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Sample records for anterior lumbar interbody

  1. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Implants: Importance of the Interdevice Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Subach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. The implantation of interbody fusion cages allows for the restoration of disc height and the enlargement of the neuroforaminal space. The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of subsidence occurring after conventional cage placement compared to a novel wider cage placement technique. Methods. This study is a retrospective evaluation of radiographs of patients who underwent stand-alone single level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with lordotic titanium cages and rhBMP-2. Fifty-three patients were evaluated: 39 patients had wide cage placement (6 mm interdevice distance and 14 had narrow cage placement (2 mm interdevice distance. Anterior and posterior intervertebral disc space heights were measured post-operatively and at follow-up imaging. Results. The decrease in anterior intervertebral disc space height was 2.05 mm versus 3.92 mm (<.005 and 1.08 mm versus 3.06 mm in posterior disc space height for the wide cage placement and the narrow cage placement respectively. The proportion of patients with subsidence greater than 2 mm was 41.0% in the wide cage patients and 85.7% for the narrow cage patients (<.005. Conclusions. The wider cage placement significantly reduced the amount of subsidence while allowing for a greater exposed surface area for interbody fusion.

  2. Subsidence following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF): a prospective study.

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    Rao, Prashanth J; Phan, Kevin; Giang, Gloria; Maharaj, Monish M; Phan, Steven; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2017-06-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a widely used surgical technique for disorders of the lumbar spine. One potential complication is the subsidence of disc height in the post-operative period. Few studies have reported the rate of subsidence in ALIF surgery prospectively. We prospectively evaluated the rate of subsidence in adult patients undergoing ALIF. Results were obtained by reviewing scans of 147 patients. Disc heights were measured on radiographic scans taken pre-operatively in addition to post-operatively immediately, at 6 weeks and at 18 months. The anterior and posterior intervertebral disc heights were measured. Subsidence was defined as greater than or equal to 2 mm loss of height. A total of 15 patients (10.2%) had subsidence, with 7 being male. Each case was of delayed cage subsidence (DCS) >6 weeks postoperatively. The mean subsidence was 4.7 mm (range, 2.4-7.8). Mean anterior disc height was 8.6±0.4 mm preoperatively, which improved to 15.1±0.5 mm at latest follow-up. Mean posterior disc height was 4.7±0.2 mm preoperatively, which improved to 8.7±0.4 mm at latest follow-up. The mean lumbar lordosis (LL) angle was 42.5°±10.8° and the mean local disc angle (LDA) was 6.7°±4.0°. The 91.2% (n=114/125) of patients with appropriate radiological follow-up demonstrated fusion by latest follow-up. There was no correlation between subsidence rate with patient reported outcomes [Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form 12 Item survey (SF-12)] and fusion rates. There was a significant negative correlation between LL and extent of subsidence (Pearson correlation =-0.754, P=0.012). In conclusion, we found that the subsidence rate at follow-up was generally low following standalone ALIF for this patient series. Patient clinical outcomes and bony fusion rates were not significantly influenced by subsidence.

  3. Mini-open Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation Following Posterior Instrumentation.

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    Mamuti, Maiwulanjiang; Fan, Shunwu; Liu, Junhui; Shan, Zhi; Wang, Chongyan; Li, Shengyun; Zhao, Fengdong

    2016-09-15

    A retrospective study. The aim of this study is to evaluate, clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of mini-open retroperitoneal anterior lumbar discectomy followed by anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for recurrent lumbar disc herniation following primary posterior instrumentation. Recurrent disc herniation following previous disc surgery occurs in 5 to 15% of cases. This is often treated by further surgical intervention where posterior approach is generally preferred. However, posterior surgery may be problematic if the initial surgery involved posterior instrumentation. An anterior approach may be indicated in these patients, and recent findings suggest that a "mini-open" procedure may have some benefits when compared with traditional open techniques and their associated morbidities. A total of 35 recurrent lumbar disc herniation patients (10 male, 25 female) following primary posterior instrumentation with an average age of 52.8 years (range: 34-70 yrs) who underwent the mini-open ALIF procedures between August 2001 and February 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. The ALIF was performed at the levels L4-L5 (n = 14), L5-S1 (n = 15), or both L4-L5 and L5-S1 (n = 6). Visual Analog pain Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) together with radiological results were assessed. The mean operating time, intraoperative estimated blood loss, and hospital stay were 115 minutes, 70 mL, and 6 days, respectively. No blood transfusion was needed. Transient complication was recorded in two patients. Postoperative follow-up was a minimum 24.3 months. VAS score and ODI percentage decreased significantly from 7.9 ± 0.8 and 78.8% ± 12.4% pre-operatively to 1.4 ± 0.6 and 21.7 ± 4.2% at final follow-up, respectively. There was no neurological worsening and radicular pain improved significantly compared with pre-operation in all the patients. Computed tomographic reconstruction 12 and 24 months after surgery showed bony fusion

  4. Radiographic evaluation of indirect decompression of mini-open anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion: oblique lateral interbody fusion for degenerated lumbar spondylolisthesis.

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    Sato, Jun; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-03-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion provides minimally invasive treatment of spinal deformity, but complications including nerve and psoas muscle injury have been noted. To avoid nerve injury, mini-open anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion methods using an approach between the aorta and psoas, such as oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) have been applied. OLIF with percutaneous pedicle screws without posterior decompression can indirectly decompress the spinal canal in lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis. In the current study, we examined the radiographic and clinical efficacy of OLIF for lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis. We assessed 20 patients with lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis who underwent OLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation without posterior laminectomy. MR and CT images and clinical symptoms were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Cross sections of the spinal canal were evaluated with MRI, and disk height, cross-sectional areas of intervertebral foramina, and degree of upper vertebral slip were evaluated with CT. Clinical symptoms including low back pain, leg pain, and lower extremity numbness were evaluated using a visual analog scale and the Oswestry Disability Index before and 6 months after surgery. After surgery, significant increases in axial and sagittal spinal canal diameter (12 and 32 %), spinal canal area (19 %), disk height (61 %), and intervertebral foramen areas (21 % on the right side, 39 % on the left), and significant decrease of upper vertebral slip (-9 %) were found (P spondylolisthesis with back and leg symptoms.

  5. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion with integrated fixation and adjunctive posterior stabilization: A comparative biomechanical analysis.

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    Yeager, Matthew S; Dupre, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Oh, Michael Y; Altman, Daniel T; Cheng, Boyle C

    2015-10-01

    Interbody fusion cages with integrated fixation components have become of interest due to their ability to provide enhanced post-operative stability and mitigate device migration. A recently approved anterior lumbar interbody fusion cage with integrated fixation anchors has yet to be compared in vitro to a standard polyetheretherketone cage when used in combination with an interspinous process clamp. Twelve human cadaveric lumbar segments were implanted at L4-L5 with a Solus interbody cage (n=6) or standard polyetheretherketone cage (n=6) following Intact testing and discectomy. Each cage was subsequently evaluated in all primary modes of loading after supplementation with the following posterior constructs: interspinous process clamp, bilateral transfacet screws, unilateral transfacet screw with contralateral pedicle screws, and bilateral pedicle screws. Range of motion results were normalized to Intact, and a two-way mixed analysis of variance was utilized to detect statistical differences. The Solus cage in combination with all posterior constructs provided significant fixation compared to Intact in all loading conditions. The polyetheretherketone cage also provided significant fixation when combined with all screw based treatments, however when used with the interspinous process clamp a significant reduction was not observed in lateral bending or axial torsion. Interbody cages with integrated fixation components enhance post-operative stability within the intervertebral space, thus affording clinicians the potential to utilize less invasive methods of posterior stabilization when seeking circumferential fusion. Interspinous process clamps, in particular, may reduce peri-operative and post-operative comorbidities compared to screw based constructs. Further study is necessary to corroborate their effectiveness in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Preliminary results of anterior lumbar interbody fusion, anterior column realignment for the treatment of sagittal malalignment.

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    Hosseini, Pooria; Mundis, Gregory M; Eastlack, Robert K; Bagheri, Ramin; Vargas, Enrique; Tran, Stacie; Akbarnia, Behrooz A

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Sagittal malalignment decreases patients' quality of life and may require surgical correction to achieve realignment goals. High-risk posterior-based osteotomy techniques are the current standard treatment for addressing sagittal malalignment. More recently, anterior lumbar interbody fusion, anterior column realignment (ALIF ACR) has been introduced as an alternative for correction of sagittal deformity. The objective of this paper was to report clinical and radiographic results for patients treated using the ALIF-ACR technique. METHODS A retrospective study of 39 patients treated with ALIF ACR was performed. Patient demographics, operative details, radiographic parameters, neurological assessments, outcome measures, and preoperative, postoperative, and mean 1-year follow-up complications were studied. RESULTS The patient population comprised 39 patients (27 females and 12 males) with a mean follow-up of 13.3 ± 4.7 months, mean age of 66.1 ± 11.6 years, and mean body mass index of 27.3 ± 6.2 kg/m 2 . The mean number of ALIF levels treated was 1.5 ± 0.5. Thirty-three (84.6%) of 39 patients underwent posterior spinal fixation and 33 (84.6%) of 39 underwent posterior column osteotomy, of which 20 (60.6%) of 33 procedures were performed at the level of the ALIF ACR. Pelvic tilt, sacral slope, and pelvic incidence were not statistically significantly different between the preoperative and postoperative periods and between the preoperative and 1-year follow-up periods (except for PT between the preoperative and 1-year follow-up, p = 0.018). Sagittal vertical axis, T-1 spinopelvic inclination, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch, intradiscal angle, and motion segment angle all improved from the preoperative to postoperative period and the preoperative to 1-year follow-up (p < 0.05). The changes in motion segment angle and intradiscal angle achieved in the ALIF-ACR group without osteotomy compared with the ALIF-ACR group with osteotomy

  7. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for multiple-level isthmic spondylolisthesis.

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    Hsieh, Chang-Sheng; Lee, Hyung Chang; Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Park, Sang-Joon; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2017-07-01

    Multiple-level lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis is rarely reported. Here, we report 23 consecutive patients who underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPF) for multiple-level isthmic spondylolisthesis. From June 2008 through December 2014, multiple-level lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis was diagnosed in 23 patients (6 men, 17 women) at Wooridul Spine Hospital (Busan, South Korea). Isthmic spondylolisthesis occurred at three spinal levels in 2 patients and at two levels in 21 patients. All patients underwent ALIF with PPF. We used the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale scores to evaluate the preoperative and postoperative functional outcome, low back pain, and radicular pain. We also evaluated segmental lordosis and the fusion status using radiographs and data from computed tomography. Isthmic spondylolisthesis occurred from L3 to S1 and mostly occurred at two consecutive spinal levels (i.e., L4-L5 and L5-S1). Significant improvements in the ODI and visual analog scale were observed in patients at final follow up (pspondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Prashanth J; Ghent, Finn; Phan, Kevin; Lee, Keegan; Reddy, Rajesh; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-10-01

    We sought to evaluate the clinical and radiologic efficacy of stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for low grade degenerative spondylolisthesis, the favoured surgical management approach at our institution. The optimal approach for surgical management of spondylolisthesis remains contentious. We performed a prospective analysis of all consecutive patients with low grade lumbar spondylolisthesis who underwent ALIF between 2009 and 2013 by a single surgeon (n=27). The mean age was 64.9 years with a male to female ratio of 14:13. There were 32 levels operated and the average preoperative spondylolisthesis was 14.8%, which reduced to 6.4% postoperatively and 9.4% at the latest follow-up (p=0001). Postoperative disc height was increased to 175% of preoperative values and was statistically significant (pspondylolisthesis reduction (p=0.04) and the only clinical factor affecting reduction was body mass index (p=0.04). The present study provides encouraging short term results for stand-alone ALIF as a procedure for low grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Future studies should include adequately powered, prospective, multicentre registry studies with long term follow-up to allow a better assessment of the relative benefits and risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Overpowering posterior lumbar instrumentation and fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody cages followed by posterior revision: a preliminary feasibility study.

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    Kadam, Abhijeet; Wigner, Nathan; Saville, Philip; Arlet, Vincent

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this study was to evaluate whether sagittal plane correction can be obtained from the front by overpowering previous posterior instrumentation and/or fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages in patients undergoing revision surgery for degenerative spinal conditions and/or spinal deformities. METHODS The authors report their experience with the application of hyperlordotic cages at 36 lumbar levels for ALIFs in a series of 20 patients who underwent revision spinal surgery at a single institution. Included patients underwent staged front-back procedures: ALIFs with hyperlordotic cages (12°, 20°, and 30°) followed by removal of posterior instrumentation and reinstrumentation from the back. Patients were divided into the following 2 groups depending on the extent of posterior instrumentation and fusion during the second stage: long constructs (≥ 6 levels with extension into thoracic spine and/or pelvis) and short constructs (lumbar lordosis increased from 44.3° to 59.8° (p lumbar levels that have pseudarthrosis from the previous posterior spinal fusion. Meticulous selection of levels for ALIF is crucial for safely and effectively performing this technique.

  10. A Change in Lumbar Sagittal Alignment After Single-level Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis With Normal Sagittal Balance.

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    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Yang, Seung Heon; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2017-08-01

    Retrospective analysis. The object is to assess the correlation between whole lumbar lordosis (LL) and the segmental angle (SA) after single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The restoration of the SA at lower lumbar spine is meaningful, considering it contributes approximately 60% of LL, and revision surgery due to flat back or adjacent segment pathology was necessary decades after the initial surgery. However, little is known about the change of whole lumbar curvature after single-level lower lumbar fusion surgery, especially for balanced spine. We included 41 consecutive patients (M:F=9:32; mean age, 59.8±9.3 y) with a single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery for low-grade degenerative spinal spondylolisthesis, with C7 plumb line of <5 cm and ≥2-year follow-up period. The operated levels were L4-L5 in 34 patients and L5-S1 in 7 patients. Whole LL, SA, pelvic tilt, and sacral slope were compared. According to the Macnab criteria, a favorable outcome (excellent, 21; good, 15) was achieved in 36/41 (88%; excellent, 21; good, 15) patients. LL and SA were significantly changed from -50.8±9.9 to -54.6±11.1 degrees and -15.6±6.1 to -18.7±5.1 degrees (P<0.01), and a positive correlation (r=0.43, P=0.01) was observed between LL and SA at postoperative month 24. The changes to the pelvic tilt and sacral slope were not significant. Whole lumbar sagittal alignment was influenced by single SA. Therefore, obtaining adequate segmental lordosis is desirable considering the effect on the whole spine for a long time.

  11. Circumferential fusion: a comparative analysis between anterior lumbar interbody fusion with posterior pedicle screw fixation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis.

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    Tye, Erik Y; Tanenbaum, Joseph E; Alonso, Andrea S; Xiao, Roy; Steinmetz, Michael P; Mroz, Thomas E; Savage, Jason W

    2018-03-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) or anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screws (ALIFPS) offer significantly higher radiographic fusion rates than other fusion techniques for L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS). As it stands, there is a relative paucity of comparative data of the two techniques. To define the clinical, radiographic, and financial differences between TLIF and ALIFPS for L5-S1 IS. A retrospective cohort study conducted at a single tertiary care center. Sixty-six patients who underwent either TLIF or ALIPFS for L5-S1 IS at a single tertiary care center between 2009 and 2014. Quality of life outcome scores including the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Sagittal balance parameters including: pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, segmental lordosis, total lordosis, degree of slip, disc height, and L1-axis S1 distance (LASD). Cost measures included in-hospital charges, hospital length of stay (LOS), and post-admission costs accrued over 1 year. Quality of life (QoL) outcome scores, radiographic data, and financial data were collected with a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Clinical results were investigated using the PDQ, PHQ-9, and EQ-5D. Radiographic measurements included lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, height of disc, L-1 axis S-1 distance, and the degree of slip. Cost data were generated based on patient-level resource utilization. Comparative data were presented as median with interquartile range (IQR). Continuous variables were compared using either independent Student t tests assuming unequal variance or Mann-Whitney U tests for parametric and nonparametric variables, respectively. The minimally clinical important difference (MCID) used for each questionnaire was as follows: PDQ (26), PHQ-9 (5), and EQ-5D (0.4). A total of 66 patients met inclusion criteria. In the ALIFPS cohort, PDQ scores

  12. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion using a barbell-shaped cage: a biomechanical comparison.

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    Murakami, H; Boden, S D; Hutton, W C

    2001-10-01

    There are drawbacks to using threaded cylindrical cages (e.g., limited area for bone ingrowth and metal precluding radiographic visualization of bone healing). To somewhat offset these drawbacks, a barbell-shaped cage has been designed. The central core of the barbell can be wrapped with collagen sheets infiltrated with bone morphogenetic protein. The obvious theoretical advantages of a barbell cage have to be weighed against potential biomechanical disadvantages. Our purpose was to compare the biomechanical properties of an anterior lumbar interbody reconstruction using 18-mm-diameter threaded cylindrical cages, with a reconstruction using barbell cages (18-mm diameter and 6 mm wide at both cylindrical ends, with a round 4-mm-diameter bar joining the two ends). Twelve cadaveric lumbar motion segments were tested. Three L5-S1 segments received two threaded cylindrical cages, and three L5-S1 segments received two barbell cages. Three L3-L4 segments received one threaded cylindrical cage, and three L3-L4 segments received one barbell cage. A series of biomechanical loading sequences were carried out on each motion segment, and stiffness curves were obtained. After the biomechanical testing, an axial compressive load was applied to the motion segments until failure. They were then radiographed and bisected through the disc, and the subsidence (or penetration) of the cage(s) in the cancellous bone of the vertebral bodies was measured. There was no difference in terms of stiffness between the motion segments with the threaded cylindrical cage(s) inserted and those with the barbell cage(s) inserted (p > 0.15). The average values of subsidence was 0.96 mm for the threaded cylindrical cage group and 0.80 mm for the barbell cage group (difference not significant: p = 0.38). The results suggest that a reconstruction using barbell cages is a biomechanically acceptable alternative to one using threaded cylindrical cages.

  13. Anterior lumbar inter-body fusion with instrumentation compared with posterolateral fusion for low grade isthmic-spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Varun; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Spondylolisthesis presenting as low back pain is not an uncommon condition. Many of such patients are treated conservatively. For those that require surgical management, various treatment options are in vogue e.g. Postero-lateral fusion (PLF) with decompression or posterior fusion with instrumentation and anterior lumbar inter-body fusion (ALIF). Each technique has produced satisfactory outcome with benefits and disadvantages. To compare the outcome of surgical management of low grade spondylolisthesis with two treatments modalities--Postero-lateral fusion (PLF) and Anterior lumbar inter-body fusion (ALIF) with posterior instrumentation in similar patient profile. Prospective study to compare the results of two surgical treatment modalities. The selected group of patients for surgery based on definite criteria was operated by the same surgeon by two modalities: Postero-lateral fusion with decompression and Anterior Lumbar Inter-body fusion with posterior instrumentation. The outcomes were compared. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Follow up was done at twelve weekly intervals up to 2 years. Both groups showed good recovery in pain as seen in Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry low back pain scoring. Intra-operative bleeding was observed to be higher in Postero-lateral fusion group. Average length of hospital stay for the patients of PLF group was 6.6 days (Range: 4-7 days) as compared to 12.5 days (Range: 10-16 days) in case of ALIF group. Treatment cost was found to be higher in patients who undergone ALIF with instrumentation. ALIF with posterior instrumentation in low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis provides satisfactory outcome in patients requiring surgical treatment. The results of pain relief and disability index are comparable to time tested posterolateral fusion. ALIF shows a tendency to faster pain relief and return to activity with less intraoperative blood requirement in low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis.

  14. Outcomes of anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery based on indication: a prospective study.

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    Rao, Prashanth J; Loganathan, Ajanthan; Yeung, Vivian; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on clinical outcomes after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) based on the indications for surgery. To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of ALIF for each surgical indication. This prospective clinical study included 125 patients who underwent ALIF over a 2-year period. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Outcome measures included the Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, Visual Analog Scale, and Patient Satisfaction Index. After a mean follow-up of 20 months, the clinical condition of the patients was significantly better than their preoperative status across all indications. A total of 108 patients had a Patient Satisfaction Index score of 1 or 2, indicating a successful clinical outcome in 86%. Patients with degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy), spondylolisthesis, and scoliosis had the best clinical response to ALIF, with statistically significant improvement in the Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale. Failed posterior fusion and adjacent segment disease showed statistically significant improvement in all of these clinical outcome scores, although the mean changes in the Short Form-12 Mental Component Summary, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale (back pain) were lower. The overall radiological fusion rate was 94.4%. Superior radiological outcomes (fusion >90%) were observed in patients with degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy), spondylolisthesis, and failed posterior fusion, whereas in adjacent segment disease, it was 80%. ALIF is an effective treatment for degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy) and spondylolisthesis. Although results were promising for scoliosis, failed posterior fusion, and adjacent segment disease, further studies are necessary to establish the effectiveness of ALIF in these conditions.

  15. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Integrated Screw Cages: Intrinsic Load Generation, Subsidence, and Torsional Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Pelletier, Matthew H; Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-05-01

    To perform a repeatable idealized in vitro model to evaluate the effects of key design features and integrated screw fixation on unloaded surface engagement, subsidence, and torsional stability. We evaluated four different stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages with two, three, and four screw designs. Polyurethane (saw-bone) foam blocks were used to simulate the vertebral bone. Fuji Film was used to measure the contact footprint, average pressure, and load generated by fixating the cages with screws. Subsidence was tested by axially loading the constructs at 10 N/s to 400 N and torsional load was applied +/-1 Nm for 10 cycles to assess stability. Outcome measures included total subsidence and maximal torsional angle range. Cages 1, 2, and 4 were symmetrical and produced similar results in terms of contact footprint, average pressure, and load. The addition of integrated screws into the cage-bone block construct demonstrated a clear trend towards decreased subsidence. Cage 2 with surface titanium angled ridges and a keel produced the greatest subsidence with and without screws, significantly more than all other cages ( P < 0.05). Angular rotation was not significantly affected by the addition of screws ( P < 0.066). A statistically significant correlation existed between subsidence and reduced angular rotation across all cage constructs ( P = 0.018). Each stand-alone cage featured unique surface characteristics, which resulted in differing cage-foam interface engagement, influencing the subsidence and torsional angle. Increased subsidence significantly reduced the torsional angle across all cage constructs. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with mini-open anterior debridement and fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion approach.

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    Lin, Yang; Li, Feng; Chen, Wenjian; Zeng, Heng; Chen, Anmin; Xiong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation for single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. This is a retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) approach. Patients underwent follow-up for 24 to 38 months. Clinical data, etiological examinations, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) lumbar function score, visual analog scale (VAS) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), postoperative complications, and the bony fusion rate were recorded. The mean operative time was 181.1 ± 22.6 minutes (range 155-240 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 173.2 ± 70.1 ml (range 100-400 ml). Infection was found in lumbar vertebrae L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 in 2, 6, and 14 patients, respectively. Bacterial cultures were positive in 15 patients, including 4 with Staphylococcus aureus, 6 with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 4 with Streptococcus, and 1 with Escherichia coli. Postoperative complications included urinary retention, constipation, and numbness in the thigh in 5, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Compared with before surgery, the VAS scores and ODI were significantly lower at the final follow-up, the JOA scores were significantly higher, and the ASIA grades had improved. All patients achieved good intervertebral bony fusion. Mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified ALIF approach results in little surgical trauma and intraoperative blood loss, acceptable postoperative complications, and is effective and safe for the treatment of single-level lumbar pyogenic

  17. Double-segment Wilhelm Tell technique for anterior lumbar interbody fusion in unstable isthmic spondylolisthesis and adjacent segment discopathy.

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    Wenger, Markus; Vogt, Emanuel; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2006-02-01

    The Wilhelm Tell technique is a novel instrumented anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) procedure using a specially designed composite carbon fibre cage and a single short-threaded cancellous screw that obliquely passes through the upper adjacent vertebral body, the interbody cage itself and through the lower adjacent vertebral body. This single-stage fusion method, which is in principle a combination of the Louis technique and modern cage surgery, is reported to have a lower rate of pseudoarthrosis formation than stand-alone cage techniques. In addition, it eliminates both the surgical trauma of paravertebral muscle retraction and the risk of neural damage by poorly located pedicular screws. This anterior approach allows decompression of neural structures within the anterior part of the spinal canal and the foraminal region. It is the purpose of this case report, to present the successful application of this novel technique in a 32-year-old woman who concurrently suffered from severe instability-related back pain from L4/5 isthmic spondylolisthesis and marked L5/S1 degenerative disc disease.

  18. Kinematic efficacy of supplemental anterior lumbar interbody fusion at lumbosacral levels in thoracolumbosacral deformity correction with and without pedicle subtraction osteotomy at L3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Benny T; Harris, Jonathan A; Gudipally, Manasa

    2017-01-01

    of operative construction (p ≤ 0.05). Across L4-S1 and L2-S1, all instrumented constructs significantly reduced motion, in both PSO- and non-PSO groups, during all loading modes (p ≤ 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest anterior interbody fusion minimally immobilizes motion segments, and interbody...... devices may primarily act to maintain disc height. Additionally, lumbar osteotomy destabilizes axial rotational stability at the osteotomy site, potentially further increasing mechanical demand on posterior instrumentation. Clinical studies are needed to assess the impact of this treatment strategy....

  19. Is Stand-Alone Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion a Safe and Efficacious Treatment for Isthmic Spondylolisthesis of L5-S1?

    OpenAIRE

    Viglione, Luke L.; Chamoli, Uphar; Diwan, Ashish D.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: A systematic review. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (sa-ALIF) for the treatment of symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5-S1 by assessing the level of available clinical and radiographic evidence. Methods: A systematic review utilizing Medline, Embase, and Scopus online databases was undertaken. Clinical, radiographic, and adverse outcome data were extracted for the relevant ist...

  20. Effect of Smoking Status on Successful Arthrodesis, Clinical Outcome, and Complications After Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Fadhil, Matthew; Chang, Nicholas; Giang, Gloria; Gragnaniello, Cristian; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2018-02-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a surgical technique indicated for the treatment of several lumbar pathologies. Smoking has been suggested as a possible cause of reduced fusion rates after ALIF, although the literature regarding the impact of smoking status on lumbar spine surgery is not well established. This study aims to assess the impact of perioperative smoking status on the rates of perioperative complications, fusion, and adverse clinical outcomes in patients undergoing ALIF surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on a prospectively maintained database of 137 patients, all of whom underwent ALIF surgery by the same primary spine surgeon. Smoking status was defined by the presence of active smoking in the 2 weeks before the procedure. Outcome measures included fusion rates, surgical complications, Short-Form 12, and Oswestry Disability Index. Patients were separated into nonsmokers (n = 114) and smokers (n = 23). Univariate analysis demonstrated that the percentage of patients with successful fusion differed significantly between the groups (69.6% vs. 85.1%, P = 0.006). Pseudarthrosis rates were shown to be significantly associated with perioperative smoking. Results for other postoperative complications and clinical outcomes were similar for both groups. On multivariate analysis, the rate of failed fusion was significantly greater for smokers than nonsmokers (odds ratio 37.10, P = 0.002). The rate of successful fusion after ALIF surgery was found to be significantly lower for smokers compared with nonsmokers. No significant association was found between smoking status and other perioperative complications or adverse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of Obesity on Complications, Clinical Outcome, and Subsidence After Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF): Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Rogers, Priya; Rao, Prashanth J; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2017-11-01

    The complications associated with obesity have been well described for posterior lumbar spinal surgery. However, the influence of obesity on anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is not well established. We aimed to compare complication risks, functional outcomes, and subsidence rates in normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients who underwent ALIF. A total of 137 consecutive patients undergoing ALIF surgery from 2012 to 2014 were followed prospectively. Patients were categorized into 3 groups according to their body mass index (BMI). Patients were evaluated preoperative and postoperatively. Outcome measures included Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, surgical complications, and subsidence. There was no significant difference between the BMI groups in terms of baseline age, proportion of men, levels operated, smoking status, diabetes status, or anterior, posterior, or average disc height. There was no difference in operative duration, blood loss, or hospital stay. At 12-month follow-up, no difference was found in terms of total complications, change in Short Form-12 mental or physical component scores, or Oswestry Disability Index scores. Average disc height was significant lower for the obese group (11.3 mm) compared with the normal-weight (14.4 mm) group. Fusion rate was also significantly lower for patients who were obese (60%) compared with normal-weight (88.2%) and overweight patients (76%) (P = 0.014). Delayed subsidence rates also were similar between normal-weight and overweight patients. There were no differences in functional outcomes or complications in patients with elevated BMI compared with normal-weight patients. Fusion rates were lower for patients were obese. Obesity should not be considered a contraindication to surgery in patients with appropriate indication to undergo ALIF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomechanics of Nested Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; de Tranaltes, Kaylee; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Reyes, Phillip M; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Tumialán, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Arthrodesis is optimized when the structural graft occupies most of the surface area within a disc space. The transforaminal corridor inherently limits interbody size. To evaluate the biomechanical implications of nested interbody spacers (ie, a second curved cage placed behind a first) to increase disc space coverage in transforaminal approaches. Seven lumbar human cadaveric specimens (L3-S1) underwent nondestructive flexibility and axial compression testing intact and after transforaminal instrumentation at L4-L5. Specimens were tested in 5 conditions: (1) intact, (2) interbody, (3) interbody plus bilateral pedicle screws and rods (PSR), (4) 2 nested interbodies, and (5) 2 nested interbodies plus PSR. Mean range of motion (ROM) with 1 interbody vs 2 nested interbodies, respectively, was: flexion, 101% vs 85%; extension, 97% vs 92%; lateral bending, 127% vs 132%; and axial rotation, 145% vs 154%. One interbody and 2 nested interbodies did not differ significantly by loading mode (P > .10). With PSR, ROM decreased significantly compared with intact, but not between interbody and interbody plus PSR or 2 interbodies plus PSR (P > .80). Mean vertical height during compressive loading (ie, axial compressive stiffness) was significantly different with 2 nested interbodies vs 1 interbody alone (P < .001) (compressive stiffness, 89% of intact vs 67% of intact, respectively). Inserting a second interbody using a transforaminal approach is anatomically feasible and nearly doubles the disc space covered without affecting ROM. Compressive stiffness significantly increased with 2 nested interbodies, and foraminal height increased. Evaluation of the clinical safety and efficacy of nested interbodies is underway.

  3. Two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. A minimum 3-year follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong-Yeob; Lee, Sang-Ho; Maeng, Dae-Hyeon

    2010-01-01

    The clinical and radiological outcomes of two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PSF) were evaluated in 24 consecutive patients who underwent two level ALIF with percutaneous PSF for segmental instability and were followed up for more than 3 years. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Sagittal alignment, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age of the patients at the time of operation was 56.3 years (range 39-70 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 39.4 months (range 36-42 months), VAS scores for back pain and leg pain, and ODI score decreased significantly (from 6.5, 6.8, and 46.9% to 3.0, 1.9, and 16.3%, respectively). Clinical success was achieved in 22 of the 24 patients. The mean segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 25.1deg, 39.2deg, and 32.6deg to 32.9deg, 44.5deg, and 36.6deg, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 21 patients. ASD was found in 8 of the 24 patients. No patient underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. Two-level ALIF with percutaneous PSF yielded satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes and could be a useful alternative to posterior fusion surgery. (author)

  4. Radiographic and Clinical Outcomes of Anterior and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Remi M; Alas, Haddy; Mosich, Gina M; Sharma, Akshay; Pourtaheri, Sina

    2017-06-15

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. Compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) to transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). ALIF and TLIF are 2 methods of achieving spinal arthrodesis. There are conflicting reports with no consensus on the optimal interbody technique to achieve successful radiographic and clinical outcomes. The goal of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes of ALIF to TLIF. A systematic search of multiple medical reference databases was conducted for studies comparing ALIF to TLIF. Studies that included stand-alone ALIFs were excluded. Meta-analysis was performed using the random-effects model for heterogeneity. Radiographic outcome measures included segmental and overall lumbar lordosis, and fusion rates. Clinical outcomes measures included Oswestry disability index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain. The search yielded 7 studies totaling 811 patients (ALIF=448, TLIF=363). ALIF was superior to TLIF in restoring segmental lumbar lordosis at L4-L5 and L5-S1 (L4-L5; P=0.013, L5-S1; P<0.001). ALIF was also superior to TLIF in restoring overall lumbar lordosis (P<0.001). However, no significant differences in fusion rates were noted between both techniques [odds ratio=0.905; 95% confidence interval, 0.458-1.789; P=0.775]. In addition, ALIF and TLIF were comparable with regards to ODI and VAS scores (ODI; P=0.184, VAS; P=0.983). For the restoration of lumbar lordosis, ALIF is superior to TLIF. However, TLIF is comparable to ALIF with regards to fusion rate and clinical outcomes.

  5. The development of discopathy in lumbar discs adjacent to a lumbar anterior interbody spondylodesis. A retrospective matched-pair study with a postoperative follow-up of 16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, J R; Bohnen, L M

    1992-01-01

    Of 46 patients who underwent a lumbar or lumbo-sacral anterior interbody fusion at one or two levels, 16 were available for a follow-up of 16-20 years. The indications for operation were instability, degenerative disc disease, pseudarthrosis of a posterior fusion, and spondylolisthesis. Preoperative roentgenograms were compared with those made at follow-up 16 years (or more) later. In only a minority of patients was discopathy or instability found. The roentgenographic findings of the operated patients at a follow-up of at least 16 years were compared with those of a group of age- and sex-matched controls not previously treated for backache. We found that most degenerative changes of the adjacent discs occurred at a rate nearly similar to that in the corresponding levels of the controls. These results may suggest that lumbar anterior interbody spondylodesis does not accelerate the development of degenerative changes in adjacent discs.

  6. Mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the surgical technique and advantages of the mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation. Clinical and radiographic results were assessed to determine the clinical outcomes in twelve consecutive patients selected for minimally invasive access (mini-open technique) for TLIF in Prasat Neurological Institute. A retrospective analysis was performed on 12 patients (age range, 38-74 yr; mean, 54. 8 yr) who underwent mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation between September 2006 and June 2008. The titanium pedicle screws were introduced bilaterally through the 3.5 cm length, skin incisions with Spine Classics MLD- system retractor, autologous bone graft were inserted to perform TLIF in all patients. Eight patients were augmented anterior column support with titanium interbody cage, unilateral cage insertion in four patients and the others were inserted bilaterally interbody cages. Six patients presented with low back pain and associated radiculopathy, and six presented with low back pain only. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L3-L4 in two patients, L4-L5 in four patients, L5-S1 in five patients, and two levels fusion in one patient. All patients were able to ambulate after spinal fusion. The patients were able to walk within 1.4 days (range 1-2 days). The hospital stay averaged 4.4 days (range 3-7 days). Periodic follow-up took place 1 to 21 months after surgery (mean, 7.4 months). The radiological fusion was archived in all nine patients who were operated on more than two months age. The other three patients who had been follow-up less than two months were probably fusion on the 1-month followed-up radiological examination. The use of mini-open technique for pedicle screw instrumentation with spinal fusion procedure provides excellent clinical results and may be an operation of choice for

  7. THE LONG-TERM RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ISTHMIC SPONDYLOLISTHESIS USING ANTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shapovalov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyzed the long-term results of surgical treatment 47 patients with true spondylolisthesis. The follow up period ranged from 14 to 25 years. All patients underwent an isolated anterior interbody riving allograft fusion. The scales of VAS and ODI were used for subjective assessment of treatment outcomes; objective assessment was based on clinical and radiographic, CT and MRI outcomes. There were 42.6% (20 cases patients with good, 31.9% (15 cases with satisfactory and 25.5% (12 cases unsatisfactory results in the long-term follow-up. The main reasons of poor outcome were: the continued high degree of displacement of the vertebral body (17.6%, instability (38.3% and the disbalance of the lumbosacral spine (63.8%, persistent compression of neural structures (42.6%. Most patients had the combination of these factors that were existed against backdrop of progressive degenerative changes of the spine.

  8. Comparison of rigid and semi-rigid instrumentation under acute load on vertebrae treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önen, Mehmet Reşid; Başgül, Cemile; Yılmaz, İlhan; Özkaya, Mustafa; Demir, Teyfik; Naderi, Sait

    2018-04-01

    Rigid and semi-rigid fixations are investigated several times in order to compare their biomechanical stability. Interbody fusion techniques are also preferable for maintaining the sagittal balance by protecting the disk height. In this study, the biomechanical comparison of semi-rigid and rigid fixations with posterior lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures is conducted under trauma. There were four different test groups to analyze the effect of acute load on treated ovine vertebrae. First and second groups were fixed with polyetheretherketone rods and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages, respectively. Third and fourth groups were fixed with titanium rods and posterior lumbar interbody fusion and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cages, respectively. The drop tests were conducted with 7 kg weight. There were six samples in each group so the drop test repeated 24 times in total. The test samples were photographed and X-rayed (laterally and anteroposteriorly) before and after drop test. Two fractures were observed on group 1. Conversely, there were no fractures observed for group 2. There were no anterior element fractures for both groups 1 and 2. However, one fracture seen on group 3 was anterior element fracture, whereas the other three were posterior element fractures. All three fractures were anterior element fractures for group 4. Treated vertebrae with polyetheretherketone rods and posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages showed the best durability to the drop tests among the groups. Semi-rigid fixation gave better results than rigid fixation according to failed segments. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages seem to be better option for semi-rigid fixation, however mentioned surgical disadvantages must be considered.

  9. Lumbar interbody fusion: techniques, indications and comparison of interbody fusion options including PLIF, TLIF, MI-TLIF, OLIF/ATP, LLIF and ALIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Malham, Greg; Seex, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine is common in the ageing population, and is one of the most frequent causes of disability. Lumbar spondylosis may result in mechanical back pain, radicular and claudicant symptoms, reduced mobility and poor quality of life. Surgical interbody fusion of degenerative levels is an effective treatment option to stabilize the painful motion segment, and may provide indirect decompression of the neural elements, restore lordosis and correct deformity. The surgical options for interbody fusion of the lumbar spine include: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF), oblique lumbar interbody fusion/anterior to psoas (OLIF/ATP), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The indications may include: discogenic/facetogenic low back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy due to foraminal stenosis, lumbar degenerative spinal deformity including symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. In general, traditional posterior approaches are frequently used with acceptable fusion rates and low complication rates, however they are limited by thecal sac and nerve root retraction, along with iatrogenic injury to the paraspinal musculature and disruption of the posterior tension band. Minimally invasive (MIS) posterior approaches have evolved in an attempt to reduce approach related complications. Anterior approaches avoid the spinal canal, cauda equina and nerve roots, however have issues with approach related abdominal and vascular complications. In addition, lateral and OLIF techniques have potential risks to the lumbar plexus and psoas muscle. The present study aims firstly to comprehensively review the available literature and evidence for different lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) techniques. Secondly, we propose a set of recommendations and guidelines

  10. Fusion and subsidence rate of stand alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion using PEEK cage with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrbalk, Eyal; Uri, Ofir; Parks, Ruth M; Musson, Rachel; Soh, Reuben Chee Cheong; Boszczyk, Bronek Maximilian

    2013-12-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is an established treatment for structural instability associated with symptomatic disk degeneration (SDD). Stand-alone ALIF offers many advantages, however, it may increase the risk of non-union. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) may enhance fusion rate but is associated with postoperative complication. The optimal dose of BMP-2 remains unclear. This study assessed the fusion and subsidence rates of stand-alone ALIF using the SynFix-LR interbody cage with 6 ml/level of BMP-2. Thirty-two ALIF procedures were performed by a single surgeon in 25 patients. Twenty-five procedures were performed for SDD without spondylolisthesis (SDD group) and seven procedures were performed for SDD with grade-I olisthesis (SDD-olisthesis group). Patients were followed-up for a mean of 17 ± 6 months. Solid fusion was achieved in 29 cases (90.6 %) within 6 months postoperatively. Five cases of implant subsidence were observed (16 %). Four of these occurred in the SDD-olisthesis group and one occurred in the SDD group (57 % vs. 4 % respectively; p = 0.004). Three cases of subsidence failed to fuse and required revision. The body mass index of patients with olisthesis who developed subsidence was higher than those who did not develop subsidence (29 ± 2.6 vs. 22 ± 6.5 respectively; p = 0.04). No BMP-2 related complications occurred. The overall fusion rate of stand-alone ALIF using the SynFix-LR system with BMP-2 was 90.6 %, comparable with other published series. No BMP-2 related complication occurred at a dose of 6 mg/level. Degenerative spondylolisthesis and obesity seemed to increase the rate of implant subsidence, and thus we believe that adding posterior fusion for these cases should be considered.

  11. Prospective Study of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Either Interbody Graft or Interbody Cage in the Treatment of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, A; Altaf, Farhaan; Jalgaonkar, Azal; Kakkar, Rahul; Sirigiri, P B R; Howieson, A; Crawford, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    A prospective study of 2 different fusion techniques for the treatment of single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis. To determine whether the addition of an intervertebral cage improves the clinical outcome and fusion rate of patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) after decompression for degenerative spondylolisthesis. The surgical approach that should be used for degenerative spondylolisthesis is a controversial issue. Decompression and PLIF with an interbody cage is widely used. Theoretical advantages in favor of PLIF include anterior column support, indirect foraminal decompression, restoration of lordosis, and reduction of the slip via ligamentotaxis. Despite numerous publications, the scientific support for the PLIF method is, however, weak. A prospective study was carried out including 59 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Average age of patients was 66 years: 34 males and 25 females. Patients were divided into 2 treatment groups: group 1-32 patients with PLIF with interbody graft and group 2-27 patients with PLIF with cage. Minimum 2-year follow-up. Outcomes were assessed by measuring preoperative and postoperative lordotic angles. SF-12 physical and mental health scores were recorded along with visual analogue scores for pain. Complications were also recorded. No significant difference in the postoperative lordotic angles was achieved between the 2 techniques. Nonsignificant difference in the clinical outcomes between both the techniques. We have found the use of a cage to achieve lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis does not confer any significant advantages in terms of restoration of lumbar lordosis, improvement in clinical symptoms, or relief of pain postoperatively.

  12. Intraoperative antepulsion of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal fusion surgery techniques develop together with technologic advancements. New complications are seen as the result of new techniques and these may be very severe due to spinal cord and vascular structures in the lumbar region. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage (PLIFC) was shown to enhance spinal ...

  13. CHANGES IN RADIOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS AFTER MINIMALLY INVASIVE LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Vialle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study aims to evaluate changes in lumbosacral parameters after minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether interbody cage shape (crescent shaped or rectangular would influence the results. Method : Retrospective analysis of 70 patients who underwent one or two level lumbar interbody fusion through a minimally invasive posterolateral approach. This included midline preservation and unilateral facetectomy. Pre- and postoperative (three to six months postoperative radiographs were used for measuring lumbar lordosis (LL, segmental lordosis (SL at the level of interbody fusion, and sacral slope (SS. Further analyses divided the patients into Roussouly lumbar subgroups. Results : LL was significantly reduced after surgery (59o:39o, p=0.001 as well as the SS (33.8o:31.2o, p=0.05. SL did not change significantly (11.4:11.06, p=0.85. There were no significant differences when comparing patients who received crescent shaped cage (n=27 and rectangular cage (n=43. Hypolordotic patients (Roussouly types 1 and 2 had radiographic improvement in comparison to normolordotic and hyperlordotic groups (types 3 and 4. Conclusion : Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion caused reduction in lumbosacral parameters. Cage shape had no influence on the results.

  14. Comparing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Mao, Keya; Qiang, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although spondylolisthesis was traditionally treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) was recently proposed as an alternative treatment for spondylolisthesis. However, no studies have focused on the comparison of these 2 techniques’ outcome on spondylolisthesis. The operative reports and perioperative data of patients who underwent single-level primary open PLIF (n = 29) and MIS-TLIF (n = 26) for I/II spondylolisthesis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients’ demographics, operative blood loss, hospital length of stay, creatine kinase (CK) level, radiographic fusion, complications, and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. Radiographic fusion was assessed using the Bridwell grading criteria. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes included the visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Average follow-up was 28 ± 3.6 months (range 24–32 months). Bed rest time, hospital stay, estimated blood loss, and operative time in the MIS-TLIF group were significantly lower than those in the PLIF group (P  .05). Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF for grade I/II spondylolisthesis can achieve similar reduction and fusion results with better short-term quality of life, shorter hospital stays, less estimated blood loss, and shorter operative times. PMID:28906383

  15. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with expandable versus static interbody devices: radiographic assessment of sagittal segmental and pelvic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Khalifeh, Jawad M; Chatrath, Ajay; Yarbrough, Chester K; Ray, Wilson Z

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has been adopted as an alternative technique to hasten recovery and minimize postoperative morbidity. Advances in instrumentation technologies and operative techniques have evolved to maximize patient outcomes as well as radiographic results. The development of expandable interbody devices allows a surgeon to perform MIS-TLIF with minimal tissue disruption. However, sagittal segmental and pelvic radiographic outcomes after MIS-TLIF with expandable interbody devices are not well characterized. The object of this study is to evaluate the radiographic sagittal lumbar segmental and pelvic parameter outcomes of MIS-TLIF performed using an expandable interbody device. METHODS A retrospective review of MIS-TLIFs performed between 2014 and 2016 at a high-volume center was performed. Radiographic measurements were performed on lateral radiographs before and after MIS-TLIF with static or expandable interbody devices. Radiographic measurements included disc height, foraminal height, fused disc angle, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, and pelvic tilt. Mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis were calculated for each radiograph. RESULTS A total of 48 MIS-TLIFs were performed, predominantly at the L4-5 level, in 44 patients. MIS-TLIF with an expandable interbody device led to a greater and more sustained increase in disc height when compared with static interbody devices. Foraminal height increased after MIS-TLIF with expandable but not with static interbody devices. MIS-TLIF with expandable interbody devices increased index-level segmental lordosis more than with static interbody devices. The increase in segmental lordosis was sustained in the patients with expandable interbody devices but not in patients with static interbody devices. For patients with a collapsed disc space, MIS-TLIF with an expandable interbody device provided superior and longer-lasting increases in

  16. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Ossification of the Yellow Ligament in the Lumbar Spine: First Reported Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Fujii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL occurs in the lumbar spine and extends to the lateral wall of the spinal canal, facetectomy is required to remove all of the ossified lesion and achieve decompression. Subsequent posterior fixation with interbody fusion will then be necessary to prevent postoperative progression of the ossification and intervertebral instability. The technique of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF has recently been introduced. Using this procedure, surgeons can avoid excess blood loss from the extradural venous plexus and detachment of the ossified lesion and the ventral dura mater is avoidable. We present a 55-year-old male patient with OYL at L3/4 and anterior spondylolisthesis of L4 vertebra, with concomitant ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, who presented with a severe gait disturbance. He underwent a 2-stage operation without complications: LLIF for L3/4 and L4/5 was performed at the initial surgery, and posterior decompression fixation using pedicle screws from L3 to L5 was performed at the second surgery. His postoperative progress was favorable, and his interbody fusion was deemed successful. Here, we present the first reported case of LLIF for OYL of the lumbar spine. This procedure can be a good option for OYL of the lumbar spine.

  17. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  18. Time-sequential changes of differentially expressed miRNAs during the process of anterior lumbar interbody fusion using equine bone protein extract, rhBMP-2 and autograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da-Fu; Zhou, Zhi-Yu; Dai, Xue-Jun; Gao, Man-Man; Huang, Bao-Ding; Liang, Tang-Zhao; Shi, Rui; Zou, Li-Jin; Li, Hai-Sheng; Bünger, Cody; Tian, Wei; Zou, Xue-Nong

    2014-03-01

    The precise mechanism of bone regeneration in different bone graft substitutes has been well studied in recent researches. However, miRNAs regulation of the bone formation has been always mysterious. We developed the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model in pigs using equine bone protein extract (BPE), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS), and autograft as bone graft substitute, respectively. The miRNA and gene expression profiles of different bone graft materials were examined using microarray technology and data analysis, including self-organizing maps, KEGG pathway and Biological process GO analyses. We then jointly analyzed miRNA and mRNA profiles of the bone fusion tissue at different time points respectively. Results showed that miRNAs, including let-7, miR-129, miR-21, miR-133, miR-140, miR-146, miR-184, and miR-224, were involved in the regulation of the immune and inflammation response, which provided suitable inflammatory microenvironment for bone formation. At late stage, several miRNAs directly regulate SMAD4, Estrogen receptor 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C for bone formation. It can be concluded that miRNAs play important roles in balancing the inflammation and bone formation.

  19. Clinical outcomes and considerations of the lumbar interbody fusion technique for lumbar disk disease in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dae-Woong; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Young-Eun; Kuh, Sung-Uk

    2013-08-01

    The posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) techniques are commonly used surgical methods for wide indications such as degeneration or trauma. Although they are rarely required for lumbar disk disease in younger patients, there are a few children and adolescents who are indicated for PLIF or TLIF for other reasons, such as congenital severe stenosis with or without lumbar instability that requires wide decompression or severe bony spur that need to be removed. In such cases, different pathophysiology and outcomes are expected compared with adult patients. We retrospectively reviewed data of 23 patients who underwent PLIF or TLIF surgery when less than 20 years old. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed during a mean of 36.4 months follow-up period. The indications of lumbar interbody fusion, success of fusion, complications, and visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed. Radiographs of all patients taken 6 months after the surgery showed fusion. Clinical outcome was also satisfactory, with improvement of VAS score from 7.7 preoperatively to 2.3 at 6 months after surgery. Only one patient had reoperation due to adjacent segment disease. For adolescent patients with severe bony spur, massive central disk rupture, or severe spondylolisthesis, lumbar interbody fusion surgery has good surgical outcome with few complications.

  20. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability

    OpenAIRE

    GUO, SHUGUANG; SUN, JUNYING; TANG, GENLIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47?72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column...

  1. Posterolateral fusion with interbody for lumbar spondylolisthesis is associated with less repeat surgery than posterolateral fusion alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Weingart, Robby; Sciubba, Daniel; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Posterior or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (PLIF/TLIF) may improve the outcomes in patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. This study aims to compare outcomes after posterolateral fusion (PLF) only versus PLF with interbody fusion (PLF+PLIF/TLIF) in patients with spondylolisthesis. We retrospectively reviewed103 patients who underwent first-time instrumented lumbar fusions for degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis. Anterior techniques and multilevel interbody fusions were excluded. All patients were followed for at least 2 years postoperatively. Clinical outcomes including back pain, radiculopathy, weakness, sensory deficits, and loss of bowel/bladder function were ascertained from clinic notes. Radiographic measures were calculated with Tillard percentage of spondylolisthesis. Reoperation for progression of degenerative disease, a primary endpoint, was indicated for all patients with (1) persistent or new-onset neurological symptoms; and (2) radiographic imaging that correlated with clinical presentation. Of the 103 patients, 56.31% were managed with PLF and 43.69% with PLF+PLIF/TLIF. On radiographic studies, spondylolisthesis improved by a mean of 13.06% after PLF+PLIF/TLIF versus 5.67% after PLF (pspondylolisthesis. Patients with interbody fusions were less likely to undergo reoperation for degenerative disease progression compared to non-interbody fusions. However, greater listhesis correction and decreased reoperation in the PLF+PLIF/TLIF cohort should be weighed with favorable clinical outcomes in the PLF cohort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomechanical Analysis of an Expandable Lumbar Interbody Spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; Palma, Atilio E; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Kelly, Brian P; Kaibara, Taro

    2018-03-13

    Recently developed expandable interbody spacers are widely accepted in spinal surgery; however, the resulting biomechanical effects of their use have not yet been fully studied. We analyzed the biomechanical effects of an expandable polyetheretherketone interbody spacer inserted through a bilateral posterior approach with and without different modalities of posterior augmentation. Biomechanical nondestructive flexibility testing was performed in 7 human cadaveric lumbar (L2-L5) specimens followed by axial compressive loading. Each specimen was tested under 6 conditions: 1) intact, 2) bilateral L3-L4 cortical screw/rod (CSR) alone, 3) WaveD alone, 4) WaveD + CSR, 5) WaveD + bilateral L3-L4 pedicle screw/rod (PSR), and 6) WaveD + CSR/PSR, where CSR/PSR was a hybrid construct comprising bilateral cortical-level L3 and pedicle-level L4 screws interconnected by rods. The range of motion (ROM) with the interbody spacer alone decreased significantly compared with the intact condition during flexion-extension (P = 0.02) but not during lateral bending or axial rotation (P ≥ 0.19). The addition of CSR or PSR to the interbody spacer alone condition significantly decreased the ROM compared with the interbody spacer alone (P ≤ 0.002); and WaveD + CSR, WaveD + PSR, and WaveD + CSR/PSR (hybrid) (P ≥ 0.29) did not differ. The axial compressive stiffness (resistance to change in foraminal height during compressive loading) with the interbody spacer alone did not differ from the intact condition (P = 0.96), whereas WaveD + posterior instrumentation significantly increased compressive stiffness compared with the intact condition and the interbody spacer alone (P ≤ 0.001). The WaveD alone significantly reduced ROM during flexion-extension while maintaining the axial compressive stiffness. CSR, PSR, and CSR/PSR hybrid constructs were all effective in augmenting the expandable interbody spacer system and improving its stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

  3. [Treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Li, Li-Jun; Tan, Jun

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effect of treating degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery. From Jan. 2006 to Jan. 2009, one hundred fifty patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery were analyzed retrospectively. The diagnosis was degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis in 84 cases of grade I, and 66 cases of grade II. There were 88 males and 62 females. Preoperatively, at 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, the pain was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring system and therapeutic effect was observed with modified Prolo scoring system. In complications, dural tear happened in 3 cases, biological glues were used for dural tear sealing and neither cerebrospinal fluid leak was found. One case suffered from intervertebral Infection and muscle weakness of foot was found in one case, either was cured after symptomatic treatment. Operative time averaged 160 minutes (120-280 min). Estimated blood loss averaged 210 ml (100-450 ml). The postoperative follow-up ranged from 6 to 36 months (averaged 15.2 months). Preoperatively,at 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, VAS scores were respectively 7.9 +/- 2.1, 2.2 +/- 0.6, 3.2 +/- 1.1 (P surgery transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion technique is indicated for lumbar vertebral instability, localized intervertebral disc disorder and lumbar spondylolisthesis with stenotic nerve root or tube below grade II. This technique has advantages of minimal invasion and early functional recovery.

  4. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. Patient concerns: A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Diagnoses: Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. Interventions: We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. Outcomes: No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Lessons: Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:29245270

  5. Single or double-level anterior interbody fusion techniques for cervical degenerative disc disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Wilco; Willems, Paul C.; van Limbeek, Jacques; Bartels, Ronald; Pavlov, Paul; Anderson, Patricia G.; Oner, Cumhur

    2011-01-01

    Background The number of surgical techniques for decompression and solid interbody fusion as treatment for cervical spondylosis has increased rapidly, but the rationale for the choice between different techniques remains unclear. Objectives To determine which technique of anterior interbody fusion

  6. Single or double-level anterior interbody fusion techniques for cervical degenerative disc disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, W.; Willems, P.C.P.H.; Limbeek, J. van; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Pavlov, P.; Anderson, P.G.; Oner, C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of surgical techniques for decompression and solid interbody fusion as treatment for cervical spondylosis has increased rapidly, but the rationale for the choice between different techniques remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To determine which technique of anterior interbody fusion

  7. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  8. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion andin SituScrew Fixation for Rostral Adjacent Segment Stenosis of the Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Hoon; Kwon, Shin Won; Moon, Jung Hyeon; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Heo, Won

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the detailed surgical technique and short-term clinical and radiological outcomes of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and in situ lateral screw fixation using a conventional minimally invasive screw fixation system (MISF) for revision surgery to treat rostral lumbar adjacent segment disease. The medical and radiological records were retrospectively reviewed. The surgery was indicated in 10 consecutive patients with rostral adjacent segment stenosis and instability. After the insertion of the interbody cage, lateral screws were inserted into the cranial and caudal vertebra using the MISF through the same LLIF trajectory. The radiological and clinical outcomes were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 3-48 months). Transient sensory changes in the left anterior thigh occurred in 3 patients, and 1 patient experienced subjective weakness; however, these symptoms normalized within 1 week. Back and leg pain were significantly improved ( p fusion was confirmed in 7 patients. Subsidence and mechanical failure did not occur in any patients. This study demonstrates that LLIF and in situ lateral screw fixation may be an alternative surgical option for rostral lumbar adjacent segment disease.

  9. Comparing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis: A STROBE-compliant observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Mao, Keya; Qiang, Xiaojun

    2017-09-01

    Although spondylolisthesis was traditionally treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) was recently proposed as an alternative treatment for spondylolisthesis. However, no studies have focused on the comparison of these 2 techniques' outcome on spondylolisthesis.The operative reports and perioperative data of patients who underwent single-level primary open PLIF (n = 29) and MIS-TLIF (n = 26) for I/II spondylolisthesis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients' demographics, operative blood loss, hospital length of stay, creatine kinase (CK) level, radiographic fusion, complications, and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. Radiographic fusion was assessed using the Bridwell grading criteria. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes included the visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI).Average follow-up was 28 ± 3.6 months (range 24-32 months). Bed rest time, hospital stay, estimated blood loss, and operative time in the MIS-TLIF group were significantly lower than those in the PLIF group (P  .05).Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF for grade I/II spondylolisthesis can achieve similar reduction and fusion results with better short-term quality of life, shorter hospital stays, less estimated blood loss, and shorter operative times.

  10. Pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis treated with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: safety and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Aiyer, Siddharth N; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Maheswaran, Anupama; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to study the safety and outcomes of posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for treating pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis. Retrospective analysis was performed on prospectively collected data of 27 consecutive cases of lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with posterior instrumentation and TLIF between January 2009 and December 2012. Cases were analysed for safety, radiological and clinical outcomes of transforaminal interbody fusion using bone graft ± titanium cages. Interbody metallic cages with bone graft were used in 17 cases and ten cases used only bone graft. Indications for surgical treatment were failed conservative management in 17, neurodeficit in six and significant bony destruction in four. There were no cases reporting cage migration, loosening, pseudoarthrosis or recurrence of infection at a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Kirkaldy-Willis criteria, which showed 14 excellent, nine good, three fair and one poor result. Mean focal deformity improved with the use of bone graft ± interbody cages, and the deformity correction was maintained at final follow-up. Mean pre-operative focal lordosis for the graft group was 8.5° (2-16.5°), which improved to 10.9 °(3.3-16°); mean pre-operative focal lordosis in the group treated with cages was 6.7 °(0-15°), which improved to 7°(0-15°) . TLIFs with cages in patients with pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis allows for acceptable clearance of infection, satisfactory deformity correction with low incidence of cage migration, loosening and infection recurrence.

  11. Analysis of Internet Information on Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belayneh, Rebekah; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-07-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a surgical technique that is being increasingly used. The authors' objective was to examine information on the Internet pertaining to the LLIF technique. An analysis was conducted of publicly accessible websites pertaining to LLIF. The following search engines were used: Google (www.google.com), Bing (www.bing.com), and Yahoo (www.yahoo.com). DuckDuckGo (www.duckduckgo.com) was an additional search engine used due to its emphasis on generating accurate and consistent results while protecting searchers' privacy and reducing advertisements. The top 35 websites providing information on LLIF from the 4 search engines were identified. A total of 140 websites were evaluated. Each web-site was categorized based on authorship (academic, private, medical industry, insurance company, other) and content of information. Using the search term lateral lumbar interbody fusion, 174,000 Google results, 112,000 Yahoo results, and 112,000 Bing results were obtained. DuckDuckGo does not display the number of results found for a search. From the top 140 websites collected from each website, 78 unique websites were identified. Websites were authored by a private medical group in 46.2% of the cases, an academic medical group in 26.9% of the cases, and the biomedical industry in 5.1% of the cases. Sixty-eight percent of websites reported indications, and 24.4% reported contraindications. Benefits of LLIF were reported by 69.2% of websites. Thirty-six percent of websites reported complications of LLIF. Overall, the quality of information regarding LLIF on the Internet is poor. Spine surgeons and spine societies can assist in improving the quality of the information on the Internet regarding LLIF. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e701-e707.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Comparison Between Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tao; Hu, Shi-Yu; Zhang, Yuan-Tao; Zheng, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Zhe; Yang, Xin-Jian

    2018-04-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety in the management of lumbar diseases performed by either posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Interbody fusion is considered the "gold standard" in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases. Both PLIF and TLIF have been advocated, and it remains controversial as to the best operative technique. The electronic databases including Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane library were searched to identify relevant studies up to September 2017. The primary outcomes were fusion rate, complications, and clinical satisfaction. The secondary outcomes were length of hospitalization, operation time, blood loss, postoperative visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 16 studies involving 1502 patients (805 patients in PLIF group and 697 in TLIF group) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in terms of fusion rate (P > 0.05) and clinical satisfaction (P > 0.05) between the 2 groups. TLIF was superior to PLIF with significantly lower incidence of nerve root injury (P 0.05) and graft malposition (P > 0.05). PLIF required significant longer operation time (P degenerative lumbar diseases. However, TLIF was superior to PLIF with shorter operation time, less blood loss, and lower incidence of nerve root injury and dural tear. There is no significant difference between both groups regarding wound infection and graft malposition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Unilateral Fixation for Degenerative Lumbar Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Wang; Hu, Yong-Cheng; Wu, Zhan-Yong; Wu, Hua-Rong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Lian-Suo; Xu, Wei-Kun; Fan, Hui-Long; Cai, Jin-Sheng; Ma, Jian-Qing

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of the minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation using a tubular retractor in the management of degenerative lumbar disease. A retrospective analysis was conducted to analyze the clinical outcome of 58 degenerative lumbar disease patients who were treated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation during December 2012 to January 2015. The spine was unilaterally approached through a 3.0-cm skin incision centered on the disc space, located 2.5 cm lateral to the midline, and the multifidus muscles and longissimus dorsi were stripped off. After transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion the unilateral pedicle screw fixation was performed. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the MacNab score were applied to evaluate clinical effects. The operation time, peri-operative bleeding, postoperative time in bed, hospitalization costs, and the change in the intervertebral height were analyzed. Radiological fusion based on the Bridwell grading system was also assessed at the last follow-up. The quality of life of the patients before and after the operation was assessed using the short form-36 scale (SF-36). Fifty-eight operations were successfully performed, and no nerve root injury or dural tear occurred. The average operation time was 138 ± 33 min, intraoperative blood loss was 126 ± 50 mL, the duration from surgery to getting out of bed was 46 ± 8 h, and hospitalization cost was 1.6 ± 0.2 ten thousand yuan. All of the 58 patients were followed up for 7-31 months, with an average of 14.6 months. The postoperative VAS scores and ODI score were significantly improved compared with preoperative data (P degenerative lumbar disease, and the short-term clinical outcome is satisfactory

  14. Surgical outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation for lumbar spondylolisthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, Motoi; Kuno, Shigehiko; Inoue, Tatsushi

    2009-01-01

    Problems of lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment are many surgical tactics, elderly patient, osteoporosis, complications and recurrence of the symptoms. PLIF (posterior lumbar interbody fusion) and PS (pedicle screw) fixation technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis provide good patient satisfaction. Good outcome has been reported by only laminectomy alone, but patient satisfaction becomes worse year after year. The role of instrumentation for lumbar spondylolisthesis is decompression of the nerve root, correction of lumbar pathologies, bony fusion and early mobilization. We show our surgical technique and long term outcome of PLIF with PS for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Three hundred and fifty cases of lumbar spondylolisthesis were operated on in Department of Neurosurgery, Fujita Health University during the period of from December 1992 to August 2008. Patient background: age 16-84 years old (mean 62.5), Gender: male 153, female 197. Follow-up period 1-180 months (mean 61.2). Degenerative: 255, Isthmic: 63, Dysplastic: 10, Fracture: 5 and scoliosis 16 cases. Surgical procedure was PS with interbody fusion cage: 331, Hybrid cage (titanium cage with hydroxyapatite) 314, PS with Cerabone: 2 and PS with autograft: 17. CT was done to evaluate bony fusion postoperatively. Post operative improvements by JOA (Japan Orthopedic Association) score is 11.4 before surgery, 24.1 (post op. within 2 years), 25.4 (post op. 2-5 years), 25.0 (post op. 5-10 years) and 22.4 (post op. 10-15 years). Significant improvements were observed in %Slip and Slip angle but no remarkable change was observed in lumbar lordotic angle by postoperative X-ray evaluation. No root injury, and systemic complication except 4 cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during surgery. Two cases were reoperated in whom cage with autograft migration due to pseudoarthrosis. Two cases had to undergo screw and cage system removal due to infection. Two cases of adjacent level stenosis had to undergo operation 10

  15. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation.Methods: Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reco...

