range uncertainty scenarios are 51%, 55% and 65%. The improvement in TCP for patients was between 4 and 30%, depending primarily on the proximity of the GTV to OAR. The average NTCPs for the brainstem and cord were about 4% and 1%, respectively, for all target margins. Conclusion: For base of skull chordomas, reduced target margins can substantially increase the TCP without increasing the NTCP. This work demonstrates the potential significance of a reduction in the range uncertainty for proton beams.

  18. A homicide in the Ukraine: DNA-based identification of a boiled, skeletonized, and varnished human skull, and of bone fragments found in a fireplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolap, Y; Krivda, G; Kozhuhova, N; Chebotar, S; Benecke, M

    2001-12-01

    In an apartment, bone fragments were found in a fireplace. Furthermore, a varnished skull was found elsewhere in the same apartment. The tenant confessed to a murder and stated that the head of a victim, a girl, was boiled for 12 hours. He stated that the soft tissue was then removed and the skull was varnished. Other parts of the body were burned to ashes in an open field. Comparison of loci D19S252, CD4, CYAR04, TII01, F13A01, F13B, and D6S366 from the skull and the bone remains to loci of the mother of a missing girl showed that the skull came from that missing child. Biological maternity was calculated as 99.99%. The bone pieces were DNA typed as male and did not share alleles with the mother in several systems. Therefore, they belonged to a different (human) victim.

  19. Recommended Standardized Terminology of the Anterior Female Pelvis Based on a Structured Medical Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppson, Peter C; Balgobin, Sunil; Washington, Blair B; Hill, Audra Jolyn; Lewicky-Gaupp, Christina; Wheeler, Thomas; Ridgeway, Beri; Mazloomdoost, Donna; Balk, Ethan M; Corton, Marlene M; Delancey, John

    2018-04-06

    To create recommended standardized terminology to describe anatomic structures of the anterior female pelvis based on a structured review of published literature and selected text books. We searched MEDLINE from its inception until May 2, 2016 using 11 MeSH terms to identify studies reporting on anterior female pelvic anatomy; any study type published in English was accepted. Nine textbooks were also included. We screened 12,264 abstracts, identifying 200 eligible studies along with 13 textbook chapters from which we extracted all pertinent anatomic terms. Sixty-seven unique structures in the anterior female pelvis were identified. Fifty-nine of these have been previously recognized with accepted terms in Terminologia Anatomica, the international standard on anatomical terminology. We also identified and propose the adoption of four anatomic regional terms (lateral vaginal wall, pelvic side wall, pelvic bones, and anterior compartment), and two structural terms not included in Terminologia Anatomica (vaginal sulcus and levator hiatus). In addition, we identified two controversial terms (pubourethral ligament and Grafenberg spot) that require additional research and consensus from the greater medical and scientific community prior to adoption or rejection of these terms. We propose standardized terminology that should be used when discussing anatomic structures in the anterior female pelvis to help improve communication between researchers, clinicians, and surgeons. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Morphometric Analysis of Bone Resection in Anterior Petrosectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama; Walther, Jonathan; Theriot, Krystle; Manuel, Morganne; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The anterior petrosectomy is a well-defined skull base approach to lesions such as petroclival meningiomas, posterior circulation aneurysms, petrous apex lesions (chondrosarcomas, cholesteatomas), ventrolateral brainstem lesions, clival chordomas, trigeminal neurinomas, and access to cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VII. Methods and Materials Fourteen anterior petrosectomies on eight cadaveric heads were performed in a skull base dissection laboratory. Predissection and postdissection thin-cut computed tomography scans were obtained to compare the bone resection. A computer program was used (InVivo5, Anatomage, San Jose, California, United States) to measure the bone resection and the improved viewing angle. Results The average bone removed in each plane was as follows: anterior to posterior plane was 10.57 mm ± 2.00 mm, superior to inferior was 9.39 mm ± 1.67 mm, and lateral to medial was 17.46 mm ± 4.64 mm. The average increased angle of view was 13.01 ± 2.35 degrees (Table 1). The average volume was 1786.94 ± 827.40 mm(3). Conclusions Anterior petrosectomy is a useful approach to access the ventrolateral brainstem region. We present a cadaveric study quantitating the volume of bone resection and improvement in the viewing angle. These data provide useful preoperative information on the utility of this skull base approach and the gain in the viewing angle after bony removal.

  1. Acute radiation-induced toxicity of heavy ion radiotherapy delivered with intensity modulated pencil beam scanning in patients with base of skull tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Haberer, Thomas; Scholz, Michael; Thilmann, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Jäkel, Oliver; Kraft, Gerhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Jürgen

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate acute radiation-induced toxicity of carbon ion therapy. From December 1997 to November 2000, 37 patients with chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base have been treated with carbon ions at the heavy ion synchrotron (SIS) at GSI, Darmstadt. Tumor-conformal application of carbon beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning in combination with pulse-to-pulse energy variation. The treatment planning procedure included a biological plan optimization. We applied a cobalt-Gray equivalent dose of 60GyE. Acute toxicity was assessed according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC). Acute toxicity included skin reactions ( degrees I+ degrees II) in four patients, mucositis ( degrees I- degrees III) in eight patients, otitis and middle ear effusion in four, sinusitis in four, nausea/weight loss in one and edema of the temporal lobes in one patient. In two patients, preexisting neurological symptoms worsened. We did not observe acute morbidity > degrees III of normal tissues. Scanning beam delivery of heavy charged particles is safe and reliable. No unexpected acute dose limiting toxicity was observed. With regard to toxicity, a substantial improvement compared to passive beam shaping technology is achieved.

  2. On-board imaging validation of optically guided stereotactic radiosurgery positioning system for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W; Murphy, James D; Chu, Karen P M; Hsu, Annie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-11-15

    To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 ± 1.1 mm and 3.9 ± 1.6 mm, respectively (p 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenoidal size in lateral roentgenogram of skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, H. S.; Byun, Y. S.; Hahm, C. K.; Kim, J. J. [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    Adenoid is a kind of tonsil located in the posterior wall of the nasopharynx. Enlargement of the adenoid can produce obstruction of the nasopharynx and eustachian tube. Disturbance in discharge of nasal and paranasal secretions can be a cause of chronic rhinitis, sinusitis and otitis media. The diagnosis of enlarged adenoid by inspection is difficult due to its location. In the lateral roentgenogram of the skull the anterior wall of the adenoid is sharply delineated by air in the nasopharynx. The authors measured the sizes of adenoid and nasopharynx and calculated the adenoid-nasopharyngeal ratio (AN ratio) from 1,000 simple skull lateral roentgenograms of the children between the age of 0 to 16 years. Adenoid size is gradually increasing in the children up to 9 years of age but almost uncharged in the older age group. The AN ratio is highest in the age group of 8-9 years. In the age groups above 9 years of age the AN ratio is gradually decreased due to atrophic changes of the adenoid.

  4. Adenoidal size in lateral roentgenogram of skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, H. S.; Byun, Y. S.; Hahm, C. K.; Kim, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Adenoid is a kind of tonsil located in the posterior wall of the nasopharynx. Enlargement of the adenoid can produce obstruction of the nasopharynx and eustachian tube. Disturbance in discharge of nasal and paranasal secretions can be a cause of chronic rhinitis, sinusitis and otitis media. The diagnosis of enlarged adenoid by inspection is difficult due to its location. In the lateral roentgenogram of the skull the anterior wall of the adenoid is sharply delineated by air in the nasopharynx. The authors measured the sizes of adenoid and nasopharynx and calculated the adenoid-nasopharyngeal ratio (AN ratio) from 1,000 simple skull lateral roentgenograms of the children between the age of 0 to 16 years. Adenoid size is gradually increasing in the children up to 9 years of age but almost uncharged in the older age group. The AN ratio is highest in the age group of 8-9 years. In the age groups above 9 years of age the AN ratio is gradually decreased due to atrophic changes of the adenoid

  5. Leg length, skull circumference, and the prevalence of dementia in low and middle income countries: a 10/66 population-based cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Martin; Acosta, Daisy; Dangour, Alan D; Uauy, Ricardo; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, K S; Rodriguez, Juan J Llibre; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Williams, Joseph D; Acosta, Isaac; Albanese, Emiliano; Dewey, Michael E; Ferri, Cleusa P; Stewart, Robert; Gaona, Ciro; Jotheeswaran, A T; Kumar, P Senthil; Li, Shuran; Guerra, Juan C Llibre; Rodriguez, Diana; Rodriguez, Guillermina

    2011-03-01

    Adult leg length is influenced by nutrition in the first few years of life. Adult head circumference is an indicator of brain growth. There is a limited literature linking short legs and small skulls to an increased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia in late life. One phase cross-sectional surveys were carried out of all residents aged over 65 years in 11 catchment areas in China, India, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Mexico and Peru (n = 14,960). The cross-culturally validated 10/66 dementia diagnosis, and a sociodemographic and risk factor questionnaire were administered to all participants, and anthropometric measures taken. Poisson regression was used to calculate prevalence ratios for the effect of leg length and skull circumference upon 10/66 dementia, controlling for age, gender, education and family history of dementia. The pooled meta-analyzed fixed effect for leg length (highest vs. lowest quarter) was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.68-0.98) and for skull circumference 0.75 (95% CI, 0.63-0.89). While point estimates varied between sites, the proportion of the variability attributable to heterogeneity between studies as opposed to sampling error (I2) was 0% for leg length and 22% for skull circumference. The effects were independent and not mediated by family history of dementia. The effect of skull circumference was not modified by educational level or gender, and the effect of leg length was not modified by gender. Since leg length and skull circumference are said to remain stable throughout adulthood into old age, reverse causality is an unlikely explanation for the findings. Early life nutritional programming, as well as neurodevelopment may protect against neurodegeneration.

  6. Craniometric Indices of Nigeria Skulls

    OpenAIRE

    Orish CN; Ibeachu PC

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Craniometric indices show the percentage relationship between different dimensions. It is an important parameter for classification of race and sex of individuals of unknown identity. This study was undertaken to determine the craniometric indices of gnathic, palatal, orbital, cranial and nasal indices of Nigerian skulls. Materials and Methods: One hundred adult dry skulls, (78 males, and 22 females) free from damage and deformities from eleven Departments of Anatomy in Nige...

  7. Outcome based definition of the anterior thalamic deep brain stimulation target in refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtimäki, K; Möttönen, T; Järventausta, K; Katisko, J; Tähtinen, T; Haapasalo, J; Niskakangas, T; Kiekara, T; Öhman, J; Peltola, J

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (ANT) is an emerging therapy for refractory focal epilepsy. However, the most optimal target for stimulation has not been unambiguously described. In the present study, we investigated the correlation between the stimulation site and outcome in order to define the optimal target for deep brain stimulation in refractory epilepsy. The locations of 62 contacts used in 30 treatment attempts in 15 prospectively followed patients during a 5 year period were assessed. Treatment attempts were classified into responding and non-responding trials using seizure reduction and side effect profile as criteria. The locations of active contacts were calculated with respect to mid-commissural point and visible borders of ANT in 3T MRI (ANT-normalized coordinate system) aiming to minimize the confounding effect of individual variation in the location and size of the ANT. Contacts in successful treatment trials were located significantly more anterior and superior both in AC-PC and ANT-normalized coordinate systems. Favourable outcome was observed at 3T MRI based location of ANT but not at location predicted by Schaltenbrandt atlas sagittal data. Contacts used in successful trials were at anterior aspect of the ANT complex evidenced by the ANT-normalized coordinate system. The anti-epileptic effect of anterior thalamic DBS may be dependent on stimulation site especially in the anterior to posterior axis. Extensive anatomical variation confounds severely the targeting of ANT. Therefore, direct visualization of the desired target for stimulation is essential for favourable outcome in refractory epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Late toxicity of proton beam therapy for patients with the nasal cavity, para-nasal sinuses, or involving the skull base malignancy: importance of long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Arahira, Satoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishio, Teiji; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Tahara, Makoto; Hayashi, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Although several reports have shown that proton beam therapy (PBT) offers promise for patients with skull base cancer, little is known about the frequency of late toxicity in clinical practice when PBT is used for these patients. Here, we conducted a retrospective analysis to clarify the late toxicity profile of PBT in patients with malignancies of the nasal cavity, para-nasal sinuses, or involving the skull base. Entry to this retrospective study was restricted to patients with (1) malignant tumors of the nasal cavity, para-nasal sinuses, or involving the skull base; (2) definitive or postoperative PBT (>50 GyE) from January 1999 through December 2008; and (3) more than 1 year of follow-up. Late toxicities were graded according to the common terminology criteria for adverse events v4.0 (CTCAE v4.0). From January 1999 through December 2008, 90 patients satisfied all criteria. Median observation period was 57.5 months (range, 12.4-162.7 months), median time to onset of grade 2 or greater late toxicity except cataract was 39.2 months (range, 2.7-99.8 months), and 3 patients had toxicities that occurred more than 5 years after PBT. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 17 patients (19%), with 19 events, and grade 4 late toxicities in 6 patients (7%), with 6 events (encephalomyelitis infection 2, optic nerve disorder 4). In conclusion, the late toxicity profile of PBT in patients with malignancy involving the nasal cavity, para-nasal sinuses, or skull base malignancy was partly clarified. Because late toxicity can still occur at 5 years after treatment, long-term follow-up is necessary. (author)

  9. Analysis of Vision Loss Caused by Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Particle Therapy for Head-and-Neck and Skull-Base Tumors Adjacent to Optic Nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demizu, Yusuke; Murakami, Masao; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Niwa, Yasue; Akagi, Takashi; Sasaki, Ryohei; Terashima, Kazuki; Suga, Daisaku; Kamae, Isao; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incident rates of vision loss (VL; based on counting fingers or more severe) caused by radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after particle therapy for tumors adjacent to optic nerves (ONs), and to evaluate factors that may contribute to VL. Methods and Materials: From August 2001 to August 2006, 104 patients with head-and-neck or skull-base tumors adjacent to ONs were treated with carbon ion or proton radiotherapy. Among them, 145 ONs of 75 patients were irradiated and followed for greater than 12 months. The incident rate of VL and the prognostic factors for occurrence of VL were evaluated. The late effects of carbon ion and proton beams were compared on the basis of a biologically effective dose at α/β = 3 gray equivalent (GyE 3 ). Results: Eight patients (11%) experienced VL resulting from RION. The onset of VL ranged from 17 to 58 months. The median follow-up was 25 months. No significant difference was observed between the carbon ion and proton beam treatment groups. On univariate analysis, age (>60 years), diabetes mellitus, and maximum dose to the ON (>110 GyE 3 ) were significant, whereas on multivariate analysis only diabetes mellitus was found to be significant for VL. Conclusions: The time to the onset of VL was highly variable. There was no statistically significant difference between carbon ion and proton beam treatments over the follow-up period. Based on multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus correlated with the occurrence of VL. A larger study with longer follow-up is warranted.

  10. [Value of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT in clinical decision-making for nasopharyngeal carcinoma and a comparison of the values of different imaging techniques for diagnosing skull-base bone invasion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Zhang, R S; Zhang, L Q; Lu, B G; Fu, W H

    2017-02-23

    Objective: To analyze the clinical value of SPECT/CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion and clinical decision-making for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and to compare their diagnostic value with SPECT/CT, CT, MRI, and MRI combined with SPECT (MRI-SPECT) for skull base bone invasion. Methods: Before treatment, among 348 newly diagnosed NPC patients, CT scan was performed in 186 patients (group A) and the remaining 162 patients received MRI scan (group B). Clinical doctors then made clinical management decisions according to the CT or MRI results. After that, all patients underwent (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT examination for nasopharyngeal local tomography, and the results were provided to the clinical doctors to make clinical management decisions again. The changes between the two clinical management decisions were scored according to diagnosis, range of lesion, staging, treatment regimens, and auxiliary examination. The diagnostic value of CT scan, MRI scan, SPECT/CT and MRI-SPECT for skull base bone invasion was then evaluated and compared. Results: In terms of changes in scores of clinical management decisions, the score of group A was 1.387 and group B was 0.951, showing a significant difference between the two groups by Wilcoxon test ( Z =6.570, P nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In addition, in view of its greater diagnostic value, MRI combined with SPECT should be the focus of future imaging studies.

  11. Three-dimensional fetal cephalometry: an evaluation of the reliability of cephalometric measurements based on three-dimensional CT reconstructions and on dry skulls of sheep fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Moschos A; Jannowitz, Christina; Boettcher, Peter; Henke, Julia; Stolla, Rudolf; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Kovacs, Laszlo; Erhardt, Wolf; Biemer, Edgar; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A

    2005-08-01

    To develop a 3D CT cephalometric analysis for maxillary growth evaluation of sheep fetuses operated in utero, and to evaluate the reliability of this analysis by comparing it with a direct cephalometric analysis on dry skulls. Five skulls of operated sheep fetuses were used, which after preparation were CT scanned and a 3D reconstruction was performed. A cephalometric analysis was performed directly on the dry skulls as well as on the reconstructed 3D CT images. In total, 56 linear distances were measured. In order to access the error of the method, the procedure was repeated after a 2 week interval. The comparison between the direct cephalometric and the 3D CT analysis revealed that only 5 variables were significantly different. The evaluation of the error of method revealed that 7 variables of the direct cephalometric analysis and none of the 3D CT analysis differed significantly. According to the results of this study, it can be concluded that a cephalometric analysis on 3D CT reconstructed images of the skulls includes fewer identification errors and seems to be an accurate and reliable method that could be regarded at least as equivalent to conventional cephalometry.

  12. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: Qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  13. A Treatment Planning Comparison of Combined Photon-Proton Beams Versus Proton Beams-Only for the Treatment of Skull Base Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuvret, Loic; Noel, Georges; Weber, Damien C.; Pommier, Pascal; Ferrand, Regis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Dhermain, Frederic; Alapetite, Claire; Mammar, Hamid; Boisserie, Gilbert; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment planning between combined photon-proton planning (CP) and proton planning (PP) for skull base tumors, so as to assess the potential limitations of CP for these tumors. Methods and Materials: Plans for 10 patients were computed for both CP and PP. Prescribed dose was 67 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) for PP; 45 Gy (photons) and 22 CGE (protons) for CP. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated for gross target volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), normal tissues (NT), and organs at risk (OARs) for each plan. Results were analyzed using DVH parameters, inhomogeneity coefficient (IC), and conformity index (CI). Results: Mean doses delivered to the GTVs and CTVs with CP (65.0 and 61.7 CGE) and PP (65.3 and 62.2 Gy CGE) were not significantly different (p > 0.1 and p = 0.72). However, the dose inhomogeneity was drastically increased with CP, with a mean significant incremental IC value of 10.5% and CP of 6.8%, for both the GTV (p = 0.01) and CTV (p = 0.04), respectively. The CI 80% values for the GTV and CTV were significantly higher with PP compared with CP. Compared with CP, the use of protons only led to a significant reduction of NT and OAR irradiation, in the intermediate-to-low dose (≤80% isodose line) range. Conclusions: These results suggest that the use of CP results in levels of target dose conformation similar to those with PP. Use of PP significantly reduced the tumor dose inhomogeneity and the delivered intermediate-to-low dose to NT and OARs, leading us to conclude that this treatment is mainly appropriate for tumors in children

  14. Accuracy of Image-guided Surgical Systems at the Lateral Skull Base as Clinically Assessed Using Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Posts as Surgical Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Ramya; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective Image-guided surgical (IGS) technology has been clinically available for over a decade. To date, no acceptable standard exists for reporting the accuracy of IGS systems, especially for lateral skull base applications. We present a validation method that uses the post from bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) patients as a target. We then compare the accuracy of two IGS systems—one using laser skin-surface scanning (LSSS) and another using a non-invasive fiducial frame (FF) attached to patient via dental bite-block (DBB) for registration. Study design Prospective. Setting Tertiary referral center. Patients Six BAHA patients who had adequate dentition for creation of a DBB. Intervention(s) For each patient, a dental impression was obtained, and a customized DBB was made to hold a FF. Temporal bone CT scans were obtained with the patient wearing the DBB, FF, and a customized marker on the BAHA post. In a mock OR, CT scans were registered to operative anatomy using two methods: (a) LSSS, (b) FF. Main outcome measure(s) For each patient and each system, the position of the BAHA marker in the CT scan and in the mock OR (using optical measurement technology) were compared and the distances between them are reported to demonstrate accuracy. Results Accuracy (mean ± standard deviation) was 1.54 ± 0.63 mm for DBB registration and 3.21 ± 1.02 mm for LSSS registration. Conclusions An IGS system using FF registration is more accurate than one using LSSS (p = 0.03, two-sided Student's t-test). BAHA patients provide a unique patient population upon which IGS systems may be validated. PMID:18836389

  15. Endoscopic anatomy of the anterior ethmoidal artery: a cadaveric dissection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo Filho, Bernardo Cunha; Weber, Raimar; Pinheiro Neto, Carlos Diógenes; Lessa, Marcus Miranda; Voegels, Richard Louis; Butugan, Ossamu

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is an important point of anatomical reference in order to locate the frontal sinus and the skull base. Notwithstanding, despite numerous endoscopic studies in cadavers, we still lack an anatomical study on the AEA in the western population. to determine reference points used to locate the artery, study its relationship with the skull base and its degree of dehiscence, as well as to study intra and inter individual variations. we dissected the nasal fossae belonging to 25 cadavers. the average intranasal length of the anterior ethmoidal artery was 5.2 mm. The anterior ethmoidal canal presented some degree of dehiscence in 66.7%. The average distance between the artery middle point to the anterior nasal spine was of 61.72 mm (sd=4.18 mm); to the lateral nasal wall (nasal axilla) was of 64.04 mm (sd=4.69 mm); and from the anterior axilla to the middle turbinate was of 21.14 mm (sd=3.25 mm). For all the measures there was no statistically significant measures when both sides were compared (p>0.05). We concluded that the middle conchae axilla is the most reliable point of reference to locate the AEA.

  16. Current Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Criterion–Based Rehabilitation Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ADAMS, DOUGLAS; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID; HUNTER-GIORDANO, AIRELLE; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be evidence based. Since our original published guidelines in 1996, successful outcomes have been consistently achieved with the rehabilitation principles of early weight bearing, using a combination of weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing exercise focused on quadriceps and lower extremity strength, and meeting specific objective requirements for return to activity. As rehabilitative evidence and surgical technology and procedures have progressed, the original guidelines should be revisited to ensure that the most up-to-date evidence is guiding rehabilitative care. Emerging evidence on rehabilitative interventions and advancements in concomitant surgeries, including those addressing chondral and meniscal injuries, continues to grow and greatly affect the rehabilitative care of patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The aim of this article is to update previously published rehabilitation guidelines, using the most recent research to reflect the most current evidence for management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The focus will be on current concepts in rehabilitation interventions and modifications needed for concomitant surgery and pathology. PMID:22402434

  17. The skull of Homo naledi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Myra F; Schroeder, Lauren; Garvin, Heather M; Scott, Jill E; Dembo, Mana; Radovčić, Davorka; Musiba, Charles M; Ackermann, Rebecca R; Schmid, Peter; Hawks, John; Berger, Lee R; de Ruiter, Darryl J

    2017-03-01

    The species Homo naledi was recently named from specimens recovered from the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa. This large skeletal sample lacks associated faunal material and currently does not have a known chronological context. In this paper, we present comprehensive descriptions and metric comparisons of the recovered cranial and mandibular material. We describe 41 elements attributed to Dinaledi Hominin (DH1-DH5) individuals and paratype U.W. 101-377, and 32 additional cranial fragments. The H. naledi material was compared to Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominins using qualitative and quantitative analyses including over 100 linear measurements and ratios. We find that the Dinaledi cranial sample represents an anatomically homogeneous population that expands the range of morphological variation attributable to the genus Homo. Despite a relatively small cranial capacity that is within the range of australopiths and a few specimens of early Homo, H. naledi shares cranial characters with species across the genus Homo, including Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo erectus, and Middle Pleistocene Homo. These include aspects of cranial form, facial morphology, and mandibular anatomy. However, the skull of H. naledi is readily distinguishable from existing species of Homo in both qualitative and quantitative assessments. Since H. naledi is currently undated, we discuss the evolutionary implications of its cranial morphology in a range of chronological frameworks. Finally, we designate a sixth Dinaledi Hominin (DH6) individual based on a juvenile mandible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fully endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach to the anterior cranial base: A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Osman Akçakaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The supraorbital keyhole approach for anterior cranial base lesions has been increasingly used in clinical practice. Anatomical studies focusing on the endoscopic anatomy via this approach are few, although the microscopic anatomy has been well studied. The aim of this study is to describe the anatomical features and surgical exposure provided by the endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach using quantitative measurements. Materials and Methods: Nine formalin-fixed human cadavers from the inventory of the Anatomy department were used. A total of 18 supraorbital keyhole cranitomies were conducted. The distances between the target anatomical structures and the dura mater at the craniotomy site, and the distances between deep anatomical structures were measured with purpose-designed hooks. Results: The distance between the dura mater and optic canal was measured as 69.5 ± 6.7 mm (62-83 mm; optic chiasm as 76.2 ± 5.4 mm (67-86 mm; anterior communicating artery as 82.6 ± 6.1 mm (71-93 mm; internal carotid artery (ICA bifurcation as 74.7 ± 6.0 mm (66-84 mm and the basilar tip as 94.9 ± 7.0 mm (87-111 mm. The mean diameter of the optic canal was 7.4 ± 1.3 mm (6-11 mm, whereas the mean diameter of diaphragma sellae was measured as 8.4 ± 1.1 mm (7-10 mm. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the anterior anda medial aspects of the anterior cranial fossa can be visualized properly. Dissection of the ipsilateral arteries of Circle of Willis can be performed easily using an endoscopic supraorbital keyhole approach.

  19. Chronic imaging through "transparent skull" in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Steinzeig

    Full Text Available Growing interest in long-term visualization of cortical structure and function requires methods that allow observation of an intact cortex in longitudinal imaging studies. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the "transparent skull" (TS preparation based on skull clearing with cyanoacrylate, which is applicable for long-term imaging through the intact skull in mice. We characterized the properties of the TS in imaging of intrinsic optical signals and compared them with the more conventional cranial window preparation. Our results show that TS is less invasive, maintains stabile transparency for at least two months, and compares favorably to data obtained from the conventional cranial window. We applied this method to experiments showing that a four-week treatment with the antidepressant fluoxetine combined with one week of monocular deprivation induced a shift in ocular dominance in the mouse visual cortex, confirming that fluoxetine treatment restores critical-period-like plasticity. Our results demonstrate that the TS preparation could become a useful method for long-term visualization of the living mouse brain.

  20. FORAMINA OF THE POSTERIOR CRANIAL BASE: A STUDY OF ADULT INDIAN SKULLS. 89\tLas foraminas de la base posterior del cráneo: Un estudio en cráneos de indios adultos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namita A Sharma

    2016-03-01

    clinician in his surgical approach to this complicated region. The present study is of foramina in the posterior cranial base including the paired jugular foramen, stylomastoid foramen, the hypoglossal canal; the unpaired foramen magnum and accessory foramina such as the mastoid foramen and the posterior condylar canal. Materials and Method: The study was done on 50 dried, macerated, adult human skulls, all belonging to the Indian subcontinent, using a vernier caliper with a precision of 0.01 mm. Results: There was wide variation in the dimensions of the jugular foramen. The maximum bilateral difference within the same skull was 6.72mm.Dome and incomplete septation coexisted in 20% skulls. The size of stylomastoid foramen ranged from 0.9-5.3 mm. One out of the 100 foramina studied showed a stenosed foramen. Duplication was seen in 4% skulls. Septations in the hypoglossal canal were exclusively on the endocranial aspect and were seen bilaterally in 4% and unilaterally in 20% skulls. In one skull there was occipitalisation of the atlas. The magnum outlet was distorted and stenosed. This was the only skull with a ‘foramen magnum index’ less than 1. The mastoid foramen was present bilaterally in 74% and unilaterally in 16% skulls while the corresponding figures for the posterior condylar canal were 62% and 26% respectively.

