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Sample records for anterior interbody fresh-frozen

  1. Dental Implant Placement with Simultaneous Anterior Maxillary Reconstruction with Block and Particulate Fresh Frozen Allograft Bone: A Case Report with 24-Month Follow-Up Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Vieira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresh frozen allograft bone is routinely used in orthopedic surgery for the reconstruction of large bone defects, and its use in oral and maxillofacial surgery is increasing. The purpose of this case was to demonstrate the installation of dental implants and the use of fresh frozen bone for reconstruction of anterior maxilla in the same surgery. This case report presents the insertion of dental implants followed immediately by a placement of fresh frozen allograft in block and particle for a reconstruction of atrophic anterior maxillary in the same surgery. Ten months subsequent to this procedure, provisional fixed prosthesis was installed on the implants. Four months later (postoperative month 14, the final fixed prosthesis was installed and the clinical success was observed. The insertion of dental implants followed immediately by a placement of fresh frozen allograft is a safe and efficient process that results in the successful return of dental function and aesthetic rehabilitation for the patient.

  2. Single or double-level anterior interbody fusion techniques for cervical degenerative disc disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Wilco; Willems, Paul C.; van Limbeek, Jacques; Bartels, Ronald; Pavlov, Paul; Anderson, Patricia G.; Oner, Cumhur

    2011-01-01

    Background The number of surgical techniques for decompression and solid interbody fusion as treatment for cervical spondylosis has increased rapidly, but the rationale for the choice between different techniques remains unclear. Objectives To determine which technique of anterior interbody fusion

  3. Single or double-level anterior interbody fusion techniques for cervical degenerative disc disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, W.; Willems, P.C.P.H.; Limbeek, J. van; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Pavlov, P.; Anderson, P.G.; Oner, C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of surgical techniques for decompression and solid interbody fusion as treatment for cervical spondylosis has increased rapidly, but the rationale for the choice between different techniques remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To determine which technique of anterior interbody fusion

  4. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Implants: Importance of the Interdevice Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Subach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. The implantation of interbody fusion cages allows for the restoration of disc height and the enlargement of the neuroforaminal space. The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of subsidence occurring after conventional cage placement compared to a novel wider cage placement technique. Methods. This study is a retrospective evaluation of radiographs of patients who underwent stand-alone single level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with lordotic titanium cages and rhBMP-2. Fifty-three patients were evaluated: 39 patients had wide cage placement (6 mm interdevice distance and 14 had narrow cage placement (2 mm interdevice distance. Anterior and posterior intervertebral disc space heights were measured post-operatively and at follow-up imaging. Results. The decrease in anterior intervertebral disc space height was 2.05 mm versus 3.92 mm (<.005 and 1.08 mm versus 3.06 mm in posterior disc space height for the wide cage placement and the narrow cage placement respectively. The proportion of patients with subsidence greater than 2 mm was 41.0% in the wide cage patients and 85.7% for the narrow cage patients (<.005. Conclusions. The wider cage placement significantly reduced the amount of subsidence while allowing for a greater exposed surface area for interbody fusion.

  5. Treating heparin resistance with antithrombin or fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Bruce D

    2008-06-01

    Heparin resistance occurs in up to 22% of patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass and it is associated with decreased levels of antithrombin. Treatment options for heparin resistance include administration of antithrombin or fresh frozen plasma. A systematic review revealed no clinical trials directly comparing antithrombin with fresh frozen plasma as heparin resistance treatment during cardiopulmonary bypass. Thus, the aim of this review is to discuss the limited number of published reports assessing antithrombin or fresh frozen plasma in managing heparin resistance and to present emerging data regarding fresh frozen plasma safety issues and practical considerations for antithrombin treatment in patients with heparin resistance undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass.