  16. Lumbar sagittal contour after posterior interbody fusion: threaded devices alone versus vertical cages plus posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemme, W R; Owens, B D; Dhawan, A; Zeidman, S; Polly, D W

    2001-03-01

    An observational radiographic study examining lumbar sagittal contour of patients undergoing posterior interbody arthrodesis. To compare operative alterations of lumbar sagittal contour after posterior interbody fusion using threaded interbody devices alone versus vertical cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation. Technique-related alterations of lumbar sagittal contour during interbody arthrodesis have received little attention in the spinal literature. Standing lumbar radiographs were measured for preoperative and postoperative segmental lordosis at levels undergoing posterior interbody arthrodesis using either stand-alone side-by-side threaded devices or vertical cages combined with posterior transpedicular compression instrumentation. Sagittal plane segmental correction (or loss of correction) was calculated and statistically compared. The radiographs of 30 patients (34 spinal segments) undergoing lumbar or lumbosacral arthrodesis were compared. Seventeen patients (18 segments) had undergone interbody fusion using threaded cages,whereas 13 patients (16 segments) underwent fusion using vertically oriented mesh cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation. Preoperative segmental lordosis averaged 8 degrees for both groups. For patients undergoing fusion with threaded cages, there was a mean lordotic loss of 3 degrees/segment. For patients undergoing fusion with vertically oriented mesh cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation,there was a mean lordotic gain of 5 degrees/segment. This difference in segmental sagittal plane contour was highly significant (P = 0.00). Threaded fusion devices placed under interbody distraction with the endplates parallel fail to preserve or reestablish segmental lordosis. Vertical cages, however, when combined with posterior compression instrumentation, not only maintain segmental lordosis, but also can correct sagittal plane deformity.

  17. Repeated adjacent-segment degeneration after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Shinya; Oda, Takenori; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Maeno, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important sequelae affecting long-term results is adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Although several reports have described the incidence rate, there have been no reports of repeated ASD. The purpose of this report was to describe 1 case of repeated ASD after PLIF. A 62-year-old woman with L-4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent PLIF at L4-5. At the second operation, L3-4 PLIF was performed for L-3 degenerative spondylolisthesis 6 years after the primary operation. At the third operation, L2-3 PLIF was performed for L-2 degenerative spondylolisthesis 1.5 years after the primary operation. Vertebral collapse of L-1 was detected 1 year after the third operation, and the collapse had progressed. At the fourth operation, 3 years after the third operation, vertebral column resection of L-1 and replacement of titanium mesh cages with pedicle screw fixation between T-4 and L-5 was performed. Although the patient's symptoms resolved after each operation, the time between surgeries shortened. The sacral slope decreased gradually although each PLIF achieved local lordosis at the fused segment.

  18. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone cage after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Chan; Chung, Hung-Tae; Cho, Jae-Lim; Kim, Dong-Jun; Chung, Nam-Su

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective case series. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of cage subsidence after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) conducted using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage, and to identify associated risk factors. Although various rates of cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion have been reported, few studies have addressed subsidence rate after MITLIF using PEEK cage. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone MITLIF using a PEEK cage with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included in this study. Cage subsidence was defined to have occurred when a cage was observed to sink into an adjacent vertebral body by ≥2 mm on the postoperative or serial follow-up lateral radiographs. The demographic variables considered to affect cage subsidence were the following: age, sex, body mass index, bone mineral density, diagnosis, number of fusion segment, and the quality/quantity of back muscle, and the cage-related variables considered were: level of fusion, intervertebral angle, cage size, cage position, and postoperative distraction of disc height. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to explore relations between these variables and cage subsidence. : For the 122 cages inserted, the rate of cage subsidence was 14.8% (18 cages), and cage subsidence occurred within 7.2±8.5 (1-25) months of surgery. The odds ratios for factors found to significantly increase the risk of cage subsidence were; 1.950 (95% confidence interval, 1.002-4.224) for L5-S1 level, and 1.018 (95% confidence interval, 1.000-1.066) for anterior cage position. The rate of PEEK cage subsidence after MITLIF was relatively low. End-plate manipulation and cage insertion during MITLIF were not influenced by a small operation window.

  19. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia.

  20. Segmental stability and compressive strength of posterior lumbar interbody fusion implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantrizos, A; Baramki, H G; Zeidman, S; Steffen, T

    2000-08-01

    Human cadaveric study on initial segmental stability and compressive strength of posterior lumbar interbody fusion implants. To compare the initial segmental stability and compressive strength of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion construct using a new cortical bone spacer machined from allograft to that of titanium threaded and nonthreaded posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages, tested as stand-alone and with supplemental pedicle screw fixation. Cages were introduced to overcome the limitations of conventional allografts. Radiodense cage materials impede radiographic assessment of the fusion, however, and may cause stress shielding of the graft. Multisegmental specimens were tested intact, with posterior lumbar interbody fusion implants inserted into the L4/L5 interbody space and with supplemental pedicle screw fixation. Three posterior lumbar interbody fusion implant constructs (Ray Threaded Fusion Cage, Contact Fusion Cage, and PLIF Allograft Spacer) were tested nondestructively in axial rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral bending. The implant-specimen constructs then were isolated and compressed to failure. Changes in the neutral zone, range of motion, yield strength, and ultimate compressive strength were analyzed. None of the stand-alone implant constructs reduced the neutral zone. Supplemental pedicle screw fixation decreased the neutral zone in flexion-extension and lateral bending. Stand-alone implant constructs decreased the range of motion in flexion and lateral bending. Differences in the range of motion between stand-alone cage constructs were found in flexion and extension (marginally significant). Supplemental posterior fixation further decreased the range of motion in all loading directions with no differences between implant constructs. The Contact Fusion Cage and PLIF Allograft Spacer constructs had a higher ultimate compressive strength than the Ray Threaded Fusion Cage. The biomechanical data did not suggest any implant construct to

  1. Biomechanical analysis of lateral interbody fusion strategies for adjacent segment degeneration in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Melodie F; Robinson, Samuel T; Maldonado, Ruben C; Rawlinson, Jeremy; Liu, John; Acosta, Frank L

    2017-07-01

    Surgical treatment of symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) typically involves extension of previous instrumentation to include the newly affected level(s). Disruption of the incision site can present challenges and increases the risk of complication. Lateral-based interbody fusion techniques may provide a viable surgical alternative that avoids these risks. This study is the first to analyze the biomechanical effect of adding a lateral-based construct to an existing fusion. The study aimed to determine whether a minimally invasive lateral interbody device, with and without supplemental instrumentation, can effectively stabilize the rostral segment adjacent to a two-level fusion when compared with a traditional posterior revision approach. This is a cadaveric biomechanical study of lateral-based interbody strategies as add-on techniques to an existing fusion for the treatment of ASD. Twelve lumbosacral specimens were non-destructively loaded in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion. Sequentially, the tested conditions were intact, two-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) (L3-L5), followed by lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedures at L2-L3 including interbody alone, a supplemental lateral plate, a supplemental spinous process plate, and then either cortical screw or pedicle screw fixation. A three-level TLIF was the final instrumented condition. In all conditions, three-dimensional kinematics were tracked and range of motion (ROM) was calculated for comparisons. Institutional funds (Spine. The addition of a lateral interbody device superadjacent to a two-level fusion significantly reduced motion in flexion, extension, and lateral bending (pfusion construct, demonstrating ROM comparable with a traditional three-level TLIF. The data presented suggest that a lateral-based interbody fusion supplemented with additional minimally invasive instrumentation may provide comparable stability with a traditional posterior revision approach

  2. Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Adult Low-Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after fusion surgery for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) has been reported to be relatively low compared with other lumbar disease entities. However, there has been no study of symptomatic ASP incidence using posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with pedicle screw instrumentation. We investigated the incidence of symptomatic ASP after PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation for adult low-grade IS and identified s...

  3. Clinical and radiological outcome of minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion in primary versus revision surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hentenaar, B.; Spoor, A. B.; Malefijt, J. de Waal; Diekerhof, C. H.; den Oudsten, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to compare the clinical and radiological outcome of minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MI-PLIF) in revision and primary cases. Methods In a retrospective study, we compared the clinical and radiological results of MI-PLIF for lytic

  4. Clinical outcomes of two minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for lumbar degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yonghao; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-10-01

    There are two modified TLIF, including MIS-TLIF and TLIF through Wiltse approach (W-TLIF). Although both of the two minimally invasive surgical procedures can be effective in the treatment for lumbar degenerative diseases, no comparative analysis has been made so far regarding their clinical outcomes. To compare the clinical outcomes of MIS-TLIF and W-TLIF for the treatment for single-segment degenerative lumbar diseases. Ninety-seven patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disorders were included in this study. Forty-seven underwent MIS-TLIF surgery (group A). For group B, fifty patients underwent W-TLIF. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, the visual analog scale (VAS) of low back pain (LBP) and leg pain, MRI score and atrophy rate of CSA, interbody fusion rate were assessed during the postoperative follow-up. Incision length, blood loss, operative time, CPK, and postoperative incision pain VAS were better in group A (P degenerative disease. MIS-TLIF has less blood loss, shorter surgical incision, and less lower postoperative back pain, while W-TLIF is less expensive for hospital stay with lower exposure to X-rays.

  5. Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion and transpsoas approach-related morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, David J; Slimack, Nicholas P; Acosta, Frank L; Koski, Tyler R; Fessler, Richard G; Liu, John C

    2011-10-01

    Recently, the minimally invasive, lateral retroperitoneal, transpsoas approach to the thoracolumbar spinal column has been described by various authors. This is known as the minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the approach-related morbidity associated with the minimally invasive transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine. To date, there have been only a couple of reports regarding the morbidity of the transpsoas muscle approach. A nonrandomized, prospective study utilizing a self-reported patient questionnaire was conducted between January 2006 and June 2008 at Northwestern University. Data were collected in 53 patients with a follow-up period ranging from 6 months to 3.5 years. Only 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Thirty-six percent (19 of 53) of patients reported subjective hip flexor weakness, 25% (13 of 53) anterior thigh numbness, and 23% (12 of 53) anterior thigh pain. However, 84% of the 19 patients reported complete resolution of their subjective hip flexor weakness by 6 months, and most experienced improved strength by 8 weeks. Of those reporting anterior thigh numbness and pain, 69% and 75% improved to their baseline function by the 6-month follow-up evaluations, respectively. All patients with self-reported subjective hip flexor weakness underwent examinations during subsequent clinic visits after surgery; however, these examinations did not confirm a motor deficit less than Grade 5. Subset analysis showed that the L3-4 and L4-5 levels were most often affected. The minimally invasive, transpsoas muscle approach to the lumbar spine has a number of advantages. The data show that a percentage of the patients undergoing the transpsoas approach will have temporary sensory and motor symptoms related to this approach. The majority of the symptoms are thought to be related to psoas muscle inflammation and/or stretch injury to the genitofemoral nerve due to the surgical corridor traversed during the

  6. Symptomatic ectopic bone formation after off-label use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan-Fu; Smith, Zachary A; Stiner, Eric; Armin, Sean; Sheikh, Hormoz; Khoo, Larry T

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) has been approved for use in the lumbar spine in conjunction with the lumbar tapered cage. However, off-label use of this osteoinductive agent is observed with anterior fusion applications as well as with both posterior lumbar interbody fusion and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Complications using rhBMP-2 in the cervical spine have been reported. Although radiographic evidence of ectopic bone in the lumbar spine has been described following rhBMP-2 use, this finding was not previously believed to be of clinical relevance. This study was a retrospective review of 4 patients who underwent minimally invasive spinal TLIF (MIS-TLIF) in which bone fusion was augmented with rhBMP-2 applied to an absorbable collagen sponge. Case presentations, operative findings, imaging data, and follow-up findings were reviewed. Four cases with delayed symptomatic neural compression following the off-label use of rhBMP-2 with MIS-TLIF were identified. Although previously believed to be only a radiographic finding, the development of ectopic bone following rhBMP-2 use in lumbar fusion can be clinically significant. This paper describes 4 cases of delayed neural compression following MIS-TLIF. The reader should be aware of this potential complication following the off-label use of rhBMP-2 in the lumbar spine.

  7. Mini-invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion through Wiltse Approach to Treating Lumbar Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Tian, Yong-hao; Zheng, Yan-ping; Liu, Xin-yu; Wang, Hu-hu

    2016-02-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy of mini-invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) through the Wiltse approach for treating lumbar spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. In this retrospective controlled study, 69 cases with lumbar spondylolytic spondylolisthesis treated in Qilu hospital from April to November 2014 were randomly assigned to Wiltse approach (31 cases, 16 male, 15 female; mean age 45.1 years) and traditional approach groups (38 cases, 21 male, 17 female; 47.2 years. In the Wiltse approach group, the affected level was L4, 5 in 19 cases and L5 S1 in 12, 9 of whom had low back pain (LBP) only and 21 both LBP and leg pain. There were 17 cases of I degree and 14 of II degree spondylolisthesis. Pre-operative Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 13.1 ± 2.6; visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP 7.4 ± 1.2; VAS for leg pain 6.1 ± 2.0 and Oswestry disability index (ODI) score 42.2% ± 1.2%. In the traditional approach group, the affected level was L4, 5 in 22 cases and L5 S1 in 16, 11 of whom had LBP only and 27 both LBP and leg pain. There were 21 cases of I degree and 17 of II degree spondylolisthesis. Pre-operative JOA score was 12.8 ± 1.2; VAS for LBP 6.9 ± 1.1; VAS for leg pain 7.1 ± 2.0 and ODI score 41.2% ± 2.0%. The JOA score, VAS for LBP and leg pain, ODI dynamic X-rays, CT and/or MR were evaluated 3 and 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. There were no differences in sex, age, affected levels, spondylolisthesis degree, pre-operative JOA score, VAS for LBP or leg pain and ODI score between the two groups (P > 0.05). The incision length, blood loss and time to achieving exposure were better in the Wiltse approach than the traditional approach group (P 0.05). The interbody fusion rate was not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). There were no complications of internal fixation in either group. TLIF via both approaches has satisfactory clinical efficacy. TLIF through the Wiltse approach significantly reduces the

  8. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with cages and local bone graft in the treatment of spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillier, Hans; Birkenmaier, Christof; Rauch, Alexander; Weiler, Christoph; Kauschke, Thomas; Refior, Hans Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) implants are increasingly being used for 360 degrees fusion after decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis combined with degenerative instability. Both titanium and PEEK (PolyEtherEtherKetone) implants are commonly used. Assessing the clinical and radiological results as well as typical complications, such as migration of the cages, is important. In addition, questions such as which radiological parameters can be used to assess successful fusion, and whether the exclusive use of local bone graft is sufficient, are frequently debated. We prospectively evaluated 30 patients after PLIF instrumentation for degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis, over a course of 42 months. In all cases, titanium cages and local bone graft were used for spondylodesis. The follow-up protocol of these 30 cases included standardised clinical and radiological evaluation at 3, 6, 12 and 42 months after surgery. Overall satisfactory results were achieved. With one exception, a stable result was achieved with restoration of the intervertebral space in the anterior column. After 42 months of follow-up in most cases, a radiologically visible loss of disc space height can be demonstrated. Clinically relevant migration of the cage in the dorsal direction was detected in one case. Based on our experience, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) can be recommended for the treatment of monosegmental and bisegmental spinal stenosis, with or without segmental instability. Postoperative evaluation is mainly based on clinical parameters since the titanium implant affects the diagnostic value of imaging studies and is responsible for artefacts. The results observed in our group of patients suggest that local autologous bone graft procured from the posterior elements after decompression is an adequate material for bone grafting in this procedure.

  10. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis and degenerative spondylosis: 5-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yung; Ha, Joong Won; Lee, Yun Tae; Sung, Na Young

    2014-06-01

    Multiple studies have reported favorable short-term results after treatment of spondylolisthesis and other degenerative lumbar diseases with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. However, to our knowledge, results at a minimum of 5 years have not been reported. We determined (1) changes to the Oswestry Disability Index, (2) frequency of radiographic fusion, (3) complications and reoperations, and (4) the learning curve associated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at minimum 5-year followup. We reviewed our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion to treat low-grade spondylolisthesis and degenerative lumbar diseases and did not need a major deformity correction. This represented 63% (124 of 198) of the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures we performed for those indications during the study period (2003-2007). Eighty-three (67%) patients had complete 5-year followup. Plain radiographs and CT scans were evaluated by two reviewers. Trends of surgical time, blood loss, and hospital stay over time were examined by logarithmic curve fit-regression analysis to evaluate the learning curve. At 5 years, mean Oswestry Disability Index improved from 60 points preoperatively to 24 points and 79 of 83 patients (95%) had improvement of greater than 10 points. At 5 years, 67 of 83 (81%) achieved radiographic fusion, including 64 of 72 patients (89%) who had single-level surgery. Perioperative complications occurred in 11 of 124 patients (9%), and another surgical procedure was performed in eight of 124 patients (6.5%) involving the index level and seven of 124 patients (5.6%) at adjacent levels. There were slowly decreasing trends of surgical time and hospital stay only in single-level surgery and almost no change in intraoperative blood loss over time, suggesting a challenging learning curve. Oswestry Disability Index scores improved for patients with spondylolisthesis

  11. New cage for posterior minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion: a study in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Wu, Xiao-tao; Zhuang, Su-yang; Bao, Jun-ping; Shi, Rui

    2014-02-01

    To design a new type of interbody fusion device made of nickel titanium NiTi shape memory alloy and to compare segmental stiffness after various posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures in vitro and in vivo. Twelve sheep lumbar functional spinal units were randomly allocated to four groups. One acted as controls (N); the other three were treated with autogenous iliac crest bone dowel graft (L), a threaded cylindrical titanium (KC) interbody fusion device (TFC) or a new type of interbody fusion device made of NiTi shape memory alloy (NT) containing autogenous iliac crest graft. In addition, 15 sheep were allocated to three groups; one served as controls and the other two underwent TFC (KC) or NiTi-FC (NT). Nondestructive mechanical tests were performed in pure compression, extension, lateral bending and torsion. The operated spines were photographed regularly to assess changes in interbody height and degree of fusion. The animals were killed at 6 months for histologic testing. Biomechanical tests showed both the strength and axial stiffness of the NT and KC groups were significantly higher than those of the control group and L group (P destructive load of the NiTi-TFC was 11 200 N and the safety coefficient was above 1.2. Radiological observations revealed that the bone callus around the interbody fusion device were gradually increased postoperatively (2 months, no obvious; 4 months, poorly define; 6 months, dense). The KC and NT group had lost 16% and 16.5% of their postoperative height but remained well above normal disc height (P < 0.05). Histologic examination showed new trabeculation connected with that of the host. The mechanical characteristics of the NiTi-TFC are excellent and it is safe and reliable. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Uninstrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Have Technological Advances in Stabilizing the Lumbar Spine Truly Improved Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolo, Laura M; Oklund, Sally A; Zawadzki, Nadine; Desai, Manisha; Prolo, Donald J

    2018-04-06

    Since 1980s numerous operations have replaced posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with human bone. These often involve expensive implants and complex procedures. Escalating expenditures in lumbar fusion surgery warrant re-evaluation of classical PLIF with allogeneic ilium and without instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term fusion rate and clinical outcomes of allo-PLIF. Between 1981-2006 321 patients ages 12-80, underwent 339 one- or two-level allo-PLIFs for degenerative instability and were followed 1-28 years. Fusion status was determined by radiographs and as available, by CT scans. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Economic/Functional Outcome Scale. 308 of the 321 patients were followed postoperatively (average 6.7 years, range 1-28); 297 (96%) fused. Fusion rates were lower for patients with substance abuse (89%, p=0.007). Clinical outcomes in 87% of patients were excellent (52%) or good (35%). Economic/Functional Outcome Scale scores following initial allo-PLIF on average increased 5.2 points. Successful fusion correlated with nearly a 2-point gain in outcome score (p=0.001). A positive association between a patient characteristic and outcome was observed only with age 65 and greater; whereas negative associations in clinical outcomes were observed with mental illness, substance abuse, heavy stress to low back, or industrial injuries. Total complication rate was 7%. With three decades of follow-up we found successful clinical outcomes are highly correlated with solid fusion using only allogeneic iliac bone. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION AND INSTRUMENTED POSTEROLATERAL FUSION IN ADULT SPONDYLOLISTHESIS: ASSESSMENT AND CLINICAL OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajarajan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study is to assess and compare the outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and posterolateral fusion (PLF in adult isthmic spondylosthesis. BACKGROUND: Posterolateral fusion has been considered the best method and widely been used for surgical treatment of adult spondylolisthesis.Superior results have subsequently been reported with interbody fusion with cages and posterior instrumentation MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty six patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis were operated. One group (20 patients had decompression and posterolateral fusion (PLF with a pedicle screw system; other group (16 patients was treated by decompression, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and a Pedicle screw system. In both groups adequate decompression was done RESULTS: Seventy seven percent of the patients had a good result with (PLIF and 68 percent with posterolateral fusion (PLF. However there was no statistical difference in cases with low grade slipping, whereas the difference was significant for cases with high grade slipping. Fusion rate was 93% with (PLIF and 68% with (PLF, but without any significant incidence in the functional outcome. 78% has relief of sciatica and neurogenic claudication. CONCLUSION: Based on these findings we found that for high grade spondylolisthesis which requires reduction or if the disc space is still high posterior lumbar inter body fusion is preferable. For low grade spondylolisthesis or if the disc space is narrow posterolateral fusion is preferable. A successful result of fusion operation depends on adequate decompression which relieves radicular symptoms.

  14. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF. Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique.

  15. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Ali; Smith, Zachary A.; Lawton, Cort D.; Fessler, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique. PMID:22928099

  16. Fracture of the L-4 vertebral body after use of a stand-alone interbody fusion device in degenerative spondylolisthesis for anterior L3-4 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yoon-Kwang; Jang, Ju-Hee; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Many studies attest to the excellent results achieved using anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for degenerative spondylolisthesis. The purpose of this report is to document a rare instance of L-4 vertebral body fracture following use of a stand-alone interbody fusion device for L3-4 ALIF. The patient, a 55-year-old man, had suffered intractable pain of the back, right buttock, and left leg for several weeks. Initial radiographs showed Grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis, with instability in the sagittal plane (upon 15° rotation) and stenosis of central and both lateral recesses at the L3-4 level. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion of the affected vertebrae was subsequently conducted using a stand-alone cage/plate system. Postoperatively, the severity of spondylolisthesis diminished, with resolution of symptoms. However, the patient returned 2 months later with both leg weakness and back pain. Plain radiographs and CT indicated device failure due to anterior fracture of the L-4 vertebral body, and the spondylolisthesis had recurred. At this point, bilateral facetectomies were performed, with reduction/fixation of L3-4 by pedicle screws. Again, degenerative spondylolisthesis improved postsurgically and symptoms eased, with eventual healing of the vertebral body fracture. This report documents a rare instance of L-4 vertebral body fracture following use of a stand-alone device for ALIF at L3-4, likely as a consequence of angular instability in degenerative spondylolisthesis. Under such conditions, additional pedicle screw fixation is advised.

  17. Results of lumbar spondylodeses using different bone grafting materials after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonderHoeh, Nicolas Heinz; Voelker, Anna; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2017-11-01

    Can a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HA) and autologous bone from decompression sites produce similar results when used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)? In the current literature, autologous iliac crest bone grafts (ICBGs) have been reported the gold standard for this procedure. Indeed, to date, no clinical data have confirmed that a mixture of equal volumes of HA and local autologous bone produce similar results in term of fusion as the same volume of autologous ICBG alone. Study design/setting This study was approved by the local ethics committee and completed in a prospective, randomized, single-blinded manner. The results of lumbar fusion using TLIF and different bone grafting materials were compared. Patient sample The patient sample included patients with spinal lumbar degenerative disease. Outcome measures The clinical outcome was determined using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The radiological outcomes and fusion rates were determined with radiographs evaluated using the McAfee criteria and computed tomography (CT) data evaluated by the Williams criteria. Three blinded investigators (one radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons) assessed the data. The secondary variables included donor site morbidity. Methods The patients were admitted to our department for orthopedic surgery with degenerative lumbar pathologies (L2-S1) that required stabilization in one or two segments using a TLIF procedure. The patients were 18-80 years old. Only those patients who had degenerative lumbar pathologies and agreed to be educated about the study were included. The patients were divided into the following two randomized groups: group A: TLIF procedure using autologous ICBGs alone; and group B: TLIF procedure using local bone from decompression site mixed with hydroxyapatite. Each group received equal graft volumes. The mixture in group B consisted of equal volumes of local autograft (5 cc) and synthetic

  18. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone intervertebral cages in minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien V; Baaj, Ali A; Dakwar, Elias; Burkett, Clinton J; Murray, Gisela; Smith, Donald A; Uribe, Juan S

    2012-06-15

    A retrospective review. The objective is to evaluate subsidence related to minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion by reviewing our experience with this procedure. Polyetheretherketone intervertebral cages of different lengths, widths, and heights filled with various allograft types are commonly used as spacers in lumbar fusions. Subsidence is a potential complication. To date, there are no published reports specifically addressing subsidence, because it relates to a series of patients undergoing minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion. An institutional review board-approved, retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was conducted. One hundred forty consecutive patients who underwent this procedure between L1 and L5 during a 2-year period were included. All patients had T scores of -2.5 or more. Postoperative radiographs during routine follow-ups were reviewed for subsidence, defined as any violation of the vertebral end plate. Radiographical subsidence occurred in 14.3% (20 of 140), whereas clinical subsidence occurred in 2.1%. Subsidence occurred in 8.8% (21 of 238) of levels fused. Construct length had a significant positive correlation with increasing subsidence rates. Subsidence rates decreased progressively with lower levels in the lumbar spine, but had a higher than expected rate at L4-L5. Subsidence rates of 14.1% (19 of 135) and 1.9% (2 of 103) were associated with 18-and 22-mm-wide cages, respectively. No significant trends were observed with cage lengths. Supplemental lateral plates had a higher rate of subsidence than bilateral pedicle screws. Subsidence occurred at the superior end plate 70% of the time. The use of wider intervertebral cages leads to a significantly lower rate of subsidence, but a longer cage does not necessarily offer a similar advantage. Wide cages are protective against subsidence, and the widest cages should be used whenever feasible for interbody

  19. Combined posteroanterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in thoracolumbar burst fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Rene; Lindtner, Richard Andreas; Lill, Markus; Blauth, Michael; Krappinger, Dietmar; Kammerlander, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The optimal treatment strategy for burst fractures of the thoracolumbar junction is discussed controversially in the literature. Whilst 360° fusion has shown to result in better radiological outcome, recent studies have failed to show its superiority concerning clinical outcome. The morbidity associated with the additional anterior approach may account for these findings. The aim of this prospective observational study was therefore to compare two different techniques for 360° fusion in thoracolumbar burst fractures using either thoracoscopy or a transforaminal approach (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)) to support the anterior column. Posterior reduction and short-segmental fixation using angular stable pedicle screw systems were performed in all patients as a first step. Monocortical strut grafts were used for the anterior support in the TLIF group, whilst tricortical grafts or titanium vertebral body replacing implants of adjustable height were used in the combined posteroanterior group. At final follow-up, the radiological outcome was assessed by performing X-rays in a standing position. The clinical outcome was measured using five validated outcome scores. The morbidity associated with the approaches and the donor site was assessed as well. There were 21 patients in the TLIF group and 14 patients in the posteroanterior group included. The postoperative loss of correction was higher in the TLIF group (4.9°±8.3° versus 3.4°±6.4°, p>0.05). There were no significant differences regarding the outcome scores between the two groups. There were no differences in terms of return to employment, leisure activities and back function either. More patients suffered from donor-site morbidity in the TLIF group, whilst the morbidity associated with the surgical approach was higher in the posteroanterior group. The smaller donor-site morbidity in the posteroanterior group is counterbalanced by an additional morbidity associated with the anterior approach

  20. Do intraoperative radiographs predict final lumbar sagittal alignment following single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Khalid M I; Eranki, Aditya P; Paquette, Scott; Boyd, Michael; Street, John; Kwon, Brian K; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2018-02-16

    OBJECTIVE The study aimed to determine if the intraoperative segmental lordosis (as calculated on a cross-table lateral radiograph following a single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion [TLIF] for degenerative spondylolisthesis/low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis) is maintained at discharge and at 6 months postsurgery. METHODS The authors reviewed images and medical records of patients ≥ 16 years of age with a diagnosis of an isolated single-level, low-grade spondylolisthesis (degenerative or isthmic) with symptomatic spinal stenosis treated between January 2008 and April 2014. Age, sex, surgical level, surgical approach, and facetectomy (unilateral vs bilateral) were recorded. Upright standardized preoperative, early, and 6-month postoperative radiographs, as well as intraoperative lateral radiographs, were analyzed for the pelvic incidence, segmental lumbar lordosis (SLL) at the TILF level, and total LL (TLL). In addition, the anteroposterior position of the cage in the disc space was documented. Data are presented as the mean ± SD; a p value level using a bullet-shaped cage. A bilateral facetectomy was performed in 17 patients (20.2%), and 89.3% of procedures were done at the L4-5 and L5-S1 segments. SLL significantly improved intraoperatively from 15.8° ± 7.5° to 20.9° ± 7.7°, but the correction was lost after ambulation. Compared with preoperative values, at 6 months the change in SLL was modest at 1.8° ± 6.7° (p = 0.025), whereas TLL increased by 4.3° ± 9.6° (p level of surgery, and use of a bilateral facetectomy did not significantly affect postoperative LL. CONCLUSIONS Following a single-level TLIF procedure using a bullet-shaped cage, the intraoperative improvement in SLL is largely lost after ambulation. The improvement in TLL over time is probably due to the decompression part of the procedure. The approach, level of surgery, bilateral facetectomy, and position of the cage do not seem to have a significant effect on LL achieved

  1. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion using traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Several biomechanical studies have demonstrated the favorable mechanical properties of the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw. However, no reports have examined surgical outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with CBT screw fixation for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) compared with those after PLIF using traditional pedicle screw (PS) fixation. The purposes of this study were thus to elucidate surgical outcomes after PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS and to compare these results with those after PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS (CBT group; mean followup 35 months). A historical control group consisted of 82 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with traditional PS fixation (PS group; mean follow-up 40 months). Clinical status was assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale score. Fusion status was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT. The need for additional surgery and surgery-related complications was also evaluated. RESULTS The mean JOA score improved significantly from 13.7 points before surgery to 23.3 points at the latest follow-up in the CBT group (mean recovery rate 64.4%), compared with 14.4 points preoperatively to 22.7 points at final follow-up in the PS group (mean recovery rate 55.8%; p 0.05). Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease developed in 3 patients from the CBT group (3.2%) compared with 9 patients from the PS group (11.0%, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS provided comparable improvement of clinical symptoms with PLIF using traditional PS fixation. However, the successful fusion rate tended to be lower in the CBT group than in the PS group, although the difference was not statistically significant between the 2 groups.

  2. Evaluation of hip flexion strength following lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Po; Regev, Gilad J; Chan, Justin; Zhang, Bing; Taylor, William; Kim, Choll W; Garfin, Steven R

    2013-10-01

    Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a minimally invasive procedure that is designed to achieve a solid interbody fusion while minimizing the damage to the surrounding soft tissue. Although short-term results have been promising, few data have been published to date regarding its risks and complication rate. The aim was to evaluate the extent of injury to the psoas muscle after the LIF procedure by measuring hip flexion strength. A prospective case series was used in the study. Hip flexion strength was measured using a handheld digital dynamometer while the patient was seated on a chair; the examiner held the device against the patient's attempt to flex the hip. Both sides were measured to compare the operated and nonoperated psoas muscles. Each side was measured three times and the average amount (in pounds) was recorded. Measurements were done before and after surgery on Day 2-3, at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and at 3 and 6 months. Thirty-three patients were recruited for this study. Mean preoperative hip flexion strength values were 20.7±3.47 lb and 21.3±4.31 lb for operated and nonoperated legs, respectively, with no significant difference (p=.85). With a mean of 11.2±2.24 lb postoperative measurements on Day 2, the operated side showed statistically significant reduction of strength (p=.0001). The nonoperated side was also weaker postoperatively, but not significantly (mean=19.12±1.74 lb; p=.097). From the first follow-up visit at 2 weeks, the values on the operated leg had returned to baseline values (20.6, p=.97) and were not significantly different from preoperative values on either side. Hip flexion was weakened immediately after the LIF procedure, which may be attributed to psoas muscle injury during the procedure. However, this damage was temporary, with almost complete return to baseline values by 2 weeks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Incidence and impact of implant subsidence after stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocahut, N; Audureau, E; Poignard, A; Delambre, J; Queinnec, S; Flouzat Lachaniette, C-H; Allain, J

    2017-12-30

    Few data are available on the occurrence after stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) of implant subsidence, whose definition and incidence vary across studies. The primary objective of this work was to determine the incidence of subsidence 1 year postoperatively, using an original measurement method, whose validity was first assessed. The secondary objective was to assess the clinical impact of subsidence. Implant subsidence after stand-alone LLIF is a common complication that can adversely affect clinical outcomes. Of 69 included patients who underwent stand-alone LLIF, 67 (97%) were re-evaluated at least 1 year later. Furthermore, 63 (91%) patients had two available computed tomography (CT) scans for assessing subsidence, one performed immediately after surgery and the other 1 year later. Reproducibility of the original measurement method was assessed in a preliminary study. Subsidence was defined as at least 4mm loss of fused space height. The incidence of subsidence was 32% (20 patients). Subsidence was global in 7 (11%) patients and partial in 13 (21%) patients. Mean loss of height was 5.5±1.5mm. Subsidence predominated anteriorly in 50% of cases. The lordotic curvature of the fused segment was altered in 50% of patients, by a mean of 8°±3°. Fusion was achieved in 67/69 (97%) patients. The Oswestry score and visual analogue scale scores for low-back and nerve-root pain were significantly improved after 1 year in the overall population and in the groups with and without subsidence. Reproducibility of our measurement method was found to be excellent. Subsidence was common but without significant clinical effects after 1 year. Nevertheless, subsidence can be associated with pain and can result in loss of lumbar lordosis, which is a potential risk factor for degenerative disease of the adjacent segments. A score for predicting the risk of subsidence will now be developed by our group as a tool for improving patient selection to stand-alone LLIF

  4. Evaluation of a novel tool for bone graft delivery in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiner JB

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey B Kleiner, Hannah M Kleiner, E John Grimberg Jr, Stefanie J Throlson The Spine Center of Innovation, The Medical Center of Aurora, Aurora, CO, USA Study design: Disk material removed (DMR during L4-5 and L5-S1 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (T-LIF surgery was compared to the corresponding bone graft (BG volumes inserted at the time of fusion. A novel BG delivery tool (BGDT was used to apply the BG. In order to establish the percentage of DMR during T-LIF, it was compared to DMR during anterior diskectomy (AD. This study was performed prospectively. Summary of background data: Minimal information is available as to the volume of DMR during a T-LIF procedure, and the relationship between DMR and BG delivered is unknown. BG insertion has been empiric and technically challenging. Since the volume of BG applied to the prepared disk space likely impacts the probability of arthrodesis, an investigation is justified. Methods: A total of 65 patients with pathology at L4-5 and/or L5-S1 necessitating fusion were treated with a minimally invasive T-LIF procedure. DMR was volumetrically measured during disk space preparation. BG material consisting of local autograft, BG extender, and bone marrow aspirate were mixed to form a slurry. BG slurry was injected into the disk space using a novel BGDT and measured volumetrically. An additional 29 patients who were treated with L5-S1 AD were compared to L5-S1 T-LIF DMR to determine the percent of T-LIF DMR relative to AD. Results: DMR volumes averaged 3.6±2.2 mL. This represented 34% of the disk space relative to AD. The amount of BG delivered to the disk spaces was 9.3±3.2 mL, which is 2.6±2.2 times the amount of DMR. The BGDT allowed uncomplicated filling of the disk space in <1 minute. Conclusion: The volume of DMR during T-LIF allows for a predictable volume of BG delivery. The BGDT allowed complete filling of the entire prepared disk space. The T-LIF diskectomy debrides 34% of the disk

  5. Outcomes of oblique lateral interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar disease in patients under or over 65 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chengzhen; Jaiswal, Milin S; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Hur, Jung-Woo; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2018-02-20

    Oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) offers the solution to problems of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). However, OLIF technique for degenerative spinal diseases of elderly patients has been rarely reported. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical and radiological results of OLIF technique for degenerative spinal diseases in patients under or over 65 years of age. Sixty-three patients who underwent OLIF procedure were enrolled, including 29 patients who were less than 65 years of age and 34 patients who were over 65 years of age. Fusion rate, change of disc height and lumbar lordotic angle, Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), return to daily activity, patient's satisfaction rate (PSR), and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. The mean NRS scores for back and leg pain decreased, respectively, from 4.6 and 5.9 to 2.3 and 1.8 in the group A (less than 65 years) and from 4.5 and 6.8 to 2.6 and 2.2 in the group B (over 65 years) at the final follow-up period. The mean ODI scores improved from 48.4 to 24.0% in the group A and from 46.5 to 25.2% in the group B at the final follow-up period. In both groups, the NRS and ODI scores significantly changed preoperatively to postoperatively (p degenerative lumbar diseases in elderly patients showed favorable clinical and radiological outcomes.

  6. Acute hospital costs after minimally invasive versus open lumbar interbody fusion: data from a US national database with 6106 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Y; Lerner, Jason; Lesko, James; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-08-01

    Retrospective multi-institutional database review. To determine if minimally invasive interbody fusion is associated with cost savings when compared with open surgery. Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgeries are increasingly recognized as equivalent to open procedures. Although these techniques have been advocated for reducing pain, disability, and length of hospitalization, to date there has been little data demonstrating these benefits. This study analyzed inpatient hospital records from the Premier Perspective database (2002 to 2009), including patients who underwent a posterior lumbar fusion with interbody cage placement by ICD-9 code, and had implant charge codes that allowed determination if MIS pedicle screws were utilized. Exclusion criteria included a refusion surgery, deformity, >2 levels, and anterior fusion. Total costs were adjusted for covariates (age, sex, race, hospital geography and setting, payor, and comorbidities) using an analysis of covariance model. A total of 6106 patients were identified (1667 MIS and 4439 open). Length of stay (LOS) for 1-level MIS surgery averaged of 3.35 days versus 3.6 days for open surgery (P≤0.006). For 2-level MIS surgery LOS averaged of 3.4 days versus 4.03 days for open surgery (P≤0.001). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $29,187 for 1-level MIS procedures versus $29,947 for open surgery, a nonsignificant difference (P=0.55). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $2106 lower for 2-level MIS surgery (total costs of $33,879 for MIS vs. $35,984 for open surgery, P=0.0023). Cost savings were attributable primarily to lower room and board ($857), operating room ($359), pharmacy ($304), and laboratory ($166) costs in the MIS group. High variances in the 2-level open surgery with prolonged hospital stay also accounted for overall cost differences. This data from a large nationwide sample of hospitalizations demonstrates that MIS lumbar interbody fusion results in a

  7. Vertebroplasty for adjacent vertebral fracture following lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yong; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2011-02-01

    Adjacent segment vertebral compression fracture after lumbosacral instrumented fusion has been reported to be a significant complication. Recently, percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) has been widely used for the treatment of non-traumatic osteoporotic vertebral fracture. However, the clinical effect of this minimally invasive treatment option to the post-fusion vertebral fracture has rarely been reported. We analysed characteristics of adjacent vertebral fractures following lumbar fusion and evaluated the clinical outcome of PVP. A total of 202 consecutive patients underwent PVP for compression fracture in our institute between January 2007 and December 2008. Among them, nine symptomatic adjacent vertebral fractures following lumbar fusion were identified. We randomly selected 50 control patients undergoing vertebroplasty for osteoporotic compression fracture in single level. We analysed the clinical data according to age, height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), and bone mineral density (BMD). Clinical outcome was assessed by a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the rate of overall satisfaction. Fractures occurred at the cranial adjacent vertebra after fusion surgery in all cases. The mean BMD score for the spine and femur were significantly higher than the control group (p adjacent segment disease. The increased stress around the fusion segment can cause vertebral fracture even with a relatively higher BMD score. Vertebroplasty for the post-fusion vertebral fracture can be as effective as it is for the usual osteoporotic vertebral fracture.

  8. Primary investigation of clinical application of percutaneous posterior lumbar interbody fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jiang; Jiao Wencang; Chen Xiangrong; Li Xiaoyu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the feasibility, key technology, indications and clinical outcome of percutaneous lumbar interbody fusion. Methods: Clinical data from 32 cases [16 male, 16 female, age range 31-77 years, average disease duration (5.0±2.0) years] underwent percutaneous nucleotomy and endplate curettage was retrospectively analyzed. After percutaneous nucleotomy and endplate curettage, one expandable spinal spacer B-twin was introduced into the intervertebral space and some allograft cancellous bone implanted around the B-twin. Indications for treatment included degenerative lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with intervertebral distability or I degree spondylolisthesis (21 cases), LDH with intervertebral space collapse (10 cases) and lumbar discogenic pain (1 case). The symptoms and function of all patients were evaluated before, 3 months and 12 months after the operation by clinical outcome judgment criterion of surgical treatment for low back pain formulated by JOA, and the rate of clinical improvement and treatment efficacy were calculated. The JOA scales preoperatively, postoperatively and on the final follow-up was compared using ANOVA in SPSS. The changes before and after surgery with the JOA score and the the rate of clinical improvement between 3 months and 12 months after the operation was also compared using χ 2 test. Results: The average operation time 1 hour and blood loss 0.05). Conclusions: Percutaneous posterior lumbar interbody fusion with B-twin expandable fusion cage could lead to satisfactory outcome in the treatment of degenerative disc disease and intervertebral instability, which minimize surgical soft tissue and trauma spinal damage, does not destroy the structure of spinal stability. The long-term outcome, complications and fusion rate need further observing. (authors)

  9. Graft Subsidence and Revision Rates Following Anterior Cervical Corpectomy: A Clinical Study Comparing Different Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michael H; Fortin, Maryse; Shen, Jian; Tay, Bobby; Hu, Serena S; Berven, Sigurd; Burch, Shane; Chou, Dean; Ames, Christopher; Deviren, Vedat

    2017-11-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the subsidence and revision rates associated with different interbody cages following anterior cervical corpectomy and reconstruction. Different interbody cages are currently used for surgical reconstruction of the anterior and middle columns of the spine following anterior cervical corpectomy. However, subsidence and delayed union/nonunion associated with allograft and cage reconstruction are common complications, which may require revision with instrumentation. We reviewed the cases of 75 patients who underwent cervical corpectomy and compared the radiographic graft subsidence and revision rates for fibula allograft, titanium mesh cage, titanium expandable cage, and carbon fiber cages. Subsidence was calculated by comparing the immediate postoperative lateral x-ray films to those obtained during follow-up visits. The average graft subsidence was 3 mm and revision rate was 25% for fibula allograft versus 2.9 mm and 11.1%, 2.9 mm and 18.8% for titanium mesh cages and titanium expandable cages, respectively. The average graft subsidence for carbon fiber cages was 0.7 mm with no revision surgery in this subset. Our findings suggest that subsidence and revision rates following anterior corpectomy and interbody fusion could be minimized with the use of a carbon fiber cage.

  10. Study on the anatomy of the lumbosacral anterior great vessels pertinent to L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery with computer tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liehua; Liang, Yong; Zhou, Qiang; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haoming; Li, Songtao; Zhao, Chen; Hou, Tianyong; Liu, Ling

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the anatomy of the lumbosacral anterior great vessels using computer tomography (CT) angiography before L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery. Sixty-two adult patients were selected. The location of the abdominal aortic bifurcation and common iliac venous confluence in the lumbar vertebrae and the anatomic parameters of the iliac vascular space (e.g., distances from the included angle vertex of the iliac vascular space to the median sagittal plane and to the inferior boundary of L5 and distances between the left and right iliac vessels on the inferior boundary of L5 and on the superior boundary of S1) were analysed. Overall, 67.73% of the 62 cases had an abdominal aortic bifurcation located at L4 and L4/5 intervertebral disc; 61.29%, the common iliac venous confluence located at L5. The four distances mentioned above were 0.98 cm ± 0.38 cm, 2.01 cm ± 1.26 cm, 3.11 cm ± 1.35 cm and 4.34 cm ± 1.10 cm, respectively. A classification system of types A, B and C was developed. The calculated L5/S1 intervertebral space exposure percentages of types A, B and C were 32.21%, 82.58% and 54.68%, respectively. During L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery, type B intervertebral discs can be exposed conveniently, preventing injury of the iliac vessels, which was also observed in 54.68% and 32.21% of the type C and type A discs, respectively. Because the type A intervertebral disc has minimal exposure, the risk of iliac vascular injury is relatively high in these patients.

  11. [Anterior interbody fusion of cervical spine with case-plate PCB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radek, M; Radek, A; Zapałowicz, K; Maciejczak, A

    2001-01-01

    Two cases with cervical discopathy and radiculopathy are presented. Discectomy and anterior interbody fusion with cage-plate PCB manufactured by French company Scient'x was performed. Authors present the shape of the implant and technical details of implantation. The paper discusses the advantages of the PCB which simplifies and shortens the operation procedure, minimizes the risk of traditional bone graft harvesting and provides immediate stabilization of the operated segment.

  12. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  13. A protocol of a randomized controlled multicenter trial for surgical treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis: the Lumbar Interbody Fusion Trial (LIFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kunder, Suzanne L; Rijkers, Kim; van Kuijk, Sander M J; Evers, Silvia M A A; de Bie, Rob A; van Santbrink, Henk

    2016-10-06

    With a steep increase in the number of instrumented spinal fusion procedures, there is a need for comparative data to develop evidence based treatment recommendations. Currently, the available data on cost and clinical effectiveness of the two most frequently performed surgeries for lumbar spondylolisthesis, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), are not sufficient. Therefore, current guidelines do not advise which is the most appropriate surgical treatment strategy for these patients. Non-randomized studies comparing TLIF and PLIF moreover suggest that TLIF is associated with fewer complications, less blood loss, shorter surgical time and hospital duration. TLIF may therefore be more cost-effective. The results of this study will provide knowledge on short- and long-term clinical and economical effects of TLIF and PLIF procedures, which will lead to recommendations for treating patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. Multicenter blinded Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT; blinding for the patient and statistician, not for the clinician and researcher). A total of 144 patients over 18 years old with symptomatic single level lumbar degenerative, isthmic or iatrogenic spondylolisthesis whom are candidates for LIF (lumbar interbody fusion) surgery through a posterior approach will be randomly allocated to TLIF or PLIF. The study will consist of three parts: 1) a clinical effectiveness study, 2) a cost-effectiveness study, and 3) a process evaluation. The primary clinical outcome measures are: change in disability measured with Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and change in quality adjusted life years (QALY) measured with EQ-5D-5L. Secondary clinical outcome measures are: Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36), VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), complications, productivity related costs (iPCQ) and medical costs (iMCQ). Measurements will be carried out at five fixed time points (pre

  14. Radiographic Restoration of Sagittal Spinopelvic Alignment After Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling-De; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Wang, Feng; Kong, Fan-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong

    2016-03-01

    A retrospective study. This study was aimed to analyze the changes in spinopelvic parameters after surgical correction of degenerative spondylolisthesis and to determine which deformity is most responsible for changes in sagittal spinopelvic alignment. The basic deformities of degenerative spondylolisthesis are forward slippage of the vertebral body, segmental kyphotic angle, and loss of disk height. Correction of those deformities during surgery will subsequently affect the spinopelvic parameters. A few studies have reported the changes of sagittal spinopelvic alignment after surgical treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis. However, there appears to be relatively little information regarding degenerative spondylolisthesis. Fifty-three patients with L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis were included. All patients underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation. Back pain, as the clinical outcome, was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS). The preoperative and postoperative spinopelvic parameters, including sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar lordosis (LL), and L1 axis S1 distance were measured, and then the correlations between spinopelvic parameters and local deformity parameters such as slip degree, slip angle (SA), and height of the intervertebral disk were evaluated. After surgical correction of local deformity, all spinopelvic parameters changed subsequently: PT and L1 axis S1 distance had a decrease, SS and LL had an increase. VAS score decreased from 6.1±2.3 before surgery to 2.4±1.7 at the final follow-up assessment. Patients with VAS score changes ≥3 showed significantly higher SS and LL, and lower PT compared with those with VAS score changes spondylolisthesis with posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation resulted in relief of back pain, which may be associated with improvement of sagittal spinopelvic alignment. Surgeons should consider deformity parameters, especially the SA, in the surgical

  15. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using unilateral pedicle screw fixation plus contralateral translaminar facet screw fixation in lumbar degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fubing; Jiang, Chun; Cao, Yuanwu; Jiang, Xiaoxing; Feng, Zhenzhou

    2014-07-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has been used in lumbar degenerative diseases. Some researchers have applied unilateral fixation in TLIF to reduce operational trauma without compromising the clinical outcome, but it is always suspected biomechanically unstable. The supplementary contralateral translaminar facet screw (cTLFS) seemed to be able to overcome the inherent drawbacks of unilateral pedicle screw (uPS) fixation theoretically. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of TLIF using uPS with cTLFS fixation in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD). 50 patients (29 male) underwent the aforementioned surgical technique for their LDD between December 2009 and April 2012. The results were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS) of the leg and back, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were recorded. The radiographic examinations in form of X-ray, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging was done preoperatively and 1 week, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months postoperatively. The student t-test was used for comparison between the preoperative values and postoperative counterparts. P degenerative diseases short termly.

  16. Evaluation of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) titanium composite interbody spacer in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model: biomechanical, microcomputed tomographic, and histologic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilvray, Kirk C; Waldorff, Erik I; Easley, Jeremiah; Seim, Howard B; Zhang, Nianli; Linovitz, Raymond J; Ryaby, James T; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2017-12-01

    The most commonly used materials used for interbody cages are titanium metal and polymer polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Both of these materials have demonstrated good biocompatibility. A major disadvantage associated with solid titanium cages is their radiopacity, limiting the postoperative monitoring of spinal fusion via standard imaging modalities. However, PEEK is radiolucent, allowing for a temporal assessment of the fusion mass by clinicians. On the other hand, PEEK is hydrophobic, which can limit bony ingrowth. Although both PEEK and titanium have demonstrated clinical success in obtaining a solid spinal fusion, innovations are being developed to improve fusion rates and to create stronger constructs using hybrid additive manufacturing approaches by incorporating both materials into a single interbody device. The purpose of this study was to examine the interbody fusion characteristic of a PEEK Titanium Composite (PTC) cage for use in lumbar fusion. Thirty-four mature female sheep underwent two-level (L 2 -L 3 and L 4 -L 5 ) interbody fusion using either a PEEK or a PTC cage (one of each per animal). Animals were sacrificed at 0, 8, 12, and 18 weeks post surgery. Post sacrifice, each surgically treated functional spinal unit underwent non-destructive kinematic testing, microcomputed tomography scanning, and histomorphometric analyses. Relative to the standard PEEK cages, the PTC constructs demonstrated significant reductions in ranges of motion and a significant increase in stiffness. These biomechanical findings were reinforced by the presence of significantly more bone at the fusion site as well as ingrowth into the porous end plates. Overall, the results indicate that PTC interbody devices could potentially lead to a more robust intervertebral fusion relative to a standard PEEK device in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lumbar spine stability after combined application of interspinous fastener and modified posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuchun; Zhu, Lei; Su, Qing

    2014-05-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and internal fixation are commonly performed for the treatment of lower back pain due to lumbar spinal degeneration. We have developed a novel interspinous fixation device, the interspinous fastener (ISF) for potential use in the surgical management of degenerative spinal disease. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro biomechanical characteristics of calf lumbar spine specimens after ISF fixation with modified PLIF. Ten lumbar spine (L3-L6) specimens from ten fresh calf cadavers (8-10 weeks of age) were used. Each specimen underwent sequential testing for each of the following four groups: no instrumentation (INTACT); interspinous fusion device fixation + PLIF (ISF); unilateral pedicle screw and titanium rod fixation + PLIF (UPS); bilateral pedicle screw and titanium rod fixation + PLIF (BPS). Outcome measures included angular range of motion (ROM) during unloaded and loaded (8 Nm) flexion, extension, left bending, right bending, left torsion and right torsion. For all unloaded and loaded assessments, ROM was significantly higher in the INTACT group compared with all other groups (P < 0.05). Similarly, ROM was significantly higher in the UPS group (indicating decreased stability) compared with the ISF and BPS groups (P < 0.05). The only significant difference between the ISF and BPS groups was in the ROM with unloaded extension (higher in the BPS group, P = 0.006). We found that ISF fixation with PLIF of the lower lumbar spine provided biomechanical stability that was equivalent to that associated with bilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation with PLIF. The ISF shows potential as an alternative means of fixation in the surgical management of degenerative spinal disease.

  18. Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma for Bone Fusion in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Go; Kamoda, Hiroto; Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhidee; Ito, Michihiro; Yamashita, Masaomi; Furuya, Takeo; Akazawa, Tsutomu; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Ohtori, Seiji

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective case series. To examine the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for bone fusion in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using local bone grafting. Several authors have reported the efficacy of PRP for bone union in animal models. However, the use of PRP for bone fusion in TLIF surgery has not been fully explored. Twenty patients underwent single-level TLIF surgery because of L4 spondylolisthesis. An interbody fusion cage and local bone were used in nine patients (control group) and an interbody fusion cage, local bone, and PRP were used in 11 patients (PRP group). PRP was prepared from the patients' blood samples (400 mL) immediately before surgery. The duration of bone union and postoperative bone fusion rate were assessed using plain radiography at every 3 months postoperatively and computed tomography at 12 or 24 months postoperatively, respectively. Lower back pain, leg pain, and leg numbness were evaluated using the visual analog scale preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. The platelet count was 8.7 times higher in PRP than in blood. The bone union rate was significantly superior in the PRP group than in the control group (91% and 77%, respectively; p =0.035), whereas the average duration of bone union was not significantly different between the groups (7.7±0.74 and 10.0±2.00 months, respectively; p =0.131). There was no significant difference in lower back pain, leg pain, and leg numbness in both groups during follow-up ( p >0.05). Our study suggests that the use of PRP in TLIF surgery increases bone fusion rate.

  19. Treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by using minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao WU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss clinical therapeutic effects of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS.  Methods A total of 32 DLS patients treated by MIS-TLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation from January 2013 to September 2015 in Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University were retrospectively reviewed. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 scores were assessed and compared between preoperation and one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up. Lumbar lordosis angle, coronal Cobb angle, coronal and sagittal body shifting, complication, the degree of spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification and the rate of spondylolisthesis were measured according to preoperative and postoperative spinal X-ray examination. Fusion rate was evaluated according to X-rays or CT in the last follow-up, and MRI was used to assess the degree of decompression.  Results Thirty-two patients were under test with mean operation time 160 min, intraoperative blood loss 120 ml, postoperative hospital stay 7.22 d and follow-up 10.83 months. Decompression and fusion levels ranged from L2-S1 and interbody fusion was performed in 32 patients and 41 levels were fused. Compared with preoperation, the VAS and ODI scores were significantly increased at one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up (P = 0.000, for all, while SF-36 score (P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, lumbar lordotic angle (P = 0.000, for all, coronal Cobb angle (P = 0.000, for all and slippage rate (P = 0.000, for all were significantly decreased. The fusion rate was 92.22%, and the improvement rate of ODI was (80.51 ± 6.02% in the last follow-up. There were 3 cases appeared complications, including one case of infection and 2 cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF fistula, and were

  20. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion for the correction of spondylolisthesis and adult degenerative scoliosis in high-risk patients: early radiographic results and complications.

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    Waddell, Brad; Briski, David; Qadir, Rabah; Godoy, Gustavo; Houston, Allison Howard; Rudman, Ernest; Zavatsky, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is not associated with many of the complications seen in other interbody fusion techniques. This study used computed tomography (CT) scans, the radiographic gold standard, to assess interbody fusion rates achieved utilizing the LLIF technique in high-risk patients. We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent LLIF between January 2008 and July 2013. Forty-nine patients underwent nonstaged or staged LLIF on 119 levels with posterior correction and augmentation. Per protocol, patients received CT scans at their 1-year follow-up. Of the 49 patients, 21 patients with LLIF intervention on 54 levels met inclusion criteria. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists and the senior surgeon (JZ) assessed fusion. Of the 21 patients, 6 patients had had previous lumbar surgery, and the cohort's comorbidities included osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking, among others. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (57.1%) patients and included anterior thigh pain and weakness in 6 patients, all of which resolved by 6 months. Two cases of proximal junctional kyphosis occurred, along with 1 case of hardware pullout. Two cases of abdominal atonia occurred. By CT scan assessment, each radiologist found fusion was achieved in 53 of 54 levels (98%). The radiologists' findings were in agreement with the senior surgeon. Several studies have evaluated LLIF fusion and reported fusion rates between 88%-96%. Our results demonstrate high fusion rates using this technique, despite multiple comorbidities in the patient population. Spanning the ring apophysis with large LLIF cages along with supplemental posterior pedicle screw augmentation can enhance stability of the fusion segment and increase fusion rates.

  1. Digitalized design of extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: a computer-based simulation and cadaveric study.

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    Mingjie Yang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study aims to investigate the feasibility of a novel lumbar approach named extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF, a newly emerging minimally invasive technique for treating degenerative lumbar disorders, using a digitalized simulation and a cadaveric study. METHODS: The ELIF surgical procedure was simulated using the Mimics surgical simulator and included dissection of the superior articular process, dilation of the vertebral foramen, and placement of pedicle screws and a cage. ELIF anatomical measures were documented using a digitalized technique and subsequently validated on fresh cadavers. RESULTS: The use of the Mimics allowed for the vivid simulation of ELIF surgical procedures, while the cadaveric study proved the feasibility of this novel approach. ELIF had a relatively lateral access approach that was located 8-9 cm lateral to the median line with an access depth of approximately 9 cm through the intermuscular space. Dissection of the superior articular processes could fully expose the target intervertebral discs and facilitate a more inclined placement of the pedicle screws and cage with robust enhancement. CONCLUSIONS: According to the computer-based simulation and cadaveric study, it is feasible to perform ELIF. Further research including biomechanical study is needed to prove ELIF has a superior ability to preserve the posterior tension bands of the spinal column, with similar effects on spinal decompression, fixation, and fusion, and if it can enhance post-fusion spinal stability and expedites postoperative recovery.

  2. Digitalized design of extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: a computer-based simulation and cadaveric study.

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    Yang, Mingjie; Zeng, Cheng; Guo, Song; Pan, Jie; Han, Yingchao; Li, Zeqing; Li, Lijun; Tan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of a novel lumbar approach named extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF), a newly emerging minimally invasive technique for treating degenerative lumbar disorders, using a digitalized simulation and a cadaveric study. The ELIF surgical procedure was simulated using the Mimics surgical simulator and included dissection of the superior articular process, dilation of the vertebral foramen, and placement of pedicle screws and a cage. ELIF anatomical measures were documented using a digitalized technique and subsequently validated on fresh cadavers. The use of the Mimics allowed for the vivid simulation of ELIF surgical procedures, while the cadaveric study proved the feasibility of this novel approach. ELIF had a relatively lateral access approach that was located 8-9 cm lateral to the median line with an access depth of approximately 9 cm through the intermuscular space. Dissection of the superior articular processes could fully expose the target intervertebral discs and facilitate a more inclined placement of the pedicle screws and cage with robust enhancement. According to the computer-based simulation and cadaveric study, it is feasible to perform ELIF. Further research including biomechanical study is needed to prove ELIF has a superior ability to preserve the posterior tension bands of the spinal column, with similar effects on spinal decompression, fixation, and fusion, and if it can enhance post-fusion spinal stability and expedites postoperative recovery.

  3. Sagittal Alignment as Predictor of Adjacent Segment Disease After Lumbar Transforaminal Interbody Fusion.

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    Sun, Jin; Wang, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Li-Wei; Huang, Hui; Fu, Na-Xin

    2018-02-01

    This study was carried out to explore the diagnostic value of sagittal measurements for adjacent segment disease after lumbar transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF). A total of 163 subjects who underwent TLIF for lumbar disease were initially enrolled in the study from July 2013 to August 2017. Sagittal alignment including thoracic inlet and spinopelvic parameters was measured by using preoperative full-length freestanding radiographs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate these parameters as the diagnostic index for adjacent segment disease (ASD). A total of 153 patients completed the final follow-up, and the mean follow-up period was 40.6 months. There were 53 (35.3%) cases with ASD found after the TLIF in the enrolled subjects. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis confirmed that preoperative pelvic tilt (PT) of more than 24.1° and thoracic kyphosis (TK) of more than 23.3° were significant risk factors of ASD after TLIF (P < 0.05). We confirmed that PT of more than 24.3° and TK of more than 23.3° could be regarded as predictors of ASD after lumbar TLIF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion for aged patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: is intentional surgical reduction essential?