  1. Pervasive genetic integration directs the evolution of human skull shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Santos, Mauro; Hernández, Miquel; Klingenberg, Christian Peter

    2012-04-01

    It has long been unclear whether the different derived cranial traits of modern humans evolved independently in response to separate selection pressures or whether they resulted from the inherent morphological integration throughout the skull. In a novel approach to this issue, we combine evolutionary quantitative genetics and geometric morphometrics to analyze genetic and phenotypic integration in human skull shape. We measured human skulls in the ossuary of Hallstatt (Austria), which offer a unique opportunity because they are associated with genealogical data. Our results indicate pronounced covariation of traits throughout the skull. Separate simulations of selection for localized shape changes corresponding to some of the principal derived characters of modern human skulls produced outcomes that were similar to each other and involved a joint response in all of these traits. The data for both genetic and phenotypic shape variation were not consistent with the hypothesis that the face, cranial base, and cranial vault are completely independent modules but relatively strongly integrated structures. These results indicate pervasive integration in the human skull and suggest a reinterpretation of the selective scenario for human evolution where the origin of any one of the derived characters may have facilitated the evolution of the others. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. The endoscopic endonasal approach is not superior to the microscopic transcranial approach for anterior skull base meningiomas-a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskens, Ivo S; Briceno, Vanessa; Ouwehand, Tom L; Castlen, Joseph P; Gormley, William B; Aglio, Linda S; Zamanipoor Najafabadi, Amir H; van Furth, Wouter R; Smith, Timothy R; Mekary, Rania A; Broekman, Marike L D

    2018-01-01

    In the past decade, the endonasal transsphenoidal approach (eTSA) has become an alternative to the microsurgical transcranial approach (mTCA) for tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSMs) and olfactory groove meningiomas (OGMs). The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate which approach offered the best surgical outcomes. A systematic review of the literature from 2004 and meta-analysis were conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Pooled incidence was calculated for gross total resection (GTR), visual improvement, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, intraoperative arterial injury, and mortality, comparing eTSA and mTCA, with p-interaction values. Of 1684 studies, 64 case series were included in the meta-analysis. Using the fixed-effects model, the GTR rate was significantly higher among mTCA patients for OGM (eTSA: 70.9% vs. mTCA: 88.5%, p-interaction OGM (p-interaction = 0.33). CSF leak was significantly higher among eTSA patients for both OGM (eTSA: 25.1% vs. mTCA: 10.5%, p-interaction OGM resection (p-interaction = 0.10). Mortality was not significantly different between eTSA and mTCA patients for both TSM (p-interaction = 0.14) and OGM resection (p-interaction = 0.88). Random-effect models yielded similar results. In this meta-analysis, eTSA was not shown to be superior to mTCA for resection of both OGMs and TSMs.

  3. The effects of office-based frenotomy for anterior and posterior ankyloglossia on breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callahan, Cliff; Macary, Susan; Clemente, Stephanie

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of office-based frenotomy on reversing breastfeeding difficulties among infants with problematic ankyloglossia, and to examine characteristics associated with anterior and posterior ankyloglossia. Mother's of infants who underwent a frenotomy for ankyloglossia from December 2006 through March 2011 completed a post-intervention web-based survey about breastfeeding difficulties they experienced before and after the frenotomy. Maternal-infant dyads had been referred from health providers to a primary care practice for assessment of ankyloglossia. Infants were subsequently classified as having no ankyloglossia, anterior (Type I or Type II) or posterior (Type III or Type IV). There were 311 infants evaluated for ankyloglossia and 299 (95%) underwent a frenotomy. Most infants were classified as having Type III (36%) or IV (49%) ankyloglossia compared to only 16% with anterior (Type I and Type II combined). Differences by classification type were found for gender (P=.016), age (P=.017), and maxillary tie (P=.005). Among survey respondents (n=157), infant latching significantly improved (P<.001) from pre- to post-intervention for infants with posterior ankyloglossia. Both the presence and severity of nipple pain decreased from pre- to post-intervention among all classifications (P<.001). Additionally, 92% of respondents breastfed exclusively post-intervention. The mean breastfeeding duration of 14 months did not differ significantly by classification. Breastfeeding difficulties associated with ankyloglossia in infants, particularly posterior, can be improved with a simple office-based procedure in most cases. The diagnosis and treatment of ankyloglossia should be a basic competency for all primary care providers and pediatric otorhinolaryngologists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence-based practice to improve outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayeni, O R; Evaniew, N; Ogilvie, R; Peterson, D C; Denkers, M R; Bhandari, M

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have considered native knee anatomy and biomechanical function, and emphasized the long-term goals of protecting knee health and preventing the development of symptomatic ACL-deficient degenerative arthrosis. Validated and reproducible examination maneuvers are necessary for accurate diagnosis and appraisal of surgical interventions. Appropriately powered expertise-based trials should be emphasized to minimize bias, enhance validity, and reduce crossover. Best practice rehabilitation protocols can guide postoperative care while minimizing heterogeneity within studies. Functional outcome scores should be sensitive, responsive, and able to reliably detect small changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The development of the skull of the Egyptian Cobra Naja h. haje (Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khannoon, Eraqi R; Evans, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    The study of craniofacial development is important in understanding the ontogenetic processes behind morphological diversity. A complete morphological description of the embryonic skull development of the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje, is lacking and there has been little comparative discussion of skull development either among elapid snakes or between them and other snakes. We present a description of skull development through a full sequence of developmental stages of the Egyptian cobra, and compare it to other snakes. Associated soft tissues of the head are noted where relevant. The first visible ossification centres are in the supratemporal, prearticular and surangular, with slight ossification visible in parts of the maxilla, prefrontal, and dentary. Epiotic centres of ossification are present in the supraoccipital, and the body of the supraoccipital forms from the tectum posterior not the tectum synoticum. The venom glands are visible as distinct bodies as early at stage 5 and enlarge later to extend from the otic capsule to the maxilla level with the anterior margin of the eye. The gland becomes more prominent shortly before hatching, concomitant with the development of the fangs. The tongue shows incipient forking at stage 5, and becomes fully bifid at stage 6. We present the first detailed staging series of cranial development for the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje. This is one of the first studies since the classical works of G. de Beer and W. Parker that provides a detailed description of cranial development in an advanced snake species. It allows us to correct errors and misinterpretations in previous accounts which were based on a small sample of specimens of uncertain age. Our results highlight potentially significant variation in supraoccipital formation among squamates and the need for further research in this area.

  6. Benchmarking of a treatment planning system for spot scanning proton therapy: Comparison and analysis of robustness to setup errors of photon IMRT and proton SFUD treatment plans of base of skull meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, R., E-mail: ruth.harding2@wales.nhs.uk [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Swansea SA2 8QA (United Kingdom); Trnková, P.; Lomax, A. J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Centre for Proton Therapy, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Weston, S. J.; Lilley, J.; Thompson, C. M.; Cosgrove, V. P. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Short, S. C. [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oncology and Clinical Research, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand St James’s Institute of Oncology, Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Loughrey, C. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Base of skull meningioma can be treated with both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and spot scanned proton therapy (PT). One of the main benefits of PT is better sparing of organs at risk, but due to the physical and dosimetric characteristics of protons, spot scanned PT can be more sensitive to the uncertainties encountered in the treatment process compared with photon treatment. Therefore, robustness analysis should be part of a comprehensive comparison between these two treatment methods in order to quantify and understand the sensitivity of the treatment techniques to uncertainties. The aim of this work was to benchmark a spot scanning treatment planning system for planning of base of skull meningioma and to compare the created plans and analyze their robustness to setup errors against the IMRT technique. Methods: Plans were produced for three base of skull meningioma cases: IMRT planned with a commercial TPS [Monaco (Elekta AB, Sweden)]; single field uniform dose (SFUD) spot scanning PT produced with an in-house TPS (PSI-plan); and SFUD spot scanning PT plan created with a commercial TPS [XiO (Elekta AB, Sweden)]. A tool for evaluating robustness to random setup errors was created and, for each plan, both a dosimetric evaluation and a robustness analysis to setup errors were performed. Results: It was possible to create clinically acceptable treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy of meningioma with a commercially available TPS. However, since each treatment planning system uses different methods, this comparison showed different dosimetric results as well as different sensitivities to setup uncertainties. The results confirmed the necessity of an analysis tool for assessing plan robustness to provide a fair comparison of photon and proton plans. Conclusions: Robustness analysis is a critical part of plan evaluation when comparing IMRT plans with spot scanned proton therapy plans.

  7. Functional Relationship between Skull Form and Feeding Mechanics in Sphenodon, and Implications for Diapsid Skull Development

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, N.; Jones, M. E. H.; Shi, J.; O Higgins, P.; Evans, S. E.; Fagan, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate skull evolved to protect the brain and sense organs, but with the appearance of jaws and associated forces there was a remarkable structural diversification. This suggests that the evolution of skull form may be linked to these forces, but an important area of debate is whether bone in the skull is minimised with respect to these forces, or whether skulls are mechanically "over-designed" and constrained by phylogeny and development. Mechanical analysis of diapsid reptile skulls...

  8. Morphometric analysis of hypoglossal canal of the occipital bone in Iranian dry skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayat Parvindokht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hypoglossal canal (HC is in basal part of cranium that transmits the nerve that supplies the motor innervations to the muscles of tongue. Study on morphometry of (HC and its variations has been a considerable interest field to neurosurgeons and research workers especially because of their racial and regional. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study, 26 adult dry human crania of no sex known were studied for (HC and its variants. Thirty five skulls were observed for any damage of post cranial fossa and those in good condition (26 skullswere selected. Sliding Vernier caliper was used for morphometric analysis. Results: There were significant difference between distances of: a-(HC till anterior tip of condyles (right and left, b-(HC till posterior tip of condyles (right and left, c-(HCtill lower border of occipital condyles (right and left, d-(HC till external border of foramen jugular (right and left, e-(HC till opisthion(right and left, f-(HC till carotid canal (right and left, g-(HC till jugular tubercle (right and left. There wasn′t significant difference in other parameters. Conclusion: Detailed morphometric analysis of (HC will help in planning of surgical intervention of skull base in safer and easier ways.

  9. Earliest directly-dated human skull-cups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M Bello

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of human braincases as drinking cups and containers has extensive historic and ethnographic documentation, but archaeological examples are extremely rare. In the Upper Palaeolithic of western Europe, cut-marked and broken human bones are widespread in the Magdalenian (∼15 to 12,000 years BP and skull-cup preparation is an element of this tradition. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe the post-mortem processing of human heads at the Upper Palaeolithic site of Gough's Cave (Somerset, England and identify a range of modifications associated with the production of skull-cups. New analyses of human remains from Gough's Cave demonstrate the skilled post-mortem manipulation of human bodies. Results of the research suggest the processing of cadavers for the consumption of body tissues (bone marrow, accompanied by meticulous shaping of cranial vaults. The distribution of cut-marks and percussion features indicates that the skulls were scrupulously 'cleaned' of any soft tissues, and subsequently modified by controlled removal of the facial region and breakage of the cranial base along a sub-horizontal plane. The vaults were also 'retouched', possibly to make the broken edges more regular. This manipulation suggests the shaping of skulls to produce skull-cups. CONCLUSIONS: Three skull-cups have been identified amongst the human bones from Gough's Cave. New ultrafiltered radiocarbon determinations provide direct dates of about 14,700 cal BP, making these the oldest directly dated skull-cups and the only examples known from the British Isles.

  10. Fournier?s gangrene - delayed pedicle flap based upon the anterior abdominal wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ania Sliwinski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fournier’s gangrene is a poly-microbial necrotizing fasciitis that involves the perineum and/or external genitalia. Urgent surgical debridement is well recognized as essential acute treatment yet unique challenges arise for plastic surgical reconstruction to obtain a complete functional recovery. This case describes a successful delayed pedicle flap repair based upon the anterior abdominal wall. Case description A 24 year old man was admitted to ICU ten days after elective circumcision with Fournier’s gangrene. He underwent a number of surgical debridements, and was referred for plastic surgical management. He had penile reconstruction using a random pattern abdominal flap, which was performed as a three stage procedure including flap vascular delay technique. Discussion Perineal and penile skin loss can be significant and is difficult to repair. Various techniques have been used to reconstruct lost tissue: skin grafts, transposition of the testes and spermatic cords to the thigh, flaps, and other types of pediculated myocutaneous flaps. Muscle flap reconstruction provides an environment that allows for complete regeneration of the urethral epithelium but is bulky and unsightly. Skin grafts contract and may produce painful and dysfunctional reconstructions. This novel technique produces a functional, and aesthetic reconstruction. Conclusion Penile skin recovery following Fournier’s gangrene recovery is problematic. This case demonstrates the functionality of a delayed flap repair using the anterior abdominal wall.

  11. Investigation of the elastic modulus, tensile and flexural strength of five skull simulant materials for impact testing of a forensic skin/skull/brain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Chun Li, Kai; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Conducting in vitro research for forensic, impact and injury simulation modelling generally involves the use of a skull simulant with mechanical properties similar to those found in the human skull. For this study epoxy resin, fibre filled epoxy resin, 3D-printing filaments (PETG, PLA) and self-cure acrylic denture base resin were used to fabricate the specimens (n=20 per material group), according to ISO 527-2 IBB and ISO20795-1. Tensile and flexural testing in a universal testing machine was used to measure their tensile/flexural elastic modulus and strength. The results showed that the epoxy resin and fibre filled epoxy resin had similar tensile elastic moduli (no statistical significant difference) with lower values observed for the other materials. The fibre filled epoxy resin had a considerably higher flexural elastic modulus and strength, possibly attributed to the presence of fibres. Of the simulants tested, epoxy resin had an elastic modulus and flexural strength close to that of mean human skull values reported in the literature, and thus can be considered as a suitable skull simulant for a skin/skull/brain model for lower impact forces that do not exceed the fracture stress. For higher impact forces a 3D printing filament (PLA) may be a more suitable skull simulant material, due to its closer match to fracture stresses found in human skull bone. Influencing factors were also anisotropy, heterogeneity and viscoelasticity of human skull bone and simulant specimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolutionary origin of the turtle skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bever, G S; Lyson, Tyler R; Field, Daniel J; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S

    2015-09-10

    Transitional fossils informing the origin of turtles are among the most sought-after discoveries in palaeontology. Despite strong genomic evidence indicating that turtles evolved from within the diapsid radiation (which includes all other living reptiles), evidence of the inferred transformation between an ancestral turtle with an open, diapsid skull to the closed, anapsid condition of modern turtles remains elusive. Here we use high-resolution computed tomography and a novel character/taxon matrix to study the skull of Eunotosaurus africanus, a 260-million-year-old fossil reptile from the Karoo Basin of South Africa, whose distinctive postcranial skeleton shares many unique features with the shelled body plan of turtles. Scepticism regarding the status of Eunotosaurus as the earliest stem turtle arises from the possibility that these shell-related features are the products of evolutionary convergence. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate strong cranial support for Eunotosaurus as a critical transitional form in turtle evolution, thus fortifying a 40-million-year extension to the turtle stem and moving the ecological context of its origin back onto land. Furthermore, we find unexpected evidence that Eunotosaurus is a diapsid reptile in the process of becoming secondarily anapsid. This is important because categorizing the skull based on the number of openings in the complex of dermal bone covering the adductor chamber has long held sway in amniote systematics, and still represents a common organizational scheme for teaching the evolutionary history of the group. These discoveries allow us to articulate a detailed and testable hypothesis of fenestral closure along the turtle stem. Our results suggest that Eunotosaurus represents a crucially important link in a chain that will eventually lead to consilience in reptile systematics, paving the way for synthetic studies of amniote evolution and development.

  13. Anatomic study of the pterion in Nigerian dry human skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukoha, U; Oranusi, C K; Okafor, J I; Udemezue, O O; Anyabolu, A E; Nwamarachi, T C

    2013-01-01

    The pterion is a point of sutural confluence seen in the norma lateralis of the skull. The site is an important landmark in surgical approaches to the anterior and middle cranial fossa. This study was designed to determine the frequency of pterion types and anatomic positions of the pterion in dry human skulls of Nigerians in the South Eastern Zone. Specific measurements were taken on both sides of 56 Nigerian human skulls of unknown sex, obtained from the Department of Anatomy, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Nigeria. All the four types of the pterion were present, i.e. sphenoparietal, frontotemporal, stellate, and epipteric. The study showed that the sphenoparietal type was 75% on the right side, 76% on the left side, the frontotemporal type was 19.6% on both sides, the stellate type was 1.8% on the right side and absent on the left side. The epipteric type was 3.6% on both sides. The distances from the centre of pterion to the frontozygomatic suture were 2.74 ± 0.07 cm on the right side and 2.74 ± 0.06 cm on the left side. The pterion was 4.02 ± 0.05 and 4.01 ± 0.03 cm above the midpoint of the zygomatic arch on the right and left sides, respectively. These findings are important for the surgeon as the pterion junction is a common extracranial landmark in neurosurgical and surgical approaches.

  14. Biting disrupts integration to spur skull evolution in eels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, David C; Wainwright, Peter C; Alfaro, Michael E; Revell, Liam J; Mehta, Rita S

    2014-11-17

    The demand that anatomical structures work together to perform biological functions is thought to impose strong limits on morphological evolution. Breakthroughs in diversification can occur, however, when functional integration among structures is relaxed. Although such transitions are expected to generate variation in morphological diversification across the tree of life, empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. Here we show that transitions between suction-based and biting modes of prey capture, which require different degrees of coordination among skull components, are associated with shifts in the pattern of skull diversification in eels (Anguilliformes). Biting eels have experienced greater independence of the jaws, hyoid and operculum during evolution and exhibit more varied morphologies than closely related suction feeders, and this pattern reflects the weakened functional integration among skull components required for biting. Our results suggest that behavioural transitions can change the evolutionary potential of the vertebrate skeleton by altering functional relationships among structures.

  15. Comparative histology of some craniofacial sutures and skull-base synchondroses in non-avian dinosaurs and their extant phylogenetic bracket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Horner, John R

    2016-08-01

    Sutures and synchondroses, the fibrous and cartilaginous articulations found in the skulls of vertebrates, have been studied for many biological applications at the morphological scale. However, little is known about these articulations at the microscopic scale in non-mammalian vertebrates, including extant archosaurs (birds and crocodilians). The major goals of this paper were to: (i) document the microstructure of some sutures and synchondroses through ontogeny in archosaurs; (ii) compare these microstructures with previously published sutural histology (i.e. that of mammals); and (iii) document how these articulations with different morphological degrees of closure (open or obliterated) appear histologically. This was performed with histological analyses of skulls of emus, American alligators, a fossil crocodilian and ornithischian dinosaurs (hadrosaurids, pachycephalosaurids and ceratopsids). Emus and mammals possess a sutural periosteum until sutural fusion, but it disappears rapidly during ontogeny in American alligators. This study identified seven types of sutural mineralized tissues in extant and extinct archosaurs and grouped them into four categories: periosteal tissues; acellular tissues; fibrous tissues; and intratendinous tissues. Due to the presence of a periosteum in their sutures, emus and mammals possess periosteal tissues at their sutural borders. The mineralized sutural tissues of crocodilians and ornithischian dinosaurs are more variable and can also develop via a form of necrosis for acellular tissues and metaplasia for fibrous and intratendinous tissues. It was hypothesized that non-avian dinosaurs, like the American alligator, lacked a sutural periosteum and that their primary mode of ossification involved the direct mineralization of craniofacial sutures (instead of intramembranous ossification found in mammals and birds). However, we keep in mind that a bird-like sutural microstructure might have arisen within non-avian saurichians. While

  16. Variability in first Homo: Analysis of the ratio between the skulls KNM-ER 1470 and KNM-ER 1813 based on sexual dimorphism of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, S W Ferreira; Lorenzo, C

    2015-10-01

    The study of the skulls KNM-ER 1470 and KNM-ER 1813, considered the first members of the genus Homo, has raised some debates. While some of researchers maintain that there is only one species, another group argues that there are two species. On one hand these two fossils are still taxonomically undetermined, on the other hand they bring up another problem related to the existence of a genus with multiple species since its beginning, according to the last discoveries. In this paper, we have compared the size ratio between these fossils with ratios established in populations of Homo sapiens, in order to know if they fit into the human standard, considering intra-sexual and inter-sexual variation. Results help to establish whether these fossils correspond to different species or their differences could be related to sexual dimorphism within a single species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. [Giant cell reparative granuloma of the skull].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Zhong, D; Liu, L; Sun, C; Han, D; Yang, W

    2000-02-01

    To investigate the clinical course, histologic feature, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG). Three cases of GCRG, which arose in the skull, were collected from 1987 to 1999 and analyzed clinicopathologically. Two patients had the lesion in the temporal bone and one in the orbit. One patient with GCRG had a recurrence after incomplete surgical resection. Histologically, all of three cases were characterized by fibroblastic proliferation with osteoclast-like giant cell rich areas, hemorrage, and newly formed bone or osteoid trabeculae. GCRG appeared as a typical bony lytic lesion on computed tomography (CT) and as low signal intensity on both T1 and T2 weighted images on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). GCRG is an uncommon nonneoplastic lesion that typically arises in mandible and maxilla and its involvement in skull is rare. Although behaves benignly, GCRG may be locally aggresive. It is usually misdiagnosed for a giant cell tumor (GCT). Diagnosis of GCRG is based on typical histologic features as well as clinical information. Complete surgical resection is believed to be the most suitable treatment for GCRG and long-term follow-up by CT scanning is essential.

  18. Cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Warren, P.S.; Fisher, C.C.

    1985-09-01

    A case of cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia is reported. The authors believe that bone dysplasia associated with cloverleaf is neither identical with thanatophoric dysplasia nor achondroplasia. Until identity of thanatophoric dysplasia and cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia is proved the diseases should be looked upon as separate entities and the wording ''thanatophoric dysplasia with cloverleaf skull'' should be abolished.

  19. Analysis of six Vietnamese trophy skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledzik, P S; Ousley, S

    1991-03-01

    This report presents morphologic, metric, and contextual information on six documented trophy skull specimens confiscated from U.S. servicemen during the Vietnam War. Additional information on the history and occurrence of trophy skull collecting is provided. This sample, consisting mostly of young Vietnamese males, exhibits graffiti, painting, and other evidence of postmortem decorative modification. Identification of trophy skulls is important to medicolegal and anthropological researchers in distinguishing trophy remains from archaeological and forensic specimens.

  20. Carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis on MR angiography: a university hospital-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Kaiji [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Rarely in the anterior circulation, an anastomosis of the carotid and anterior cerebral arteries occurs when an anomalous branch arises from the ophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery and anastomoses with the A1-A2 junction of the anterior communicating artery. Right-side predominance is known. To our knowledge, the incidence of carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis has not been reported, so we researched cases in our institution records to determine incidence and investigated characteristic features of the condition on magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. To isolate such cases, we retrospectively reviewed cranial MR angiographic images of 3,491 consecutive patients in our institution. We found three cases with carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis (two men, one woman), representing an incidence of 0.086%. The anastomosis was on the right in all three cases. A normal A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was present in two cases but could not be identified in the remaining case on MR angiographic images that included source images. Two of the three patients demonstrated associated arterial variations in their carotid systems. On MR angiography, we observed a 0.086% incidence of carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis in our institution and reaffirmed the right-side predominance of this anomaly. We found a high frequency of other associated arterial variations in the carotid system. (orig.)

  1. Magnetoencephalography signals are influenced by skull defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S; Flemming, L; Haueisen, J

    2014-08-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals had previously been hypothesized to have negligible sensitivity to skull defects. The objective is to experimentally investigate the influence of conducting skull defects on MEG and EEG signals. A miniaturized electric dipole was implanted in vivo into rabbit brains. Simultaneous recording using 64-channel EEG and 16-channel MEG was conducted, first above the intact skull and then above a skull defect. Skull defects were filled with agar gels, which had been formulated to have tissue-like homogeneous conductivities. The dipole was moved beneath the skull defects, and measurements were taken at regularly spaced points. The EEG signal amplitude increased 2-10 times, whereas the MEG signal amplitude reduced by as much as 20%. The EEG signal amplitude deviated more when the source was under the edge of the defect, whereas the MEG signal amplitude deviated more when the source was central under the defect. The change in MEG field-map topography (relative difference measure, RDM(∗)=0.15) was geometrically related to the skull defect edge. MEG and EEG signals can be substantially affected by skull defects. MEG source modeling requires realistic volume conductor head models that incorporate skull defects. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stories, skulls, and colonial collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    The essay explores the hypothesis of colonial collecting processes involving the active addition of the colonial context and historical past to museum objects through the production of short stories. It examines the emergent historicity of collections through a focus on the "histories" that museum workers and colonial agents have been attaching to scientific collections of human skulls. Drawing on the notions of collection trajectory and historiographical work, it offers an alternative perspective from which to approach the creation of singular histories and individual archives for objects in collections.

  3. Contribution of postero-anterior cephalometry in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Pire, Sylvie; Raskin, Sylviane; Limme, Michel; Poirrier, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Lateral cephalometry has been widely used to characterize facial and maxillary morphology in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. It is a useful tool to assess orthodontic and maxillofacial procedures, but transverse dimensions of the airway (e.g., nasal framework) have not been well described yet by cephalometry. We explored whether postero-anterior cephalometry could refine the analysis of the facial morphology, with a special attention paid to nasal morphology. We validated cephalometric measurements relevant to the diagnosis of OSA. Controlled study. We explored postero-anterior and lateral cephalometric bony structures in OSA patients and in control subjects to determine which were predictive of an association with OSA. Healthy volunteers paired for age and sex to OSA patients underwent polysomnography and cephalometry. Data were analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk, Fisher, Wilcoxon, and paired t tests where appropriate. Nasal fossae and maxillary bone proportions were positively and independently associated with the absence of OSA. Measurements of maxillary width, nasal fossae angle, and anterior skull base contributed to the characterization of OSA patients. Postero-anterior cephalometry is an easy, rapid, informative, and reliable technique, which is complementary to the lateral cephalometry in the assessment of OSA patients. Our study may also suggest the negative impact of the nasal resistance on the upper airway resistance in sleep disorders. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Accuracy and reproducibility of voxel based superimposition of cone beam computed tomography models on the anterior cranial base and the zygomatic arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Rania M; Maal, Thomas J J; Breuning, K Hero; Bergé, Stefaan J; Mostafa, Yehya A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2011-02-09

    Superimposition of serial Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans has become a valuable tool for three dimensional (3D) assessment of treatment effects and stability. Voxel based image registration is a newly developed semi-automated technique for superimposition and comparison of two CBCT scans. The accuracy and reproducibility of CBCT superimposition on the anterior cranial base or the zygomatic arches using voxel based image registration was tested in this study. 16 pairs of 3D CBCT models were constructed from pre and post treatment CBCT scans of 16 adult dysgnathic patients. Each pair was registered on the anterior cranial base three times and on the left zygomatic arch twice. Following each superimposition, the mean absolute distances between the 2 models were calculated at 4 regions: anterior cranial base, forehead, left and right zygomatic arches. The mean distances between the models ranged from 0.2 to 0.37 mm (SD 0.08-0.16) for the anterior cranial base registration and from 0.2 to 0.45 mm (SD 0.09-0.27) for the zygomatic arch registration. The mean differences between the two registration zones ranged between 0.12 to 0.19 mm at the 4 regions. Voxel based image registration on both zones could be considered as an accurate and a reproducible method for CBCT superimposition. The left zygomatic arch could be used as a stable structure for the superimposition of smaller field of view CBCT scans where the anterior cranial base is not visible.

  5. The development of an evidence-based clinical checklist for the diagnosis of anterior knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique C. Leibbrandt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterior knee pain (AKP or patellofemoral pain syndrome is common and may limit an individual’s ability to perform common activities of daily living such as stair climbing and prolonged sitting. The diagnosis is difficult as there are multiple definitions for this disorder and there are no accepted criteria for diagnosis. It is therefore most commonly a diagnosis that is made once other pathologies have been excluded. Objectives: The aim of this study was to create an evidence-based checklist for researchers and clinicians to use for the diagnosis of AKP. Methods: A systematic review was conducted in July 2016, and an evidence-based checklist was created based on the subjective and objective findings most commonly used to diagnose AKP. For the subjective factors, two or more of the systematic reviews needed to identify the factor as being important in the diagnosis of AKP. Results: Two systematic reviews, consisting of nine different diagnostic studies, were identified by our search methods. Diagnosis of AKP is based on the area of pain, age, duration of symptoms, common aggravating factors, manual palpation and exclusion of other pathologies. Of the functional tests, squatting demonstrated the highest sensitivity. Other useful tests include pain during stair climbing and prolonged sitting. The cluster of two out of three positive tests for squatting, isometric quadriceps contraction and palpation of the patella borders and the patella tilt test were also recommended as useful tests to include in the clinical assessment. Conclusion: A diagnostic checklist is useful as it provides a structured method for diagnosing AKP in a clinical setting. Research is needed to establish the causes of AKP as it is difficult to diagnose a condition with unknown aetiology.

  6. Assessment of the Endoscopic Endonasal Transclival Approach for Surgical Clipping of Anterior Pontine Anterior-Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmillan, Jose L; Lawton, Michael T; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; El-Sayed, Ivan H; Zhang, Xin; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Gabarros, Andreu; Benet, Arnau

    2016-05-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior pontine segment of the anterior-inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are uncommon. Their treatment is challenging because critical neurovascular structures are adjacent to it and the available surgical corridors are narrow and deep. Although endoscopic endonasal approaches are accepted for treating midline skull base lesions, their role in the treatment vascular lesions remains undefined. The present study is aimed to assess the anatomic feasibility of the endoscopic endonasal transclival (EET) approach for treating anterior pontine AICA aneurysms and compare it with the subtemporal anterior transpetrosal (SAT) approach. Twelve cadaveric specimens were prepared for surgical simulation. The AICAs were exposed using both EET and SAT approaches. Surgical window area and the length of the exposed artery were measured. The distance from the origin of the artery to the clip applied for proximal control was measured. The number of AICA perforators exposed and the anatomic features of each AICA were recorded. The EET approach provided a wider surgical window area compared with the SAT (P AICA perforators were visualized using the EET approach (P AICA, an aneurysm clip could be applied closer to the origin of AICA using EET (0.2 ± 0.42 mm) compared with SAT (6.26 ± 3.4 mm) (P AICA aneurysms using the EET approach is feasible. Compared with SAT, the EET approach provides advantages in surgical window area, ensuring proximal control before aneurysm dissection, visualization of perforating branches, and better proximal control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Encephalocele and associated skull defects | Komolafe | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encephalocele is a common congenital problem in the practice of Neurosurgery worldwide, with varying sizes of the underlying skull defects. This study was carried out to determine the size of the problem; to assess whether the skull defects are being under-managed or not; and also to determine those patients that will ...