  6. Perioperative coagulation management--fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kor, Daryl J; Stubbs, James R; Gajic, Ognjen

    2010-03-01

    Clinical studies support the use of perioperative fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients who are actively bleeding with multiple coagulation factor deficiencies and for the prevention of dilutional coagulopathy in patients with major trauma and/or massive haemorrhage. In these settings, current FFP dosing recommendations may be inadequate. However, a substantial proportion of FFP is transfused in non-bleeding patients with mild elevations in coagulation screening tests. This practice is not supported by the literature, is unlikely to be of benefit and unnecessarily exposes patients to the risks of FFP. The role of FFP in reversing the effects of warfarin anticoagulation is dependent on the clinical context and availability of alternative agents. Although FFP is commonly transfused in patients with liver disease, this practice needs broad reconsideration. Adverse effects of FFP include febrile and allergic reactions, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-related acute lung injury. The latter is the most serious complication, being less common with the preferential use of non-alloimmunised, male-donor predominant plasma. FP24 and thawed plasma are alternatives to FFP with similar indications for administration. Both provide an opportunity for increasing the safe plasma donor pool. Although prothrombin complex concentrates and factor VIIa may be used as alternatives to FFP in a variety of specific clinical contexts, additional study is needed.

  7. Subsidence following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF): a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Prashanth J; Phan, Kevin; Giang, Gloria; Maharaj, Monish M; Phan, Steven; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2017-06-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a widely used surgical technique for disorders of the lumbar spine. One potential complication is the subsidence of disc height in the post-operative period. Few studies have reported the rate of subsidence in ALIF surgery prospectively. We prospectively evaluated the rate of subsidence in adult patients undergoing ALIF. Results were obtained by reviewing scans of 147 patients. Disc heights were measured on radiographic scans taken pre-operatively in addition to post-operatively immediately, at 6 weeks and at 18 months. The anterior and posterior intervertebral disc heights were measured. Subsidence was defined as greater than or equal to 2 mm loss of height. A total of 15 patients (10.2%) had subsidence, with 7 being male. Each case was of delayed cage subsidence (DCS) >6 weeks postoperatively. The mean subsidence was 4.7 mm (range, 2.4-7.8). Mean anterior disc height was 8.6±0.4 mm preoperatively, which improved to 15.1±0.5 mm at latest follow-up. Mean posterior disc height was 4.7±0.2 mm preoperatively, which improved to 8.7±0.4 mm at latest follow-up. The mean lumbar lordosis (LL) angle was 42.5°±10.8° and the mean local disc angle (LDA) was 6.7°±4.0°. The 91.2% (n=114/125) of patients with appropriate radiological follow-up demonstrated fusion by latest follow-up. There was no correlation between subsidence rate with patient reported outcomes [Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form 12 Item survey (SF-12)] and fusion rates. There was a significant negative correlation between LL and extent of subsidence (Pearson correlation =-0.754, P=0.012). In conclusion, we found that the subsidence rate at follow-up was generally low following standalone ALIF for this patient series. Patient clinical outcomes and bony fusion rates were not significantly influenced by subsidence.

  8. Graft Subsidence and Revision Rates Following Anterior Cervical Corpectomy: A Clinical Study Comparing Different Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michael H; Fortin, Maryse; Shen, Jian; Tay, Bobby; Hu, Serena S; Berven, Sigurd; Burch, Shane; Chou, Dean; Ames, Christopher; Deviren, Vedat

    2017-11-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the subsidence and revision rates associated with different interbody cages following anterior cervical corpectomy and reconstruction. Different interbody cages are currently used for surgical reconstruction of the anterior and middle columns of the spine following anterior cervical corpectomy. However, subsidence and delayed union/nonunion associated with allograft and cage reconstruction are common complications, which may require revision with instrumentation. We reviewed the cases of 75 patients who underwent cervical corpectomy and compared the radiographic graft subsidence and revision rates for fibula allograft, titanium mesh cage, titanium expandable cage, and carbon fiber cages. Subsidence was calculated by comparing the immediate postoperative lateral x-ray films to those obtained during follow-up visits. The average graft subsidence was 3 mm and revision rate was 25% for fibula allograft versus 2.9 mm and 11.1%, 2.9 mm and 18.8% for titanium mesh cages and titanium expandable cages, respectively. The average graft subsidence for carbon fiber cages was 0.7 mm with no revision surgery in this subset. Our findings suggest that subsidence and revision rates following anterior corpectomy and interbody fusion could be minimized with the use of a carbon fiber cage.