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    Lian, Xiao-Feng; Hou, Tie-Sheng; Xu, Jian-Guang; Zeng, Bing-Fang; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Zhao, Cheng; Li, Hao

    2013-10-01

    Surgical reduction and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is commonly used to recover segmental imbalance in degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, whether intentional reduction of the slipped vertebra during PLIF is essential in aged patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of surgical reduction and fusion in situ among aged patients who underwent PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis. A prospective randomized clinical trial on the surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis patients aged older than 70 years. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 73 patients aged 70 years or older with single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis requiring surgical treatment were included in this study. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Radiographic outcomes included percentage of vertebral slippage, focal lordosis, and disc height. The 73 patients were randomly assigned to two groups treated using surgical reduction (Group A, n=36) and fusion in situ (Group B, n=37). Both groups were followed up for an average of 33.2 months (range, 24-54 months). The clinical and radiographic outcomes were compared between the two groups. Surgical complications were similar in the two groups. The average operative time and blood loss during surgery did not insignificantly differ (p>.05) between the two groups. Spondylolisthesis, disc height, and focal lordosis were significantly improved postoperatively in both groups. There was no obvious difference in clinical outcomes, as assessed using the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores, although the radiographic outcomes were considerably better in Group A than in Group B. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screws fixation, with or without intraoperative reduction, provides good outcomes in the surgical treatment of

  5. Effect of lumbar lordosis on the adjacent segment in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: A finite element analysis.

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    Zhao, Xin; Du, Lin; Xie, Youzhuan; Zhao, Jie

    2018-02-21

    Here we used a finite element (FE) analysis to investigate the biomechanical changes caused by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) at the L4-L5 level by lumbar lordosis (LL) degree. A lumbar FE model (L1-S5) was constructed based on computed tomography scans of a 30-year-old healthy male volunteer (pelvic incidence = 50°, LL = 52°). We investigated the influence of LL on the biomechanical behavior of the lumbar spine after TLIF in L4-L5 fusion models with 57°, 52°, 47°, and 40° LL. The LL was defined as the angle between the superior endplate of L1 and the superior endplate of S1. A 150-N vertical axial pre-load was imposed on the superior surface of L3. A 10-N·m moment was simultaneously applied on the L3 superior surface along the radial direction to simulate the four basic physiological motions of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion in the numerical simulations. The range of motion (ROM) and intradiscal pressure (IDP) of L3-L4 were evaluated and compared in the simulated cases. In all motion patterns, the ROM and IDP were both increased after TLIF. In addition, the decrease in lordosis generally increased the ROM and IDP in all motion patterns. The current FE analysis indicated that decreased spinal lordosis may evoke overstress of the adjacent segment and increase the risk of the pathological development of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD); thus, ASD should be considered when planning a spinal fusion procedure. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Comparison of Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Nonrigid Fixation System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Single-Level Lumbar Disc Herniation: A New Method of MRI Analysis of Lumbar Nucleus Pulposus Volume.

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    Yang, Shaofeng; Liu, Yanan; Bao, Zhaohua; Zou, Jun; Yang, Huilin

    2017-05-19

    To evaluate the influence of a nonrigid fixation system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion on adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration by using MRI analysis of lumbar nucleus pulposus volume for single-level lumbar disc herniation. We selected 112 patients who underwent nonrigid fixation (17 men and 44 women) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (13 men and 38 women) for this retrospective study. Based on the T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans taken preoperatively, and 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery, the nucleus pulposus in the upper segments of the operated level was considered an ellipsoid, and their volumes were measured respectively and then compared between the two groups. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion group had significantly lower lumbar nucleus pulposus volume than the nonrigid fixation group at 12 (4.04 ± 1.42 vs. 5.25 ± 1.47 mm 3 ) and 24 months (4.16 ± 0.89 vs. 5.06 ± 1.23 mm 3 ), and had the highest nucleus pulposus. Meanwhile, the h value in the posterior lumbar interbody fusion group was notably smaller than the preoperative level at 12 (0.46 ± 0.03 vs. 0.55 ± 0.05 mm) and 24 months (0.44 ± 0.03 vs. 0.55 ± 0.05 mm). MRI analysis of lumbar nucleus pulposus volume is a new and quantitative method of analysis, which is a considerable method and contributes to the detection of severe intervertebral disc degeneration. Based on this new method, nonrigid fixation demonstrates excellent outcomes on the adjacent segment in comparison with posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

  7. Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis: A case series

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    Miller Larry E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traditional surgical management of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis is technically challenging and is associated with significant complications. The advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques offers patients treatment alternatives with lower operative morbidity risk. The combination of percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and an axial presacral approach for lumbosacral discectomy and fusion offers an alternative procedure for the surgical management of low-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Case presentation Three patients who had L5-S1 grade 2 spondylolisthesis and who presented with axial pain and lumbar radiculopathy were treated with a minimally invasive surgical technique. The patients-a 51-year-old woman and two men (ages 46 and 50-were Caucasian. Under fluoroscopic guidance, spondylolisthesis was reduced with a percutaneous pedicle screw system, resulting in interspace distraction. Then, an axial presacral approach with the AxiaLIF System (TranS1, Inc., Wilmington, NC, USA was used to perform the discectomy and anterior fixation. Once the axial rod was engaged in the L5 vertebral body, further distraction of the spinal interspace was made possible by partially loosening the pedicle screw caps, advancing the AxiaLIF rod to its final position in the vertebrae, and retightening the screw caps. The operative time ranged from 173 to 323 minutes, and blood loss was minimal (50 mL. Indirect foraminal decompression and adequate fixation were achieved in all cases. All patients were ambulatory after surgery and reported relief from pain and resolution of radicular symptoms. No perioperative complications were reported, and patients were discharged in two to three days. Fusion was demonstrated radiographically in all patients at one-year follow-up. Conclusions Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction combined with axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion offers a promising and minimally invasive alternative for the management

  8. Axial lumbar interbody fusion: a 6-year single-center experience

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    Zeilstra DJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dick J Zeilstra,1 Larry E Miller,2,3 Jon E Block3 1Bergman Clinics, Naarden and NedSpine, Ede, The Netherlands; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, USA; 3The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA Introduction: The aim of this study is to report our 6-year single-center experience with L5–S1 axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF. Methods: A total of 131 patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease refractory to nonsurgical treatment were treated with AxiaLIF at L5–S1, and were followed for a minimum of 1 year (mean: 21 months. Main outcomes included back and leg pain severity, Oswestry Disability Index score, working status, analgesic medication use, patient satisfaction, and complications. Computed tomography was used to determine postoperative fusion status. Results: No intraoperative complications, including vascular, neural, urologic, or bowel injuries, were reported. Back and leg pain severity decreased by 51% and 42%, respectively, during the follow-up period (both P < 0.001. Back function scores improved 50% compared to baseline. Clinical success, defined as improvement ≥30%, was 67% for back pain severity, 65% for leg pain severity, and 71% for back function. The employment rate increased from 47% before surgery to 64% at final follow-up (P < 0.001. Less than one in four patients regularly used analgesic medications postsurgery. Patient satisfaction with the AxiaLIF procedure was 83%. The fusion rate was 87.8% at final follow-up. During follow-up, 17 (13.0% patients underwent 18 reoperations on the lumbar spine, including pedicle screw fixation (n = 10, total disc replacement of an uninvolved level (n = 3, facet screw fixation (n = 3, facet screw removal (n = 1, and interbody fusion at L4–L5 (n = 1. Eight (6.1% reoperations were at the index level. Conclusion: Single-level AxiaLIF is a safe and effective means to achieve lumbosacral fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease. Keywords: Axia

  9. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Novel Apatite-Wollastonite Ceramic Cage Design for Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Finite Element Model Study.

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    Bozkurt, Celal; Şenköylü, Alpaslan; Aktaş, Erdem; Sarıkaya, Baran; Sipahioğlu, Serkan; Gürbüz, Rıza; Timuçin, Muharrem

    2018-01-01

    Cage design and material properties play a crucial role in the long-term results, since interbody fusions using intervertebral cages have become one of the basic procedures in spinal surgery. Our aim is to design a novel Apatite-Wollastonite interbody fusion cage and evaluate its biomechanical behavior in silico in a segmental spinal model. Mechanical properties for the Apatite-Wollastonite bioceramic cages were obtained by fitting finite element results to the experimental compression behavior of a cage prototype. The prototype was made from hydroxyapatite, pseudowollastonite, and frit by sintering. The elastic modulus of the material was found to be 32 GPa. Three intact lumbar vertebral segments were modelled with the ANSYS 12.0.1 software and this model was modified to simulate a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion. Four cage designs in different geometries were analyzed in silico under axial loading, flexion, extension, and lateral bending. The K2 design had the best overall biomechanical performance for the loads considered. Maximum cage stress recorded was 36.7 MPa in compression after a flexion load, which was within the biomechanical limits of the cage. Biomechanical analyses suggest that K2 bioceramic cage is an optimal design and reveals essential material properties for a stable interbody fusion.

  10. Comparison of Topping-off and posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery in lumbar degenerative disease: a retrospective study.

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    Liu, Hai-ying; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Bo; Wang, Hui-min; Jin, Zhao-hui; Zhu, Zhen-qi; Miao, Ke-nan

    2012-11-01

    Topping-off surgery is a newly-developed surgical technique which combines rigid fusion with an interspinous process device in the adjacent segment to prevent adjacent segment degeneration. There are few reports on Topping-off surgery and its rationality and indications remains highly controversial. Our study aims to investigate the short-term and mid-term clinical results of Topping-off surgery in preventing adjacent segment degeneration when mild or moderate adjacent segment degeneration existed before surgery. The 25 cases that underwent L5-S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) + L4-L5 interspinous process surgeries between April 2008 and March 2010 formed Topping-off group. The 42 cases undergoing L5-S1 PLIF surgery formed PLIF group. Both groups matched in gender, age, body mass index and Pfirrmann grading (4 to 6). The patients were evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) and Japanese orthopaedic association (JOA) scores before surgery and in the last follow-up. Modic changes of endplates were recorded. The follow-up averaged 24.8 and 23.7 months. No symptomatic or radiological adjacent segment degeneration was observed. There was no significant difference in intraoperative blood loss or postoperative drainage. VAS and lumbar JOA scores improved significantly in both groups (t = 12.1 and 13.5, P adjacent segment degeneration, restrict the adjacent segment's ROM in extension and prevent excessive olisthesis of adjacent segment in both extension and flexion.

  11. Medium-term effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiting; Pang, Qingjiang; Jiang, Guoqiang

    2017-10-01

    Objective To compare the medium-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Fifty-seven patients with multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease underwent Dynesys stabilization (n = 26) or PLIF (n = 31) from December 2008 to February 2010. The mean follow-up period was 50.3 (range, 46-65) months. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Radiographic evaluations included disc height and range of motion (ROM) of the operative segments and proximal adjacent segment on lumbar flexion-extension X-rays. The intervertebral disc signal change was defined by magnetic resonance imaging, and disc degeneration was classified by the Pfirrmann grade. Results The clinical outcomes including the VAS score and ODI were significantly improved in both groups at 3 months and the final follow-up, but the difference between the two was not significant. At the final follow-up, the disc height of stabilized segments in both groups was significantly increased; the increase was more notable in the Dynesys than PLIF group. The ROM of stabilized segments at the final follow-up decreased from 6.20° to 2.76° and 6.56° to 0.00° in the Dynesys and PLIF groups, respectively. There was no distinct change in the height of the proximal adjacent segment in the two groups. The ROM of the proximal adjacent segment in both groups increased significantly at the final follow-up; the change was significantly greater in the PLIF than Dynesys group. Only one case of adjacent segment degeneration occurred in the PLIF group, and this patient underwent a second operation. Conclusions Both Dynesys stabilization and PLIF can improve the clinical and radiographic outcomes of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Compared with PLIF, Dynesys stabilization can maintain the mobility of the

  12. [Clinical outcomes of single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis by minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with bilateral tubular channels].

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    Zeng, Z L; Jia, L; Yu, Y; Xu, W; Hu, X; Zhan, X H; Jia, Y W; Wang, J J; Cheng, L M

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment with bilateral Spotlight tubular channels. Methods: A total of 21 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis whom underwent MIS-TLIF via bilateral Spotlight tubular channels were retrospectively analyzed from October 2014 to November 2015. The 21 patients included 11 males and 10 females ranged from 35 to 82 years (average aged 60.7 years). In term of spondylolisthesis category, there were 18 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis and 3 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis. With respect to spondylolisthesis degree, 17 cases were grade Ⅰ° and 4 cases were grade Ⅱ°. Besides, 17 cases at L(4-5) and 4 cases at L(5)-S(1)were categorized by spondylolisthesis levels. Operation duration, blood loss, postoperative drainage and intraoperative exposure time were recorded, functional improvement was defined as an improvement in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was also employed at pre and post-operation (3 months and the last follow-up), to evaluate low back and leg pain. Furthermore, to evaluate the recovery of the intervertebral foramen and of lumbar sagittal curvature, average height of intervertebral space, Cobb angles of lumbar vertebrae and operative segments, spondylolisthesis index were measured. At the last follow-up, intervertebral fusion was assessed using Siepe evaluation criteria and the clinical outcome was assessed using the MacNab scale. Radiographic and functional outcomes were compared pre- and post-operation using the paired T test to determine the effectiveness of MIS-TLIF. Statistical significance was defined as P spondylolisthesis incidence ( t =17.1, P spondylolisthesis incidence ( t =18.6, P spondylolisthesis vertebrae were restored completely. Lastly, at the last follow-up, 12 cases of grade 1 and 7 cases of grade 2 fusion were present as determined

  13. Fusion Rate and Clinical Outcomes in Two-Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

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    Aono, Hiroyuki; Takenaka, Shota; Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Tobimatsu, Hidekazu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Furuya, Masayuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2018-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become a general surgical method for degenerative lumbar diseases. Although many reports have focused on single-level PLIF, few have focused on 2-level PLIF, and no report has covered the fusion status of 2-level PLIF. The purpose of this study is to investigate clinical outcomes and fusion for 2-level PLIF by using a combination of dynamic radiographs and multiplanar-reconstruction computed tomography scans. This study consisted of 48 consecutive patients who underwent 2-level PLIF for degenerative lumbar diseases. We assessed surgery duration, estimated blood loss, complications, clinical outcomes as measured by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, lumbar sagittal alignment as measured on standing lateral radiographs, and fusion status as measured by dynamic radiographs and multiplanar-reconstruction computed tomography. Patients were examined at a follow-up point of 4.8 ± 2.2 years after surgery. Thirty-eight patients who did not undergo lumbosacral fusion comprised the lumbolumbar group, and 10 patients who underwent lumbosacral fusion comprised the lumbosacral group. The mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved from 12.1 to 22.4 points by the final follow-up examination. Sagittal alignment also was improved. All patients had fusion in the cranial level. Seven patients had nonunion in the caudal level, and the lumbosacral group (40%) had a significantly poorer fusion rate than the lumbolumbar group (97%) did. Surgical outcomes of 2-level PLIF were satisfactory. The fusion rate at both levels was 85%. All nonunion was observed at the caudal level and concentrated at L5-S level in L4-5-S PLIF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Symptomatic adjacent segment pathology after posterior lumbar interbody fusion for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis.

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    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after fusion surgery for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) has been reported to be relatively low compared with other lumbar disease entities. However, there has been no study of symptomatic ASP incidence using posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with pedicle screw instrumentation. We investigated the incidence of symptomatic ASP after PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation for adult low-grade IS and identified significant risk factors for symptomatic ASP. We retrospectively studied records of 40 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Japan. The patients were followed for ≥ 4 years. Patients' medical records were retrospectively examined for evidence of symptomatic ASP. Age at time of surgery, sex, fusion level, whole lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, preexisting laminar inclination angle, and facet tropism at the cranial fusion segment were analyzed to identify risk factors for symptomatic ASP. Four patients (ASP group) developed symptomatic ASP at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion. There were no significant differences in age, sex, fusion level, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, or facet tropism at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion between the ASP and the non-ASP groups. In contrast, laminar inclination angle at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was significantly higher in the ASP group than in the non-ASP group. Four patients (10%) developed symptomatic ASP after PLIF with transpedicular fixation for adult low-grade IS. Preexisting laminar horizontalization at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was a significant risk factor for symptomatic ASP.

  15. One-Level or Multilevel Interbody Fusion for Multilevel Lumbar Degenerative Diseases: A Prospective Randomized Control Study with a 4-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiefeng; Shi, Lei; Luo, Yibin; Chen, Deyu; Chen, Yu

    2018-02-01

    The treatment of multilevel lumbar degenerative disease (LDD) is complicated and challenging, and the optimal surgical strategy remains controversial. To compare the differences in clinical and radiologic outcomes and in complications after 1-level interbody fusion versus multilevel interbody fusion for the treatment of multilevel LDD. A total of 100 patients with multilevel LDD were randomized in a 1:1 ratio into the 1-level interbody fusion group or the multilevel interbody fusion group. Clinical and radiologic results and major complications in the 2 groups were analyzed. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale for radicular and back pain, the Oswestry Disability Index, and the short-form 36 physical score. Clinical status was assessed by the Whitecloud classification. Radiologic evaluation included assessment of lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, and sacral slope. There were no significant differences in clinical and radiologic results between the 2 groups. Procedure duration and intraoperative blood loss were significantly greater in the multilevel interbody fusion group than in the 1-level interbody fusion group; the multilevel interbody fusion group also had greater incidences of temporary nerve root palsy, wound infection, and adjacent segment disease. A hybrid technique including 1-level interbody fusion and multilevel posterolateral fusion is recommended for patients with multilevel LDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation exposure during the lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedure and techniques to reduce radiation dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is widely used in spine surgery to assist with graft and hardware placement. Previous studies have not measured radiation exposure to a surgeon during minimally invasive lateral lumbar spine surgery for single-level discectomy and interbody cage insertion. This study was performed to model and measure radiation exposure to a surgeon during spine surgery using the direct lateral lumbar procedure. The study was performed using a mannequin substituting for the surgeon and a cadaver substituting for the patient. Radiation was measured with dosimeters attached to 6 locations on the mannequin using a OEC Medical Systems 9800 C-arm fluoroscope (OEC Medical Systems, Salt Lake City, Utah). Three different fluoroscopy setups were tested: a standard imaging setup, a standard setup using pulsed-mode fluoroscopy, and a reversed setup. The experiment was tested 5 times per setup, and the dosimeters' values were recorded. The highest amount of radiation exposure occurred when obtaining an anteroposterior view of the spine in the standard setup. Compared with the standard setup, the pulsed-mode setting decreased the radiation exposure to the mannequin by a factor of 6 times (P exposure to the mannequin by a factor of 6 times (P exposure to the eye level (P exposure. Radiation exposure to the surgeon can be greatly minimized by using either a pulsed imaging mode or the reversed setup. The reversed setup has the lowest amount of radiation exposure to the eye level.

  17. Short-term outcomes of lateral lumbar interbody fusion without decompression for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis at L4-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter G; Nunley, Pierce D; Cavanaugh, David; Kerr, Eubulus; Utter, Philip Andrew; Frank, Kelly; Stone, Marcus

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recently, authors have called into question the utility and complication index of the lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedure at the L4-5 level. Furthermore, the need for direct decompression has also been debated. Here, the authors report the clinical and radiographic outcomes of transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion, relying only on indirect decompression to treat patients with neurogenic claudication secondary to Grade 1 and 2 spondylolisthesis at the L4-5 level. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective evaluation of 18 consecutive patients with Grade 1 or 2 spondylolisthesis from a prospectively maintained database. All patients underwent a transpsoas approach, followed by posterior percutaneous instrumentation without decompression. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and SF-12 were administered during the clinical evaluations. Radiographic evaluation was also performed. The mean follow-up was 6.2 months. RESULTS Fifteen patients with Grade 1 and 3 patients with Grade 2 spondylolisthesis were identified and underwent fusion at a total of 20 levels. The mean operative time was 165 minutes for the combined anterior and posterior phases of the operation. The estimated blood loss was 113 ml. The most common cage width in the anteroposterior dimension was 22 mm (78%). Anterior thigh dysesthesia was identified on detailed sensory evaluation in 6 of 18 patients (33%); all patients experienced resolution within 6 months postoperatively. No patient had lasting sensory loss or motor deficit. The average ODI score improved 26 points by the 6-month follow-up. At the 6-month follow-up, the SF-12 mean Physical and Mental Component Summary scores improved by 11.9% and 9.6%, respectively. No patient required additional decompression postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS This study offers clinical results to establish lateral lumbar interbody fusion as an effective technique for the treatment of Grade 1 or 2 degenerative spondylolisthesis at L4-5. The use of this surgical

  18. Posterior Decompression, Lumber Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation in the Treatment of Upper Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation

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    DONG Zhan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the clinical outcomes of posterior decompression, interbody fusion and internal fixationfor the treatment of the upper lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Methods: Twelve patients with the upper lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated by posterior decompression, interbosy fusion and internal fixation. The time of the operation, the amount of bleeding and the clinical efficacy were evaluated. Results: The time of operation was (143±36 min and the amount of bleeding during operation was (331.5±47.9 mL. There was no spinal cord and injuries, nerve injury, epidural damage and leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. All patients were followed up for 10~19 months with the average being 12.6 months. The functional scoring of Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA before the operation was (11.4±3.3 scores and final score after follow-up was (22.9±3.1 scores and there were statistical difference (P<0.01. Lumber interbody fusion of all patients completed successfully and the good rate after the operation was 91.7%. Conclusion: Posterior decompression, interbody fusion and internal fixation for the treatment of the upper lumbar intervertebral disc herniation was characterized by full exposure, safety and significant efficacy.

  19. Which Approach Is Advantageous to Preventing Development of Adjacent Segment Disease? Comparative Analysis of 3 Different Lumbar Interbody Fusion Techniques (ALIF, LLIF, and PLIF) in L4-5 Spondylolisthesis.

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    Lee, Chul-Woo; Yoon, Kang-Jun; Ha, Sang-Soo

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare radiologic and clinical outcomes in patients with L4-5 lumbar spondylolisthesis who have undergone either instrumented anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF), or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), especially with regard to the development of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Eighty-two patients with preoperative L4-5 spondylolisthesis and minimal ASD who underwent instrumented L4-5 fusion were divided into 3 groups according to the surgical approach used for treatment (ALIF: 27 patients, LLIF: 24 patients, PLIF: 31 patients). Radiographic measurements including preoperative and postoperative foraminal and disk height, segmental and lumbar lordosis, percentage of vertebral slippage, and reduction rate were reviewed. The incidence of ASD and clinical outcomes were evaluated and compared between the 3 groups. ASD was found in 37.0% (10/27), 41.7% (10/24), and 64.5% (20/31) of the patients in the ALIF, LLIF, and PLIF groups, respectively (mean follow-up duration: 35.42 ± 9.35 months). The ALIF and LLIF groups had significantly increased disk and foraminal height compared with the PLIF group. The ALIF group had significantly improved lordosis compared with the PLIF and LLIF groups. There were no statistically significant intergroup differences in clinical outcomes assessed by visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index. The 3 different fusion techniques investigated can all produce good outcomes in treating lumbar spondylolisthesis in L4-5, but ALIF and LLIF are more advantageous in preventing the development of ASD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The Correlation Between Cage Subsidence, Bone Mineral Density, and Clinical Results in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

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    Oh, Kyu Won; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Do-Yoon; Shim, Hee Jong

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected radiographic and clinical data. This study aims to investigate the relationship between cage subsidence and bone mineral density (BMD), and to reveal the clinical implications of cage subsidence. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become one of the standard treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. However, cage subsidence might result in recurrent foraminal stenosis and deteriorate the clinical results. Furthermore, numbers of osteoporosis patients who underwent PLIF are increasing. Therefore, the information on the correlations between cage subsidence, BMD, and clinical results will be of great significance. A total 139 segments was included in this retrospective study. We examined functional rating index (Visual Analogue Scale for pain, Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form-36 score) preoperatively, and investigated their changes after postoperative 1 year. Correlation between cage subsidence and clinical scores was investigated. Plain anteroposterior and lateral radiograph were taken preoperatively and postoperatively and during follow-up. Preoperative BMD and subsidence measured by postoperative 1 year 3-dimensional computed tomography were achieved and their correlation was assessed. All postoperative clinical scores improved significantly compared with preoperative ones (pain Visual Analogue Scale: 7.34-2.89, Oswestry Disability Index: 25.34-15.86, Short Form-36: 26.45-16.46, all Psubsidence (r=-0.285, Psubsidence (>3 mm) compared with the segments in which T score were higher than -3.0 (P=0.012), and its odds ratio was 8.44. Subsidence had no significant correlation with all clinical scores. This study revealed that cage subsidence is relevant to BMD. However, it was demonstrated that subsidence is not related to the clinical deterioration. Therefore, PLIF procedure which is conducted carefully can be a good surgical option to treat lumbar degenerative disease for osteoporotic patients.

  1. Mast Quadrant-assisted Minimally Invasive Modified Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Single Incision Versus Double Incision

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    Xin-Lei Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of minimally invasive techniques is to make every effort to reduce tissue damage. Certainly, reducing skin incision is an important part of these techniques. This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of Mast Quadrant-assisted modified transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF with a small single posterior median incision. Methods: During the period of March 2011 to March 2012, 34 patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disease underwent the minimally invasive modified TLIF assisted by Mast Quadrant with a small single posterior median incision (single incision group. The cases in this group were compared to 37 patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disease in the double incision group. The perioperative conditions of patients in these two groups were statistically analyzed and compared. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scores, Visual Analog Scale (VAS scores, and sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators before operation and 3, 12 months postoperation were compared. Results: A total of 31 and 35 cases in the single incision and double incision groups, respectively, completed at least 12 months of systemic follow-up. The differences in perioperative conditions between the two groups were not statistically significant. The incision length of the single incision group was significantly shorter than that of the double incision group (P < 0.01. The ODI and VAS scores of patients in both groups improved significantly at 3 and 12 months postoperation. However, these two indicators at 3 and 12 months postoperation and the sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators at 3 months postoperation did not differ significantly between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05. Conclusions: Mast Quadrant-assisted modified TLIF with a small single posterior median incision has excellent clinical feasibility compared to minimally invasive TLIF with a double paramedian incision.

  2. Effect of one- or two-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion on global sagittal balance.

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    Cho, Jae Hwan; Joo, Youn-Suk; Lim, Cheongsu; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Choon Sung

    2017-12-01

    Sagittal imbalance is associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients with degenerative lumbar disease. However, there is no consensus on the impact of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) on local and global sagittal balance. To reveal the effect of one- or two-level PLIF on global sagittal balance. A retrospective case-control study. This study included 88 patients who underwent a one- or two-level PLIF for spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis. Clinical and radiological parameters were measured pre- and postoperatively. All patients were followed up for >2 years. Clinical outcomes included a visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and EuroQol 5-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D). Radiological parameters were measured using whole-spine standing lateral radiographs. Fusion, loosening, subsidence rates, and adverse events were also evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups according to their preoperative C7-S1 sagittal vertical axis (SVA): Group N: SVA≤5 cm vs Group I: SVA>5 cm; they were also divided according to postoperative changes in C7-S1 SVA. Clinical and radiological outcomes were compared between the groups. All clinical outcomes and radiological parameters improved postoperatively. C7-S1 SVA improved (-1.6 cm) after L3-L5 fusion, but it was compromised (+3.6 cm) after L4-S1 fusion (p=.001). Preoperative demographic and clinical data showed no difference except in the anxiety or depression domain of EQ-5D. No differences were found in postoperative clinical outcomes. Lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, and thoracic kyphosis slightly improved in Group N, whereas C7-S1 SVA decreased from 9.5 cm to 3.8 cm (pfusion (L3-L5 vs L4-S1, p=.033). Global sagittal balance improved after short-level lumbar fusion surgery in patients having spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis who showed preoperative sagittal imbalance. Restoration of sagittal balance predominantly occurred after L3-L4, L4-L5, or L3-L5 PLIF. However, no such restoration was

  3. Minimally invasive presacral approach for revision of an Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod due to fall-related lumbosacral instability: a case report

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    Cohen Anders

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The purpose of this study was to describe procedural details of a minimally invasive presacral approach for revision of an L5-S1 Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility with marked thoracolumbar scoliosis, osteoarthritic changes characterized by high-grade osteophytes, and significant intervertebral disc collapse and calcification. Our patient required crutches during ambulation and reported intractable axial and radicular pain. Multi-level reconstruction of L1-4 was accomplished with extreme lateral interbody fusion, although focal lumbosacral symptoms persisted due to disc space collapse at L5-S1. Lumbosacral interbody distraction and stabilization was achieved four weeks later with the Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion System (TranS1 Inc., Wilmington, NC, USA and rod implantation via an axial presacral approach. Despite symptom resolution following this procedure, our patient suffered a fall six weeks postoperatively with direct sacral impaction resulting in symptom recurrence and loss of L5-S1 distraction. Following seven months of unsuccessful conservative care, a revision of the Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod was performed that utilized the same presacral approach and used a larger diameter implant. Minimal adhesions were encountered upon presacral re-entry. A precise operative trajectory to the base of the previously implanted rod was achieved using fluoroscopic guidance. Surgical removal of the implant was successful with minimal bone resection required. A larger diameter Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod was then implanted and joint distraction was re-established. The radicular symptoms resolved following revision surgery and our patient was ambulating without assistance on post-operative day one. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions The Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion distraction rod may be revised and replaced with a larger diameter rod using

  4. Cost-effectiveness of posterior lumbar interbody fusion in the Japanese universal health insurance system.

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    Fujimori, Takahito; Miwa, Toshitada; Iwasaki, Motoki; Oda, Takenori

    2018-03-01

    Globally, the cost-effectiveness of spinal surgery is becoming increasingly important. However, these data are limited to a few countries. The purpose of our study was to examine the cost/quality adjusted life year (cost/QALY) gained for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in the Japanese universal health insurance system. Fifty five patients underwent PLIF for lumbar degenerative spinal canal stenosis between July 2013 and September 2015 was included. Effectiveness was measured using Euro QOL 5-dimension (EQ-5D), Short-Form 8 physical component summary (PCS), and visual analog scale (VAS). The cost was calculated from the perspective of the public healthcare payer. Effectiveness and cost were measured one year after surgery. QALYs were calculated by multiplying the utility value (EQ-5D) and life years. Only direct costs were included on the basis of actual reimbursements. Cost/QALY at a 5-year time horizon with a 2% discount rate was estimated. Sensitivity analysis was performed by varying the time horizon (2 years or 10 years). The exchange rate was defined as US $1 to Japanese 100 yen. Mean total cost one year after surgery was ¥2,802,900 ($28029). Operative cost was ¥1,779,700 ($17797). Mean gained score was 0.22 in EQ-5D, 10.3 in PCS, and -44 in VAS. Cost/QALY was ¥2,697,500 ($26975). Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that cost/QALY at a 10-year time horizon was ¥1,428,300 ($14283) and that cost/QALY at a 2-year time horizon was ¥6,435,400 ($64354). Clinical outcomes after PLIF improved beyond minimum clinical improvement difference. Cost/QALY was below the widely-accepted benchmark (cost/QALY < $50000). PLIF could be regarded as cost-effective interventions. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Standard versus Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Prospective Randomized Study

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    Daniel Serban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic spondylolisthesis patients may benefit from surgical decompression and stabilization. The standard (S technique is a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF. Newer, minimally invasive (MI techniques seem to provide similar results with less morbidity. We enrolled patients with at least 6 months of symptoms and image-confirmed low-grade spondylolisthesis, at a single academic institution, between 2011 and 2015. The patients were randomized to either S or MI TLIF. The primary outcome measure was the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI improvement at 1 year. Secondary outcome measures included length of operation, estimated blood loss, length of hospitalization, and fusion rates at 1 year. Forty patients were enrolled in each group. The differences in mean operative time and estimated blood loss were not statistically significant between the two groups. The patients were discharged after surgery at 4.12 days for the S TLIF group and 1.92 days for the MI TLIF group. The ODI improvement was similar and statistically significant in both groups. The fusion was considered solid in 36 (90% of patients at 1 year in both groups. In conclusion, the two techniques provided similar clinical and radiological outcomes at 1 year. The patients undergoing MI TLIF had a shorter hospital stay. This trial is registered with NCT03155789.

  6. Accidental Durotomy in Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Frequency, Risk Factors, and Management

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    Jan-Helge Klingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the frequency, risk factors, and management of accidental durotomy in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF. Methods. This single-center study retrospectively investigates 372 patients who underwent MIS TLIF and were mobilized within 24 hours after surgery. The frequency of accidental durotomies, intraoperative closure technique, body mass index, and history of previous surgery was recorded. Results. We identified 32 accidental durotomies in 514 MIS TLIF levels (6.2%. Analysis showed a statistically significant relation of accidental durotomies to overweight patients (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2; P=0.0493. Patient age older than 65 years tended to be a positive predictor for accidental durotomies (P=0.0657. Mobilizing patients on the first postoperative day, we observed no durotomy-associated complications. Conclusions. The frequency of accidental durotomies in MIS TLIF is low, with overweight being a risk factor for accidental durotomies. The minimally invasive approach seems to minimize durotomy-associated complications (CSF leakage, pseudomeningocele because of the limited dead space in the soft tissue. Patients with accidental durotomy can usually be mobilized within 24 hours after MIS TLIF without increased risk. The minimally invasive TLIF technique might thus be beneficial in the prevention of postoperative immobilization-associated complications such as venous thromboembolism. This trial is registered with DRKS00006135.

  7. Total 3D Airo® Navigation for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

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    Xiaofeng Lian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A new generation of iCT scanner, Airo®, has been introduced. The purpose of this study is to describe how Airo facilitates minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF. Method. We used the latest generation of portable iCT in all cases without the assistance of K-wires. We recorded the operation time, number of scans, and pedicle screw accuracy. Results. From January 2015 to December 2015, 33 consecutive patients consisting of 17 men and 16 women underwent single-level or two-level MIS-TLIF operations in our institution. The ages ranged from 23 years to 86 years (mean, 66.6 years. We treated all the cases in MIS fashion. In four cases, a tubular laminectomy at L1/2 was performed at the same time. The average operation time was 192.8 minutes and average time of placement per screw was 2.6 minutes. No additional fluoroscopy was used. Our screw accuracy rate was 98.6%. No complications were encountered. Conclusions. Airo iCT MIS-TLIF can be used for initial planning of the skin incision, precise screw, and cage placement, without the need for fluoroscopy. “Total navigation” (complete intraoperative 3D navigation without fluoroscopy can be achieved by combining Airo navigation with navigated guide tubes for screw placement.

  8. [Effect evaluation of over 5 year follow up of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Ying, Jin-He; Xie, Pan-Pan; Wu, Xiao-Guang

    2016-07-25

    To evaluate the clinical effects of over 5 year follow up of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion(TLIF) in treating lumbar degenerative diseases. The clinical data of 24 patients with lumbar degenerative disease underwent unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion from March 2007 to October 2009, were retrospectively analyzed. There were 13 males and 11 females, aged from 34 to 68 years old with an average of 52 years. Postoperative pain and functional results were analyzed by the visual analogue scale(VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index(ODI). Radiological examination was obtained for each patient to assess the height of intervertebral space, postoperative intervertebral fusion conditions and general complications. All patients were followed up from 5 to 8 years with an average of 6.7 years. VAS scores of low back pain and leg pain decreased from preoperative 7.82±0.71, 8.42±1.24 to postoperative 1.87±0.81, 2.23±1.62, respectively( P degenerative diseases according to over 5 year follow up, however, its indications should be well considered. But the problems such as intervertebral space height of operated side loss and adjacent segment degeneration after unilateral pedicle screw fixation need further clinical study.

  9. Outcomes of autograft alone versus PEEK+ autograft interbody fusion in the treatment of adult lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis.

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    Wang, Gang; Han, Dunfu; Cao, Zhenglin; Guan, Honggang; Xuan, Tianhang

    2017-04-01

    Bone resulting from a complete resection of the posterior arch can be cut into an autograft bone that contains the facet joint structure and morselised bone for interbody fusion. However, whether a strut autograft that contains this trimmed facet joint can produce the same clinical and radiographic outcomes as a cage for interbody fusion remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of a local facet joint autograft alone to those of polyetheretherketone (PEEK)+autograft for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. A retrospective analysis was performed on 84 patients with single lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis who were treated with a local facet joint autograft alone (group A; n=44) or PEEK+autograft (group B; n=40) in PLIF with a minimum follow-up period of 24 months. Pain and disability were assessed using the visual analogue scale, Oswestry disability index and Kirkaldy-Willis criteria. In the radiological evaluation, disc height, slippage reduction, and fusion status were examined. Postoperative complications were also monitored. At the last follow-up examination, 84.1% (37/44) of the patients in group A and 82.5% (33/40) of the patients in group B had a good outcome, and there were no significant differences between the two groups. Boh Methods led to significant improvements in disc height, and while PEEK+autograft produced a smaller loss in disc height, the difference was insignificant. The improvements in slippage and the fusion and complication rates between the two groups were similar. There were no significant differences in the clinical outcomes or radiographic improvements of both fusion methods in the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. An autograft excised from a complete posterior arch containing a facet joint for interbody fusion is effective and affordable for treating isthmic spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Early postoperative dislocation of the anterior Maverick lumbar disc prosthesis: report of 2 cases.

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    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Seex, Kevin A; Eisermann, Lukas G; Claydon, Matthew H; Malham, Gregory M

    2013-08-01

    The authors report on 2 cases of anterior dislocation of the Maverick lumbar disc prosthesis, both occurring in the early postoperative period. These cases developed after experience with more than 50 uneventful cases and were therefore thought to be unrelated to the surgeon's learning curve. No similar complications have been previously reported. The anterior Maverick device has a ball-and-socket design made of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum metal plates covered with hydroxyapatite. The superior and inferior endplates have keels to resist translation forces. The patient in Case 1 was a 52-year-old man with severe L4-5 discogenic pain; and in Case 2, a 42-year-old woman with disabling L4-5 and L5-S1 discogenic back pain. Both patients were without medical comorbidities and were nonsmokers with no risk factors for osteoporosis. Both had undergone uneventful retroperitoneal approaches performed by a vascular access surgeon. Computed tomography studies on postoperative Day 2 confirmed excellent prosthesis placement. Initial recoveries were uneventful. Two weeks postoperatively, after stretching (extension or hyperextension) in bed at home, each patient suffered the sudden onset of severe abdominal pain with anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis. The patients were returned to the operating room and underwent surgery performed by the same spinal and vascular surgeons. Removal of the Maverick prosthesis and anterior interbody fusion with a separate cage and plate were performed. Both patients had recovered well with good clinical and radiological recovery at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Possible causes of the anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis include the following: 1) surgeon error: In both cases the keel cuts were neat, and early postoperative CT confirmed good placement of the prosthesis; 2) equipment problem: The keel cuts may have been too large because the cutters were worn, which led to an inadequate press fit of the implants; 3) prosthesis

  11. Direct lateral approach to lumbar fusion is a biomechanically equivalent alternative to the anterior approach: an in vitro study.

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    Laws, Cory J; Coughlin, Dezba G; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Serhan, Hassan A; Hu, Serena S

    2012-05-01

    A human cadaveric biomechanical study of lumbar mobility before and after fusion and with or without supplemental instrumentation for 5 instrumentation configurations. To determine the biomechanical differences between anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) with and without supplementary instrumentation. Some prior studies have compared various surgical approaches using the same interbody device whereas others have investigated the stabilizing effect of supplemental instrumentation. No published studies have performed a side-by-side comparison of standard and minimally invasive techniques with and without supplemental instrumentation. Eight human lumbosacral specimens (16 motion segments) were tested in each of the 5 following configurations: (1) intact, (2) with ALIF or DLIF cage, (3) with cage plus stabilizing plate, (4) with cage plus unilateral pedicle screw fixation (PSF), and (5) with cage plus bilateral PSF. Pure moments were applied to induce specimen flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Three-dimensional kinematic responses were measured and used to calculate range of motion, stiffness, and neutral zone. Compared to the intact state, DLIF significantly reduced range of motion in flexion, extension, and lateral bending (P = 0.0117, P = 0.0015, P = 0.0031). Supplemental instrumentation significantly increased fused-specimen stiffness for both DLIF and ALIF groups. For the ALIF group, bilateral PSF increased stiffness relative to stand-alone cage by 455% in flexion and 317% in lateral bending (P = 0.0009 and P < 0.0001). The plate increased ALIF group stiffness by 211% in extension and 256% in axial rotation (P = 0.0467 and P = 0.0303). For the DLIF group, bilateral PSF increased stiffness by 350% in flexion and 222% in extension (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0008). No differences were observed between ALIF and DLIF groups supplemented with bilateral PSF. Our data support that the direct lateral approach

  12. Additional sagittal correction can be obtained when using an expandable titanium interbody device in lumbar Smith-Peterson osteotomies: a biomechanical study.

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    Qandah, Nicholas A; Klocke, Noelle F; Synkowski, Jordan J; Chinthakunta, Suresh R; Hussain, Mir M; Salloum, Kanaan G; Marvin, Eric A; Bucklen, Brandon S

    2015-03-01

    Insertion of intervertebral fusion devices between consecutive Smith-Peterson osteotomies (SPOs) provides an anterior fulcrum during compression, which has been documented to improve achievable Cobb angle correction. Extension of these principles to an expandable device would theoretically provide greater surgical adjustment for flatback and scoliotic cases than a static cage. To investigate whether an expandable titanium interbody device would produce greater sagittal correction than a static spacer when used during SPO procedures. Cadaveric research was performed. Seven T10-S1 human specimens were used. Cobb angle changes and range of motion are the physiological measures. No self-report/functional measures were applicable. Bilateral pedicle screws were placed (T11-L5) before Smith-Petersen osteotomy creation from L2 to L4. A transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion titanium expandable implant was placed in each disc space from L2-L3 to L4-L5, which is currently an off-label use of this implant. Initial placement simulated a static spacer, and then incremental device expansion was performed to obtain an intermediate and final height. Lateral fluoroscopic images were taken for Cobb angle evaluation between L2 and L5, and range of motion as observed during application of pure bending moments was captured using a six degree-of-freedom spine simulator. A one-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc analysis was performed to determine significant differences (pcompany, where some authors are salaried employees; another author has been a paid consultant elsewhere. These financial associations were not believed to bias the results. Change in Cobb angle from L2 to L5 was significantly greater with the interbody spacer compared with SPO alone. Despite an obvious increase in lordosis with expansion height, there were no significant differences between implant expansion states for the L2-L5 Cobb angle. All instrumented constructs were statistically equivalent in every

  13. Clinical study on minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis

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    Hao WU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the operative essentials and therapeutic effects of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS.  Methods A total of 17 DLS patients without prior spinal diseases were treated by MIS-TLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation from January 2013 to September 2015 in Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, and postoperative complication were recorded in each patient. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI were used to evaluate postoperative improvement of low back and leg pain, and clinical effects were assessed according to Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. Coronal Cobb angle, sagittal lordosis angle and spinal deviation distances on coronal and sagittal plane were measured before operation, one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up in spinal full-length X-ray examination. Fusion rate was calculated according to X-ray or CT scan, and the degree of decompression was evaluated by MRI.  Results Decompression and fusion levels ranged from T12-S1 vertebrae, and interbody fusion was performed in 17 patients and 56 levels were fused. Average operation time was 200 min (180-300 min, intraoperative blood loss was 320 ml (200-1000 ml and hospital stay was 8.21 d (5-12 d. All patients were followed-up for 12.13 months (5-24 months. Compared with preoperation, VAS (P = 0.000, for all and ODI scores (P = 0.000, for all decreased significantly, SF-36 score increased (P = 0.000, for all, coronal Cobb angle (P = 0.000, for all, sagittal lordosis angle (P = 0.000, for all, coronal and sagittal deviation (P = 0.000, for all decreased significantly one week and 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up. The improvement rate of ODI was (86.51 ± 6.02%, fusion rate of vertebral bodies

  14. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for treatment of massive lumbar disc herniation.

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    Zhao, Chang-Qing; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Large lumbar or lumbosacral (LS) disc herniations usually expand from the paramedian space to the neuroforamen and compress both the transversing (lower) and the exiting (upper) nerve roots, thus leading to bi-radicular symptoms. Bi-radicular involvement is a statistically significant risk factor for poor outcome in patients presenting with far lateral or foraminal disc herniation after facet preserving microdecompression. There is evidence showing that patients suffering from large lumbar disc herniations treated with interbody fusion have significant superior results in comparison with those who received a simple discectomy. We report our experiences on managing large LS disc herniation with bi-radicular symptoms by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using one diagonal fusion cage with unilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation. Twenty-three patients who suffered from single level lumbar or LS disc herniation with bi-radicular symptoms treated with unilateral decompression and TLIF using one diagonal fusion cage with ipsilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation operated between January 2005 and December 2009, were included in this study. Operation time and blood loss were recorded. The pain and disability status were pre- and postoperatively evaluated by the visual analog score (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Interbody bony fusion was detected by routine radiographs and computed tomography scan. Adjacent segment degeneration was detected by routine radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging examination. Overall outcomes were categorized according to modified Macnab classification. The patients were followed up for an average of 44.7 months. Pain relief in the VAS and improvement of the ODI were significant after surgery and at final followup. No severe complications occurred during hospital stay. Interbody bony fusion was achieved in every case. No cage retropulsion was observed, while 3 cases experienced cage subsidence. Adjacent segment degeneration

  15. Endoscope-Assisted Abscess Drainage Secondary to Endoscope-Assisted Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: 1-Year Follow-Up.

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    Madhavan, Karthik; Burks, Steven Shelby; Chieng, Lee Onn; Veeravagu, Anand; Wang, Michael Y

    2017-11-01

    Endoscopic discectomy and fusions have been gaining popularity in the recent past and are noted to be safe for their application in elderly population. The procedure involves ultra-small incision for discectomy followed by placement of percutaneous screws in awake patients. Treatment of advanced spinal pathology with endoscope-assisted techniques is challenging. Although not common with the endoscopic approach, postoperative infection can be problematic, as there are no established guidelines on its management. A 76-year-old female patient underwent lumbar 4-5 endoscopic-assisted transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for severe degenerative changes leading to back and radicular leg pain. She did well postoperatively and was discharged home the following day. She presented to the outside hospital with new onset of severe back pain, sepsis, and positive methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus with blood culture and demonstrated no improvement while on antibiotics. Initial magnetic resonance imaging revealed postoperative changes only. With positive blood culture and localized pain, she was then offered to undergo a percutaneous drainage of the abscess. Under local anesthesia and intravenous sedation, a small pocket of collection was found along the endoscopic trajectory from previous surgery. After evacuation of the collection, the interbody device was irrigated with vancomycin through endoscope. Postoperatively, immediate symptomatic improvement was noted in back pain. She was discharged home on oxacillin and continues to do well at 12 months' follow-up with excellent fusion. The present case illustrates the successful treatment of a surgical-site infection after endoscope-assisted transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion via a repeat percutaneous endoscopic approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of different cage designs and mechano-regulation algorithms in the lumbar interbody fusion process - a finite element analysis.

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    Postigo, Sergio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Rohlmann, Antonius; Putzier, Michael; Simón, Antonio; Duda, Georg; Checa, Sara

    2014-04-11

    Lumbar interbody fusion cages are commonly used to treat painful spinal degeneration and instability by achieving bony fusion. Many different cage designs exist, however the effect of cage morphology and material properties on the fusion process remains largely unknown. This finite element model study aims to investigate the influence of different cage designs on bone fusion using two mechano-regulation algorithms of tissue formation. It could be observed that different cages play a distinct key role in the mechanical conditions within the fusion region and therefore regulate the time course of the fusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Graft subsidence as a predictor of revision surgery following stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; McDowell, Michael M; Panczykowski, David M; Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a less invasive surgical option commonly used for a variety of spinal conditions, including in high-risk patient populations. LLIF is often performed as a stand-alone procedure, and may be complicated by graft subsidence, the clinical ramifications of which remain unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize further the sequelae of graft subsidence following stand-alone LLIF. METHODS A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was conducted on consecutive patients who underwent stand-alone LLIF between July 2008 and June 2015; 297 patients (623 levels) met inclusion criteria. Imaging studies were examined to grade graft subsidence according to Marchi criteria, and compared between those who required revision surgery and those who did not. Additional variables recorded included levels fused, DEXA (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) T-score, body mass index, and routine demographic information. The data were analyzed using the Student t-test, chi-square analysis, and logistic regression analysis to identify potential confounding factors. RESULTS Of 297 patients, 34 (11.4%) had radiographic evidence of subsidence and 18 (6.1%) required revision surgery. The median subsidence grade for patients requiring revision surgery was 2.5, compared with 1 for those who did not. Chi-square analysis revealed a significantly higher incidence of revision surgery in patients with high-grade subsidence compared with those with low-grade subsidence. Seven of 18 patients (38.9%) requiring revision surgery suffered a vertebral body fracture. High-grade subsidence was a significant predictor of the need for revision surgery (p subsidence following stand-alone LLIF required revision surgery. When evaluating patients for LLIF, supplemental instrumentation should be considered during the index surgery in patients with a significant risk of graft subsidence.

  18. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Isthmic Spondylolisthesis: In Situ Versus Reduction.

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    Fan, Guoxin; Gu, Guangfei; Zhu, Yanjie; Guan, Xiaofei; Hu, Annan; Wu, Xinbo; Zhang, Hailong; He, Shisheng

    2016-06-01

    The study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of reduction versus in situ fusion with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for isthmic spondylolisthesis. Demographic, preoperative, and postoperative data were collected from the medical records. Radiographic fusion was assessed by use of the grading criteria of Bridwell. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes including visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, Japanese Orthopedic Association scale and improvement rate were calculated. Patient satisfaction was assessed with the criteria of Macnab (excellent, good, fair, poor). There were 24 patients (11 male) in the reduction group and 21 patients (10 male) in the in situ fusion group. The average follow-up was 34.75 ± 8.06 months in reduction group and 31.05 ± 6.52 months in the in situ fusion group (P = 0.101). There were no significant differences in hospital stay, estimated blood loss, blood transfusion, operation time, fusion grading, and complications between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Spinal fusion rate was 91.67% (22/24) in the reduction group and 85.71% (18/21) in the in situ group (P = 0.835). There were no significant differences in Japanese Orthopedic Association scale, visual analog scale, and Oswestry Disability Index score between the 2 groups whenever preoperatively, 3-month postoperatively, or at the last follow-up (P > 0.05). According to the criteria of Macnab, the rate of excellent and good was 83.33% in reduction group and 80.95% in the in situ group (P = 0.899). MIS-TLIF with reduction did not induce significantly better patient-reported outcomes, spinal fusion rate, perioperative outcomes, or fewer complications in isthmic spondylolisthesis. Intentional reduction may not be a requirement in MIS-TLIF for isthmic spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lumbar interbody fusion: a parametric investigation of a novel cage design with and without posterior instrumentation.

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    Galbusera, Fabio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2012-03-01

    A finite element model of the L4-L5 human segment was employed to carry out a parametric biomechanical investigation of lumbar interbody fusion with a novel "sandwich" cage having an inner stiff core and two softer layers in the areas close to the endplates, with and without posterior fixation. Considered cage designs included: (a) cage in a homogeneous material with variable elastic modulus (19-2,000 MPa), (b) "sandwich" cage having an inner core (E=2,000 MPa) and softer layers (E=19 MPa) with variable thickness (1-2.5 mm). The latter cage was also considered in combination with posterior rods made with a material having variable elastic modulus (19-210,000 MPa). All the models were loaded with 500 N compression and moments of 7.5 Nm in flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. The homogeneous cage stabilized the segment in flexion, lateral bending and axial rotation; in extension there was a destabilization up to 60% and remarkable cage movement (1 mm). The "sandwich" cage limited this phenomenon (cage movement<0.6 mm), effectively stabilized the segment in the other directions and lowered the maximal contact pressure on the endplates, reducing the risk of subsidence. Posterior fixation reduced spinal flexibility and cage movement. The soft layers of the "sandwich" cage had the potential to limit the risk of cage subsidence and to preserve a significant loading of the structure even in combination with flexible posterior instrumentation, which may have a beneficial effect in promoting bony fusion.

  20. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Spondylolisthesis: Comparison Between Isthmic and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Yeol; Park, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2015-11-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is a common surgical option for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). However, its effectiveness for isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) is still controversial. No current studies have directly compared perioperative and postoperative results including various radiological parameters between IS and DS after MIS TLIF. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical and radiological results between isthmic and degenerative spondylolisthesis after MIS TLIF. This is a retrospective study of 41 patients who underwent MIS TLIF for single-segment, grade 1 or 2 IS (n = 18) and DS (n = 23). The same surgical techniques and procedure were applied to both groups. Perioperative outcomes (operation time, blood loss, hospital stay, complications); clinical outcomes (visual analog scale [VAS], Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]); radiological parameters (disk height, degree of spondylolisthesis, slip angle, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, sacropelvic parameters: pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tile); and fusion rates using computed tomography scanning were compared between groups at 1 year postoperatively. There were no significantly different perioperative results between groups. Mean VAS and ODI scores improved significantly postoperatively in both groups but were not significantly different between groups at each follow-up point. Radiological parameters were not significantly different between groups except disk height and degree of spondylolisthesis. The disk heights were increased postoperatively (IS: 6.79-9.22 mm; DS: 8.18-8.97 mm) in both groups, and there were significant differences preoperatively. In addition, disk height restoration was greater for IS than DS (2.43 mm vs. 0.79 mm, P = 0.01). However, postoperative disk heights were not significantly different between groups. The degree of spondylolisthesis was significantly different between groups both preoperatively (16.77% vs. 11.33%, P

  1. Risk Factors of Adjacent Segment Disease After Transforaminal Inter-Body Fusion for Degenerative Lumbar Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Koji; Hoshino, Masahiro; Omori, Keita; Igarashi, Hidetoshi; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuruta, Takashi; Matsumoto, Koji; Iriuchishima, Takanori; Ajiro, Yasumitsu; Matsuzaki, Hiromi

    2017-01-15

    A retrospective study. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) after transforaminal inter-body fusion (TLIF) for degenerative lumbar disease. ASD is a major complication after spinal fusion. Many reports have been published concerning the risk factors for ASD after TLIF. A number of quantitative relationships to spino-pelvic parameters have been established. A retrospective cohort study was carried out to investigate spino-pelvic alignment in patients with ASD after TLIF. This study evaluated 263 subjects (150 subjects undergoing floating fusion (FF group), and 113 patients undergoing lumbosacral fusion (LF group)) who underwent TLIF from 2009 to 2012. The mean follow-up period was 37.6 months. Several parameters were measured using pre- and postoperative full-length free-standing radiographs, including lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral slope (SS), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and PI-LL. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate these parameters as potential risk factors of early onset radiographic ASD. Radiographic ASD was found in 65 cases (43.3%) in the FF group, and 49 cases (43.3%) in the LF group. LL improved by 7.5° and 3.9° in each group respectively after TLIF. However, PT worsened by 6.4° in the LF group. When comparing with ASD positive cases and ASD negative cases, a significant difference in preoperative PT was observed in both FF (P = 0.001) and LF groups (P = 0.0001). Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that preoperative PT of more than 22.5° was a significant risk factor of the incidence of ASD after TLIF (P = 0.02; odds ratio: 5.1, 95% CI: 1.62-9.03). Patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance have a statistically significant increased risk of ASD. The risk of ASD incidence was 5.1 times greater in subjects with preoperative PT of more than 22.5°.

  2. Low incidence of adjacent segment disease after posterior lumbar interbody fusion with minimum disc distraction: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Takahiro; Honda, Hirotsugu; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Kaito, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected data. To investigate the incidence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) and identify possible risk factors for ASD after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with minimum disc distraction by selecting low-height interbody cages. Excessive disc space distraction is reportedly 1 of the risk factors for ASD after PLIF; however, the incidence and other risk factors of ASD after PLIF with minimum disc distraction remain unclear. Forty-one consecutive patients who underwent PLIF at L4-L5 and were postoperatively followed up for a minimum of 2 years were included. The height and shape (box or bullet shape) of interbody cages was determined according to the disc height and morphology of the intervertebral space assessed on preoperative computed tomography scans to avoid excessive distraction. The incidence of radiographic and symptomatic ASD was evaluated and all demographic and radiographic parameters were compared between patients with and without ASD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for ASD among the variables with P < .20 in univariate analysis. The overall incidence of ASD was 12.2% (5/41 patients): radiographic ASD, 7.3% (3 patients); symptomatic ASD, 4.9% (2 patients). Multivariate analysis revealed preoperative retrolisthesis of L3 on extension as the sole risk factor for ASD after PLIF with minimum disc distraction (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-4.05; P = .049). The incidence of ASD in this study was lower than that of ASD in our previous study about PLIF with distraction of disc space (12.2% vs. 31.8%). Minimum disc distraction by selection of low-height interbody cages is a simple and effective method to prevent ASD at the surgeons' discretion, although preexisting retrolisthesis at the adjacent upper segment should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health

  3. Vertebral Body Hounsfield Units are Associated With Cage Subsidence After Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jie; Li, Kang; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Jie

    2017-10-01

    To assess the association between Hounsfield units (HU) measurement and cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with unilateral fixation becomes a popular treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. Cage subsidence is a potentially devastating complication after lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral fixation. Recently, a new technique for assessing bone mineral density using HU values from computed tomography has been proposed. Bone quality is believed to be one of the important factors that cause cage subsidence after TLIF. Cage subsidence after single-level (L4/5) TLIF with unilateral fixation was prospectively documented at a single institution between 2013 and 2014. Patients with cage subsidence were matched 1:1 to a control cohort without cage subsidence on the basis of age and sex. HU values were measured from the preoperative computed tomography. All patients received computed tomographic scans at a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Sagittal images were evaluated for evidence of cage subsidence. Eighteen patients with cage subsidence were well matched 1:1 to a cohort without cage subsidence and had complete imaging data. The global lumbar HU values were significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence than in the controls (112.4±10.08 vs. 140.2±10.17; P=0.0015). Similarly, a regional assessment of HU across the fusion levels was significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence (113.4±10.47 vs. 127.9±8.13; P=0.0075). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic cure were 0.715 and 0.636 for global and regional assessment, respectively. The best cut-offs for global and regional assessment were 132 (sensitivity: 83.3%; specificity: 61.1%) and 122 (sensitivity: 72.2%; specificity: 55.6%), respectively. Lower preoperative HU values is associated with cage subsidence after TLIF with unilateral fixation. HU measurement may be used as a predictor of cage subsidence after

  4. Effects of Addition of Preoperative Intravenous Ibuprofen to Pregabalin on Postoperative Pain in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery

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    Hüseyin Ulaş Pınar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Ibuprofen and pregabalin both have independent positive effects on postoperative pain. The aim of the study is researching effect of 800 mg i.v. ibuprofen in addition to preoperative single dose pregabalin on postoperative analgesia and morphine consumption in posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery. Materials and Methods. 42 adult ASA I-II physical status patients received 150 mg oral pregabalin 1 hour before surgery. Patients received either 250 ml saline with 800 mg i.v. ibuprofen or saline without ibuprofen 30 minutes prior to the surgery. Postoperative analgesia was obtained by morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA and 1 g i.v. paracetamol every six hours. PCA morphine consumption was recorded and postoperative pain was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS in postoperative recovery room, at the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, 24th, 36th, and 48th hours. Results. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in ibuprofen group in recovery room, at the 1st, 2nd, 36th, and 48th hours. Total morphine consumption was lower in ibuprofen group at the 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 48th hours. Conclusions. Multimodal analgesia with preoperative ibuprofen added to preoperative pregabalin safely decreases postoperative pain and total morphine consumption in patients having posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery, without increasing incidences of bleeding or other side effects.

  5. Subsidence after anterior cervical inter-body fusion. A randomized prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Erich; Derakhshani, Sharam; Bothmann, Matthias; Oberle, Joachim

    2009-04-01

    In ventral fusion after anterior cervical discectomy there is still a remarkable number of cage subsidence and segmental kyphosis seen. The aim of the present study is to assess whether the cage design influences the extent of correction loss during follow-up. Sixty patients with single-level cervical disc herniation were randomly treated with two different cervical inter-body cages (group 1: Solis cage, Stryker Company and group 2: Shell cage, AMT Company). Clinical and radiological follow-up was done before and after surgery, 3 and 6 months post-surgery. Clinical follow-up was done with the help of Odom's criteria. Both groups were similar in the baseline parameters (age, sex, treated level). Statistically, the subsidence was significantly higher at 3 and 6-month follow-ups in group 1 than in group 2, however, clinical results showed no significant differences. In 67%, subsidence was seen in the anterior lower aspect of the treated segment. Segmental kyphosis was seen in seven patients of group 1 and two patients of group 2. A significant correlation is found between Odom's criteria and subsidence. Although there was no significant difference in a short-term clinical result between the two treatment groups, we recommend the use of cages which preserve the determined segmental height and lordosis.

  6. Restoration of lumbopelvic sagittal alignment and its maintenance following transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF): comparison between straight type versus curvilinear type cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Tae; Shin, Myung-Hoon; Lee, Ho-Jin; Choi, Du-Yong

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate a radiological and clinical difference between the curvilinear type cages compared to the straight type cages for the restoration of lumbopelvic sagittal alignment and its maintenance after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure. 68 patients who underwent single-level TLIF using either the straight type or curvilinear type cage were retrospectively reviewed. Assessment of the lumbopelvic parameters and the height of disc space was performed before surgery as well as 2 days, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Clinical outcome was assessed using VAS and ODI. The curvilinear type cages were positioned more anteriorly than the straight type. Restoration of the segmental lordosis (SL) in the curvilinear group was significantly greater than the straight group and at 12 months of follow-up, the straight group showed greater decrease in the disc height than the curvilinear group. The straight group failed to show improvement of lumbar lordosis (LL), while the curvilinear group showed significant restoration of LL and could maintain it to the 6 months of follow-up. In both groups, pelvic tilt was significantly decreased and it lasted to 6 months in the straight group; whereas in the curvilinear group, it was maintained to the last follow-up of 12 months. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean VAS and ODI score over the follow-up period. This study demonstrates that the curvilinear type cage is superior to the straight type cage in improving the SL and maintaining both the restored lumbopelvic parameters and elevated disc height. These results could be attributable to the anterior position of the curvilinear cage which permits easy restoration of segmental lordosis and less sinking of cages.