  8. Endoscopic transnasal resection of anterior cranial fossa meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Divitiis, Enrico; Esposito, Felice; Cappabianca, Paolo; Cavallo, Luigi M; de Divitiis, Oreste; Esposito, Isabella

    2008-01-01

    The extended transnasal approach, a recent surgical advancements for the ventral skull base, allows excellent midline access to and visibility of the anterior cranial fossa, which was previously thought to be approachable only via a transcranial route. The extended transnasal approach allows early decompression of the optic canals, obviates the need for brain retraction, and reduces neurovascular manipulation. Between 2004 and 2007, 11 consecutive patients underwent transnasal resection of anterior cranial fossa meningiomas--4 olfactory groove (OGM) and 7 tuberculum sellae (TSM) meningiomas. Age at surgery, sex, symptoms, and imaging studies were reviewed. Tumor size and tumor extension were estimated, and the anteroposterior, vertical, and horizontal diameters were measred on MR images. Medical records, surgical complications, and outcomes of the patients were collected. A gross-total removal of the lesion was achieved in 10 patients (91%), and in 1 patient with a TSM only a near-total (> 90%) resection was possible. Four patients with preoperative visual function defect had a complete recovery, whereas 3 patients experienced a transient worsening of vision, fully recovered within few days. In 3 patients (2 with TSMs and 1 with an OGM), a postoperative CSF leak occurred, requiring a endoscopic surgery for skull base defect repair. Another patient (a case involving a TSM) developed transient diabetes insipidus. The operative time ranged from 6 to 10 hours in the OGM group and from 4.5 to 9 hours in the TSM group. The mean duration of the hospital stay was 13.5 and 10 days in the OGM and TSM groups, respectively. Six patients (3 with OGMs and 3 with TSMs) required a blood transfusion. Surgery-related death occurred in 1 patient with TSM, in whom the tumor was successfully removed. The technique offers a minimally invasive route to the midline anterior skull base, allowing the surgeon to avoid using brain retraction and reducing manipulation of the large vessels and

  9. Outcomes of anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery based on indication: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Prashanth J; Loganathan, Ajanthan; Yeung, Vivian; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on clinical outcomes after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) based on the indications for surgery. To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of ALIF for each surgical indication. This prospective clinical study included 125 patients who underwent ALIF over a 2-year period. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Outcome measures included the Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, Visual Analog Scale, and Patient Satisfaction Index. After a mean follow-up of 20 months, the clinical condition of the patients was significantly better than their preoperative status across all indications. A total of 108 patients had a Patient Satisfaction Index score of 1 or 2, indicating a successful clinical outcome in 86%. Patients with degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy), spondylolisthesis, and scoliosis had the best clinical response to ALIF, with statistically significant improvement in the Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale. Failed posterior fusion and adjacent segment disease showed statistically significant improvement in all of these clinical outcome scores, although the mean changes in the Short Form-12 Mental Component Summary, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale (back pain) were lower. The overall radiological fusion rate was 94.4%. Superior radiological outcomes (fusion >90%) were observed in patients with degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy), spondylolisthesis, and failed posterior fusion, whereas in adjacent segment disease, it was 80%. ALIF is an effective treatment for degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy) and spondylolisthesis. Although results were promising for scoliosis, failed posterior fusion, and adjacent segment disease, further studies are necessary to establish the effectiveness of ALIF in these conditions.

  10. Ontogenetic study of the skull in modern humans and the common chimpanzees: neotenic hypothesis reconsidered with a tridimensional Procrustes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Xavier; Berge, Christine; Baylac, Michel

    2002-05-01

    primarily the function of encephalization, but less so other parts of the skull. Our results, based on the discriminant function, reveal that additional structural traits (corresponding to the nonallometric part of the shape which is specific to humans) are rather situated in the other part of the skull. They mainly concern the equilibrium of the head related to bipedalism, and the respiratory and masticatory functions. Thus, the reduced prognathism, the flexed cranial base (forward position of the foramen magnum which is brought closer to the palate), the reduced anterior portion of the face, the reduced glabella, and the prominent nose mainly correspond to functional innovations which have nothing to do with a neotenic process in human evolution. The statistical analysis used here gives us the possibility to point out that some traits, which have been classically described as paedomorphic because they superficially resemble juvenile traits, are in reality independent of growth. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. CT findings in patient with skull fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Han Gi; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    CT scan has been inevitable method for patient with head trauma. CT scans of 94 cases, which were confirmed skull fracture by plain film, were reviewed for better and useful dealing of CT. The results were as follows: 1. Car accident was the most frequent cause of head injury. 2. No evidence of intracranial abnormality in CT scan of skull fractures on plane film was 45.7%, and alert mentality was 46.8% of skull fracture on skull fracture on simple film. 3. Detection rate on CT scan to skull fractures was 27.7%, but detection rate to depression fractures of skull fracture was 70.2%. 4. Mortality rate of patients with skull fracture was 10.6%. 5. Associated CT findings were pneumocephalus on CT scan 3.2%, contusion of edema 4.2%, epidural hematoma 16.0%, subdural hematoma 17.0%, subdural hygroma 2.1%, intracerebral hemorrhage 4.9%, and subarachnoid hemorrhage 2.0%.

  12. Reconstruction of the anterior floor of the mouth with the inferiorly based nasolabial flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, MP; Damen, A; Nauta, JM; Lichtendahl, DHE; Dhar, BK

    The results of reconstruction of the anterior floor of the mouth, using 105 nasolabial flaps in 79 patients were reviewed in a retrospective study. Of those flaps, 82% healed uneventfully; flap survival was 95%. Considerable flap loss occurred in 5%. Primary dehiscence was observed in 5% of all

  13. Anterior and posterior compartment 3D endovaginal ultrasound anatomy based on direct histologic comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobeiri, S Abbas; White, Dena; Quiroz, Lieschen H; Nihira, Mikio A

    2012-08-01

    We used direct histologic comparison to validate the use of 3D endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) as a novel and emerging technology for evaluating the structures found in the anterior and posterior pelvic floor compartments. A young nulliparous female pelvis specimen was dissected and histologic slides were prepared by making 8-Micron-thick sagittal cuts. The slides were stained with Mallory trichrome and arranged to form large sections encompassing each anterior and posterior sagittal plane. Healthy nulliparous women underwent 3D EVUS to obtain 3D cubes of the anterior and posterior compartments. Two investigators independently evaluated the anterior and posterior midsagittal structures. The investigators mutually viewed the images and calculated urethral and anal sphincter measurements. Thirty-one nulliparous women underwent 3D EVUS; 77% of the participants were Caucasian, with mean age 31.8 [standard deviation (SD) 5.8] and mean body mass index (BMI) of 28.5 (SD 7.9). The following mean (SD) measurements were obtained: urethral length 36 mm (± 5); striated urogenital sphincter area 0.6 cm(2) (± 0.16); longitudinal and circular smooth muscle area 1.1 cm(2) (± 0.4); urethral complex width 14 mm (± 2); urethral complex area 1.3 cm(2) (± 0.4); internal anal sphincter length 26 mm (± 4); internal anal sphincter thickness 3.2 mm (± 0.8); and rectovaginal septum length 31 mm (± 5). The agreement for visualization of structures was as follows: vesical trigone 96% (κ = 0.65), trigonal ring 94% (κ = 0.8), trigonal plate 84% (κ = 0.6); longitudinal and circular smooth muscle 100%; compressor urethra 97% (κ = 0.85); striated urogenital sphincter 97% (κ = 0.85); rectovaginal septum 100%; internal anal sphincter 100%; external anal sphincter subdivisions 100%. Three-dimensional EVUS can be used to visualize structures of the anterior and posterior compartments in nullipara.

  14. An historical skull collection and its use in forensic odontology and anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejrsen, B; Lynnerup, N; Hejmadi, M

    2005-01-01

    ? We tried to clarify this question by recording non-metric dental traits and by performing craniometric analyses. A morphological and morphometric investigation of anatomical/dental traits in 80 adult skulls was performed. For each skull four non-metric dental traits using the ASU-System and three non...... ethnicity based on skull measurements in overall 70% of the cases. It was found that this historical collection does show expected dental non-metric and craniometric traits and the collection may be of value in forensic casework in terms of comparison and for teaching purposes....

  15. An historical skull collection and its use in forensic odontology and anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejrsen, B; Lynnerup, N; Hejmadi, M

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Forensic Medicine, Copenhagen, houses a collection of historical skulls of unclear origin, marked with a general geographic or "racial descriptor". Would these historical skulls be of any value for the forensic odontologist and anthropologist concerned with teaching and casework...... ethnicity based on skull measurements in overall 70% of the cases. It was found that this historical collection does show expected dental non-metric and craniometric traits and the collection may be of value in forensic casework in terms of comparison and for teaching purposes....

  16. Can skull form predict the shape of the temporomandibular joint? A study using geometric morphometrics on the skulls of wolves and domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curth, Stefan; Fischer, Martin S; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2017-11-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) conducts and restrains masticatory movements between the mammalian cranium and the mandible. Through this functional integration, TMJ morphology in wild mammals is strongly correlated with diet, resulting in a wide range of TMJ variations. However, in artificially selected and closely related domestic dogs, dietary specialisations between breeds can be ruled out as a diversifying factor although they display an enormous variation in TMJ morphology. This raises the question of the origin of this variation. Here we hypothesise that, even in the face of reduced functional demands, TMJ shape in dogs can be predicted by skull form; i.e. that the TMJ is still highly integrated in the dog skull. If true, TMJ variation in the dog would be a plain by-product of the enormous cranial variation in dogs and its genetic causes. We addressed this hypothesis using geometric morphometry on a data set of 214 dog and 60 wolf skulls. We digitized 53 three-dimensional landmarks of the skull and the TMJ on CT-based segmentations and compared (1) the variation between domestic dog and wolf TMJs (via principal component analysis) and (2) the pattern of covariation of skull size, flexion and rostrum length with TMJ shape (via regression of centroid size on shape and partial least squares analyses). We show that the TMJ in domestic dogs is significantly more diverse than in wolves: its shape covaries significantly with skull size, flexion and rostrum proportions in patterns which resemble those observed in primates. Similar patterns in canids, which are carnivorous, and primates, which are mostly frugivorous imply the existence of basic TMJ integration patterns which are independent of dietary adaptations. However, only limited amounts of TMJ variation in dogs can be explained by simple covariation with overall skull geometry. This implies that the final TMJ shape is gained partially independently of the rest of the skull. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Gmb

  17. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures. (b...

  18. Sex-Based Differences in Knee Kinetics With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Strain on Cadaveric Impact Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilaty, Nathan D; Bates, Nathaniel A; Nagelli, Christopher; Krych, Aaron J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2018-03-01

    Females are at an increased risk of sustaining noncontact knee ligament injuries as compared with their male counterparts. The kinetics that load the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are still under dispute in the literature. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in knee kinetics between the sexes that lead to greater ACL strain in females when similar external loads are applied during a simulated drop vertical jump landing task. It was hypothesized that female limbs would demonstrate significant differences in knee abduction moment that predispose females to ACL injury when compared with males. Controlled laboratory study. Motion analysis data of 67 athletes who performed a drop vertical jump were collected. The kinematic and kinetic data were used to categorize tertiles of relative risk, and these values were input into a cadaveric impact simulator to assess ligamentous loads during the simulated landing task. Uni- and multiaxial load cells and differential variable reluctance transducer strain sensors were utilized to collect kinetic data and maximum ACL strain for analysis. Conditions of external loads applied to the cadaveric limbs were systematically varied and randomized. Data were analyzed with 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and the Fisher exact test. Five kinetic parameters were evaluated. Of the 5 kinetic variables, only knee abduction moment (KAM) demonstrated significant differences in females as compared with males ( F 1,136 = 4.398, P = .038). When normalized to height and weight, this difference between males and females increased in significance ( F 1,136 = 7.155, P = .008). Compared with males, females exhibited a 10.3-N·m increased knee abduction torque at 66 milliseconds postimpact and a 22.3-N·m increased abduction torque at 100 milliseconds postimpact. For loading condition, the condition of "maximum ACL strain" demonstrated a maximum difference of 54.3-N·m increased abduction torque and 74

  19. Performance-Based Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Professional Athletes Differ Between Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Harry T; Chun, Danielle S; Schneider, Andrew D; Erickson, Brandon J; Freshman, Ryan D; Kester, Benjamin; Verma, Nikhil N; Hsu, Wellington K

    2017-08-01

    Excellent outcomes have been reported for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) in professional athletes in a number of different sports. However, no study has directly compared these outcomes between sports. To determine if differences in performance-based outcomes exist after ACLR between professional athletes of each sport. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. National Football League (NFL), National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL), and Major League Baseball (MLB) athletes undergoing primary ACLR for an acute rupture were identified through an established protocol of injury reports and public archives. Sport-specific performance statistics were collected before and after surgery for each athlete. Return to play (RTP) was defined as a successful return to the active roster for at least 1 regular-season game after ACLR. Of 344 professional athletes who met the inclusion criteria, a total of 298 (86.6%) returned to play. NHL players had a significantly higher rate of RTP (95.8% vs 83.4%, respectively; P = .04) and a shorter recovery time (258 ± 110 days vs 367 ± 268 days, respectively; P athletes in all the other sports. NFL athletes experienced significantly shorter careers postoperatively than players in all the other sports (2.1 vs 3.2 years, respectively; P athletes played fewer games ( P ≤ .02) 1 season postoperatively, while those in the NFL had the lowest rate of active players 2 and 3 seasons postoperatively (60%; P = .002). NBA and NFL players showed decreased performance at season 1 after ACLR ( P ≤ .001). NFL players continued to have lower performance at seasons 2 and 3 ( P = .002), while NBA players recovered to baseline performance. The data indicate that NFL athletes fare the worst after ACLR with the lowest survival rate, shortest postoperative career length, and sustained decreases in performance. NHL athletes fare the best with the highest rates of RTP, highest survival rates, longest postoperative

  20. Assessing skull burdens of actinides using a mathematical phantom: a Monte Carlo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhati, S; Sharma, R C; Raj, V V

    2003-01-01

    In vivo monitoring techniques are needed to estimate the amount of an actinide in the skeleton in addition to that in the lungs and liver. Skull counting with external detectors has been a standard procedure for this purpose. Realistic skull phantoms are normally used to calibrate the counting systems. However, the fabrication of realistic phantoms is extremely difficult and expensive. Therefore, a theoretical approach based on Monte Carlo methods in conjunction with a Cristy mathematical phantom has been examined for assessing skull burdens of actinides. A computer program that generates surface sources of actinides on the skull and simulates low-energy photon transport in the heterogeneous media of the head region of the Cristy phantom was developed for this purpose. The program determines the observable pulse height spectrum of the detector and the corresponding calibration factors for different counting geometries. The computer program was used to generate the pulse height spectra and the corresponding calibration factors of 20 cm and 15 cm diameter phoswich detectors, each positioned on the left and right sides and on the top of the head region of the Cristy phantom, whose skull surfaces were assumed to have a uniform distribution of 241Am. The computed calibration factor for a counting geometry consisting of three phoswich detectors (15 cm diameter each) surrounding the phantom's skull was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results obtained for the same geometry using a realistic physical skull phantom. This provided a validation of the realistic design of the skull in the Cristy phantom, implying that the results reported in this paper could be used for in vivo measurements of skull burdens of 241Am for the stated counting geometry.

  1. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating remote skull fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, F T

    1978-01-01

    A patient in whom cryptococcal meningitis complicated a nine year old depressed frontal skull fracture, an association which has not been reported previously, is recorded. This is also the first case of cryptococcal meningitis recognised in Ethiopia. PMID:690646

  2. The Skull of Phyllomedusa sauvagii (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Monachesi, Mario R; Lavilla, Esteban O; Montero, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    The hylid genus Phyllomedusa comprises charismatic frogs commonly known as monkey, leaf or green frogs, and is the most diverse genus of the subfamily Phyllomedusinae, including about 31 species. Although there is some information about the anatomy of these frogs, little is known about the osteology. Here the adult skull of Phyllomedusa sauvagii, both articulated and disarticulated, is described and the intraspecific variation is reported. Additionally, cartilage associated with the adult skull, such as the nasal capsules, auditory apparatus, and hyobranchial apparatus, are included in the analysis. Further examination of disarticulated bones reveals their remarkable complexity, specifically in the sphenethmoid and of the oocipital region. The description of disarticulated bones is useful for the identification of fossil remains as well as providing morphological characteristics that are phylogenetically informative. When comparing the skull morphology with the available information of other species of the genus, Phyllomesusa sauvagii skull resembles more that of P. vaillantii and P. venusta than P. atelopoides. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Nondestructive Determination of the Aluminum Content in Pressed Skulls of Aluminum Dross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkijan, Varuzan; Škapin, Srečo Davor; Kovačec, Uroš

    2013-02-01

    prediction of the amount of free aluminum in pressed skulls w Al, based on nondestructive measurement of the density ρ of the pressed skulls. The pressed skulls density is measured by a fully automatic gas displacement pyknometer with a working volume large enough to enable the insertion of the whole pressed skull sample. An additional integral part of this methodology is the set of experimentally determined linear graphs w Al- ρ, plotted in advance for all classes of pressed skulls existing in the plant, from the experimentally collected data on pressed skulls density and aluminum recovery by melting. After selecting the proper graph w Al- ρ, which is usually performed on an aluminum alloy basis, the pyknometric measured density of the pressed skulls can be routinely related to the aluminum content sought, within a relative error of ±5%.

  4. Accuracy and reproducibility of voxel based superimposition of cone beam computed tomography models on the anterior cranial base and the zygomatic arches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M Nada

    Full Text Available Superimposition of serial Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scans has become a valuable tool for three dimensional (3D assessment of treatment effects and stability. Voxel based image registration is a newly developed semi-automated technique for superimposition and comparison of two CBCT scans. The accuracy and reproducibility of CBCT superimposition on the anterior cranial base or the zygomatic arches using voxel based image registration was tested in this study. 16 pairs of 3D CBCT models were constructed from pre and post treatment CBCT scans of 16 adult dysgnathic patients. Each pair was registered on the anterior cranial base three times and on the left zygomatic arch twice. Following each superimposition, the mean absolute distances between the 2 models were calculated at 4 regions: anterior cranial base, forehead, left and right zygomatic arches. The mean distances between the models ranged from 0.2 to 0.37 mm (SD 0.08-0.16 for the anterior cranial base registration and from 0.2 to 0.45 mm (SD 0.09-0.27 for the zygomatic arch registration. The mean differences between the two registration zones ranged between 0.12 to 0.19 mm at the 4 regions. Voxel based image registration on both zones could be considered as an accurate and a reproducible method for CBCT superimposition. The left zygomatic arch could be used as a stable structure for the superimposition of smaller field of view CBCT scans where the anterior cranial base is not visible.

  5. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  6. A Study for Establishment of Diagnostic Reference Level of Patient Dose in Skull Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Eun; Jeong, Jin Baek; Lee, Hyun Koo

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is most widely used for X-Ray examination . among all artificial radiation exposure, it takes up the largest proportion. Even in Korea, the medical exposure by diagnostic X-Ray examination takes up 17.4% of all radiation exposure. It takes up 92% even in artificial radiation exposure. There were 111,567 cases X-Ray radiography for skull diagnosis in 2007, which is 3% annual increase since 2004. Thus, It is need to establish the diagnostic reference level and the medical facilities as a diagnostic reference level to optimize radiation protection of the patients and to reduce the doses of X-ray. In this paper, we survey patient dose on skull radiography - collected from 114 medical facilities nationwide by using human phantom and glass dosimeter. When the patient dose for the skull radiography was measured and evaluated to establish the diagnostic reference level, 2.23 mGy was established for posterior-anterior imaging and 1.87 mGy for lateral imaging was established. The posterior-anterior skull radiography entrance surface dose of 2.23 is less than the guidance level of 5 mGy from the global organizations such as World Health Organization (WHO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and 1.87 mGy for the lateral skull imaging is less than the guidance level of 3 mGy, which is guided by the global organizations such as World Health Organization (WHO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  7. SPHENOID SINUS (SS ANTERIOR MEDIAL TEMPORAL LOBE ENCEPHALOCELE (AMTLE WITH SPONTANEOUS CSF RHINORRHOEA : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cranial encephaloceles are the herniation of intracranial meninges and brain tissue through a defect in the cranium or skull base. These are rare conditions with an incidence of approximately 1 in 35,000 people, and are more common in the anterior cranial fossa than those in the middle one . 1,2 Temporal lobe herniation through a mid dle fossa defect into the lateral recess of the Sphenoid Sinus is even rarer than its medial representation. Intrasphenoidal encephaloceles are extremely rare findings 3 . Spontaneous, or primary, CSF fistula is a separate entity with no underlying cause of the CSF leak. Spontaneous CSF leaks are usually associated with a co - existing encephalocele of variable size 4 . We present a case of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhoea in a sphenoid sinus Anterior Medial Temporal lobe encephalocele herniating through a clinically silent lateral Craniopharyngeal canal.

  8. Clinical characteristics and molecular pathology of skull ectopic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Longxing; Wang, Zhongyong; Ma, Jiawei; Chen, Jinsheng; Zhu, Haojiang; Zhou, Xiaohua; Zhu, Qing; Dong, Jun; Huang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is very common, but skull ectopic thyroid cancer has not been reported in 50 years of literatures in foreign countries. There are only four cases of the skull ectopic thyroid cancer reported in more than 30 years of domestic literature including the cases in this report. This paper aims to investigate the clinical characteristics and possible molecular mechanisms of this rare disease. Five keywords of “thyroid gland”, “ectopic thyroid”, “thyroid cancer”, “ectopic thyroid cancer” and “metastatic thyroid cancer” were included and 50 years of literatures in the PubMed-MEDLINE and Wanfang database were reviewed. By combining the test data of 2 cases of surgical patient tissue microarray specimens-molecular immunology pathology, the possible molecular mechanisms were analyzed and molecular regulation network diagram was drawn. The skull ectopic thyroid cancer has not been reported in 50 years of literatures in foreign countries and there are only four cases of the skull ectopic thyroid cancer reported in more than 30 years of domestic literature including the cases in this report. The molecular expressions of skull ectopic thyroid cancer, orthotopic thyroid cancer, and metastatic thyroid cancer were not the same: (I) AKT (P=0.012, 0.002) and mTOR (P=0.002, 0.004) were highly expressed in the skull ectopic thyroid cancer; (II) BRAF (P=0.029, 0.014) and ERK (P=0.002, 0.001) were highly expressed in orthotopic thyroid cancer; (III) MMP-9 (P=0.023, 0.016) was highly expressed in metastatic thyroid cancer. According to the molecular information base, the PI3K is predicted to be a key crossing gene of the above three signaling pathways, which showed no significant differences in these three thyroid cancers (P=0.692, 0.388, 0.227), but PI3K has regulation roles in the three signaling pathways of Akt/mTOR, MAPK, and NF-κB. PI3K gene is an important starting gene of thyroid cancers. After the canceration starts, due to the fact that the local

  9. Imaging of cerebellopontine angle lesions: an update. Part 2: intra-axial lesions, skull base lesions that may invade the CPA region, and non-enhancing extra-axial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville, Fabrice; Chiras, Jacques [Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Savatovsky, Julien [Adolphe de Rothschild Foundation, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2007-11-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging reliably demonstrate typical features of vestibular schwannomas or meningiomas in the vast majority of mass lesions responsible for cerebellopontine angle (CPA) syndrome. However, a large variety of unusual lesions can also be encountered in the CPA. Covering the entire spectrum of lesions potentially found in the CPA, these articles explain the pertinent neuroimaging features that radiologists need to know to make clinically relevant diagnoses in these cases, including data from diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging or MR spectroscopy, when available. A diagnostic algorithm based on the lesion's site of origin, shape and margins, density, signal intensity and contrast material uptake is also proposed. Non-enhancing extra-axial CPA masses are cystic (epidermoid cyst, arachnoid cyst, neurenteric cyst) or contain fat (dermoid cyst, lipoma). Tumours can also extend into the CPA by extension from the skull base (paraganglioma, chondromatous tumours, chordoma, cholesterol granuloma, endolymphatic sac tumour). Finally, brain stem or ventricular tumours can present with a significant exophytic component in the CPA that may be difficult to differentiate from an extra-axial lesion (lymphoma, hemangioblastoma, choroid plexus papilloma, ependymoma, glioma, medulloblastoma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour). (orig.)

  10. Segmentation of human skull in MRI using statistical shape information from CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Defeng; Shi, Lin; Chu, Winnie C W; Cheng, Jack C Y; Heng, Pheng Ann

    2009-09-01

    To automatically segment the skull from the MRI data using a model-based three-dimensional segmentation scheme. This study exploited the statistical anatomy extracted from the CT data of a group of subjects by means of constructing an active shape model of the skull surfaces. To construct a reliable shape model, a novel approach was proposed to optimize the automatic landmarking on the coupled surfaces (i.e., the skull vault) by minimizing the description length that incorporated local thickness information. This model was then used to locate the skull shape in MRI of a different group of patients. Compared with performing landmarking separately on the coupled surfaces, the proposed landmarking method constructed models that had better generalization ability and specificity. The segmentation accuracies were measured by the Dice coefficient and the set difference, and compared with the method based on mathematical morphology operations. The proposed approach using the active shape model based on the statistical skull anatomy presented in the head CT data contributes to more reliable segmentation of the skull from MRI data.

  11. CraMs: Craniometric Analysis Application Using 3D Skull Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Paulo; Neves, Luis; Santos, Daniel; Coelho, Catarina; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Santos, Helder; Silva, Samuel; Santos, Beatriz Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Craniometric analysis plays an important role in anthropology studies and forensics. This paper presents CraMs, an application using a new craniometric approach based on 3D models of the skull. The main objective is to obtain, through a process supervised by anthropologists, the main points of interest used to compute craniometric measurements. The application aids this process by analyzing the skull geometry and automatically providing points of interest. The application also allows for semiautomatic point detection, where the user provides an initial guess that might be refined based on the curvature of the skull, as well as the manual selection of any other points of interest. Moreover, results comparing measurements obtained with CraMs and traditional craniometry methods on eight skulls suggest that the application provides comparable craniometric measurements and lower inter-observer variability. This approach offers advantages such as an easier access to skulls with no risk of bone damage and the possibility of defining new measurements based on morphology or other skull characteristics, which are not possible using traditional methods.

  12. Imaging basilar skull fractures in the horse: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, O. III; Jorgensen, J.S.; Thrall, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Due to the complex nature of the anatomy of the equine head, superimposition of numerous structures, and poor soft tissue differentiation, radiography may be of limited value in the diagnosis of basilar skull fractures. However, in many horses radiographic changes such as soft tissue opacification of the guttural pouch region, irregular bone margination at the sphenooccipital line, attenuation of the nasopharynx, ventral displacement of the dorsal pharyngeal wall and the presence of irregularly shaped bone fragments in the region of the guttural pouches are suggestive of a fracture of the skull base. These findings in conjunction with physical examination findings and historical information may lead to a presumptive diagnosis of a fracture. When available and when the patient will accommodate the equipment, computed tomography may give a definitive diagnosis owing to its superior resolution and differentiation of soft tissue structures

  13. Practice-based clinical evaluation of zirconia abutments for anterior single-tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Sven; Lattke, Anja; Eickholz, Peter; Kramer, Katharina; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the survival rate and prevalence of biologic and technical complications associated with single-tooth implants with all-ceramic abutments in the anterior region. A total of 33 patients were restored with 50 anterior implants and temporarily luted all-ceramic crowns on prefabricated zirconia abutments. All of the patients subsequently received annual supportive maintenance; 27 patients (18 women, 22-74 years) with 42 implants participated in the final maintenance visit and were included in the study (follow-up 78.1 ± 27.0 months). The time-dependent survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) and the frequency of prosthetic complications (abutment fracture [AF], screw loosening [SL], fracture of veneering ceramics [VF], retention loss [RL]) and biologic complications (peri-implantitis) were calculated to determine the success rates. No implant loss (implant-related survival rate 100%) but one abutment fracture occurred throughout the entire observation period; therefore, the survival rate of the superstructures (in situ criterion) was 97.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.930- 1.000) after 7 years. Eleven restorations were affected by prosthetic complications: RL (n = 4), VF (n = 5), and SL (n = 2). Peri-implantitis was diagnosed for two implants (probing depth > 5 mm, bleeding on probing [BOP]/suppuration, and bone loss > 3 mm) (implant-related peri-implantitis rate 4.8%). No restoration required replacement due to complications. The success rate (event-free restoration) was 75.9% (95% CI 0.636- 0.882) after 7 years. Considering the calculated survival rate, the application of all-ceramic zirconia implant abutments in the anterior region can be recommended as a reliable therapy in private practice. Fractures of veneering ceramics were the most common prosthetic complication.