  9. [Anterior interbody fusion of cervical spine with case-plate PCB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radek, M; Radek, A; Zapałowicz, K; Maciejczak, A

    2001-01-01

    Two cases with cervical discopathy and radiculopathy are presented. Discectomy and anterior interbody fusion with cage-plate PCB manufactured by French company Scient'x was performed. Authors present the shape of the implant and technical details of implantation. The paper discusses the advantages of the PCB which simplifies and shortens the operation procedure, minimizes the risk of traditional bone graft harvesting and provides immediate stabilization of the operated segment.

  10. Coagulation Factors Level in Fresh Frozen Plasma in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coagulation Factors Level in Fresh Frozen Plasma in Rwanda. ... Factor X, Von Willbrand Factor, Protein C and Antithrombin decreased from baseline up to three months and then Factor VIII, Factor IX, Factor XI, Factor XII and Protein S, remained constant from baseline up to one month and decreased up to three months.

  11. coagulation factors level in fresh frozen plasma in rwanda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-02

    Feb 2, 2014 ... National Centre for Blood Transfusion Division/Kigali-Rwanda, D. Agwata, BSc, MSc, Medical Laboratory Sciences,. Jomo Kenyatta University Of Agriculture and Technology. COAGULATION FACTORS LEVEL IN FRESH FROZEN PLASMA IN RWANDA. S. UWAMUNGU, A. K. NYAMACHE, F. MASAISA, ...

  12. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion with integrated fixation and adjunctive posterior stabilization: A comparative biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Matthew S; Dupre, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Oh, Michael Y; Altman, Daniel T; Cheng, Boyle C

    2015-10-01

    Interbody fusion cages with integrated fixation components have become of interest due to their ability to provide enhanced post-operative stability and mitigate device migration. A recently approved anterior lumbar interbody fusion cage with integrated fixation anchors has yet to be compared in vitro to a standard polyetheretherketone cage when used in combination with an interspinous process clamp. Twelve human cadaveric lumbar segments were implanted at L4-L5 with a Solus interbody cage (n=6) or standard polyetheretherketone cage (n=6) following Intact testing and discectomy. Each cage was subsequently evaluated in all primary modes of loading after supplementation with the following posterior constructs: interspinous process clamp, bilateral transfacet screws, unilateral transfacet screw with contralateral pedicle screws, and bilateral pedicle screws. Range of motion results were normalized to Intact, and a two-way mixed analysis of variance was utilized to detect statistical differences. The Solus cage in combination with all posterior constructs provided significant fixation compared to Intact in all loading conditions. The polyetheretherketone cage also provided significant fixation when combined with all screw based treatments, however when used with the interspinous process clamp a significant reduction was not observed in lateral bending or axial torsion. Interbody cages with integrated fixation components enhance post-operative stability within the intervertebral space, thus affording clinicians the potential to utilize less invasive methods of posterior stabilization when seeking circumferential fusion. Interspinous process clamps, in particular, may reduce peri-operative and post-operative comorbidities compared to screw based constructs. Further study is necessary to corroborate their effectiveness in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preliminary results of anterior lumbar interbody fusion, anterior column realignment for the treatment of sagittal malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Pooria; Mundis, Gregory M; Eastlack, Robert K; Bagheri, Ramin; Vargas, Enrique; Tran, Stacie; Akbarnia, Behrooz A