  7. Biomechanics of lumbar cortical screw-rod fixation versus pedicle screw-rod fixation with and without interbody support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Orribo, Luis; Kalb, Samuel; Reyes, Phillip M; Chang, Steve W; Crawford, Neil R

    2013-04-15

    Seven different combinations of posterior screw fixation, with or without interbody support, were compared in vitro using nondestructive flexibility tests. To study the biomechanical behavior of a new cortical screw (CS) fixation construct relative to the traditional pedicle screw (PS) construct. The CS is an alternative to the PS for posterior fixation of the lumbar spine. The CS trajectory is more sagittally and cranially oriented than the PS, being anchored in the pars interarticularis. Like PS fixation, CS fixation uses interconnecting rods fastened with top-locking connectors. Stability after bilateral CS fixation was compared with stability after bilateral PS fixation in the setting of intact disc and with direct lateral interbody fixation (DLIF) or transforaminal lateral interbody fixation (TLIF) support. Standard nondestructive flexibility tests were performed in cadaveric lumbar specimens, allowing non-paired comparisons of specific conditions from 28 specimens (4 groups of 7) within a larger experiment of multiple hardware configurations. Condition tested and group from which results originated were as follows: (1) intact (all groups); (2) with L3-L4 bilateral PS-rods (group 1); (3) with bilateral CS-rods (group 2); (4) with DLIF (group 3); (5) with DLIF + CS-rods (group 4); (6) with DLIF + PS-rods (group 3); (7) with TLIF + CS-rods (group 2), and (8) with TLIF + PS-rods (group 2). To assess spinal stability, the mean range of motion, lax zone, and stiff zone at L3-L4 were compared during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. With intact disc, stability was equivalent after PS-rod and CS-rod fixation, except that PS-rod fixation was stiffer during axial rotation. With DLIF support, there was no significant difference in stability between PS-rod and CS-rod fixation. With TLIF support, PS-rod fixation was stiffer than CS-rod fixation during lateral bending. Bilateral CS-rod fixation provided about the same stability in cadaveric specimens

  8. A STUDY OF POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION WITH LOCALLY HARVESTED SPINOLAMINECTOMY BONE GRAFT AND PEDICLE SCREW FIXATION IN SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

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    Pardhasaradhi M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF create intervertebral fusion by means of a posterior approach. Successful results have been reported with allograft, various cages (for interbody support, autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein‐2. Interbody fusion techniques facilitate reduction and enhance fusion. Corticocancellous laminectomy bone chips alone can be used as a means of spinal fusion in patients with single level instrumented PLIF. This has got a good fusion rate. PLIF with cage gives better fusion on radiology than PLIF with iliac bone graft, but no statistical difference in the clinical outcome. Cage use precludes complications associated with iliac bone harvesting. The reported adjacent segment degeneration was 40.5% and reoperation was 8.1% after 10 years of follow up. MATERIALS AND METHODS 30 cases of spondylolisthesis who attended the Orthopaedic Outpatient Department of Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, from 2014 to 2016 were taken up for study. All the cases were examined clinically and confirmed radiologically. The patient’s age, sex, symptoms and duration were noted and were examined clinically for the status of the spine. Straight leg raising test was done and neurological examination of the lower limbs performed. All the patients were subjected to the radiological examination of the lumbosacral spine by taking anteroposterior, lateral (flexion and extension views, oblique views to demonstrate spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. MRI and x-rays studies were done in all the cases to facilitate evaluation of the root compression disk changes and spinal cord changes. RESULTS In our study, we followed all the 30 patients after the surgery following procedure of removal of loose lamina, spinous process and fibrocartilaginous mass, PLIF with only the laminectomy bone mass and CD screw system fixation up to 2 years. 12 patients (40% had excellent

  9. Preventive Effect of Dynamic Stabilization Against Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Naohiro; Kawamura, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Daiki; Shimizu, Takaki; Sasagawa, Takeshi; Masuyama, Shigeru; Hirao, Yujiro; Kunogi, Junichi

    2017-01-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To investigate the effects of dynamic stabilization with sublaminar taping (ST) on the upper segment adjacent to posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Hybrid procedures such as dynamic stabilization for adjacent segment in addition to spinal fusion have been developed for reduction of the mechanical stress and prevention of adjacent segment pathology (ASP). However, a few reports are available on hybrid procedures and their efficacy is still controversial. Of the 116 patients who underwent L4/5 PLIF between August 2006 and September 2012, 76 patients with minimum 2-year follow up were included in this study. Fifty three patients underwent L4/5 PLIF with hybrid procedure using ST on L3 lamina (group U), and 23 patients underwent conventional L4/5 PLIF (group C). The adjacent segment degeneration (ASDeg) was determined by measurements of radiograph, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging; the adjacent segment disease (ASDis) was evaluated on medical records. The incidence of ASDeg at L3/4 segment of group U (3.7%) was significantly less than that of group C (30.4%) (P = 0.003), although there were no significant differences at L2/3 (group U, 7.5%; group C, 13%) or L5/S1 segment (group U, 5.7%; group C, 8.7%). On the other hand, no significant difference was found between two groups in the incidence of ASDis in L2/3 to L5/S1 levels, and no patient underwent reoperation. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses for L3/4 segment ASDeg revealed that the difference of surgical procedure was the only significant factor. The current study showed that L4/5 PLIF with hybrid procedure using ST on L3 lamina significantly reduced the incidence of L3/4 ASDeg as compared with the conventional L4/5 PLIF without compromising L2/3 or L5/S1 segment. Although further studies and longer follow up are necessary, the hybrid procedure is expected to be effective for preventing ASP. 4.

  10. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a risk factor for further surgery in short-segment lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Bungo; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Kimura, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Takayoshi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate the effect of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) on the clinical results of short-segment lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. The 208 patients who underwent one- or two-level LIF were selected as the subjects of this study. Patients with prior lumbar fusion surgery or follow-up adjacent segment disease (ASD). The Cox proportional-hazards model was used to identify possible risk factors (DISH, age, sex, number of levels fused, level of the lowest instrumented vertebra, and laminectomy adjacent to the index fused levels) for further surgery. Among the 208 patients (39 with DISH), 21 patients required further surgery during follow-up. Cox analysis showed that DISH (hazard ratio = 5.46) and two-level fusion (hazard ratio = 2.83) were significant independent predictors of further surgery. Age, sex, level of the lowest instrumented vertebra, and laminectomy adjacent to the index fused levels were not significant predictors. DISH after short-segment LIF surgery is a significant risk factor for further surgery because of pseudoarthrosis or ASD.

  11. Preserving Posterior Complex Can Prevent Adjacent Segment Disease following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgeries: A Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Peng; Du, Cheng-Fei; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Chen, Xuan-Wei; Wu, Gui; Li, Zhe-Cheng; Ye, Jin-Duo; Lin, Jian-Hua; Wang, Li Zhen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the biomechanical effects of the lumbar posterior complex on the adjacent segments after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgeries. A finite element model of the L1-S1 segment was modified to simulate PLIF with total laminectomy (PLIF-LAM) and PLIF with hemilaminectomy (PLIF-HEMI) procedures. The models were subjected to a 400N follower load with a 7.5-N.m moment of flexion, extension, torsion, and lateral bending. The range of motion (ROM), intradiscal pressure (IDP), and ligament force were compared. In Flexion, the ROM, IDP and ligament force of posterior longitudinal ligament, intertransverse ligament, and capsular ligament remarkably increased at the proximal adjacent segment in the PLIF-LAM model, and slightly increased in the PLIF-HEMI model. There was almost no difference for the ROM, IDP and ligament force at L5-S1 level between the two PLIF models although the ligament forces of ligamenta flava remarkably increased compared with the intact lumbar spine (INT) model. For the other loading conditions, these two models almost showed no difference in ROM, IDP and ligament force on the adjacent discs. Preserved posterior complex acts as the posterior tension band during PLIF surgery and results in less ROM, IDP and ligament forces on the proximal adjacent segment in flexion. Preserving the posterior complex during decompression can be effective on preventing adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following PLIF surgeries.

  12. A perioperative cost analysis comparing single-level minimally invasive and open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kern; Nandyala, Sreeharsha V; Marquez-Lara, Alejandro; Fineberg, Steven J; Oglesby, Mathew; Pelton, Miguel A; Andersson, Gunnar B; Isayeva, Darya; Jegier, Briana J; Phillips, Frank M

    2014-08-01

    Emerging literature suggests superior clinical short- and long-term outcomes of MIS (minimally invasive surgery) TLIFs (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion) versus open fusions. Few studies to date have analyzed the cost differences between the two techniques and their relationship to acute clinical outcomes. The purpose of the study was to determine the differences in hospitalization costs and payments for patients treated with primary single-level MIS versus open TLIF. The impact of clinical outcomes and their contribution to financial differences was explored as well. This study was a nonrandomized, nonblinded prospective review. Sixty-six consecutive patients undergoing a single-level TLIF (open/MIS) were analyzed (33 open, 33 MIS). Patients in either cohort (MIS/open) were matched based on race, sex, age, smoking status, medical comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity index), payer, and diagnosis. Every patient in the study had a diagnosis of either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis and stenosis. Operative time (minutes), length of stay (LOS, days), estimated blood loss (EBL, mL), anesthesia time (minutes), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores, and hospital cost/payment amount were assessed. The MIS and open TLIF groups were compared based on clinical outcomes measures and hospital cost/payment data using SPSS version 20.0 for statistical analysis. The two groups were compared using bivariate chi-squared analysis. Mann-Whitney tests were used for non-normal distributed data. Effect size estimate was calculated with the Cohen d statistic and the r statistic with a 95% confidence interval. Average surgical time was shorter for the MIS than the open TLIF group (115.8 minutes vs. 186.0 minutes respectively; p=.001). Length of stay was also reduced for the MIS versus the open group (2.3 days vs. 2.9 days, respectively; p=.018). Average anesthesia time and EBL were also lower in the MIS group (pFinancial analysis demonstrated lower total hospital direct

  13. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

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    Chen Hsiang-Ho

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1 large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2 polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3 polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of a spherical lumbar interbody device at varying levels of subsidence

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    Rundell, Steven A.; Isaza, Jorge E.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ulf Fernström implanted stainless steel ball bearings following discectomy, or for painful disc disease, and termed this procedure disc arthroplasty. Today, spherical interbody spacers are clinically available, but there is a paucity of associated biomechanical testing. The primary objective of the current study was to evaluate the biomechanics of a spherical interbody implant. It was hypothesized that implantation of a spherical interbody implant, with combined subsidence into the vertebral bodies, would result in similar ranges of motion (RoM) and facet contact forces (FCFs) when compared with an intact condition. A secondary objective of this study was to determine the effect of using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) versus a cobalt chrome (CoCr) implant on vertebral body strains. We hypothesized that the material selection would have a negligible effect on vertebral body strains since both materials have elastic moduli substantially greater than the annulus. Methods A finite element model of L3-L4 was created and validated by use of ROM, disc pressure, and bony strain from previously published data. Virtual implantation of a spherical interbody device was performed with 0, 2, and 4 mm of subsidence. The model was exercised in compression, flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. The ROM, vertebral body effective (von Mises) strain, and FCFs were reported. Results Implantation of a PEEK implant resulted in slightly lower strain maxima when compared with a CoCr implant. For both materials, the peak strain experienced by the underlying bone was reduced with increasing subsidence. All levels of subsidence resulted in ROM and FCFs similar to the intact model. Conclusions The results suggest that a simple spherical implant design is able to maintain segmental ROM and provide minimal differences in FCFs. Large areas of von Mises strain maxima were generated in the bone adjacent to the implant regardless of whether the implant was PEEK or Co

  15. Risk factors of adjacent segment disease requiring surgery after lumbar spinal fusion: comparison of posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion.

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    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Yongdai; Soh, Jae-Wan; Shin, Byung-Joon

    2014-03-01

    A retrospective study. To determine the incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) requiring surgery among patients previously treated with spinal fusion for degenerative lumbar disease and to compare the survivorship of adjacent segment according to various risk factors including comparison of fusion methods: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) versus posterolateral fusion (PLF). One of the major issues after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment disease. Biomechanically, PLIF has been reported to be more rigid than PLF, and therefore, patients who undergo PLIF are suspected to experience a higher incidence of ASD than those who underwent PLF. There have been many studies analyzing the risk factors of ASD, but we are not aware of any study comparing PLIF with PLF in incidence of ASD requiring surgery. A consecutive series of 490 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal fusion of 3 or fewer segments to treat degenerative lumbar disease was identified. The mean age at index operation was 53 years, and the mean follow-up period was 51 months (12-236 mo). The number of patients treated by PLF and PLIF were 103 and 387, respectively. The incidence and prevalence of revision surgery for ASD were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. For risk factor analysis, we used log-rank test and Cox regression analysis with fusion methods, sex, age, number of fused segments, and presence of laminectomy adjacent to index fusion. After index spinal fusion, 23 patients (4.7%) had undergone additional surgery for ASD. Kaplan-Meier analysis predicted a disease-free survival rate of adjacent segments in 94.2% of patients at 5 years and 89.6% at 10 years after the index operation. In the analysis of risk factors, PLIF was associated with 3.4 times higher incidence of ASD requiring surgery than PLF (P = 0.037). Patients older than 60 years at the time of index operation were 2.5 times more likely to undergo revision operation than those younger

  16. Incidence of vascular complications during lateral lumbar interbody fusion: an examination of the mini-open access technique.

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    Kueper, Janina; Fantini, Gary A; Walker, Brendon R; Aichmair, Alexander; Hughes, Alexander P

    2015-04-01

    This article examines the incidence and management of vascular injury during Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion (LLIF). The details of the mini-open access technique are presented. A total of 900 patients who underwent a LLIF at an average 1.94 levels (range: 1-5 levels) by one of six fellowship trained surgeons on 1,754 levels from 2006 to 2013 were identified. The incidence of intraoperative vascular injury was retrospectively determined from the Operative Records. The management of vascular injury was evaluated. The mini-open access adapted by our institution for LLIF is described. The incidence of major vascular complication in our series was 1/900. The incidence of minor vascular injury was 4/900. The overall incidence of vascular injury was calculated to be 0.056 % per case and 0.029 % per level. All minor vascular injuries were identified to be segmental vessel lacerations, which were readily ligated under direct visualization without further extension of the incision with no clinical sequelae. The laceration of the abdominal aorta, the major vascular complication of this series, was emergently repaired through an exploratory laparotomy. None of the patients suffered long-term sequelae from their intraoperative vascular injuries. The mini-open lateral access technique for LLIF provides for minimal risk of vascular injury to the lumbar spine. In the rare event of minor vascular injury, the mini-open access approach allows for immediate visualization, confirmation and repair of the vessel with no long-term sequelae.

  17. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L5-S1 through a Unilateral Approach: Technical Feasibility and Outcomes

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    Won-Suh Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Minimally invasive spinal transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 is technically more demanding than it is at other levels because of the anatomical and biomechanical traits. Objective. To determine the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIS-TLIF for treatment of single-level spinal stenosis low-grade isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis at L5-S1. Methods. Radiological data and electronic medical records of patients who underwent MIS-TLIF between May 2012 and December 2014 were reviewed. Fusion rate, cage position, disc height (DH, disc angle (DA, disc slope angle, segmental lordotic angle (SLA, lumbar lordotic angle (LLA, and pelvic parameters were assessed. For functional assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS, Oswestry disability index (ODI, and patient satisfaction rate (PSR were utilized. Results. A total of 21 levels in 21 patients were studied. DH, DA, SLA, and LLA had increased from their preoperative measures at the final follow-up. Fusion rate was 86.7% (18/21 at 12 months’ follow-up. The most common cage position was anteromedial (15/21. The mean VAS scores for back and leg pain mean ODI scores improved significantly at the final follow-up. PSR was 88%. Cage subsidence was observed in 33.3% (7/21. Conclusions. The clinical and radiologic outcomes after MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 in patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis are generally favorable.

  18. Role of Weekly Teriparatide Administration in Osseous Union Enhancement within Six Months After Posterior or Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Osteoporosis-Associated Lumbar Degenerative Disorders: A Multicenter, Prospective Randomized Study.

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    Ebata, Shigeto; Takahashi, Jun; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Isogai, Yukihiro; Ohba, Tetsuro; Shibata, Yosuke; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Yamagata, Zentaro; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Haro, Hirotaka

    2017-03-01

    For elderly patients, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is usually performed to treat lumbar degenerative diseases. However, some patients exhibit pseudarthrosis following such procedures. The anabolic agent teriparatide is an approved treatment for promoting bone formation in osteoporotic patients. Our multicenter, prospective randomized study assessed the role of once-weekly teriparatide administration on patient outcomes following interbody fusion. Patients were females who were ≥50 years of age, had a bone mineral density (BMD) of teriparatide, administered subcutaneously starting at week 1, for 6 months postoperatively (the teriparatide arm), or no teriparatide (the control arm). Blinded radiographic evaluations were performed using dynamic radiography and computed tomography (CT) and assessed by modified intention-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analysis. Clinical and neurological symptoms were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOA-BPEQ) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Seventy-five patients were randomized to treatment, and 66 patients completed treatment. At 4 months postoperatively, bone fusion in the 2 center CT slices was significantly higher in the teriparatide arm compared with the control arm in the age-adjusted modified intention-to-treat analysis and was significantly higher at 6 months in the per-protocol analysis. Radiographic examinations showed no disc-space narrowing and no intervertebral disc instability. JOA-BPEQ and ODI results were improved postoperatively in both treatment arms. Weekly administration of teriparatide promoted bone formation at the surgical fusion site and decreased bone resorption, as indicated by bone metabolic marker results, within the early postoperative period. Our findings suggest that combining lumbar interbody fusion and teriparatide treatment may be an effective option for managing lumbar

  19. Risk factors for adjacent segment disease after posterior lumbar interbody fusion and efficacy of simultaneous decompression surgery for symptomatic adjacent segment disease.

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    Hikata, Tomohiro; Kamata, Michihiro; Furukawa, Mitsuru

    2014-04-01

    A retrospective study. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) increases mechanical stress and can cause degenerative changes at the adjacent segment. However, the precise causes of adjacent segment disease (ASD) after PLIF are not known, and it is unclear whether simultaneous decompression surgery for symptomatic ASD is effective. To study, radiographically and symptomatically, the risk factors for adjacent segment disease (ASD) in the lumbar spine after L4/5 PLIF and to examine whether decompression surgery for the adjacent segment (L3/4) reduces the occurrence of symptomatic ASD. Fifty-four patients who underwent L4/5 PLIF for L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis and could be followed up for at least 2 years were included. Of these, 37 were treated simultaneously with decompression surgery at L3/4. We measured radiographic changes and assessed symptoms from the cranial adjacent segment. Thirty-one patients (57.4%) met radiologic criteria for ASD. The length of follow-up (P=0.004) and simultaneous decompression surgery at L3/4 (P=0.009) were statistically significant factors for radiologic diagnosis of ASD. Seven patients (13.0%) had symptomatic ASD: 6 in the decompression group (16.2%) and 1 in the PLIF-only group (5.9%). Simultaneous decompression surgery did not reduce the incidence of symptomatic ASD (P=0.256). Local lordosis at the fused segment (P=0.005) and the sagittal angle of the facet joint at L3/4 (P=0.024) were statistically significant predictors of symptomatic ASD, which was accompanied by postoperative anterior listhesis above the fused segment (S group, 8.4%±8.0%; nonsymptomatic group: -0.7%±5.0%, P=0.024). Patients whose facet joint at the adjacent segment had a more sagittal orientation had postoperative anterior listhesis, which caused symptomatic ASD. Simultaneous decompression surgery without fusion at the adjacent level was not effective for these patients, but rather, there was a possibility that it induced symptomatic ASD.

  20. Clinico-radiological profile of indirect neural decompression using cage or auto graft as interbody construct in posterior lumbar interbody fusion in spondylolisthesis: Which is better?

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    Q R Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Study design: A prospective clinical study of posterior lumbar interbody fusion in grade I and II degenerative spondylolisthesis was conducted between Mar 2007 and Aug 2008. Purpose: The objective was to assess the clinicoradiological profile of structural v/s nonstructural graft on intervertebral disc height and its consequences on the low back pain (LBP assessed by Visual analog score (VAS score and oswestry disability index (ODI . This study involved 28 patients. Inclusion criteria: Age of 30-70 years, symptomatic patient with disturbed Activities of daily living (ADL, single-level L4/L5 or L5/S1 grade I or grade II degenerative spondylolisthesis. Exclusion criteria: Patients with osteoporosis, recent spondylodiscitis, subchondral sclerosis, visual and cognitive impairment and all other types of spondylolisthesis. All the patients underwent short-segment posterior fixation using CD2 or M8 instrumentation, laminectomy discectomy, reduction and distraction of the involved vertebral space. In 53.5% (n = 15 of the patients, snugly fitted local bone chips were used while in 46.4% (n = 13 of the patients, cage was used. Among the cage group, titanium cage was used in nine (32.1% and PEEK cages were used in four (14.2% patients. In one patient, a unilateral PEEK cage was used. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Among the 28 patients, 67.8% (n = 19 were females and 32.14% (n = 9 were males. 68.24% (n = 18 had L4/L5 and 35.71% (n = 10 had L5/S1 spondylolisthesis. 39.28% (n = 11 were of grade I and 60.71% (n = 17 were of grade II spondylolisthesis. Conclusions: There was a statistically significant correlation (P < 0.012 and P < 0.027 between the change in disc height achieved and the improvement in VAS score in both the graft group and the cage group. The increment in disc height and VAS score was significantly better in the cage group (2 mm ± SD vis-a-vis 7.2 [88%] than the graft group (1.2 mm ± SD vis-a-vis 5 [62 %].

  1. Bony ingrowth potential of 3D printed porous titanium alloy: a direct comparison of interbody cage materials in an in vivo ovine lumbar fusion model.

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    McGilvray, Kirk; Easley, Jeremiah; Seim, Howard B; Regan, Daniel; Berven, Sigurd H; Hsu, Wellington K; Mroz, Thomas E; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2018-02-26

    There is significant variability in the materials commonly used for interbody cages in spine surgery. It is theorized that 3-D printed interbody cages utilizing porous titanium material can provide more consistent bone ingrowth and biological fixation. The purpose of this study was to provide an evidence-based approach to decision making regarding interbody materials for spinal fusion. Comparative animal study. A skeletally mature ovine lumbar fusion model was utilized for this study. Interbody fusions were performed at (L2-L3 and L4-L5) in 27 mature sheep using three different interbody cages (i.e., polyetheretherketone [PEEK], plasma sprayed porous titanium coated PEEK [PSP], and 3-D printed porous titanium alloy cage [PTA]). Non-destructive kinematic testing was performed in the three primary directions of motion. The specimens were then analyzed using micro-computed tomography (µCT); quantitative measures of the bony fusion were performed. Histomorphometric analyses were also performed in the sagittal plane through the interbody device. Outcome parameters were compared between cage designs and time-points. Flexion-extension range of motion (ROM) was statistically reduced for the PTA group as compared to the PEEK cages at 16 weeks (p-value = 0.02). Only the PTA cages demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in ROM and increase in stiffness across all three loading directions between the 8-week and 16-week sacrifice time-points (p-value ≤ 0.01). Micro-CT data demonstrated significantly greater total bone volume within the graft window for the PTA cages at both 8-weeks and 16-weeks compared to the PEEK cages (p-value < 0.01). A direct comparison of interbody implants demonstrates significant and measurable differences in biomechanical, µCT, and histologic performance in an ovine model. The 3-D printed porous titanium interbody cage resulted in statistically significant reductions in ROM, increases in the bone ingrowth profile, as well as average

  2. [COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS AND CHANGE OF SAGITTAL SPINO-PELVIC PARAMETERS BETWEEN MINIMALLY INVASIVE TRANSFORAMINAL AND CONVENTIONAL OPEN POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSIONS IN TREATMENT OF LOW-DEGREE ISTHMIC LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Zeng, Rong; Li, Guangsheng; Wei, Bo; Hu, Zibing; Lin, Hao; Chen, Guanghua; Chen, Siyuan; Sun, Jiecong

    2015-12-01

    To compare the effectiveness and changes of sagittal spino-pelvic parameters between minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and conventional open posterior lumbar interbody fusion in treatment of the low-degree isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis. Between May 2012 and May 2013, 86 patients with single segmental isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis (Meyerding degree I or II) were treated by minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (minimally invasive group) in 39 cases, and by open posterior lumbar interbody fusion in 47 cases (open group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, disease duration, degree of lumbar spondylolisthesis, preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and Oswestry disability index (ODI) between 2 groups (P>0.05). The following sagittal spino-pelvic parameters were compared between 2 groups before and after operation: the percentage of slipping (PS), intervertebral height, angle of slip (AS), thoracolumbar junction (TLJ), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), spino-sacral angle (SSA), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), and pelvic incidence (PI). Pearson correlation analysis of the changes between pre- and post-operation was done. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients of 2 groups. The postoperative hospital stay of minimally invasive group [(5.1 ± 1.6) days] was significantly shorter than that of open group [(7.2 ± 2.1) days] (t = 2.593, P = 0.017). The patients were followed up 11-20 months (mean, 15 months). The reduction rate was 68.53% ± 20.52% in minimally invasive group, and was 64.21% ± 30.21% in open group, showing no significant difference (t = 0.725, P = 0.093). The back and leg pain VAS scores, and ODI at 3 months after operation were significantly reduced when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). The postoperative other sagittal spino-pelvic parameters were significantly improved (P 0.05), but there was no significant

  3. Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with 3D-Navigation Guided Cortical Bone Trajectory Screws for L4/5 Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: 1-Year Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes.

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    Hussain, Ibrahim; Virk, Michael S; Link, Thomas W; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Elowitz, Eric

    2018-02-01

    We describe our technique and evaluate clinical and radiographic outcomes for patients undergoing L4/5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion with 3D-navigation guided cortical bone trajectory screws (PLIF-CBT) for grade 1 or 2 degenerative spondylolisthesis with a minimum follow-up time of 12 months. A single-institution series of 18 patients was evaluated with data prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed. Pain and disability scores were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of 12 months postoperatively, including back and bilateral leg pain visual analog scores (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. Radiographic fusion was assessed as complete, partial, or none based on the presence of bridging bones across the disc space, posterior elements, or both. Patients demonstrated statistically significant reductions in back pain VAS (P = 0.0025), leg pain VAS (P fusion at an average of 14.9 months postoperatively was available for 16/18 patients, with 6 patients demonstrating fusion (4/6 with complete fusion; 2/6 with partial fusion). There were no instances of intraoperative complications or delayed complications requiring subsequent interventions. PLIF-CBT can be performed in a safe and reproducible fashion with excellent clinical outcomes at 1 year postoperatively. The outcomes did not correlate with fusion status, which was unexpectedly low at 37.5% without significant hardware abnormalities necessitating reoperations. PLIF-CBT offers several perioperative advantages compared with traditional open PLIF and requires longer-term studies to demonstrate its durability with regard to improvement in clinical pain and radiographic endpoints, including anterior and/or posterior element fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [The shor-term clinical outcomes and safety of extreme lateral interbody fusion combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xu-Dong; Ma, Wei-Hu; Jiang, Wei-Yu; Ruan, Chao-Yue; Chen, Yun-Lin

    2017-02-25

    To evaluate the early efficacy and safety of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for lumbar degenerative disease. From January 2013 to June 2014, 13 patients with degenerative lumbar disease were treated with XLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, including 8 cases of lumbar instability, 5 cases of mild to moderate lumbar spondylolisthesis;there were 5 males and 8 females, aged from 56 to 73 years with an average of 62.1 years. All patients were single segment fusion. Operation time, perioperative bleeding and perioperative complications were recorded. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used to evaluate the clinical efficacy. Interbody fusion rate was observed and the intervertebral foramen area changes were compared preoperation and postoperation by X-rays and CT scanning. The mean operation time and perioperative bleeding in the patients respectively was(62.8±5.2) min and(82.5±22.6) ml. One case occurred in the numbness of femoribus internus and 1 case occurred in the muscle weakness of hip flexion after operation, both of them recovered within 2 weeks. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 19 months with an average of 15.6 months. VAS was decreased from preoperative 7.31±0.75 to 2.31±0.75 at final follow-up( P degenerative disease.

  5. Long-term outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with spinal stenosis and degenerative scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurra, Swamy; Lavelle, William F; Silverstein, Michael P; Savage, Jason W; Orr, R Douglas

    2017-11-22

    Patients with spinal deformity may present with complaints related to either the deformity itself or the manifestations of the coexisting spinal stenosis. There are reports of successful management of lumbar pathology in the absence of global sagittal or coronal imbalance, with limited decompression and fusion, addressing only the symptomatic segment. Our study examined the long-term outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), a less extensive procedure, based on the experience of the senior author over the past 10 years. This was a retrospective study of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and spinal deformity managed by one surgeon at The Cleveland Clinic since 2003. Forty-one patients were included in the study. The present study measures the long-term clinical functional outcomes of these patients through EQ-5D (EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire), PHQ-9 (Patient Health Questionnaire), and PDQ (Pain Disability Questionnaire) forms, along with documented radiographic parameters and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). There were no funding or potential conflicts of interest associated biases in the present study. Patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis with neutral global alignment in the sagittal and coronal planes and symptomatic stenosis at the deformity level were treated by limited fusion and TLIF, and had a follow-up period of at least 5 years. Excluded were patients under 18 years of age, had more than three levels of fusion, and had an active spinal malignancy or recent spinal trauma. The grouping variables were curve magnitude, revision surgeries, and TLIF levels. Clinical outcomes were compared in all the grouping variables. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests were utilized; pfusion, in the setting of modest spinal deformity, is a reasonable and safe option. Further study on the concept of short segment fusions in the growing patient population is required as more comprehensive fusions do have noted complication

  6. Is Body Mass Index a Risk Factor for Revision Procedures After Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Bohl, Daniel D; Yom, Kelly H; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Singh, Kern

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To determine if an association exists between body mass index (BMI) and the rate of revision surgery after single-level minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). MIS TLIF is an effective treatment for lumbar degenerative disease. Previous studies in the orthopedic literature have associated increased BMI with increased postoperative complications and need for revision. Few studies have evaluated the association between BMI and the risk for revision after minimally invasive spinal procedures. A surgical registry of patients who underwent a single-level MIS TLIF for degenerative pathology between 2005 and 2014 was reviewed. Patients were stratified based on BMI category: normal weight (BMIrevision fusion procedure within 2 years after MIS TLIF using multivariate Cox proportional hazards survival analysis modeling. In total, 274 patients were analyzed; of these, 52 (18.98%) were normal weight, 101 (36.86%) were overweight, 62 (22.63%) were obese I, and 59 (21.53%) were obese II-III. On multivariate Cox proportional hazards survival analysis modeling, BMI category was not associated with undergoing a revision procedure within 2 years after MIS TLIF (P=0.599). On multivariate analysis, younger age (P=0.004) was associated with increased risk of undergoing a revision after MIS TLIF. The results of this study suggest that increasing BMI is not a risk factor for undergoing a revision procedure after MIS TLIF. As such, patients with high BMI should be counseled regarding having similar rates of needing a revision procedure after MIS TLIF as those with lower BMI. Level IV.

  7. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion: Analogous procedures in decreasing the index of disability in patients with spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijani, Babak; Emamhadi, Mohamahreza; Behzadnia, Hamid; Aramnia, Ali; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Ramtinfar, Sara; Leili, Ehsan Kazemnejad; Golmohamadi, Shabnam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the disability in patients with spondylolisthesis who assigned either to posterolateral fusion (PLF) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to compare it between two groups. In a prospective observational study, 102 surgical candidates with low-grade degenerative and isthmic spondylolisthesis enrolled from 2012 to 2014, and randomly assigned into two groups: PLF and PLIF. Evaluation of disability has been done by a questionnaire using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The questionnaire was completed by all patients before the surgery, the day after surgery, after 6 months and after 1-year. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age and sex distribution and pre-operation ODI between groups (P > 0.05). Comparison of the mean ODI scores of two groups over the whole study period showed no significant statistical difference (P = 0.074). ODIs also showed no significant differences between two groups the day after surgery, 6(th) months and 1-year after surgery (P = 0.385, P = 0.093, P = 0.122 and P = 433) respectively. Analyzing the course of ODI over the study period, showed a significant descending pattern for either of groups (P disability of patients with spondylolisthesis, and none of the fusion techniques were related to a better outcome in terms of disability.

  8. Single-Level Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Adjacent Segment Disease: A Retrospective Two-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichmair, Alexander; Alimi, Marjan; Hughes, Alexander P; Sama, Andrew A; Du, Jerry Y; Härtl, Roger; Burket, Jayme C; Lampe, Lukas P; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2017-05-01

    A retrospective case series. The aim of this study was to assess the postoperative outcome after single-level lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for adjacent segment disease (ASD). Although there is a plethora of literature on ASD following traditional arthrodesis techniques, literature on ASD following LLIF is limited. Vice versa, the surgical outcome after LLIF for the treatment of ASD remains to be elucidated. Patients who underwent single-level LLIF for ASD at two institutions (March 2006-April 2012) were included, and the medical records, operative reports, radiographic imaging studies, and office records reviewed. Out of 523 LLIF patients, 52 met the inclusion criteria, and were postoperatively followed for 16.1 ± 9.8 months (range: 5-44). When comparing the pre-operative data with both the first and most recent follow-up postoperatively, LLIF resulted in a reduction in back pain (P fusion rate in patients who underwent circumferential fusion than the standalone subgroup (87.5% vs. 53.8%; P = 0.173). LLIF may be an effective surgical treatment option for ASD with regard to both the clinical and radiographic outcome in a large proportion of cases. Although standalone LLIF is associated with a narrower spectrum of adverse effects than circumferential fusion, posterior instrumentation may be necessary to increase segmental stability. 4.

  9. Ceramic granules enhanced with B2A peptide for lumbar interbody spine fusion: an experimental study using an instrumented model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Bryan W; Atkinson, Brent L; Hu, Nianbin; Kikkawa, Jun; Jenis, Louis; Bryant, Joseph; Zamora, Paul O; McAfee, Paul C

    2009-04-01

    New generations of devices for spinal interbody fusion are expected to arise from the combined use of bioactive peptides and porous implants. The purpose of this dose-ranging study was to evaluate the fusion characteristics of porous ceramic granules (CGs) coated with the bioactive peptide B2A2-K-NS (B2A) by using a model of instrumented lumbar interbody spinal fusion in sheep. Instrumented spinal arthrodesis was performed in 40 operative sites in 20 adult sheep. In each animal, posterior instrumentation (pedicle screw and rod) and a polyetheretherketone cage were placed in 2 single-level procedures (L2-3 and L4-5). All cages were packed with graft material prior to implantation. The graft materials were prepared by mixing (1:1 vol/vol) CGs with or without a B2A coating and morselized autograft. Ceramic granules were coated with B2A at 50, 100, 300, and 600 microg/ml granules (50-B2A/CG, 100-B2A/CG, 300-B2A/CG, and 600-B2A/CG, respectively), resulting in 4 B2A-coated groups plus a control group (uncoated CGs). Graft material from each of these groups was implanted in 8 operative sites. Four months after arthrodesis, interbody fusion status was assessed with CT, and the interbody site was further evaluated with quantitative histomorphometry. All B2A/CG groups had higher CT-confirmed interbody fusion rates compared with those in controls (CGs only). Seven of 8 sites were fused in the 50-B2A/CG, 100-B2A/CG, and 300-B2A/CG groups, whereas 5 of 8 sites were fused in the group that had received uncoated CGs. New woven and lamellar bone spanned the fusion sites with excellent osseointegration. There was no heterotopic ossification or other untoward events attributed to the use of B2A/CG in any group. Each B2A/CG treatment produced more new bone than that in the CG group. Bioactive treatment with B2A effectively enhanced the fusion capacity of porous CGs. These findings suggest that B2A/CG may well represent a new generation of biomaterials for lumbar interbody fusion and

  10. [Effects of robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and traditional open surgery in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, G Y; Tian, W; He, D; Xing, Y G; Liu, B; Yuan, Q; Wang, Y Q; Sun, Y Q

    2017-07-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical effects of robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and traditional open TLIF in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods: A total of 41 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis accepted surgical treatment in Department of Spinal Surgery of Beijing Jishuitan Hospital From July 2015 to April 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 16 cases accepted robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF and 25 accepted traditional open TLIF. The operation time, X-ray radiation exposure time, perioperative bleeding, drainage volume, time of hospitalization, time for pain relief, time for ambulatory recovery, visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and complications were compared. T test and χ(2) were used to analyze data. Results: There were no significant difference in gender, age, numbers, degrees, pre-operative VAS and ODI in spondylolisthesis (all P >0.05). Compared with traditional open TLIF group, the robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF group had less perioperative bleeding ((187.5±18.4) ml vs . (332.1±23.5) ml), less drainage volume ((103.1±15.6) ml vs . (261.3±19.8) ml), shorter hospitalization ((7.8±1.9) days vs . (10.0±1.6) days), shorter time for pain relief ((2.8±1.0) days vs . (5.2±1.1) days), shorter time for ambulatory recovery ((1.7±0.9) days vs . (2.9±1.3) days) and less VAS of the third day postoperatively (2.2±0.9 vs . 4.2±2.4) ( t =2.762-16.738, all P 0.05). The results of the post-operative CT showed that the pedicle screws in the robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF group were more precisely placed than traditional open TLIF group (χ(2)=4.247, P =0.039). The mean follow-up time was 8 months (ranging from 3 to 12 months). There were no significant difference in outcomes between the two groups (χ(2)=0.366, P =0.545). Conclusions: In the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis, Robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF can lead to less

  11. Does Subcutaneous Infiltration of Liposomal Bupivacaine Following Single-Level Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery Improve Immediate Postoperative Pain Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Marko; Tou, Kevin; Winkel, Rose; Puffer, Ross; Bydon, Mohamad; Nassr, Ahmad; Huddleston, Paul; Yaszemski, Michael; Currier, Bradford; Freedman, Brett

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective case-control study using prospectively collected data. Evaluate the impact of liposomal bupivacaine (LB) on postoperative pain management and narcotic use following standardized single-level low lumbar transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Poor pain control after surgery has been linked with decreased pain satisfaction and increased economic burden. Unfortunately, opioids have many limitations and side effects despite being the primary treatment of postoperative pain. LB may be a form of pre-emptive analgesia used to reduce the use of postoperative narcotics as evidence in other studies evaluating its use in single-level microdiskectomies. The infiltration of LB subcutaneously during wound closure was performed by a single surgeon beginning in July 2014 for all single-level lumbar TLIF spinal surgeries at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. This cohort was compared against a control cohort of patients who underwent the same surgery by the same surgeon in the preceding 6 months. Statistical analysis was performed on relevant variables including: morphine equivalents of narcotic medication used (primary outcome), length of hospitalization, Visual Analog Scale pain scores, and total time spent on a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump. A total of 30 patients were included in this study; 16 were in the intervention cohort and 14 were in the control cohort. The morphine equivalents of intravenous narcotic use postoperatively were significantly less in the LB cohort from day of surgery to postoperative day 3. Although the differences lost their statistical significance, the trend remained for total (oral and intravenous) narcotic consumption to be lower in the LB group. The patients who received the study intervention required an acute pain service consult less frequently (62.5% in LB cohort vs. 78.6% in control cohort). The amount of time spent on a PCA pump in the LB group was 31 hours versus 47 hours in the control group ( p =0.1506). Local

  12. Minimally invasive lateral transpsoas interbody fusion using a stand-alone construct for the treatment of adjacent segment disease of the lumbar spine: review of the literature and report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palejwala, Sheri K; Sheen, Whitney A; Walter, Christina M; Dunn, Jack H; Baaj, Ali A

    2014-09-01

    We describe 3 patients who presented with radiographic signs and clinical symptoms of adjacent segment disease several years after undergoing L4-S1 posterior pedicle screw fusion. All patients underwent successful lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) at 1-2 levels above their previous constructs, using stand-alone cages, with complete resolution of radiculopathy and a significant improvement in low-back pain. In addition to a thorough analysis of these cases, we review the pertinent literature regarding treatment options for adjacent segment disease and the applications of the lateral lumbar interbody technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The NEtherlands Cervical Kinematics (NECK) Trial. Cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation; A double-blind randomised multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Arts (Mark); R. Brand (René); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco); M.E. van den Akker-van Marle (Elske)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Patients with cervical radicular syndrome due to disc herniation refractory to conservative treatment are offered surgical treatment. Anterior cervical discectomy is the standard procedure, often in combination with interbody fusion. Accelerated adjacent disc degeneration is

  14. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion vs. posterolateral instrumented fusion: cost-utility evaluation along side an RCT with a 2-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann Demant; Hoy, K.; Bunger, C.

    2014-01-01

    -utility of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) compared to posterolateral instrumented fusion (PLF) from the societal perspective. 100 Patients were randomized to TLIF or PLF (51/49) and followed for 2 years. Cost data were acquired from national registers, and outcomes were measured using the Oswestry Disability...... Index and SF-6D questionnaires. Conventional cost-effectiveness methodology was employed to estimate net benefit and to illustrate cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. The statistical analysis was based on means and bootstrapped confidence intervals. Results showed no statistically significant...

  15. Subsidence of Cylindrical Cage (AMSLU™ Cage) : Postoperative 1 Year Follow-up of the Cervical Anterior Interbody Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Young Il; Ko, Yong; Yi, Hyeong Joong; Lee, Seung Ku

    2007-01-01

    Objective There are numerous reports on the primary stabilizing effects of the different cervical cages for cervical radiculopathy. But, little is known about the subsidence which may be clinical problem postoperatively. The goal of this study is to evaluate subsidence of cage and investigate the correlation between radiologic subsidence and clinical outcome. Methods To assess possible subsidence, the authors investigated clinical and radiological results of the one-hundred patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion by using AMSLU™ cage during the period between January 2003 and June 2005. Preoperative and postoperative lateral radiographs were measured for height of intervertebral disc space where cages were placed. Intervertebral disc space was measured by dividing the sum of anterior, posterior, and midpoint interbody distance by 3. Follow-up time was 6 to 12 months. Subsidence was defined as any change in at least one of our parameters of at least 3 mm. Results Subsidence was found in 22 patients (22%). The mean value of subsidence was 2.21 mm, and mean subsidence rate was 22%. There were no cases of the clinical status deterioration during the follow-up period. No posterior or anterior migration was observed. Conclusion The phenomenon of subsidence is seen in substantial number of patients. Nevertheless, clinical and radiological results of the surgery were favorable. An excessive subsidence may result in hardware failure. Endplate preservation may enables us to control subsidence and reduce the number of complications. PMID:19096571

  16. Posterolateral fusion (PLF) versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for spondylolisthesis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jay M; Tanenbaum, Joseph E; Steinmetz, Michael P; Mroz, Thomas E; Overley, Samuel C

    2018-02-13

    Lumbar fusion is an effective and durable treatment for symptomatic lumbar spondylolisthesis; however, the current literature provides insufficient evidence to recommend an optimal surgical fusion strategy. The present study aims to compare the clinical outcomes, fusion rates, blood loss, and operative times between open posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) alone and open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) + posterolateral fusion for spondylolisthesis. This is a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of English language studies for the treatment of spondylolisthesis with PLF versus PLF + TLIF. Data were obtained from published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and retrospective cohort studies. Clinical outcomes included Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), back pain, leg pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scores. Fusion rate, operative time, blood loss, and infection rate were also assessed. A literature search of three electronic databases was performed to identify investigations performed comparing PLF alone with PLF + TLIF for treatment of low-grade lumbar spondylolisthesis. The summary effect size was assessed from pooling observational studies for each of the outcome variables, with odds ratios (ORs) used for fusion and infection rate, mean difference used for improvement in ODI and leg pain as well as operative time and blood loss, and standardized mean difference used for improvement in back pain and HRQOL outcomes. Studies were weighed based on the inverse of the variance and heterogeneity. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I 2 -an estimate of the error caused by between-study variation. Effect sizes from the meta-analysis were then compared with data from the RCTs to assess congruence in outcomes. The initial literature search yielded 282 unique, English language studies. Seven were determined to meet our inclusion criteria and were included in our qualitative analysis. Five observational studies were included in

  17. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect on adjacent motion segments remains unclear.

  18. Cajas intersomáticas lumbares: ¿medios de fusión o sólo espaciadores? [Lumbar interbody cages: Fusing means or only spacers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Nicolas Flores Kanter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción La fusión quirúrgica de la columna lumbar es un método muy utilizado para el tratamiento de la inestabilidad segmentaria lumbar dolorosa. En la actualidad, las dos técnicas de fusión instrumentada más utilizadas son la fusión posterolateral con tornillos pediculares y la fusión circunferencial mediante asociación de caja intersomática. Si bien hay evidencia de que la asociación de dispositivos intersomáticos aumenta la tasa de fusión, la mayoría de los estudios no discriminan si esta se produce solo de forma posterolateral o si se asocia una fusión anterior. El objetivo de este trabajo es determinar si existe fusión ósea real a nivel de las cajas intersomáticas o si estas actúan solo como espaciadores. Material y métodos Se analizaron 28 pacientes con patología de la columna lumbar sometidos a artrodesis lumbar circunferencial en un solo nivel entre mayo de 2007 y enero de 2012, mediante tomografía computarizada posquirúrgica para valorar la presencia o no de artrodesis anterior. Se efectuó un estudio de valor terapéutico, descriptivo, de observación (nivel de evidencia IV; mediante evaluación estadística se realizó un análisis de frecuencias para describir la proporción de casos con fusión anterior. Resultados Se detectó una tasa de fusión del 92,86% y falta de fusión radiológica anterior en el 7,14% de los pacientes. Conclusiones Hay una alta tasa de fusión anterior a nivel de las cajas intersomáticas; de este modo, se demuestra que dichos dispositivos actúan como medios de fusión y no solo como espaciadores.

  19. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) for Spondylolisthesis in 282 Patients: In Situ Arthrodesis versus Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Auffinger, Brenda; Wong, Ricky H; Lam, Sandi K; Lawton, Cort D; Nixon, Alexander T; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Smith, Zachary A; Fessler, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    The benefits of spondylolisthesis reduction via minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) remain poorly understood. The purpose was to compare the complications, perioperative factors, and fusion rates in patients undergoing MI-TLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis between those in whom reduction was or was not performed. 1) patients who underwent a 1, 2, or 3 level MI-TLIF and 2) had a preoperative diagnosis of degenerative spondylolisthesis (Meyerding grade >0). >10° coronal curves, significant sagittal malalignment, infection, and preoperative hardware failure. Patients were grouped on the basis of those who underwent reduction of the spondylolisthesis by at least 1 Meyerding grade (RED) and those who did not (NORED). A total of 282 patients were included: RED (162, 57.4%) and NORED (120, 42.6%). Mean ages (61.68 ± 10.43 vs. 61.88 ± 11.76 years, respectively, P > 0.05) and operative times (P > 0.05) were statistically similar. RED had a significantly larger EBL (280.2 ± 24.03 vs. 212.61 ± 17.54, P 0.05, for all). RED had a significantly higher percentage of patients with a successful fusion at 1 year than NORED (84.50% vs. 70.83%, P spondylolisthesis was not associated with an increase in operative time, length of stay, and perioperative and postoperative complications compared with fusion in situ. Reduction was associated with higher blood loss but also a higher rate of fusion success at 1 year. Overall, reduction did not incur additional risk and had positive perioperative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biomechanical Analysis of a Newly Developed Shape Memory Alloy Hook in a Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) In Vitro Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yuexing; Li, Jiukun; Zhou, Si; Tian, Shunliang; Xiang, Yucheng; Liu, Xingmo; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH) in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) model. Methods Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2) were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH); bilateral SMAH (BSMAH); unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS); and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS). The L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM) were recorded by a Motion Analysis System. Results Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p0.05). Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05). Conclusions Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4–5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:25474112

  1. Biomechanical analysis of a newly developed shape memory alloy hook in a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wang

    Full Text Available The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF model.Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2 were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH; bilateral SMAH (BSMAH; unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS; and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS. The L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM were recorded by a Motion Analysis System.Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p0.05. Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05.Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4-5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration.

  2. Trends Analysis of rhBMP Utilization in Single-Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Lifeng; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Buser, Zorica; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C; Meisel, Hans-Joerg

    2017-10-01

    Retrospective study. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) has been widely used in spinal fusion surgery, but there is little information on rhBMP-2 utilization in single-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the trends and demographics of rhBMP-2 utilization in single-level PLIF. Patients who underwent single-level PLIF from 2005 to 2011 were identified by searching ICD-9 diagnosis and procedure codes in the PearlDiver Patient Records Database, a national database of orthopedic insurance records. The year of procedure, age, gender, and region of the United States were recorded for each patient. Results were reported for each variable as the incidence of procedures identified per 100 000 patients searched in the database. A total of 2735 patients had single-level PLIF. The average rate of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 maintained at a relatively stable level (28% to 31%) from 2005 to 2009, but decreased in 2010 (9.9%) and 2011 (11.8%). The overall incidence of single-level PLIF without rhBMP-2 (0.68 cases per 100 000 patients) was statistically higher ( P level PLIF with rhBMP-2 (0.21 cases per 100 000 patients). The average rate of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 utilization was the highest in West (30.1%), followed by Midwest (26.9%), South (20.5%), and Northeast (17.8%). The highest incidence of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 was observed in the age group level PLIF. There was a 3-fold increase in the rate of PLIF without rhBMP-2 compared to PLIF with rhBMP-2, with both procedures being mainly done in patients less than 65 years of age.

  3. Restoration of the spinopelvic sagittal balance in isthmic spondylolisthesis: posterior lumbar interbody fusion may be better than posterolateral fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yong; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Yang, Hui-Lin; Tang, Tian-Si

    2015-07-01

    More and more orthopedic surgeons recognize the importance of the sagittal balance of the spine. To analyze the pre- and postoperative sagittal and deformity parameters of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis and evaluate the effect of posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) on spinopelvic sagittal balance. Nonrandomized controlled prospective study with a historical control. A total of 99 patients with low-grade L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis were treated surgically; 36 patients (mean age, 60.2±5.2 years) received the PLF operation, and 63 patients (mean age, 57.1±6.9 years) chose the PLIF operation. The healthy control group was composed of 60 volunteers (mean age, 44.5±8.4 years). The pre- and postoperative spinopelvic and deformity parameters. All patients had radiographs that allowed measurement of spinopelvic parameters before and after the operation. All the spinopelvic and deformity parameters were measured. Two radiologists measured the parameters with the Cobb method. All of the preoperative spinopelvic parameters showed no difference between the PLIF and PLF groups in this study (p>.05). In both of the operation groups, the preoperative pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, lumbar lordosis (LL), and L5 incidence (L5I) were significantly higher than in the control group (p.05). LL increased in the PLIF group and decreased in the PLF group. The slip degree (SD) and L5I were restored significantly in both groups. The HOD of the PLIF group increased 5.04 mm, the postoperative HOD of the PLF group had no significant change. In both PLIF and PLF groups, the correction of SD was correlated with the change of LL (r=-0.398, p=.007; r=0.365, p=.022). The restoration of HOD in the PLIF group correlated with the change of LL (r=0.334, p=.011). No significant differences could be found between the short-term clinical outcomes of the PLF and PLIF. Either PLF or PLIF would lead a great change in spinopelvic parameters and

  4. The European multicenter trial on the safety and efficacy of guided oblique lumbar interbody fusion (GO-LIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkenmaier Christof

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the implant-related problems with pedicle screw-based spinal instrumentations, other types of fixation have been tried in spinal arthrodesis. One such technique is the direct trans-pedicular, trans-discal screw fixation, pioneered by Grob for spondylolisthesis. The newly developed GO-LIF procedure expands the scope of the Grob technique in several important ways and adds security by means of robotic-assisted navigation. This is the first clinical trial on the GO-LIF procedure and it will assess safety and efficacy. Methods/Design Multicentric prospective study with n = 40 patients to undergo single level instrumented spinal arthrodesis of the lumbar or the lumbosacral spine, based on a diagnosis of: painful disc degeneration, painful erosive osteochondrosis, segmental instability, recurrent disc herniation, spinal canal stenosis or foraminal stenosis. The primary target criteria with regards to safety are: The number, severity and cause of intra- and perioperative complications. The number of significant penetrations of the cortical layer of the vertebral body by the implant as recognized on postoperative CT. The primary target parameters with regards to feasibility are: Performance of the procedure according to the preoperative plan. The planned follow-up is 12 months and the following scores will be evaluated as secondary target parameters with regards to clinical improvement: VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, short form - 12 health questionnaire and the Swiss spinal stenosis questionnaire for patients with spinal claudication. The secondary parameters with regards to construct stability are visible fusion or lack thereof and signs of implant loosening, implant migration or pseudarthrosis on plain and functional radiographs. Discussion This trial will for the first time assess the safety and efficacy of guided oblique lumbar interbody fusion. There is no control group, but the results, the

  5. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of adjacent segment disease: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jerry Y; Kiely, Paul D; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Aichmair, Alexander; Huang, Russel C

    2017-09-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes of 20 patients who underwent single level unilateral pedicle screw fixation following lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for treatment of lumbar adjacent segment disease (ASD). Demographic, comorbidity, clinical assessment, peri-operative, and complication data were assessed. Visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and short form-12 (SF-12) were used to assess clinical outcomes. Post-operative radiographs were assessed for subsidence, cage migration, and fusion. Average age of patients was 63.2±13.7 years (range, 41-86 years), with 8 males and 12 females. Recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was utilized in 18 LLIF cages (90%) and 12 posterolateral fusions (60%). Mean operation time was 214.1±47.2 minutes (range, 146-342 minutes), mean estimated blood loss of 187.5±90.1 cc (range, 50-400 cc). No patients received a blood transfusion. There were no intra-operative complications. Mean hospital length of stay was 4.4±1.7 days (range, 2-9 days). At final follow-up (mean: 13.0±12.7 months after surgery), there was significant improvement in post-op VAS (P=0.006) score compared to pre-op, but not ODI (P=0.181), SF-12 PC (P=0.480), and SF-12 MC (P=0.937). Patients with >6 months of post-operative imaging (14/20, 70%) demonstrated successful fusion in 13 out of 14 cases (93%). There was grade 0 subsidence of adjacent cranial vertebra in all cases (100%). There was grade 0 subsidence of the adjacent caudal vertebra in 13 cases (93%) and grade 1 subsidence in 1 case (7%). There was evidence of cage migration in 3 cases (21%). There were 4 patients (20%) who experienced transient neurological deficits that eventually resolved. Two patients required surgery for further ASD. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that patients who undergo LLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for treatment of ASD may have significantly reduced pain and favorable radiographic results. Further investigation in

  6. Superior Facet Joint Violations during Single Level Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Preliminary Retrospective Clinical Study

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    Long Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Facet joint violation (FV was reported as variable iatrogenic damage that can be a crucial risk factor leading to the adjacent segment degeneration (ASD. “Blind” screw placement technique in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF contributes to the increasing incidence of FV that can be influenced by several potential factors. Many controversies about these factors and clinical outcomes of different types of FV patients exist, yet they have not been analyzed. Methods. 99 cases undergoing single-segment MIS-TLIF from July 2013 to December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Computed tomography (CT was applied to determine the incidence of FV, and then the correlation between FV and relevant factors, including gender, age, body mass index (BMI, top-screw level, and decompression, was analyzed. A total of 53 cases were followed up after one year, 31 cases in noninjury (A group and 22 patients in FV injury (B group. Results. The incidence of FV was 39. 39% (39/99 in the patients and 23.23% (46/198 in the screws. Logistic regression analysis showed that screw at L5 in patients with BMI > 30 kg/m2 was vulnerable to FV (P<0.05. Moreover, postoperative average intervertebral disc height (AIDH of fusion segment, visual analog scale (VAS, and Oswestry disability index (ODI scores improved significantly in group A and B when compared with preoperative data (P<0.05. Adjacent superior average intervertebral disc height (ASAIDH presented decrease, but adjacent superior intervertebral disc Cobb angle (ASIDCA appeared to increase in the two groups at the final follow-up compared with postoperative 3 days (P<0.05. Low back VAS and ODI scores in group A (31 cases were lower than those in group B (22 cases in the final follow-up (P<0.05. Conclusion. MIS-TLIF is an effective treatment for lumbar degenerative disease, but FV occurred at a higher incidence. Facet joints should be protected in MIS-TLIF to avoid FV.

  7. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of adjacent segment disease: a preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Paul D.; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Aichmair, Alexander; Huang, Russel C.

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the clinical outcomes of 20 patients who underwent single level unilateral pedicle screw fixation following lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for treatment of lumbar adjacent segment disease (ASD). Methods Demographic, comorbidity, clinical assessment, peri-operative, and complication data were assessed. Visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and short form-12 (SF-12) were used to assess clinical outcomes. Post-operative radiographs were assessed for subsidence, cage migration, and fusion. Results Average age of patients was 63.2±13.7 years (range, 41–86 years), with 8 males and 12 females. Recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was utilized in 18 LLIF cages (90%) and 12 posterolateral fusions (60%). Mean operation time was 214.1±47.2 minutes (range, 146–342 minutes), mean estimated blood loss of 187.5±90.1 cc (range, 50–400 cc). No patients received a blood transfusion. There were no intra-operative complications. Mean hospital length of stay was 4.4±1.7 days (range, 2–9 days). At final follow-up (mean: 13.0±12.7 months after surgery), there was significant improvement in post-op VAS (P=0.006) score compared to pre-op, but not ODI (P=0.181), SF-12 PC (P=0.480), and SF-12 MC (P=0.937). Patients with >6 months of post-operative imaging (14/20, 70%) demonstrated successful fusion in 13 out of 14 cases (93%). There was grade 0 subsidence of adjacent cranial vertebra in all cases (100%). There was grade 0 subsidence of the adjacent caudal vertebra in 13 cases (93%) and grade 1 subsidence in 1 case (7%). There was evidence of cage migration in 3 cases (21%). There were 4 patients (20%) who experienced transient neurological deficits that eventually resolved. Two patients required surgery for further ASD. Conclusions In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that patients who undergo LLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for treatment of ASD may have significantly reduced pain and favorable

  8. One-Level Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Approach: Is Transforaminal Lateral Interbody Fusion Mandatory?: A Randomized Controlled Trial With 2-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challier, Vincent; Boissiere, Louis; Obeid, Ibrahim; Vital, Jean-Marc; Castelain, Jean-Etienne; Bénard, Antoine; Ong, Nathalie; Ghailane, Soufiane; Pointillart, Vincent; Mazas, Simon; Mariey, Rémi; Gille, Olivier

    2017-04-15

    A monocentric open-label randomized controlled trial (MRCT). Comparison of clinical and radiological outcomes between isolated instrumented posterior fusion (PLF) and associated instrumented posterior fusion and interbody fusion by transforaminal approach (PLF + TLIF) for patients suffering from one-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) undergoing surgery. DS is a common cause of symptomatic lumbar stenosis. PLF has shown better clinical outcome than decompression with noninstrumented posterolateral fusion. TLIF with interbody cage showed better fusion rate than PLF. There is a need for randomized controlled trials to compare PLF with and without TLIF as to clinical and radiological outcomes. This is a MRCT comparing PLF and TLIF techniques in surgical treatment of DS. Sixty patients were included in a secured database from 2009 to 2011 and randomized into two groups: 30 PLF with posterior pedicle screws and intertransverse autologuous graft, and 30 TLIF in which an interbody fusion by transforaminal approach was added. Data included clinical (pain and disability), surgical (blood loss and operating time), and radiological (alignment and fusion) parameters at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Comparison was made by Student t test and Chi-square test. There was a significant improvement in each group for pain and disability but no difference between the groups. Radiographic assessment showed better posterolateral fusion rate for TLIF without superiority in segmental lordosis improvement. A case of deformity cascade with spino-pelvic mismatch at baseline was noted in PLF. Posterior decompression and instrumented fusion is an efficient technique that proved its significant clinical benefit in the surgical treatment of DS. TLIF did not show its superiority neither in clinical nor alignment parameters despite a better fusion rate. These results suggest that TLIF is not mandatory in this specific indication. Sagittal alignment analysis by standing full

  9. Cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus traditional pedicle screw fixation for 2-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion: comparison of surgical outcomes for 2-level degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique is a new nontraditional pedicle screw (PS) insertion method. However, the biomechanical behavior of multilevel CBT screw/rod fixation remains unclear, and surgical outcomes in patients after 2-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using CBT screw fixation have not been reported. Thus, the purposes of this study were to examine the clinical and radiological outcomes after 2-level PLIF using CBT screw fixation for 2-level degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DS) and to compare these outcomes with those after 2-level PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS The study included 22 consecutively treated patients who underwent 2-level PLIF with CBT screw fixation for 2-level DS (CBT group, mean follow-up 39 months) and a historical control group of 20 consecutively treated patients who underwent 2-level PLIF using traditional PS fixation for 2-level DS (PS group, mean follow-up 35 months). Clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system. Bony union was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT images. Surgery-related complications, including symptomatic adjacent-segment disease (ASD), were examined. RESULTS The mean operative duration and intraoperative blood loss were 192 minutes and 495 ml in the CBT group and 218 minutes and 612 ml in the PS group, respectively (p 0.05, respectively). The mean JOA score improved significantly from 12.3 points before surgery to 21.1 points (mean recovery rate 54.4%) at the latest follow-up in the CBT group and from 12.8 points before surgery to 20.4 points (mean recovery rate 51.8%) at the latest follow-up in the PS group (p > 0.05). Solid bony union was achieved at 90.9% of segments in the CBT group and 95.0% of segments in the PS group (p > 0.05). Symptomatic ASD developed in 2 patients in the CBT group (9.1%) and 4 patients in the PS group (20.0%, p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Two-level PLIF with CBT screw fixation

  10. Evaluation of Coflex interspinous stabilization following decompression compared with decompression and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease: A minimum 5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Su, Qing-Jun; Liu, Tie; Yang, Jin-Cai; Kang, Nan; Guan, Li; Hai, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have compared the clinical and radiological outcomes between Coflex interspinous stabilization and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for degenerative lumbar disease. We compared the at least 5-year clinical and radiological outcomes of Coflex stabilization and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Eighty-seven consecutive patients with lumbar degenerative disease were retrospectively reviewed. Forty-two patients underwent decompression and Coflex interspinous stabilization (Coflex group), 45 patients underwent decompression and PLIF (PLIF group). Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated. Coflex subjects experienced less blood loss, shorter hospital stays and shorter operative time than PLIF (all pdisease was higher in the PLIF group, but this did not achieve statistical significance (11.1% vs. 4.8%, p=0.277). Both groups provided sustainable improved clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease through at least 5-year follow-up. The Coflex group had significantly better early efficacy than the PLIF group. Coflex interspinous implantation after decompression is safe and effective for lumbar degenerative disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Late Results of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Interbody Cages

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    Da?l?, Murat; Er, Uygur; ?im?ek, Serkan; Bavbek, Murad

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for degenerative cervical disc disease. Overview of Literature Anterior spinal surgery originated in the mid-1950s and graft for fusion was also employed. Currently anterior cervical microdiscectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of cervical disc hernia. Artificial grafts and cages for fusion are preferred because of their ...

  12. Effects of Lordotic Angle of a Cage on Sagittal Alignment and Clinical Outcome in One Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Pedicle Screw Fixation

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    Ji-Ho Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the differences in the radiological and clinical results depending on the lordotic angles of the cage in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF. We reviewed 185 segments which underwent PLIF using two different lordotic angles of 4° and 8° of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK cage. The segmental lordosis and total lumbar lordosis of the 4° and 8° cage groups were compared preoperatively, as well as on the first postoperative day, 6th and 12th months postoperatively. Clinical assessment was performed using the ODI and the VAS of low back pain. The pre- and immediate postoperative segmental lordosis angles were 12.9° and 12.6° in the 4° group and 12° and 12.0° in the 8° group. Both groups exhibited no significant different segmental lordosis angle and total lumbar lordosis over period and time. However, the total lumbar lordosis significantly increased from six months postoperatively compared with the immediate postoperative day in the 8° group. The ODI and the VAS in both groups had no differences. Cages with different lordotic angles of 4° and 8° showed insignificant results clinically and radiologically in short-level PLIF surgery. Clinical improvements and sagittal alignment recovery were significantly observed in both groups.