  14. Human skulls with turquoise inlays: pre hispanic origin or replicas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva V, Y.; Castillo M, M.T.; Bautista M, J.P.; Arenas A, J.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of archaeological context determining if the manufacture of two human skulls adorned with turquoise inlays have pre-Columbian origin or not (replicas), led to perform other studies. Under these conditions, besides orthodox methodology commonly used to assign chronology and cultural aspects as form, style, decoration, iconography, etc., it was necessary to obtain more results based on the use of characterization techniques. The techniques employed were Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), in order to determine the manufacture techniques and chemical composition of the materials used for the cementant. SEM analysis showed the presence of zones composed by Ca, O, C and Al. In some cases Mg, Cl, Fe and Pb were identified. High concentration of Cu was present in all samples, due to residues of turquoise inlays (CuAI 6 (PO 4 ) 4 (OH) 8 (H 2 O) 4 ) with which the skulls were decorated. In the cementant was identified the Ca as base element of the cementant, as well as particles < 100 nm with irregular morphology and other amorphous zones. FTIR spectrums indicated the presence of organic substances that could be used as agglutinating in the cementant. The current work shows a progress identifying involved techniques in the manufacturing of two human skulls with turquoise inlays. (Author)

  15. [Collateral score based on CT perfusion can predict the prognosis of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Meixia; Chen, Zhicai; Lou, Min

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate the value of collateral score based on CT perfusion (CTP-CS) in predicting the clinical outcome of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy. Clinical data of acute ischemic stroke patients with anterior artery occlusion undergoing endovascular treatment in the Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine during October 2013 and October 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Collateral scores were assessed based on CTP and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images, respectively. And DSA-CS or CTP-CS 3-4 was defined as good collateral vessels. Good clinical outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤ 2 at 3 months after stroke. The binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the correlation between the collateral score and clinical outcome, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the value of DSA-CS and CTP-CS in predicting the clinical outcome. Among 40 patients, 33 (82.5%) acquired recanalization and 16 (40.0%) got good outcome. Compared with poor outcome group, the collateral score (all P collateral vessels were higher in good outcome group (all P collateral vessels were independent factor of good outcome (CTP-CS: OR =48.404, 95% CI :1.373-1706.585, P Collateral scores based on CTP and DSA had good consistency ( κ =0.697, P <0.01), and ROC curve showed that the predictive value of CTP-CS and DSA-CS were comparable (both AUC=0.726, 95% CI :0.559-0.893, P <0.05). CTP-CS can predict the clinical outcome of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy.

  16. Numerical evaluation of the skull for human neuromodulation with transcranial focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Ai, Leo; Bansal, Priya; Legon, Wynn

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Transcranial focused ultrasound is an emerging field for human non-invasive neuromodulation, but its dosing in humans is difficult to know due to the skull. The objective of the present study was to establish modeling methods based on medical images to assess skull differences between individuals on the wave propagation of ultrasound. Approach. Computational models of transcranial focused ultrasound were constructed using CT and MR scans to solve for intracranial pressure. We explored the effect of including the skull base in models, different transducer placements on the head, and differences between 250 kHz or 500 kHz acoustic frequency for both female and male models. We further tested these features using linear, nonlinear, and elastic simulations. To better understand inter-subject skull thickness and composition effects we evaluated the intracranial pressure maps between twelve individuals at two different skull sites. Main results. Nonlinear acoustic simulations resulted in virtually identical intracranial pressure maps with linear acoustic simulations. Elastic simulations showed a difference in max pressures and full width half maximum volumes of 15% at most. Ultrasound at an acoustic frequency of 250 kHz resulted in the creation of more prominent intracranial standing waves compared to 500 kHz. Finally, across twelve model human skulls, a significant linear relationship to characterize intracranial pressure maps was not found. Significance. Despite its appeal, an inherent problem with the use of a noninvasive transcranial ultrasound method is the difficulty of knowing intracranial effects because of the skull. Here we develop detailed computational models derived from medical images of individuals to simulate the propagation of neuromodulatory ultrasound across the skull and solve for intracranial pressure maps. These methods allow for a much better understanding of the intracranial effects of ultrasound for an individual in order to

  17. Training time and quality of smartphone-based anterior segment screening in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig CA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cassie A Ludwig,1 Megan Newsom,1 Alexandre Jais,1 David J Myung,1,2 Somasheila I Murthy,3 Robert T Chang1 1Department of Ophthalmology, The Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Department of Ophthalmology, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 3Cornea and Anterior Segment Service, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Kallam Anji Reddy Campus, Hyderabad, India Objective: We aimed at evaluating the ability of individuals without ophthalmologic training to quickly capture high-quality images of the cornea by using a smartphone and low-cost anterior segment imaging adapter (the “EyeGo” prototype. Methods: Seven volunteers photographed 1,502 anterior segments from 751 high school students in Varni, India, by using an iPhone 5S with an attached EyeGo adapter. Primary outcome measures were median photograph quality of the cornea and anterior segment of the eye (validated Fundus Photography vs Ophthalmoscopy Trial Outcomes in the Emergency Department [FOTO-ED] study; 1–5 scale; 5, best and the time required to take each photograph. Volunteers were surveyed on their familiarity with using a smartphone (1–5 scale; 5, very comfortable and comfort in assessing problems with the eye (1–5 scale; 5, very comfortable. Binomial logistic regression was performed using image quality (low quality: <4; high quality: ≥4 as the dependent variable and age, comfort using a smartphone, and comfort in assessing problems with the eye as independent variables. Results: Six of the seven volunteers captured high-quality (median ≥4/5 images with a median time of ≤25 seconds per eye for all the eyes screened. Four of the seven volunteers demonstrated significant reductions in time to acquire photographs (P1=0.01, P5=0.01, P6=0.01, and P7=0.01, and three of the seven volunteers demonstrated significant improvements in the quality of photographs between the first 100 and last 100 eyes screened (P1<0.001, P2<0.001, and P6<0.01. Self

  18. Features of Designing the Criterion-Based Rehabilitation Program for Patients after Arthroscopic Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Roy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an innovative criterion-based rehabilitation program for patients, who underwent arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. The features of the program are described, methodological foundations to perform permissible exercises are presented for each periods of the program, which correspond to a specific motor mode. The degree of preparedness of the patient is determined by the criterion of performance of the test exercises that will permit him to the loads of a new, higher level of trainings. The effectiveness of the developed program is confirmed clinically.

  19. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorayski, Peter; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Barry, Tamara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital and Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Foote, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI.

  20. Functional relationship between skull form and feeding mechanics in Sphenodon, and implications for diapsid skull development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, Marc E H; Shi, Junfen; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E; Fagan, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate skull evolved to protect the brain and sense organs, but with the appearance of jaws and associated forces there was a remarkable structural diversification. This suggests that the evolution of skull form may be linked to these forces, but an important area of debate is whether bone in the skull is minimised with respect to these forces, or whether skulls are mechanically "over-designed" and constrained by phylogeny and development. Mechanical analysis of diapsid reptile skulls could shed light on this longstanding debate. Compared to those of mammals, the skulls of many extant and extinct diapsids comprise an open framework of fenestrae (window-like openings) separated by bony struts (e.g., lizards, tuatara, dinosaurs and crocodiles), a cranial form thought to be strongly linked to feeding forces. We investigated this link by utilising the powerful engineering approach of multibody dynamics analysis to predict the physiological forces acting on the skull of the diapsid reptile Sphenodon. We then ran a series of structural finite element analyses to assess the correlation between bone strain and skull form. With comprehensive loading we found that the distribution of peak von Mises strains was particularly uniform throughout the skull, although specific regions were dominated by tensile strains while others were dominated by compressive strains. Our analyses suggest that the frame-like skulls of diapsid reptiles are probably optimally formed (mechanically ideal: sufficient strength with the minimal amount of bone) with respect to functional forces; they are efficient in terms of having minimal bone volume, minimal weight, and also minimal energy demands in maintenance. © 2011 Curtis et al.

  1. Functional relationship between skull form and feeding mechanics in Sphenodon, and implications for diapsid skull development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Curtis

    Full Text Available The vertebrate skull evolved to protect the brain and sense organs, but with the appearance of jaws and associated forces there was a remarkable structural diversification. This suggests that the evolution of skull form may be linked to these forces, but an important area of debate is whether bone in the skull is minimised with respect to these forces, or whether skulls are mechanically "over-designed" and constrained by phylogeny and development. Mechanical analysis of diapsid reptile skulls could shed light on this longstanding debate. Compared to those of mammals, the skulls of many extant and extinct diapsids comprise an open framework of fenestrae (window-like openings separated by bony struts (e.g., lizards, tuatara, dinosaurs and crocodiles, a cranial form thought to be strongly linked to feeding forces. We investigated this link by utilising the powerful engineering approach of multibody dynamics analysis to predict the physiological forces acting on the skull of the diapsid reptile Sphenodon. We then ran a series of structural finite element analyses to assess the correlation between bone strain and skull form. With comprehensive loading we found that the distribution of peak von Mises strains was particularly uniform throughout the skull, although specific regions were dominated by tensile strains while others were dominated by compressive strains. Our analyses suggest that the frame-like skulls of diapsid reptiles are probably optimally formed (mechanically ideal: sufficient strength with the minimal amount of bone with respect to functional forces; they are efficient in terms of having minimal bone volume, minimal weight, and also minimal energy demands in maintenance.

  2. The conductivity of neonatal piglet skulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, Shilpa; Te, Tang; Tucker, Aaron; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2011-01-01

    We report the first measured values of conductivities for neonatal mammalian skull samples. We measured the average radial (normal to the skull surface) conductivity of fresh neonatal piglet skull samples at 1 kHz and found it to be around 30 mS m −1 at ambient room temperatures of about 23 °C. Measurements were made on samples of either frontal or parietal cranial bone, using a saline-filled cell technique. The conductivity value we observed was approximately twice the values reported for adult skulls (Oostendorp et al 2000 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 47 1487–92) using a similar technique, but at a frequency of around 5 Hz. Further, we found that the conductivity of skull fragments increased linearly with thickness. We found evidence that this was related to differences in composition between the frontal and parietal bone samples tested, which we believe is because frontal bones contained a larger fraction of higher conductivity cancellous bone material

  3. Hip and Ankle Kinematics in Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Situations: Video Analysis Using Model-Based Image Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hideyuki; Nakamae, Atsuo; Shima, Yosuke; Bahr, Roald; Krosshaug, Tron

    2018-02-01

    Detailed kinematic descriptions of real anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury situations are limited to the knee only. To describe hip and ankle kinematics as well as foot position relative to the center of mass (COM) in ACL injury situations through use of a model-based image-matching (MBIM) technique. The distance between the projection of the COM on the ground and the base of support (BOS) (COM_BOS) normalized to the femur length was also evaluated. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten ACL injury video sequences from women's handball and basketball were analyzed. Hip and ankle joint kinematic values were obtained by use of MBIM. The mean hip flexion angle was 51° (95% CI, 41° to 63°) at initial contact and remained constant over the next 40 milliseconds. The hip was internally rotated 29° (95% CI, 18° to 39°) at initial contact and remained unchanged for the next 40 milliseconds. All of the injured patients landed with a heel strike with a mean dorsiflexion angle of 2° (95% CI, -9° to 14°), before reaching a flatfooted position 20 milliseconds later. The foot position was anterior and lateral to the COM in all cases. However, none of the results showed larger COM_BOS than 1.2, which has been suggested as a criterion for ACL injury risk. Hip kinematic values were consistent among the 10 ACL injury situations analyzed; the hip joint remained unchanged in a flexed and internally rotated position in the phase leading up to injury, suggesting that limited energy absorption took place at the hip. In all cases, the foot contacted the ground with the heel strike. However, relatively small COM_BOS distances were found, indicating that the anterior and lateral foot placement in ACL injury situations was not different from what can be expected in noninjury game situations.

  4. Reoperation Rates After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy and Myelopathy: A National Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Soo; Ju, Young-Su; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Makhni, Melvin C; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-10-15

    National population-based cohort study. To compare the reoperation rates between cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy in a national population of patients. There is an inherently low incidence of reoperation after surgery for cervical degenerative disease. Therefore, it is difficult to sufficiently power studies to detect differences between reoperation rates of different cervical diagnoses. National population-based databases provide large, longitudinally followed cohorts that may help overcome this challenge. We used the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service national database to select our study population. We included patients with the diagnosis of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion from January 2009 to June 2014. We separated patients into two groups based on diagnosis codes: cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Age, sex, presence of diabetes, osteoporosis, associated comorbidities, number of operated cervical disc levels, and hospital types were considered potential confounding factors. The overall reoperation rate was 2.45%. The reoperation rate was significantly higher in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy than in patients with cervical radiculopathy (myelopathy: P = 0.0293, hazard ratio = 1.433, 95% confidence interval 1.037-1.981). Male sex, presence of diabetes or associated comorbidities, and hospital type were noted to be risk factors for reoperation. The reoperation rate after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was higher for cervical spondylotic myelopathy than for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy in a national population of patients. 3.

  5. [Development of a Striatal and Skull Phantom for Quantitative123I-FP-CIT SPECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Masanobu; Uno, Masaki; Miyazaki, Takuma; Kataoka, Yumi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Ichihara, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    123 Iodine-labelled N-(3-fluoropropyl) -2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane ( 123 I-FP-CIT) single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images are used for differential diagnosis such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Specific binding ratio (SBR) is affected by scattering and attenuation in SPECT imaging, because gender and age lead to changes in skull density. It is necessary to clarify and correct the influence of the phantom simulating the the skull. The purpose of this study was to develop phantoms that can evaluate scattering and attenuation correction. Skull phantoms were prepared based on the measuring the results of the average computed tomography (CT) value, average skull thickness of 12 males and 16 females. 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging of striatal phantom was performed with these skull phantoms, which reproduced normal and PD. SPECT images, were reconstructed with scattering and attenuation correction. SBR with partial volume effect corrected (SBR act ) and conventional SBR (SBR Bolt ) were measured and compared. The striatum and the skull phantoms along with 123 I-FP-CIT were able to reproduce the normal accumulation and disease state of PD and further those reproduced the influence of skull density on SPECT imaging. The error rate with the true SBR, SBR act was much smaller than SBR Bolt . The effect on SBR could be corrected by scattering and attenuation correction even if the skull density changes with 123 I-FP-CIT on SPECT imaging. The combination of triple energy window method and CT-attenuation correction method would be the best correction method for SBR act .

  6. Anterior-inferior shoulder instability: treatment based on the Thal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, R; Giudice, G; Ciccarelli, M; Vernaglia Lombardi, L; Cautiero, F

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to analyze the results of a consecutive series of 139 patients affected with anterior-inferior shoulder instability and treated by arthroscopic capsuloplasty using the Thal method with absorbable and non-absorbable Mitek knotless anchors. Much attention was paid to the preoperative and intraoperative selection of patients, excluding from the arthroscopic procedure those with bony Bankart lesions measuring more than 25%, with an inverted-pear glenoid, with engaged Hill-Sachs lesions and patients with HAGL lesions. Pre- and postoperative clinical evaluation was carried out using the Rowe scale. Scores rose from 45-55 to 96 postoperatively. Intra-articular mobilization of the anchors did not occur and peri-metallic lysis was not manifested. Areas of bone resorption were observed in 7 cases (7/38, 18.4%) with the presence of peri-insertional geodes with biological anchors, but this had no effect on the clinical results.

  7. A small skull from Flores dated to the 20th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, C; Persson, L; Alexandersen, V; Lynnerup, N

    2012-02-01

    A human skull with mandible from the Ngada District on the island of Flores, Indonesia, is described in order to contribute to the knowledge of variation in cranial architecture, which is important in interpretations of evolutionary cerebralisation. The skull was excavated in 1924 and sent to the National Museum in Copenhagen. The "Copenhagen Flores" (CF) male skull is radiocarbon-dated and of modern age. The cranium is small, but larger than e.g. Liang Bua skull (LB1) in every measurement. The (CT-scan based) cranial capacity of 1258 ml is normal for modern humans, but somewhat lower than values from the middle or upper Palaeolithics. The metric cranial data analysed in FORDISC, characterize the skull as a male Vietnamese rather than a Chinese or White individual. Tooth morphology shows the sundadont pattern and tooth size corresponds to that of teeth from Bali, Java and Malayan Orang Asli. Remarkable are the marked asymmetries in the dentition with rotation of an upper premolar and congenital absence of a third molar. In these respects the CF skull is similar to dentitions belonging to the pygmoid villagers of Rampasasa, a village not far from the Liang Bua cave, and to LB1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  9. In Vivo Kinematics of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Knee During Wide-Based Squat Using a 2D/3D Registration Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaji, Takeshi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi; Kidera, Kenichi; Ikuta, Futoshi; Yoneta, Kei; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Osaki, Makoto; Yonekura, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA). Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD) knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients w...

  10. Bone scintigraphy in lesions of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Wasilewski, A.; Deitmer, T.

    1982-01-01

    The value of 3-phase-scintigraphy in bone lesions of the skull with a new seeking agent 99mTc-2,3-dicarboxypropane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (DPD) is studied. A high soft tissue-bone-ratio of DPD is emphasized. For this reason DPD is used for bone scintigraphy of the skull, because the mass of soft tissue in relation to bone is high and a higher clearance improves the interpretation of the images of the first two phases. An increased tracer uptake is found for skeletal neoplasms (malignant and benign lesions) and for acute osteomyelitis. By contrast, the chronic inflammatory bone lesions showed normal tracer uptake. This new bone seeking agent allows to localize and differentiate tumorous or acute inflammatory lesions and chronic inflammatory bone lesions of the skull

  11. Adaptation of proton total dose with respect to dosimetric parameters within the frame of treatment of skull base or upper cervical spine chordomas; Adaptation de la dose totale de protons en fonction des parametres dosimetriques dans le cadre du traitement des chordomes de la base du crane et du rachis cervical haut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemery, C.G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Feuvret, L. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere (AP-HP), 75 - Paris (France); Calugaru, V.; Bolle, S.; Habrand, J.L.; Datcharty, J.; Alapetite, C.; Dendale, R.; Feuvret, L. [Institut Curie-Centre de protontherapie d' Orsay, 91 (France); Habrand, J.L.; Datcharty, J. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Noel, G. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report the study of the feasibility of a photon-proton irradiation protocol with a dose adaptation with respect to dosimetric factors for patients suffering form a skull base and upper cervical spine chordoma. Sixty patients have been treated between May 2006 and June 2008 with a combination of high energy photons and protons. As five tumours have locally relapsed and one at distance, the authors comment the local control rates, the number of attained cranial nerves, the value of the macroscopic tumour volume, the survival rate without relapse in terms of multifactorial of uni-factorial analysis. Short communication

  12. Creating a normative database of age-specific 3D geometrical data, bone density, and bone thickness of the developing skull: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delye, Hans; Clijmans, Tim; Mommaerts, Maurice Yves; Sloten, Jos Vnder; Goffin, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) of the head are used to study the biomechanics of traumatic brain injury and depend heavily on the use of accurate material properties and head geometry. Any FEM aimed at investigating traumatic head injury in children should therefore use age-specific dimensions of the head, as well as age-specific material properties of the different tissues. In this study, the authors built a database of age-corrected skull geometry, skull thickness, and bone density of the developing skull to aid in the development of an age-specific FEM of a child's head. Such a database, containing age-corrected normative skull geometry data, can also be used for preoperative surgical planning and postoperative long-term follow-up of craniosynostosis surgery results. Computed tomography data were processed for 187 patients (age range 0-20 years old). A 3D surface model was calculated from segmented skull surfaces. Skull models, reference points, and sutures were processed into a MATLAB-supported database. This process included automatic calculation of 2D measurements as well as 3D measurements: length of the coronal suture, length of the lambdoid suture, and the 3D anterior-posterior length, defined as the sum of the metopic and sagittal suture. Skull thickness and skull bone density calculations were included. Cephalic length, cephalic width, intercoronal distance, lateral orbital distance, intertemporal distance, and 3D measurements were obtained, confirming the well-established general growth pattern of the skull. Skull thickness increases rapidly in the first year of life, slowing down during the second year of life, while skull density increases with a fast but steady pace during the first 3 years of life. Both skull thickness and density continue to increase up to adulthood. This is the first report of normative data on 2D and 3D measurements, skull bone thickness, and skull bone density for children aged 0-20 years. This database can help build an age

  13. Changes of the skull in general body diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', G.Yu.; Perepust, L.A.; Novikova, Eh.Z.

    1984-01-01

    Changes of the skull in the following body disease are considered. Diseases: endocrine diseases, fibrous osteodystrophy, reticulohistocytoses and noninfectious granulomas, the blood system diseases, disturbance of vitamin balance. Skull roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  14. Relationship between the anterior forebrain mesocircuit and the default mode network in the structural bases of disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lant, Nicholas D; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Owen, Adrian M; Fernández-Espejo, Davinia

    2016-01-01

    The specific neural bases of disorders of consciousness (DOC) are still not well understood. Some studies have suggested that functional and structural impairments in the default mode network may play a role in explaining these disorders. In contrast, others have proposed that dysfunctions in the anterior forebrain mesocircuit involving striatum, globus pallidus, and thalamus may be the main underlying mechanism. Here, we provide the first report of structural integrity of fiber tracts connecting the nodes of the mesocircuit and the default mode network in 8 patients with DOC. We found evidence of significant damage to subcortico-cortical and cortico-cortical fibers, which were more severe in vegetative state patients and correlated with clinical severity as determined by Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) scores. In contrast, fiber tracts interconnecting subcortical nodes were not significantly impaired. Lastly, we found significant damage in all fiber tracts connecting the precuneus with cortical and subcortical areas. Our results suggest a strong relationship between the default mode network - and most importantly the precuneus - and the anterior forebrain mesocircuit in the neural basis of the DOC.

  15. Relationship between the anterior forebrain mesocircuit and the default mode network in the structural bases of disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Lant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific neural bases of disorders of consciousness (DOC are still not well understood. Some studies have suggested that functional and structural impairments in the default mode network may play a role in explaining these disorders. In contrast, others have proposed that dysfunctions in the anterior forebrain mesocircuit involving striatum, globus pallidus, and thalamus may be the main underlying mechanism. Here, we provide the first report of structural integrity of fiber tracts connecting the nodes of the mesocircuit and the default mode network in 8 patients with DOC. We found evidence of significant damage to subcortico-cortical and cortico-cortical fibers, which were more severe in vegetative state patients and correlated with clinical severity as determined by Coma Recovery Scale—Revised (CRS-R scores. In contrast, fiber tracts interconnecting subcortical nodes were not significantly impaired. Lastly, we found significant damage in all fiber tracts connecting the precuneus with cortical and subcortical areas. Our results suggest a strong relationship between the default mode network – and most importantly the precuneus – and the anterior forebrain mesocircuit in the neural basis of the DOC.

  16. Bilateral symmetry of anterior maxillary incisors: evaluation of a community-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormianer, Z; Solodukhin, A L; Lauritano, D; Segal, P; Lavi, D; Carinci, F; Block, J

    2017-01-01

    The final outcome of dental treatment needs to be not only clinically sufficient, but also esthetically pleasing. Bilateral symmetry in the maxillary incisor teeth is of significant importance in esthetic dentistry. In restorative dentistry, symmetry refers to the appearance of balance around the dental midline. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the maxillary incisor teeth dimensions from both sides of the dental midline, in order to asses if this symmetry occurs naturally. From the student community population at Tel Aviv University, 66 students between the ages of 20-35 (35 males, 31 females) were enrolled and gave consent. The inclusion criteria for this study were: upper maxillary incisors that have never undergone restorative or rehabilitative treatment, and no history of orthodontic treatment. Standardized digital photographs were taken, and the length and width of the maxillary central and lateral incisors were measured and proportions were calculated. SPSS was used to compare the measured differences between teeth on the left versus right of the midline. Tooth proportions were not significantly different between the left and right sides. Asymmetry was found only between the lengths of the maxillary lateral incisors (p=0.009); the width for these teeth was symmetrical. A significant statistical difference was not found on most parameters when evaluating symmetry of the upper incisors. Therefore, when treating the esthetically important anterior of the mouth, care must be taken to ensure bilateral symmetry to mirror the natural symmetry found in most patients.

  17. Congenital skull defect and neurofibroma: without scalp and other abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-Cong; Wei, Liu; Xu, Jia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gui, Lai

    2012-07-01

    Congenital skull defect is a rare malformation that is usually associated with congenital anomalies of the scalp and comparable lesions in the brain, spinal cord, limbs, and skeletal muscle. Most previously reported cases have described skull defects with aplasia cutis congenita and other congenital abnormalities. Very few patients with skull defects present with an intact scalp or neurofibroma. The authors report an adult patient with a rare congenital skull defect and local neurofibroma.

  18. The Growing-Skull Fracture of Childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    processes. Uncommonly, such a defect may occur as a sequel to a simple fracture of the skull, giving rise to an alarming, but none the less benign, physical sign and. X-ray appearance. Two children exhibiting this pheno· menon have recently been seen at the Red Cross \\Var. Memorial Children's Hospital. CASE REPORTS.

  19. Cave crawling in zebra Finch skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Salomon, Rasmus; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh

    The middle ears of birds are acoustically coupled through an air-filled interaural canal, often illustrated and modelled as a simple tube. It allows sound to propagate through the skull from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing by interaction with the ext...

  20. The Growing-Skull Fracture of Childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    secondary neuroblastoma, leukaemic deposits, and osteo- myelitis, but none of these will have the clear-cut and elongated appearance of the growing fracture. Of considerable interest is the suggestion made by. Alajouanine and Thurel,' that at least some of the holes found in ancient skulls, long cited by archaeologists as.

  1. Descriptions of anatomical differences between skulls and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The external anatomical differences between the skulls and mandibles of 10 mountain zebras Equus zebra and 10 plains zebras E. burchelli of both sexes were studied. The nomenclature used conforms to Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (1983). Eleven structural differences are described for the first time and illustrated, viz., ...

  2. Sex-diagnosis of human skulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looze, de Ellen M.A.

    1996-01-01

    For 41 human skulls from the 19th century in the collection of the Zoological Museum Amsterdam the discriminant function score was calculated using a set of twelve variables in order to arrive at a best-as-possible sex-diagnosis. The function used was developed by Van Vark & Pasveer (1994). This led

  3. A critical inventory of preoperative skull replicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasel, J H D; Beinemann, J; Schaller, K; Gailloud, P

    2013-09-01

    Physical replicas of organs are used increasingly for preoperative planning. The quality of these models is generally accepted by surgeons. In view of the strong trend towards minimally invasive and personalised surgery, however, the aim of this investigation was to assess qualitatively the accuracy of such replicas, using skull models as an example. Skull imaging was acquired for three cadavers by computed tomography using clinical routine parameters. After digital three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, physical replicas were produced by 3D printing. The facsimilia were analysed systematically and compared with the best gold standard possible: the macerated skull itself. The skull models were far from anatomically accurate. Non-conforming rendering was observed in particular for foramina, sutures, notches, fissures, grooves, channels, tuberosities, thin-walled structures, sharp peaks and crests, and teeth. Surgeons should be aware that preoperative models may not yet render the exact anatomy of the patient under consideration and are advised to continue relying, in specific conditions, on their own analysis of the native computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Deformation of skull bone as intracranial pressure changing | Yue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By using the 'Ansys' finite element processor, a three-dimensional FEM of a hollow sphere was constructed for human skull. The model was used to calculate the deformation of human skull with the intracranial pressure changing. The skull is a layered sphere constructed in a specially designed form with a Tabula externa, ...

  5. The first fossil skull of Alligator sinensis from the Pleistocene, Taiwan, with a paleogeographic implication of the species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi-yin, Shan; Yen-nien, Cheng; Xiao-chun, Wu

    2013-06-01

    A nearly complete fossil skull of Alligatoridae from the Pleistocene, Penghu Channel, east of Taiwan, is reported. It can be referred to the most latest clade of Alligatorinae, which includes Alligator sinensis, Alligator mississippiensis and Alligator mefferdi, on the basis of the following features: the splenial is excluded from the mandibular symphysis; the anterior tip of the splenial passes dorsal to the Meckelian groove; and the mandible is gently curved between the fourth alveoli and the mid dentary. It differs from A. mississippiensis and A. mefferdi mainly in the following characters: the breadth between the supratemporal fenestrae is approximately equal to the interorbital width, the snout is about half the length of the skull; and the anterior part of the snout is subtriangular in dorsal view. These features suggest that the Penghu alligator is most probably referable to A. sinensis. This is the only fossil skull of A. sinensis known. The discovery of the skull in Penghu Channel not only provides the first solid fossil evidence to indicate that the geological distribution of A. sinensis extended farther southeast than the historical/archeological range of the species but also adds new information on the biodiversity of the Penghu fauna.