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Sagittal malalignment decreases patients' quality of life and may require surgical correction to achieve realignment goals. High-risk posterior-based osteotomy techniques are the current standard treatment for addressing sagittal malalignment. More recently, anterior lumbar interbody fusion, anterior column realignment (ALIF ACR) has been introduced as an alternative for correction of sagittal deformity. The objective of this paper was to report clinical and radiographic results for patients treated using the ALIF-ACR technique. METHODS A retrospective study of 39 patients treated with ALIF ACR was performed. Patient demographics, operative details, radiographic parameters, neurological assessments, outcome measures, and preoperative, postoperative, and mean 1-year follow-up complications were studied. RESULTS The patient population comprised 39 patients (27 females and 12 males) with a mean follow-up of 13.3 ± 4.7 months, mean age of 66.1 ± 11.6 years, and mean body mass index of 27.3 ± 6.2 kg/m 2 . The mean number of ALIF levels treated was 1.5 ± 0.5. Thirty-three (84.6%) of 39 patients underwent posterior spinal fixation and 33 (84.6%) of 39 underwent posterior column osteotomy, of which 20 (60.6%) of 33 procedures were performed at the level of the ALIF ACR. Pelvic tilt, sacral slope, and pelvic incidence were not statistically significantly different between the preoperative and postoperative periods and between the preoperative and 1-year follow-up periods (except for PT between the preoperative and 1-year follow-up, p = 0.018). Sagittal vertical axis, T-1 spinopelvic inclination, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch, intradiscal angle, and motion segment angle all improved from the preoperative to postoperative period and the preoperative to 1-year follow-up (p < 0.05). The changes in motion segment angle and intradiscal angle achieved in the ALIF-ACR group without osteotomy compared with the ALIF-ACR group with osteotomy

  14. Treatment of plasminogen deficiency patients with fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızılocak, Hande; Ozdemir, Nihal; Dikme, Gürcan; Koç, Begüm; Atabek, Ayşe Ayzıt; Çokuğraş, Haluk; İskeleli, Güzin; Dönmez-Demir, Buket; Christiansen, Nina Merete; Ziegler, Maike; Ozdağ, Hilal; Schuster, Volker; Celkan, Tiraje

    2018-02-01

    Congenital plasminogen (Plg) deficiency leads to the development of ligneous membranes on mucosal surfaces. Here, we report our experience with local and intravenous fresh frozen plasma (FFP). We retrospectively reviewed medical files of 17 patients and their eight first-degree relatives. Conjunctivitis was the main complaint. Thirteen patients were treated both with intravenous and conjunctival FFP. Venous thrombosis did not develop in any. Genetic evaluation revealed heterogeneous mutations as well as polymorphisms. Diagnosis and treatment of Plg deficiency is challenging; topical and intravenous FFP may be an alternative treatment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. COAGULATION FACTORS LEVEL IN FRESH FROZEN PLASMA IN RWANDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwamungu, S; Nyamache, A K; Masaisa, F; Njoki, S K; Abdalah, F; Saibu, K; Ndahiriwe, O; Agwata, D

    2014-02-01

    Objectives: To determine the level of coagulation factors and inherited inhibitors in Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) and to evaluate Prothrombin Time and activated partial thrombin time in fresh frozen plasma. Cross-sectional study. Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology in Medical Laboratory Sciences. Eighteen blood bags collected from voluntary blood donors. Coagulation factors and inhibitors levels, Prothrombin Time (PT) and Activated Partial thrombin Time (APTT) remained within the reference range requested by quality assurance regulations after three months of storage. APTT and PT show an increase from baseline to one month then remain constant up to three months, while, Fibrinogen, Factor II, Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Von Willbrand Factor, Protein C and Antithrombin decreased from baseline up to three months and then Factor VIII, Factor IX, Factor XI, Factor XII and Protein S, remained constant from baseline up to one month and decreased up to three months. There is good retention of all coagulation factors and inhibitors in plasma produced from whole blood within eight hours of collection, stored at minus 18 degrees C for three months.

  16. Prevention of ligneous conjunctivitis by topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F

    2004-08-01

    To present a case of ligneous conjunctivitis where the recurrence of membranous conjunctivitis was prevented by subconjunctival and topical instillation of fresh frozen plasma. Interventional case report. A case of ligneous conjunctivitis with multiple recurrences since the age of 3 years developed recurrent membranous conjunctivitis after transconjunctival levator recession. Blood plasminogen activity was determined. The membrane was excised, and the membrane reappeared 4 days later. The patient was treated with excision of the membrane and subconjunctival injection of fresh frozen plasma and topical fresh frozen plasma. Plasminogen activity of the fresh frozen plasma was normal. Plasminogen blood functional activity was 52% (normal is 80%-120%). The patient had complete remission with no recurrences of membranous conjunctivitis after topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma. Prophylactic use of topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma may help in the prevention of membranes in susceptible patients with plasminogen deficiency.