  13. [One-segment interbody lumbar arthrodesis using impacted cages: posterior unilateral approach versus posterior bilateral approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commarmond, J

    2001-04-01

    We assessed the relative advantages of unilateral versus bilateral posterior approaches for lumbar spine fusion. Eighty-three patients who underwent lumbar spine fusion via a bilateral posterior approach and who had reached more than two years follow-up were compared with 80 patients who had undergone the same procedure via a unilateral posterior approach, including 54 with a follow-up greater than one year and 24 greater than two years. Most cases were L4-L5 fusions for degenerative spondylolisthesis or recurrent discal herniation with instability. Two composite carbon cages were filled with autologous cancellous bone. The key to the unilateral approach was the comfortable exposure of the disc by lamino-arthectomy; the osteosynthesis could then be performed unilaterally if only one gutter was opened. We measured bleeding and operative time to quantify surgical difficulty. At one year we assessed disc height, lordosis, frontal balance, and fusion of the operated disk. At two years, we assessed lombalgia and sciatalgia [scored from 4 (none) to 0 (intolerable)], subjective outcome, and recovery of former activity level. Mean blood loss and operative time were 360 ml and 162 min for the 83 classical procedures and 216 ml and 118 min for the 80 unilateral procedures. There were ten dural wounds with the bilateral approach and one dural wound and one transient radicular deficit with the unilateral approach. At one year, 81 of the 83 unilateral cases had reached fusion (2 nonunions). There was a mean 2 degrees gain in discal lordosis despite three cases of impaction due to osteoporosis. For the unilateral procedures, all 54 reached fusion at one year with a mean 2.5 degrees gain in lordosis, also with 3 impactions. With intersomatic distraction, balanced disc height in the frontal plane was obtained in all cases where the initial narrowing was not excessive. There were no cases of posterior displacement. There was a degradation of the supra-adjacent segment in three of

  14. Subsidence and nonunion after anterior cervical interbody fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage.

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    Yang, Jae Jun; Yu, Chang Hun; Chang, Bong-Soon; Yeom, Jin Sup; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The purposes of the present study are to evaluate the subsidence and nonunion that occurred after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a stand-alone intervertebral cage and to analyze the risk factors for the complications. Thirty-eight patients (47 segments) who underwent anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and an autologous cancellous iliac bone graft from June 2003 to August 2008 were enrolled in this study. The anterior and posterior segmental heights and the distance from the anterior edge of the upper vertebra to the anterior margin of the cage were measured on the plain radiographs. Subsidence was defined as ≥ a 2 mm (minor) or 3 mm (major) decrease of the segmental height at the final follow-up compared to that measured at the immediate postoperative period. Nonunion was evaluated according to the instability being ≥ 2 mm in the interspinous distance on the flexion-extension lateral radiographs. The anterior and posterior segmental heights decreased from the immediate postoperative period to the final follow-up at 1.33 ± 1.46 mm and 0.81 ± 1.27 mm, respectively. Subsidence ≥ 2 mm and 3 mm were observed in 12 segments (25.5%) and 7 segments (14.9%), respectively. Among the expected risk factors for subsidence, a smaller anteroposterior (AP) diameter (14 mm vs. 12 mm) of cages (p = 0.034; odds ratio [OR], 0.017) and larger intraoperative distraction (p = 0.041; OR, 3.988) had a significantly higher risk of subsidence. Intervertebral nonunion was observed in 7 segments (7/47, 14.9%). Compared with the union group, the nonunion group had a significantly higher ratio of two-level fusion to one-level fusions (p = 0.001). Anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone cage with a large AP diameter while preventing anterior intraoperative over-distraction will be helpful to prevent the subsidence of cages. Two-level cervical fusion might require more careful attention for avoiding nonunion.

  15. Effect of soft tissue thickness over the posterior border of the vertebral body and disc space on cage placement during posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a cadaveric study.

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    Yang, Jae Hyuk; Kasat, Niraj Sharad; Whang, Jin Ho; Kim, Min Keun; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Hong, Jae Young; Modi, Hitesh N; Suh, Seung Woo

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether there is a difference between visual depth (VD) and radiological image depth (RD) of cages (i.e., structural interbody support devices) placed in disc spaces during posterior lumbar interbody fusion and whether soft tissues covering the posterior border of the vertebral body and associated disc space are the cause of any observed differences. Using digital calipers, cages were inserted at a depth of 5 mm from the soft tissues covering the posterior border of the vertebral body and disc space under direct vision; this depth was defined as VD. After insertion, RD was measured in triplicate. The reliability of RD measurements was evaluated using an intraclass coefficient test. To identify the cause of differences between VD and RD, the thicknesses of soft tissues were measured microscopically. A total of 40 lumbar intervertebral disc spaces with cages were evaluated. The mean RD of cages was 3.12 mm, while the mean difference between the VD and RD of cages (DVRD) was 1.91 mm. On histological examination, the mean thickness of the soft tissue was 2.02 mm. Comparative analysis between histological values and DVRD showed no statistical difference (P = 1.14, 1.55, 0.06). There was a significant difference between VD and RD during cage placement, and soft tissue structure appeared to be responsible for the DVRD of inserted cages. Therefore, cages should be inserted deeper to account for differences between visual and radiological image depths. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Radiographic and clinical evaluation of cage subsidence after stand-alone lateral interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Luis; Abdala, Nitamar; Oliveira, Leonardo; Amaral, Rodrigo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2013-07-01

    Indirect decompression of the neural structures through interbody distraction and fusion in the lumbar spine is feasible, but cage subsidence may limit maintenance of the initial decompression. The influence of interbody cage size on subsidence and symptoms in minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion is heretofore unreported. The authors report the rate of cage subsidence after lateral interbody fusion, examine the clinical effects, and present a subsidence classification scale. The study was performed as an institutional review board-approved prospective, nonrandomized, comparative, single-center radiographic and clinical evaluation. Stand-alone short-segment (1- or 2-level) lateral lumbar interbody fusion was investigated with 12 months of postoperative follow-up. Two groups were compared. Forty-six patients underwent treatment at 61 lumbar levels with standard interbody cages (18 mm anterior/posterior dimension), and 28 patients underwent treatment at 37 lumbar levels with wide cages (22 mm). Standing lateral radiographs were used to measure segmental lumbar lordosis, disc height, and rate of subsidence. Subsidence was classified using the following scale: Grade 0, 0%-24% loss of postoperative disc height; Grade I, 25%-49%; Grade II, 50%-74%; and Grade III, 75%-100%. Fusion status was assessed on CT scanning, and pain and disability were assessed using the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Complications and reoperations were recorded. Pain and disability improved similarly in both groups. While significant gains in segmental lumbar lordosis and disc height were observed overall, the standard group experienced less improvement due to the higher rate of interbody graft subsidence. A difference in the rate of subsidence between the groups was evident at 6 weeks (p = 0.027), 3 months (p = 0.042), and 12 months (p = 0.047). At 12 months, 70% in the standard group and 89% in the wide group had Grade 0 or I subsidence, and 30% in the standard group

  17. Outcomes and Complications of the Midline Anterior Approach 3 Years after Lumbar Spine Surgery

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    Charla R. Fischer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new questionnaire to assess outcomes related to the midline anterior lumbar approach and to identify risk factors for negative patient responses. Methods. A retrospective review of 58 patients who underwent anterior lumbar surgery at a single institution for either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis in 2009 was performed. The outcome measures included our newly developed Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire (ALSQ, ODI, and EQ-5D. Results. There were 58 patients available for followup, 27 women and 31 men. The average age at surgery was 50.8 years, with an average followup of 2.92 years. The average change in ODI was 34.94 (22.7 and EQ-5D was 0.28 (0.29. The rate of complications with the anterior approach was 10.3% and there was one male patient (3.2% with retrograde ejaculation. Determination of the effectiveness of the new ALSQ revealed that it significantly correlated to the EQ-5D and ODI (P<0.05. Smoking was associated with a negative response on thirteen questions. BMP use was not associated with a negative response on any sexual function questions. Conclusions. Our new Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire determines patient perceived complications related to the midline anterior lumbar surgical approach.

  18. Miniopen Oblique Lateral L5-S1 Interbody Fusion: A Report of 2 Cases

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    Keijiro Kanno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF has been widely used for minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF, but an approach to L5-S1 is difficult because of the iliac crest. In the current study, we present 2 cases using minimally invasive oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF of L5-S1. The patients showed foraminal stenosis between L5 and S1 and severe low back and leg pain. The patients were placed in a lateral decubitus position and underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest without posterior decompression. Posterior screws were used in the patients. Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. OLIF surgery was minimally invasive and produced good surgical results without complications.

  19. Adjacent Segment Disease After Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Based on Cases With a Minimum of 10 Years of Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Noriaki; Tsuji, Taichi; Ohara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Saito, Toshiki; Nohara, Ayato; Tauchi, Ryoji; Ohta, Kyotaro; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Imagama, Shiro

    2015-07-15

    Retrospective case-controlled study. To investigate the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and the associated risk factors during a period of at least 10 years after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). ASD is a problematic sequelae after spinal fusion surgery. Few long-term follow-up studies have investigated ASD after PLIF; thus, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data available for the evaluation of postoperative changes associated with ASD are limited. One hundred one patients were retrospectively enrolled. The minimum follow-up was 10 years after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative (2, 5, and 10 yr after surgery) Radiographs and MRI images were evaluated. Disc height, vertebral slip, and intervertebral angle were examined on radiographical images. Disc degeneration and spinal stenosis on MRI images were evaluated. Risk factors for developing early-onset radiographical ASD were evaluated using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The degenerative changes in disc height, vertebral slip, and intervertebral angle on radiographs 10 years after surgery were found in 12, 36, and 17 cases, respectively, at the cranial-adjacent level and in 3, 6, and 11 cases, respectively, at the caudal-adjacent level. Increased disc degeneration and spinal stenosis worsening were observed in 62 and 68 cases, respectively, at the cranial-adjacent level and in 25 and 12 cases, respectively, at the caudal-adjacent level on MRI 10 years after surgery. Ten patients (9.9%) required reoperation, and 80% of revision surgeries were performed more than 5 years after the initial surgery. High pelvic incidence was a risk factor for developing early-onset radiographical ASD. The majority of the reoperations for ASD were performed more than 5 years after the initial lumbar fusion surgery, although the progression of radiographical ASD began in the early postoperative period. A high degree of pelvic incidence was a risk factor for developing early-onset radiographical

  20. [Risk Factors for Predicting the Need for Additional Surgery for Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Disease after Minimally Invasive Surgery-Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Kenji; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Shirato, Mitsuru; Teshima, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    To determine the incidence of and risk factors for symptomatic adjacent segment disease(SASD)requiring additional surgery in patients previously treated with minimally invasive surgery-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion(MIS-TLIF)for degenerative lumbar disease. A series of 467 consecutive patients who had undergone MIS-TLIF of one or two segments to treat degenerative lumbar disease was identified. The mean age of the patients at the time of the index operation was 67.7 years and the mean follow-up period was 33.2 months(range, 6.0-110.1 months). The incidence rate of SASD surgeries was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank test and Cox regression analysis were used for risk factor analysis based on age, sex, number of fused segments, presence of laminectomy adjacent to index fusion, and L1 plumb line. The overall incidence rate of SASD requiring additional surgery was 2.8%. Kaplan-Meier analysis predicted a disease-free rate of adjacent segments in 94.3% of the patients at 4 years and in 90.8% of the patients at 8 years after the index operation. In the analysis of risk factors, a negative L1 plumb line was associated with a 5.6 times higher incidence of SASD requiring additional surgery than that associated with a positive L1 plumb line(p=0.0096). There was no significant difference in the survival rates based on age, sex, number of fused segments, and concomitant laminectomy to adjacent segment. Approximately 9.2% of the patients were predicted to undergo additional surgery for treating SASD within 8 years of MIS-TLIF. In this study, presence of a negative L1 plumb line indicated higher incidence of additional SASD associated surgeries than that shown by a positive L1 plumb line. Therefore, surgeons should carefully consider this factor while performing MIS-TLIF.

  1. Surgical data and early postoperative outcomes after minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion: results of a prospective, multicenter, observational data-monitored study.

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    Paulo Pereira

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF offers potential for reduced operative morbidity and earlier recovery compared with open procedures for patients with degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD. Firm conclusions about advantages of MILIF over open procedures cannot be made because of limited number of large studies of MILIF in a real-world setting. Clinical effectiveness of MILIF in a large, unselected real-world patient population was assessed in this Prospective, monitored, international, multicenter, observational study.To observe and document short-term recovery after minimally invasive interbody fusion for DLD.In a predefined 4-week analysis from this study, experienced surgeons (≥ 30 MILIF surgeries pre-study treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF. The primary study objective was to document patients' short-term post-interventional recovery (primary objective including back/leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS], disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], health status (EQ-5D and Patient satisfaction.At 4 weeks, 249 of 252 patients were remaining in the study; the majority received one-level MILIF (83% and TLIF was the preferred approach (94.8%. For one-level (and two-level procedures, surgery duration was 128 (182 min, fluoroscopy time 115 (154 sec, and blood-loss 164 (233 mL. Time to first ambulation was 1.3 days and time to study-defined surgery recovery was 3.2 days. Patients reported significantly (P < 0.0001 reduced back pain (VAS: 2.9 vs 6.2, leg pain (VAS: 2.5 vs 5.9, and disability (ODI: 34.5% vs 45.5%, and a significantly (P < 0.0001 improved health status (EQ-5D index: 0.61 vs 0.34; EQ VAS: 65.4 vs 52.9 4 weeks postoperatively. One adverse event was classified as related to the minimally invasive surgical approach. No deep site infections or deaths were reported.For experienced surgeons, MILIF for DLD demonstrated early benefits (short time to first ambulation, early recovery, high patient satisfaction

  2. Clinical anatomy study of autonomic nerve with respective to the anterior approach lumbar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Xu, Yong-qing; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Shi, Ji-hong; Ding, Zi-hai; Li, Zhong-hua; Zhong, Shi-zhen

    2009-07-01

    Male genital dysfunction was recognized as a complication following anterior approach lumbar surgery. Disruption of efferent sympathetic pathways such as the abdominal aortic plexus (AAP) and superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) which lied pre-abdominal aorta and iliac artery had been thought as the main reason. Though there were some clinical reports of retrograde ejaculation, the applied anatomic study of the autonomic nerve anterior to the lumbar was little. The purpose was to find out a lumbar surgery approach which was ejaculation preservation through the detailed study of the anatomy and histology observation of the autonomic nerve anterior to the lumbar vertebrae. The lumbar region of ten male cadavers was dissected and analyzed. We investigated the relationship between the peritoneum and abdominal aorta, iliac artery and sacral promontory fascia, as well as the trend and distribution of the autonomic nerve and SHP anterior to the L5-S1. We also observed the distribution of autonomic nerve at retroperitoneum through hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained tissues pre-aorta, para-aorta, and pre-vertebrae sacrales. Superior hypogastric plexus, which deviated to left, located in a triangle formed by the common iliac arteries and its bilateral branches, its truck sited anterior to the lumbarsacral space in seven cases (70%), and anterior to sacrum in three cases (30%); at the aortic bifurcation, SHP strided over left iliac artery from left-hand side, then located in front of sacrum in four cases (40%), and sifted to the left at the lumbar sacral promontory in six cases (60%); from both anatomic and histological view, the autonomic nerve plexus lying in an fascia layer of retroperitoneum. At the anterior approach lumbar surgery of trans-peritoneum, we should choose the right-hand side incision; the SHP should be pushed aside carefully from right to left along intervertebral disc. The accurate surgical plane was at the deeper layer of autonomical nerve fascia; we also

  3. Correction of sagittal plane deformity and predictive factors for a favourable radiological outcome following multilevel posterior lumbar interbody fusion for mild degenerative scoliosis.

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    Sabou, Silviu; Tseng, Tzu-Heng Jason; Stephenson, John; Siddique, Irfan; Verma, Rajat; Mohammad, Saeed

    2016-08-01

    Limited data is available in the literature on the radiographic results of multilevel posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MPLIF) in the treatment of degenerative scoliosis. The objective of our study was to evaluate the segmental and global correction achieved with MPLIF in the treatment of degenerative scoliosis. Between 2009 and 2014, 42 patients underwent correction of degenerative scoliosis with MPLIF. Several radiological parameters were measured pre- and post-operatively by two independent observers. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the inter-observer reliability of the measurements and to determine the degree of segmental correction achieved at each intervertebral disc. Using sagittal vertical axis (SVA) less than 47 mm; lumbar lordosis (LL) within 11° of pelvic incidence (PI); and pelvic tilt (PT) no more than 22° as radiological criteria for procedural acceptability, we determined predictive factors for a favourable radiological outcome. Forty-two patients (34 female) were included in our study. The average amount of correction per segment was 6.2°. The overall correction achieved with MPLIF was 16.6°. Twenty-six of the 42 patients (61.9 %) had post-operative SVA values less than 47 mm. Nineteen of the 42 patients (45.2 %) had average post-operative LL within 11° of the PI. Sixteen of the 42 patients (38.1 %) had PT less than 22°. Younger age, female gender and a low pre-operative PT were significantly associated with the attainment of a satisfactory sagittal alignment. Our results demonstrate that a satisfactory correction can be achieved in degenerative scoliosis with MPLIF. In addition, our results show that it is significantly more likely to achieve a satisfactory radiological outcome in younger, female patients with low pre-operative PT.

  4. An effect comparison of teriparatide and bisphosphonate on posterior lumbar interbody fusion in patients with osteoporosis: a prospective cohort study and preliminary data.

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    Cho, Pyung Goo; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Shin, Dong Ah; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun

    2017-03-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of teriparatide for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in osteoporotic women. Forty-seven osteoporotic patients underwent PLIF with pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar stenosis and instability. Patients were divided into two groups. The teriparatide group (n = 23) was injected subcutaneously with teriparatide (20 μg daily) for 3-month cycles alternating with 3-month periods of oral sodium alendronate for 12 months. The bisphosphonate group (n = 24) was administered oral sodium alendronate (91.37 mg/week) for ≥1 year. Serial plain radiography, computed tomography, and bone mineral densitometry (BMD) evaluations were performed. Fusion rate, bony fusion duration, and T score changes were evaluated. Clinical data [pain scores, Prolo's functional scale, and Oswestry disability index (ODI)] were also serially evaluated. The teriparatide group showed earlier fusion than the bisphosphonate group. The average period of bone fusion was 6.0 ± 4.8 months in the teriparatide group but 10.4 ± 7.2 months in the bisphosphonate group. The bone fusion rate in the teriparatide group was higher than that in the bisphosphonate group at 6 months; however, there was no difference 12 and 24 months after surgery. Pain scores and ODI were not significantly different between groups. BMD scores in the teriparatide group were significantly improved compared with the bisphosphonate group 2 years after surgery. There was no significant improvement in overall fusion rate and clinical outcome in our patients after injection of teriparatide, but the teriparatide group showed faster bony union and highly improved BMD scores.

  5. Comparison of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with autogenous bone chips and PLIF with cage for treatment of double-level isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Deyong; Chen, Zhong; Song, Dewei; Li, Zaixue

    2015-11-01

    Spondylolytic defects involving multiple vertebral levels are rare. It is reported that only 1.48% of patients with back pain were diagnosed with multi-level spondylolysis. The incidence of multiple-level spondylolisthesis is even rarer, so far there have been few reports of multi-level isthmic spondylolisthesis in the literature. The aim of this study is to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes of two different fusion techniques for treatment of double-level isthmic spondylolisthesis. Fifty-four patients who were managed surgically for treatment of double-level symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis were included in this study. Between May 2004 and September 2012, 29 consecutive patients underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with autogenous bone chips (group I) at Foshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangdong, China. Between March 2005 and December 2013, 25 consecutive patients underwent PLIF with cage (group II) at Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangdong, China. The mean follow-up periods were 27.2 and 26.8 months, respectively. The mean VAS scores of back and leg pain significantly decreased from 7.2 to 2.2 and 5.8 to 2.1 in the group I and from 7.0 to 1.9 and 6.1 to 1.8 in the group II, respectively. In the group I, mean ODI scores improved significantly from 54% to 14.2% and, in the group II, from 60% to 12.6%. In both groups, VAS and ODI scores significantly changed from pre- to postoperatively (p0.05). In both groups, changes in disc height, degree of listhesis, and whole lumbar lordosis between the pre- and postoperative periods were significant. Clinical and functional outcomes demonstrate no significant differences between groups in treating back and leg pain of adult patients with double-level isthmic spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extreme lateral interbody fusion with posterior instrumentation for spondylodiscitis.

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    Blizzard, Daniel J; Hills, Christopher P; Isaacs, Robert E; Brown, Christopher R

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate our initial experience utilizing extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF; NuVasive, San Diego, CA, USA) with percutaneous posterior instrumentation to treat 11 spondylodiscitis patients between January 2011 and February 2014. Although medical management is the first line treatment for spondylodiscitis, many patients fail antibiotic therapy and bracing, or present with instability, neurologic deficits, or sepsis, requiring operative debridement and stabilization. High rates of fusion and infection clearance have been reported with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but this approach requires a morbid exposure, associated with non-trivial rates of vascular and peritoneal complications. XLIF is an increasingly popular interbody fusion technique which utilizes a fast and minimally invasive approach, sparing the anterior longitudinal ligament, and allowing sufficient visualization of the intervertebral discs and bodies to debride and place a large, lordotic cage. The outcome measures for this study included lumbar lordosis, sagittal balance, subsidence, fusion, pain, neurological deficit, and microbiology/laboratory evidence of infection. The mean follow-up time was 9.3 months. All patients had improvements in pain and neurological symptoms. The mean lordosis change was 11.0°, from 23.1° preoperatively to 34.0° postoperatively. Fusion was confirmed with CT scans in five of six patients. At the last follow-up, all patients had normalization of inflammatory markers, no symptoms of infection, and none required repeat surgical treatment for spondylodiscitis. XLIF with percutaneous posterior instrumentation is a minimally invasive technique with reduced morbidity for lumbar spine fusion which affords adequate exposure to the vertebral bodies and discs to aggressively debride necrotic and infected tissue. This study suggests that XLIF may be a safe and effective alternative to ALIF for the treatment of spondylodiscitis

  7. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Percutaneous Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation for Lumbosacral Spine Degenerative Diseases. A retrospective database of 40 consecutive treated cases and literature review.

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    Millimaggi, Daniele Francesco; DI Norcia, Valerio; Luzzi, Sabino; Alfiero, Tommaso; Galzio, Renato Juan; Ricci, Alessandro

    2017-04-12

    To report our results about minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) with bilateral pedicle screw fixation, in patients with degenerative lumbosacral spine disease. To describe the indications, surgical technique and results of a consecutive series of 40 patients undergone MI-TLIF. Despite the limited number of clinical studies, published data suggest tremendous potential advantages of this technique. Forty patients with radiological findings of degenerative lumbosacral spine disease were undergone MI-TLIF between July 2012 and January 2015. Clinical outcomes were assessed by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Health Survey Scoring (SF36) before surgery and at first year follow-up. Furthermore, the following parameters were retrospectively reviewed: age, sex, working activity, body mass index (BMI), type of degenerative disease, number of levels of fusion, operative time, blood loss, length of hospital stay. Average operative time was of 230 minutes, mean estimated blood loss 170 mL, average length of hospital stay 5 days. The ODI improved from a score of 59, preoperatively, to post-operative score of 20 at first year follow-up. Average SF36 score increased from 36 to 54 (Physical Health) and from 29 to 50 (Mental Health) at first year outcome evaluation. MI-TLIF with bilateral pedicle screw fixation is an excellent choice for selected patients suffering from symptomatic degenerative lumbosacral spine disease, especially secondary to recurrent disk herniations.

  8. Effect of Mechanical Ventilation Mode Type on Intra- and Postoperative Blood Loss in Patients Undergoing Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Kang, Woon-Seok; Oh, Chung-Sik; Kwon, Won-Kyoung; Rhee, Ka Young; Lee, Yun Gu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Suk Ha; Kim, Seong-Hyop

    2016-07-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical ventilation mode type, pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV), or volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on intra- and postoperative surgical bleeding in patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery. This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, and parallel study that included 56 patients undergoing PLIF and who were mechanically ventilated using PCV or VCV. A permuted block randomization was used with a computer-generated list. The hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were measured after anesthesia induction in supine position, 5 min after patients were changed from supine to prone position, at the time of skin closure, and 5 min after the patients were changed from prone to supine position. The amount of intraoperative surgical bleeding, fluid administration, urine output, and transfusion requirement were measured at the end of surgery. The amount of postoperative bleeding and transfusion requirement were recorded every 24 h for 72 h. The primary outcome was the amount of intraoperative surgical bleeding, and 56 patients were analyzed. The amount of intraoperative surgical bleeding was significantly less in the PCV group than that in the VCV group (median, 253.0 [interquartile range, 179.0 to 316.5] ml in PCV group vs. 382.5 [328.0 to 489.5] ml in VCV group; P patients undergoing PLIF, which may be related to lower intraoperative peak inspiratory pressure.

  9. Surgical treatment of adult scoliosis: is anterior apical release and fusion necessary for the lumbar curve?

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    Kim, Youngbae B; Lenke, Lawrence G; Kim, Yongjung J; Kim, Young-Woo; Bridwell, Keith H; Stobbs, Georgia

    2008-05-01

    A retrospective study. To analyze radiographic and functional outcomes after posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion (PSSIF) with and without an anterior apical release of the lumbar curve in adult scoliosis patients. No comparison study on PSSIF of adult lumbar scoliosis with apical release versus without has been published. Forty-eight adult patients with lumbar scoliosis (average age at surgery 49.6 years, average follow-up 3.7 years) who underwent PSSIF were analyzed with respect to radiographic change, perioperative and postoperative complications, and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) outcome scores. Twenty-three patients underwent an anterior apical release of the lumbar curve via a thoracoabdominal approach followed by PSSIF (Group I). The remaining 25 patients underwent a PSSIF of the lumbar curve followed by anterior column support at the lumbosacral region through an anterior paramedian retroperitoneal or posterior transforaminal approach (Group II). Before surgery, Group I showed a somewhat larger lumbar major Cobb angle (63.2 degrees vs. 55.9 degrees , P = 0.07), and both groups demonstrated significant differences in lumbar curve flexibility (26.9% vs. 37.2%, P = 0.02) and thoracolumbar kyphosis (27.0 degrees vs. 15.0 degrees , P = 0.03). After surgery, at the ultimate follow-up, there were no significant differences in major Cobb angle, C7 plumbline to the center sacral vertical line (P = 0.17), C7 plumbline to the posterior superior endplate of S1 (P = 0.44), and sagittal Cobb angles at the proximal junction (P = 0.57), T10-L2 (P = 0.24) and T12-S1 (P = 0.51). There were 4 pseudarthroses in Group I and one in Group II (P = 0.02). Postoperative total normalized SRS outcome scores at ultimate follow-up were significantly higher in Group II (69% vs. 79%, P = 0.01). Posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion without anterior apical release of lumbar curves in adult scoliosis demonstrated better total SRS outcome scores and no

  10. Anterior versus posterior approach in surgical treatment of tuberculous spondylodiscitis of thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Khaled; Elmorshidy, Essam

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the clinical, radiological and functional outcome of anterior versus posterior surgical debridement and fixation in patients with thoracic and lumbar tuberculous spondylodiscitis. A total number of 42 patients with tuberculous spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine treated surgically were included in this study. Twenty patients (group A) underwent anterior debridement, decompression and instrumentation by anterior approach. Twenty-two patients (group B) were operated by posterolateral (extracavitary) decompression and posterior instrumentation. Operative parameters, clinical, radiographic and functional results for the two groups were analyzed and compared. The average follow-up period was 15 months (range 12-24) in both groups. The average operative time, blood loss and blood transfusion of anterior group were significantly less than the posterior one. There was significant better back pain relief, kyphotic angle correction and less angle loss in the posterior group than anterior. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding neurological recovery, functional outcome and fusion rate. Both anterolateral and posterolateral approaches are sufficient for achieving the goals of surgical treatment of thoracic and lumbar Pott's disease but posterolateral approach allows significant better kyphotic angle correction, less angle loss, better improvement in back pain but unfortunately more operative time and blood loss.

  11. Posterolateral instrumented fusion with and without transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis: A randomized clinical trial with 2-year follow-up

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    Mohammad Reza Etemadifar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spondylolisthesis is a common cause of surgery in patients with lower back pain. Although posterolateral fusion and pedicle screw fixation are a relatively common treatment method for the treatment of spondylolisthesis, controversy exists about the necessity of adding interbody fusion to posterolateral fusion. The aim of our study was to assess the functional disability, pain, and complications in patients with spondylolisthesis treated by posterolateral instrumented fusion (PLF with and without transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in a randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: From February 2007 to February 2011, 50 adult patients with spondylolisthesis were randomly assigned to be treated with PLF or PLF+TLIF techniques (25 patients in each group by a single surgeon. Back pain, leg pain, and disability were assessed before treatment and until 2 years after surgical treatment using visual analog scale (VAS and oswestry disability index (ODI. Patients were also evaluated for postoperative complications such as infection, neurological complications, and instrument failure. Results: All patients completed the 24 months of follow-up. Twenty patients were females and 30 were males. Average age of the patients was 53 ± 11 years for the PLF group and 51 ± 13 for the PLF + TLIF group. Back pain, leg pain, and disability score were significantly improved postoperatively compared to preoperative scores (P < 0.001. At 3 months of follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS score for back pain and leg pain in both groups; however, after 6 months and 1 year and 2 years follow-up, the reported scores for back pain and leg pain were significantly lower in the PLF+TLIF group (P < 0.05. The ODI score was also significantly lower in the PLF+TLIF group at 1 year and 2 years of follow-up (P < 0.05. One screw breakage and one superficial infection occurred in the PLF+TLIF group, which had no statistical

  12. The SNAP trial: a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial of a silicon nitride versus a PEEK cage in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disorders, and show good clinical results. Still, complications such as subsidence and migration of the cage are frequently seen. A lack of osteointegration and fibrous tissues surrounding PEEK cages are held responsible. Ceramic implants made of silicon nitride show better biocompatible and osteoconductive qualities, and therefore are expected to lower complication rates and allow for better fusion. Purpose of this study is to show that fusion with the silicon nitride cage produces non-inferior results in outcome of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire at all follow-up time points as compared to the same procedure with PEEK cages. Methods/Design This study is designed as a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial with repeated measures analysis. 100 patients (18–75 years) presenting with symptomatic lumbar degenerative disorders unresponsive to at least 6 months of conservative treatment are included. Patients will be randomly assigned to a PEEK cage or a silicon nitride cage, and will undergo a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Primary outcome measure is the functional improvement measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcome parameters are the VAS leg, VAS back, SF-36, Likert scale, neurological outcome and radiographic assessment of fusion. After 1 year the fusion rate will be measured by radiograms and CT. Follow-up will be continued for 2 years. Patients and clinical observers who will perform the follow-up visits will be blinded for type of cage used during follow-up. Analyses of radiograms and CT will be performed independently by two experienced radiologists. Discussion In this study a PEEK cage will be compared with a silicon nitride cage in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled

  13. The NEtherlands Cervical Kinematics (NECK Trial. Cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation; a double-blind randomised multicenter study

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    van den Akker Elske

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with cervical radicular syndrome due to disc herniation refractory to conservative treatment are offered surgical treatment. Anterior cervical discectomy is the standard procedure, often in combination with interbody fusion. Accelerated adjacent disc degeneration is a known entity on the long term. Recently, cervical disc prostheses are developed to maintain motion and possibly reduce the incidence of adjacent disc degeneration. A comparative cost-effectiveness study focused on adjacent segment degeneration and functional outcome has not been performed yet. We present the design of the NECK trial, a randomised study on cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in patients with cervical disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18-65 years presenting with radicular signs due to single level cervical disc herniation lasting more than 8 weeks are included. Patients will be randomised into 3 groups: anterior discectomy only, anterior discectomy with interbody fusion, and anterior discectomy with disc prosthesis. The primary outcome measure is symptomatic adjacent disc degeneration at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Other outcome parameters will be the Neck Disability Index, perceived recovery, arm and neck pain, complications, re-operations, quality of life, job satisfaction, anxiety and depression assessment, medical consumption, absenteeism, and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multicenter trial, in which 3 surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses will be kept blinded of the allocated treatment for 2 years. The follow-up period is 5 years. Discussion Currently, anterior cervical discectomy with fusion is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of cervical disc herniation. Whether additional interbody fusion or disc prothesis is necessary and cost-effective will be determined by this trial

  14. Dynamic stabilization for L4-5 spondylolisthesis: comparison with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with more than 2 years of follow-up.

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    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Cheng, Henrich; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the past decade, dynamic stabilization has been an emerging option of surgical treatment for lumbar spondylosis. However, the application of this dynamic construct for mild spondylolisthesis and its clinical outcomes remain uncertain. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS) with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for the management of single-level spondylolisthesis at L4-5. METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive patients with Meyerding Grade I spondylolisthesis at L4-5 who were managed with surgery. Patients were divided into 2 groups: DDS and MI-TLIF. The DDS group was composed of patients who underwent standard laminectomy and the DDS system. The MI-TLIF group was composed of patients who underwent MI-TLIF. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by visual analog scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores at each time point of evaluation. Evaluations included radiographs and CT scans for every patient for 2 years after surgery. RESULTS A total of 86 patients with L4-5 spondylolisthesis completed the follow-up of more than 2 years and were included in the analysis (follow-up rate of 94.5%). There were 64 patients in the DDS group and 22 patients in the MI-TLIF group, and the overall mean follow-up was 32.7 months. Between the 2 groups, there were no differences in demographic data (e.g., age, sex, and body mass index) or preoperative clinical evaluations (e.g., visual analog scale back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores). The mean estimated blood loss of the MI-TLIF group was lower, whereas the operation time was longer compared with the DDS group (both p spondylolisthesis at L4-5. DDS might be an alternative to standard arthrodesis in mild lumbar spondylolisthesis. However, unlike fusion, dynamic implants have issues of wearing and loosening in the long term

  15. Retrospective Study of Anterior Interbody Fusion Rates and Patient Outcomes of Using Mineralized Collagen and Bone Marrow Aspirate in Multilevel Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostin, Richard; O'Brien, Michael; McCarthy, Ian; Bess, Shay; Gupta, Munish; Klineberg, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Retrospective, single-center analysis of multilevel anterior fusion rates and health-related quality-of-life outcomes of mineralized collagen and bone marrow aspirate (BMA) in anterior interbody fusion cages for spine fusion surgery. To determine the ability and effectiveness of mineralized collagen and BMA to achieve multilevel anterior spinal fusion in adult spinal deformity patients when placed in carbon fiber reinforced polymer cages. High rates of postoperative pain and nonunion can result from spine fusion procedures. Factors that affect the success of fusion include patient comorbidities, position of implant, and mechanical and biological deficiencies, as well as the choice of bone graft replacement. Analysis of radiographic images and health-related quality-of-life outcomes was performed for a consecutive series of 22 prospectively enrolled adult spinal deformity patients with 104 total anterior fusion levels. Fusions were graded by 3 blinded surgeons not involved in the operative procedure; each fusion was graded on a 1-4 scale based on fusion mass appearance. Levels with an average fusion grade of 1-2.4 were classified as fused; levels with an average grade >2.5 were classified as not fused. The mean patient age was 51.5 years (range, 38-61) with 21 females. A total of 95% of anterior operative levels were graded as fused based on flexion/extension and full-length biplane radiographs at 1 year. Computed tomography grading showed a reduced fusion rate at 87% overall. There was a statistically significant improvement in the Oswestry Disability Index and Scoliosis Research Society 22-item questionnaire scores at 1 and 2 years after index surgery. Fusion rates in multilevel anterior spinal fusion using mineralized collagen and BMA are relatively low compared with fusion rates of 95% or more reported in the existing literature on long fusions with bone morphogenetic protein.

  16. Associated lumbar scoliosis does not affect outcomes in patients undergoing focal minimally invasive surgery-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MISTLIF) for neurogenic symptoms-a minimum 2-year follow-up study.

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    Tay, Kae Sian; Bassi, Anupreet; Yeo, William; Yue, Wai Mun

    2017-01-01

    There is no current literature comparing outcomes of patients with and without lumbar scoliosis having neurologic symptoms undergoing minimally invasive surgery-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MISTLIF) technique. This study aimed to determine whether associated lumbar scoliosis will result in different clinical, radiological, and operative outcomes in patients undergoing focal MISTLIF for neurogenic symptoms, without specific correction of the scoliosis. A retrospective case comparison study from prospectively collected hospital registry data was carried out. Two hundred and thirty eligible patients were evaluated and divided into two groups: Scoliosis Group (SG; n=57) with Cobb angle >10 degrees on anterioposterior (AP) plain lumbar spine radiographs and Non-Scoliosis Group (NSG; n=173) consisting of the remaining patients. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index, the North American Spine Society (NASS) Neurogenic Symptom Score, the NASS Satisfaction with Surgery Rating, the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Numerical Pain Rating Scale for back and leg pain. Radiological findings included Cobb angle, fusion, implant failure or loosening, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Both groups were compared for demographics, perioperative parameters, complications, clinical, and radiological outcomes. Interobserver agreement (kappa statistics) for measurement of Cobb angle was calculated on all cases of both groups by two authors. Patients were evaluated preoperatively, at 6 months, and 2 years after surgery. The average follow-up was 2.88±1.47 years in the SG and 2.71±1.34 years in the NSG (p=.444). Differences in mean age (SG: 62.9±10.9 years and NSG: 57.6±13.1 years), estimated related risk of death (SG: 3.05±2.13 and NSG: 2.41±1.74), and gender (female=SG: 87.7% and NSG: 64.2%) were statistically significant (p.05). Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were similar in both groups (p>.05) except

  17. Impaired bone mineral density as a predictor of graft subsidence following minimally invasive transpsoas lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2015-04-01

    The LLIF procedure is a useful stand-alone and adjunct surgical approach for many spinal conditions. One complication of LLIF is subsidence of the interbody graft into the vertebral bodies, resulting in severe pain, impaired arthrodesis and potentially fracture of the body. Low bone density, as measured by T score on DEXA scanning, has also been postulated to increase the risk of subsidence. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was performed on all patients who underwent LLIF at this institution consisting of 712 levels in 335 patients. Patients with subsidence following LLIF were recorded. We utilized the T score obtained from the femoral neck DEXA scans, which is used to determine overall fracture risk. The T score of patients with subsidence was compared to those without subsidence. 20 of 57 (35 %) patients without subsidence had a DEXA T score between -1.0 and -2.4 consistent osteopenia, one patient (1.8 %) exhibited a T score less than -2.5, consistent with osteoporosis. 13 patients of 23 (57 %) with subsidence exhibited a T score between -1.0 and -2.4, consistent with osteopenia, five (22 %) exhibited a T score of -2.5 or less, consistent with osteoporosis. The mean DEXA T score in patients with subsidence was -1.65 (SD 1.04) compared to -0.45 (SD 0.97) in patients without subsidence (p subsidence. Further, they are at an increased risk of requiring additional surgery. In patients with poor bone quality, consideration could be made to supplement the LLIF cage with posterior instrumentation.

  18. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumented posterolateral fusion in adult spondylolisthesis: description and association of clinico-surgical variables with prognosis in a series of 36 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Moreta, Juan A.; Hernandez-Vicente, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background We present our experience in the treatment of patients with isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis, by means of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and instrumented posterolateral fusion (IPLF), and we compare them with those published in the literature. We analyse whether there exists any statistical association between the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the disease and our surgical technique, with the complications and the clinical-radiological prognosis of the cases. Method We designed a prospective study. A total of 36 cases were operated. The patients included were 14 men and 22 women, with an average age of 57.17±27.32 years. Our technique consists of PLIF+IPLF, using local bone for the fusion. The clinical results were evaluated with the Visual Analogical Scale (VAS) and the Kirkaldy-Willis criteria. The radiological evaluation followed the Bratingan (PLIF) and Lenke (IPLF) methodology. A total of 42 variables were statistically analysed by means of SPSS18. We used the Paired Student's T-test, logistic regression and Pearson's Chi-square-test. Results The spondylolisthesis was isthmic in 15 cases and degenerative in 21 cases. The postoperative evaluations had excellent or good results in 94.5% (n = 34), with a statistically significant improvement in the back pain and sciatica (p spondylolisthesis, isthmic or degenerative, refractory to conservative treatment, for the obtaining the best clinical results and rates of fusion, with similar risks to those of the other published techniques. Our statistical analysis could contribute to improve outcomes after surgery. PMID:26196029

  19. Patient-reported and radiographic outcomes of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis with or without reduction: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Zhang, Hailong; Guan, Xiaofei; Gu, Guangfei; Wu, Xinbo; Hu, Annan; Gu, Xin; He, Shisheng

    2016-11-01

    This retrospective study aimed to compare the patient-reported outcomes and radiographic assessment of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for degenerative spondylolisthesis with reduction versus in situ fusion. Patients receiving MI-TLIF with reduction were assigned as Group A, and those without reduction were assigned as Group B. Radiographic fusion was assessed using Bridwell's grading criteria. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes including visual analogue score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scale and improvement rate were analyzed. There were 41 patients in Group A and 37 patients in Group B. The mean follow-up was 30.78±14.15months in Group A and 28.95±10.75months in Group B (p=0.525). There were no significant differences in hospital stay (p=0.261), estimated blood loss (p=0.639), blood transfusion (p=0.336), operation time (p=0.762) and complications (p=1.00) between the two groups. Radiographic fusion rate was 92.68% (38/41) in Group A, and 81.08% (30/37) in Group B (p=0.110). Significant differences were observed in either 3-month or last follow-up JOA, VAS, and ODI compared with preoperative JOA, VAS, and ODI, respectively (p0.05). According to MacNab criteria, the excellent and good rate was 85.37% in Group A and 86.49% in Group B (p=0.983). MI-TLIF is an effective and satisfactory surgical technique to manage degenerative spondylolisthesis regardless of reduction or not, so routine reduction may not be a requirement in MI-TLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. First Results of a New Vacuum Plasma Sprayed (VPS Titanium-Coated Carbon/PEEK Composite Cage for Lumbar Interbody Fusion

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    Sven Hoppe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a new vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS titanium-coated carbon/polyetheretherketone (PEEK cage under first use clinical conditions. Forty-two patients who underwent a one or two segment transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF procedure with a new Ca/PEEK composite cage between 2012 and 2016 were retrospectively identified by an electronic patient chart review. Fusion rates (using X-ray, patient’s satisfaction, and complications were followed up for two years. A total of 90.4% of the patients were pain-free and satisfied after a follow up (FU period of 29.1 ± 9 (range 24–39 months. A mean increase of 3° in segmental lordosis in the early period (p = 0.002 returned to preoperative levels at final follow-ups. According to the Bridwell classification, the mean 24-month G1 fusion rate was calculated as 93.6% and the G2 as 6.4%. No radiolucency around the cage (G3 or clear pseudarthrosis could be seen (G4. In conclusion, biological properties of the inert, hydrophobic surface, which is the main disadvantage of PEEK, can be improved with VPS titanium coating, so that the carbon/PEEK composite cage, which has great advantages in respect of biomechanical properties, can be used safely in TLIF surgery. High fusion rates, good clinical outcome, and low implant-related complication rates without the need to use rhBMP or additional iliac bone graft can be achieved.

  1. Adjacent segment disease after anterior cervical interbody fusion: a multicenter retrospective study of 288 patients with long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litrico, S; Lonjon, N; Riouallon, G; Cogniet, A; Launay, O; Beaurain, J; Blamoutier, A; Pascal-Mousselard, H

    2014-10-01

    Cervical discectomy with interbody fusion is a common procedure in spinal surgery. The resultant biomechanical alterations accelerate degeneration of the adjacent segment, but the contribution of natural degeneration to adjacent segment disease is unclear. To assess the long-term rate of surgery to discs adjacent to cervical interbody fusion; and to assess the associated incidence of cervico-brachial neuralgia and radiological degeneration of adjacent discs. A multicenter retrospective study included anterior cervical discectomy patients at a minimum of 10 years' follow-up. Clinical variables comprised pain, use of analgesics and surgical revision. Functional assessment was performed on the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiologic degeneration was assessed on the Goffin score based on cervical spine X-ray. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients were contacted and filled out the clinical questionnaire. Among the patients, 153 underwent radiological reassessment. Mean age was 46 years (range, 16-73 years). Mean follow-up was 14.5 years (12-18 years). The rate of surgical revision on a disc adjacent to the primary level was 5.9%. Frequent attacks of cervico-brachial neuralgia were reported in 20.5% of cases. Radiologic adjacent segment degeneration was found in 81.3% of cases over follow-up. There was a significant correlation between degree of radiologic adjacent segment degeneration and NDI (P=0.02). Degeneration adjacent to discectomy/fusion is partly due to aging. The present findings, however, agree with the literature and indicate accelerated degeneration in adjacent segments. These findings should be taken into account in treatment decision-making and suggest a possible interest of more physiological surgery such as arthroplasty. IV - Multicenter retrospective study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion versus instrumented posterolateral fusion In degenerative spondylolisthesis: An attempt to evaluate the superiority of one method over the other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Amir Abbas

    2016-11-01

    Various surgical procedures have been recommended for the treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis,but Controversy still exists regarding the optimal surgical technique . In this study,we compared the clinical and radiologic outcome of the Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion(TLIF) method with the Instrumented Posterolateral fusion(PLF) in these patients. The study population in this retrospective study consisted of 145 consecutive patients of degenerative spondylolisthesis who had undergone lumbar fusion in our institute between September 2010 and October 2013. The patients were divided into two treatment groups, where either instrumented PLF with pedicle screw(180° fusion) or TLIF procedure(360° fusion) was done. The follow-up was performed clinically using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS)and global outcome. Outcome scores were assessed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Radiographs were obtained postoperatively and at regular intervals for 24 months. Perioperative outcomes such as surgery time, blood loss, length of hospital stay and incidence of surgical complications were also recorded. 80 patients underwent TLIF procedure and 65 patients were included in the instrumented PLF group. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to age,gender,Body Mass Index,smoking and comorbid conditions(p>0.05). No significant difference existed in Pre-operative VAS for back pain,VAS for leg pain and ODI between the two groups(p>0.05). There were no significant group differences in the operation level,hospital stay and surgical complications(all p>0.05). Blood loss, operation time and fusion success rate were significantly greater in the TLIF group than in the PLF group (all P<0.05). Significant differences between groups concerning VAS for back pain,ODI and Global outcome were present at final follow-up. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to VAS for leg pain. Our study

  3. [Clinical anatomy study on autonomic nerves related to anterior approach lumbar surgery ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianzhong; Chen, Xianshuai; Wu, Min; Wang, Zhaodong; Zhou, Jiansheng; Xiao, Yuzhou

    2014-10-01

    To understand the location characteristics of the lumbosacral autonomic nerve plexus and the morphological changes so as to provide the anatomic theoretical basis for the protection of autonomic nerve during the lower lumbar anterior approach operation. A random anatomic investigation was carried out on 19 formalin-treated adult cadavers (15 males and 4 females; aged 44-78 years, mean 64 years). The anterior median line (connection of suprasternal fossa point and the midpoint of the symphysis pubis) was determined, and the characteristics of abdominal aortic plexus (AAP), inferior mesenteric plexus (IMP), and superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) were observed. The relationship between the autonomic nerve and the anterior median line was measured and recorded. APP and IMP were found to be located chiefly in front of the abdominal aorta in a reticular pattern, and the nerve fibers of the two nerve plexuses were more densely at the left side of abdominal aorta than at the right side. Superior hypogastric plexus showed more distinct main vessel variations, including 4 types. The main vessel length of the SHP was (59.38 ± 12.86) mm, and the width was (11.25 ± 2.92) mm. The main vessels of SHP were mainly located at the left side of the ventral median line (10, 52.6%) and anterior lumbar vertebra (13, 68.4%). The main vessels extended down to form the left and right hypogastric nerves. It is applicable to expose the nerve from the right side of centrum and move the autonomic nerve and blood vessel as a whole during anterior lower lumbar operation. In this way, the dissection to separate nerve plexus is not needed, thus nerve injury can be avoided to the largest extent.

  4. Biomechanical advantages of robot-assisted pedicle screw fixation in posterior lumbar interbody fusion compared with freehand technique in a prospective randomized controlled trial-perspective for patient-specific finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Park, Sung-Cheol; Kwon, Oh-Hyo; Son, Juhyun; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2017-05-01

    There have been conflicting results on the surgical outcome of lumbar fusion surgery using two different techniques: robot-assisted pedicle screw fixation and conventional freehand technique. In addition, there have been no studies about the biomechanical issues between both techniques. This study aimed to investigate the biomechanical properties in terms of stress at adjacent segments using robot-assisted pedicle screw insertion technique (robot-assisted, minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion, Rom-PLIF) and freehand technique (conventional, freehand, open approach, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, Cop-PLIF) for instrumented lumbar fusion surgery. This is an additional post-hoc analysis for patient-specific finite element (FE) model. The sample is composed of patients with degenerative lumbar disease. Intradiscal pressure and facet contact force are the outcome measures. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo an instrumented PLIF procedure using a Rom-PLIF (37 patients) or a Cop-PLIF (41), respectively. Five patients in each group were selected using a simple random sampling method after operation, and 10 preoperative and postoperative lumbar spines were modeled from preoperative high-resolution computed tomography of 10 patients using the same method for a validated lumbar spine model. Under four pure moments of 7.5 Nm, the changes in intradiscal pressure and facet joint contact force at the proximal adjacent segment following fusion surgery were analyzed and compared with preoperative states. The representativeness of random samples was verified. Both groups showed significant increases in postoperative intradiscal pressure at the proximal adjacent segment under four moments, compared with the preoperative state. The Cop-PLIF models demonstrated significantly higher percent increments of intradiscal pressure at proximal adjacent segments under extension, lateral bending, and torsion moments than the Rom-PLIF models (p=.032, p=.008, and p

  5. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support: a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year magnetic resonance imaging follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Egund, Niels; Christensen, Finn B; Grethe Jurik, Anne; Bünger, Cody E

    2010-10-15

    Randomized controlled trial. To analyze long-term adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion on magnetic resonance imaging and compare randomization groups with and without anterior column support. ASD can be a long-term complication after fusion. The prevalence and the cause of ASD are not well documented, but ASD are one of the main arguments for introducing the use of motion-preserving techniques as an alternative to fusion. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral lumbar fusion (ALIF+PLF) has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for ALIF+PLF or for PLF alone. Ninety-five patients participated. ASD was examined on magnetic resonance imaging with regard to disc degeneration, disc herniation, stenosis, and endplate changes. Disc heights on radiographs taken at index surgery and at long-term follow-up were compared. Outcome was assessed by validated questionnaires. The follow-up rate was 76%. ASD was similar between randomization groups. In the total cohort, endplate changes were seen in 26% of the participants and correlated significantly with the presence of disc degeneration and disc herniation. Disc degeneration and dorsal disc herniation were the parameters registered most frequently and were significantly more pronounced at the first adjacent level than at the second and the third adjacent levels. Patients without disc height reduction over time were significantly younger than patients with disc height reduction. Disc degeneration and stenosis correlated significantly with outcome at the first adjacent level. The cause of the superior outcome in the group with anterior support is still unclear. Compared with the findings reported in the literature, the prevalence of ASD is likely to be in concordance with the expected changes in a nonoperated symptomatic population and therefore

  6. Radiographic Adjacent Segment Degeneration at 5 Years After L4/5 Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Pedicle Screw Instrumentation: Evaluation by Computed Tomography and Annual Screening With Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Shiro; Kawakami, Noriaki; Matsubara, Yuji; Tsuji, Taichi; Ohara, Tetsuya; Katayama, Yoshito; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kanemura, Tokumi

    2016-11-01

    Retrospective clinical study. To investigate adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) at 5 years after L4/5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation and L4/5 decompression surgery using plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with the evaluation of annual changes on MRI. Methods of evaluation have been inconsistent among studies of ASD. There is no report that ASD in the lumbar spine after posterior lumbar interbody fusion at the same level is thoroughly evaluated on radiographs, CT, annual MRI changes, and the impact of decompression procedures. ASD was evaluated in 52 patients. Disk height, vertebral slip, intervertebral angle, and intervertebral range of motion were examined on plain radiographs. Facet joint degeneration on CT and disk degradation and spinal stenosis on MRI were classified into categories, and facet sagittalization and tropism were measured on CT. The incidence of ASD was compared between the decompression procedures. The radiographic changes observed in the study were defined as radiographic ASD (R-ASD) without reoperation, as no patient required reoperation. R-ASD was rarely detected by radiography. The incidences of facet joint degeneration, MRI-detected disk degeneration, and spinal stenosis at the L3/4 and L5/S1 levels were 21% and 23%, 27% and 17%, and 35% and 4%, respectively. Progressive disk degeneration at L3/4 was found significantly more frequently in patients with aggravation of facet degeneration (Pspine fusion, rather than aging degeneration. Decompression with preservation of posterior connective components is recommended to prevent R-ASD.

  7. Subsidence as of 12 months after single-level anterior cervical inter-body fusion. Is it related to clinical outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Yeom, Jin S; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2015-06-01

    Subsidence is a frequent phenomenon in the interbody fusion process in patients with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). There is little evidence of whether subsidence in the cervical spine has any impact on clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation of subsidence and clinical outcomes after ACDF and to consider reasons subsidence might not cause unfavorable clinical outcomes. A total of 158 consecutive patients who underwent single-level ACDF were included. The patients were divided into a subsidence group (S-group) and a no subsidence group (N-group), with subsidence defined as a decrease by ≥3 mm in total intervertebral height (TIH). We analyzed outcomes resulting from subsidence, particularly focusing on clinical outcomes and subsequent global and segmental kyphosis using a repeated measure analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA). Subsidence occurred in 74 patients (46.8%) as of a 12-month follow-up. The S-group included 58.6% with a stand-alone cage for interbody fusion (p = 0.002). Clinical outcomes improved significantly over time (neck pain, RM-ANOVA: F(1.3, 205) = 125.1, p subsidence and clinical outcomes between the S- and N-group (neck pain, RM-ANOVA: F(2,153) = 1.04, p = 0.356, partial η(2) = 0.229; arm pain, RM-ANOVA: F(2,153) = 0.56, p = 0.571, partial η(2) = 0.142). Segmental angle increased in both groups over time and showed a statistically significant difference between the S- and N-groups (RM-ANOVA: F(3,143) = 6.148, p = 0.001, partial η(2) = 0.959). Although, global cervical angle decreased generally and displayed no statically significant difference between the S- and N-group (RM-ANOVA: F(3,119) = 2.361, p = 0.075, partial η(2) = 0.056). Radiographic subsidence after ACDF occurred in 46.8% patients as of 12 months after the single-level ACDF. The lack of correlation between bad clinical outcome and radiographic subsidence may be due to

  8. Iterative design and testing of a modular anterior plate for lumbar spine fixation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Teyfik

    2012-09-01

    In this study, a modular anterior lumbar plate is designed and tested in an iterative fashion. The study starts with a basic design that is built by combining same-sized modules; an approach that allow inventory costs to be decreased. The basic design is iteratively improved guided by the results of biomechanical tests performed on each new design. At the end of three iterations of improvements, the design is complete and the plate is of sufficient quality for it to be used in anterior surgical operations. Using these plates creates the advantage of being able to increase the size and slot count during surgical operations, even when some of the modules are already fixed to vertebrae. The designed modular plate is shown to be as safe for use as a rigid plate in terms of its static and fatigue biomechanical performances.

  9. A Retrospective Study of 39 Patients Treated With Anterior Approach of Thoracic and Lumbar Spondylodiscitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaldız, Can; Özdemir, Nail; Yaman, Onur; Feran, Hamit Günes; Tansug, Tugrul; Minoglu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to report our 39 patients treated with anterior debridement and autologous iliac bone grafting with or without anterior instrumentation, which is the presumed treatment of choice for thoracic or lumbar spondylodiscitis. Our patients underwent surgical treatment of spondylodiscitis using anterior debridement and autologous iliac bone grafting with or without anterior instrumentation and were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 8 years (range, 2–11 years). Kaneda 2-rod system instrumentation was used in 12 patients, in total. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Frankel grade. Radiographic fusion was characterized based on 3-dimensional computed tomography. Of the whole group, 20 patients suffered from tuberculous spondylodiscitis and 19 suffered from hematogenous spondylodiscitis. Pathogens responsible for pyogenic infection included Staphylococcus aureus (4 patients), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3 patients), and Brucella melitensis (1 patient). Fifteen patients had thoracic involvement, 20 had lumbar involvement, and 4 had thoracolumbar junction involvement. Preoperative neurological deficits were noted in 13 of the 39 patients. In terms of Frankel grade, 8 patients have improved, 4 have remained the same, and 1 patient has worsened during the follow-up period. Imaging-documented fusion was achieved in 23 of 27 patients in the graft group (85% fusion rate) and 11 of 12 patients in the graft + Kaneda instrumentation group (91% fusion rate). There was no instrumentation failure, loosening, or graft-related complication such as slippage or fracture of the graft. This approach demonstrated a good recovery rate of neurological functions and a high fusion rate. PMID:26632729

  10. Anterior Hip Subluxation due to Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis and Posterior Pelvic Tilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tsuchie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontraumatic anterior subluxation and dislocation of the hip joint are extremely rare. A 58-year-old woman presented to our outpatient clinic with left hip pain with a duration of 15 years. There was no history of trauma or other diseases. Her hip pain usually occurred only on walking and not at rest. Physical examinations demonstrated no tenderness in the hip joint. The range of motion of both hip joints was almost normal. Laxity of other joints was not observed. The bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and proximal femur confirmed a diagnosis of osteoporosis. A plain radiograph showed osteoarthritic changes of the hip joints, severe posterior pelvic tilt, and superior displacement of both femoral heads, especially in a standing position. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT revealed anterior subluxation of both femoral heads. Seven years after the initial visit, both hip joints showed progression to severe osteoarthritis. Although the exact cause remains unclear, lumbar kyphosis, posterior pelvic tilt, and a decrease in acetabular coverage may have influenced the current case. We should be aware of these factors when we examine patients with hip osteoarthritis.

  11. Anterior Hip Subluxation due to Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis and Posterior Pelvic Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shin; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kijima, Hiroaki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Nontraumatic anterior subluxation and dislocation of the hip joint are extremely rare. A 58-year-old woman presented to our outpatient clinic with left hip pain with a duration of 15 years. There was no history of trauma or other diseases. Her hip pain usually occurred only on walking and not at rest. Physical examinations demonstrated no tenderness in the hip joint. The range of motion of both hip joints was almost normal. Laxity of other joints was not observed. The bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and proximal femur confirmed a diagnosis of osteoporosis. A plain radiograph showed osteoarthritic changes of the hip joints, severe posterior pelvic tilt, and superior displacement of both femoral heads, especially in a standing position. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) revealed anterior subluxation of both femoral heads. Seven years after the initial visit, both hip joints showed progression to severe osteoarthritis. Although the exact cause remains unclear, lumbar kyphosis, posterior pelvic tilt, and a decrease in acetabular coverage may have influenced the current case. We should be aware of these factors when we examine patients with hip osteoarthritis. PMID:24592346

  12. Application of Gelatin Sponge Impregnated with a Mixture of 3 Drugs to Intraoperative Nerve Root Block Combined with Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery in the Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis: A Clinical Observation Including 96 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jin Peng; Fan, Yong; Liu, Ji Jun; Zhang, Jia Nan; Chang Liu, Shi; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-12-01

    Application of nerve root block is mainly for diagnosis with less application in intraoperative treatment. The aim of this study was to observe clinical and imaging outcomes of application of gelatin sponge impregnated with a mixture of 3 drugs to intraoperative nerve root block combined with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery in to treat adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis. From January 2012 to November 2014, 108 patients with adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis were treated with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery combined with intraoperative gelatin sponge impregnated with a mixture of 3 drugs. Visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores were used to evaluate postoperative improvement of back and leg pain, and clinical effects were assessed according to the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Imaging was obtained preoperatively, 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, and at the last follow-up. Fusion status, complications, and other outcomes were assessed. Follow-up was complete for 96 patients. Visual analog scale scores of leg and back pain on postoperative days 1-7 were decreased compared with preoperatively. At 1 week postoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and last follow-up, visual analog scale score, Oswestry Disability Index score, coronal Cobb angle, and coronal and sagittal deviated distance decreased significantly (P = 0.000) and lumbar lordosis angle increased (P = 0.000) compared with preoperatively. Improvement rate of Oswestry Disability Index was 81.8% ± 7.4. Fusion rate between vertebral bodies was 92.7%. Application of gelatin sponge impregnated with 3 drugs combined with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis is safe and feasible with advantages of good short-term analgesia effect, minimal invasiveness, short length of stay, and good long-term clinical

  13. Comparison of polymethylmethacrylate versus expandable cage in anterior vertebral column reconstruction after posterior extracavitary corpectomy in lumbar and thoraco-lumbar metastatic spine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleraky, Mohammed; Papanastassiou, Ioannis; Tran, Nam D; Dakwar, Elias; Vrionis, Frank D

    2011-08-01

    Single-stage posterior corpectomy for the management of spinal tumors has been well described. Anterior column reconstruction has been accomplished using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or expandable cages (EC). The aim of this retrospective study was to compare PMMA versus ECs in anterior vertebral column reconstruction after posterior corpectomy for tumors in the lumbar and thoracolumbar spine. Between 2006 and 2009 we identified 32 patients that underwent a single-stage posterior extracavitary tumor resection and anterior reconstruction, 16 with PMMA and 16 with EC. There were no baseline differences in regards to age (mean: 58.2 years) or performance status. Differences between groups in terms of survival, estimated blood loss (EBL), kyphosis reduction (decrease in Cobb's angle), pain, functional outcomes, and performance status were evaluated. Mean overall survival and EBL were 17 months and 1165 ml, respectively. No differences were noted between the study groups in regards to survival (p = 0.5) or EBL (p = 0.8). There was a trend for better Kyphosis reduction in favor of the EC group (10.04 vs. 5.45, p = 0.16). No difference in performance status or VAS improvements was observed (p > 0.05). Seven patients had complications that led to reoperation (5 infections). PMMA or ECs are viable options for reconstruction of the anterior vertebral column following tumor resection and corpectomy. Both approaches allow for correction of the kyphotic deformity, and stabilization of the anterior vertebral column with similar functional and performance status outcomes in the lumbar and thoracolumbar area.