  6. [Cloverleaf skull and bilateral facial clefts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Manassero-Morales, Gioconda

    2015-01-01

    Cloverleaf skull syndrome, or Kleeblattschädel syndrome, is a rare malformation in which the skull has a cloverleaf appearance. It is caused by the premature closure of several sutures, being evident before birth. To present our experience in a case of cloverleaf skull syndrome, and update the information from the literature. A female infant of 5 months of age, diagnosed at birth with cleft lip and palate and hydrocephaly. A peritoneal ventricle valve was implanted at 30 days of life, and an ocular enucleation was performed due to an infectious process. The patient was followed-up in Genetics, where it confirmed a macrocephaly and craniosynostosis type cloverleaf skull. The 46XX cytogenetic study and echocardiography were normal. The brain CT scan showed multiple anomalies associated with hydrocephaly and non-specific malformations. Cloverleaf skull may be present in isolated form or associated with other congenital abnormalities, leading to various craniosynostosis syndromes, such as Crouzon, Pfeiffer or Carpenter. It may also be a component of the amniotic rupture sequence or to different dysplasias, such as campomelic dysplasia, thanatophoric dysplasia type 2, or the asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy of Jeune. The case presented does not fulfil all the characteristics needed to be included within a specific syndrome, and on not having a family history that suggests a hereditary pattern or chromosome abnormalities, it is concluded that it is a case of a congenital anomaly of sporadic presentation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of surface treatment on the in-vitro fracture resistance of zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, M; Lotze, G; Bömicke, W; Rues, S

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface treatment on the fracture resistance of zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns. Sixty-four zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns, veneered by use of a press-on technique, were produced. For 48 crowns intraoral adjustment was simulated (A-group), 16 crowns remained unadjusted (WA-group). The adjusted area was then treated in three ways: 1. no further surface treatment; 2. polishing, with irrigation, using polishers interspersed with diamond grit for ceramics; and 3. polishing and glaze firing. Half of the specimens were loaded until fracture in an universal testing device without artificial ageing; the other crowns underwent thermocycling and chewing simulation before ultimate-load testing. Explorative statistical analysis was performed by use of non-parametric and parametric tests. In addition, fracture-strength tests according to ISO 6872 were performed for veneer ceramic subjected to the different surface treatments. Finite element analysis was also conducted for the crowns, and surface roughness was measured. Crowns in the A-group were more sensitive to aging than crowns in the WA-group (p=0.038). Although both polishing and glaze firing slightly improved the fracture resistance of the specimens, the fracture resistance in the WA-group (initial fracture resistance (IFR): 652.0 ± 107.7N, remaining fracture resistance after aging (RFR): 560.6 ± 233.3N) was higher than the fracture resistance in the A-group (polished: IFR: 477.9 ± 108.8N, RFR: 386.0 ± 218.5N; glaze firing: IFR: 535.5 ± 128.0N, RFR: 388.6 ± 202.2N). Surface roughness without adjustment was Ra=0.1 μm; for adjustment but without further treatment it was Ra=1.4 μm; for adjustment and polishing it was Ra=0.3 μm; and for adjustment, polishing, and glazing it was Ra=0.6 μm. Stress distributions obtained by finite element analysis in combination with fracture strength tests showed that fractures most probably originated from

  8. STUDY ON NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN INDIA VARIATIONS OF HUMAN SKULL- A SECONDARY RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameskutty Baby Jacob Kaithackal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Identity of a human being with regard to sex, race, age etc. can be revealed if the skull is suitably examined. The general concept of ethnic and geographic variations being reflected in the body as variations in size, shape, etc. can be checked for in the case of skeleton also. This article is formed out of a term paper study submitted by myself in 2016 to the Yenepoya University, Mangalore, Karnataka, as part of the postgraduate diploma course in Forensic Anthropology. The research was based on a question whether there is a significant difference between human skulls from North and South India. The aims/objectives were bi-fold: to analyse the difference in male and female skull from North Indian and South Indian regions from review of scholarly literature and to explore the possibility identification of individuals from cranial features unique to North and South India. MATERIALS AND METHODS The original articles available on this type of work were extensively reviewed to recognise any traits that differentiated the skulls with regard to their regional variation. RESULTS At the end of the scrutiny of such papers, a summary of the features that distinguished skulls as belonging to northern or southern parts of India was tried. The Indian cranial series, though varied widely in shape, the absence of any statistically significant difference between them made it unreliable to predict skull as male or female by morphometric estimation. The studies by different scholars did not propose for a uniform distinctiveness between north and south Indian skulls. CONCLUSION It was concluded that analysing a single specimen to be of a distinct geographic origin should be done more cautiously when compared to a setting of series analysis where variability might be there of course.

  9. Effects of the freezing and thawing process on biomechanical properties of the human skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Nishida, Yoshifumi; Takano, Tachio; Koizumi, Yoshinori; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if biomechanical investigations of skull samples are reliable after skulls have been subjected to a freezing and thawing process. The skulls were obtained from 105 Japanese cadavers (66 males, 39 females) of known age that were autopsied in our department between October 2012 and June 2013. We obtained bone specimens from eight sites (four bilaterally symmetrical pairs) of each skull and measured the mass of each specimen. They were then classified into three groups (A, B, C) based on the duration of freezing of the experimental samples. The left-side samples were subjected to frozen storage (experimental group). The corresponding right-side samples were their controls. Bending tests were performed on the controls immediately after they were obtained. The experimental samples were preserved by refrigeration at -20 °C for 1 day (group A), 1 month (group B), or 3 months (group C). Following refrigeration, these samples were placed at 37 °C to thaw for 1 h and then were subjected to bending tests using a three-point-bending apparatus attached to a Handy force gauge. The device recorded the fracture load automatically when the specimen fractured. Statistical analyses revealed that there were no significant differences in sample fracture loads between the frozen preserved/thawed samples and the unfrozen controls for each of the cryopreservation intervals. We eliminated any possible sample mass bias by using controls from the same skull in each case. The results suggest that the freezing/thawing process has little effect on the mechanical properties of human skulls. Thus, frozen storage for up to 3 months is a good method for preserving human skulls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interspecific variation of ontogeny and skull shape among porpoises (Phocoenidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius-Jørgensen, Anders; Berta, Annalisa; Frandsen, Marie Michele Schou

    2011-01-01

    was detected; in species with pelagic preference the position and orientation of the foramen magnum aligned the skull with the vertebral column; the rostrum showed less ventral inclination, and the facial region was larger and more concave in lateral aspect. J. Morphol., 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc........ Interspecific shape differences indicate phylogenetic relationships similar to that proposed based on morphology or convergent evolution of the two pelagic species, Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, under the scenarios suggested by recent molecular studies. A shape trend coinciding with habitat preference...

  11. The oldest anatomical handmade skull of the world c. 1508: 'the ugliness of growing old' attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missinne, Stefaan J

    2014-06-01

    The author discusses a previously unknown early sixteenth-century renaissance handmade anatomical miniature skull. The small, naturalistic skull made from an agate (calcedonia) stone mixture (mistioni) shows remarkable osteologic details. Dr. Saban was the first to link the skull to Leonardo. The three-dimensional perspective of and the search for the senso comune are discussed. Anatomical errors both in the drawings of Leonardo and this skull are presented. The article ends with the issue of physiognomy, his grotesque faces, the Perspective Communis and his experimenting c. 1508 with the stone mixture and the human skull. Evidence, including the Italian scale based on Crazie and Braccia, chemical analysis leading to a mine in Volterra and Leonardo's search for the soul in the skull are presented. Written references in the inventory of Salai (1524), the inventory of the Villa Riposo (Raffaello Borghini 1584) and Don Ambrogio Mazenta (1635) are reviewed. The author attributes the skull c. 1508 to Leonardo da Vinci.

  12. Arrow injury to the skull base

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in which the orbits is a prime target, are exceedingly rare.3. O'Neil et a1 presented a case of non-fatal transorbital penetrating arrow injury to the brain.I The case highlighted. WAJM VOL. 23 NO l, JANUARY ~ MARCH. 2004 the necessity for anterograde removal of the arrow in the direction of its lines of trajectory. Pandey et ...

  13. Abordaje subcraneal discusión y revisión histórica de la técnica quirúrgica Anterior subcranial approach: Discussion and historical review of the surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zubillaga Rodríguez

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La cirugía de la base craneal es en la actualidad una realidad que se ha ido consolidando en las últimas décadas. El vertiginoso avance tecnológico desarrollado ha actuado como motor en la evolución de las técnicas quirúrgicas que abordan dicha región anatómica. Su impulso definitivo se ha cimentado en el concepto básico de equipo multidisciplinario. Material y métodos. Se describe el abordaje subcraneal como alternativa a los tradicionales abordajes a la base craneal anterior. Discusión y revisión histórica de los distintos pasos claves en la realización del mismo. Discusión. La elección del abordaje más adecuado a la base craneal en cada caso es esencial para la obtención de resultados quirúrgicos globales satisfactorios. Inicialmente dependerá de la localización anatómica exacta de la lesión dentro de la base craneal y de su extensión tridimensional, así como de la naturaleza de la misma. El abordaje subcraneal representa un paso importante en el desarrollo de las técnicas quirúrgicas de la base craneal. Conclusiones. El abordaje subcraneal permite una amplia y óptima exposición de todos los planos de la fosa craneal anterior, desde el techo etmoidal anterior hasta el clivus-planum esfenoidale incluyendo los techos orbitarios. Este objetivo se logra sin retracción de los lóbulos frontales evitando de esta manera la morbimortalidad asociada que dicha maniobra conlleva. Favorece el manejo precoz preciso de patología oncológica con afectación intra-extradural y el tratamiento de fracturas tras impactos de alta energía con afectación de la fosa craneal anterior.Introduction. Skull base surgery is now a reality that has become consolidated over the last decades. The dizzyingly rapid technological advances that have taken place have served as a motor for the development of surgical techniques to approach this anatomic region. The foundation for the definitive push forward of this technique was

  14. Office-based relaxing incision procedure for correction of astigmatism after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Javadi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Office-based relaxing incision is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of corneal graft astigmatism after DALK. This approach effectively decreases the need for the more costly alternative in the operating room.

  15. Neonatal skull depression unassociated with birth trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, D.; Kirchner, S.G.; Perrin, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    With few exceptions, a depression of the calvaria in a neonate is caused by birth trauma and often is associated with fracture. Localized depression of the skull without trauma is rare, and such a case is reported here. The cause, complications, and treatment of this condition are briefly discussed. Computed tomography (CT) was useful in clinical management. Although sizable, the depression was not associated with neurologic features and disappeared spontaneously

  16. Periorbital skull fractures in five horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, J.P.; Barber, S.M.; Bailey, J.V.; Fretz, P.B.; Pharr, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Periorbital skull fractures were diagnosed in 5 horses, and were associated with ophthalmic complications including corneal ulceration, uveitis, and entrapment of the eye by retrobulbar bone fragments. Physical examination was of greater diagnostic use than radiography. Surgical repair was performed on all horses and was associated with a more favorable postoperative appearance in horses treated acutely; however, the cosmetic results were considered acceptable in all horses. Major postoperative complications were not observed

  17. Anterior and posterior ocular biometry in healthy Chinese subjects: data based on AS-OCT and SS-OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenbin; Gao, Xinbo; Li, Xingyi; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Shida; Wang, Wei; Du, Shaolin; He, Mingguang; Zhang, Xiulan

    2015-01-01

    To measure the anterior and posterior ocular biometric characteristics concurrently and to determine the relationship between the iris and choroid in healthy Chinese subjects. A total of 148 subjects (270 eyes) were enrolled in this cross-section study. The anterior and posterior ocular biometric characteristics were measured simultaneously by anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) and swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). Compared with male eyes, female eyes had narrower anterior biometric parameters that presented with smaller anterior segment parameters [including anterior chamber depth (ACD), width (ACW), area (ACA), and volume (ACV); (all piris space area (TISA750), and angle recess area (ARA); (all piris curvature (ICURV) (p = 0.003), and larger lens vaults (LV) (p = 0.019). These anterior ocular biometric parameters were correlated with increasing age (pIris thickness (IT750) and iris area (IAREA) were associated with age, ACW, and pupil diameter (all pbiometric parameters that correlated with increasing age, which would be helpful in explaining the higher prevalence of angle closure rates in the female gender and in aging people. Increased CT might be associated with smaller iris area; however, this possibility needs to be investigated in future studies before this conclusion is made.

  18. Anterior and posterior ocular biometry in healthy Chinese subjects: data based on AS-OCT and SS-OCT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Huang

    Full Text Available To measure the anterior and posterior ocular biometric characteristics concurrently and to determine the relationship between the iris and choroid in healthy Chinese subjects.A total of 148 subjects (270 eyes were enrolled in this cross-section study. The anterior and posterior ocular biometric characteristics were measured simultaneously by anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT and swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT.Compared with male eyes, female eyes had narrower anterior biometric parameters that presented with smaller anterior segment parameters [including anterior chamber depth (ACD, width (ACW, area (ACA, and volume (ACV; (all p<0.001], narrower anterior chamber angle parameters [including angle opening distance (AOD750, trabecular-iris space area (TISA750, and angle recess area (ARA; (all p<0.001], higher iris curvature (ICURV (p = 0.003, and larger lens vaults (LV (p = 0.019. These anterior ocular biometric parameters were correlated with increasing age (p<0.01. Iris thickness (IT750 and iris area (IAREA were associated with age, ACW, and pupil diameter (all p<0.05, while choroidal thickness (CT was associated with age, gender, and axial length (all p<0.05. Univariate regression analysis showed that greater CT was significantly associated with smaller IAREA (p = 0.026.Compared with male eyes, female eyes had narrower anterior biometric parameters that correlated with increasing age, which would be helpful in explaining the higher prevalence of angle closure rates in the female gender and in aging people. Increased CT might be associated with smaller iris area; however, this possibility needs to be investigated in future studies before this conclusion is made.

  19. A micro-CT study of the greater palatine foramen in human skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetge, Mia-Michaela; Todorovic, Vladimir S; Oettlé, Anna; Hoffman, Jakobus; van Zyl, Andre W

    2018-03-24

    The greater palatine foramen (GPF) is an important anatomical landmark and has substantial clinical relevance in dental surgery. Knowledge of its precise location and dimensions is required for proper planning of surgical procedures involving the posterior maxilla. We used microfocus computed tomography to determine the location and dimensions of the GPF, and any sex and race variations in those measurements, in 77 human skulls scanned at the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation. Specialized software was used for three-dimensional rendering, segmentation, and visualization of the reconstructed volume data. GPF location ranged from adjacent to the first molar to distal of the third molar. The most common GPF location was near the third molar (66.7% of skulls), and the GPF was as close as 6.31 mm (mean distance 12.75 ± 3 mm). The mean GPF dimensions were 5.22 mm on the anterior-posterior axis and 2.81 mm on the lateral-medial axis. We noted no significant differences in relation to race, sex, or age in the sample. The GPF was adjacent or posterior to the third maxillary molar in most skulls.

  20. A morphological analysis of the skull size and shape of Kerivoulinae (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Son Truong; Motokawa, Masaharu; Oshida, Tatsuo; Endo, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    Southeast Asia is a region of high biodiversity, containing species of plants and animals that are yet to be discovered. In this region, bats of the subfamily Kerivoulinae are widespread and diverse with six species recorded in Vietnam. However, the taxonomy of the Kerivoulinae in Asia is complicated. In our study, we used diagnostic characters and multivariate analysis to determine morphological differences between the genera Kerivoula and Phoniscus. We showed that the two genera are distinguishable by the size of second upper incisors, the shape of skull, nasal sinus, canines, second upper and lower premolars. In addition, the two genera can be osteometrically separated by measurements of the braincase height, interorbital width and shape of anterior palatal emargination. Our data clearly revealed the morphological variations in the skull shape of Kerivoula hardwickii in Vietnam. This suggests a possible separation into three morphotypes, representing cryptic species supported by statistical differences with wide variation in skull shape, size and teeth. These results demonstrated Kerivoula hardwickii can be separated three subspecies, and the result will serve as the basis for the future assessment and classification of this group in Southeast Asia.

  1. Clinical, biomechanical and morphological assessment of anterior cruciate ligament Kevlar®-based artificial prosthesis in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza-Castro, Santiago; González-Rivera, Carlos E; Vílchez-Cavazos, Félix; Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Barrera-Flores, Francisco J; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E; Soto-Dominguez, Adolfo; Acosta-Olivo, Carlos; Mendoza-Lemus, Oscar F

    2017-07-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, biomechanical and morphological characteristics of a Kevlar®-based prosthetic ligament as a synthetic graft of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in an experimental animal model in rabbits. A total of 27 knees of rabbits randomly divided into 3 groups (control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with a Kevlar® prosthesis) were analyzed using clinical, biomechanical and morphological tests at 6, 12 and 18 weeks postprocedure. The mean displacement in mechanical testing was 0.73 ± 0.06 mm, 1.58 ± 0.19 mm and 0.94 ± 0.20 mm for the control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with synthetic prosthesis groups, respectively. The results showed an improvement in the stability of the knee with the use of the Kevlar® synthetic prosthesis in the biomechanical testing (p0.05), between the replacement group and the control group. The histological study revealed a good morphological adaptation of the synthetic material to the knee. This study proposes a new animal model for the placement and evaluation of Kevlar®-based synthetic ACL implants. The studied prosthesis showed promising behavior in the clinical and biomechanical tests and in the histological analysis. This study lays the foundation for further basic and clinical studies of artificial ACL prostheses using this material.

  2. Efficacy of a lutein-based dye (PhacodyneTM for visualizing anterior capsulorhexis during cataract surgery by phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Monferrari Monteiro Vianna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Avaliar a eficácia e eficiência de um novo corante à base de luteína para coloração da cápsula anterior durante cirurgia de facoemulsificação em humanos. Métodos: Vinte e cinco olhos de 25 pacientes foram operados por 25 cirurgiões diferentes que realizaram capsulorrexis circular contínua e facoemulsificação após coloração da cápsula anterior com corante à base de luteína. Um questionário avaliou a opinião dos cirurgiões sobre a eficácia do corante. Exames pós-operatórios foram realizados nos dias 1, 7 e 30 por meio de exame oftalmológico completo, topografia/ paquimetria e contagem de células endoteliais. Resultados: De acordo com o questionário aplicado, o corante facilitou a cirurgia em todos os olhos. A classificação da catarata de acordo com o LOCS III foi de 3,24 ± 1,12. A acuidade visual pré-operatória com melhor correção foi de 0,89 ± 0,59 (logMAR, passando a 0,23 ± 0,22 no pós-operatório. A pressão intraocular (PIO permaneceu estável e houve reação de câmara leve que desapareceu em todos os casos durante os primeiros 7 dias de pós-operatório. Não houve significância estatística comparando a paquimetria e PIO pré e pós-operatórios. Conclusão: O novo corante se mostrou eficiente e sem sinais de toxicidade ou efeitos adversos, após 30 dias, quando usado para auxiliar a cirurgia de facoemulsificação.

  3. Factors associated with the prevalence of anterior open bite among preschool children: a population-based study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daniella Borges; Brizon, Valéria Silva Cândido; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Madureira, Davidson Fróis; Gomes, Viviane Elisângela; de Oliveira, Ana Cristina Borges

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with the prevalence of anterior open bite among five-year-old Brazilian children. A cross-sectional study was undertaken using data from the National Survey of Oral Health (SB Brazil 2010). The outcome variable was anterior open bite classified as present or absent. The independent variables were classified by individual, sociodemographic and clinical factors. Data were analyzed through bivariate and multivariate analysis using SPSS statistical software (version 18.0) with a 95% level of significance. The prevalence of anterior open bite was 12.1%. Multivariate analysis showed that preschool children living in Southern Brazil had an increased chance of 1.8 more times of having anterior open bite (CI 95%: 1.16-3.02). Children identified with alterations in overjet had 14.6 times greater chances of having anterior open bite (CI 95%: 8.98-24.03). There was a significant association between anterior open bite and the region of Brazil where the children lived, the presence of altered overjet and the prevalence of posterior crossbite.

  4. Prevalence of Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, With or Without Meniscectomy: An Evidence-Based Practice Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Jennifer S; Sitler, Michael R; Driban, Jeffrey B

    2017-06-02

    Reference:  Claes S, Hermie L, Verdonk R, Bellemans J, Verdonk P. Is osteoarthritis an inevitable consequence of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A meta-analysis. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2013;21(9):1967-1976.   What is the prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) at a mean follow-up equal to or greater than 10 years after autologous anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, with or without meniscectomy?   The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) reporting guidelines were used to conduct this meta-analysis. Studies were identified by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library dating from their earliest file until October 2010. Key terms applied for searching were anterior cruciate ligament or ACL, autologous, follow-up, long-term, outcome, reconstruction, results, treatment, and (osteo)arthritis or osteoarthrosis. The reference lists of included studies were also manually checked to ensure that relevant articles were not omitted.   The authors limited their search to English- and French-language journals. Included studies provided radiographic outcomes after autologous ACL reconstruction and had a mean follow-up of ≥10 years. Excluded studies evaluated ACL reconstruction with major concomitant surgical procedures (eg, meniscal allograft transplantation, high tibial osteotomy). In addition, data from 2 studies completed by the same research team with identical patient populations were limited to the article with the longest follow-up. Finally, manuscripts with inaccurate or incomplete data were excluded.   The following key characteristics of each study were extracted: type of study (prospective or retrospective); ACL surgical procedure (eg, open or arthroscopic bone-patellar tendon-bone graft); time frame of surgery; mean follow-up (in years) post-ACL reconstruction; total number of participants with radiographs; total number of participants with radiographic OA

  5. Leonardo da Vinci's "A Skull Sectioned" : Skull and dental formula revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, Peter O.; Veening, Jan G.

    What can be learned from historical anatomical drawings and how to incorporate these drawings into anatomical teaching? The drawing A skull sectioned (RL 19058v) by Leonardo da Vinci (14521519), hides more detailed information than reported earlier. A well-chosen section cut explores sectioned

  6. Scheimpflug image-based changes in anterior segment parameters during accommodation induced by short-term reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipecz, Agnes; Tsorbatzoglou, Alexis; Hassan, Ziad; Berta, Andras; Modis, Laszlo; Nemeth, Gabor

    2017-05-11

    To analyze the effect of the accommodation on the anterior segment data (corneal and anterior chamber parameters) induced by short-time reading in a healthy, nonpresbyopic adult patient group. Images of both eyes of nonpresbyopic volunteers were captured with a Scheimpflug device (Pentacam HR) in a nonaccommodative state. Fifteen minutes of reading followed and through fixation of the built-in target of Pentacam HR further accommodation was achieved and new images were captured by the device. Anterior segment parameters were observed and the differences were analyzed. Fifty-two healthy eyes of 26 subjects (range 20.04-28.58 years) were analyzed. No significant differences were observed in the keratometric values before and after the accommodative task (p = 0.35). A statistically significant difference was measured in the 5.0-mm-diameter and the 7.0-mm-diameter corneal volume (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03) between accommodation states. Corneal aberrometric data did not change significantly during short-term accommodation. Significant differences were observed between nonaccommodative and accommodative states of the eyes for all measured anterior chamber parameters. Among the parameters of the cornea, only corneal volume changed during the short-term accommodation process, showing some fine changes with accommodation of the cornea in young, emmetropic patients. The position of the pupil and the anterior chamber parameters were observed to change with accommodation as captured by a Scheimpflug device.

  7. Anatomical network analysis shows decoupling of modular lability and complexity in the evolution of the primate skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Boughner, Julia C; Diogo, Rui; Villmoare, Brian A; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Modularity and complexity go hand in hand in the evolution of the skull of primates. Because analyses of these two parameters often use different approaches, we do not know yet how modularity evolves within, or as a consequence of, an also-evolving complex organization. Here we use a novel network theory-based approach (Anatomical Network Analysis) to assess how the organization of skull bones constrains the co-evolution of modularity and complexity among primates. We used the pattern of bone contacts modeled as networks to identify connectivity modules and quantify morphological complexity. We analyzed whether modularity and complexity evolved coordinately in the skull of primates. Specifically, we tested Herbert Simon's general theory of near-decomposability, which states that modularity promotes the evolution of complexity. We found that the skulls of extant primates divide into one conserved cranial module and up to three labile facial modules, whose composition varies among primates. Despite changes in modularity, statistical analyses reject a positive feedback between modularity and complexity. Our results suggest a decoupling of complexity and modularity that translates to varying levels of constraint on the morphological evolvability of the primate skull. This study has methodological and conceptual implications for grasping the constraints that underlie the developmental and functional integration of the skull of humans and other primates.

  8. Cases of Trephination in Ancient Greek Skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Ζafiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trephination, or trepanning, is considered to be one of the most ancient surgical operations with an especially extensive geographical incidence, both in the New World and in the Old. In Europe, more than 200 finds of trephination have been found, from Scandinavia to the Balkans. The technique of trephination or trepanning covers overall the last 10,000 years and exhibits great versatility and adjustability in the knowledge, technical means, therapeutic needs, prejudices and social standards of each period and of each population group. Hippocrates was the one to classify for the first time the kinds of cranial fractures and define the conditions and circumstances for carrying out a trepanning.Aim: The present research aims to investigate the Greek cranial trephinations on sculls from the collection of the Anthropological Museum of the Medical School of Athens that come from archaeological excavations.Method: Skulls were examined by macroscopic observation with reflective light. Furthermore, radiographic representation of the skulls was used.Results: The anthropological researches and the studies of anthropological skeleton remains that came out during archaeological excavations from different eras and areas have given information about the medical practices in the very important geographic area of Greece and in particular, we referred to cases of Greek trephinations.

  9. Brain atrophy and neuropsychological outcome after treatment of ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a voxel-based morphometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendel, Paula; Koskenkorva, Paeivi; Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koivisto, Timo; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland); Niskanen, Eini [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Haenninen, Tuomo [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-11-15

    Cognitive impairment after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is frequently detected. Here, we describe the pattern of cerebral (gray matter) atrophy and its clinical relevance after treatment of aSAH caused by a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. Thirty-seven aSAH patients with ACA aneurysm (17 surgical, 20 endovascular treatment) and a good or moderate clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale V or IV) and 30 controls underwent brain MRI. Voxel-based morphometric analysis was applied to compare the patients and controls. Patients also underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment. The comparisons between controls and either all patients (n=37) or the subgroup of surgically treated patients (n=17) revealed bilateral cortical atrophy in the frontal lobes, mainly in the basal areas. The brainstem, bilateral thalamic and hypothalamic areas, and ipsilateral caudate nucleus were also involved. Small areas of atrophy were detected in temporal lobes. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus showed atrophy ipsilateral to the surgical approach. In the subgroup of endovascularly treated patients (n = 15), small areas of atrophy were detected in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and in the thalamic region. Twenty patients (54%) showed cognitive deficits in neuropsychological assessment. Group analysis after aSAH and treatment of the ruptured ACA aneurysm revealed gray matter atrophy, principally involving the frontobasal cortical areas and hippocampus ipsilateral to the surgical approach. Areas of reduced gray matter were more pronounced after surgical than endovascular treatment. Together with possible focal cortical infarctions and brain retraction deficits in individual patients, this finding may explain the neuropsychological disturbances commonly detected after treatment of ruptured ACA aneurysms. (orig.)

  10. The good, the bad, and the ugly: the influence of skull reconstructions and intraspecific variability in studies of cranial morphometrics in theropods and Basal saurischians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Foth

    Full Text Available Several studies investigating macroevolutionary skull shape variation in fossil reptiles were published recently, often using skull reconstructions taken from the scientific literature. However, this approach could be potentially problematic, because skull reconstructions might differ notably due to incompleteness and/or deformation of the material. Furthermore, the influence of intraspecific variation has usually not been explored in these studies. Both points could influence the results of morphometric analyses by affecting the relative position of species to each other within the morphospace. The aim of the current study is to investigate the variation in morphometric data between skull reconstructions based on the same specimen, and to compare the results to shape variation occurring in skull reconstructions based on different specimens of the same species (intraspecific variation and skulls of closely related species (intraspecific variation. Based on the current results, shape variation of different skull reconstructions based on the same specimen seems to have generally little influence on the results of a geometric morphometric analysis, although it cannot be excluded that some erroneous reconstructions of poorly preserved specimens might cause problems occasionally. In contrast, for different specimens of the same species the variation is generally higher than between different reconstructions based on the same specimen. For closely related species, at least with similar ecological preferences in respect to the dietary spectrum, the degree of interspecific variation can overlap with that of intraspecific variation, most probably due to similar biomechanical constraints.

  11. In Vivo Kinematics of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Knee During Wide-Based Squat Using a 2D/3D Registration Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Takeshi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi; Kidera, Kenichi; Ikuta, Futoshi; Yoneta, Kei; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Osaki, Makoto; Yonekura, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA). Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD) knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p squat activity (p squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension.

  12. Bilaterally symmetric Fourier approximations of the skull outlines of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Sengupta P D, Sengupta D and Ghosh P 2005 Bilaterally symmetric Fourier approximations of the skull outlines of temnospondyl amphibians and their ... The outlines of the vertebrate skulls are variable and they help in recognizing the ..... Carrol R L 1988 Vertebrate paleontology and evolution (New York: Freeman) pp 698.

  13. Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Presenting as Massive Skull Metastasis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of follicular thyroid carcinoma metastasizing to the skull, metastases occurred long after the diagnosis and institution of treatment for primary cancer. Very few cases have been reported with occult follicular thyroid carcinoma presenting as skull metastasis. A 48-year-old female patient presented with massive swelling in the ...