  17. Radiographic evaluation of indirect decompression of mini-open anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion: oblique lateral interbody fusion for degenerated lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Jun; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-03-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion provides minimally invasive treatment of spinal deformity, but complications including nerve and psoas muscle injury have been noted. To avoid nerve injury, mini-open anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion methods using an approach between the aorta and psoas, such as oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) have been applied. OLIF with percutaneous pedicle screws without posterior decompression can indirectly decompress the spinal canal in lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis. In the current study, we examined the radiographic and clinical efficacy of OLIF for lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis. We assessed 20 patients with lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis who underwent OLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation without posterior laminectomy. MR and CT images and clinical symptoms were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Cross sections of the spinal canal were evaluated with MRI, and disk height, cross-sectional areas of intervertebral foramina, and degree of upper vertebral slip were evaluated with CT. Clinical symptoms including low back pain, leg pain, and lower extremity numbness were evaluated using a visual analog scale and the Oswestry Disability Index before and 6 months after surgery. After surgery, significant increases in axial and sagittal spinal canal diameter (12 and 32 %), spinal canal area (19 %), disk height (61 %), and intervertebral foramen areas (21 % on the right side, 39 % on the left), and significant decrease of upper vertebral slip (-9 %) were found (P spondylolisthesis with back and leg symptoms.

  18. Subsidence after anterior cervical inter-body fusion. A randomized prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Erich; Derakhshani, Sharam; Bothmann, Matthias; Oberle, Joachim

    2009-04-01

    In ventral fusion after anterior cervical discectomy there is still a remarkable number of cage subsidence and segmental kyphosis seen. The aim of the present study is to assess whether the cage design influences the extent of correction loss during follow-up. Sixty patients with single-level cervical disc herniation were randomly treated with two different cervical inter-body cages (group 1: Solis cage, Stryker Company and group 2: Shell cage, AMT Company). Clinical and radiological follow-up was done before and after surgery, 3 and 6 months post-surgery. Clinical follow-up was done with the help of Odom's criteria. Both groups were similar in the baseline parameters (age, sex, treated level). Statistically, the subsidence was significantly higher at 3 and 6-month follow-ups in group 1 than in group 2, however, clinical results showed no significant differences. In 67%, subsidence was seen in the anterior lower aspect of the treated segment. Segmental kyphosis was seen in seven patients of group 1 and two patients of group 2. A significant correlation is found between Odom's criteria and subsidence. Although there was no significant difference in a short-term clinical result between the two treatment groups, we recommend the use of cages which preserve the determined segmental height and lordosis.

  19. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for multiple-level isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-Sheng; Lee, Hyung Chang; Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Park, Sang-Joon; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2017-07-01

    Multiple-level lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis is rarely reported. Here, we report 23 consecutive patients who underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPF) for multiple-level isthmic spondylolisthesis. From June 2008 through December 2014, multiple-level lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis was diagnosed in 23 patients (6 men, 17 women) at Wooridul Spine Hospital (Busan, South Korea). Isthmic spondylolisthesis occurred at three spinal levels in 2 patients and at two levels in 21 patients. All patients underwent ALIF with PPF. We used the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale scores to evaluate the preoperative and postoperative functional outcome, low back pain, and radicular pain. We also evaluated segmental lordosis and the fusion status using radiographs and data from computed tomography. Isthmic spondylolisthesis occurred from L3 to S1 and mostly occurred at two consecutive spinal levels (i.e., L4-L5 and L5-S1). Significant improvements in the ODI and visual analog scale were observed in patients at final follow up (pspondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Prashanth J; Ghent, Finn; Phan, Kevin; Lee, Keegan; Reddy, Rajesh; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-10-01