  14. Disc displacement patterns in lumbar anterior spondylolisthesis: Contribution to foraminal stenosis

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    MacMahon, P.J. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin 11 (Ireland)], E-mail: petermacmahon@yahoo.com; Taylor, D.H.; Duke, D.; Brennan, D.D.; Eustace, S.J. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin 11 (Ireland)

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: To describe the particular disc displacement pattern seen at MRI in patients with spondylolisthesis, and its potential contribution to foraminal stenosis. Methods: 38 patients with symptomatic lumbar anterior spondylolisthesis and 38 sex and aged matched control patients with herniated disc disease, at corresponding disc space levels, were included for study. In each case note was made of the presence, absence and direction of disc displacement and also the presence and location of neural contact with the displaced disc. Results: In 33 of 38 (86.8%) patients in the spondylolisthesis group, the vertical disc displacement was upward. In the control group only 3 patients (7.8%) had upward vertical disc displacement. 19 patients (53%) from the spondylolisthesis group had exit foraminal nerve root contact, compared to 7 patients (18.4%) from the control group. 27 control patients (71%) had contact within the lateral recess, compared to only 6 patients (17%) with spondylolisthesis. Differences for upward displacement were significant (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Disc displacement in patients with spondylolisthesis is predominately in a cephalad and lateral direction. Although this disc displacement pattern can occur in patients without spondylolisthesis, its incidence is much greater in the subset of patients with concomitant spondylolisthesis. In the setting of acquired osseous narrowing of the exit foramen, this described pattern of disc displacement superiorly and laterally in spondylolisthesis increases the susceptibility of spondylolisthesis patients to radicular symptoms and accounts for the exiting nerve root being more commonly affected than the traversing nerve root.

  15. Surgeon, staff, and patient radiation exposure in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: impact of 3D fluoroscopy-based navigation partially replacing conventional fluoroscopy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbe, Ulrich; Sircar, Ronen; Scheiwe, Christian; Scholz, Christoph; Kogias, Evangelos; Krüger, Marie Therese; Volz, Florian; Klingler, Jan-Helge

    2015-04-09

    Some symptomatic degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine may be treated with spinal fusion if conservative treatment has failed. The minimally invasive technique of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is increasingly used but has been found to generate increased radiation exposure to the patient and staff. Modern three-dimensional (3D) C-arm devices are capable of providing conventional two-dimensional fluoroscopic images (x-rays) as well as 3D image sets for intraoperative navigation. This study was designed to compare the radiation exposure between these two intraoperative imaging techniques in MIS TLIF procedures. This study is a randomized controlled trial. Forty participants scheduled to undergo monosegmental MIS TLIF will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two groups with respect to the applied intraoperative imaging technique: conventional fluoroscopy (FLUORO group) and 3D fluoroscopy-based navigation combined with conventional fluoroscopy (NAV group). Furthermore, patients scheduled to undergo bisegmental MIS TLIF during the recruitment period for monosegmental MIS TLIF will be assessed for eligibility and will be randomly assigned separately. The primary endpoint is the radiation exposure to the surgeon and is measured by dosimeter readings. Secondary endpoints are the radiation exposure to the assistant surgeon, scrub nurse, anesthetist, patient, and C-arm as well as radiation exposure in relation to the body mass index of the patient. Results of this randomized study will help to compare the radiation exposure to the operating staff and patient during MIS TLIF procedures using conventional fluoroscopy versus 3D fluoroscopy-based navigation combined with conventional fluoroscopy. Furthermore, recommendations regarding the appropriate use of the investigated intraoperative imaging techniques will be made to improve radiation protection and to reduce radiation exposure. Registration number of the German Clinical Trials Register

  16. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Comparison Study Based on End Plate Subsidence and Cystic Change in Individuals Older and Younger than 65 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guang-Xun; Quillo-Olvera, Javier; Jo, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Hyeong-Jin; Covarrubias-Rosas, Claudia Angelica; Jin, Chengzhen; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2017-10-01

    To compare the outcomes between patients older and younger than 65 years who underwent single-level minimally invasive transforaminal interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) surgery. This study is a retrospective analysis of 76 patients who underwent MI-TLIF between April 2012 and June 2016. Group A consisted of 35 patients (subsidence, end plate cyst formation, and fusion rate were assessed. The mean age of the study subjects was 65.3 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 18.98 months. Group B had a higher rate of comorbidities compared with group A (90.24% vs. 57.14%, respectively; P subsidence or positive cyst sign between the groups. MI-TLIF presented similar safeness and acceptable outcomes and complication rate in both groups. Cyst formation may be aggravated by cage subsidence, because cage subsidence was a useful potential predictor of cyst formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Unusual back pain caused by intervertebral disc degeneration associated with schmorl node at Th11/12 in a young athlete, successfully treated by anterior interbody fusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Shoji; Miyamoto, Kei; Iwata, Atsushi; Hosoe, Hideo; Iwata, Hisashi; Shirahashi, Koyo; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2009-03-01

    A case report describing thoracic intervertebral disc degeneration and spondylolisthesis associated with a Schmorl node in a young athlete, which was successfully treated by anterior interbody fusion (AIF). To describe a rare pathologic condition with a clinical outcome of a surgical intervention. Intervertebral degeneration and spondylolisthesis of the lower thoracic spine associated with a Schmorl node in a young athlete has not been reported. A 19-year-old male amateur soccer player presented with severe back pain during motion. This pain was associated with intervertebral disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis, and a Schmorl node at the Th11/12 level. He was surgically treated by AIF. The AIF resulted in a solid fusion, an improvement in sagittal alignment, and amelioration of symptoms. The AIF procedure was effective for lower thoracic symptomatic intervertebral disc degeneration and spondylolisthesis associated with a Schmorl node.

  18. What is the rate of lumbar adjacent segment disease after percutaneous versus open fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Kristen E; Kepler, Christopher K; Maaieh, Motasem; Anderson, D Greg; Rihn, Jeffrey; Albert, Todd; Vaccaro, Alex; Hilibrand, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) requiring treatment or re-operation is a common problem after surgery on the lumbar spine. The hypothesis of this retrospective study was that ASD occurs less often following lumbar spine fusion in patients who undergo percutaneous minimally invasive (MIS) instrumentation than in those in whom open instrumentation is used. A case-control study was performed on consecutive patients who had undergone staged single or two level anterior lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative conditions followed by open or MIS instrumentation from 2002 to 2005 in our institution. ASD was defined as that necessitating additional procedures for new symptoms related to an adjacent lumbar dermatome. One hundred and seventeen patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 53 had been followed up by chart or medical record review for longer than one year. There were 23 patients in the MIS group and 30 in the open group. Of the 30 patients in the open group, 9 had developed ASD (30%). Of the 23 patients in the MIS group, 7 had developed ASD (30%). This difference is not statistically significant (P = 1.00). Contrary to our hypothesis, there was no significant difference in incidence of ASD in patients who had underwent open versus percutaneous instrumentation following anterior lumbar interbody fusion. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. A Retrospective Study of 39 Patients Treated With Anterior Approach of Thoracic and Lumbar Spondylodiscitis: Clinical Manifestations, Anterior Surgical Treatment, and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaldz, Can; Özdemir, Nail; Yaman, Onur; Feran, Hamit Günes; Tansug, Tugrul; Minoglu, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to report our 39 patients treated with anterior debridement and autologous iliac bone grafting with or without anterior instrumentation, which is the presumed treatment of choice for thoracic or lumbar spondylodiscitis.Our patients underwent surgical treatment of spondylodiscitis using anterior debridement and autologous iliac bone grafting with or without anterior instrumentation and were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 8 years (range, 2-11 years). Kaneda 2-rod system instrumentation was used in 12 patients, in total. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Frankel grade. Radiographic fusion was characterized based on 3-dimensional computed tomography.Of the whole group, 20 patients suffered from tuberculous spondylodiscitis and 19 suffered from hematogenous spondylodiscitis. Pathogens responsible for pyogenic infection included Staphylococcus aureus (4 patients), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3 patients), and Brucella melitensis (1 patient). Fifteen patients had thoracic involvement, 20 had lumbar involvement, and 4 had thoracolumbar junction involvement. Preoperative neurological deficits were noted in 13 of the 39 patients. In terms of Frankel grade, 8 patients have improved, 4 have remained the same, and 1 patient has worsened during the follow-up period. Imaging-documented fusion was achieved in 23 of 27 patients in the graft group (85% fusion rate) and 11 of 12 patients in the graft + Kaneda instrumentation group (91% fusion rate).There was no instrumentation failure, loosening, or graft-related complication such as slippage or fracture of the graft. This approach demonstrated a good recovery rate of neurological functions and a high fusion rate.

  20. Combined transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with posterolateral instrumented fusion for degenerative disc disease can be a safe and effective treatment for lower back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara J Deukmedjian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar fusion is a proven treatment for chronic lower back pain (LBP in the setting of symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis; however, fusion is controversial when the primary diagnosis is degenerative disc disease (DDD. Our objective was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of lumbar fusion in the treatment of LBP due to DDD. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred and five consecutive patients with single or multi-level DDD underwent lumbar decompression and instrumented fusion for the treatment of chronic LBP between the years of 2008 and 2011. The primary outcome measures in this study were back and leg pain visual analogue scale (VAS, patient reported % resolution of preoperative back pain and leg pain, reoperation rate, perioperative complications, blood loss and hospital length of stay (LOS. Results: The average resolution of preoperative back pain per patient was 84% (n = 205 while the average resolution of preoperative leg pain was 90% (n = 190 while a mean follow-up period of 528 days (1.5 years. Average VAS for combined back and leg pain significantly improved from a preoperative value of 9.0 to a postoperative value of 1.1 (P ≤ 0.0001, a change of 7.9 points for the cohort. The average number of lumbar disc levels fused per patient was 2.3 (range 1-4. Median postoperative LOS in the hospital was 1.2 days. Average blood loss was 108 ml perfused level. Complications occurred in 5% of patients (n = 11 and the rate of reoperation for symptomatic adjacent segment disease was 2% (n = 4. Complications included reoperation at index level for symptomatic pseudoarthrosis with hardware failure (n = 3; surgical site infection (n = 7; repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 1, and one patient death at home 3 days after discharge. Conclusion: Lumbar fusion for symptomatic DDD can be a safe and effective treatment for medically refractory LBP with or without leg pain.

  1. THE COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT THE NERVE ROOT COMPRESS SYNDROME USING THE ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR APPROACHES OF PATIENTS WITH COMBINED LATERAL LUMBAR STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. B. Kolotov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the therapeutic possibility of the decompressiveviedecompressive with stabilization surgeries using the standard posterior and anterior retroperitoneal approaches in patients with combination of inherent and obtaining lateral stenosis and to demonstrate the adequacy of using. At the main group we removed the herniated disc with stabilization using anterior and posterior approaches – 82 patients. The control group was treated by standard microdiscectomy – 40 patients. More excellent and good results were in the main group where decompression was combined with stabilization, and at the same group were less negative results. The decompressive-stabilizing surgery with anterior interbody fusion is a pathogenetic and technically adequate treatment for combined lateral stenosis.

  2. Congenital hypoplasia of the lumbar pedicle with spondylolisthesis: report of 2 cases.

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    Hsieh, Chang-Sheng; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Hyung Chang; Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Park, Sang-Joon; Chen, Jian-Han

    2017-04-01

    Congenital hypoplasia of the spinal pedicle is a rare condition. Previously reported cases were treated conservatively or with posterior instrumented fusion. However, the absence or hypoplasia of the lumbar pedicle may increase the difficulty of pedicle screw fixation and fusion. Herein, the authors describe 2 cases of rare adult congenital hypoplasia of the right lumbar pedicles associated with spondylolisthesis. The patients underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion with a stand-alone cage as well as percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. This method was used to avoid the difficulties associated with pedicle screw fixation and to attain solid fusion. Both patients achieved satisfactory outcomes after a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. This method may be an alternative for patients with congenital hypoplasia of the lumbar spinal pedicle.

  3. Comparison of outcomes and safety of using hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft in cervical cages for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion

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    Hosein Mashhadinezhad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   After cervical discectomy, autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies, but donor site–related complications can still occur. In this study we evaluate the use   of hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft for interbody fusion.     Methods:   From November 2008 to November 2011, 236 patients participated in this study. Peek cages were packed with autologous bone grafts taken from the iliac crest in 112 patients and hydroxyapatite (HA granules in 124 patients.   Patients were followed for 12 months. The patients’ neurological signs, results, and complications were fully recorded   throughout the procedure. Radiological imaging was done to assess the fusion rate and settling ratio.     Results:   Formation of bony bridges at the third month was higher in the autograft group versus the granule group. However, there was no difference between both groups at the 12-month follow-up assessment. No difference (     P > 0.05   was found regarding improvement in neurological deficit as well as radicular pain and recovery rate between the two groups. Conclusions:   Interbody fusion cage containing HA granules proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical and neurological outcome, radiographic measurement and fusion rate   in cage containing HA are similar and competitive with autograft packed cages.

  4. Comparison of outcomes and safety of using hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft in cervical cages for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion

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    Hosein Mashhadinezhad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   After cervical discectomy, autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies, but donor site–related complications can still occur. In this study we evaluate the use   of hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft for interbody fusion.     Methods:   From November 2008 to November 2011, 236 patients participated in this study. Peek cages were packed with autologous bone grafts taken from the iliac crest in 112 patients and hydroxyapatite (HA granules in 124 patients.   Patients were followed for 12 months. The patients’ neurological signs, results, and complications were fully recorded   throughout the procedure. Radiological imaging was done to assess the fusion rate and settling ratio.     Results:   Formation of bony bridges at the third month was higher in the autograft group versus the granule group. However, there was no difference between both groups at the 12-month follow-up assessment. No difference (     P > 0.05   was found regarding improvement in neurological deficit as well as radicular pain and recovery rate between the two groups. Conclusions:   Interbody fusion cage containing HA granules proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical and neurological outcome, radiographic measurement and fusion rate   in cage containing HA are similar and competitive with autograft packed cages.    

  5. The significance of removing ruptured intervertebral discs for interbody fusion in treating thoracic or lumbar type B and C spinal injuries through a one-stage posterior approach.

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    Qian-Shi Zhang

    Full Text Available To identify the negative effect on treatment results of reserving damaged intervertebral discs when treating type B and type C spinal fracture-dislocations through a one-stage posterior approach.This is a retrospective review of 53 consecutive patients who were treated in our spine surgery center from January 2005 to May 2012 due to severe thoracolumbar spinal fracture-dislocation. The patients in Group A (24 patients underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression. In Group B (29 patients, the patients underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression evacuating of the ruptured disc and inserting of a bone graft into the evacuated disc space for interbody fusion. The mean time between injury and operation was 4.1 days (range 2-15 days. The clinical, radiologic and complication outcomes were analyzed retrospectively.Periodic follow-ups were carried out until an affirmative union or treatment failure took place. A progressive kyphosis angle larger than 10°, loss of disc height, pseudoarthrosis, recurrence of dislocation or subluxation, or instrument failure before fusion were considered treatment failures. Treatment failures were detected in 13 cases in Group A (failure rate was 54.2%. In Group B, there were 28 cases in which definitive bone fusion was demonstrated on CT scans, and CT scans of the other cases demonstrated undefined pseudoarthrosis without hardware failure. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups (p0.05 Fisher's exact test.Intervertebral disc damage is a common characteristic in type B and C spinal fracture-dislocation injuries. The damaged intervertebral disc should be removed and substituted with a bone graft because reserving the damaged disc in situ increases the risk of treatment failure.

  6. Comparison of fusion rate and clinical results between CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3bioactive glass ceramics spacer with titanium cages in posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

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    Lee, Jae Hyup; Kong, Chang-Bae; Yang, Jae Jun; Shim, Hee-Jong; Koo, Ki-Hyoung; Kim, Jeehyoung; Lee, Choon-Ki; Chang, Bong-Soon

    2016-11-01

    The CaO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 glass ceramics spacer generates chemical bonding to adjacent bones with high mechanical stability to produce a union with the end plate, and ultimately stability. The authors aimed to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of CaO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 glass ceramics with a titanium cage that is widely used for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery in the clinical field. This is a prospective, stratified randomized, multicenter, single-blinded, comparator-controlled non-inferiority trial. The present study was conducted in four hospitals and enrolled a total of 86 patients between 30 and 80 years of age who required one-level PLIF due to severe spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or huge disc herniation. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), and pain visual analog scale (VAS) were assessed before surgery and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The spinal fusion rate was assessed at 6 and 12 months after surgery. The spinal fusion rate and the area of fusion, subsidence of each CaO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 glass ceramics and titanium cage, and the extent of osteolysis were evaluated using a dynamic plain radiography and a three-dimensional computed tomography at 12 months after surgery. The present study was supported by BioAlpha, and some authors (JHL, C-KL, and B-SC) have stock ownership (CaO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 glass ceramics spacer showed a similar fusion rates and clinical outcomes compared with titanium cage. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Posterior instrumentation, anterior column reconstruction with single posterior approach for treatment of pyogenic osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine.

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    Gorensek, M; Kosak, R; Travnik, L; Vengust, R

    2013-03-01

    Surgical treatment of thoracolumbar osteomyelitis consists of radical debridement, reconstruction of anterior column either with or without posterior stabilization. The objective of present study is to evaluate a case series of patients with osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine treated by single, posterior approach with posterior instrumentation and anterior column reconstruction. Seventeen patients underwent clinical and radiological evaluation pre and postoperatively with latest follow-up at 19 months (8-56 months) after surgery. Parameters assessed were site of infection, causative organism, angle of deformity, blood loss, duration of surgery, ICU stay, deformity correction, time to solid bony fusion, ambulatory status, neurologic status (ASIA impairment scale), and functional outcome (Kirkaldy-Willis criteria). Mean operating time was 207 min and average blood loss 1,150 ml. Patients spent 2 (1-4) days in ICU and were able to walk unaided 1.6 (1-2) days after surgery. Infection receded in all 17 patients postoperatively. Solid bony fusion occurred in 15 out of 17 patients (88 %) on average 6.3 months after surgery. Functional outcome was assessed as excellent or good in 82 % of cases. Average deformity correction was 8 (1-18) degrees, with loss of correction of 4 (0-19) degrees at final follow-up. Single, posterior approach addressing both columns poses safe alternative in treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine. It proved to be less invasive resulting in faster postoperative recovery.

  8. Avaliação clínica radiológica da artrodese lombar transforaminal aberta versus minimamente invasiva Evaluación clínica radiológica de la artrodesis lumbar transforaminal abierta versus mínimamente invasiva Clinical and radiological evaluation of open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion versus minimally invasive

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    Cristiano Magalhães Menezes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: a proposta deste trabalho é comparar os resultados clínicos e radiológicos dos pacientes submetidos à artrodese transforaminal aberta e minimamente invasiva. MÉTODOS: quarenta e cinco pacientes foram submetidos à artrodese lombar transforaminal pelo Grupo de Cirurgia Espinhal do Hospital Lifecenter/Ortopédico de Belo Horizonte, no período de Dezembro de 2005 a Maio de 2007, sendo 15 no grupo de artrodese aberta e 30 pacientes do grupo de artrodese minimamente invasiva (MIS. As indicações para a artrodese intersomática foram: doença degenerativa do disco, associada ou não a hérnia de disco ou estenose do canal; espondilolistese de baixo grau espondilolítica ou degenerativa; e síndrome pós-laminectomia/discectomia. As variáveis analisadas foram: tempo de cirurgia, tempo de internação hospitalar, necessidade de hemotransfusão, escala analógica visual de dor (VAS lombar e dos membros inferiores, Oswestry, índice de consolidação da artrodese e retorno ao trabalho. RESULTADOS: o seguimento mínimo foi de 24 meses. Havia oito homens e sete mulheres no Grupo Aberto e 17 homens e 13 mulheres no Grupo MIS. O tempo cirúrgico médio foi de 222 minutos e 221 minutos, respectivamente. Houve melhora significativa da VAS e Oswestry no pós-operatório em ambos os grupos. O tempo de internação hospitalar variou de 3,3 dias para o Grupo Aberto e 1,8 dias para o Grupo MIS. O índice de fusão obtido foi de 93,3% em ambos os grupos. Houve necessidade de hemotransfusão em três pacientes no Grupo Aberto (20% e nenhum caso MIS. CONCLUSÕES: a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF minimamente invasiva apresenta resultados similares em longo prazo quando comparado à TLIF aberta, com os benefícios adicionais de menor morbidade pós-operatória, menor período de internação e reabilitação precoce.OBJETIVO: la propuesta de este trabajo es comparar los resultados clínicos y radiológicos de los pacientes sometidos a la

  9. Prognosis of spontaneous thoracic curve correction after the selective anterior fusion of thoracolumbar/lumbar (Lenke 5C) curves in idiopathic scoliosis.

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    Senkoylu, Alpaslan; Luk, Keith D K; Wong, Yat W; Cheung, Kenneth M C

    2014-07-01

    Prognosis of minor lumbar curve correction after selective thoracic fusion in idiopathic scoliosis is well defined. However, the prognosis of minor thoracic curve after isolated anterior fusion of the major lumbar curve has not been well described. To define the prognosis of spontaneous thoracic curve correction after selective anterior fusion of the lumbar/thoracolumbar curve in idiopathic scoliosis. A retrospective cohort study on the prognosis of the minor curve after selective anterior correction and fusion of the lumbar/thoracolumbar curve in idiopathic scoliosis. Idiopathic lumbar scoliosis patients treated with anterior spinal fusion. The Scoliosis Research Society 22 questionnaire was used as an outcome measure at the final follow-up. Twenty-eight patients were included in this study. Four patients were male, 24 patients were female, and average age at the time of surgery was 16 years. Mean follow-up was 48 months. According to the Lenke Classification, 22 patients were 5CN, 5 were 5C-, and 1 was 5C+. All operations were performed in the same institution. Standing long posterior-anterior and lateral radiographs were taken just before surgery, 1 week after surgery, and at final follow-up. The mean preoperative Cobb angle of the lumbar (major) curve was 53° (standard deviation [SD]=8.6) and that of the thoracic (minor) curve was 38.4° (SD=6.24). The lumbar and thoracic curves were corrected to 10° (SD=7.6) and 25° (SD=8.3) postoperatively and measured 17° (SD=10.6) and 27° (SD=7.7), respectively, at the last follow-up. There was a significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative measurements of the minor curves (p.05). Regarding the overall sagittal balance, there was no significant difference between preoperative, early, and late postoperative measurements (p>.05). Selective anterior fusion of the major thoracolumbar/lumbar curve was an effective method for the treatment of Lenke Type 5C curves. Minor thoracic curves did not progress

  10. Anatomical variations of the iliolumbar vein with application to the anterior retroperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine: a cadaver study.

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    Unruh, Kenneth P; Camp, Christopher L; Zietlow, Scott P; Huddleston, Paul M

    2008-10-01

    Objectives of this study include identification of lumbosacral venous variations, designation of a critical area of dissection for surgical exposure, and comparison between both male/female and right/left-sided anatomy. Attempts were made to provide anatomic nomenclature that accurately describes these structures. Thirty-eight iliolumbar venous systems in 20 cadavers (11 females/9 males) were dissected. Each system was identified as one of three patterns of variation: common venous trunk (combining ascending lumbar and iliolumbar venous systems) with distal veins, common venous trunk without distal veins, and venous systems without a common venous trunk. Dimensions including distances to the inferior vena cava (IVC) confluence, the obturator nerve, and the lumbosacral trunk, and venous stem length were obtained to aid surgical dissection. Differences between males and females and those between right and left sides were compared. Anterior lumbosacral venous variations could be organized into three groups. A Type 1 venous system (common venous trunk with distal veins) was most common (53% of systems). The anatomical name "lateral lumbosacral veins" adequately describes the anatomical location of these veins and does not assume a direction of venous flow or the lack of individual distal veins. A critical area bordered by the obturator nerve anteriorly, the psoas muscle laterally, the spinal column medially, and sacrum posteriorly within 8.2 cm of the IVC confluence should be defined to adequately dissect the lateral lumbosacral veins. Differences in male and female lateral lumbosacral venous anatomy do not alter surgeon's approach to the anterior lumbar spine. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Titanium vs. polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody fusion: Meta-analysis and review of the literature.

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    Seaman, Scott; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Mohamad; Torner, James C; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2017-10-01

    Spinal interbody fusion is a standard and accepted method for spinal fusion. Interbody fusion devices include titanium (Ti) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with distinct biomechanical properties. Titanium and PEEK cages have been evaluated in the cervical and lumbar spine, with conflicting results in bony fusion and subsidence. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we reviewed the available literature evaluating Ti and PEEK cages to assess subsidence and fusion rates. Six studies were included in the analysis, 3 of which were class IV evidence, 2 were class III, and 1 was class II. A total of 410 patients (Ti-228, PEEK-182) and 587 levels (Ti-327, PEEK-260) were studied. Pooled mean age was 50.8years in the Ti group, and 53.1years in the PEEK group. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 4 studies (395 levels) and transforaminal interbody fusion in 2 studies (192 levels). No statistically significant difference was found between groups with fusion (OR 1.16, 95% C.I 0.59-2.89, p=0.686, I 2 =49.7%) but there was a statistically significant the rate of subsidence with titanium (OR 3.59, 95% C.I 1.28-10.07, p=0.015, I 2 =56.9%) at last follow-up. Titanium and PEEK cages are associated with a similar rate of fusion, but there is an increased rate of subsidence with titanium cage. Future prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate these cages using surgical and patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Complication with Removal of a Lumbar Spinal Locking Plate

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    Brooke Crawford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The use of locking plate technology for anterior lumbar spinal fusion has increased stability of the vertebral fusion mass over traditional nonconstrained screw and plate systems. This case report outlines a complication due to the use of this construct. Case. A patient with a history of L2 corpectomy and anterior spinal fusion presented with discitis at the L4/5 level and underwent an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF supplemented with a locking plate placed anterolaterally for stability. Fifteen months after the ALIF procedure, he returned with a hardware infection. He underwent debridement of the infection site and removal of hardware. Results. Once hardware was exposed, removal of the locking plate screws was only successful in one out of four screws using a reverse thread screw removal device. Three of the reverse thread screw removal devices broke in attempt to remove the subsequent screws. A metal cutting drill was then used to break hoop stresses associated with the locking device and the plate was removed. Conclusion. Anterior locking plates add significant stability to an anterior spinal fusion mass. However, removal of this hardware can be complicated by the inherent properties of the design with significant risk of major vascular injury.

  13. Outcomes of interbody fusion cages used in 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: titanium cages versus polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

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    Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2010-07-01

    A prospective study was performed in case with cervical spondylosis who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with titanium or polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. To find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical and radiographic results. Although use of autogenous iliac-bone grafts in ACDF for cervical disc diseases remain standard surgical procedure, donor site morbidity and graft collapse or breakage are concerns. Cage technology was developed to prevent these complications. However, there is no comparison regarding the efficacy between titanium and PEEK cage. January 2005 to January 2006, 53 patients who had 1 and 2-levels ACDF with titanium or PEEK cages were evaluated. We measured the rate and amount of interspace collapse, segmental sagittal angulations, and the radiographic fusion success rate. Odom criteria were used to assess the clinical results. The fusion rate was higher in the PEEK group (100% vs. 86.5%, P=0.0335). There was no significant difference between both groups in loss of cervical lordosis (3.2 + or - 2.4 vs. 2.8 + or - 3.4, P=0.166). The mean anterior interspace collapse (1.6 + or - 1.0 mm) in the titanium group was significantly higher than the collapse of the PEEK group (0.5 + or - 0.6 mm) (PPEEK group (PPEEK group achieved an 80% rate of successful clinical outcomes, compared with 75% in the titanium group (P=0.6642). The PEEK cage is superior to the titanium cage in maintaining cervical interspace height and radiographic fusion after 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical decompression procedures.

  14. Lumbar manipulation and exercise in the management of anterior knee pain and diminished quadriceps activation following acl reconstruction: a case report.

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    Jayaseelan, Dhinu J; Courtney, Carol A; Kecman, Michael; Alcorn, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps weakness is a common finding following knee injuries or surgery, and can be associated with significant functional limitations. This weakness or muscle inhibition may be due to central inhibitory mechanisms, rather than local peripheral dysfunction. Lumbopelvic manipulation has been shown to effect efferent muscle output by altering nociceptive processing. The purpose of this report is to describe the physical therapy management of anterior knee pain and chronic quadriceps weakness utilizing side-lying rotational lumbar thrust manipulation and therapeutic exercise for an individual eight months status-post ACL reconstruction. A 20 year-old male presented to physical therapy eight months following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction of the left knee with primary complaints of residual anterior knee pain and quadriceps weakness. The subject was treated with a multimodal approach using side-lying rotational lumbar thrust manipulation in addition to therapeutic exercise. The subject was seen in physical therapy for eight sessions over eight weeks. Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) scores improved from 58/80 to 72/80, quadriceps force, measured by hand-held dynamometry (HHD), was improved from 70.6 lbs to 93.5 lbs and the subject was able to return to pain free participation in recreational sports. Therapeutic exercises can facilitate improved quadriceps strength, however, in cases where quadriceps weakness persists and there is concurrent pain, other interventions should be considered. In this case, lower quarter stabilization exercise and lumbar thrust manipulation was associated with improved functional outcomes in a subject with anterior knee pain and quadriceps weakness. Side-lying rotational lumbar thrust manipulation may be a beneficial adjunctive intervention to exercise in subjects with quadriceps weakness. 5, Single case report.

  15. Fusão intersomática lombar transforaminal: experiência de uma instituição Fusión intersomática lumbar transforaminal: la experiencia de una institución Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: a single-center experience

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    Vinicius de Meldau Benites

    2012-12-01

    del dolor y/o claudicación neurogénicas en comparación con el status preoperatorio. Solamente cinco pacientes continuaron usando alguna medicación analgésica. Cinco pacientes presentaran alguna complicación, pero sólo dos de ellas están relacionadas directamente al procedimiento. CONCLUSIONES: Es una técnica segura, posible de ser realizada en todos los niveles de la columna lumbar y es aplicable a la mayoría de las enfermedades que afectan a esta región de la columna.OBJECTIVE: Describe the early results and experience from a reference center in spine surgery in São Paulo, Brazil with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF technique in its various indications. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 25 patients who underwent surgery with TLIF technique in 2011. One patient was excluded because we considered that TLIF was not the most important technique used. The indications were 9 lumbar disc herniations, 7 spondylolistheses, 4 revision surgeries of which 2 were for pseudoarthroses and 2 for low back pain, and finally, 4 lumbar spinal stenoses. RESULTS: All the patients reported low back pain and/or neurologic claudication improvement when comparing to preoperative status. Only five patients continued using analgesics. Five patients presented some complication, but only two of them were related to the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: TLIF is a safe technique which can be performed at any lumbar level of the lumbar spine and is applicable to the majority of diseases that affect this region.

  16. Surgical anatomy of the minimally invasive lateral lumbar approach.

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    Bina, Robert W; Zoccali, Carmine; Skoch, Jesse; Baaj, Ali A

    2015-03-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion approach (LLIF), which encompasses the extreme lateral interbody fusion or direct lateral interbody fusion techniques, has gained popularity as an alternative to traditional posterior approaches. With rapidly expanding applications, this minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approach is now utilized in basic degenerative pathologies as well as complex lumbar degenerative deformities and tumors. Given the intimate relationship of the psoas muscle, and hence the lumbar plexus, to this MIS approach, several authors have examined the surgical anatomy of this approach. Understanding this regional neural anatomy is imperative given the potential for serious injuries to both the motor and sensory nerves of the lumbar plexus. In this review, we critically and comprehensively discuss all published studies detailing the surgical anatomy of the lateral lumbar approach with respect to the MIS LLIF techniques. This is a timely review given the rapidly growing number of surgeons utilizing this technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Lumbar Core Stability Exercise Programme on Knee Pain, Range of Motion, and Function Post Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

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    Priyanka Panchal

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Institutional conventional exercise protocol is effective in reducing pain and improving the ROM post and lumbar core stability exercise programme is effective in improving function, post ACL reconstruction.

  18. Artrodese cervical anterior em três e quatro níveis com dispositivo intersomático não associado à placa cervical Artrodesis cervical anterior en tres y cuatro niveles con dispositivo intersomático no asociado a placa cervical Anterior cervical arthrodesis for three and four levels using stand-alone interbody cages without cervical plates

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    Marcel Luiz Benato

    2009-06-01

    en tercer y cuarto niveles; dolor axial y/o irradiada; con mínimo seis meses de postoperatorio. El criterio de exclusión fue la presencia de inestabilidad cervical traumática. Fueron evaluadas las tasas de consolidación, la presencia de síntomas, la tasa de complicaciones y la posición de los dispositivos intersomáticos (subsidente después de seis meses. RESULTADOS: todos los pacientes obtuvieron consolidación en tres meses, sin embargo, dos pacientes presentaron el fenómeno de subsidente, o sea, migración con consolidación en cifosis, sin alterar los resultados clínicos y la consolidación de la artrodesis a los seis meses de postoperatorio. Los pacientes presentaron mejoría del dolor preoperatorio y solo tres (15% presentaron dolor residual. No hubo complicaciones mayores. El tiempo de hospitalización fue de dos días. No fue utilizada inmovilización rígida en el postoperatorio. CONCLUSIÓN: fue obtenida consolidación con esta técnica en todos los casos. La técnica se mostró segura y promovió buenos resultados radiológicos y clínicos.evaluate the rates of fusion of the anterior cervical discectomy and arthrodesis for three and four levels using interbody cages (stand-alone without cervical plates six months after post-operative. METHODS: from November 2005 to July 2008, 20 patients were treated as proposed. The inclusion criteria were: cervical degenerative disease of three and four levels; axial and/or irradiated pain at least six months of follow-up. The exclusion criteria were: cervical traumatic instability. The fusion rate, clinical symptoms, rate of complications and the implant position were evaluated six months after post-operative. RESULTS: results were favorable in 100% of the patients, with residual pain in two cases. Fusion was found in 100% of the patients, except for two cases with minimum subsidence and fusion in a slight kyphotic position. There were not significant complications. The discharge of the hospital was performed

  19. Minimal invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion versus open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

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    Arvind G Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The results in MI TLIF are comparable with O-TLIF in terms of outcomes. The advantages of MI-TLIF are lesser blood loss, shorter hospital stay, lesser tissue trauma, and early mobilization. The challenges of MI-TLIF lie in the steep learning curve and significant radiation exposure. The ultimate success of TLIF lies in the execution of the procedure, and in this respect the ability to achieve similar results using a minimally invasive technique makes MI-TLIF an attractive alternative.

  20. The Use of Percutaneous Lumbar Fixation Screws for Bilateral Pedicle Fractures with an Associated Dislocation of a Lumbar Disc Prosthesis

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    William D. Harrison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Case report. Objective. To identify a safe technique for salvage surgery following complications of total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR is considered by some as the gold standard for discogenic back pain. Revision techniques for TDR and their complications are in their infancy. This case describes a successful method of fixation for this complex presentation. Methods and Results. A 48-year-old male with lumbar degenerative disc disease and no comorbidities. Approximately two weeks postoperatively for a TDR, the patient represented with acute severe back pain and the TDR polyethylene inlay was identified as dislocated anteriorly. Subsequent revision surgery failed immediately as the polyethylene inlay redislocated intraoperatively. Further radiology identified bilateral pedicle fractures, previously unseen on the plain films. The salvage fusion of L5/S1 reutilized the anterior approach with an interbody fusion cage and bone graft. The patient was then turned intraoperatively and redraped. The percutaneous pedicle screws were used to fix L5 to the sacral body via the paracoccygeal corridor. Conclusion. The robust locking screw in the percutaneous screw allowed a complete fixation of the pedicle fractures. At 3-year followup, the patient has an excellent result and has returned to playing golf.

  1. Salvage Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation Using Polymethyl Methacrylate in Patients with Failed Interbody Fusion.

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    Yun, Dong-Ju; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Kim, Jin-Sung; Jeon, Sang-Hyeop; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Percutaneous vertebral augmentation with cement is used as a salvage procedure for failed instrumentation. Few studies have reported the use of this procedure for failed anterior lumbar fusion in elderly patients with osteoporosis and other complicated diseases who have undergone a previous major operation. Between January 2007 and December 2015, the clinical and radiographic results of 8 patients with osteoporosis who showed subsidence and migration of the implant after an initial operation were examined. After the development of implant failure, the patients underwent vertebral augmentation with polymethyl methacrylate. Mean patient age was 73.4 years (range, 67-78 years), and mean bone mineral density was -2.96 (range, -2.1 to -3.8). The mean radiologic follow-up period between augmentation and the last follow-up examination was 16 months (range, 3-38 months). Although the subjective clinical outcome was not satisfying to the patients, no loss of correction, fractures, or screw loosening occurred during the follow-up period. The injection of cement around the instrument might help to stabilize it by providing strength to the axis and preventing further loosening. This salvage procedure could be an alternative in the management of cases with failed interbody fusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Strontium Ranelate on Spinal Interbody Fusion Surgery in an Osteoporotic Rat Model.

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    Tsung-Ting Tsai

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a bone disease that afflicts millions of people around the world, and a variety of spinal integrity issues, such as degenerative spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis, are frequently concomitant with osteoporosis and are sometimes treated with spinal interbody fusion surgery. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of strontium ranelate (SrR treatment of osteoporosis in improving bone strength, promoting bone remodeling, and reducing the risk of fractures, but its effects on interbody fusion surgery have not been adequately investigated. SrR-treated rats subjected to interbody fusion surgery exhibited significantly higher lumbar vertebral bone mineral density after 12 weeks of treatment than rats subjected to the same surgery but not treated with SrR. Furthermore, histological and radiographic assessments showed that a greater amount of newly formed bone tissue was present and that better fusion union occurred in the SrR-treated rats than in the untreated rats. Taken together, these results show significant differences in bone mineral density, PINP level, histological score, SrR content and mechanical testing, which demonstrate a relatively moderate effect of SrR treatment on bone strength and remodeling in the specific context of recovery after an interbody fusion surgery, and suggest the potential of SrR treatment as an effective adjunct to spinal interbody fusion surgery for human patients.

  3. Minimally invasive lateral trans-psoas approach for tuberculosis of lumbar spine

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    Nitin Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior, posterolateral and posterior approaches are used for managing lumbar tuberculosis. Minimally invasive methods are being used increasingly for various disorders of the spine. This report presents the utility of lateral trans-psoas approach to the lumbar spine (LS using minimal access techniques, also known as direct lateral lumbar interbody fusion in 2 cases with tuberculosis of LS. Two patients with tuberculosis at L2-3 and L4-5 presented with back pain. Both had destruction and deformity of the vertebral body. The whole procedure comprising debridement and placement of iliac crest graft was performed using tubular retractors and was augmented by posterior fixation using percutaneous transpedicular screws. Both patients recovered well with no significant procedure related morbidity. Post-operative computed tomography scans showed appropriate position of the graft and instrumentation. At follow-up, both patients are ambulant with no progression of the deformity. Minimal access direct lateral transpsoas approach can be used for debridement and reconstruction of ventral column in tuberculous of Lumbar spine. This paper highlights the growing applications of minimal access surgery for spine.

  4. Outcome in the treatment of discopathy by interbody fusion with the posterior approach using metal cages.

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    Milecki, Marcin; Lukawski, Stanisław; Rapała, Kazimierz; Białecki, Jerzy

    2004-06-30

    Background. Discopathy most often occurs in persons from 20 to 50 years old, in the period of greatest physical and intellectual capacity, and thus poses a major social problem. The goal of our research was to evaluation the outcome of interbody fusion performed with metal cages. Material and methods. We operated 52 patients ranging in age from 29 to 60, who presented with prolapse of the nucleus pulposus (21 patients), instability (8 patients), lumbar stenosis (11 patients), and recurrent discopathy with spondylolisthesis (12 patients). Interbody fusion was performed on these patients from the posterior approach using metal implants. Results. Applying both subjective and radiological criteria, we obtained good outcome in 36 cases, satisfactory in 12 cases, and unsatisfactory in 4 cases. A follow-up at 4 years after surgery showed that the solution was effective in preventing lumbar stenosis and intervertebral instability. However, there were still difficulties in the assessment of bone union. Conclusions. Maintaining or expanding the height of the interbody space by using implants is indicated by radiography in our material to be the most important surgical intervention justifying the use of this method. Interbody fusion in discopathy using metal implants is a logical solution to prevent secondary stenosis of the vertebral canal and intervertebral instability. The outcomes obtained at 4-year follow-up should be regarded as satisfactory.

  5. Monosegmental combined anterior posterior instrumentation for the treatment of a severe lumbar tuberculous spondylodiscitis: case report and literature review

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    Petracchi Matias

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Spinal tuberculosis (Pott disease can produce severe deformities when it is not properly treated. Long instrumentations through single or combined double approaches are usually required to prevent and correct the deformity. The authors present a case of severe deformity secondary to tuberculous spondylodiscitis in the lumbar spine treated with a monosegmental instrumentation through a double approach in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis. Deformity correction and infection resolution through debridement and arthrodesis is observed after one year of follow-up.

  6. Simultaneous Lateral Interbody Fusion and Posterior Percutaneous Instrumentation: Early Experience and Technical Considerations

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    Doniel Drazin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar fusion surgery involving lateral lumbar interbody graft insertion with posterior instrumentation is traditionally performed in two stages requiring repositioning. We describe a novel technique to complete the circumferential procedure simultaneously without patient repositioning. Twenty patients diagnosed with worsening back pain with/without radiculopathy who failed exhaustive conservative management were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients with both procedures simultaneously from a single lateral approach and 10 control patients with lateral lumbar interbody fusion followed by repositioning and posterior percutaneous instrumentation were analyzed. Pars fractures, mobile grade 2 spondylolisthesis, and severe one-level degenerative disk disease were matched between the two groups. In the simultaneous group, avoiding repositioning leads to lower mean operative times: 130 minutes (versus control 190 minutes; p=0.009 and lower intraoperative blood loss: 108 mL (versus 93 mL; NS. Nonrepositioned patients were hospitalized for an average of 4.1 days (versus 3.8 days; NS. There was one complication in the control group requiring screw revision. Lateral interbody fusion and percutaneous posterior instrumentation are both readily accomplished in a single lateral decubitus position. In select patients with adequately sized pedicles, performing simultaneous procedures decreases operative time over sequential repositioning. Patient outcomes were excellent in the simultaneous group and comparable to procedures done sequentially.

  7. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Rods in Lumbar Spine Degenerative Disease: A Case Series.

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    Ormond, D Ryan; Albert, Ladislau; Das, Kaushik

    2016-08-01

    Retrospective case series. The purpose of our study was to retrospectively review the results of posterior lumbar fusion using polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods. Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the lumbar spine for degenerative disease. Rigid fixation with titanium rods leads to high fusion rates, but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Thus, some have advocated using semirigid rods made of PEEK. Although the biomechanical properties of PEEK rods have shown improved stress-shielding characteristics and anterior load-sharing properties, there are very few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine. We evaluated a retrospective cohort of 42 patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion from 2007 to 2009 for the treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease using PEEK rods. Reoperation rate was the primary outcome evaluated. Fusion rate was also evaluated. Eight of the 42 patients with PEEK rods required reoperation. Reasons for reoperation mainly included ASD (5/8) and nonunion with cage migration (3/8). Radiographically, documented fusion rate was 86%. Mean follow-up was 31.4 months. No statistical differences were found in fusion rates or reoperation between age above 55 years and younger than 55 years (P=1.00), male and female (P=0.110), single or multilevel fusion (P=0.67), and fusion with and without an interbody graft (P=0.69). Smokers showed a trend towards increased risk of reoperation for ASD or instrumentation failure (P=0.056). PEEK rods demonstrate a similar fusion and reoperation rate in comparison to other instrumentation modalities in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disease.

  8. Surgical results of a one-stage combined anterior lumbosacral fusion and posterior percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

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    Chien-Yuan Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lumbosacral fusion through either an anterior or a posterior approach to achieve good lordosis and stability is always a challenging surgical operation and is often accompanied by a higher rate of pseudarthrosis than when other lumbar segments are involved. This study evaluated the clinical and radiological results of lumbosacral fusions achieved through a combined anterior and posterior approach. Materials and Methods: From June 2008 to 2012, 20 patients who had L5–S1 instability and stenosis were consecutively treated, first by anterior interbody fusion using an allogenous strut bone graft through the pararectus approach and then by posterior pedicle screw fixation. A minimum of 1-year of clinical and radiological follow-up was conducted. Intraoperative blood loss, surgical time, and any surgery-related complications were recorded. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS and the patient's Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score. After 1 year, radiological outcomes were assessed by analyzing pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and segmental lordosis using static plain films, while fusion stability was assessed using dynamic plain films. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss were 215 min and 325 cc, respectively. After 1 year, the VAS and ODI scores had significantly improved, and stable fusion with good lordotic curvature was obtained in all cases. Conclusion: The surgical results of the combined procedure are satisfactory in terms of the functional and radiological outcomes. Our method offers advantages regarding both anterior fusion and posterior fixation.

  9. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

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    Ninomiya, Koshi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  10. Anterior corpectomy via the mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach combined with short-segment posterior fixation for single-level traumatic lumbar burst fractures: analysis of health-related quality of life outcomes and patient satisfaction.

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    Theologis, Alexander A; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Toogood, Paul; Kennedy, Abbey; Birk, Harjus; McClellan, R Trigg; Pekmezci, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The authors present clinical outcome data and satisfaction of patients who underwent minimally invasive vertebral body corpectomy and cage placement via a mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach and posterior short-segment instrumentation for lumbar burst fractures. Patients with unstable lumbar burst fractures who underwent corpectomy and anterior column reconstruction via a mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach with short-segment posterior fixation were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic information, operative parameters, perioperative radiographic measurements, and complications were analyzed. Patient-reported outcome instruments (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], 12-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-12]) and an anterior scar-specific patient satisfaction questionnaire were recorded at the latest follow-up. Twelve patients (7 men, 5 women, average age 42 years, range 22-68 years) met the inclusion criteria. Lumbar corpectomies with anterior column support were performed (L-1, n = 8; L-2, n = 2; L-3, n = 2) and supplemented with short-segment posterior instrumentation (4 open, 8 percutaneous). Four patients had preoperative neurological deficits, all of which improved after surgery. No new neurological complications were noted. The anterior incision on average was 6.4 cm (range 5-8 cm) in length, caused mild pain and disability, and was aesthetically acceptable to the large majority of patients. Three patients required chest tube placement for pleural violation, and 1 patient required reoperation for cage subsidence/hardware failure. Average clinical follow-up was 38 months (range 16-68 months), and average radiographic follow-up was 37 months (range 6-68 months). Preoperative lumbar lordosis and focal lordosis were significantly improved/maintained after surgery. Patients were satisfied with their outcomes, had minimal/moderate disability (average ODI score 20, range 0-52), and had good physical (SF-12 physical component score 41.7% ± 10

  11. [Costotransversectomy and interbody fusion for treatment of thoracic dyscopathy].

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    Sagan, Leszek M; Madany, Lukasz; Lickendorf, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Surgical treatment of a thoracic discopathy comprises 4% of all surgeries performed for discopathy. Therefore, analysis of efficacy of particular operative methods used in that scope is limited. We present our analyze modification of costotransversectomy with policarbone cage interbody fusion as the contribution to discussion on optimal operative treatment of thoracic discopathy. Results of the operative treatment of 14 cases of a thoracic discopathy are analyzed. In 12 cases neurological examination revealed radiculopathy and in 2 cases upper motor neuron involvement. All patients underwent MRI for estimation of level and morphology of discopathy. In one case there was two-level dyscopathy and in the other cases there was one-level discopathy localized in the region between fifth and twelve thoracic vertebrae. The follow up period was of 10 months to 6 years (mean 2 years and four months). During the surgery lateral upper aspect of the intervertebral disc on a one side was exposed. It was accomplished by removal of the head of the rib and the upper aspect of the pedicle located caudally to the intervertebral disc. The policarbone cage was introduced into the intervertebral space after discectomy. In the case with sudden preoperative deterioration of the lower extremities strength there was further postoperative deterioration. During follow up, continuous improvement was observed. In the 12th postoperative month the weakness was minimal. In the other cases immediate postoperative resolution of the pain syndrome and neurological deficits was observed. Postoperative imaging studies reveled appropriate decompression of the spinal canal and localization interbody implant. 1. Costotransversectomy approach leads to sufficient exposition of the anterior aspect of the spinal canal. 2. Our modification of interbody fusion with policarbone cage gives good results in fusion of compromised motion unit. It makes the approach more attractive in the light of remote surgery

  12. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

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    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  13. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

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    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted. PMID:25276453

  14. Radiologic adjacent segment degeneration 2 years after lumbar fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis.

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    Moreau, P-E; Ferrero, E; Riouallon, G; Lenoir, T; Guigui, P

    2016-10-01

    Lumbar fusion is now a currently accepted treatment for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLSP), but may induce adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). The present study hypothesis was that there are radiological parameters associated with ASD. The study objective was to determine predictive factors of ASD. A single-center retrospective study included patients operated on between 2006 and 2013 for DLSP. Radiological parameters were analyzed on preoperative, immediate postoperative and final follow-up lateral X-ray. ASD was defined by the following adjacent segment criteria:>3mm anteroposterior translation,>10° segmental kyphosis, or>50% loss of disc height. One hundred and seven patients were included: 79% female; mean age, 67±10.2 years. Fusion involved 1 level in 67% of cases and 2 or more in 33%, with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in 27% of cases. There was overall significant gain in lumbar lordosis (mean, 3.1°; P=0.04). At a mean 27.8 months' follow-up, 29% of cases showed ASD and 10% required surgical reintervention. Preoperative anterior imbalance and long fusion (>2 levels) were significantly associated with ASD (OR=2.81, 95% CI [1.17-6.74] versus OR=2.76, 95% CI [1.15-6.63]). There were no significant differences according to postoperative radiological parameters, or to TLIF (OR=1.8, 95% CI [0.7-4.4]). Twenty-nine percent of patients developed ASD, with a surgical revision rate of 10%. ASD risk factors comprised high number of instrumented levels and preoperative sagittal imbalance. IV, retrospective cohort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Postoperative initial single fungal discitis progressively spreading to adjacent multiple segments after lumbar discectomy.

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    Zou, Ming-xiang; Peng, An-bo; Dai, Zhi-hui; Wang, Xiao-bin; Li, Jing; Lv, Guo-hua; Deng, You-wen; Wang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    To report multiple cases and investigate etiology of initially single fungal spondylodiscitis that progressively spread to adjacent segments following lumbar discectomy, resulting in multiple spinal involvements. From January 2005 to May 2013, ten adult patients were admitted or referred to our institution with postoperative discitis. Fungal infections were confirmed by microbiologic and pathologic examinations. The clinical appearance, radiographic features, and treatments of this pathology were investigated. All the patients were previously healthy. The average interval between the occurrence of symptoms and primary lumbar discectomy was 61 days (range, 15-120 days). All the patients were treated with anterior surgical debridement, interbody fusion, and prolonged antifungal therapy. Three patients additionally received combined posterior instrumented fusion. Despite aggressive surgical debridement and antifungal therapy, spread of the infections to adjacent multiple discs was observed. No deaths, severe neurologic deficits, or deterioration of neurologic status were noted. The infections were completely resolved in all cases with spontaneous fusion within an average follow-up of 32.4 months. Fungal spondylodiscitis after surgery represents an intractable and troublesome complication, and surgical debridement may not impede the progression of the infection in cases where an insufficient course of antifungal treatment is administered. Such cases may require prolonged antifungal treatment with regular consultation by an infectious disease specialist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. MICROSURGICAL LANDMARKS IN MINIMALLY INVASIVE TRANSFORAMINAL LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

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    Javier Quillo-Olvera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsurgical landmarks of the facet joint complex were defined to provide guidance and security within the tubular retractor during transforaminal surgery. A retrospective observational study was performed in segments L4-L5 by the left side approach. Microsurgical relevant photos, anatomical models and drawing were used to expose the suggested landmarks. The MI-TLIF technique has advantages compared with conventional open TLIF technique, however minimally invasive technique implies lack of security for the surgeon due to the lack of defined microanatomical landmarks compared to open spine surgery, and disorientation within the tubular retractor, the reason why to have precise microsurgical references and its recognition within the surgical field provide speed and safety when performing minimally invasive technique.

  17. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF

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    Hey Hwee Weng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Through a description of each procedure, we hope to illustrate the potential benefits of TLIF over PLIF. In a retrospective study of 53 ALIF/PLIF patients and 111 TLIF patients we found reduced risk of vessel and nerve injury in TLIF patients due to less exposure of these structures, shortened operative time and reduced intra-operative bleeding. These advantages could be translated to shortened hospital stay, faster recovery period and earlier return to work. The disadvantages of TLIF such as incomplete intervertebral disc and vertebral end-plate removal and potential occult injury to exiting nerve root when under experienced hands are rare. Hence TLIF remains the mainstay of treatment in degenerative deformities of the lumbar spine. However, TLIF being a unilateral transforaminal approach, is unable to decompress the opposite nerve root. This may require contralateral laminotomy, which is a fairly simple procedure.The use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF to treat degenerative lumbar spinal deformity is still in its early stages. Although the initial results appear promising, it remains a difficult operative procedure to master with a steep learning curve. In a recent study comparing 29 MI-TLIF patients and 29 open TLIF, MI-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, with no difference in SF-36 scores at six months and two years. Whether it can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of

  18. RESULTS OF TREATMENT OF CERVICAL DISCOPATHY WITH PEEK INTERBODY CAGES AT THREE LEVELS WITHOUT PLATE FIXATION

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    Amado González Moga

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To present the results of treatment of patients with cervical discopathy by anterior cervical approach, discectomy and placement of a PEEK interbody cage without anterior plate fixation. Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional study from March 2013 to March 2015. Sixteen patients with radiculopathy or clinical signs of myelopathy were included; all patients underwent cervical surgery through anterior approach, discectomy, and placement of PEEK cages on three levels. Decompression levels were determined according to the correlation between preoperative radiological and clinical findings. Results: Sixteen patients predominantly male were included, with mean age of 50 years at the onset of the condition. Ten patients had involvement of C4-C5, C5-C6, C6-C7 levels, and six patients C3-C4, C4-C5 and C5-C6. Fourteen patients had cervicobrachialgia and two myelopathy. The preoperative visual analog scale average was 8/10 and the average postoperative value at 6 months was 3/10. At 6 months, there was no radiological evidence of recurrence. One patient had non-fatal complications. Conclusions: The treatment of cervical discopathy by anterior approach with interbody fusion with PEEK cage on three levels, with no plate fixation seemed to be safe and effective with better long-term results in terms of pain and myelopathy. The clinical results compare favorably with other similar series and, most importantly, the complications associated with anterior fixation plate are avoided.

  19. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

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    Ding Zi-hai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP. All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical

  20. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative

  1. Assessment and classification of subsidence after lateral interbody fusion using serial computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malham, Gregory M; Parker, Rhiannon M; Blecher, Carl M; Seex, Kevin A

    2015-07-24

    OBJECT Intervertebral cage settling during bone remodeling after lumbar lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a common occurrence during the normal healing process. Progression of this settling with endplate collapse is defined as subsidence. The purposes of this study were to 1) assess the rate of subsidence after minimally invasive (MIS) LIF by CT, 2) distinguish between early cage subsidence (ECS) and delayed cage subsidence (DCS), 3) propose a descriptive method for classifying the types of subsidence, and 4) discuss techniques for mitigating the risk of subsidence after MIS LIF. METHODS A total of 128 consecutive patients (with 178 treated levels in total) underwent MIS LIF performed by a single surgeon. The subsidence was deemed to be ECS if it was evident on postoperative Day 2 CT images and was therefore the result of an intraoperative vertebral endplate injury and deemed DCS if it was detected on subsequent CT scans (≥ 6 months postoperatively). Endplate breaches were categorized as caudal (superior endplate) and/or cranial (inferior endplate), and as ipsilateral, contralateral, or bilateral with respect to the side of cage insertion. Subsidence seen in CT images (radiographic subsidence) was measured from the vertebral endplate to the caudal or cranial margin of the cage (in millimeters). Patient-reported outcome measures included visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey physical and mental component summary scores. RESULTS Four patients had ECS in a total of 4 levels. The radiographic subsidence (DCS) rates were 10% (13 of 128 patients) and 8% (14 of 178 levels), with 3% of patients (4 of 128) exhibiting clinical subsidence. In the DCS levels, 3 types of subsidence were evident on coronal and sagittal CT scans: Type 1, caudal contralateral, in 14% (2 of 14), Type 2, caudal bilateral with anterior cage tilt, in 64% (9 of 14), and Type 3, both endplates bilaterally, in 21% (3 of 14). The mean subsidence in the DCS

  2. The 'Lumbar Fusion Outcome Score' (LUFOS): a new practical and surgically oriented grading system for preoperative prediction of surgical outcomes after lumbar spinal fusion in patients with degenerative disc disease and refractory chronic axial low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Tobias A; Rehman, Azeem A; Teles, Alisson R; Aldag, Jean C; Dinh, Dzung H; McCall, Todd D

    2017-01-01

    In order to evaluate the predictive effect of non-invasive preoperative imaging methods on surgical outcomes of lumbar fusion for patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) and refractory chronic axial low back pain (LBP), the authors conducted a retrospective review of 45 patients with DDD and refractory LBP submitted to anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) at a single center from 2007 to 2010. Surgical outcomes - as measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS/back pain) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) - were evaluated pre-operatively and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year post-operatively. Linear mixed-effects models were generated in order to identify possible preoperative imaging characteristics (including bone scan/99mTc scintigraphy increased endplate uptake, Modic endplate changes, and disc degeneration graded according to Pfirrmann classification) which may be predictive of long-term surgical outcomes . After controlling for confounders, a combined score, the Lumbar Fusion Outcome Score (LUFOS), was developed. The LUFOS grading system was able to stratify patients in two general groups (Non-surgical: LUFOS 0 and 1; Surgical: LUFOS 2 and 3) that presented significantly different surgical outcomes in terms of estimated marginal means of VAS/back pain (p = 0.001) and ODI (p = 0.006) beginning at 3 months and continuing up to 1 year of follow-up. In conclusion,  LUFOS has been devised as a new practical and surgically oriented grading system based on simple key parameters from non-invasive preoperative imaging exams (magnetic resonance imaging/MRI and bone scan/99mTc scintigraphy) which has been shown to be highly predictive of surgical outcomes of patients undergoing lumbar fusion for treatment for refractory chronic axial LBP.

  3. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

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    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. A Novel Nonpedicular Screw-Based Fixation in Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

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    Ming-Hong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The authors present the clinical results obtained in patients who underwent interspinous fusion device (IFD implantation following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF. The purpose of this study is investigating the feasibility of IFD with PLIF in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods. Between September 2013 and November 2014, 39 patients underwent PLIF and subsequent IFD (Romeo®2 PAD, Spineart, Geneva, Switzerland implantation. Medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed to collect relevant data such as blood loss, operative time, and length of hospital stay. Radiographs and clinical outcome were evaluated 6 weeks and 12 months after surgery. Results. All 39 patients were followed up for more than one year. There were no major complications such as dura tear, nerve injuries, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, or deep infection. Both interbody and interspinous fusion could be observed on radiographs one year after surgery. However, there were 5 patients having early retropulsion of interbody fusion devices. Conclusion. The interspinous fusion device appears to achieve posterior fixation and facilitate lumbar fusion in selected patients. However, further study is mandatory for proposing a novel anatomic and radiological scoring system to identify patients suitable for this treatment modality and prevent postoperative complications.

  5. A Novel Nonpedicular Screw-Based Fixation in Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The authors present the clinical results obtained in patients who underwent interspinous fusion device (IFD) implantation following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The purpose of this study is investigating the feasibility of IFD with PLIF in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods. Between September 2013 and November 2014, 39 patients underwent PLIF and subsequent IFD (Romeo®2 PAD, Spineart, Geneva, Switzerland) implantation. Medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed to collect relevant data such as blood loss, operative time, and length of hospital stay. Radiographs and clinical outcome were evaluated 6 weeks and 12 months after surgery. Results. All 39 patients were followed up for more than one year. There were no major complications such as dura tear, nerve injuries, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, or deep infection. Both interbody and interspinous fusion could be observed on radiographs one year after surgery. However, there were 5 patients having early retropulsion of interbody fusion devices. Conclusion. The interspinous fusion device appears to achieve posterior fixation and facilitate lumbar fusion in selected patients. However, further study is mandatory for proposing a novel anatomic and radiological scoring system to identify patients suitable for this treatment modality and prevent postoperative complications. PMID:28164125

  6. Dynamic Stabilization for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Lumbar Spinal Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHTONARI, Tatsuya; NISHIHARA, Nobuharu; SUWA, Katsuyasu; OTA, Taisei; KOYAMA, Tsunemaro

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a widely accepted surgical procedure for patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and lumbar spinal instability in the active age group. However, in elderly patients, it is often questionable whether it is truly necessary to construct rigid fixation for a short period of time. In recent years, we have been occasionally performing posterior dynamic stabilization in elderly patients with such lumbar disorders. Posterior dynamic stabilization was performed in 12 patients (6 women, 70.9 ± 5.6 years old at the time of operation) with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis in whom % slip was less than 20% or instability associated with lumbar disc herniation between March 2011 and March 2013. Movement occurs through the connector linked to the pedicle screw. In practice, 9 pairs of D connector system where the rod moves in the perpendicular direction alone and 8 pairs of Dynamic connector system where the connector linked to the pedicle screw rotates in the sagittal direction were installed. The observation period was 77–479 days, and the mean recovery rate of lumbar Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 65.6 ± 20.8%. There was progression of slippage due to slight loosening in a case with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, but this did not lead to exacerbation of the symptoms. Although follow-up was short, there were no symptomatic adjacent vertebral and disc disorders during this period. Posterior dynamic stabilization may diminish the development of adjacent vertebral or disc disorders due to lumbar interbody fusion, especially in elderly patients, and it may be a useful procedure that facilitates decompression and ensures a certain degree of spinal stabilization. PMID:25169137

  7. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

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    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD. PMID:26693387

  8. [Enlargement in managment of lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steib, J P; Averous, C; Brinckert, D; Lang, G

    1996-05-01

    instability and to restore the normal static anatomy; thus bone resection is not necessary. At the present time all the lumbar stenoses with reduction in flexion are instrumented with spinal reduction and arthrodesis without opening the canal. The laminoarthrectomy and the enlargement are done when there is a fixed arthrosis which is rare in our practice and found in an older population. The follow-up shows a loss of reduction in some cases after reduction-instrumentation-arthrodesis and poses the question of an interbody fusion. We don't open the canal only for fusion (PLIF) if this is not necessary for the treatment of the stenosis. We think that, in such a situation, the future is ALIF with endoscopical approach. The problem is to determine which disc demanding this anterior fusion, is able to regenerate or not.

  9. Transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion in the treatment of thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Wu

    Full Text Available A retrospective clinical study.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion in the treatment of thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation with spinal cord injury.Twenty-six spinal cord injured patients with thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation were treated by transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and complications were recorded; the Cobb angle and compressive rate (CR of the anterior height of two adjacent vertebrae were measured; and the nerve injury was assessed according to sensory scores and motor scores of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury.The operative time was 250±57 min, and intraoperative blood loss was 440±168 ml. Cerebrospinal leakage was detected and repaired during the operation in two patients. A total of 24 of 26 patients were followed up for more than 2 years. ASIA sensory scores and motor scores were improved significantly at 3 months and 6 months after operation; the Cobb angle and CR of the anterior height of two adjacent vertebrae were corrected and showed a significant difference at post-operation; and the values were maintained at 3 months after operation and the last follow-up.We showed that transforaminal decompression together with interbody fusion is an alternative method to treat thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation.