  14. Viscoelastic finite-element analysis of human skull - dura mater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 1/8 model consisted of 25224 nodes and 24150 three-dimensional 8-node isoparametric solid elements. The elastic-viscous mechanical characteristics must be used for the skull. The viscous strains account for about 40% of total strains of human skull and dura mater. And the range of strain errors is from 6.45 to ...

  15. Bilaterally symmetric Fourier approximations of the skull outlines of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Present work illustrates a scheme of quantitative description of the shape of the skull outlines of temnospondyl amphibians using bilaterally symmetric closed Fourier curves. Some special points have been identified on the Fourier fits of the skull outlines, which are the local maxima, or minima of the distances from the ...

  16. Viscoelastic finite-element analysis of human skull - dura mater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... tensor; ij δ , the Kronecker delta;. )( tG , the shear relaxation function;. )( tK , the bulk relaxation function; )(t θ , the volumetric strain; t , the present time; τ , the past time. Human skull has the viscoelastic material (Charalambopoulos et al., 1998). Considering the viscoelasticity of human skull and dura mater ...

  17. Sagittal synostosis: I. Preoperative morphology of the skull

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guimaraes-Ferreira, J.; Gewalli, F.; David, L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the preoperative morphology of the skull in sagittal synostosis in an objective and quantified way. The shapes of the skulls of 105 patients with isolated premature synostosis of the sagittal suture ( SS group) were studied and compared with those of a co...

  18. The Radiological Diagnosis of Defects of the Skull Vault

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    another flat, vascular, cancellous bone with a c"rtical layer on each side, but modified by its outer covering of vascular scalp and its inner relationship to meninges and brain. Brain lesions which produce skull defects usually present as brain lesions and scalp lesions which produce skull defects always present as scalp ...

  19. Deformation of skull bone as intracranial pressure changing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-06

    Mar 6, 2009 ... The cranium could move and human skull - dura mater system was deformed as the ICP fluctuates. Key words: Deformation, skull bone, intracranial pressure, finite-element model, rat. ..... A silicone rubber cylinder attached to a nylon surgical thread was inserted through the internal carotid artery in rats and ...

  20. Home-based intravenous analgesia with elastomeric pump as an outpatient procedure for pain control after anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, J; Peñalver, J; Torner, P; Serra, M; Planell, J

    To follow up pain in the immediate postoperative period, using an elastomeric pump in anterior cruciate ligament surgery. 309 patients who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament repair with bone-tendon-bone allograft. Pain control was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS) during the immediate postoperative period, in the postoperative care unit, in the recovery room, and after the first 24-48-72hours following home discharge. The need for rescue medication, adverse effects observed and emergency visits were also registered. 309 patients were assessed (264 males, 45 females), mean age 33 (range: 18 - 55). Postoperative pain was mild in 44.7% of patients, and 38.5% were pain-free. At discharge, 41.1% of patients reported mild pain and 57% were pain-free. At home, mild to moderate levels of pain were maintained and over 97% of patients presented VAS values ≤ 3. Fewer than 3% had adverse effects, 8.7% had to use analgesic medication at some point. Pruritus occurred in less than 1% of patients receiving intravenous analgesia at home, and fewer than 2% had device-related complications. There is no consensus regarding the postoperative management of anterior cruciate ligament lesions, although most surgeons use multimode anaesthesia and different combinations of analgesics to reduce postoperative pain. The use of an intravenous elastomeric pump as postoperative analgesia for anterior cruciate ligamentoplasty has yielded good results. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  1. Diagnostic and Clinical Management of Skull Fractures in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Arneitz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The indications of routine skull X-rays after mild head trauma are still in discussion, and the clinical management of a child with a skull fracture remains controversial. The aim of our retrospective study was to evaluate our diagnostic and clinical management of children with skull fractures following minor head trauma. Methods: We worked up the medical history of all consecutive patients with a skull fracture treated in our hospital from January 2009 to October 2014 and investigated all skull X-rays in our hospital during this period. Results: In 5217 skull radiographies, 66 skull fractures (1.3% were detected. The mean age of all our patients was 5.9 years (median age: 4.0 years; the mean age of patients with a diagnosed skull fracture was 2.3 years (median age: 0.8 years. A total of 1658 children (32% were <2 years old. A typical boggy swelling was present in 61% of all skull fractures. The majority of injuries were caused by falls (77%. Nine patients (14% required a computed tomography (CT scan during their hospital stay due to neurological symptoms, and four patients had a brain magnetic resonance imaging. Nine patients (14% showed an intracranial hemorrhage (ICH; mean age: 7.3 years; one patient had a neurosurgery because of a depressed skull fracture. Nine patients (14% were observed at our pediatric intensive care unit for a mean time of 2.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 4.2 days. Conclusions: Our findings support previous evidence against the routine use of skull X-rays for evaluation of children with minor head injury. The rate of diagnosed skull fractures in radiographs following minor head trauma is low, and additional CT scans are not indicated in asymptomatic patient with a linear skull fracture. All detected ICHs could be treated conservatively. Children under the age of 2 years have the highest risk of skull fractures after minor head trauma, but do not have a higher incidence of intracranial bleeding

  2. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  3. Photogeologic reconnaissance of X-tunnel at Little Skull Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voegele, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    On June 29, 1992, a magnitude 5.6 earthquake occurred immediately to the south of Little Skull Mountain; the depth of the shock was about 9 kilometers (6 miles). It is the location of an underground structure known as X-tunnel, that once supported deep basing studies for the Air Force in the 1980s. The Nevada Operations Office of US DOE authorized access to the facility on several occasions to allow technical specialists from the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, including geoscientists and engineers, to gather information about possible damage related to the earthquake. Examination of the underground facility in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain indicated little or no damage to the facility. Photogeologic reconnaissance affirmed that the potential for damage to underground facilities is moderated and attenuated by depth below the ground surface

  4. Sexing the human skull through the mastoid process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva Luiz Airton Saavedra de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance for sex determination of the measurement of the area formed by the xerographic projection of 3 craniometric points related to the mastoid process: the porion, asterion, and mastoidale points. METHOD: Sixty skulls, 30 male and 30 female, were analyzed. A xerographic copy of each side of the skull was obtained. On each xerographic copy, the craniometric points were marked to demarcate a triangle. The area (mm² of the demarcated triangle for each side of the skull (right (D and left (E sides was determined, and the total value of these measures (T was calculated. RESULTS: Concerning the right area of the male and female skulls, 60% of the values overlapped; for the left area, 51.67% overlapped, and for the total area, 36.67% overlapped. The analysis of the differences between the sexes in the areas studied was significant for the 3 areas. Regarding the total area, which is the preferred measurement because of the asymmetry between the sides of the skull, the value of the mean was 1505.32 mm² for male skulls, which was greater than the maximum value obtained in the female skulls. The value of the mean for female skulls was 1221.24 mm², less than the minimum value obtained for the male skulls. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a significant result in the 3 studied areas, (D, (E, and (T. The total area values show less overlapping of values between the sexes, and therefore can be used for sexing human skulls. For the population studied, values of the total area that were greater than or equal to 1447.40 mm² belonged to male crania (95% confidence. Values for this area that were less than or equal to 1260.36 mm² belonged to female crania (95% confidence.

  5. Sexing the human skull through the mastoid process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Luiz Airton Saavedra; Segre, Marco

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance for sex determination of the measurement of the area formed by the xerographic projection of 3 craniometric points related to the mastoid process: the porion, asterion, and mastoidale points. Sixty skulls, 30 male and 30 female, were analyzed. A xerographic copy of each side of the skull was obtained. On each xerographic copy, the craniometric points were marked to demarcate a triangle. The area (mm ) of the demarcated triangle for each side of the skull (right (D) and left (E) sides) was determined, and the total value of these measures (T) was calculated. Concerning the right area of the male and female skulls, 60% of the values overlapped; for the left area, 51.67% overlapped, and for the total area, 36.67% overlapped. The analysis of the differences between the sexes in the areas studied was significant for the 3 areas. Regarding the total area, which is the preferred measurement because of the asymmetry between the sides of the skull, the value of the mean was 1505.32 mm for male skulls, which was greater than the maximum value obtained in the female skulls. The value of the mean for female skulls was 1221.24 mm , less than the minimum value obtained for the male skulls. This study demonstrates a significant result in the 3 studied areas, (D), (E), and (T). The total area values show less overlapping of values between the sexes, and therefore can be used for sexing human skulls. For the population studied, values of the total area that were greater than or equal to 1447.40 mm belonged to male crania (95% confidence). Values for this area that were less than or equal to 1260.36 mm belonged to female crania (95% confidence).

  6. Interspecific variation of ontogeny and skull shape among porpoises (Phocoenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatius, Anders; Berta, Annalisa; Frandsen, Marie Schou; Goodall, R Natalie P

    2011-02-01

    All extant members of Phocoenidae (porpoises) have been characterized as pedomorphic based on skeletal characters. To investigate the ontogenetic background for pedomorphosis and assess interspecific differences in ontogeny among phocoenids, samples of the six extant species were compared in terms of development of both epiphyseal and cranial suture fusion. Across all species, full maturity of the vertebral column was rare. Vertebral epiphyseal development did not progress so far in most Phocoena phocoena as in Phocoenoides dalli and Phocoena dioptrica. P. phocoena, Phocoena spinipinnis, Ph. dalli, and P. dioptrica, for which large series were available, were further compared in terms of ontogeny of cranial shape by three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica generally showed further development of cranial sutures than the other species. Postnatal skull shape development was similar for all species studied; the majority of interspecific shape differences are present at parturition. Smaller species had a higher rate of shape development relative to growth in size than Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, but they still showed less allometric development due to less postnatal growth. Interspecific shape differences indicate phylogenetic relationships similar to that proposed based on morphology or convergent evolution of the two pelagic species, Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, under the scenarios suggested by recent molecular studies. A shape trend coinciding with habitat preference was detected; in species with pelagic preference the position and orientation of the foramen magnum aligned the skull with the vertebral column; the rostrum showed less ventral inclination, and the facial region was larger and more concave in lateral aspect. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A morphometric study of the canine skull and periorbita and its implications for regional ocular anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaumann, Paulo Roberto; Moreno, Juan Carlos Duque; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano

    2018-01-01

    A hypothetical relationship between canine cranial length and the length of the periorbita could be used for intraconal anesthetic volume estimation. Forty-one canine cadaver heads and one macerated dog skull. Inion and nasion points were recognized in the macerated skull and used as landmarks for cranial length measure. Thirty cadavers classified as dolichocephalic, mesaticephalic and brachycephalic were distributed in three study groups. Anatomic references of the skull shapes were recognized and parameters measured: body weight (BW), cranial length (L cr ) and length of the periorbita (L po ). Results were compared and statistical analyses were performed to find correlations between BW and the skull parameters. Contrast medium was injected in another 11 cadavers with a total volume calculated based on L cr (10 cadavers) or BW (one cadaver) and then submitted to computerized tomography examination to compare techniques, estimate the capacity of the intraconal space of the periorbita and to illustrate practical implications. There is a positive correlation between BW and L po (P morphometric features is presented. The formula 0.1 mL/cm L cr to calculate total intraconal anesthetic volume is suggested. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  8. The application of finite element analysis in the skull biomechanics and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Felippe Bevilacqua; Rossi, Ana Cláudia; Freire, Alexandre Rodrigues; Ferreira Caria, Paulo Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Empirical concepts describe the direction of the masticatory stress dissipation in the skull. The scientific evidence of the trajectories and the magnitude of stress dissipation can help in the diagnosis of the masticatory alterations and the planning of oral rehabilitation in the different areas of Dentistry. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is a tool that may reproduce complex structures with irregular geometries of natural and artificial tissues of the human body because it uses mathematical functions that enable the understanding of the craniofacial biomechanics. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the advantages and limitations of FEA in the skull biomechanics and Dentistry study. The keywords of the selected original research articles were: Finite element analysis, biomechanics, skull, Dentistry, teeth, and implant. The literature review was performed in the databases, PUBMED, MEDLINE and SCOPUS. The selected books and articles were between the years 1928 and 2010. The FEA is an assessment tool whose application in different areas of the Dentistry has gradually increased over the past 10 years, but its application in the analysis of the skull biomechanics is scarce. The main advantages of the FEA are the realistic mode of approach and the possibility of results being based on analysis of only one model. On the other hand, the main limitation of the FEA studies is the lack of anatomical details in the modeling phase of the craniofacial structures and the lack of information about the material properties.

  9. Four-year follow-up of a polymethyl methacrylate-based bone cement graft for optimizing esthetics in maxillary anterior implants: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Érica Miranda De; Naldi, Luis Fernando; Bernades, Karina Oliveira; Carvalho, Alexandre Leite

    2017-01-01

    Tooth loss promotes bone and gingival tissue remodeling, thus breaking the harmony between the residual ridge and natural teeth. This is critical in the anterior region of the mouth, and the integration of several dental specialties is often essential to successful rehabilitation with implants. This article describes a multidisciplinary approach to implant-supported oral rehabilitation in the maxillary anterior region, presenting a new technique for optimizing esthetics in implants. A 19-year-old woman was missing her central and lateral incisors and had 2 dental implants in the lateral incisor sites. The patient exhibited deficient thickness of the alveolar edge, loss of lip support, and absence of gingival architecture, and the implants were improperly placed. A multidisciplinary team created a correct emergence profile through a polymethyl methacrylate-based bone cement graft along with connective tissue grafts. This technique may be a useful therapeutic adjunct in dental implantology, showing good predictability and regular healing procedures.

  10. Septic Arthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Clinical and Functional Outcomes Based on Graft Retention or Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Brian R; Arroyo, William; Cotter, Eric J; Zacchilli, Michael A; Garcia, E'Stephan J; Owens, Brett D

    2018-03-01

    There remains a debate over whether to retain the index anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft in the setting of septic arthritis. To evaluate and compare clinical outcomes for the treatment of septic arthritis after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) in those with and without early graft retention. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The Military Health System was queried for all ACLR procedures performed between 2007 and 2013. Inclusion criteria required active military status, primary ACLR with secondary septic arthritis, and minimum 24-month surveillance. Demographic, clinical, and surgical variables were evaluated using descriptive statistics and regression analysis for factors influencing selected outcomes. Of 9511 ACLR procedures, 31 (0.32%) were identified as having secondary septic arthritis requiring urgent arthroscopic irrigation and debridement and intravenous antibiotics (mean, 6.3 weeks). The majority (62%) were treated in the subacute (2 weeks to 2 months) setting. Index ACLR was performed with a hamstring autograft (n = 17, 55%), soft tissue allograft (n = 11, 35%), and patellar tendon autograft (n = 3, 10%). The graft was retained in 71% (n = 22) of patients, while 29% (n = 9) underwent early graft debridement. At a mean 26.9-month follow-up, 48% of patients (n = 15) had returned to the military. Graft removal was not predictive of return to active duty ( P = .29). The presence of postoperative complications, including symptomatic postinfection arthritis (22.6%) and arthrofibrosis (9.7%), was the only variable predictive of inability to return to duty (odds ratio, 27.5 [95% CI, 3.24-233.47]; P = .002). Seven of 9 patients who underwent graft debridement underwent revision ACLR, and all 7 had stable knees at final follow-up compared with 68% (15/22) in the graft retention group. Arthroscopic debridement with early graft removal and staged revision ACLR remains a viable option for restoring knee stability (100%), although the rate of return to active duty was

  11. Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Strokes Based on Variant Vascular Anatomy of the Posterior Circulation: Clinical Deficits and Imaging Territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Melissa M; Chen, Stephen R; Diaz-Marchan, Pedro; Schomer, Donald; Kumar, Vinodh A

    2018-04-01

    We report imaging findings of 3 patients with anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarcts who presented with atypical clinical findings of cerebellar strokes. AICA strokes are rare, and diagnosis can be difficult because of the high variability of the posterior circulation vascular anatomy. We describe the embryology and variant anatomy of AICA so that clinicians can understand and recognize the patterns of these infarcts. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anatomia endoscópica da artéria etmoidal anterior: estudo de dissecção em cadáveres Endoscopic anatomy of the anterior ethmoidal artery: a cadaveric dissection study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Cunha Araujo Filho

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a artéria etmoidal anterior (AEA é um importante ponto de reparo anatômico para localização do seio frontal e da base de crânio. Entretanto, apesar de diversos estudos endoscópicos em cadáveres, ainda não temos um estudo anatômico sobre AEA na população ocidental. OBJETIVOS: Determinar pontos de reparo para localização da artéria, estudar sua relação com a base do crânio e grau de deiscência, assim como variações intra e interindividuais. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas dissecções das fossas nasais em 25 cadáveres. RESULTADOS: O comprimento médio do trajeto intranasal da artéria etmoidal anterior foi de 5,82mm. O canal etmoidal anterior apresentou algum grau de deiscência em 66,7%. A distância média do ponto médio da artéria à espinha nasal anterior foi de 61,72mm (dp = 4,18mm; à axila nasal foi de 64,04mm (dp = 4,69mm; e à axila anterior do corneto médio foi de 21,14mm (dp = 3,25mm. Para todas as medidas, não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa quando comparados os lados direito e esquerdo (p>0,05. CONCLUSÕES: Concluímos que a axila da concha média é o ponto de reparo mais confiável para a localização da AEA.INTRODUCTION: The anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA is an important point of anatomical reference in order to locate the frontal sinus and the skull base. Notwithstanding, despite numerous endoscopic studies in cadavers, we still lack an anatomical study on the AEA in the western population. AIM: to determine reference points used to locate the artery, study its relationship with the skull base and its degree of dehiscence, as well as to study intra and inter individual variations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: we dissected the nasal fossae belonging to 25 cadavers. RESULTS: the average intranasal length of the anterior ethmoidal artery was 5.2 mm. The anterior ethmoidal canal presented some degree of dehiscence in 66.7%. The average distance between the artery middle point

  13. Repair of large frontal temporal parietal skull defect with digitally reconstructed titanium mesh: a report of 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-ge CHENG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical effect and surgical technique of the repair of large defect involving frontal, temporal, and parietal regions using digitally reconstructed titanium mesh. Methods Twenty patients with large frontal, temporal, and parietal skull defect hospitalized in Air Force General Hospital from November 2006 to May 2012 were involved in this study. In these 20 patients, there were 13 males and 7 females, aged 18-58 years (mean 39 years, and the defect size measured from 7.0cm×9.0cm to 11.5cm×14.0cm (mean 8.5cm×12.0cm. Spiral CT head scan and digital three-dimensional reconstruction of skull were performed in all the patients. The shape and geometric size of skull defect was traced based on the symmetry principle, and then the data were transferred into digital precision lathe to reconstruct a titanium mesh slightly larger (1.0-1.5cm than the skull defect, and the finally the prosthesis was perfected after pruning the border. Cranioplasty was performed 6-12 months after craniotomy using the digitally reconstructed titanium mesh. Results The digitally reconstructed titanium mesh was used in 20 patients with large frontal, temporal, parietal skull defect. The surgical technique was relatively simple, and the surgical duration was shorter than before. The titanium mesh fit to the defect of skull accurately with satisfactory molding effect, good appearance and symmetrical in shape. No related complication was found in all the patients. Conclusion Repair of large frontal, temporal, parietal skull defect with digitally reconstructed titanium mesh is more advantageous than traditional manual reconstruction, and it can improve the life quality of patients.

  14. Sexing the human skull using the mastoid process.

    OpenAIRE

    Swati Shah; Pratik Patel

    2013-01-01

    Sex determination of human or human skeletal remains is considered an initial step in its identification. In cases of fragmented or mutilated body, it is difficult to identify the body. This skillful process is carried out by forensic and anatomy experts. In cases where intact skull is not found, mastoid play a vital role in sex determination as it is the most dimorphic bone of skull. The mastoid region, a fragmentary piece of skull is ideal for sex determination as it is resistant to damage ...

  15. IN VIVO KINEMATICS OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT DEFICIENT KNEE DURING WIDE-BASED SQUAT USING A 2D/3D REGISTRATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Miyaji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA. Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral medial contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 5, 10 and 15° of knee flexion in the extension phase of the squat activity (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral lateral contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0° flexion in the both phases (p < 0.05. The kinematics of the ACLD and contralateral intact knees were similar during the wide-based squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension

  16. Evidence-based clinical practice update: practice guidelines for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on a systematic review and multidisciplinary consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melick, N. van; Cingel, R.E. van; Brooijmans, F.; Neeter, C.; Tienen, T. van; Hullegie, W.; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) instructed a multidisciplinary group of Dutch anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) experts to develop an evidence statement for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. DESIGN: Clinical practice guideline underpinned by systematic review and

  17. Traumatic Anterior Cerebral Artery Pseudoaneurysmal Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing Lin; Xue, Hao; Qi, Chang Jing; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Dong Hai; Li, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is a rare but emergent condition. We report a case of traumatic anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis and review the published literature. A 49-year-old man sustained severe head trauma. He was diagnosed with multiple skull bone fractures, left subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pneumocephalus, and right frontal hematoma. Subdural hematoma evacuation was done at a local hospital. In the following months, he experienced repeated epistaxis that required nasal packing to stop the bleeding. Digital subtraction angiography showed an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm protruding into the posterior ethmoid sinus. Embolization of the aneurysm was performed with microcoils, and the parent artery was occluded by thrombosis. The patient presented 1 month later with another epistaxis episode. Digital subtraction angiography showed recanalization of the parent artery and recurrence of the aneurysm. The parent artery was occluded for the second time with coils and Onyx embolic agent. Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is rare, and this is the first report of an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm that manifested with epistaxis. Endovascular intervention has become the first choice of treatment for this disease. The high recurrence rate is the main disadvantage of endovascular intervention. Aneurysm trapping with bypass surgery is another treatment option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Meningiomas of the Anterior Clinoid Process: Is It Wise to Drill Out the Optic Canal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughrue, Michael; Kane, Ari; Rutkowski, Martin J; Berger, Mitchel S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Meningiomas of the anterior clinoid process are uncommon tumors, acknowledged by most experienced surgeons to be among the most challenging meningiomas to completely remove. In this article, we summarize our institutional experience removing these uncommon and challenging skull base meningiomas. Methods: We analyzed the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing surgical removal of anterior at our institution over an 18-year period. We characterized the radiographic appearance of these tumors and related tumor features to symptoms and ability to obtain a gross total resection. We also analyzed visual outcomes in these patients, focusing on visual outcomes with and without optic canal unroofing. Results: We identified 29 patients with anterior clinoid meningiomas who underwent surgical resection at our institution between 1991 and 2007. The median length of follow-up was 7.5 years (range: 2.0 to 18.6 years). Similar to others, we found gross total resection was seldom safely achievable in these patients. Despite this, only 1/20 of patients undergoing subtotal resection without immediate postoperative radiosurgery experienced tumor progression. The optic canal was unroofed in 18/29 patients in this series, while in 11/29 patients it was not. Notably, all five patients experiencing visual improvement underwent optic canal unroofing, while three of four patients experiencing visual worsening did not. Conclusions:  These data provide some evidence suggesting that unroofing the optic canal in anterior clinoid meningiomas might improve visual outcomes in these patients. PMID:26487997

  19. The outcome of a surgical protocol based on ischemia overprotection in large and giant aneurysms of the anterior cerebral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hideaki; Watanabe, Katsushige; Miyagishima, Takaaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Kin, Taichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-07-01

    Aiming to define the optimal treatment of large and giant aneurysms (LGAs) in the anterior circulation, we present our surgical protocol and patient outcome. A series of 42 patients with intracavernous LGAs (n = 16), paraclinoid (C2) LGAs (n = 17), and peripheral (middle cerebral artery-MCA or anterior cerebral artery-ACA) LGAs (n = 9) were treated after bypass under motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring. Preoperatively, three categories of ischemic tolerance during internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion were defined on conventional angiography: optimal, suboptimal, and insufficient collaterals. Accordingly, three types of bypass: low flow (LFB), middle flow (MFB) and high flow (HFB) were applied for the cases with optimal, suboptimal, and insufficient collaterals, respectively. Outcome was evaluated by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). All patients had excellent GOS score except one, who suffered a major ischemic stroke immediately after surgery for a paraclinoid lesion. Forty-one patients were followed up for 87.1 ± 40.1 months (range 13-144 months). Intracavernous LGAs were all treated by proximal occlusion with bypass surgery. Of paraclinoid LGA patients, 15 patients had direct clipping under suction decompression and other 2 patients with recurrent aneurysms had ICA (C2) proximal clipping with HFB. MEP monitoring guided for temporary clipping time and clip repositioning, observing significant MEP changes for up to 6 min duration. Of 9 peripheral LGAs patients 7 MCA LGAs had reconstructive clipping (n = 4) or trapping (n = 3) with bypass including LFB in 3 cases, MFB in 1 and HFB in 1. Two ACA LGAs had clipping (n = 1) or trapping (n = 1) with A3-A3 bypass. The applied protocol provided excellent results in intracavernous, paraclinoid, and peripheral thrombosed LGAs of the anterior circulation.

  20. Skull and buccal cavity allometry increase mass-specific engulfment capacity in fin whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Potvin, Jean; Shadwick, Robert E

    2010-03-22

    Rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) represent not only some of the largest animals of all time, but also exhibit a wide range in intraspecific and interspecific body size. Balaenopterids are characterized by their extreme lunge-feeding behaviour, a dynamic process that involves the engulfment of a large volume of prey-laden water at a high energetic cost. To investigate the consequences of scale and morphology on lunge-feeding performance, we determined allometric equations for fin whale body dimensions and engulfment capacity. Our analysis demonstrates that larger fin whales have larger skulls and larger buccal cavities relative to body size. Together, these data suggest that engulfment volume is also allometric, increasing with body length as L(3.5)(body). The positive allometry of the skull is accompanied by negative allometry in the tail region. The relative shortening of the tail may represent a trade-off for investing all growth-related resources in the anterior region of the body. Although enhanced engulfment volume will increase foraging efficiency, the work (energy) required to accelerate the engulfed water mass during engulfment will be relatively higher in larger rorquals. If the mass-specific energetic cost of a lunge increases with body size, it will have major consequences for rorqual foraging ecology and evolution.

  1. Photo-Realistic Statistical Skull Morphotypes: New Exemplars for Ancestry and Sex Estimation in Forensic Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Jodi; Stephan, Carl N

    2017-05-01

    Graphic exemplars of cranial sex and ancestry are essential to forensic anthropology for standardizing casework, training analysts, and communicating group trends. To date, graphic exemplars have comprised hand-drawn sketches, or photographs of individual specimens, which risks bias/subjectivity. Here, we performed quantitative analysis of photographic data to generate new photo-realistic and objective exemplars of skull form. Standardized anterior and left lateral photographs of skulls for each sex were analyzed in the computer graphics program Psychomorph for the following groups: South African Blacks, South African Whites, American Blacks, American Whites, and Japanese. The average cranial form was calculated for each photographic view, before the color information for every individual was warped to the average form and combined to produce statistical averages. These mathematically derived exemplars-and their statistical exaggerations or extremes-retain the high-resolution detail of the original photographic dataset, making them the ideal casework and training reference standards. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Pile driving into the skull and suspending the bridging veins? An undescribed role of arachnoid granulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Ono, Hideo; Yasumoto, Yukimasa

    2017-05-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AGs) occasionally appear to protrude into the calvarial convexity, lying close to the bridging veins (BVs). This study aims to characterize such AGs and BVs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ninety-five patients were enrolled in this study. Initially, stepwise frontal craniotomy was performed in an injected cadaver head. Next, examinations with contrast MRI were performed involving the whole cranial vault. In cadaveric dissection, the AGs located in the parasagittal regions appeared as outward protrusions through the dura mater and in contact with the diploic veins. Forming tent-shaped sleeves, these AGs and the continuous arachnoid membranes suspended the BVs coursing just below. A total of 237 AGs were identified on contrast MRI that protruded into the skull, lying close to the BVs. Among them, 78 % were located in parasagittal regions as AG-BV pairs. These pairs were most frequently found in the middle third of the calvarial hemisphere, followed by the anterior and posterior thirds. In 34 %, the BV segments were lodged in the AGs. Some AGs located in the parasagittal regions and cerebral convexity pass through the dura mater and pile drive into the skull, which contribute to forming hanging-type arachnoid sleeves suspending the BVs. These structures may underpin the predisposition of BVs to injury following mechanical impacts.