    We sought to evaluate the clinical and radiologic efficacy of stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for low grade degenerative spondylolisthesis, the favoured surgical management approach at our institution. The optimal approach for surgical management of spondylolisthesis remains contentious. We performed a prospective analysis of all consecutive patients with low grade lumbar spondylolisthesis who underwent ALIF between 2009 and 2013 by a single surgeon (n=27). The mean age was 64.9 years with a male to female ratio of 14:13. There were 32 levels operated and the average preoperative spondylolisthesis was 14.8%, which reduced to 6.4% postoperatively and 9.4% at the latest follow-up (p=0001). Postoperative disc height was increased to 175% of preoperative values and was statistically significant (pspondylolisthesis reduction (p=0.04) and the only clinical factor affecting reduction was body mass index (p=0.04). The present study provides encouraging short term results for stand-alone ALIF as a procedure for low grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Future studies should include adequately powered, prospective, multicentre registry studies with long term follow-up to allow a better assessment of the relative benefits and risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The majority of patients in septic shock are transfused with fresh-frozen plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Nanna; Wesche, Nikolaj; Perner, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion may be widely used in patients in septic shock, but the use is not well-described. Our aim was to describe the current use of FFP transfusion in medical patients with septic shock.......Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion may be widely used in patients in septic shock, but the use is not well-described. Our aim was to describe the current use of FFP transfusion in medical patients with septic shock....

  2. Embalmed and fresh frozen human bones in orthopedic cadaveric studies: which bone is authentic and feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Tobias; Müller, Thorben; Huss, Sebastian; Kann, Peter Herbert; Weihe, Eberhard; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Zettl, Ralph Peter

    2012-10-01

    The most frequently used bones for mechanical testing of orthopedic and trauma devices are fresh frozen cadaveric bones, embalmed cadaveric bones, and artificial composite bones. Even today, the comparability of these different bone types has not been established. We tested fresh frozen and embalmed cadaveric femora that were similar concerning age, sex, bone mineral density, and stiffness. Artificial composite femora were used as a reference group. Testing parameters were pullout forces of cortex and cancellous screws, maximum load until failure, and type of fracture generated. Stiffness and type of fracture generated (Pauwels III) were similar for all 3 bone types (fresh frozen: 969 N/mm, 95% confidence interval (CI): 897-1,039; embalmed: 999 N/mm, CI: 875-1,121; composite: 946 N/mm, CI: 852-1,040). Furthermore, no significant differences were found between fresh frozen and embalmed femora concerning pullout forces of cancellous screws (fresh frozen: 654 N, CI: 471-836; embalmed: 595 N, CI: 365-823) and cortex screws (fresh frozen: 1,152 N, CI: 894-1,408; embalmed: 1,461 N, CI: 880-2,042), and axial load until failure (fresh frozen: 3,427 N, CI: 2,564-4290; embalmed: 3,603 N, CI: 2,898-4,306). The reference group showed statistically significantly different results for pullout forces of cancellous screws (2,344 N, CI: 2,068-2,620) and cortex screws (5,536 N, CI: 5,203-5,867) and for the axial load until failure (> 7,952 N). Embalmed femur bones and fresh frozen bones had similar characteristics by mechanical testing. Thus, we suggest that embalmed human cadaveric bone is a good and safe option for mechanical testing of orthopedic and trauma devices.

  3. Embalmed and fresh frozen human bones in orthopedic cadaveric studies: which bone is authentic and feasible?

    OpenAIRE

    Topp, Tobias; Müller, Thorben; Huss, Sebastian; Kann, Peter Herbert; Weihe, Eberhard; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Zettl, Ralph Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose The most frequently used bones for mechanical testing of orthopedic and trauma devices are fresh frozen cadaveric bones, embalmed cadaveric bones, and artificial composite bones. Even today, the comparability of these different bone types has not been established. Methods We tested fresh frozen and embalmed cadaveric femora that were similar concerning age, sex, bone mineral density, and stiffness. Artificial composite femora were used as a reference group. Testing para...