  10. Load-sharing through elastic micro-motion accelerates bone formation and interbody fusion.

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    Ledet, Eric H; Sanders, Glenn P; DiRisio, Darryl J; Glennon, Joseph C

    2018-02-13

    Achieving a successful spinal fusion requires the proper biological and biomechanical environment. Optimizing load-sharing in the interbody space can enhance bone formation. For anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), loading and motion are largely dictated by the stiffness of the plate, which can facilitate a balance between stability and load-sharing. The advantages of load-sharing may be substantial for patients with comorbidities and in multilevel procedures where pseudarthrosis rates are significant. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel elastically deformable, continuously load-sharing anterior cervical spinal plate for promotion of bone formation and interbody fusion relative to a translationally dynamic plate. An in vivo animal model was used to evaluate the effects of an elastically deformable spinal plate on bone formation and spine fusion. Fourteen goats underwent an ACDF and received either a translationally dynamic or elastically deformable plate. Animals were followed up until 18 weeks and were evaluated by plain x-ray, computed tomography scan, and undecalcified histology to evaluate the rate and quality of bone formation and interbody fusion. Animals treated with the elastically deformable plate demonstrated statistically significantly superior early bone formation relative to the translationally dynamic plate. Trends in the data from 8 to 18 weeks postoperatively suggest that the elastically deformable implant enhanced bony bridging and fusion, but these enhancements were not statistically significant. Load-sharing through elastic micro-motion accelerates bone formation in the challenging goat ACDF model. The elastically deformable implant used in this study may promote early bony bridging and increased rates of fusion, but future studies will be necessary to comprehensively characterize the advantages of load-sharing through micro-motion. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis

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    Adam M. Caputo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The use of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF and other lateral access surgery is rapidly increasing in popularity. However, limited data is available regarding its use in scoliosis surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of adults with degenerative lumbar scoliosis treated with XLIF. Methods. Thirty consecutive patients with adult degenerative scoliosis treated by a single surgeon at a major academic institution were followed for an average of 14.3 months. Interbody fusion was completed using the XLIF technique with supplemental posterior instrumentation. Validated clinical outcome scores were obtained on patients preoperatively and at most recent follow-up. Complications were recorded. Results. The study group demonstrated improvement in multiple clinical outcome scores. Oswestry Disability Index scores improved from 24.8 to 19.0 (P < 0.001. Short Form-12 scores improved, although the change was not significant. Visual analog scores for back pain decreased from 6.8 to 4.6 (P < 0.001 while scores for leg pain decreased from 5.4 to 2.8 (P < 0.001. A total of six minor complications (20% were recorded, and two patients (6.7% required additional surgery. Conclusions. Based on the significant improvement in validated clinical outcome scores, XLIF is effective in the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis.

  12. Transforaminal versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion as operative treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis, a retrospective case series

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    S.L. de Kunder, MD

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: In this case series, TLIF was associated with shorter surgical time. Other assumed advantages of TLIF could not be verified in this retrospective patient series. Further prospective research is needed to confirm these results.

  13. [Lumbar spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seichi, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    Lumbar spondylosis is a chronic, noninflammatory disease caused by degeneration of lumbar disc and/or facet joints. The etiology of lumbar spondylosis is multifactorial. Patients with lumbar spondylosis complain of a broad variety of symptoms including discomfort in the low back lesion, whereas some of them have radiating leg pain or neurologenic intermittent claudication (lumbar spinal stenosis). The majority of patients with spondylosis and stenosis of the lumbosacral spine can be treated nonsurgically. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and COX-2 inhibitors are helpful in controlling symptoms. Prostaglandin, epidural injection, and transforaminal injection are also helpful for leg pain and intermittent claudication. Operative therapy for spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis is reserved for patients who are totally incapacitated by their condition.

  14. Lumbar total disc replacement from an extreme lateral approach: clinical experience with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Luiz; Oliveira, Leonardo; Schaffa, Thomas; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Marchi, Luis

    2011-01-01

    current lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) devices require an anterior approach for implantation. This approach has inherent limitations, including risks to abdominal structures and the need for resection of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL). Placement of a TDR device from a true lateral (extreme lateral interbody fusion [XLIF]) approach is thought to offer a less invasive option to access the disc space, preserving the stabilizing ligaments and avoiding scarring of anterior vasculature. In this study, the authors attempted to quantify the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a lateral approach to lumbar TDR from a prospective, single-center experience. a TDR device designed for implantation through a true lateral, retroperitoneal, transpsoas approach (XLIF) was implanted in 36 patients with discography-confirmed 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease. Clinical (pain and function) and radiographic (range of motion [ROM]) data were prospectively collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and serially for a minimum of 24 months' follow-up. thirty-six surgeries were performed in 16 men and 20 women (mean age 42.6 years). Surgeries included 15 single-level TDR procedures at L3-4 or L4-5, three 2-level TDR procedures spanning L3-4 and L4-5, and 18 hybrid procedures (anterior lumbar interbody fusion [ALIF]) at L5-S1 and TDR at L4-5 [17] or L3-4 [1]). Operative time averaged 130 minutes, with an average blood loss of 60 ml and no intraoperative complications. Postoperative radiographs showed good device placement. All patients were walking within 12 hours of surgery and all but 9 were discharged the next day (7 of 9 had hybrid TDR/ALIF procedures). Five patients (13.8%) had psoas weakness and 3 (8.3%) had anterior thigh numbness postoperatively, both resolving within 2 weeks. One patient (2.8%) demonstrated weakness of the leg ipsilateral to the approach side, which lasted through the 3-month visit but was resolved by the 6-month visit. One patient (2.8%) was

  15. Biomechanics of Posterior Dynamic Fusion Systems in the Lumbar Spine: Implications for Stabilization With Improved Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alexander K; Siegfried, Catherine M; Chew, Brandon; Hobbs, Joseph; Sabersky, Abraham; Jho, Diana J; Cook, Daniel J; Bellotte, Jonathan Brad; Whiting, Donald M; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-08-01

    A comparative biomechanical human cadaveric spine study of a dynamic fusion rod and a traditional titanium rod. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the biomechanical metrics associated with a dynamic fusion device, Isobar TTL Evolution, and a rigid rod. Dynamic fusion rods may enhance arthrodesis compared with a rigid rod. Wolff's law implies that bone remodeling and growth may be enhanced through anterior column loading (AL). This is important for dynamic fusion rods because their purpose is to increase AL. Six fresh-frozen lumbar cadaveric specimens were used. Each untreated specimen (Intact) underwent biomechanical testing. Next, each specimen had a unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion performed at L3-L4 using a cage with an integrated load cell. Pedicle screws were also placed at this time. Subsequently, the Isobar was implanted and tested, and finally, a rigid rod replaced the Isobar in the same pedicle screw arrangement. In terms of range of motion, the Isobar performed comparably to the rigid rod and there was no statistical difference found between Isobar and rigid rod. There was a significant difference between the intact and rigid rod and also between intact and Isobar conditions in flexion extension. For interpedicular displacement, there was a significant increase in flexion extension (P=0.017) for the Isobar compared with the rigid rod. Isobar showed increased AL under axial compression compared with the rigid rod (P=0.024). Isobar provided comparable stabilization to a rigid rod when using range of motion as the metric, however, AL was increased because of the greater interpedicular displacement of dynamic rod compared with a rigid rod. By increasing interpedicular displacement and AL, it potentially brings clinical benefit to procedures relying on arthrodesis.

  16. Multiple-level lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Lianlei; Yuan, Suomao; Tian, Yonghao; Zheng, Yanping; Li, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis occur most commonly at only one spinal level. The authors report on 13 cases of lumbar spondylolysis with spondylolisthesis at multiple levels. During July 2007-March 2012, multiple-level spondylolysis associated with spondylolisthesis was diagnosed in 13 patients (10 male, 3 female) at Qilu Hospital of Shandong University. The mean patient age was 43.5 ± 14.6 years. The duration of low-back pain was 11.7 ± 5.1 months. Spondylolysis occurred at L-2 in 2 patients, L-3 in 4 patients, L-4 in all patients, and L-5 in 5 patients. Spondylolysis occurred at 3 spinal levels in 3 patients and at 2 levels in 10 patients. All patients had spondylolisthesis at 1 or 2 levels. Japanese Orthopaedic Association and visual analog scale scores were used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function and low-back pain. All patients underwent pedicle screw fixation and interbody fusion or direct pars interarticularis repair. Both low-back pain scores improved significantly after surgery (p spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis occurred more often in men. Most multiplelevel lumbar spondylolysis occurred at 2 spinal levels and was associated with sports, trauma, or heavy labor. Multiplelevel lumbar spondylolysis occurred mostly at L3-5; associated spondylolisthesis usually occurred at L-4 and L-5, mostly at L-4. The treatment principle was the same as that for single-level spondylolisthesis.

  17. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkol, Sandesh; Sarda, Praveen; Karpe, Prasad; Krishna, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period. PMID:24600073

  18. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

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    Sandesh Lakkol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period.

  19. Short-term alendronate treatment does not maintain a residual effect on spinal fusion with interbody devices and bone graft after treatment withdrawal: an experimental study on spinal fusion in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Baoding; Zou, Xuenong; Li, Haisheng; Xue, Qingyun; Bünger, Cody

    2013-02-01

    Whether alendronate treatment has a residual effect on bone ingrowth into porous biomaterial in humans or experimental animals after treatment withdrawal is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate bone ingrowth into porous tantalum and carbon fiber interbody implants after discontinuing alendronate treatment in experimental spinal fusion in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into two groups of each 12 pigs. The pigs underwent anterior intervertebral lumbar arthrodeses at L2-3, L4-5 and L6-7. Each level was randomly allocated to one of the three implants: a porous tantalum ring with pedicle screw fixation, a porous tantalum ring or a carbon fiber cage with anterior staple fixation. The central hole of implants was packed with an autograft. Alendronate was given orally for the first 3 months to one of the two groups. The pigs were observed for 6 months postoperatively. Histology and micro-CT scans were done at the endpoint. The spinal fusion rates of each implant showed no differences between two treatment groups. Furthermore, no differences were found between two groups as for bone ingrowth into the central holes of implants and bone-implant interface in each implant, or as for the pores of tantalum implants. Trabecular bone microarchitecture in the central hole of the carbon fiber cage did not differ between two treatment groups. The application of ALN, with a dose equivalent to that given to humans during the first 3 months after surgery, does not maintain a residual effect on spinal fusion with porous tantalum ring and autograft after treatment withdrawal in a porcine ALIF model.

  20. The impact of sagittal balance on clinical results after posterior interbody fusion for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: A Pilot study

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    Chung Sung-Soo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparatively little is known about the relation between the sagittal vertical axis and clinical outcome in cases of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lumbar sagittal balance affects clinical outcomes after posterior interbody fusion. This series suggests that consideration of sagittal balance during posterior interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis can yield high levels of patient satisfaction and restore spinal balance Methods A retrospective study of clinical outcomes and a radiological review was performed on 18 patients with one or two level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients were divided into two groups: the patients without improvement in pelvic tilt, postoperatively (Group A; n = 10 and the patients with improvement in pelvic tilt postoperatively (Group B; n = 8. Pre- and postoperative clinical outcome surveys were administered to determine Visual Analogue Pain Scores (VAS and Oswestry disability index (ODI. In addition, we evaluated full spine radiographic films for pelvic tilt (PT, sacral slope (SS, pelvic incidence (PI, thoracic kyphosis (TK, lumbar lordosis (LL, sacrofemoral distance (SFD, and sacro C7 plumb line distance (SC7D Results All 18 patients underwent surgery principally for the relief of radicular leg pain and back pain. In groups A and B, mean preoperative VAS were 6.85 and 6.81, respectively, and these improved to 3.20 and 1.63 at last follow-up. Mean preoperative ODI were 43.2 and 50.4, respectively, and these improved to 23.6 and 18.9 at last follow-up. In spinopelvic parameters, no significant difference was found between preoperative and follow up variables except PT in Group A. However, significant difference was found between the preoperative and follows up values of PT, SS, TK, LL, and SFD/SC7D in Group B. Between parameters of group A and B, there is borderline significance on preoperative PT, preoperative LL and last

  1. Mid-range outcomes in 64 consecutive cases of multilevel fusion for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röllinghoff, Marc; Schlüter-Brust, Klaus; Groos, Daniel; Sobottke, Rolf; Michael, Joern William-Patrick; Eysel, Peer; Delank, Karl Stefan

    2010-03-20

    In the treatment of multilevel degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, spondylodesis plays a controversial role. Most patients can be treated conservatively with success. Multilevel lumbar fusion with instrumentation is associated with severe complications like failed back surgery syndrome, implant failure, and adjacent segment disease (ASD). This retrospective study examines the records of 70 elderly patients with degenerative changes or instability of the lumbar spine treated between 2002 and 2007 with spondylodesis of more than two segments. Sixty-four patients were included; 5 patients had died and one patient was lost to follow-up. We evaluated complications, clinical/radiological outcomes, and success of fusion. Flexion-extension and standing X-rays in two planes, MRI, and/or CT scans were obtained pre-operatively. Patients were assessed clinically using the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Surgery performed was dorsolateral fusion (46.9%) or dorsal fusion with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF; 53.1%). Additional decompression was carried out in 37.5% of patients. Mean follow-up was 29.4±5.4 months. Average patient age was 64.7±4.3 years. Clinical outcomes were not satisfactory for all patients. VAS scores improved from 8.6±1.3 to 5.6±3.0 pre- to post-operatively, without statistical significance. ODI was also not significantly improved (56.1±22.3 pre- and 45.1±26.4 post-operatively). Successful fusion, defined as adequate bone mass with trabeculation at the facets and transverse processes or in the intervertebral segments, did not correlate with good clinical outcomes. Thirty-five of 64 patients (54%) showed signs of pedicle screw loosening, especially of the screws at S1. However, only 7 of these 35 (20%) complained of corresponding back pain. Revision surgery was required in 24 of 64 patients (38%). Of these, indications were adjacent segment disease (16 cases), pedicle screw loosening (7 cases), and

  2. Mid-range outcomes in 64 consecutive cases of multilevel fusion for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Röllinghoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of multilevel degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, spondylodesis plays a controversial role. Most patients can be treated conservatively with success. Multilevel lumbar fusion with instrumentation is associated with severe complications like failed back surgery syndrome, implant failure, and adjacent segment disease (ASD. This retrospective study examines the records of 70 elderly patients with degenerative changes or instability of the lumbar spine treated between 2002 and 2007 with spondylodesis of more than two segments. Sixty-four patients were included; 5 patients had died and one patient was lost to follow-up. We evaluated complications, clinical/radiological outcomes, and success of fusion. Flexion-extension and standing X-rays in two planes, MRI, and/or CT scans were obtained pre-operatively. Patients were assessed clinically using the Oswestry disability index (ODI and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Surgery performed was dorsolateral fusion (46.9% or dorsal fusion with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF; 53.1%. Additional decompression was carried out in 37.5% of patients. Mean follow-up was 29.4±5.4 months. Average patient age was 64.7±4.3 years. Clinical outcomes were not satisfactory for all patients. VAS scores improved from 8.6±1.3 to 5.6±3.0 pre- to post-operatively, without statistical significance. ODI was also not significantly improved (56.1±22.3 pre- and 45.1±26.4 post-operatively. Successful fusion, defined as adequate bone mass with trabeculation at the facets and transverse processes or in the intervertebral segments, did not correlate with good clinical outcomes. Thirty-five of 64 patients (54% showed signs of pedicle screw loosening, especially of the screws at S1. However, only 7 of these 35 (20% complained of corresponding back pain. Revision surgery was required in 24 of 64 patients (38%. Of these, indications were adjacent segment disease (16 cases, pedicle screw loosening (7 cases

  3. Visceral, vascular, and wound complications following over 13,000 lateral interbody fusions: a survey study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan S; Deukmedjian, Armen R

    2015-04-01

    Minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS-LIF) has become a popular less invasive treatment option for degenerative spinal disease, deformity, and trauma. While MIS-LIF offers several advantages over traditional anterior and posterior approaches, the procedure is not without risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of visceral, vascular, and wound complications following MIS-LIF performed by experienced surgeons. A survey was conducted by experienced (more than 100 case experience) MIS-LIF surgeons active in the society of lateral access surgery (SOLAS) to collect data on wound infections and visceral and vascular injuries. Of 77 spine surgeons surveyed, 40 (52 %) responded, including 25 (63 %) orthopedic surgeons and 15 (38 %) neurosurgeons, with 20 % practicing at an academic institution and 80 % in community practice. Between 2003 and 2013, 13,004 patients were treated with MIS-LIF by the 40 surgeons who responded to the survey. Of those patients, 0.08 % experienced a visceral complication (bowel injury), 0.10 % experienced a vascular injury, 0.27 % experienced a superficial wound infection, and 0.14 % experienced a deep wound infection. The incidence of surgical site infections and vascular and visceral complications following MIS-LIF in this large series was low and compared favorably with rates for alternative interbody fusion approaches. Although technically demanding, MIS-LIF is a reproducible approach for interbody fusion with a low risk of vascular and visceral complications and infections.

  4. Degenerative spondylolisthesis: contemporary review of the role of interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph F; Errico, Thomas J; Kim, Yong; Razi, Afshin

    2017-02-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a common presentation, yet the best surgical treatment continues to be a matter of debate. Interbody fusion is one of a number of options, but its exact role remains ill defined. The aim of this study was to provide a contemporary review of the literature to help determine the role, if any, of interbody fusion in the surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis. A systematic review of the literature since 2005 was performed. Details on study size, patient age, surgical treatments, levels of slip, patient reported outcome measures, radiographic outcomes, complications and selected utility measures were recorded. Studies that compared a cohort treated with interbody fusion and at least one other surgical intervention for comparison were included for review. Only studies examining the effect in degenerative spondylolisthesis were included. Two authors independently reviewed the manuscripts and extracted key data. Thirteen studies were included in the final analysis. A total of 565 underwent interbody fusion and 761 underwent other procedures including decompression alone, interspinous stabilisation and posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation. Most studies were graded Level III evidence. Heterogeneous reporting of outcomes prevented formal statistical analysis. However, in general, studies reviewed concluded no significant clinical or radiographic difference in outcome between interbody fusion and other treatments. Two small studies suggested interbody fusion is a better option in cases of definite instability. Interbody fusion only provided outcomes as good as instrumented posterolateral fusion. However, most studies were Level III, and hence, we remain limited in defining the exact role of interbody fusion-cases with clear instability appear to be most appropriate. Future work should use agreed-upon common outcome measures and definitions.

  5. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: cohort of 670 patients, and proposal of a new classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, O; Challier, V; Parent, H; Cavagna, R; Poignard, A; Faline, A; Fuentes, S; Ricart, O; Ferrero, E; Ould Slimane, M

    2014-10-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis is common in adults. No consensus is available about the analysis or surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis. In 2013, the French Society for Spine Surgery (Societe francaise de chirurgie du rachis) held a round table discussion to develop a classification system and assess the outcomes of the main surgical treatments. A multicentre study was conducted in nine centres located throughout France and Luxembourg. We established a database on a prospective cohort of 260 patients included between July 2011 and July 2012 and a retrospective cohort of 410 patients included in personal databases between 2009 and 2013. For patients in the prospective cohort clinical assessments were performed before and after surgery using the self-administered functional impact questionnaire AQS, SF12, and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Type of treatment and complications were recorded. Antero-posterior and lateral full-length radiographs were used to measure lumbar lordosis (LL), segmental lordosis (SL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), and percentage of vertebral slippage. Mean follow-up was 10 months. We started a randomised clinical trial comparing posterior fusion of degenerative spondylolisthesis with versus without an inter-body cage. 60 patients were included, 30 underwent 180° fusion and 30 underwent 360° fusion using an inter-body cage implanted via a transforaminal approach. We evaluated the quality of neural decompression achieved by minimally invasive fusion technique. In a subgroup of 24 patients computed tomography (CT) was performed before and after the procedure and then compared. Mean age was 67 years and 73% of degenerative spondylolisthesis were located at L4-L5 level. The many surgical procedures performed in the prospective cohort were posterior fusion (39%), posterior fusion combined with inter-body fusion (36%), dynamic stabilization (15%), anterior lumbar fusion (8%), and postero

  6. Lumbar spinal fusion. Outcome in relation to surgical methods, choice of implant and postoperative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Finn Bjarke

    2004-10-01

    were included in the investigation from 1979 to 1999. Each had prior to inclusion at least 2 years of CLBP and had therefore been subjected to most of the conservative treatment leg pain, due to localized isthmic spondylolisthesis grades I-II or primary or secondary degeneration. PATIENT-BASED FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME: Patients' self-reported parameters should include the impact of CLBP on daily activity, work and leisure time activities, anxiety/depression, social interests and intensity of back and leg pain. Between 1993 and 2003 approximately 1400 lumbar spinal fusion patients completed the Dallas Pain Questionnaire under prospective design studies. In 1996, the Low Back Pain Rating scale was added to the standard questionnaire packet distributed among spinal fusion patients. In our experience, these tools are valid instruments for clinical assessment of candidates for spinal fusion procedures. It is extremely difficult to interpret radiographs of both lumbar posterolateral fusion and anterior interbody fusion. Plain radiographs are clearly not the perfect media for analysis of spinal fusion, but until new and better diagnostic methods are available for clinical use, radiographs will remain the golden standard. Therefore, the development of a detailed reliable radiographic classification system is highly desirable. The classification used in the present thesis for the evaluation of posteroalteral spinal fusion, both with and without instrumentation, demonstrated good interobserver and intraobserver agreement. The classification showed acceptable reliability and may be one way to improve interstudy and intrastudy correlation of radiologic outcomes after posterolateral spinal fusion. Radiology-based evaluation of anterior lumbar interbody fusion is further complicated when cages are employed. The use of different cage designs and materials makes it almost impossible to establish a standard radiological classification system for anterior fusions. BONE-SCREW INTERFACE

  7. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency.

  8. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with lumbar segmental stenosis treated with XLIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Carpineta, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Literature review of adults TCS associated with lumbar spinal degenerative disease as lumbar canal stenosis or disc herniation, is reported. Moderate entity of traction of spinal cord may remain asymptomatic in childhood and may result in delayed neurological deficits in adult life. The stretching of conus medullaris and spinal nerves of cauda equina, reduces regional blood flow and causes neural death and fibrous tissue replacement. Sudden or progressive onset of paraparesis with spastic gait, bladder dysfunction and acute low back pain in patient with history of spinal dysraphism must be considered as possible lumbar spinal cord compression caused by low lying cord related to TCS. Surgical decompression should be performed as early as possible to ensure neurological recovery. XLIF approach seems to be safe and fast and represent an excellent surgical option to obtain spinal cord indirect decompression and lumbar interbody fusion.

  9. Responses to lumbar magnetic stimulation in newborns with spina bifida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, N.; Pasman, J.W.; Roeleveld, N.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Mullaart, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Searching for a tool to quantify motor impairment in spina bifida, transcranial and lumbar magnetic stimulation were applied in affected newborn infants. Lumbar magnetic stimulation resulted in motor evoked potentials in both the quadriceps muscle and the tibialis anterior muscle in most (11/13)

  10. Impaction durability of porous polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and titanium-coated PEEK interbody fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstrick, F Brennan; Klosterhoff, Brett S; Westerlund, L Erik; Foley, Kevin T; Gochuico, Joanna; Lee, Christopher S D; Gall, Ken; Safranski, David L

    2018-01-31

    Various surface modifications, often incorporating roughened or porous surfaces, have recently been introduced to enhance osseointegration of interbody fusion devices. However, these topographical features can be vulnerable to damage during clinical impaction. Despite the potential negative impact of surface damage on clinical outcomes, current testing standards do not replicate clinically relevant impaction loading conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare the impaction durability of conventional smooth polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) cervical interbody fusion devices with two surface-modified PEEK devices that feature either a porous structure or plasma-sprayed titanium coating. A recently developed biomechanical test method was adapted to simulate clinically relevant impaction loading conditions during cervical interbody fusion procedures. Three cervical interbody fusion devices were used in this study: smooth PEEK, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated PEEK, and porous PEEK (n=6). Following Kienle et al., devices were impacted between two polyurethane blocks mimicking vertebral bodies under a constant 200 N preload. The posterior tip of the device was placed at the entrance between the polyurethane blocks, and a guided 1-lb weight was impacted upon the anterior face with a maximum speed of 2.6 m/s to represent the strike force of a surgical mallet. Impacts were repeated until the device was fully impacted. Porous PEEK durability was assessed using micro-computed tomography (µCT) pre- and postimpaction. Titanium-coating coverage pre- and postimpaction was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Changes to the surface roughness of smooth and titanium-coated devices were also evaluated. Porous PEEK and smooth PEEK devices showed minimal macroscopic signs of surface damage, whereas the titanium-coated devices exhibited substantial visible coating loss. Quantification of the porous PEEK deformation

  11. Older literature review of increased risk of adjacent segment degeneration with instrumented lumbar fusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following lumbar spine surgery occurs in up to 30% of cases, and descriptions of such changes are not new. Here, we review some of the older literature concerning the rate of ASD, typically more severe cephalad than caudad, and highly correlated with instrumented fusions. Therefore, for degenerative lumbar disease without frank instability, ASD would be markedly reduced by avoiding instrumented fusions. Methods: In a prior review, the newer literature regarding the frequency of ASD following lumbar instrumented fusions (e.g., transforaminal or posterior lumbar interbody fusions [TLIF/PLIF] fusions or occasionally, posterolateral fusions [PLFs]) was presented. Some studies cited an up to an 18.5% incidence of ASD following instrumented versus noninstrumented fusions/decompressions alone (5.6%). A review of the older literature similarly documents a higher rate of ASD following instrumented fusions performed for degenerative lumbar disease alone. Results: More frequent and more severe ASD follows instrumented lumbar fusions performed for degenerative lumbar disease without instability. Alternatively, this entity should be treated with decompressions alone or with noninstrumented fusions, without the addition of instrumentation. Conclusions: Too many studies assume that TLIF, PLIF, and even PLF instrumented fusions are the “gold standard of care” for dealing with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine without documented instability. It is time to correct that assumption, and reassess the older literature along with the new to confirm that decompression alone and noninstrumented fusion avoid significant morbidity and even potentially mortality attributed to unnecessary instrumentation. PMID:26904370

  12. Results of instrumented posterolateral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis with and without segmental kyphosis: A retrospective investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Yuan Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment by posterolateral fusion (PLF with pedicle-screw instrumentation can be unsuccessful in one-segment and low-grade lumbar spondylolisthesis. Segmental kyphosis, either rigid or dynamic, was hypothesized to be one of the factors interfering with the fusion results. Methods: From 2004 to 2005, 239 patients with single-segment and low-grade spondylolisthesis were recruited and divided into two groups: Group 1 consisting of 129 patients without segmental kyphosis and group 2 consisting of 110 patients with segmental kyphosis. All patients underwent instrumented PLF at the same medical institute, and the average follow-up period was 31 ± 19 months. We obtained plain radiographs of the lumbosacral spine with the anteroposterior view, the lateral view, and the dynamic flexion-extension views before the operation and during the follow-ups. The results of PLF in the two groups were then compared. Results: There was no significant difference in the demographic data of the two groups, except for gender distribution. The osseous fusion rates were 90.7% in group 1 and 68.2% in group 2 (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Instrumented PLF resulted in significantly higher osseous fusion rate in patients without segmental kyphosis than in the patients with segmental kyphosis. For the patients with sagittal imbalance, such as rigid or dynamic kyphosis, pedicle-screw fixation cannot ensure successful PLF. Interbody fusion by the posterior lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion technique might help overcome this problem.

  13. Lumbar pseudarthrosis: a review of current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Danielle S; Baker, Kevin C; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Failed solid bony fusion, or pseudarthrosis, is a well-known complication of lumbar arthrodesis. Recent advances in radiographic technology, biologics, instrumentation, surgical technique, and understanding of the local biology have all aided in the prevention and treatment of pseudarthrosis. Here, the current literature on the diagnosis and management of lumbar pseudarthroses is reviewed. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE and Embase databases in order to search for the current radiographie diagnosis and surgical treatment methods published in the literature (1985 to present). Inclusion criteria included: 1) published in English; 2) level of evidence I-III; 3) diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spine conditions and/or history of lumbar spine fusion surgery; and 4) comparative studies of 2 different surgical techniques or comparative studies of imaging modality versus surgical exploration. RESULTS Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for current radiographie imaging used to diagnose lumbar pseudarthrosis. Plain radiographs and thin-cut CT scans were the most common method for radiographie diagnosis. PET has been shown to be a valid imaging modality for monitoring in vivo active bone formation. Eight studies compared the surgical techniques for managing and preventing failed lumbar fusion. The success rates for the treatment of pseudarthrosis are enhanced with the use of rigid instrumentation. CONCLUSIONS Spinal fusion rates have improved secondary to advances in biologies, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and understanding of local biology. Treatment of lumbar pseudarthrosis includes a variety of surgical options such as replacing loose instrumentation, use of more potent biologies, and interbody fusion techniques. Prevention and recognition are important tenets in the algorithm for the management of spinal pseudarthrosis.

  14. An economic analysis of using rhBMP-2 for lumbar fusion in Germany, France and UK from a societal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Volker; Chhabra, Amit; Franke, Jörg; Cuche, Matthieu; Schnettler, Reinhard; Le Huec, Jean-Charles

    2009-06-01

    Recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2) can replace autogenous bone grafting in single-level lumbar interbody fusion. Its use is associated with a higher initial price for the intervention; 2,970 euros in Germany, 2,950 euros in France and 2,266 euros (1,790 pounds sterling) in UK. The aim of this study was to calculate the financial impact of rhBMP-2 treatment in Germany, UK and France from a societal perspective with a two-year time horizon. Based on clinical findings of a previously published study with a pooled data analysis, a health economic model was developed to estimate potential cost savings derived from reduced surgery time and secondary treatment costs, and faster return-to-work time associated with rhBMP-2 use compared with autogenous bone grafting. Country-specific costs are reported in 2008 Euros. From a societal perspective, overall savings from the use of rhBMP-2 in ALIF surgery compared with autograft are 8,483 euros, 9,191 euros and 8,783 euros per case for Germany, France and UK, respectively. In all the three countries savings offset the upfront price for rhBMP-2. The savings are mainly achieved by reduced productivity loss due to faster return-to-work time for patients treated with rhBMP-2. Use of rhBMP-2 in anterior lumbar fusion is a net cost-saving treatment from a societal perspective for Germany, France and UK. Improved clinical outcome for the patient combined with better health-economic outcome for the society support rhBMP-2 as a valuable alternative compared with autograft.

  15. Cortical bone trajectory screws fixation in lumbar adjacent segment disease: A technique note with case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Hsuan; Huang, Hsieng-Ming; Chen, Der-Cherng; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Han-Chun; Cho, Der-Yang

    2018-02-01

    Lumbar adjacent segment disease after lumbar fusion surgery often requires surgical intervention. However, subsequent surgical treatment often needs to expose and remove all of the previous instruments. This additional surgery leads to significant post-operative pain, muscular fibrosis, poor wound healing and infection, etc. From October 2015 to March 2016, we collected six cases underwent cortical bone trajectory screws fixation with minimal invasive inter-body cage fusion for lumbar adjacent segment disease. Patients in the study all had improvement after surgery without recurrence or instruments failure during follow-up. The technique negates removal of pre-existing instruments and when combined with minimal invasive fusion surgery, the wound length, blood loss and soft tissue damage could be reduced compared with traditional surgery. We introduce the surgical procedures in detail and wish this technique could be an option for spine surgeons who encounter a similar situation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of the fourth lumbar vertebra: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koakutsu, Tomoaki; Morozumi, Naoki; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Ogawa, Shinji; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2012-03-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a well known cause of low back pain, usually affects the pars interarticularis of a lower lumbar vertebra and rarely involves the articular processes. We report a rare case of bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of L4 vertebra that caused spinal canal stenosis with a significant segmental instability at L4/5 and scoliosis. A 31-year-old male who had suffered from low back pain since he was a teenager presented with numbness of the right lower leg and scoliosis. Plain X-rays revealed bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of L4, anterolisthesis of the L4 vertebral body, and right lateral wedging of the L4/5 disc with compensatory scoliosis in the cephalad portion of the spine. MR images revealed spinal canal stenosis at the L4/5 disc level. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion of the L4/5 was performed, and his symptoms were relieved.

  17. [Imaging study of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing-yang; Yang, Cun-rui; Yu, Lang-tao

    2009-04-01

    Using regional assignment to forked method to study lumbar intervertebral disc hemiation (bugle, hernia, prolapse) dependablity and reason of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. From March 2005 to October 2006, 120 patients of match condition from orthopaedics dept and rehabilitative dept of the Boai hospital of Longyan were studied. All patients were equally divided into two groups according to whether or not accompany with symptom of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. There was not statistical difference in sex, age, course of disease, segment of intervertebral disc between two groups. Sixty patients of symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were equally divided into three groups according to (bugle, hernia, prolapse) image on CT. Sixty patients of asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were equally divided into three groups according to (bugle, hernia, prolapse) image on CT. The age was 20-59 years old with an average of 38.5 years. Using regional assignment to give a mark respectively for every group. The sagittal diameter index (SI), anterior diastema of flaval ligaments, the width of superior outlet of latero-crypt, anteroposterior diameter of dura sac were respectively measured by sliding caliper. CT value and protrusible areas were respectively evaluated by computer tomography. Adopting mean value to measure three times. (1) There were not statistical difference in SI, CT value, hernia areas, anteroposterior diameter of dura sac between two groups (symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation). There were statistical difference in the width of superior outlet of latero-crypt, anterior diastema of flaval ligaments between two groups (symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation). (2) There were statistical difference in protrusible type,protrusible segment

  18. Critical analysis of trends in lumbar fusion for degenerative disorders revisited: influence of technique on fusion rate and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanji, Heeren; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Bhalla, Amandeep; Bono, Christopher M

    2018-03-15

    Lumbar fusion for degenerative disorders is among the most common spine surgical procedures performed. The purpose of this study was to analyze fusion, complications, and clinical success for lumbar fusion performed with various surgical techniques as reported in the literature from 2000 to 2015 and compare with previous critical analysis of outcomes from 1980 to 2000. A systematic review of the literature to identify all studies of adult lumbar fusion for degenerative disorders published between January 1, 2000, and August 31, 2015, was performed adhering to PRISMA guidelines. Studies were included if they enabled analysis of outcomes of individual fusion techniques. Data from 8599 patients extracted from 160 studies were recorded. Posterior and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and TLIF) had significantly higher fusion rates compared to instrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) (OR 3.20 and 2.46, respectively). Clinical success rate was statistically higher with MIS versus non-MIS fusion (OR 2.44). While methodological quality was higher in studies from 2000 to 2015 than prior decades, the outcomes of comparable procedures were about the same. Lumbar fusions for degenerative disorders from 2000 to 2015 demonstrate a trend toward more interbody fusions and MIS techniques than prior decades. Clinical success with MIS appears more likely than with non-MIS fusions, despite equivalent fusion and complication rates. While these data are intriguing, they should be interpreted cautiously considering the level of heterogeneity of the studies available. Further, high-quality comparative studies are warranted to better understand the relative benefits of more complex interbody and MIS fusions for these conditions. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  19. Comprehensive comparing percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy with posterior lumbar internal fixation for treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis: A retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yapeng; Zhang, Wei; Qie, Suhui; Zhang, Nan; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2017-07-01

    The study was to comprehensively compare the postoperative outcome and imaging parameter characters in a short/middle period between the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and the internal fixation of bone graft fusion (the most common form is posterior lumbar interbody fusion [PLIF]) for the treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis after a previous lumbar internal fixation surgery.In this retrospective case-control study, we collected the medical records from 11 patients who received PELD operation (defined as PELD group) for and from 13 patients who received the internal fixation of bone graft fusion of lumbar posterior vertebral lamina decompression (defined as control group) for the treatment of the lumbar disc prolapse combined with stable retrolisthesis at Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University (Shijiazhuang, China) from May 2010 to December 2015. The operation time, the bleeding volume of perioperation, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were compared between 2 groups. Before and after surgery at different time points, ODI, VAS index, and imaging parameters (including Taillard index, inter-vertebral height, sagittal dislocation, and forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae) were compared.The average operation time, the blooding volume, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were significantly less in PELD than in control group. The ODI and VAS index in PELD group showed a significantly immediate improving on the same day after the surgery. However, Taillard index, intervertebral height, sagittal dislocation in control group showed an immediate improving after surgery, but no changes in PELD group till 12-month after surgery. The forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae was significantly increased and decreased in PELD and in control group, respectively.PELD operation was superior in terms of operation time, bleeding volume, recovery period, and financial

  20. Comprehensive comparing percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy with posterior lumbar internal fixation for treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yapeng; Zhang, Wei; Qie, Suhui; Zhang, Nan; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The study was to comprehensively compare the postoperative outcome and imaging parameter characters in a short/middle period between the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and the internal fixation of bone graft fusion (the most common form is posterior lumbar interbody fusion [PLIF]) for the treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis after a previous lumbar internal fixation surgery. In this retrospective case-control study, we collected the medical records from 11 patients who received PELD operation (defined as PELD group) for and from 13 patients who received the internal fixation of bone graft fusion of lumbar posterior vertebral lamina decompression (defined as control group) for the treatment of the lumbar disc prolapse combined with stable retrolisthesis at Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University (Shijiazhuang, China) from May 2010 to December 2015. The operation time, the bleeding volume of perioperation, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were compared between 2 groups. Before and after surgery at different time points, ODI, VAS index, and imaging parameters (including Taillard index, inter-vertebral height, sagittal dislocation, and forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae) were compared. The average operation time, the blooding volume, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were significantly less in PELD than in control group. The ODI and VAS index in PELD group showed a significantly immediate improving on the same day after the surgery. However, Taillard index, intervertebral height, sagittal dislocation in control group showed an immediate improving after surgery, but no changes in PELD group till 12-month after surgery. The forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae was significantly increased and decreased in PELD and in control group, respectively. PELD operation was superior in terms of operation time, bleeding volume, recovery period

  1. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with stand-alone Trabecular Metal cages for repeatedly recurrent lumbar disc herniation and back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lequin, Michiel B.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Bouma, Gerrit J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with recurrent sciatica due to repeated reherniation of the intervertebral disc carry a poor prognosis for recovery and create a large burden on society. There is no consensus about the best treatment for this patient group. The goal of this study was to evaluate the 12-month results of the

  2. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel

    2007-01-01

    consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2......) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means...... of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted...

  3. Cirugía de la columna lumbar degenerativa

    OpenAIRE

    López-Sastre Núñez, Antonio; Menéndez Díaz, D.; Vaquero Morillo, F.

    1998-01-01

    En una realidad la gran demanda actual de fusiones de la columna lumbar. Los resultados clínicos obtenidos con la fusión posterolateral se ven claramente superados con las fusiones anteroposteriores. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica de las diferentes formas de fusión de la columna lumbar y la reaparición del concepto de soporte de columna anterior. Se establecen las indicaciones y las ventajas de la fusión anteroposterior lumbar, describiéndose las posibles vías de abordaje posterior y a...

  4. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Benezech

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov’Spine, France composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%, quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%, and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones.

  5. Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic decompression and cageless percutaneous bone graft transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Krishnan

    2018-01-01

    RESULTS: All the outcome measures were significant (P < 0.05 and fusion achieved in all with a mean follow-up period was 39 ± 6.36 months. Operating room time was 250.23 ± 52.90 min (187–327. Postoperative LOH hospital stay was 29.92 ± 4.94 h (24–39. The tolerance score was 2.30 ± 0.85 (1–3. One superficial bone graft site infection resolved with antibiotics. CONCLUSION: It not appealing to be recommendable to general population inspite of it being low cost and with negligible complications. Further research and engineered tools are needed to reduce the operating time.

  6. Assessment of the suitability of biodegradable rods for use in posterior lumbar fusion: An in-vitro biomechanical evaluation and finite element analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fon-Yih Tsuang

    Full Text Available Interbody fusion with posterior instrumentation is a common method for treating lumbar degenerative disc diseases. However, the high rigidity of the fusion construct may produce abnormal stresses at the adjacent segment and lead to adjacent segment degeneration (ASD. As such, biodegradable implants are becoming more popular for use in orthopaedic surgery. These implants offer sufficient stability for fusion but at a reduced stiffness. Tailored to degrade over a specific timeframe, biodegradable implants could potentially mitigate the drawbacks of conventional stiff constructs and reduce the loading on adjacent segments. Six finite element models were developed in this study to simulate a spine with and without fixators. The spinal fixators used both titanium rods and biodegradable rods. The models were subjected to axial loading and pure moments. The range of motion (ROM, disc stresses, and contact forces of facet joints at adjacent segments were recorded. A 3-point bending test was performed on the biodegradable rods and a dynamic bending test was performed on the spinal fixators according to ASTM F1717-11a. The finite element simulation showed that lumbar spinal fusion using biodegradable implants had a similar ROM at the fusion level as at adjacent levels. As the rods degraded over time, this produced a decrease in the contact force at adjacent facet joints, less stress in the adjacent disc and greater loading on the anterior bone graft region. The mechanical tests showed the initial average fatigue strength of the biodegradable rods was 145 N, but this decreased to 115N and 55N after 6 months and 12 months of soaking in solution. Also, both the spinal fixator with biodegradable rods and with titanium rods was strong enough to withstand 5,000,000 dynamic compression cycles under a 145 N axial load. The results of this study demonstrated that biodegradable rods may present more favourable clinical outcomes for lumbar fusion. These polymer rods

  7. Elimination of Subsidence with 26-mm-Wide Cages in Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gernot; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Gandevia, Lena; Hussain, Ibrahim; Nakhla, Jonathan; Zubkov, Micaella; Härtl, Roger

    2017-08-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (ELIF) has gained popularity as a minimally invasive technique for indirect decompression. However, graft subsidence potentially threatens long-term success of ELIF. This study evaluated whether 26-mm-wide cages can eliminate subsidence and subsequent loss of decompression in ELIF. Patients undergoing ELIF surgery using a 26-mm-wide cage were analyzed retrospectively. Patient demographics and perioperative data for radiographic and clinical outcomes were recorded. Radiographic parameters included regional sagittal lumbar lordosis and foraminal and disc height. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale. Subsidence of 26-mm-wide cages was compared with previous outcomes of patients undergoing ELIF using 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages. There were 21 patients and 28 spinal segments analyzed. Radiographic outcome measures such as disc and foraminal height revealed significant improvement at follow-up compared with before surgery (P = 0.001). Postoperative to last follow-up cage subsidence translated into 0.34 mm ± 0.26 and -0.55 mm ± 0.64 in disc and foraminal height loss, respectively. Patients with 26-mm-wide cages experienced less subsidence by means of disc (26 mm vs. 18 mm and 22 mm, P ≤ 0.05) and foraminal height (26 mm vs. 18 mm, P = 0.005; 26 mm vs. 22 mm, P = 0.208) loss compared with patients receiving 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages. The 26-mm-wide cages almost eliminated cage subsidence in ELIF. Compared with 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages, 26-mm-wide cages significantly reduced cage subsidence in ELIF at midterm follow-up. A 26-mm-wide cage should be used in ELIF to achieve sustained indirect decompression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. A new bone surrogate model for testing interbody device subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony G; Aiyangar, Ameet K; Anderson, Paul A; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn

    2011-07-15

    An in vitro biomechanical study investigating interbody device subsidence measures in synthetic vertebrae, polyurethane foam blocks, and human cadaveric vertebrae. To compare subsidence measures of bone surrogates with human vertebrae for interbody devices varying in size/placement. Bone surrogates are alternatives when human cadaveric vertebrae are unavailable. Synthetic vertebrae modeling cortices, endplates, and cancellous bone have been developed as an alternative to polyurethane foam blocks for testing interbody device subsidence. Indentors placed on the endplates of synthetic vertebrae, foam blocks, and human vertebrae were subjected to uniaxial compression. Subsidence, measured with custom-made extensometers, was evaluated for an indentor seated either centrally or peripherally on the endplate. Failure force and indentation stiffness were determined from force-displacement curves. Subsidence measures in human vertebrae varied with indentor placement: failure forces were higher and indentors subsided less with peripheral placement. Subsidence measures in foam blocks were insensitive to indentor size/placement; they were similar to human vertebrae for centrally placed but not for peripherally placed indentors. Although subsidence measures in synthetic vertebrae were sensitive to indentor size/placement, failure force and indentation stiffness were overestimated, and subsidence underestimated, for both centrally placed and peripherally placed indentors. The synthetic endplate correctly represented the human endplate geometry, and thus, failure force, stiffness, and subsidence in synthetic vertebrae were sensitive to indentor size/placement. However, the endplate was overly strong and thus synthetic vertebrae did not accurately model indentor subsidence in human cadaveric vertebrae. Foam blocks captured subsidence measures more accurately than synthetic vertebrae for centrally placed indentors, but because of their uniform density were not sufficiently robust to

  9. SACRALISATION OF LUMBAR VERTEBRAE

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeta Wazir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lumbar backache is a very common problem nowadays. Sacralisation of lumbar vertebrae is one of the cause for that. During routine osteology teaching a sacrum with incomplete attached lumbar 5 vertebrae is seen. Observation: Incompletely fused L 5 vertebrae with sacrum is seen. The bodies of the vertebrae are fused but the transverse process of left side is completely fused with the ala of sacrum.But on the right side is incompletely fused. Conclusion: The person ...

  10. Is There Variation in Procedural Utilization for Lumbar Spine Disorders Between a Fee-for-Service and Salaried Healthcare System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Makanji, Heeren; Jiang, Wei; Koehlmoos, Tracey; Bono, Christopher M; Haider, Adil H

    2017-12-01

    Whether compensation for professional services drives the use of those services is an important question that has not been answered in a robust manner. Specifically, there is a growing concern that spine care practitioners may preferentially choose more costly or invasive procedures in a fee-for-service system, irrespective of the underlying lumbar disorder being treated. (1) Were proportions of interbody fusions higher in the fee-for-service setting as opposed to the salaried Department of Defense setting? (2) Were the odds of interbody fusion increased in a fee-for-service setting after controlling for indications for surgery? Patients surgically treated for lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis (2006-2014) were identified. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether the surgery was performed in the fee-for-service setting (beneficiaries receive care at a civilian facility with expenses covered by TRICARE insurance) or at a Department of Defense facility (direct care). There were 28,344 patients in the entire study, 21,290 treated in fee-for-service and 7054 treated in Department of Defense facilities. Differences in the rates of fusion-based procedures, discectomy, and decompression between both healthcare settings were assessed using multinomial logistic regression to adjust for differences in case-mix and surgical indication. TRICARE beneficiaries treated for lumbar spinal disorders in the fee-for-service setting had higher odds of receiving interbody fusions (fee-for-service: 7267 of 21,290 [34%], direct care: 1539 of 7054 [22%], odds ratio [OR]: 1.25 [95% confidence interval 1.20-1.30], p service setting irrespective of the underlying diagnosis. These results speak to the existence of provider inducement within the field of spine surgery. This reality portends poor performance for surgical practices and hospitals in Accountable Care Organizations and bundled payment programs in which provider inducement is allowed to

  11. Risk Factors for Blood Transfusion With Primary Posterior Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basques, Bryce A; Anandasivam, Nidharshan S; Webb, Matthew L; Samuel, Andre M; Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Bohl, Daniel D; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-11-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To identify factors associated with blood transfusion for primary posterior lumbar fusion surgery, and to identify associations between blood transfusion and other postoperative complications. Blood transfusion is a relatively common occurrence for patients undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion. There is limited information available describing which patients are at increased risk for blood transfusion, and the relationship between blood transfusion and short-term postoperative outcomes is poorly characterized. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was used to identify patients undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion from 2011 to 2013. Multivariate analysis was used to find associations between patient characteristics and blood transfusion, along with associations between blood transfusion and postoperative outcomes. Out of 4223 patients, 704 (16.7%) had a blood transfusion. Age 60 to 69 (relative risk [RR] 1.6), age greater than equal to 70 (RR 1.7), American Society of Anesthesiologists class greater than equal to 3 (RR 1.1), female sex (RR 1.1), pulmonary disease (RR 1.2), preoperative hematocrit less than 36.0 (RR 2.0), operative time greater than equal to 310 minutes (RR 2.9), 2 levels (RR 1.6), and 3 or more levels (RR 2.1) were independently associated with blood transfusion. Interbody fusion (RR 0.9) was associated with decreased rates of blood transfusion. Receiving a blood transfusion was significantly associated with any complication (RR 1.7), sepsis (RR 2.6), return to the operating room (RR 1.7), deep surgical site infection (RR 2.6), and pulmonary embolism (RR 5.1). Blood transfusion was also associated with an increase in postoperative length of stay of 1.4 days (P blood transfusion while undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion, and risk factors for these occurrences were characterized. Strategies to minimize blood loss might be considered in these

  12. Aggressive discectomy for single level lumbar disk herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamrul Ahsan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive open lumbar discectomy is the most commonly performed surgical procedure for patients with persistent low back and leg pain. In this retrospective study,  1,380 patients were evaluated for long-term results of aggressive discectomy for the single level lumbar disk herniation. Demographic data, surgical data, complications and reherniation rate were collected and clinical outcomes were assessed using visual analogue score (VAS, Oswestry disability index (ODI and modified Mcnab criteria. The mean follow-up period was 28.8 months. According to the modified Mcnab criteria, the long-term results were excellent in 640 cases, good in 445 cases, fair in 255 cases, and poor in 40 cases. The mean VAS scores for back and radicular pains and ODI at the end of 2 years were 1.1 ± 1.0, 1.5 ± 0.5 and 6.6 ± 3.1% respectively. The complications were foot drop (n=7, dural tear (n=14, superficial wound infection (n=17, discitis (n=37 and reherniation (n=64. The dural tear and superficial wound infections resolved after treatment but 28 discitis patients were treated by conservatively and the remaining 9 underwent surgery. Among reherniation patients, 58 underwent revision discectomy and 4 underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and stabilization. Aggressive discectomy is an effective treatment of lumbar disk herniation and maintains a lower incidence of reherniation but leads to a collapse of disc height and in long run gives rise to intervertebral instability and accelerates spondylosis.

  13. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required.

  14. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sá

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation.

  15. Retrospective exploration of risk factors for L5 radiculopathy following lumbar floating fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamagata, Masatsune; Ikeda, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Fumitake; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Takane; Ohtori, Seiji

    2015-10-17

    Lumbar floating fusion occasionally causes postoperative adjacent segment disorder (ASD) at lumbosacral level, causing L5 spinal nerve disorder by L5-S1 foraminal stenosis. The disorder is considered to be one of the major outcomes of L5-S1 ASD, which has not been evaluated yet. The present study aimed to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of postoperative L5 spinal nerve disorder after lumbar interbody fusion extending to the L5 vertebra. We evaluated 125 patients with a diagnosis of spondylolisthesis who underwent floating fusion surgery with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with average postoperative period of 25.2 months. The patients were regarded as symptomatic with postoperative L5 spinal nerve disorder such as radicular pain/numbness in the lower limbs and/or motor dysfunction. We estimated and compared the wedging angle (frontal view) and height (lateral view) of the lumbosacral junction in pre- and postoperative plain X-ray images and the foraminal ratio (ratio of the narrower foraminal diameter to the wider diameter in the craniocaudal direction) in the preoperative magnetic resonance image. Risk factors for the incidence of L5 spinal nerve disorder were explored using multivariate logistic regression. Eight of the 125 patients (6.4%) were categorized as symptomatic, an average of 13.3 months after surgery. The wedging angle was significantly higher, and the foraminal ratio was significantly decreased in the symptomatic group (both P < 0.05) compared to the asymptomatic group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of possible risk factors revealed that the wedging angle, foraminal ratio, and multileveled fusion were statistically significant. Higher wedging angle and lower foraminal ratio in the lumbosacral junction were significantly predictive for the incidence of L5 nerve root disorder as well as multiple-leveled fusion. These findings indicate that lumbosacral fixation should be considered for patients with these risk factors even

  16. [Discarthrosis with hyperalgic lumbar multileveled radicular syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaru, D; Tiţu, Gabriela; Pendefunda, L

    2012-01-01

    The problems at the level of intervertebral discs are producing dysfunctions and important functional regression at the level of lumbar column, at a stage at which the patient could remain blocked in an anterior or lateral flexion position or producing an antalgic position of scoliosis that could incapacitate the patient to perform activities of daily living. The medical rehabilitation, in such cases, must seek not only the relief of local pain through different methods of obtaining it, but also the functional reeducation of the intervertebral articulations through specific analytical mobilization in order to achieve the biomechanical harmonization of the rachis. We report the case study of a 66 year-old patient who presented to our clinic for medical consult and physical therapy when he was diagnosed with discharthrosis, hyperalgic lumbar multileveled radiculopathy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. The lumbar x-ray showed osteophytes, disc narrowing at the level of L5-S1 and inter-apophysis arthrosis. The clinical examination revealed difficulty walking with pain in the right sacroiliac articulations and right sciatic emergence with plantar paraesthesia. The patient developed pain induced scoliosis on the right side that restricted the lumbar range of motion and prevented the right flexion blocking him into an left flexion, any attempt of straightening inducing pain. The condition was treated using specific analytical lumbar mobilization for the realignment of the vertebrae complex. In this case study, we found that functional reeducation in cases of pain induced deviations of the rachis of the column should be centered on the harmonization of inadequate pressure and position of the complex intervertebral articulations.

  17. Herniated lumbar disc

    OpenAIRE

    Jordon, Jo; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2009-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30-50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  18. Herniated lumbar disc

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Jo; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2011-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  19. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal stenosis with instability: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative spinal stenosis and instability requiring multilevel spine surgery has been associated with large blood losses. Factors that affect perioperative blood loss include time of surgery, surgical procedure, patient height, combined anterior/posterior approaches, number of levels fused, blood salvage techniques, and the use of anti-fibrinolytic medications. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in spine surgery. Methods This retrospective case control study includes 97 patients who had to undergo surgery because of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and instability. All operations included spinal decompression, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (4-5 segments. Forty-six patients received 1 g tranexamic acid intravenous, preoperative and six hours and twelve hours postoperative; 51 patients without tranexamic acid administration were evaluated as a control group. Based on the records, the intra- and postoperative blood losses were measured by evaluating the drainage and cell saver systems 6, 12 and 24 hours post operation. Additionally, hemoglobin concentration and platelet concentration were reviewed. Furthermore, the number of red cell transfusions given and complications associated with tranexamic acid were assessed. Results The postoperative hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.0130 showing superiority for tranexamic acid use (tranexamic acid group: 11.08 g/dl, SD: 1.68; control group: 10.29 g/dl, SD: 1.39. The intraoperative cell saver volume and drainage volume after 24 h demonstrated a significant difference as well, which indicates a less blood loss in the tranexamic acid group than the control group. The postoperative drainage volume at12 hours showed no significant differences; nor did the platelet concentration Allogenic blood transfusion (two red cell units was needed for eight patients

  20. Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Reoperation for Recurrent Sciatica Symptoms: A Retrospective Analysis of Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in 94 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junlong; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Kang; Li, Changqing; Zhou, Yue

    2018-01-01

    Recurrent symptoms of sciatica after previous surgical intervention is a relatively common and troublesome clinical problem. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar decompression has been proved to be an effective method for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. However, the prognostic factors and outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar reoperation (PELR) for recurrent sciatica symptoms were still unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and prognostic factors of patients who underwent PELR for recurrent sciatica symptoms. From 2009 to 2015, 94 patients who underwent PELR for recurrent sciatica symptoms were enrolled. The primary surgeries include transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (n = 16), microendoscopic discectomy (n = 31), percutaneous endoscopic lumbar decompression (PELD, n = 17), and open discectomy (n = 30). The mean follow-up period was 36 months, and 86 (91.5%) patients had obtained at least 24 months' follow-up. Of the 94 patients with adequate follow-up, 51 (54.3%) exhibited excellent improvement, 23 (24.5%) had good improvement, and 7 (7.4%) had fair improvement according to modified Macnab criteria. The average re-recurrence rate was 9.6%, with no difference among the different primary surgery groups (PELD, 3/17; microendoscopic discectomy, 2/31; open discectomy, 3/30; transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, 1/16). There was a trend toward greater rates of symptom recurrence in the primary group of PELD who underwent percutaneous endoscopic lumbar reoperation compared with other groups, but this did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). Multivariate analysis suggested that age, body mass index, and surgeon level was independent prognostic factors. Obesity (hazard ratio 13.98, 95% confidence interval 3.394-57.57; P sciatica symptoms regardless of different primary operation type. Obesity, inferior surgeon level, and patient age older than 40 years were associated with a worse prognosis. Obesity was also a strong and

  1. Risk factors for adjacent segment degeneration after surgical correction of degenerative lumbar scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-yong Ha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Degenerative lumbar scoliosis surgery can lead to development of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD after lumbar or thoracolumbar fusion. Its incidence, risk factors, morbidity and correlation between radiological and clinical symptoms of ASD have no consensus. We evaluated the correlation between the occurrence of radiologic adjacent segment disease and certain imperative parameters. Materials and Methods: 98 patients who had undergone surgical correction and lumbar/thoracolumbar fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis with a minimum 5 year followup were included in the study. We evaluated the correlation between the occurrence of radiologic adjacent segment disease and imperative patient parameters like age at operation, sex, body mass index (BMI, medical comorbidities and bone mineral density (BMD. The radiological parameters taken into consideration were Cobb′s angle, angle type, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, intercristal line, preoperative existence of an ASD on plain radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and surgical parameters were number of the fusion level, decompression level, floating OP (interlumbar fusion excluding L5-S1 level and posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Visual Analogue Score (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI. Results: ASD was present in 44 (44.9% patients at an average period of 48.0 months (range 6-98 months. Factors related to occurrence of ASD were preoperative existence of disc degeneration (as revealed by MRI and age at operation ( P = 0.0001, 0.0364. There were no statistically significant differences between radiological adjacent segment degeneration and clinical results (VAS, P = 0.446; ODI, P = 0.531. Conclusions: Patients over the age of 65 years and with preoperative disc degeneration (as revealed by plain radiograph and MRI were at a higher risk of developing ASD.

  2. Surgical treatment of low lumbar osteoporotic vertebral collapse: a single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Honjoh, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Takumi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Low lumbar osteoporotic vertebral collapse (OVC) has not been well documented compared with OVC of the thoracolumbar spine. The differences between low lumbar and thoracolumbar lesions should be studied to provide better treatment. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical and imaging features as well as outcomes of low lumbar OVC and to discuss the appropriate surgical treatment. Thirty patients (10 men; 20 women; mean age 79.3 ± 4.7 years [range 70-88 years]) with low lumbar OVC affecting levels below L-3 underwent surgical treatment. The clinical symptoms, morphological features of affected vertebra, sagittal spinopelvic alignment, neurological status before and after surgery, and surgical procedures were reviewed at a mean follow-up period of 2.4 years. The main clinical symptom was radicular leg pain. Most patients had old compression fractures at the thoracolumbar level. The affected vertebra was flat-type and concave or H-shaped type, not wedge type as often found in thoracolumbar OVC. There were mismatches between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis on plain radiographs. On CT and MR images, foraminal stenosis was seen in 18 patients (60%) and canal stenosis in 24 patients (80%). Decompression with short fusion using a posterior approach was performed. Augmentations of vertebroplasty, posterolateral fusion, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion were performed based on the presence/absence of local kyphosis of lumbar spine, cleft formation, and/or intervertebral instability. Although the neurological and visual analog scale scores improved postoperatively, 8 patients (26.7%) developed postoperative complications mainly related to instrumentation failure. In patients with postoperative complications, lumbar spine bone mineral density was significantly low, but the spinopelvic alignment showed no correlation when compared with those without complications. The main types of low lumbar OVC were flat-type and concave type, which resulted in neurological

  3. Cervical disc prosthesis replacement and interbody fusion — a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu–Hua, Jia

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the new functional intervertebral cervical disc prosthesis replacement and the classical interbody fusion operation, including the clinical effect and maintenance of the stability and segmental motion of cervical vertebrae. Twenty-four patients with single C5-6 intervertebral disk hernias were specifically selected and divided randomly into two groups: One group underwent artificial cervical disc replacement and the other group received interbody fusion. All patients were followed up and evaluated. The operation time for the single disc replacement was (130 ± 50) minutes and interbody fusion was (105 ± 53) minutes. Neurological or vascular complications were not observed during or after operation. There was no prosthesis subsidence or extrusion. The JOA score of the group with prosthesis replacement increased from an average of 8.6 to 15.8. The JOA score of the group with interbody fusion increased from an average of 9 to 16.2. The clinical effect and the ROM of the adjacent space of the two groups showed no statistical difference. The short follow-up time does not support the advantage of the cervical disc prosthesis. The clinical effect and the maintenance of the function of the motion of the intervertebral space are no better than the interbody fusion. At least 5 years of follow-up is needed to assess the long-term functionality of the prosthesis and the influence on adjacent levels. PMID:17180356

  4. Case report: Greater meningeal inflammation in lumbar than in ventricular region in human bacterial meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Naija, Walid; Matéo, Joaquim; Raskine, Laurent; Timsit, Jean-François; Lukascewicz, Anne-Claire; George, Bernard; Payen, Didier; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    Differences in the composition of ventricular and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) based on single pairs of samples have previously been described. We describe a patient that developed post-surgical recurrent meningitis monitored by daily biochemical and bacteriological CSF analysis, simultaneously withdrawn from lumbar space and ventricles. A 20-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the ICU after a resection of a chordoma that extended from the sphenoidal sinus to the anterior face of C2. C...

  5. Current strategies for the restoration of adequate lordosis during lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrey, Cédric; Darnis, Alice

    2015-01-18

    Not restoring the adequate lumbar lordosis during lumbar fusion surgery may result in mechanical low back pain, sagittal unbalance and adjacent segment degeneration. The objective of this work is to describe the current strategies and concepts for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. Theoretical lordosis can be evaluated from the measurement of the pelvic incidence and from the analysis of spatial organization of the lumbar spine with 2/3 of the lordosis given by the L4-S1 segment and 85% by the L3-S1 segment. Technical aspects involve patient positioning on the operating table, release maneuvers, type of instrumentation used (rod, screw-rod connection, interbody cages), surgical sequence and the overall surgical strategy. Spinal osteotomies may be required in case of fixed kyphotic spine. AP combined surgery is particularly efficient in restoring lordosis at L5-S1 level and should be recommended. Finally, not one but several strategies may be used to achieve the need for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery.