  3. Skull and buccal cavity allometry increase mass-specific engulfment capacity in fin whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A.; Potvin, Jean; Shadwick, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) represent not only some of the largest animals of all time, but also exhibit a wide range in intraspecific and interspecific body size. Balaenopterids are characterized by their extreme lunge-feeding behaviour, a dynamic process that involves the engulfment of a large volume of prey-laden water at a high energetic cost. To investigate the consequences of scale and morphology on lunge-feeding performance, we determined allometric equations for fin whale body dimensions and engulfment capacity. Our analysis demonstrates that larger fin whales have larger skulls and larger buccal cavities relative to body size. Together, these data suggest that engulfment volume is also allometric, increasing with body length as . The positive allometry of the skull is accompanied by negative allometry in the tail region. The relative shortening of the tail may represent a trade-off for investing all growth-related resources in the anterior region of the body. Although enhanced engulfment volume will increase foraging efficiency, the work (energy) required to accelerate the engulfed water mass during engulfment will be relatively higher in larger rorquals. If the mass-specific energetic cost of a lunge increases with body size, it will have major consequences for rorqual foraging ecology and evolution. PMID:19939846

  4. Skull osteometry of the adult alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

    OpenAIRE

    Castañeda C., Henry; Laboratorio de Anatomía Animal y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Navarrete Z., Miluska; Laboratorio de Anatomía Animal y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Sato S., Alberto; Laboratorio de Anatomía Animal y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Chávez R., Alexander; Laboratorio de Anatomía Animal y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the skull osteometry and to calculate the craniometric indexes of adult alpacas (Vicugna pacos). The study was carried out using 30 heads of adult Huacaya alpacas (15 males and 15 females), from the district of Sicuani, Cusco, Peru. The skulls were obtained by the maceration technique. The anatomical description was applied using the recommended terminology by the Veterinary Anatomical Nomenclature 2012. A digital vernier was used in the measurement and calculatio...

  5. Peramorphic traits in the tokay gecko skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Juan D; Mapps, Aurelia A; Lewis, Patrick J; Thies, Monte L; Bauer, Aaron M

    2015-08-01

    Traditionally, geckos have been conceived to exhibit paedomorphic features relative to other lizards (e.g., large eyes, less extensively ossified skulls, and amphicoelous and notochordal vertebrae). In contrast, peramorphosis has not been considered an important process in shaping their morphology. Here, we studied different sized specimens of Gekko gecko to document ontogenetic changes in cranial anatomy, especially near maturity. Comparison of this species with available descriptions of other geckos resulted in the identification of 14 cranial characteristics that are expressed more strongly with size increase. These characteristics become move evident in later stages of post-hatching development, especially near maturation, and are, therefore, attributed to peramorphosis (hyperossification). ACCTRAN and DELTRAN character optimizations were applied to these characters using a tree of 11 genera derived from a gekkotan molecular phylogeny. This analysis revealed that G. gecko expresses the majority of these putative peramorphic features near maturity, and that some of these features are also expressed in species closely related to G. gecko. The characters studied have the potential to be applied in future phylogenetic and taxonomic studies of this group of lizards. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Impact response and energy absorption of human skull cellular bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianqian; Ma, Li; Liu, Qiunan; Feng, Lina; Wang, Zhenyu; Ohrndorf, Arne; Christ, Hans-Jürgen; Xiong, Jian

    2018-05-01

    A skull fracture, due to a composition of typical lightweight cellular structures, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. This paper presents a systematic investigation on the failure mechanism and energy absorption of skull cellular bones under low- and medium-velocity impact loadings. Non-destructive three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) is utilized to scan samples of human skull cellular bones, and relevant structural parameters are obtained to reconstruct a finite element (FE) model of these bones. Micro-structures, mechanical properties, and failure process analysis of human skull cellular bones under impact loadings are investigated. The effects of some typical parameters, such as impact velocity and angle, impactor shape and density, and various reconstructed sections on the impact behavior of human skull cellular bones are investigated. Their impact properties and energy absorption are summarized. The present work will be of great significance in understanding the mechanical mystery of human skull cellular bones under impact loading. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CT findings of skull tumors forming subcutaneous masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niida, Hirohito; Takeda, Norio; Onda, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Ryuichi

    1991-01-01

    Some characteristics of CT findings in 27 patients with skull tumors forming subcutaneous tumors were studied. There were sixteen metastatic skull tumors, six primary skull tumors, and five meningiomas. A CT scan was found to be helpful in the diagnosis of the lesions. Especially, bone-window CT images proved very sensitive in the detection of destructive and permeative lesions of the skull. In 19 of the 27 cases, some lytic lesions were observed. In all cases with skull metastasis from carcinomas, a complete osteolytic change of the skull was observed. Furthermore, all of the metastatic tumors from thyroid carcinoma showed well circumscribed and homogeneously enhanced lesions, in contrast with the other metastatic carcinomas, which usually showed heterogeneously enhanced lesions with irregular margins. Osteoblastic changes were characteristically observed in all cases of meningiomas, osteosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Meningiomas were located mainly in the intracranial region and extended extracranially. In one case of malignant lymphoma, one of a neuroblastoma, and one of leukemia, there was little or no gross cortical bone change, despite a large mass. (author)

  8. Verifying Three-Dimensional Skull Model Reconstruction Using Cranial Index of Symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kung, Woon-Man; Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Lin, Chung-Hsiang; Lu, Yu-Mei; Chen, Tzu-Hsuan; Lin, Muh-Shi

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Difficulty exists in scalp adaptation for cranioplasty with customized computer-assisted design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) implant in situations of excessive wound tension and sub-cranioplasty dead space. To solve this clinical problem, the CAD/CAM technique should include algorithms to reconstruct a depressed contour to cover the skull defect. Satisfactory CAM-derived alloplastic implants are based on highly accurate three-dimensional (3-D) CAD modeling. Thus, it is quite important ...

  9. Comparison of geometries for in vivo measurements of actinides in the skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, T

    2010-01-01

    In vivo measurement of actinide activity in the skeleton is a valuable source of information on human internal contamination. Estimates of skeleton activity are based on measurements of the knee, elbow or skull. Different laboratories use different measurement geometries. Different calibration phantoms and detectors are used, making a comparison of detection efficiencies rather difficult. This paper compares various head measurement geometries when using MC simulations with a voxel head phantom. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence-based clinical practice update: practice guidelines for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on a systematic review and multidisciplinary consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Melick, Nicky; van Cingel, Robert E H; Brooijmans, Frans; Neeter, Camille; van Tienen, Tony; Hullegie, Wim; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-12-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) instructed a multidisciplinary group of Dutch anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) experts to develop an evidence statement for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. Clinical practice guideline underpinned by systematic review and expert consensus. A multidisciplinary working group and steering group systematically reviewed the literature and wrote the guideline. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched for meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials and prospective cohort studies published between January 1990 and June 2015. Included literature must have addressed 1 of 9 predetermined clinical topics: (1) preoperative predictors for postoperative outcome, (2) effectiveness of physical therapy, (3) open and closed kinetic chain quadriceps exercises, (4) strength and neuromuscular training, (5) electrostimulation and electromyographic feedback, (6) cryotherapy, (7) measurements of functional performance, (8) return to play and (9) risk for reinjury. Ninety studies were included as the basis for the evidence statement. Rehabilitation after ACL injury should include a prehabilitation phase and 3 criterion-based postoperative phases: (1) impairment-based, (2) sport-specific training and (3) return to play. A battery of strength and hop tests, quality of movement and psychological tests should be used to guide progression from one rehabilitation stage to the next. Postoperative rehabilitation should continue for 9-12 months. To assess readiness to return to play and the risk for reinjury, a test battery, including strength tests, hop tests and measurement of movement quality, should be used. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. A bird-like skull in a Triassic diapsid reptile increases heterogeneity of the morphological and phylogenetic radiation of Diapsida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Adam C.; Nesbitt, Sterling J.

    2017-10-01

    The Triassic Period saw the first appearance of numerous amniote lineages (e.g. Lepidosauria, Archosauria, Mammalia) that defined Mesozoic ecosystems following the end Permian Mass Extinction, as well as the first major morphological diversification of crown-group reptiles. Unfortunately, much of our understanding of this event comes from the record of large-bodied reptiles (total body length > 1 m). Here we present a new species of drepanosaurid (small-bodied, chameleon-like diapsids) from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of New Mexico. Using reconstructions of micro-computed tomography data, we reveal the three-dimensional skull osteology of this clade for the first time. The skull presents many archaic anatomical traits unknown in Triassic crown-group reptiles (e.g. absence of bony support for the external ear), whereas other traits (e.g. toothless rostrum, anteriorly directed orbits, inflated endocranium) resemble derived avian theropods. A phylogenetic analysis of Permo-Triassic diapsids supports the hypothesis that drepanosaurs are an archaic lineage that originated in the Permian, far removed from crown-group Reptilia. The phylogenetic position of drepanosaurids indicates the presence of archaic Permian clades among Triassic small reptile assemblages and that morphological convergence produced a remarkably bird-like skull nearly 100 Myr before one is known to have emerged in Theropoda.

  12. Prospective cohort clinical study assessing the 5-year survival and success of anterior maxillary zirconia-based crowns with customized zirconia copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Sami; Raigrodski, Ariel J; Zhang, Hai; Mancl, Lloyd A

    2017-02-01

    Studies evaluating anterior zirconia-based crowns are limited. The purpose of this prospective cohort clinical study was to assess the efficacy of zirconia-based anterior maxillary crowns with 0.3-mm customized copings at the cervical third and anatomical design elsewhere for up to 5 years of service. Eighteen participants who required an anterior maxillary crown (n=20) and who had signed a consent form approved by the University of Washington Health Sciences Center Human Subjects Division were enrolled. All preparations were standardized and prepared with an occlusal reduction of 1.5 to 2 mm and an axial reduction of 1 to 1.5 mm with 10 degrees of convergence angle. All finish lines were located on the sound tooth structure. Zirconia copings (Lava; 3M ESPE) were custom designed and milled to a 0.3-mm thickness at the cervical third and with selective thickness elsewhere to support the veneering porcelain. All restorations were luted with self-etching self-adhesive composite resin cement. Recall appointments were at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months, and annually thereafter for 5 years. Modified Ryge criteria were used to assess the clinical fracture measurements, esthetics, marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, radiographic proximal recurrent caries, and periapical pathoses. Descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals were used to describe the number and rate of complications and self-reported satisfaction with the crowns. Twenty crowns with a mean follow-up of 58.7 months were evaluated. All crowns were rated as Alfa for fracture measurements (smooth surface, no fracture/chipping). Twelve crowns were rated esthetically as Romeo (no mismatch in color and shade) and 8 as Sierra (mismatch in color and shade within normal range). Twelve crowns were rated as Alfa (no visible evidence of crevice) and 8 as Bravo (visible evidence of crevice, no penetration of explorer) for marginal integrity. Nineteen were rated as Alfa (no discoloration) and 1 as Bravo

  13. Microsurgical anatomy and variations of the anterior clinoid process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagtekin, Ahmet; Avci, Emel; Uzmansel, Denız; Kurtoglu, Zeliha; Kara, Engin; Uluc, Kutluay; Akture, Erinc; Baskaya, Mustafa K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better define the microsurgical anatomy of the supra/parasellar region and describe variations of the anterior clinoid process (ACP). Fifteen formalin-fixed cadaver heads and 25 dry skulls were used to define the microsurgical anatomy of the ACP and related structures. The presence of the caroticoclinoid foramen (CaCF) as well as other relevant measurements were all noted. Radiological examination of the CaCF was also demonstrated on dry skulls. Interosseous bridges, which form between the anterior and middle clinoid processes or connect all three (anterior, middle and posterior) clinoid processes, were found in 30% of the specimens. The average basal width, length and thickness of the ACP were 7.3 mm, 9.7 mm and 5.4 mm, respectively. Length of the optic nerve (ON) up to the falciform ligament (FL) was 10.9 mm; length of the ON under the FL was 2.7 mm; length of ON after removal of the ACP and unroofing the optic canal was 21.1 mm. This study contributes to the relationship of important vascular, neural, bone and dural layers of this region and also demonstrates the variations of ACP by means of microsurgical dissections and radiological examinations.

  14. The localization and morphology of pterion in adult West Anatolian skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Funda; Akyer, Sahika Pınar; Kale, Ayşin; Geylan, Serdar; Gayretli, Ozcan

    2014-07-01

    The pterion is an important skull landmark because it is located where the frontal, the great wing of sphenoid, parietal, and squamous parts of the temporal bone junction. The objectives of this study were to determine the localization and the shape of pterion on skulls and to find out the distances between the pterion and some certain anatomic landmarks on neighboring structures. The study was performed on the skulls of 128 (256 sides) adult West Anatolian people. All of the morphometric measurements of the distances between the pterion and the anatomic landmarks were performed using a Vernier caliper with an accuracy of 0.1 mm. The pterion was classified into 4 types: the sphenoparietal, frontotemporal, stellate, or epipteric types. The incidences of types of pterion in the skulls were also found as the sphenoparietal type (85.2%), the epipteric type (8.2%), the stellate type (5.5%), and the frontotemporal type (1.1%). The mean (SD) distances from the center of the pterion to the zygomatic arch were measured as 40.02 (4.06) mm and 39.88 (4.01) mm; to the frontozygomatic suture, 31.80 (4.51) mm and 31.44 (4.73) mm; to the zygomatic angle, 41.54 (4.95) mm and 41.35 (5.14) mm; to the mastoid process, 82.48 (5.45) mm and 81.81 (5.50) mm; and to the external acoustic meatus, 53.29 (4.55) mm and 56.22 (4.60) mm, on the right and left sides, respectively. The mean (SD) distances between the foremost point of pterion and the anterior edge of the lateral wall of the orbit were 31.02 (5.78) mm and 32.31 (5.79) mm on the right and left sides, respectively. The localization and the shape of pterion are of importance because it is an anatomic landmark and should be of use in surgical approaches and interventions via the pterion.

  15. Leonardo da Vinci's "A skull sectioned": skull and dental formula revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, Peter O; Veening, Jan G

    2013-05-01

    What can be learned from historical anatomical drawings and how to incorporate these drawings into anatomical teaching? The drawing "A skull sectioned" (RL 19058v) by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), hides more detailed information than reported earlier. A well-chosen section cut explores sectioned paranasal sinuses and ductus nasolacrimalis. A dissected lateral wall of the maxilla is also present. Furthermore, at the level of the foramen mentale, the drawing displays compact and spongious bony components, together with a cross-section through the foramen mentale and its connection with the canalis mandibulae. Leonardo was the first to describe a correct dental formula (6424) and made efforts to place this formula above the related dental elements. However, taking into account, the morphological features of the individual elements of the maxilla, it can be suggested that Leonardo sketched a "peculiar dental element" on the position of the right maxillary premolar in the dental sketch. The fact that the author did not make any comment on that special element is remarkable. Leonardo could have had sufficient knowledge of the precise morphology of maxillary and mandibular premolars, since the author depicted these elements in the dissected skull. The fact that the author also had access to premolars in situ corroborates our suggestion that "something went wrong" in this part of the drawing. The present study shows that historical anatomical drawings are very useful for interactive learning of detailed anatomy for students in medicine and dentistry. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-based Evaluation of the Anterior Teeth Position Changes obtained by Passive Self-ligating Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Fernando K; Maltagliati, Liliana Á; de Castro Ferreira Conti, Ana C; Almeida-Pedrin, Renata R; Filho, Leopoldino C; de Almeida Cardoso, Maurício

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the anterior teeth position changes obtained by passive self-ligating brackets using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty patients with a mean age of 16.5 years, class I malocclusion, constricted maxillary arch, and teeth crowding above 5 mm were enrolled in this study, and treated by passive orthodontic self-ligating brackets. A sequence of stainless steel thermoset wire was implemented with ending wire of 0.019" × 0.025". The CBCT and dental casts were obtained prior to the installation of orthodontic appliances (T1), and 30 days after rectangular steel wire 0.019" × 0.025" installation (T2). The measurements in CBCT were performed with the Anatomage software, and the dental casts were evaluated with a digital caliper rule with an accuracy of 0.01 mm. The CBCT data demonstrated mean buccal inclination of the upper and lower central incisors ranging from 6.55° to 7.24° respectively. The upper and lower lateral incisors ranged from 4.90° to 8.72° respectively. The lower canines showed an average increase of 3.88° in the buccal inclination and 1.96 mm in the transverse intercuspal distance. The upper canines showed a negative inclination with mean average of -0.36°, and an average increase of 0.82 mm in the transverse distance, with negative correlation with the initial crowding. Treatment with passive self-ligating brackets without obtaining spaces increases buccal inclination of the upper and lower incisors with no correlation with the amount of initial teeth crowding. The intercanine distance tends to a small increase showing different inclinations between the arches. When taking into account the self-ligating brackets, the amount of initial dental crowding is not a limitation factor that could increase the buccal inclination of the anterior teeth.

  17. Lesion in Scalp and Skull as the First Manifestation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most common primary tumor of the liver and the fifth most common cancer in the world. The lungs, bone, and lymph nodes are frequent sites of metastasis of HCC. The purpose of the present study is show that metastases, although rare, must be among the differential diagnosis of skin lesions and that a diagnostic research based on these findings can be conducted. The authors report a rare case of metastatic hepatocellular injury to the scalp and skull treated by a radical surgical approach. Excision of the lesion in the scalp was performed “en bloc.” The tumor was supplied by the frontal branch of the superficial temporal artery. There are few case reports of metastatic HCC to scalp and skull; treatment of these lesions should be individualized in order to control symptoms, improve quality of life, and promote an increase in survival.

  18. The Traveling Optical Scanner – Case Study on 3D Shape Models of Ancient Brazilian Skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinderup, Camilla Himmelstrup; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Gregersen, Kristian Murphy

    2016-01-01

    , inoffensive and inexpensive 3D scanning modality based on structured light, suitable for capturing the morphology and the appearance of specimens. Benefits of having 3D models are manifold. The 3D models are easy to share among researchers and can be made available to the general public. Advanced...... morphological modelling is possible with accurate description of the specimens provided by the models. Furthermore, performing studies on models reduces the risk of damage to the original specimen. In our work we employ a high resolution structured light scanner for digitalizing a collection of 8500 year old...... human skulls from Brazil. To evaluate the precision of our setup we compare the structured light scan to micro-CT and achieve submillimetre difference. We analyse morphological features of the Brazilian skulls using manual landmarks, but a research goal is to automate this, fully utilize the dense 3D...

  19. [Mini-orbitozygomatic craniotomy in surgery for supratentorial aneurysms and tumors of the anterior and middle cranial fossae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhindzhikhadze, R S; Dreval', O N; Lazarev, V A; Kambiev, R L

    2016-01-01

    Progress in microneurosurgical techniques, neuroanesthesiology, and intraoperative imaging enables surgery using small incisions and craniotomy, in accordance with the keyhole surgery concept. Supraorbital craniotomy is the most widespread minimally invasive approach. There are a number of supraorbital craniotomy modifications, regarding different soft tissue incisions and the extent of craniotomy. We present the first results of using mini-orbitozygomatic craniotomy for aneurysms of the anterior circle of Willis and space-occupying lesions of the anterior and middle cranial fossae performed through an eyebrow incision. Forty five patients were operated on using mini-orbitozygomatic (MOZ) craniotomy in the period between March 2014 and December 2015. Fifteen supratentorial aneurysms were clipped, and 30 space-occupying lesions were resected. Most patients had unruptured aneurysms (10 patients). Five patients had a history of SAH. The aneurysm localization was as follows: 8 anterior communicating artery aneurysms, 4 aneurysms of the internal carotid artery in the area of the posterior communicating artery orifice, and 3 ophthalmic aneurysms. The Hunt-Hess scale was used to evaluate the patients' condition, and the Fisher scale was used to quantify SAH volume. Surgery was performed 14 days after SAH, on average. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was the diagnostic method of choice in a group of patients with space-occupying lesions within the anterior and middle cranial fossae. In some cases, patients underwent CT with reconstruction for assessment of the skull base bone structures. The mean age of patients was 58.3 years. All aneurysms were completely excluded from the cerebral blood flow. No serious complications and deaths in a group of aneurysm patients occurred. Complete tumor removal was performed in 28 patients. Two patients having pituitary macroadenomas with supra- and parasellar spread underwent subtotal resection due to adenoma invasion into the cavernous

  20. Comparative analysis of the anterior and posterior length and deflection angle of the cranial base, in individuals with facial Pattern I, II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Thiesen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the variations in the anterior cranial base (S-N, posterior cranial base (S-Ba and deflection of the cranial base (SNBa among three different facial patterns (Pattern I, II and III. METHOD: A sample of 60 lateral cephalometric radiographs of Brazilian Caucasian patients, both genders, between 8 and 17 years of age was selected. The sample was divided into 3 groups (Pattern I, II and III of 20 individuals each. The inclusion criteria for each group were the ANB angle, Wits appraisal and the facial profile angle (G'.Sn.Pg'. To compare the mean values obtained from (SNBa, S-N, S-Ba each group measures, the ANOVA test and Scheffé's Post-Hoc test were applied. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference for the deflection angle of the cranial base among the different facial patterns (Patterns I, II and III. There was no significant difference for the measures of the anterior and posterior cranial base between the facial Patterns I and II. The mean values for S-Ba were lower in facial Pattern III with statistically significant difference. The mean values of S-N in the facial Pattern III were also reduced, but without showing statistically significant difference. This trend of lower values in the cranial base measurements would explain the maxillary deficiency and/or mandibular prognathism features that characterize the facial Pattern III.OBJETIVO: o presente estudo avaliou as variações da base craniana anterior (S-N, base craniana posterior (S-Ba, e ângulo de deflexão da base do crânio (SNBa entre três diferentes padrões faciais (Padrão I, II e III. MÉTODOS: selecionou-se uma amostra de 60 telerradiografias em norma lateral de pacientes brasileiros leucodermas, de ambos os sexos, com idades entre 8 anos e 17 anos. A amostra foi dividida em três grupos (Padrão I, II e III, sendo cada grupo constituído de 20 indivíduos. Os critérios de seleção dos indivíduos para cada grupo

  1. Frequency of extradural haematoma in patients with linear skull fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb, A.; Afridi, E.A.K.; Khan, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Apparently normal looking patients after traumatic brain injury can have serious neurological deterioration, and one of the common causes of such deterioration is extradural haematomas. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of extradural hematoma and common types of trauma leading to it among patients presenting with skull fracture due to head injury. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Neurosurgery Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from June 2011 to June 2012. All patients who were suspected to have Skull fracture on X-ray skull, during the study period, were included in study after informed consent and later on CT-Scan brain was done to see for extradural hematoma. Findings were recorded on a predesigned proforma including demographic data, radiological findings and the type of head trauma. Results: Out of 114 patients 85 (74.5%) were males and 29 (225.4%) were females. Age ranged from 2 to 70 years (18.23 ± 16.5 years). Among these patients the most important cause of head injury was fall from height in 65(57%), followed by road traffic accidents in 39 (34.2%), and assault in 10 (8.8%) patients. The most common site of fracture was parietal in 49 (43%) of patients, followed by frontal bone in 28 (24.6%) of patients, occipital bone in 24 (21.1%) of patients, and temporal bone in 23 (20.2%) of patients. Frequency of extradural hematoma among linear skull fracture was in 34 (29.8%) patients. Extradural hematoma was most common with parietotemporal linear skull fractures (73.5%). Conclusion: Extradural haematoma occurs commonly with linear skull fractures, so patients with linear skull fracture should be properly evaluated with CT brain. (author)

  2. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  3. Geometric morphometric analysis of skull morphology reveals loss of phylogenetic signal at the generic level in extant lagomorphs (Mammalia: Lagomorpha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deyan Ge, D.; Yao, L.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Q.

    2015-01-01

    The intergeneric phylogeny of Lagomorpha had been controversial for a long time before a robust phylogeny was reconstructed based on seven nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences. However, skull morphology of several endemic genera remained poorly understood. The morphology of supraorbital processes

  4. Morphological convergence in ‘river dolphin’ skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Page

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Convergent evolution can provide insights into the predictability of, and constraints on, the evolution of biodiversity. One striking example of convergence is seen in the ‘river dolphins’. The four dolphin genera that make up the ‘river dolphins’ (Inia geoffrensis, Pontoporia blainvillei, Platanista gangetica and Lipotes vexillifer do not represent a single monophyletic group, despite being very similar in morphology. This has led many to using the ‘river dolphins’ as an example of convergent evolution. We investigate whether the skulls of the four ‘river dolphin’ genera are convergent when compared to other toothed dolphin taxa in addition to identifying convergent cranial and mandibular features. We use geometric morphometrics to uncover shape variation in the skulls of the ‘river dolphins’ and then apply a number of phylogenetic techniques to test for convergence. We find significant convergence in the skull morphology of the ‘river dolphins’. The four genera seem to have evolved similar skull shapes, leading to a convergent morphotype characterised by elongation of skull features. The cause of this morphological convergence remains unclear. However, the features we uncover as convergent, in particular elongation of the rostrum, support hypotheses of shared feeding mode or diet and thus provide the foundation for future work into convergence within the Odontoceti.

  5. The Analysis of Plantar Pressure Data Based on Multimodel Method in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency during Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The movement information of the human body can be recorded in the plantar pressure data, and the analysis of plantar pressure data can be used to judge whether the human body motion function is normal or not. A two-meter footscan® system was used to collect the plantar pressure data, and the kinetic and dynamic gait characteristics were extracted. According to the different description of gait characteristics, a set of models was established according to various people to present the movement of lower limbs. By the introduction of algorithm in machine learning, the FCM clustering algorithm is used to cluster the sample set and create a set of models, and then the SVM algorithm was used to identify the new samples, so as to complete the normal and abnormal motion function identification. The multimodel presented in this paper was carried out into the analysis of the anterior cruciate ligament deficiency. This method demonstrated being effective and can provide auxiliary analysis for clinical diagnosis.

  6. IMU-based Real-time Pose Measurement system for Anterior Pelvic Plane in Total Hip Replacement Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe Cao; Shaojie Su; Hao Tang; Yixin Zhou; Zhihua Wang; Hong Chen

    2017-07-01

    With the aging of population, the number of Total Hip Replacement Surgeries (THR) increased year by year. In THR, inaccurate position of the implanted prosthesis may lead to the failure of the operation. In order to reduce the failure rate and acquire the real-time pose of Anterior Pelvic Plane (APP), we propose a measurement system in this paper. The measurement system includes two parts: Initial Pose Measurement Instrument (IPMI) and Real-time Pose Measurement Instrument (RPMI). IPMI is used to acquire the initial pose of the APP, and RPMI is used to estimate the real-time pose of the APP. Both are composed of an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and magnetometer sensors. To estimate the attitude of the measurement system, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is adopted in this paper. The real-time pose of the APP could be acquired together with the algorithm designed in the paper. The experiment results show that the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) is within 1.6 degrees, which meets the requirement of THR operations.

  7. Verifying three-dimensional skull model reconstruction using cranial index of symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Woon-Man; Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Lin, Chung-Hsiang; Lu, Yu-Mei; Chen, Tzu-Hsuan; Lin, Muh-Shi

    2013-01-01

    Difficulty exists in scalp adaptation for cranioplasty with customized computer-assisted design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) implant in situations of excessive wound tension and sub-cranioplasty dead space. To solve this clinical problem, the CAD/CAM technique should include algorithms to reconstruct a depressed contour to cover the skull defect. Satisfactory CAM-derived alloplastic implants are based on highly accurate three-dimensional (3-D) CAD modeling. Thus, it is quite important to establish a symmetrically regular CAD/CAM reconstruction prior to depressing the contour. The purpose of this study is to verify the aesthetic outcomes of CAD models with regular contours using cranial index of symmetry (CIS). From January 2011 to June 2012, decompressive craniectomy (DC) was performed for 15 consecutive patients in our institute. 3-D CAD models of skull defects were reconstructed using commercial software. These models were checked in terms of symmetry by CIS scores. CIS scores of CAD reconstructions were 99.24±0.004% (range 98.47-99.84). CIS scores of these CAD models were statistically significantly greater than 95%, identical to 99.5%, but lower than 99.6% (ppairs signed rank test). These data evidenced the highly accurate symmetry of these CAD models with regular contours. CIS calculation is beneficial to assess aesthetic outcomes of CAD-reconstructed skulls in terms of cranial symmetry. This enables further accurate CAD models and CAM cranial implants with depressed contours, which are essential in patients with difficult scalp adaptation.

  8. A modification of the bisecting-angle technique for anterior periapical dental radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsour, P A

    1986-10-01

    A modification of the standard bisecting-angle technique for periapical views of incisor teeth is presented. The technique involves a constant x-ray cone position, which is perpendicular to the floor for maxillary incisors and parallel to the floor for mandibular incisors. The periapical film is held between the incisor teeth as if it were an occlusal film for all anterior periapical radiographs. Tracings from lateral skull radiographs, taken of dried skulls of various ages, were used to determine the optimal angle between the periapical film and the floor to produce a dimensionally accurate periapical view of the incisors. The technique is suggested as an alternative to the standard bisecting-angle technique and the parallel technique. It is intended for anterior periapical radiographs when clinical conditions make conventional techniques difficult. For example, it can be used in very young children, patients with gagging problems, and patients with narrow lower jaws or large muscular tongues.