  4. Mini-open Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation Following Posterior Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamuti, Maiwulanjiang; Fan, Shunwu; Liu, Junhui; Shan, Zhi; Wang, Chongyan; Li, Shengyun; Zhao, Fengdong

    2016-09-15

    A retrospective study. The aim of this study is to evaluate, clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of mini-open retroperitoneal anterior lumbar discectomy followed by anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for recurrent lumbar disc herniation following primary posterior instrumentation. Recurrent disc herniation following previous disc surgery occurs in 5 to 15% of cases. This is often treated by further surgical intervention where posterior approach is generally preferred. However, posterior surgery may be problematic if the initial surgery involved posterior instrumentation. An anterior approach may be indicated in these patients, and recent findings suggest that a "mini-open" procedure may have some benefits when compared with traditional open techniques and their associated morbidities. A total of 35 recurrent lumbar disc herniation patients (10 male, 25 female) following primary posterior instrumentation with an average age of 52.8 years (range: 34-70 yrs) who underwent the mini-open ALIF procedures between August 2001 and February 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. The ALIF was performed at the levels L4-L5 (n = 14), L5-S1 (n = 15), or both L4-L5 and L5-S1 (n = 6). Visual Analog pain Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) together with radiological results were assessed. The mean operating time, intraoperative estimated blood loss, and hospital stay were 115 minutes, 70 mL, and 6 days, respectively. No blood transfusion was needed. Transient complication was recorded in two patients. Postoperative follow-up was a minimum 24.3 months. VAS score and ODI percentage decreased significantly from 7.9 ± 0.8 and 78.8% ± 12.4% pre-operatively to 1.4 ± 0.6 and 21.7 ± 4.2% at final follow-up, respectively. There was no neurological worsening and radicular pain improved significantly compared with pre-operation in all the patients. Computed tomographic reconstruction 12 and 24 months after surgery showed bony fusion

  5. Anterior lumbar inter-body fusion with instrumentation compared with posterolateral fusion for low grade isthmic-spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Varun; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Spondylolisthesis presenting as low back pain is not an uncommon condition. Many of such patients are treated conservatively. For those that require surgical management, various treatment options are in vogue e.g. Postero-lateral fusion (PLF) with decompression or posterior fusion with instrumentation and anterior lumbar inter-body fusion (ALIF). Each technique has produced satisfactory outcome with benefits and disadvantages. To compare the outcome of surgical management of low grade spondylolisthesis with two treatments modalities--Postero-lateral fusion (PLF) and Anterior lumbar inter-body fusion (ALIF) with posterior instrumentation in similar patient profile. Prospective study to compare the results of two surgical treatment modalities. The selected group of patients for surgery based on definite criteria was operated by the same surgeon by two modalities: Postero-lateral fusion with decompression and Anterior Lumbar Inter-body fusion with posterior instrumentation. The outcomes were compared. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Follow up was done at twelve weekly intervals up to 2 years. Both groups showed good recovery in pain as seen in Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry low back pain scoring. Intra-operative bleeding was observed to be higher in Postero-lateral fusion group. Average length of hospital stay for the patients of PLF group was 6.6 days (Range: 4-7 days) as compared to 12.5 days (Range: 10-16 days) in case of ALIF group. Treatment cost was found to be higher in patients who undergone ALIF with instrumentation. ALIF with posterior instrumentation in low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis provides satisfactory outcome in patients requiring surgical treatment. The results of pain relief and disability index are comparable to time tested posterolateral fusion. ALIF shows a tendency to faster pain relief and return to activity with less intraoperative blood requirement in low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis.

  6. Outcomes of anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery based on indication: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Prashanth J; Loganathan, Ajanthan; Yeung, Vivian; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on clinical outcomes after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) based on the indications for surgery. To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of ALIF for each surgical indication. This prospective clinical study included 125 patients who underwent ALIF over a 2-year period. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Outcome measures included the Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, Visual Analog Scale, and Patient Satisfaction Index. After a mean follow-up of 20 months, the clinical condition of the patients was significantly better than their preoperative status across all indications. A total of 108 patients had a Patient Satisfaction Index score of 1 or 2, indicating a successful clinical outcome in 86%. Patients with degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy), spondylolisthesis, and scoliosis had the best clinical response to ALIF, with statistically significant improvement in the Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale. Failed posterior fusion and adjacent segment disease showed statistically significant improvement in all of these clinical outcome scores, although the mean changes in the Short Form-12 Mental Component Summary, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale (back pain) were lower. The overall radiological fusion rate was 94.4%. Superior radiological outcomes (fusion >90%) were observed in patients with degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy), spondylolisthesis, and failed posterior fusion, whereas in adjacent segment disease, it was 80%. ALIF is an effective treatment for degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy) and spondylolisthesis. Although results were promising for scoliosis, failed posterior fusion, and adjacent segment disease, further studies are necessary to establish the effectiveness of ALIF in these conditions.