  6. Current strategies for the restoration of adequate lordosis during lumbar fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrey, Cédric; Darnis, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Not restoring the adequate lumbar lordosis during lumbar fusion surgery may result in mechanical low back pain, sagittal unbalance and adjacent segment degeneration. The objective of this work is to describe the current strategies and concepts for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. Theoretical lordosis can be evaluated from the measurement of the pelvic incidence and from the analysis of spatial organization of the lumbar spine with 2/3 of the lordosis given by the L4-S1 segment and 85% by the L3-S1 segment. Technical aspects involve patient positioning on the operating table, release maneuvers, type of instrumentation used (rod, screw-rod connection, interbody cages), surgical sequence and the overall surgical strategy. Spinal osteotomies may be required in case of fixed kyphotic spine. AP combined surgery is particularly efficient in restoring lordosis at L5-S1 level and should be recommended. Finally, not one but several strategies may be used to achieve the need for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. PMID:25621216

  7. Minimally invasive spine surgery in lumbar spondylodiscitis: a retrospective single-center analysis of 67 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschugg, Anja; Hartmann, Sebastian; Lener, Sara; Rietzler, Andreas; Sabrina, Neururer; Thomé, Claudius

    2017-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques have been developed to minimize tissue damage, reduce narcotic requirements, decrease blood loss, and, therefore, potentially avoid prolonged immobilization. Thus, the purpose of the present retrospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of a minimally invasive posterior approach with transforaminal lumbar interbody debridement and fusion plus pedicle screw fixation in lumbar spondylodiscitis in comparison to an open surgical approach. Furthermore, treatment decisions based on the patient´s preoperative condition were analyzed. 67 patients with lumbar spondylodiscitis treated at our department were included in this retrospective analysis. The patients were categorized into two groups based on the surgical procedure: group (MIS) minimally invasive lumbar spinal fusion (n = 19); group (OPEN) open lumbar spinal fusion (n = 48). Evaluation included radiological parameters on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), laboratory values, and clinical outcome. Preoperative MRI showed higher rates of paraspinal abscess (35.5 vs. 5.6%; p = 0.016) and multilocular location in the OPEN group (20 vs. 0%, p = 0.014). Overall pain at discharge was less in the MIS group: NRS 2.4 ± 1 vs. NRS 1.6 ± 1 (p = 0.036). The duration of hospital stay was longer in the OPEN than the MIS group (19.1 ± 12 days vs. 13.7 ± 5 days, p = 0.018). The open technique is effective in all varieties of spondylodiscitis inclusive in epidural abscess formation. MIS can be applied safely and effectively as well in selected cases, even with epidural abscess.

  8. A method for quantitative measurement of lumbar intervertebral disc structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tunset, Andreas; Kjær, Per; Samir Chreiteh, Shadi

    2013-01-01

    There is a shortage of agreement studies relevant for measuring changes over time in lumbar intervertebral disc structures. The objectives of this study were: 1) to develop a method for measurement of intervertebral disc height, anterior and posterior disc material and dural sac diameter using MRI......, 2) to evaluate intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability for the measurements included, and 3) to identify factors compromising agreement....

  9. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have lumbar spinal canal stenosis, your treatment will depend on how bad your symptoms are. If your pain is mild and you haven’t had it long, you can try an exercise program or a physical therapy program. This can strengthen your back muscles and ...

  10. Epidurography in lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, J.G.; Hauge, O.

    1982-04-01

    Seventeen patients with lytic lumbar spondylolisthesis (Meyerding grade I-II) and radicular symptoms were examined by epidurography in addition to radiculomyelography before surgical treatment. Epidurography is considered more suitble than radiculomyelogrphy for assessing this condition because narrowing of the epidural space and compression of the nerve roots, due to osteofibrous changes at the lysis, are more consistently demonstrated.

  11. Surgical management of pyogenic discitis of lumbar region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devkota, Pramod; Krishnakumar, R; Renjith Kumar, J

    2014-04-01

    Retrospective review of patients who had pyogenic discitis and were managed surgically. To analyze the bacteriology, pathology, management and outcome of pyogenic discitis of the lumbar region treated surgically. Surgical management of pyogenic discitis is still an infrequently used modality of treatment. A total of 42 patients comprised of 33 males and 9 females who had pyogenic discitis with a mean age of 51.61 years (range, 16-75 years) were included in this study. All the cases were confirmed as having pyogenic discitis by pus culture report and histopathological examination. The mean follow-up period was 41.9 months. Debridement and posterior lumbar interbody fusion with autologous iliac bone graft was done in all cases. Thirteen (30.95%) patients had other medical co-morbidities. Five cases had a previous operation of the spine, and three cases had a history of vertebral fracture. Three patients were operated for gynaecological problems, and four cases had a history of urological surgery. L4-5 level was the most frequent site of pyogenic discitis. The most common bacterium isolated was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Radiologically good fusion was seen in the majority of patients. Pyogenic discitis should be suspected in people having pain and local tenderness in the spinal region with a rise in inflammatory parameters in blood. The most common bacterium was S. aureus, but there were still a greater number of patients infected with other types of bacteria. Therefore, antibiotics therapy should be started only after isolating the bacteria and making the culture sensitivity report.

  12. [Efficacy of Coflex in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Y; Meng, X L; Li, D Y; Zhang, X N; Wang, Y S

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To study the clinical results of Coflex and lumbar posterior decompression and fusion in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis at L(4-5). Methods: Thirty-eight patients with Grade Ⅰ degenerative spondylolisthesis, from January 2008 to December 2011 in Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University were reviewed, and patients were divided into two groups by randomness. Group A was treated with Coflex and group B with pedicle instrumentation and interbody fusion. Fifteen patients were included in group A, and 23 patients were included in group B. In group A, the average age was (56.3±9.1) years. In group B, the average age was (58.2±11.2) years. The clinical results were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Slip distance (SD) was measured before and after surgery, and the changes of intervertebral angle at index level and adjacent level were also recorded. Results: The follow-up period was 36 to 68 months, with the average of (39±14) months in the both groups. The operation time and bleeding volume of patients in group A were significantly less than that of group B ( P surgery, the difference at upper and below adjacent segment before and after surgery were statistically significant. Conclusions: Coflex interspinous dynamic stabilization system has same excellent clinical results as pedicle screw instrumentation and fusion surgery for the treatment of L(4-5) degenerative spondylolisthesis; no significant progression of spondylolisthesis been observed during more than 3 years follow-up, and no obvious adjacent segment degeneration has been found.

  13. Tertiary syphilis in the lumbar spine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Niu, Feng; Liu, Lidi; Sha, Hui; Wang, Yimei; Zhao, Song

    2017-07-24

    The incidence of tertiary syphilis involvement in the spinal column with destructive bone lesions is very rare. It is difficult to establish the correct diagnosis from radiographs and histological examination alone. Limited data are available on surgical treatment to tertiary syphilitic spinal lesions. In this article, we report a case of tertiary syphilis in the lumbar spine with osteolytic lesions causing cauda equina compression. A 44-year-old man who suffered with low back pain for 6 months and progressive radiating pain at lower extremity for 1 week. Radiologic findings showed osteolytic lesion and new bone formation in the parts of the bodies of L4 and L5. Serum treponema pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) test was positive. A surgery of posterior debridement, interbody and posterolateral allograft bone fusion with instrumentation from L3 to S1 was performed. The low back pain and numbness abated after operation. But the follow-up radiographs showed absorption of the bone grafts and failure of instrumentation. A Charcot's arthropathy was formed between L4 and L5. It is challenging to diagnose the tertiary syphilis in the spine. Surgery is a reasonable auxiliary method to antibiotic therapy for patients who suffered with neuropathy. Charcot's arthropathy should be considered as an operative complication.

  14. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of 18F-fluoride PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van; Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn

    2015-01-01

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of 18 F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after 18 F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) 18 F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following 18 F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, 18 F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest Oswestry Disability Index

  15. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Radiology /Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) {sup 18}F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following {sup 18}F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, {sup 18}F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest

  16. ASSOCIATION OF SPINOPELVIC PARAMETERS WITH THE LOCATION OF LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Coelho de Léo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To associate spinopelvic parameters, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt and lumbar lordosis with the axial location of lumbar disc herniation.Methods:Retrospective study, which evaluated imaging and medical records of 61 patients with lumbar disc herniation, who underwent surgery with decompression and instrumented lumbar fusion in only one level. Pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt and lumbar lordosis with simple lumbopelvic lateral radiographs, which included the lumbar spine, the sacrum and the proximal femur. The affected segment was identified as the level and location of lumbar disc herniation in the axial plane with MRI scans.Results:Of 61 patients, 29 (47.5% had low lumbar lordosis; in this group 24 (82.8% had central disc herniation, 4 (13.8% had lateral recess disc herniation and 1 (3.4% had extraforaminal disc herniation (p<0.05. Of the 61 patients, 18 (29.5% had low sacral slope; of this group 15 (83.3% had central disc herniation and 3 (16.7% had disc herniation in lateral recess (p<0.05.Conclusions:There is a trend towards greater load distribution in the anterior region of the spine when the spine has hypolordotic curve. This study found an association between low lordosis and central disc herniation, as well as low sacral slope and central disc herniation.

  17. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  18. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... performance requirements specified in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Test procedure. (1) Soak the lumbar... Figure U2-A in appendix A to this subpart. Torque the lumbar hex nut (p/n 9000057) on to the lumbar cable...

  19. Lumbar gibbus in storage diseases and bone dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Lachman, R.S. [International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Anyane-Yeboa, K. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Roye, D.P. Jr. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to review the problem of lumbar gibbus in children with storage diseases and bone dysplasias utilizing plain films and MR imaging. Materials and methods. Clinical histories and radiographic images in five patients with storage diseases [four mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) and one mucolipidosis] and two with achondroplasia were reviewed. The International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (Los Angeles, Calif.), surveyed for all patients with lumbar gibbus and skeletal dysplasias, provided 12 additional cases. Results. All patients had localized gibbus of the upper lumbar spine, characterized by anterior wedging and posterior displacement of the vertebrae at the apex of the curve, producing a beaked appearance. The curve, exaggerated in the sitting or standing position, was most severe in the two patients with MPS-IV (one of whom died). Both developed severe neurologic signs and symptoms requiring surgical intervention. In four patients, MR images demonstrated the apex of the curve to be at or below the conus. Two patients demonstrated anterior herniation of the intervertebral discs at the apex of the curve, though the signal intensity of the intervertebral discs was normal. Conclusion. Lumbar gibbus has important neurologic and orthopedic implications, and is most severe in patients with MPS. The etiology of the gibbus with vertebral beaking is multifactorial and includes poor truncal muscle tone, weight-bearing forces, growth disturbance and anterior disc herniation. The curve is generally at or below the conus. Neurologic complications are unusual, although orthopedic problems can arise. Due to their longer survival, patients with achondroplasia or Morquio`s disease are more vulnerable to eventual gibbus-related musculoskeletal complications. (orig.). With 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Sagittal plane lumbar loading when navigating an obstacle and carrying a load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriella, Jeevaka B; Perry, Carolyn J; Hawkins, Kara M; Shanahan, Camille J; Gage, William H; Moore, Anne E

    2016-11-01

    The current study quantified lumbar loading while carrying an anterior load mass and navigating an obstacle. Eight healthy male participants walked down a walkway and crossed an obstacle under three randomised LOAD conditions; empty-box (2 KG), five kilogram (5 KG) and ten kilogram (10 KG). Each walk was assessed at two events: left foot mid-stance (LMS) and right toe-crossing (TC) to characterise any changes from approach to crossing. Measures of interest included: trunk pitch, L4/L5 joint moment, compression, joint anterior-posterior shear and erector spinae activation. Findings demonstrate that obstacle crossing extended posture by 50, 41, 44%, respectively for each carried load magnitude. Further, these results indicate that shear rather than compressive loading may be an important consideration during crossing due to increase by 8, 9, 22% from LMS to TC for each load magnitude tested. These results provide insight into sagittal lumbar loading when navigating an obstacle while carrying a load. Practitioner Summary: The risk of carrying while navigating obstacles on the lumbar spine is not completely understood. The forces at the lumbar spine while simultaneously carrying and obstacle crossing were analysed. Data indicate that carrying and obstacle crossing influence lumbar shear loads, thereby moderately increasing the relative risk at lumbar spine.

  1. Influence of Physiological Loading on the Lumbar Spine of National Level Athletes in Different Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozan, Mansoorehossadat; Rouhollahi, Vahid; Rastogi, Amit; Dureha, Dilip Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The lumbar spine is subjected to considerable stress during many athletic efforts. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of physiological loading on the lumbar spine in national male players of different games, which may be predictive of the future development of low back pain and injury symptoms. Thirty-four national players (12 cricket players, 12 field hockey players, and 10 basketball players) underwent magnetic resonance imaging, and selected geometric variables including intervertebral disc angles, the Farfan ratio, the lumbar body index, the compression deformity ratio, the biconcave deformity ratio and the anterior wedge deformity ratio were measured using KINOVEA-0.8.15 software and syngo fast view software and calculated using specific formulas. The results indicated a significant difference in the intervertebral disc angle between the three groups at the L2/3, L3/4 and L4/5 levels. In relation to the lumbar vertebral body shape and size, significant differences were found in the lumbar index at the L2 level, in the biconcave deformity at the L1 and L2 levels and in relation to the anterior wedge deformity at L2 between the three selected groups. Our data suggest that the different physiological loadings in the selected sports play an important role in the development of degenerative changes of the lumbar spine, which may be considered a risk factor for future injury and/or low back pain in each specific sport because of the unique demands of each discipline.

  2. Short term outcome of posterior dynamic stabilization system in degenerative lumbar diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingyuan; Li, Chao; Chen, Ziqiang; Bai, Yushu; Li, Ming

    2014-11-01

    Decompression and fusion is considered as the 'gold standard' for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases, however, many disadvantages have been reported in several studies, recently like donor site pain, pseudoarthrosis, nonunion, screw loosening, instrumentation failure, infection, adjacent segment disease (ASDis) and degeneration. Dynamic neutralization system (Dynesys) avoids many of these disadvantages. This system is made up of pedicle screws, polyethylene terephthalate cords, and polycarbonate urethane spacers to stabilize the functional spinal unit and preserve the adjacent motion after surgeries. This was a retrospective cohort study to compare the effect of Dynesys for treating degenerative lumbar diseases with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) based on short term followup. Seventy five consecutive patients of lumbar degenerative disease operated between October 2010 and November 2012 were studied with a minimum followup of 2 years. Patients were divided into two groups according to the different surgeries. 30 patients underwent decompression and implantation of Dynesys in two levels (n = 29) or three levels (n = 1) and 45 patients underwent PLIF in two levels (n = 39) or three levels (n = 6). Clinical and radiographic outcomes between two groups were reviewed. Thirty patients (male:17, female:13) with a mean age of 55.96 ± 7.68 years were included in Dynesys group and the PLIF group included 45 patients (male:21, female:24) with a mean age of 54.69 ± 3.26 years. The average followup in Dynesys group and PLIF group was 2.22 ± 0.43 year (range 2-3.5 year) and 2.17 ± 0.76 year (range 2-3 year), respectively. Dynesys group showed a shorter operation time (141.06 ± 11.36 min vs. 176.98 ± 6.72 min, P degenerative disease showed clinical benefits with motion preservation of the operated segments, but does not have the significant advantage on motion preservation at adjacent segments, to avoid the degeneration of adjacent intervertebral disk.

  3. Differences in 3D vs. 2D analysis in lumbar spinal fusion simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hung-Wei; Bashkuev, Maxim; Pumberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2018-03-15

    Lumbar interbody fusion is currently the gold standard in treating patients with disc degeneration or segmental instability. Despite it having been used for several decades, the non-union rate remains high. A failed fusion is frequently attributed to an inadequate mechanical environment after instrumentation. Finite element (FE) models can provide insights into the mechanics of the fusion process. Previous fusion simulations using FE models showed that the geometries and material of the cage can greatly influence the fusion outcome. However, these studies used axisymmetric models which lacked realistic spinal geometries. Therefore, different modeling approaches were evaluated to understand the bone-formation process. Three FE models of the lumbar motion segment (L4-L5) were developed: 2D, Sym-3D and Nonsym-3D. The fusion process based on existing mechano-regulation algorithms using the FE simulations to evaluate the mechanical environment was then integrated into these models. In addition, the influence of different lordotic angles (5, 10 and 15°) was investigated. The volume of newly formed bone, the axial stiffness of the whole segment and bone distribution inside and surrounding the cage were evaluated. In contrast to the Nonsym-3D, the 2D and Sym-3D models predicted excessive bone formation prior to bridging (peak values with 36 and 9% higher than in equilibrium, respectively). The 3D models predicted a more uniform bone distribution compared to the 2D model. The current results demonstrate the crucial role of the realistic 3D geometry of the lumbar motion segment in predicting bone formation after lumbar spinal fusion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of preoperative diagnosis on the incidence of adjacent segment disease after lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Sciubba, Daniel M; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy F; Bydon, Mohamad

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD) requiring reoperation after lumbar fusion and to compare survivorship of adjacent levels according to preoperative diagnosis. Two hundred and seventy five patients who underwent instrumented posterolateral fusion of the lumbar spine without an interbody device were included. Patients were stratified by preoperative diagnoses (lumbar spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or postlaminectomy revision) and were followed for an average time of 59 months. The incidence of ASD requiring reoperation was calculated via Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis. A Cox-proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify the independent impact of preoperative diagnosis, age, sex, and number of segments fused on ASD development. A total of 59 (21.5%) patients required reoperation for ASD. Following Kaplan-Meier analysis, the predicted ASD-free survival was 79.7% (95% CI, 72.3-85.3) at 5 years and 53.4% (95% CI, 40.0-65.0) at 10 years. Moreover, the incidence was not significantly different between diagnostic subgroups by the log-rank test (P=0.144). Following risk factor analysis, the only significant factor associated with ASD was increasing age (RR 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00-1.05). Male sex, preoperative diagnosis, and the numbers of segments fused were not significantly associated with ASD. Few studies to date have specifically investigated the influence of pre-operative diagnosis on lumbar fusion outcomes. The incidence of ASD requiring reoperation was estimated at 20.3% and 45.7% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. In this study, the incidences of ASD based on preoperative diagnosis were not significantly different between groups; the only significant risk factor was increasing age.

  5. Lumbar disc cyst with contralateral radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Tourani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Disc cysts are uncommon intraspinal cystic lesions located in the ventrolateral epidural space. They communicate with the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc and cause symptoms by radicular compression. We report a unique case of lumbar disc cyst that was associated with disc herniation and contralateral radiculopathy. A 22 year old male presented with one month history of back-ache radiating to the left leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI showed L3-L4 disc herniation with annular tear and cystic lesion in the extradural space anterior to the thecal sac on right side, which increased in size over a period of 3 weeks. L3 laminectomy and bilateral discectomy and cyst excision was done with partial improvement of patients symptoms.

  6. Biomechanical evaluation of immediate stability with rectangular versus cylindrical interbody cages in stabilization of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb John K

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent cadaver studies show stability against axial rotation with a cylindrical cage is marginally superior to a rectangular cage. The purpose of this biomechanical study in cadaver spine was to evaluate the stability of a new rectangular titanium cage design, which has teeth similar to the threads of cylindrical cages to engage the endplates. Methods Ten motion segments (five L2-3, five L4-5 were tested. From each cadaver spine, one motion segment was fixed with a pair of cylindrical cages (BAK, Sulzer Medica and the other with paired rectangular cages (Rotafix, Corin Spinal. Each specimen was tested in an unconstrained state, after cage introduction and after additional posterior translaminar screw fixation. The range of motion (ROM in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and rotation was tested in a materials testing machine, with +/- 5 Nm cyclical load over 10 sec per cycle; data from the third cycle was captured for analysis. Results ROM in all directions was significantly reduced (p Conclusions There was no significant difference in immediate stability in any direction between the threaded cylindrical cage and the new design of the rectangular cage with endplate teeth.

  7. Does adding interbody fusion to posterolateral fusion increase success in the surgical management of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Meissner-Haecker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen INTRODUCCIÓN Frecuentemente se agrega una artrodesis intersomática a la artrodesis posterolateral en el tratamiento quirúrgico de la espondilolistesis degenerativa. Sin embargo, la real utilidad de esta medida no está clara. MÉTODOS Para responder esta pregunta utilizamos Epistemonikos, la mayor base de datos de revisiones sistemáticas en salud, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples fuentes de información, incluyendo MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, entre otras. Extrajimos los datos desde las revisiones identificadas, reanalizamos los datos de los estudios primarios, realizamos un metanálisis y preparamos una tabla de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. RESULTADOS Y CONCLUSIONES Identificamos cuatro revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen nueve estudios primarios, de los cuales ninguno corresponde a un ensayo aleatorizado. Concluimos que agregar una artrodesis intersomática a una artrodesis posterolateral en el tratamiento quirúrgico de la espondilolistesis degenerativa podría asociarse a una disminución en el deslizamiento del cuerpo vertebral y a una leve mejoría de la calidad de vida de los pacientes, pero asociado también a un mayor costo.

  8. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  9. Back pain in tennis players: a link with lumbar serve kinematics and range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Amity; O'Sullivan, Peter; Straker, Leon; Elliott, Bruce; Reid, Machar

    2014-02-01

    This study compared regional lumbar (upper and lower), pelvis, trunk, and lower limb kinematics between elite male adolescent players with and without a history of low back pain (LBP) during the kick and flat serves as well as regional lumbar mobility and serving kinematics relative to the end of range. Seven players with a history of LBP and confirmed L4/L5 injury and 13 controls matched for age, height, mass, and performance underwent a three-dimensional motion analysis during serving trials and lumbar mobility assessments. Regional lumbar, pelvis, trunk, and lower limb kinematics were compared between pain/no pain and kick/flat serves using a series of 2 × 2 mixed-model ANOVA, with independent samples t-tests used to compare regional lumbar mobility between pain/no pain. The pain group had significantly reduced lower lumbar mobility in every plane of motion than the no pain group. The pain group demonstrated less right lower lumbar and pelvis/shoulder rotation, greater right pelvic tilt, earlier peak right knee extension velocity during the drive phase of the tennis serves, and greater lower lumbar and pelvis left rotation, upper lumbar left lateral flexion, and anterior pelvis tilt during the forward-swing phase. All players approached their lumbar end of range during the serve. The results of this investigation suggest that a multidimensional LBP management and prevention strategy is required, including the assessment of regional spinal mobility, the lower limb and upper limb and spinal kinematics, and the integrated work between clinicians and coaches to adapt adverse technique.

  10. PARAMETRIC MODEL OF LUMBAR VERTEBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAPPETTI Nicola

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes the realization of a parametric/variational CAD model of a normotype lumbar vertebra, which could be used for improving the effectiveness of actual imaging techniques in informational augmentation of the orthopaedic and traumatological diagnosis. In addition it could be used for ergonomic static and dynamical analysis of the lumbar region and vertebral column.

  11. The need for lumbar-pelvic assessment in the resolution of chronic hamstring strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayi, Stephanie

    2010-07-01

    A lumbar-pelvic assessment and treatment model based on a review of clinical and anatomical research is presented for consideration in the treatment of chronic hamstring strain. The origin of the biceps femoris muscle attaches to the pelvis at the ischial tuberosity and to the sacrum via the sacrotuberous ligament. The biomechanics of the sacroiliac joint and hip, along with lumbar-pelvic stability, therefore play a significant role in hamstring function. Pelvic asymmetry and/or excessive anterior tilt can lead to increased tension at the biceps origin and increase functional demands on the hamstring group by inhibiting its synergists. Joint proprioceptive mechanisms may play a significant role in re-establishing balance between agonists and antagonists. An appreciation of neuromuscular connections as well as overall lumbar-pelvic structural assessment is recommended in conjunction with lumbar-pelvic strengthening exercises to help resolve chronic hamstring strain. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical management of multilevel lumbar spondylolysis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnis, A; Launay, O; Perrin, G; Barrey, C

    2014-05-01

    Multilevel lumbar spondylolysis accounts for less than 6% of the cases of lumbar spondylolysis and its treatment, as reported in the literature, has not been consistent. Fewer than ten cases presenting triple lumbar spondylosis have been published. We describe the case of a 33-year-old male presenting bilateral L3, L4, and L5 isthmic lysis with no spondylolisthesis or disc degeneration. The MRI and CT of the lumbar spine were decisive elements in the therapeutic choice and the surgical treatment performed was bilateral L3 and L4 isthmic repair via a combined anterior and posterior L5S1 approach. The clinical and radiological results were good at the last follow-up visit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Fixed-Angle, Posteriorly Connected Anterior Cage Reconstruction Improves Stiffness and Decreases Cancellous Subsidence in a Spondylectomy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Matthew W; Guss, Andrew; Bachus, Kent N; Spiker, W Ryan; Lawrence, Brandon D; Brodke, Darrel S

    2016-05-01

    An idealized biomechanical model. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a construct designed to minimize intervertebral cage subsidence and maximize stiffness. Reconstruction after vertebral resection typically involves posterior segmental fixation and anterior interbody support. However, poor bone density, adjuvant radiation, or the oncologic need for endplate resection make interbody device subsidence and resultant instrumentation failure a significant concern. An idealized thoracolumbar spondylectomy reconstruction model was constructed using titanium segmental instrumentation and Delrin plastic. In vivo mechanical stress was simulated on a custom multi-axis spine simulator. Rigid body position in space was measured using an optical motion-capture system. Cancellous subsidence was modeled using a 1 cm thick wafer of number 3 closed-cell Sawbones foam at one endplate. Ten foam specimens were tested in a control state consisting of posterior segmental fixation with a free interbody cage. Ten additional foam specimens were tested in the test state, with the Delrin interbody cage "connected" to the posterior rods using two additional pedicle screws placed into the cage. Foam indentation was quantified using a precision digital surface-mapping device, and subsidence volume calculated using geometric integration. The control group exhibited significantly greater foam indentation after cycling, with a mean subsidence volume of 1906 mm [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1810-2001] than the connected cage group subsidence volume of 977 mm (95% CI 928-1026 mm; P subsidence compared with a traditional unconnected cage. N/A.

  14. Rate of graft bone filling by transforaminal lumber interbody fusion (TLIF) with mesh cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kazuto; Kawaji, Youichi; Matsuba, Atsushi; Kouda, Hisao

    2007-01-01

    Compared to posterior lumber interbody fusion (PLIF), the transforaminal lumber interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure has a latent disadvantage in terms of bone grafting because of being a unilateral approach. We calculated the rate of graft bone filling in TLIF cases by postoperative CT and evaluated the clinical results. The rate of filling in the TLIF cases was not significantly less than in the PLIF cases. The results also showed no significant difference between TLIF and PLIF. An adequate amount of bone were grafted into the intervertebral space even by the unilateral TLIF approach, however the procedure is not easy. An incidental dural tear occurred in 1 case each treated by TLIF and PLIF. The exposure of the dural tube increases the risk of epidural bleeding and neural tissue injury. We recommend TLIF for discopathy, foraminal stenosis, and repeat surgery to avoid latent risk. (author)

  15. EFFICACY OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN EXPERIMENTAL INSTRUMENTED INTERBODY SPINAL FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfilippo Caggiari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to analyze the influence of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP on bone growth in experimental instrumented interbody spinal fusion (IISF. Methods. 16 adult sheep underwent IISF at L3–L4 level using a cylindrical threaded expanding titanium cage with morselized iliac crest cancellous autograft. In 8 animals (Group I this was augmented with PRP, in the remaining 8 (Group II, it was not. Radiographs of the spine were taken preoperatively and at 1, 3, and 6 months, moreover autoptic vertebral samples were obtained and evaluated histologically and by CT scan at 8 months. Results. Histological analysis revealed more evident new bone formation with bony bridge into the cages in Group I than Group II. There were relevant differences between the groups with regard to interbody fusion calculated using trabecular bone score (p<0.05.

  16. An unexpected lumbar lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Beard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report details an interesting case of suspected spinal bifida in an obstetric patient who presented for an elective cesarean section. A large scarred/dimpled area, surrounded by significant hair growth in the region of the lumbar spine had been missed in multiple antenatal and preoperative assessments and was recognized on the day of the surgery as the patient was being prepared for spinal anesthesia. The patient was uncertain regarding the pathology of the lesion, and all investigations relating to this had been undertaken in Pakistan where she lived as a child. General anesthesia was undertaken because magnetic resonance imaging had not been performed and tethering of the spinal cord could not be ruled out clinically. The patient suffered from significant blood loss intra and postoperatively, requiring a two unit blood transfusion. She was discharged after 5 days in the hospital. This case highlights the need for thorough examination in all obstetric patients presenting to the preoperative clinic, focusing on the airway, vascular access, and lumbar spine. Patients may not always disclose certain information due to a lack of understanding, embarrassment, forgetfulness, or language barriers. Significant aspects of their care may have been undertaken abroad and access to these notes is often limited. Preoperative detection of the lesion would have allowed further investigation and imaging of the lesion and enabled more comprehensive discussions with the patient regarding anesthetic options and risk.

  17. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR ISTHMIC SPONDYLOLISTHESIS USING ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR EXPOSURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rudenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective - to compare results of spondylolisthesis treatment using different surgical technologies. Material and methods: 84 patients (aged from 19 till 67 with spondylolisthesis of 1-3 degree (H.W Meyerding were operated. Two methods of surgical exposures were used for decompression and stabilization. Anterior decompression and stabilization exposures from retroperitoneal access were used for the first group of patients. The second group was operated using posteriolateral interbody fusion with transpedicular screw fixation. The following results were estimated after operation: the level of patients’ postoperative adaptation period and the rate of neurological and orthopedic rehabilitation during the postoperative period. Conclusions. The obtained functional results show no difference for both groups where posterior and anterior exposures were used for spondylolisthesis surgical treatment of 1-3 degree.

  19. Optimal patient positioning for ligamentotaxis during balloon kyphoplasty of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D T

    2011-06-01

    Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty aims to restore vertebral height, correct angular deformity and stabilize the spine in the setting of vertebral compression fractures. The patient is positioned prone with supports under the iliac crests and upper thorax to allow gravity to extend the spine. In the treatment of lumbar fractures, we evaluated patient positioning with the contribution of hip extension to increase anterior ligamentotaxis, thus facilitating restoration of vertebral height. Our positioning technique created a mean anterior height increase from 72% to 78% of the average height of the cranial and caudal vertebrae (p=0.037). Balloon inflation did not significantly further increase anterior or posterior vertebral height, or Cobb angle.

  20. Reproduction of the lumbar lordosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Marianne Løgtholt; Langhoff, Lotte; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates whether it is possible to reproduce the lumbar lordosis in the upright position during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by positioning the patient supine with straightened lower extremities and investigates intra- and interexaminer reliability of measurements...... supine with straightened lower extremities. These measurements were compared statistically. Intra- and interexaminer reliability was calculated applying the Bland and Altman method. RESULTS: The lumbar lordosis in the standing position was reproduced in the straightened supine position with a median......: The findings of this study show that lumbar lordosis in the upright position can be reproduced by positioning the patient supine with straightened lower extremities....

  1. The imaging of lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP (United Kingdom) and Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculo-Skeletal Sciences, University College, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com

    2005-05-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is a common finding on plain radiographs. The condition has a variety of causes which can be differentiated on the basis of imaging findings. As the treatment is dependent upon the type of spondylolisthesis, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of these features. We present a pictorial review of the imaging features of lumbar spondylolisthesis and explain the differentiating points between different groups of this disorder. The relative merits of the different imaging techniques in assessing lumbar spondylolisthesis are discussed.

  2. Side effects after diagnostic lumbar puncture and lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Salvesen, R.; Dale, L.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective, controlled study was performed to compare side effect incidences after lumbar iohexol myelography (n=97) and diagnostic lumbar puncture (n=85). No significant side effect incidence differences (iohexol vs. controls) were found regarding number of patients with any side effect (63 vs. 73%), headache (44 vs. 54%), nausea, dizziness, visual, auditory, or psychic symptoms. Early-onset headache occurred significantly more often in the iohexol group (16 vs 5%), while postural headache occurred most frequently after lumbar puncture (25 vs. 41%). These results suggest that apart from the slight early-onset headache, most side effets after lumbar iohexol myelography are related to the puncture per se, not to the contrast agent. (orig.)

  3. LUMBAR CORSETS CAN DECREASE LUMBAR MOTION IN GOLF SWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hashimoto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K., full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC, with a soft corset (SC, and with a hard corset (HC, with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38° or HC (28° than under WOC (44° conditions (p < 0.05. The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec than under SC (177°/sec and WOC (191° /sec conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC

  4. Percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Chengjiang; Su Huanbin; Xu Sui; He Xiaofeng; Li Yanhao

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To probe the therapeutic effects, indications and safety of the percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLDP). Methods: To ameliorate percutaneous punctured route based on classic PLD and modified jaw structure of pulpiform nacleus forceps, with statistic analysis of the therapeutic results of 352 cases of patient undergone PLDP and follow up ranging from 6 to 38 months retrospectively. Results: The effective ratios were excellent in 45.5%, good for 45.4% and bad in 9.1%. 44 of 352 cases with pulps prolapse were cured. No intervertebral inflammation and paradisc hematoma took place. One case complicated with cauda equina injury and 4 cases with appliances broken inside the disc. Conclusions: PLDP is effective and safe, not only adaptive to the contained disc herniation, but also for noncontained herniation. (authors)

  5. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  6. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Antonio; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2011-06-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  7. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Dept. of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic Univ., Rome (Italy); Cianfoni, Alessandro [Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston (United States); Cerase, Alfonso [General Hospital, Unit Neuroimaging and Neurointervention (NINT), Department of Neurosciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  8. Lateral lumbar retroperitoneal transpsoas approach in the setting of spondylodiscitis: A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, George M; Al-Saiegh, Fadi; Franco, Daniel; Benito, Daniel; Heller, Joshua

    2017-05-01

    Thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis is a morbid disease entity, impacting a sick patient population with multiple comorbidities. Wherever possible, surgical measures in this population should limit the extent of soft tissue disruption and overall morbidity that is often associated with anteroposterior thoracolumbar decompression and fusion. The authors describe the rationale, technique, and use of the lateral lumbar transpsoas retroperitoneal approach in tandem with posterior decompression and instrumented fusion in the treatment of circumferential thoracolumbar spondylodiscitis with or without epidural abscesses. The authors have routinely implemented the lateral lumbar transpsoas retroperitoneal approaches to address all pyogenic vertebral abscesses, spondylodiscitis, and ventral epidural abscesses with anterior column debridement and reconstruction with iliac crest autograft, posterior decompression, and pedicle screw instrumentation. In five consecutive patients, the mean blood loss and operative duration was 275mL and 259min, respectively. There were no instances of major vascular injury as this corridor obviates the need for retraction of inflamed retroperitoneal structures. The use of the lumbar lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine for the treatment of destructive and pyogenic spondylodiscitis is a potential alternative to the traditional anterior lumbar retroperitoneal approach in tandem with posterior spinal decompression and instrumented stabilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fat saturation technique and gadolinium in MRI of lumbar spinal degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aprile, P; Tarantino, A; Lorusso, V; Brindicci, D

    2006-11-30

    We evaluated the potential of MR sequences with Fat Saturation and gadolinium in patients with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and low back pain, by studying both anterior and posterior elements of the lumbar spine. We examined 3323 patients (age range 15-78 years) presenting low back pain. We used T2-weighted sequences with Fat Saturation and in some selected cases (1063 patients, 32%) administered gadolinium using T1-weighted sequences with Fat Saturation. In particular we used gadolinium in the following cases: 1) presence of hyperintense areas on T2 weighted images with Fat Saturation in the osteo-articular and muscular-ligamentous structures of the lumbar spine; 2) Clinical-radiological discrepancy in patients without disc-root conflict and clinical suspicion of posterior vertebral compartment syndrome. We found degenerative-inflammatory changes in osteo-articular, ligamentous and muscular structures in 1063 patients: osteochondrosis, "aseptic discitis", facet joint effusion and synovitis, osteoarthritis, synovial cysts, spondylolysis, degenerative-inflammatory changes of the posterior ligaments (flava, interspinous and supraspinous ligaments) and posterior perispinal muscles. To improve diagnostic accuracy and allow correct therapeutic guidance, MR examination in patients with low back pain must evaluate both anterior and posterior elements of the lumbar spine. Our study indicates that T2 sequences with Fat Saturation and, in selected cases, gadolinium administration, better visualize or disclose degenerative-inflammatory changes in the lumbar spine, showing the active-inflammatory phase and extension of these processes which may not be depicted during a standard MR examination.

  10. Ultrasound guided, painful electrical stimulation of lumbar facet joint structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Søren; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Manniche, Claus

    2009-01-01

    placed either side of a lumbar facet joint (right L3-4) and used to induce experimental low back pain for 10 min with continuous stimulation. Thresholds, stimulus-response relationships, distribution and quality of the electrically induced pain were recorded. Electrical facet joint stimulation induced...... low back pain and pain referral into the anterior leg, ipsilaterally, proximal to the knee, similar to what is observed clinically. Pressure pain thresholds did not change significantly before, during and after facet joint stimulation. In conclusion, we describe a novel model of acute experimental low...

  11. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan; Huang Xianglong; Shen Tianzhen; Hu Zhou; Hong Shuizong; Mei Haiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  12. Minimally-invasive posterior lumbar stabilization for degenerative low back pain and sciatica. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaldi, G., E-mail: bbonaldi@yahoo.com [Neuroradiology Department, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo (Italy); Brembilla, C. [Department of neurosurgery, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo (Italy); Cianfoni, A. [Neuroradiology of Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland, Lugano, CH (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    The most diffused surgical techniques for stabilization of the painful degenerated and instable lumbar spine, represented by transpedicular screws and rods instrumentation with or without interbody cages or disk replacements, require widely open and/or difficult and poorly anatomical accesses. However, such surgical techniques and approaches, although still considered “standard of care”, are burdened by high costs, long recovery times and several potential complications. Hence the effort to open new minimally-invasive surgical approaches to eliminate painful abnormal motion. The surgical and radiological communities are exploring, since more than a decade, alternative, minimally-invasive or even percutaneous techniques to fuse and lock an instable lumbar segment. Another promising line of research is represented by the so-called dynamic stabilization (non-fusion or motion preservation back surgery), which aims to provide stabilization to the lumbar spinal units (SUs), while maintaining their mobility and function. Risk of potential complications of traditional fusion methods (infection, CSF leaks, harvest site pain, instrumentation failure) are reduced, particularly transitional disease (i.e., the biomechanical stresses imposed on the adjacent segments, resulting in delayed degenerative changes in adjacent facet joints and discs). Dynamic stabilization modifies the distribution of loads within the SU, moving them away from sensitive (painful) areas of the SU. Basic biomechanics of the SU will be discussed, to clarify the mode of action of the different posterior stabilization devices. Most devices are minimally invasive or percutaneous, thus accessible to radiologists’ interventional practice. Devices will be described, together with indications for patient selection, surgical approaches and possible complications.

  13. Significant reduction of fluoroscopy repetition with lumbar localization system in minimally invasive spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Xin; Wang, Chuanfeng; Guan, Xiaofei; Fan, Yunshan; He, Shisheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The conventional location methods for minimally invasive spinal surgery (MISS) were mainly based on repeated fluoroscopy in a trial-and-error manner preoperatively and intraoperatively. Localization system mainly consisted of preoperative applied radiopaque frame and intraoperative guiding device, which has the potential to minimize fluoroscopy repetition in MISS. The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel lumbar localization system in reducing radiation exposure to patients. Included patients underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MISTLIF) or percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED). Patients treated with novel localization system were regarded as Group A, and patients treated without novel localization system were regarded as Group B. For PTED, The estimated effective dose was 0.41 ± 0.13 mSv in Group A and 0.57 ± 0.14 mSv in Group B (P fluoroscopy exposure time of PTED was 22.18 ± 7.30 seconds in Group A and 30.53 ± 7.56 seconds in Group B (P fluoroscopy exposure time was 25.41 ± 5.52 seconds in Group A and 32.82 ± 5.03 seconds in Group B (P < .001); The estimated cancer risk was 24.90 ± 5.15 (10–6) in Group A and 31.96 ± 5.04 (10–6) in Group B (P < .001). There were also significant differences in localization time and operation time between the 2 groups either for MISTLIF or PTED. The lumbar localization system could be a potential protection strategy for minimizing radiation hazards. PMID:28538369

  14. Effect of minimally invasive surgery on related serum factors in patients with lumbar degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Zhong Sun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of minimally invasive surgery and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF on the related serum factors in patients with lumbar degenerative disease. Methods: A total of 100 patients with lumbar degenerative disease who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2014 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group according to different surgical methods. The patients in the observation group were given MIS-TLIF, while the patients in the control group were given the traditional TLIF. The peripheral venous blood before operation, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 24 h after operation in the two groups was collected, and centrifuged for the serum. ELISA was used to detect the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels. The peripheral venous blood before operation, 1 h, 3 h, 5 h and 7 d after operation in the two groups was collected. DGKC velocity method was used to detect CK activity and fusion rate. The fusion grade was evaluated 6 months after operation according to Bridwell fusion grading standard. Results: The serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 24 h after operation in the two groups were significantly elevated when compared with before operation, and the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels at each timing point after operation in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group. CK activity 1 d, 3 d, 5 d, and 7d after operation in the two groups was significantly elevated when compared with before operation, and CK activity at each timing point after operation in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Conclusions: MISTLIF has a small damage on the tissues, can effectively alleviate the inflammatory reaction, and preferably retain the stable structure of posterior column, whose advantage is significantly superior to that by the traditional TLIF.

  15. Nursing Review Section of Surgical Neurology International Part 2: Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The lumbar spine includes 5 lumbar vertebral bodies, L1, L2, L3, L4, and L5. At each level, there is a disc space defined by the two bones (vertebral bodies) in the back; for example, there is a disc space at the L5-S1 level etc. The normal front to back (anterior to posterior or AP diameter) measurement of the spinal canal is typically 18-20 mm, but some patients have narrowing called spinal stenosis. Methods: Lumbar stenosis is defined by two major types. Central stenosis compresses the midline (in the middle) sac of nerve tissue (dural or thecal sac containing the lumbar nerve roots). Lateral recess stenosis (off to the sides) compresses the individual exiting nerve roots. Results: At each lumbar level, there may be compression of the nerve tissue centrally (dura also called cauda equina) or the nerve roots (on one or both sides). Compression may occur due to soft or calcified discs in the front (anteriorly) of the spine at different levels or from behind (posteriorly) due to arthritic enlargement (hypertrophy) or calcification (ossification) of the yellow ligament, facet joints, and/or bones (laminae). Surgery to remove bone and arthritic structures from the back of the spinal canal to decompress nerve tissue is called a laminectomy. Conclusions: Patients with narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal may have central or lateral recess stenosis that compresses the thecal sac and/or exiting nerve roots at any of 5 levels. Laminectomy, performed at single or multiple levels, decompresses lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:28781916

  16. Abdominal vascular injury during lumbar disc surgery: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, Fuat; Tuna, Hakan; Deda, Haluk

    2007-04-01

    Anterior longitudinal ligament perforation and abdominal vascular injury is one of the most critical complications that may develop during lumbar disc surgery. The vascular injury-related symptoms that warns the surgeon may be late to appear; they usually turn out to be mortal. The hypotension during the operation, tachycardia and pulsatile unstoppable hemorrhage observed in the disc space are the major findings. Urgent detection of this complication and the repair of the vascular injury prevent the case from turning out to be fatal. In the present study, three patients who underwent surgical treatment of abdominal vascular injuries that had developed during lumbar disc surgery, were presented.

  17. Subsidence after single-level anterior cervical fusion with a stand-alone cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Young; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju; Hur, Hyuk; Jang, Jae-Won; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the risk factors for subsidence in patients treated with stand-alone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages for single-level degenerative cervical disease. Seventy-seven consecutive patients who underwent single-level stand-alone ACDF with a PEEK cage between 2005 and 2012 were included. Subsidence was defined as a decrease in the interbody height of more than 3mm on radiographs at the 1-year follow-up compared with that in the immediate post-operative image. Patients were divided into the subsidence and non-subsidence groups. The following factors were investigated in relation to the occurrence of subsidence: age, pre-operative overall cervical sagittal angle, segmental angle of the operated level, interbody height, cage height, cage devices and cage location (distance between anterior margin of the body endplate and that of the cage). The clinical outcomes were assessed with visual analog scale, modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score and neck disability index. Twenty-six out of the 77 (33.8%) patients had radiological signs of cage subsidence. Solid fusion was achieved in 25 out of the 26 patients (96.2%) in the subsidence group and in 47 out of the 51 patients (92.2%) in the non-subsidence group. More than 3mm distance between anterior margin of the vertebral body and that of the cage was significantly associated with subsidence (psubsidence did not correlate with fusion rate or clinical outcomes. Cage location was the only significant risk factor. Therefore, cage location should be taken into consideration during stand-alone ACDF using PEEK cages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  19. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  20. NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL IN LUMBAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Leinonen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Impaired motor and sensory functions have been associated with low back pain (LBP. This includes disturbances in a wide range of sensorimotor control e.g. sensory dysfunctions, impaired postural responses and psychomotor control. However, the physiological mechanisms, clinical relevance and characteristics of these findings in different spinal pathologies require further clarification. The purposes of this study were to investigate postural control, lumbar muscle function, movement perception and associations between these findings in healthy volunteers (n=35, patients with lumbar disc herniation (n=20 and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS, n=26. Paraspinal muscle responses for sudden upper limb loading and muscle activation during flexion-extension movement and the lumbar endurance test were measured by surface electromyography (EMG. Postural stability was measured on a force platform during two- and one-footed standing. Lumbar movement perception was assessed in a motorised trunk rotation unit in the seated position. In addition, measurements of motor-(MEP and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP and needle EMG examination of lumbar multifidus muscles were performed in the LSS patients. Clinical and questionnaire data were also recorded. A short latency paraspinal muscle response (~50 ms for sudden upper limb loading was observed. The latency of the response was shortened by expectation (p=0.017. The response latency for unexpected loading was similar in healthy persons and disc herniation patients but the latency was not shortened by expectation in the patients (p = 0.014. Also impaired postural control (p < 0.05 and lumbar movement perception (p = 0.012 were observed in disc herniation patients. The impaired lumbar movement perception (p=0.054 and anticipatory muscle activation (p = 0.043 tended to be restored after successful surgery but postural control had still not recovered after 3 months of follow-up. The majority of LSS patients were unable

  1. Revisions for screw malposition and clinical outcomes after robot-guided lumbar fusion for spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Marc L; Staartjes, Victor E

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The accuracy of robot-guided pedicle screw placement has been proven to be high, but little is known about the impact of such guidance on clinical outcomes such as the rate of revision surgeries for screw malposition. In addition, there are very few data about the impact of robot-guided fusion on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Thus, the clinical benefit for the patient is unclear. In this study, the authors analyzed revision rates for screw malposition and changes in PROs following minimally invasive robot-guided pedicle screw fixation. METHODS A retrospective cohort study of patients who had undergone minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MI-PLIF) or minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was performed. Patients were followed up clinically at 6 weeks, 12 months, and 24 months after treatment and by mailed questionnaire in March 2016 as a final follow-up. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores for back and leg pain severity, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), screw revisions, and socio-demographic factors were analyzed. A literature review was performed, comparing the incidence of intraoperative screw revisions and revision surgery for screw malposition in robot-guided, navigated, and freehand fusion procedures. RESULTS Seventy-two patients fit the study inclusion criteria and had a mean follow up of 32 ± 17 months. No screws had to be revised intraoperatively, and no revision surgery for screw malposition was needed. In the literature review, the authors found a higher rate of intraoperative screw revisions in the navigated pool than in the robot-guided pool (p surgery for screw malposition was observed for freehand procedures than for the robot-guided procedures (p treatment again. CONCLUSIONS In adults with low-grade spondylolisthesis, the data demonstrated a benefit in using robotic guidance to reduce the rate of revision surgery for screw malposition as compared with other techniques of pedicle screw insertion described

  2. Comparison of two angles of approach for trigger point dry needling of the lumbar multifidus in human donors (cadavers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Mary C; Cope, Janet; Palermo, Alec; Smith, Walker; Wacker, Valerie

    2016-12-01

    Descriptive comparison study. To assess the accuracy of two needle angle approaches for dry needling of the lumbar multifidus. Low back pain is a leading cause of disability around the world; the lumbar multifidus plays a vital role in low back health. Manual therapy such as dry needling can improve pain mediation and motor control activation of the lumbar multifidus. Clinicians practicing dry needling at the lumbar multifidus typically use an inferomedial approach considered non-controversial. Clinicians practicing electromyography and nerve conduction studies commonly sample the lumbar multifidus in a directly posteroanterior approach that may provide another option for dry needling technique. Four human donors were used for a total of eight needle placements-four with an inferomedial orientation and four with a posteroanterior orientation. Each needle was placed from 1 to 1.5 cm lateral to the spinous process of L4 to the depth of the lumbar lamina. Each lower lumbar spine was then dissected to determine the structures that the needle traversed and the needle's final resting place. All four inferomedial approach needles ended at the lamina of the vertebrae below. All four posterior-anterior approach needles ended in the lamina of the same level. All eight needles traversed the lumbar multifidus and ended in the lumbar lamina with little possibility of the needle entering the subarachnoid space. Thus both the inferomedial and the posteroanterior angles of approach are efficacious for clinicians to use in dry needling of the lumbar mulifidus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of office chair features on lumbar lordosis, intervertebral joint and sacral tilt angles: a radiographic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Diana; Grondin, Diane; Callaghan, Jack

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which office chair feature is better at improving spine posture in sitting. Participants (n = 28) were radiographed in standing, maximum flexion and seated in four chair conditions: control, lumbar support, seat pan tilt and backrest with scapular relief. Measures of lumbar lordosis, intervertebral joint angles and sacral tilt were compared between conditions and sex. Sitting consisted of approximately 70% of maximum range of spine flexion. No differences in lumbar flexion were found between the chair features or control. Significantly more anterior pelvic rotation was found with the lumbar support (p = 0.0028) and seat pan tilt (p chair features used, still involves near end range flexion of the spine. This will increase stresses to the spine and could be a potential injury generator during prolonged seated exposures.

  4. Evaluation of Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis After Short Segment Decompression and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Naiguo; Wang, Dachuan; Wang, Feng; Tan, Bingyi; Yuan, Zenong

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate short segment decompression of degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) and the efficiency of fusion treatment.After DLS surgery, the patients were retrospectively reviewed using the VAS (visual analog scale) and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index) to assess clinical outcomes. All patients underwent posterior lumbar decompressive laminectomy, pedicle screw internal fixation, and posterolateral bone graft fusion surgery. Radiographic measurements included the scoliotic Cobb angle, the fused Cobb angle, the anterior intervertebral angle (AIA), the sagittal intervertebral angle (SIA), and lumbar lordosis angle. The relationships between these parameters were examined by bivariate Pearson analysis and linear regression analysis.Preoperatively, the Cobb angle at the scoliotic segment was 15.4°, which decreased to 10.2° immediately following surgery (P adjacent segment and proximal fused vertebra continues to increase postoperatively, which does not exacerbate clinical symptoms, as reflected by the low reoperation rates for repairing degeneration at adjacent levels.

  5. The influence of muscle forces on the stress distribution in the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, C; Rasmussen, J; Simonsen, Erik B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies of bone stresses in the human lumbar spine have relied on simplified models when modeling the spinal musculature, even though muscle forces are likely major contributors to the stresses in the vertebral bones. Detailed musculoskeletal spine models have recently become...... available and show good correlation with experimental findings. A combined inverse dynamics and finite element analysis study was conducted in the lumbar spine to investigate the effects of muscle forces on a detailed musculoskeletal finite element model of the 4th lumbar vertebral body. Materials...... muscles. Results: In general the von Mises stress was larger by 30 %, and even higher when looking at the von Mises stress distribution in the superio-anterior and central part of the vertebral body and in the pedicles. Conclusion: The application of spine muscles to a finite element model showed markedly...

  6. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods: short-term results in lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, S; Barbanti Brodàno, G; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Mesfin, A; Griffoni, C; Boriani, S

    2015-06-01

    Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease. Rigid fixation leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration. Thus, the use of semirigid rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been proposed. Although the PEEK rods biomechanical properties, such as anterior load sharing properties, have been shown, there are few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine surgical treatment. This study examined a retrospective cohort of patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion for degenerative disease using PEEK rods, in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the incidence of complications.

  7. Shape optimization for the subsidence resistance of an interbody device using simulation-based genetic algorithms and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Chi

    2013-07-01

    Subsidence of interbody devices into the vertebral body might result in serious clinical problems, especially when the devices are not well designed and analyzed. Recently, some novel designs were proposed to reduce the risk of subsidence, but those designs are based on the researcher's experience. The purpose of this study was to discover the interbody device design with excellent subsidence resistance by changing the device's shape. The three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models, which consisted of the interbody device and vertebral body, were created first. Then, the simulation-based genetic algorithm, which combined the finite element model and the searching algorithm, was developed by using ANSYS® Parametric Design Language. Finally, the numerical results were carefully validated with the use of biomechanical tests. The optimum shape design obtained in this study looks like a flower with many petals and it has excellent subsidence resistance when compared with the other designs provided by the past studies. The results of the present study could help surgeons to understand the subsidence resistance of interbody devices in terms of their shapes and has directly provided the design rationales to engineers. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  9. Complications in lumbar spine surgery: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Proietti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatment of adult lumbar spinal disorders is associated with a substantial risk of intraoperative and perioperative complications. There is no clearly defined medical literature on complication in lumbar spine surgery. Purpose of the study is to retrospectively evaluate intraoperative and perioperative complications who underwent various lumbar surgical procedures and to study the possible predisposing role of advanced age in increasing this rate. Materials and Methods: From 2007 to 2011 the number and type of complications were recorded and both univariate, (considering the patients′ age and a multivariate statistical analysis was conducted in order to establish a possible predisposing role. 133 were lumbar disc hernia treated with microdiscetomy, 88 were lumbar stenosis, treated in 36 cases with only decompression, 52 with decompression and instrumentation with a maximum of 2 levels. 26 patients showed a lumbar fracture treated with percutaneous or open screw fixation. 12 showed a scoliotic or kyphotic deformity treated with decompression, fusion and osteotomies with a maximum of 7.3 levels of fusion (range 5-14. 70 were spondylolisthesis treated with 1 or more level of fusion. In 34 cases a fusion till S1 was performed. Results: Of the 338 patients who underwent surgery, 55 showed one or more complications. Type of surgical treatment ( P = 0.004, open surgical approach (open P = 0.001 and operative time ( P = 0.001 increased the relative risk (RR of complication occurrence of 2.3, 3.8 and 5.1 respectively. Major complications are more often seen in complex surgical treatment for severe deformities, in revision surgery and in anterior approaches with an occurrence of 58.3%. Age greater than 65 years, despite an increased RR of perioperative complications (1.5, does not represent a predisposing risk factor to complications ( P = 0.006. Conclusion: Surgical decision-making and exclusion of patients is not justified only

  10. A lumbar body support (KBS 2000) alters lumbar muscle recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    back pain. K. L. Derman, E. w. Derman, T. D. Noakes. Objective. To determine the effects of a locally designed lumbar body support (LBS) on integrated ... surface, patients with chronic low back pain have higher. IEMG activity of the erector spinae ... It has also been shown that changes in sitting posture can alter LBP.6 The ...

  11. Single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulizi, Yakefu; Liang, Wei-Dong; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Maimaiti, Maierdan; Sheng, Wei-Bin

    2017-07-14

    Spinal brucellosis is a less commonly reported infectious spinal pathology. There are few reports regarding the surgical treatment of spinal brucellosis in existing literature. This retrospective study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral spinal brucellosis. From February 2012 to April 2015, 32 consecutive patients (19 males and 13 females, mean age 53.7 ± 8.7) with lumbosacral brucellosis treated by transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation were enrolled. Medical records, imaging studies, laboratory data were collected and summarized. Surgical outcomes were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale. The changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), clinical symptoms and complications were investigated. Graft fusion was evaluated using Bridwell grading criteria. The mean follow-up period was 24.9 ± 8.2 months. Back pain and radiating leg pain was relieved significantly in all patients after operation. No implant failures were observed in any patients. Wound infection was observed in two patients and sinus formation was observed in one patient. Solid bony fusion was achieved in 30 patients and the fusion rate was 93.8%. The levels of ESR and CRP were returned to normal by the end of three months' follow-up. VAS and ODI scores were significantly improved (P brucellosis.

  12. Lumbar discography: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    and then come back to reinject more contrast into the disk in question. As radiologists, we tend to focus on the technical aspects of a procedure and the anatomic/morphologic information it provides. However, it cannot be emphasized enough that when performing lumbar discography, the assessment of the patient's pain response during the injection is the most important component of the procedure, and requires not only technical skills, but an understanding of how best to avoid some of the pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results.

  13. The Effects on the Pain Index and Lumbar Flexibility of Obese Patients with Low Back Pain after PNF Scapular and PNF Pelvic Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, KwangYong; Seo, KyoChul

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercises using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) scapular and pelvic patterns might decrease the pain index and increase the lumbar flexibility of obese patients with low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty obese patients with low back pain were randomly assigned to an experimetal group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The exercise program of the experimental group consisted of scapular patterns (anterior depression - posterior elevation) and pelvic patterns (anterior elevation - posterior depression). The control group performed neutral back muscle strengthening exercises. Over the course of four weeks, the groups participated in PNF or performed strengthening exercises for 30 minutes, three times per week. Subjects were assessed a pre-test and post-test using measurements of pain and lumbar flexibility. [Results] The results show that lumbar flexion and lumbar extension significantly improved in the experimental group, had significant improvement and that the Oswestry Disability index (ODI) significantly decreased. However, there were no significant changes in the control group. The experimental group also showed significant differences in the pain index and lumbar flexibility from the control group. [Conclusion] This study showed that PNF can be used to improve pain index rating and lumbar flexibility. The findings indicate that the experimental group experienced greater improvement than the control group by participating in the PNF lumbar stabilization program.

  14. Anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications in a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasiou, Anastasia; Giannis, Theofanis; Brotis, Alexandros G; Siasios, Ioannis; Georgiadis, Iordanis; Gatos, Haralampos; Tsianaka, Eleni; Vagkopoulos, Konstantinos; Paterakis, Konstantinos; Fountas, Kostas N

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cervical spine procedures have been associated with satisfactory outcomes. However, the occurrence of troublesome complications, although uncommon, needs to be taken into consideration. The purpose of our study was to assess the actual incidence of anterior cervical spine procedure-associated complications and identify any predisposing factors. A total of 114 patients undergoing anterior cervical procedures over a 6-year period were included in our retrospective, case-control study. The diagnosis was cervical radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy due to degenerative disc disease, cervical spondylosis, or traumatic cervical spine injury. All our participants underwent surgical treatment, and complications were recorded. The most commonly performed procedure (79%) was anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Fourteen patients (12.3%) underwent anterior cervical corpectomy and interbody fusion, seven (6.1%) ACDF with plating, two (1.7%) odontoid screw fixation, and one anterior removal of osteophytes for severe Forestier's disease. Mean follow-up time was 42.5 months (range, 6-78 months). The overall complication rate was 13.2%. Specifically, we encountered adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration in 2.7% of our cases, dysphagia in 1.7%, postoperative soft tissue swelling and hematoma in 1.7%, and dural penetration in 1.7%. Additionally, esophageal perforation was observed in 0.9%, aggravation of preexisting myelopathy in 0.9%, symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in 0.9%, mechanical failure in 0.9%, and superficial wound infection in 0.9%. In the vast majority anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications are minor, requiring no further intervention. Awareness, early recognition, and appropriate management, are of paramount importance for improving the patients' overall functional outcome.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CORRECTION FEATURES OF POSTTRAUMATIC KYPHOSIS OF THORACIC AND LUMBAR SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Nadulich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental biomechanical study was performed in 60 spine specimens. Anterior wedge osteotomy and fixation of a specimen in a kyphotic position modeled kyphotic deformity. Deformity correction with various instrumentation systems was firstly performed by maximal extension of segments adjacent to kyphosis-producing block, and carried on after crossing of intervertebral anatomical structures. The study resulted in defining rational approach to surgical correction of posttraumatic deformities in the thoracic and lumbar spine. Minor kyphotic deformities are effectively corrected by instrumentation without mobilization of the spine. Large unfixed kyphosis sometimes requires anterior mobilization. Cases with rigid posttraumatic kyphotic deformity should be operated on with combined mobilization of the spine.

  16. CT of adult lumbar disc herniations mimicking posterior apophyseal ring fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomori, J.M. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Radiology); Floman, Y.; Liebergall, M. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1991-10-01

    This report concerns 35 adult patients with lumbar or sciatic pain and axial CT findings reportedly associated with posterior apophyseal ring fractures. Review of the CT images suggested two pathophysiologic categories. (1) Posterior Schmorl - A posterior intravertebral disc herniation with posterior displacement of a fractured or remodelled vertebral margin. (2) Calcified subligamentous - Reactive annular and or posterior longitudinal ligament calcification at the periphery of a herniated disc with or without remodelling and anterior displacement of the posterior vertebral margin. (orig.).

  17. Imaging of thoracic and lumbar spinal extradural arachnoid cysts: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmelin, A.; Clouet, P.L.; Salatino, S.; Kehrli, P.; Maitrot, D.; Stephan, M.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Extradural arachnoid cysts are uncommon expanding lesions in the spinal canal which may communicate with the subarachnoid space. Usually in the lower thoracic spine, they may cause symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots. We report cases of thoracic and lumbar arachnoid cysts studied by cystography, myelography, CT and MRI. These techniques showed extradural cystic lesions containing cerebrospinal fluid, with variable communication with the subarachnoid space, causing anterior displacement and flattening of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  18. Chondroblastoma of the lumbar vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, L.Y.J.; Shu, S.J.; Chan, M.K.; Chan, C.H.S. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2001-12-01

    Chondroblastoma of the vertebra is a very rare condition. To our knowledge fewer than 20 cases have been reported in the world literature. We report a 54-year-old man with chondroblastoma of the fifth lumbar vertebra. The clinical and radiological aspects of the tumor are discussed, emphasizing the presence of an extraosseous mass suggestive of locally aggressive behavior. (orig.)

  19. CASE REPORT Lumbar vertebra chordoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vertebral column tumours. Introduction. Spinal chordomas mostly present in association with the clivus or sacrum. We report a case where it was overlooked in the differential diagnosis of vertebral col- umn tumours because it presented in the lumbar spine. Case. A 66-year-old male patient presented with a longstand-.

  20. Lumbar myelography with Omnipaque (iohexol)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleaas, F.; Bach-Gansmo, T.; Weber, H.

    1986-07-01

    Lumbar myelography with iohexol (Omnipaque) was performed in 103 consecutive adult patients with low back pain or sciatica. The patients were observed for 48 h with registration of possible adverse reactions. Mild or moderate transient side effects were recorded in 24 patients. No serious adverse reactions were noted, and EEG recorded in 25 patients showed no changes.

  1. [Analysis of clinical outcomes of simplified treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis with adjacent segment degeneration by MAST Quadrant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Li-Li; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhong, Cheng-Fan; Li, Xiao-Chuan; He, Yu-Sheng

    2017-09-25

    To explore the method and clinical effect of MAST Quadrant for lumbar spondylolisthesis with adjacent segment degeneration. From April 2014 to January 2016, 36 cases of lumbar spondyl