  9. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  10. Sex estimation in forensic anthropology: skull versus postcranial elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradley, M Katherine; Jantz, Richard L

    2011-03-01

    When the pelvis is unavailable, the skull is widely considered the second best indicator of sex. The goals of this research are to provide an objective hierarchy of sexing effectiveness of cranial and postcranial elements and to test the widespread notion that the skull is superior to postcranial bones. We constructed both univariate and multivariate discriminant models using data from the Forensic Anthropology Data Bank. Discriminating effectiveness was assessed by cross-validated classification, and in the case of multivariate models, Mahalanobis D(2). The results clearly indicate that most postcranial elements outperform the skull in estimating sex. It is possible to correctly sex 88-90% of individuals with joint size, up to 94% with multivariate models of the postcranial bones. The best models for the cranium do not exceed 90%. We conclude that postcranial elements are to be preferred to the cranium for estimating sex when the pelvis is unavailable. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. The ecological origins of snakes as revealed by skull evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Filipe O; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Savriama, Yoland; Ollonen, Joni; Mahlow, Kristin; Herrel, Anthony; Müller, Johannes; Di-Poï, Nicolas

    2018-01-25

    The ecological origin of snakes remains amongst the most controversial topics in evolution, with three competing hypotheses: fossorial; marine; or terrestrial. Here we use a geometric morphometric approach integrating ecological, phylogenetic, paleontological, and developmental data for building models of skull shape and size evolution and developmental rate changes in squamates. Our large-scale data reveal that whereas the most recent common ancestor of crown snakes had a small skull with a shape undeniably adapted for fossoriality, all snakes plus their sister group derive from a surface-terrestrial form with non-fossorial behavior, thus redirecting the debate toward an underexplored evolutionary scenario. Our comprehensive heterochrony analyses further indicate that snakes later evolved novel craniofacial specializations through global acceleration of skull development. These results highlight the importance of the interplay between natural selection and developmental processes in snake origin and diversification, leading first to invasion of a new habitat and then to subsequent ecological radiations.

  12. Torsional Appearance of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Explaining "Ribbon" and Double-Bundle Concepts: A Cadaver-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noailles, Thibaut; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Sanchez, Matthieu; Beaufils, Philippe; Pujol, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) torsion in 90° knee flexion on the morphological appearance of the ACL. Sixty knees from fresh frozen anatomical specimens were dissected. Eighteen knees were excluded according to selection criteria (torn ACL, mucoid degeneration of the ACL, arthritic lesions of the notch, or knees harboring synovial inflammatory pathologies). After the removal of the synovial membrane, the morphology of the ligamentous fibers of the ACL and the twist were analyzed. Twisting of the ACL was measured using a goniometer in 90° knee flexion and defined by the angle of external rotation of the femur on the axis of the tibia required to visualize a flat ACL. The orientation of tibial and femoral footprint was described in a coronal plane for the tibia and a sagittal plane for the femur. In the 42 knees that were finally included, the ACL was always displayed as a single ribbon-like structure. The torsion of the fibers was on average 83.6° (± 9.4°) in 90° knee flexion. The twisting could be explained by the different orientations of the femoral (vertical in a sagittal plane) and tibial (horizontal in a coronal plane) footprints. An intraligamentous proximal cleavage area was encountered in 11 cases (i.e., 26%). The ACL is a twisted structure with 83.6° of external torsion of fibers in 90° knee flexion. It is the torsion in the fibers, due to the relative position of bone insertions, which gives the ACL the appearance of being double bundle. The concept of the torsional flat structure of the native ACL may be of importance during ACL reconstruction, both in terms of graft choice (flat rather than cylindrical) and of technical positioning (torsion). Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The relationship between skull asymmetry and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamori, Yuriko; Yuge, Mariko; Kanda, Toyoko; Ashida, Hiromi; Fukase, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between brain damage and skull asymmetry or supine head position preference, we classified CT findings of 330 cases with cerebral palsy or risk of motor disturbance into 6 groups according to skull shape. Those were severe (I, n = 37) and mild (II, n = 114) grades in the right occipital flatness, severe (III, n = 34) and mild (IV, n = 58) grades in the left occipital flatness, long skull with temporal flatness (V, n = 33) and symmetric round skull (control, n = 54). It was considered that the asymmetry of cortical atrophy in appearance was formed physicaly by skull asymmetry but that the asymmetric dilatation in appearance of lateral ventricle was related to the asymmetry of brain damage. The severity and the asymmetry of brain damage were tend to increase the grade of skull asymmetry. The incidence of cases with the right occipital flatness was 1.6 times more frequently than the left sided. The incidence of cases whose left (lateral) ventricle was larger than the right was 4.1 times more than the cases whose right ventricle was larger than the left. The cases with occipital flatness in the contralateral side of the larger lateral ventricle were found more than the cases with occipital flatness in the ipsilateral side of the larger ventricle, that is to say, the direction of supine head position preference during early infant was suspected to be the more severely disturbed side of body. These results suggest that the supine head position preference to the right in newborn babies and infants with scoliosis or cerebral palsy might be the result of transient or permanent asymmetric (left > right) brain dysfunction. (author)

  14. Changes of anterior and posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth after SMILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the changes of anterior and posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth after small incision lenticule extraction(SMILEfor low and high myopic astigmatism. METHODS: Sixty-three cases(88 eyesundergone SMILE in our hospital were included. The patients were divided into two groups based on astigmatism degree: the Group A: -2.00D to -4.00D astigmatism, the Group B: -0.25D to -1.00D astigmatism. Patients were examined at 1wk, 1 and 3mo after operations. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, refraction, corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth were recorded. The change of anterior and posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth was compared. Spearman correlation analysis and independent t test were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Surgery was done well in all patients without complications. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth preoperatively, postoperatively 7d,1 and 3mo(P>0.05. One week postoperatively, the anterior corneal curvature was statistically significant from that of preoperative in both groups(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION: No significant change of anterior and posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth was found after SMILE for correcting low and high myopic astigmatism. One week after SMILE the anterior corneal curvature become stable.

  15. Robust skull stripping using multiple MR image contrasts insensitive to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Snehashis; Butman, John A; Pham, Dzung L

    2017-02-01

    Automatic skull-stripping or brain extraction of magnetic resonance (MR) images is often a fundamental step in many neuroimage processing pipelines. The accuracy of subsequent image processing relies on the accuracy of the skull-stripping. Although many automated stripping methods have been proposed in the past, it is still an active area of research particularly in the context of brain pathology. Most stripping methods are validated on T 1 -w MR images of normal brains, especially because high resolution T 1 -w sequences are widely acquired and ground truth manual brain mask segmentations are publicly available for normal brains. However, different MR acquisition protocols can provide complementary information about the brain tissues, which can be exploited for better distinction between brain, cerebrospinal fluid, and unwanted tissues such as skull, dura, marrow, or fat. This is especially true in the presence of pathology, where hemorrhages or other types of lesions can have similar intensities as skull in a T 1 -w image. In this paper, we propose a sparse patch based Multi-cONtrast brain STRipping method (MONSTR), 2 where non-local patch information from one or more atlases, which contain multiple MR sequences and reference delineations of brain masks, are combined to generate a target brain mask. We compared MONSTR with four state-of-the-art, publicly available methods: BEaST, SPECTRE, ROBEX, and OptiBET. We evaluated the performance of these methods on 6 datasets consisting of both healthy subjects and patients with various pathologies. Three datasets (ADNI, MRBrainS, NAMIC) are publicly available, consisting of 44 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with schizophrenia. Other three in-house datasets, comprising 87 subjects in total, consisted of patients with mild to severe traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, and various movement disorders. A combination of T 1 -w, T 2 -w were used to skull-strip these datasets. We show significant improvement in stripping

  16. Country of my skull/Skull of my country: Krog and Zagajewski, South Africa and Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. van Schalkwyk

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the ninth poem of the cycle “land van genade en verdriet” (“country of grace and sorrow” in the collection “Kleur kom nooit alleen nie” (“Colour never comes on its own”, Antjie Krog contends that the old is “stinking along” ever so cheerfully/ robustly in the new South African dispensation. This could also hold true for the new democratic Poland. Krog and the Polish poet Adam Zagajewksi could, in fact, be described as “intimate strangers”, specifically with regard to the mirrored imagery of “country of my skull”/“skull of my country” present in their work. The notion of “intimate strangers” may be seen as pointing toward the feminine dimension of subjectivity, which could be elaborated along the lines of Bracha Ettinger’s concept of “matrixial borderlinking”. Ettinger has made a significant contribution to the field of psychoanalysis, building on Freud and Lacan. She investigates the subject’s relation to the m/Other, and the intimate matrixial sharing of “phantasm”, “jouissance” and trauma among several entities. Critical of the conventional “phallic” paradigm, Ettinger turns to the womb in exploring the “borderlinking” of the I and the non-I within the matrix (the psychic creative “borderspace”. With these considerations as point of departure, and with specific reference to the closing poem in Krog’s “Country of my skull” and Zagajewski’s “Fire” (both exploring “weaning” experiences in recent personal and public history, I intend to show how the public/political is connected to the personal/psychological, and vice versa, and how committed literary works like those of Krog and Zagajewski can be clarified further from a psychoanalytical perspective. The image of the skull in the texts under scrutiny is investigated with recourse to the Lacanian notion of the “cavity”, as adopted and adapted by Ettinger. True to the mirror experience as described within

  17. Single-layer skull approximations perform well in transcranial direct current stimulation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampersad, S.M.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2013-01-01

    In modeling the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation, the representation of the skull is an important factor. In a spherical model, we compared a realistic skull modeling approach, in which the skull consisted of three isotropic layers, to anisotropic and isotropic single-layer

  18. The Influence of Evidence-Based Surgical Indications and Techniques on Failure Rates After Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization in the Contact or Collision Athlete With Anterior Shoulder Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Timothy S; Saltzman, Bryan M; Meyer, Maximilian; Frank, Rachel M; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-04-01

    It has been reported that arthroscopic shoulder stabilization yields higher rates of failure in contact or collision athletes as compared with open shoulder stabilization; however, this is largely based upon studies that do not employ modern, evidence-based surgical indications and techniques for arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. To (1) determine the pooled failure rate across all studies reporting failure after primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization for anterior shoulder instability in contact or collision athletes and (2) stratify failure rates according to studies that use evidence-based surgical indications and techniques. Systematic review. A review of PubMed, Medline, and Embase was performed to identify all clinical studies with a minimum of 1-year follow-up that reported failure rates after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization for anterior shoulder instability in contact or collision athletes. Data pertaining to patient demographics, clinical and radiographic preoperative assessment, surgical indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and outcome were collected from each included study. An overall failure rate was determined across all included studies. After this, a secondary literature review was performed to identify factors related to patient selection and surgical technique that significantly influence failure after primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Failure rates were then determined among included studies that used these evidence-based indications and techniques. Overall, 26 studies reporting on 779 contact or collision athletes met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 19.9 years, 90.3% were male, and the most common sport was rugby. There was considerable variability in the reporting of patient demographics, preoperative assessment, surgical indications, surgical technique, and patient outcomes. Across all included studies, the pooled failure rate after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization in the contact or

  19. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  20. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thighbone where the kneecap normally rests is too shallow. You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  1. Identifying anterior segment crystals.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, I W; Brooks, A M; Reinehr, D P; Grant, G B; Gillies, W E

    1991-01-01

    A series of 22 patients with crystals in the anterior segment of the eye was examined by specular microscopy. Of 10 patients with hypermature cataract and hyperrefringent bodies in the anterior chamber cholesterol crystals were identified in four patients and in six of the 10 in whom aspirate was obtained cholesterol crystals were demonstrated in three, two of these having shown crystals on specular microscopy. In 10 patients with intracorneal crystalline deposits, cholesterol crystals were f...

  2. Comparative skull osteology of Karsenia koreana (Amphibia, Caudata, Plethodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, David; Wake, Marvalee H; Wake, David B

    2010-05-01

    The recent discovery of a plethodontid salamander, Karsenia koreana, in Korea challenged our understanding of the biogeographic history of the family Plethodontidae, by far the largest family of salamanders, which otherwise is distributed in the New World with a few European species. Molecular studies suggest that Karsenia forms a clade with Hydromantes (sensu lato), which includes among its species the only other Old World plethodontids. We studied the skull of K. koreana and compared it with that of other plethodontid genera, especially members of the subfamily Plethodontinae, which it resembles most closely in general anatomy. The anatomy of its skull corresponds to the most generalized and apparently ancestral condition for plethodontids. No clearly autapomorphic states were detected, and no synapomorphies can be found that would link it to other genera. The Karsenia skull is cylindrical and well ossified, giving an impression of strength. In contrast, the skull of Hydromantes is highly derived; the skull is flattened and the bones are weakly ossified and articulated. Hydromantes and Karsenia share no unique anatomical features; differences between them are especially evident in the hyobranchial skeleton, which is generalized in Karsenia but highly modified in Hydromantes, which is well known for its highly projectile tongue. Plethodon and Plethodon-like species, including Karsenia and to a lesser degree Ensatina, represent the more generalized and apparently ancestral plethodontid morphology. Specialized morphologies have evolved along only a few morphological axes within the Plethodontidae, resulting in a pattern of rampant homoplasy. Our analysis of the anatomy of the new Asiatic lineage illuminates some potential mechanisms underlying adaptive morphological evolution within the Plethodontidae. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagstrum, Jonathon T.; Firestone, Richard B; West, Allen; Stefanka, Zsolt; Revay, Zsolt

    2010-02-03

    We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites imbedded in seven late Pleistocene Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull. The micrometeorites apparently shattered on impact leaving 2 to 5 mm hemispherical debris patterns surrounded by carbonized rings. Multiple impacts are observed on only one side of the tusks and skull consistent with the micrometeorites having come from a single direction. The impact sites are strongly magnetic indicating significant iron content. We analyzed several imbedded micrometeorite fragments from both tusks and skull with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These analyses confirm the high iron content and indicate compositions highly enriched in nickel and depleted in titanium, unlike any natural terrestrial sources. In addition, electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain (tusk 2) show it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) of a particle extracted from the bison skull indicates ~;;0.4 mg of iron, in agreement with a micrometeorite ~;;1 mm in diameter. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and XRF analyses of the skull show possible entry channels containing Fe-rich material. The majority of tusks (5/7) have a calibrated weighted mean 14C age of 32.9 +- 1.8 ka BP, which coincides with the onset of significant declines<36 ka ago in Beringian bison, horse, brown bear, and mammoth populations, as well as in mammoth genetic diversity. It appears likely that the impacts and population declines are related events, although their precise nature remains to be determined.

  4. Typical external skull beveling wound unlinked with a gunshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Y; Colard, T; Becart, A; Tournel, G; Gosset, D; Hedouin, V

    2013-03-10

    Lesions of the cranial vault resulting from firearms are traditionally described in forensic medical literature with many reports illustrating atypical bone lesions carried out to the skull by gunshot wounds. The authors present this report which illustrates an external beveled skull wound, associated with internal beveling damage, caused by a stabbing injury. A partially buried human skeleton was found in a forest. The examining of the skull revealed a hole resembling the exit wound caused by a bullet and two other smaller stab wounds. No typical entering bullet wound and no other bone lesions were found. During the course of the investigation, one of the perpetrators admitted to hitting the victim, using a sickle, and to hiding the body. For this purpose, he dragged the corpse with the sickle still implanted in the skull, using it as a hook. Upon retrieving the sickle, a piece of cranial vault was removed, thus creating an external beveled wound. In order to identify the mechanism which brought about this kind of lesion, experimental work was carried out on a human skull. In this particular case, the tip of the sickle penetrated into the bone, creating a lesion that would typically be produced with a stabbing instrument when applied with vertical force. When the body was dragged, using the sickle as a hook, this was a hand-produced vertical force, which was applied in the opposite direction. It caused the tearing of a piece of bone and the creation of an outer bevel. This atypical lesion should be made known to medical examiners and pathologists in order to help investigating and understanding of the circumstances of injuries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anterior Impingement Syndrome of the Ankle Caused by Osteoid Osteoma in the Talar Neck Treated with Arthroscopy and 3D C-Arm-Based Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masachika Ikegami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma in periarticular lesions tends to have an unusual presentation that likely leads to a delayed or missed diagnosis compared with a typical osteoid osteoma in the metaphysis or diaphysis of the long bone. In cases that are unresponsive to conservative treatment, surgical interventions including en bloc resection, computed tomography-guided percutaneous treatment, and arthroscopic resection have been performed; however, these methods frequently result in inadequate tumor resection and recurrence. Here we present a case of a 16-year-old girl with osteoid osteoma in the talar neck presenting as anterior impingement syndrome due to marked synovitis in the ankle joint which was successfully treated without complications by arthroscopic synovectomy and tumor resection followed by intraoperative 3D C-arm-based imaging confirming complete tumor lesion removal. Her pain was relieved immediately after the surgery, and there was no recurrence at 12 months of follow-up. This is the first case report of the surgical treatment of the osteoid osteoma in the talar neck with the combination methods of arthroscopy and 3D C-arm-based imaging.

  6. Upper anterior zone restoration with composites

    OpenAIRE

    Lamas Lara, César; CD, Docente del Área de Operatoria Dental y Endodoncia de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Angulo de la Vega, Giselle; CD, Alumna de la Especialidad de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    The anterior sector problems are very common in our professional practice and became vital importance to make a suitable rehabilitation in these cases; we can not do a good rehabilitation if we do not know the basic characteristics, both aesthetic and functional. Today the composites are a valid alternative for the restoration of the anterior sector, since they offer to us a conservative and aesthetic possibility, but independently of the material to use we have to based on certain rules or p...

  7. Lengths of the maxillary central incisor, the nasal bone, and the anterior cranial base in different skeletal malocclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arntsen, Torill; Kjær, Inger; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2009-01-01

    malocclusions. Material and methods . Incisor, nasal, and cranial base lengths were measured on lateral radiographs of adult patients with skeletal malocclusions, including open bite (n=35), mandibular overjet (n=56), maxillary overjet (n=31), deep bite (n=19), and compared with those of a control group...... with neutral occlusion and normal craniofacial morphology (n=39). Two-way ANOVA tests were used to evaluate differences in lengths between groups and gender. Results. Statistically shorter maxillary central incisor length was found in the open bite group (p....001), and in the deep bite group (p

  8. Surgical versus conservative treatment for high-risk stress fractures of the lower leg (anterior tibial cortex, navicular and fifth metatarsal base): a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallee, Wouter H.; Weel, Hanneke; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine

    2015-01-01

    To compare surgical and conservative treatment for high-risk stress fractures of the anterior tibial cortex, navicular and proximal fifth metatarsal. Systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and PEDro were performed to identify relevant prospective and retrospective

  9. Foraging Value, Risk Avoidance, and Multiple Control Signals: How the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Controls Value-based Decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua W; Alexander, William H

    2017-10-01

    Recent work on the role of the ACC in cognition has focused on choice difficulty, action value, risk avoidance, conflict resolution, and the value of exerting control among other factors. A main underlying question is what are the output signals of ACC, and relatedly, what is their effect on downstream cognitive processes? Here we propose a model of how ACC influences cognitive processing in other brain regions that choose actions. The model builds on the earlier Predicted Response Outcome model and suggests that ACC learns to represent specifically the states in which the potential costs or risks of an action are high, on both short and long timescales. It then uses those cost signals as a basis to bias decisions to minimize losses while maximizing gains. The model simulates both proactive and reactive control signals and accounts for a variety of empirical findings regarding value-based decision-making.

  10. Urban-Rural Differences in Eye, Bill, and Skull Allometry in House Finches (Haemorhous mexicanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Pierce; McGraw, Kevin J

    2016-12-01

    Allometry, the proportional scaling of log trait size with log body size, evolves to optimize allocation to growth of separate structures and is a major constraint on the functional limits of animal traits. While there are many studies demonstrating the rigidity of allometry across traits and taxa, comparatively less work has been done on allometric variation across environments within species. Rapidly changing environments, such as cities, may be prime systems for studying the flexibility of allometry because they uniquely alter many environmental parameters (e.g., habitat, light, noise). We studied size variation, allometry, and allometric dispersion of craniofacial traits in both sexes of urban and rural house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus) because many traits in the head are ecologically critical to the survival and acclimation of birds to their environment (e.g., brain: response to cognitive challenges; bill: foraging modes). We found that urban finches had shorter eye axial lengths and skull widths, but longer (but not wider or deeper) bills, than rural finches. Also, allometric slopes of eye, skull, and bill traits differed based on sex and environment. In the rural environment, females had a far steeper allometric slope for eye axial length than males, but such slopes were similar between males and females in the city. Skull allometry was similar for males and females in both environments, but urban birds had a shallower slope for skull length (but not width) than rural birds. Other traits only differed by sex (males had a steeper slope for bill width), and one trait did not differ based on either sex or environment (bill depth). The dispersion of points around the allometric line did not differ by sex or environment for any craniofacial variable. Due to the significant but low genetic divergence between urban and rural finch populations, allometric differences are probably largely driven by plastic forces. We suggest that differences in diet and cognitive

  11. Verifying three-dimensional skull model reconstruction using cranial index of symmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woon-Man Kung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Difficulty exists in scalp adaptation for cranioplasty with customized computer-assisted design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM implant in situations of excessive wound tension and sub-cranioplasty dead space. To solve this clinical problem, the CAD/CAM technique should include algorithms to reconstruct a depressed contour to cover the skull defect. Satisfactory CAM-derived alloplastic implants are based on highly accurate three-dimensional (3-D CAD modeling. Thus, it is quite important to establish a symmetrically regular CAD/CAM reconstruction prior to depressing the contour. The purpose of this study is to verify the aesthetic outcomes of CAD models with regular contours using cranial index of symmetry (CIS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 2011 to June 2012, decompressive craniectomy (DC was performed for 15 consecutive patients in our institute. 3-D CAD models of skull defects were reconstructed using commercial software. These models were checked in terms of symmetry by CIS scores. RESULTS: CIS scores of CAD reconstructions were 99.24±0.004% (range 98.47-99.84. CIS scores of these CAD models were statistically significantly greater than 95%, identical to 99.5%, but lower than 99.6% (p<0.001, p = 0.064, p = 0.021 respectively, Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test. These data evidenced the highly accurate symmetry of these CAD models with regular contours. CONCLUSIONS: CIS calculation is beneficial to assess aesthetic outcomes of CAD-reconstructed skulls in terms of cranial symmetry. This enables further accurate CAD models and CAM cranial implants with depressed contours, which are essential in patients with difficult scalp adaptation.

  12. Mechanisms and situations of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in professional male soccer players: a YouTube-based video analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Alberto; Smiley, Stephen Paul; Roberti di Sarsina, Tommaso; Signorelli, Cecilia; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Bondi, Alice; Romagnoli, Matteo; Agostini, Alessandra; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Soccer is considered the most popular sport in the world concerning both audience and athlete participation, and the incidence of ACL injury in this sport is high. The understanding of injury situations and mechanisms could be useful as substratum for preventive actions. To conduct a video analysis evaluating the situations and mechanisms of ACL injury in a homogeneous population of professional male soccer players, through a search entirely performed on the YouTube.com Web site focusing on the most recent years. A video analysis was conducted obtaining videos of ACL injury in professional male soccer players from the Web site YouTube. Details regarding injured players, events and situations were obtained. The mechanism of injury was defined on the basis of the action, duel type, contact or non-contact injury, and on the hip, knee and foot position. Thirty-four videos were analyzed, mostly from the 2014-2015 season. Injuries occurred mostly in the first 9 min of the match (26%), in the penalty area (32%) or near the side-lines (44%), and in non-rainy conditions (97%). Non-contact injuries occurred in 44% of cases, while indirect injuries occurred in 65%, mostly during pressing, dribbling or tackling. The most recurrent mechanism was with an abducted and flexed hip, with knee at first degrees of flexion and under valgus stress. Through a YouTube-based video analysis, it was possible to delineate recurrent temporal, spatial and mechanical characteristics of ACL injury in male professional soccer players. Level IV, case series.

  13. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Naftulin

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT collect three-dimensional data (3D that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM images to stereolithography (STL files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = <30 min. Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  14. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftulin, Jason S; Kimchi, Eyal Y; Cash, Sydney S

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  15. Hydrologic reconnaissance of Skull Valley, Tooele County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, James W.; Waddell, K.M.

    1968-01-01

    This report is the second in a series by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, which describes the water resources of the western basins of Utah. Its purpose is to present available hydrologic data on Skull Valley, to provide an evaluation of the potential water-resource development of the valley, and to identify needed studies that would help provide an understandingof the valley's water supply.

  16. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Sydney S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3–4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14–17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4–6 hr; printing = 9–11 hr, post-processing = Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1–5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes. PMID:26295459

  17. Does nasal echolocation influence the modularity of the mammal skull?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, S E; Lofgren, S E

    2013-11-01

    In vertebrates, changes in cranial modularity can evolve rapidly in response to selection. However, mammals have apparently maintained their pattern of cranial integration throughout their evolutionary history and across tremendous morphological and ecological diversity. Here, we use phylogenetic, geometric morphometric and comparative analyses to test the hypothesis that the modularity of the mammalian skull has been remodelled in rhinolophid bats due to the novel and critical function of the nasal cavity in echolocation. We predicted that nasal echolocation has resulted in the evolution of a third cranial module, the 'nasal dome', in addition to the braincase and rostrum modules, which are conserved across mammals. We also test for similarities in the evolution of skull shape in relation to habitat across rhinolophids. We find that, despite broad variation in the shape of the nasal dome, the integration of the rhinolophid skull is highly consistent with conserved patterns of modularity found in other mammals. Across their broad geographical distribution, cranial shape in rhinolophids follows two major divisions that could reflect adaptations to dietary and environmental differences in African versus South Asian distributions. Our results highlight the potential of a relatively simple modular template to generate broad morphological and functional variation in mammals. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  18. Ground truth data generation for skull-face overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, O; Cavalli, F; Campomanes-Álvarez, B R; Campomanes-Álvarez, C; Valsecchi, A; Huete, M I

    2015-05-01

    Objective and unbiased validation studies over a significant number of cases are required to get a more solid picture on craniofacial superimposition reliability. It will not be possible to compare the performance of existing and upcoming methods for craniofacial superimposition without a common forensic database available for the research community. Skull-face overlay is a key task within craniofacial superimposition that has a direct influence on the subsequent task devoted to evaluate the skull-face relationships. In this work, we present the procedure to create for the first time such a dataset. We have also created a database with 19 skull-face overlay cases for which we are trying to overcome legal issues that allow us to make it public. The quantitative analysis made in the segmentation and registration stages, together with the visual assessment of the 19 face-to-face overlays, allows us to conclude that the results can be considered as a gold standard. With such a ground truth dataset, a new horizon is opened for the development of new automatic methods whose performance could be now objectively measured and compared against previous and future proposals. Additionally, other uses are expected to be explored to better understand the visual evaluation process of craniofacial relationships in craniofacial identification. It could be very useful also as a starting point for further studies on the prediction of the resulting facial morphology after corrective or reconstructive interventionism in maxillofacial surgery.

  19. Preliminary report: The Little Skull Mountain earthquake, June 29, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.G.; Brune, J.N.; Polo, D. de; Savage, M.K.; Sheehan, A.F.; Smith, K.D.; Gomberg, J.; Harmsen, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Little Skull Mountain earthquake occurred about 20 km from the potential high level nuclear repository at Yucca Mountain. The magnitude was 5.6, and the focal mechanism indicates normal faulting on a northeast trending structure. There is evidence that the earthquake was triggered by the magnitude M S = 7.5 earthquake in Landers, California, which occurred less than 24 hours earlier. Preliminary locations of the hypocenter and several aftershocks define an L shaped pattern near the southern boundary of the Nevada Test Site. One arm trends to the northeast beneath Little Skull Mountain, and a shorter, more diffuse zone trends to the southeast. The aftershocks are mostly located at depths between 7 km and 11 km, and may suggest a southeast dipping plane. There is no clear correlation with previously mapped surface faulting. The strongest recorded acceleration is about 0.21 g at Lathrop Wells, Nevada, 15 km from the epicenter. An extensive network of aftershock recorders was installed by the Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, by the US Geological Survey, Golden, Colorado, and by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, California. Aftershock experiments are ongoing as of November, 1992, and include experiments to improve location, depth, focal mechanism, and stress drop, study basin and ridge response near the epicenter and at Midway Valley, and study response of a tunnel at Little Skull Mountain. Analysis of this data, which includes thousands of aftershocks, has only begun

  20. Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Surgery for Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: An MRI-Based Propensity-Score-Matched Analysis Using Data from the Prospective Multicenter AOSpine CSM North America and International Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, So; Nouri, Aria; Wu, Dongjin; Nori, Satoshi; Tetreault, Lindsay; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-06-21

    Surgeons often choose between 2 different approaches (anterior and posterior) for surgical treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy on the basis of imaging features of spinal cord compression, the number of levels affected, and the spinal alignment. However, there is a lack of consensus on which approach is preferable. The objective of the present study was to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based propensity-score-matched analysis to compare postoperative outcomes between the anterior and posterior surgical approaches for degenerative cervical myelopathy. A total of 757 patients were enrolled in 2 prospective multicenter AOSpine studies, which involved 26 international sites. Preoperative MRIs were reviewed to characterize the causes of the cord compression, including single-level disc disease, multilevel disc disease, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, enlargement of the ligamentum flavum, vertebral subluxation/spondylolisthesis, congenital fusion, number of compressed levels, or kyphosis. The propensity to choose anterior decompression was calculated using demographic data, preoperative MRI findings, and the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scores in a logistic regression model. We then performed 1-to-1 matching of patients who had received anterior decompression with those who had the same propensity sc