  7. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Integrated Screw Cages: Intrinsic Load Generation, Subsidence, and Torsional Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Pelletier, Matthew H; Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-05-01

    To perform a repeatable idealized in vitro model to evaluate the effects of key design features and integrated screw fixation on unloaded surface engagement, subsidence, and torsional stability. We evaluated four different stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages with two, three, and four screw designs. Polyurethane (saw-bone) foam blocks were used to simulate the vertebral bone. Fuji Film was used to measure the contact footprint, average pressure, and load generated by fixating the cages with screws. Subsidence was tested by axially loading the constructs at 10 N/s to 400 N and torsional load was applied +/-1 Nm for 10 cycles to assess stability. Outcome measures included total subsidence and maximal torsional angle range. Cages 1, 2, and 4 were symmetrical and produced similar results in terms of contact footprint, average pressure, and load. The addition of integrated screws into the cage-bone block construct demonstrated a clear trend towards decreased subsidence. Cage 2 with surface titanium angled ridges and a keel produced the greatest subsidence with and without screws, significantly more than all other cages ( P < 0.05). Angular rotation was not significantly affected by the addition of screws ( P < 0.066). A statistically significant correlation existed between subsidence and reduced angular rotation across all cage constructs ( P = 0.018). Each stand-alone cage featured unique surface characteristics, which resulted in differing cage-foam interface engagement, influencing the subsidence and torsional angle. Increased subsidence significantly reduced the torsional angle across all cage constructs. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion using a barbell-shaped cage: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Boden, S D; Hutton, W C

    2001-10-01

    There are drawbacks to using threaded cylindrical cages (e.g., limited area for bone ingrowth and metal precluding radiographic visualization of bone healing). To somewhat offset these drawbacks, a barbell-shaped cage has been designed. The central core of the barbell can be wrapped with collagen sheets infiltrated with bone morphogenetic protein. The obvious theoretical advantages of a barbell cage have to be weighed against potential biomechanical disadvantages. Our purpose was to compare the biomechanical properties of an anterior lumbar interbody reconstruction using 18-mm-diameter threaded cylindrical cages, with a reconstruction using barbell cages (18-mm diameter and 6 mm wide at both cylindrical ends, with a round 4-mm-diameter bar joining the two ends). Twelve cadaveric lumbar motion segments were tested. Three L5-S1 segments received two threaded cylindrical cages, and three L5-S1 segments received two barbell cages. Three L3-L4 segments received one threaded cylindrical cage, and three L3-L4 segments received one barbell cage. A series of biomechanical loading sequences were carried out on each motion segment, and stiffness curves were obtained. After the biomechanical testing, an axial compressive load was applied to the motion segments until failure. They were then radiographed and bisected through the disc, and the subsidence (or penetration) of the cage(s) in the cancellous bone of the vertebral bodies was measured. There was no difference in terms of stiffness between the motion segments with the threaded cylindrical cage(s) inserted and those with the barbell cage(s) inserted (p > 0.15). The average values of subsidence was 0.96 mm for the threaded cylindrical cage group and 0.80 mm for the barbell cage group (difference not significant: p = 0.38). The results suggest that a reconstruction using barbell cages is a biomechanically acceptable alternative to one using threaded cylindrical cages.

  9. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsiang-Ho

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1 large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2 polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3 polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment

  10. Double-segment Wilhelm Tell technique for anterior lumbar interbody fusion in unstable isthmic spondylolisthesis and adjacent segment discopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Markus; Vogt, Emanuel; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2006-02-01

    The Wilhelm Tell technique is a novel instrumented anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) procedure using a specially designed composite carbon fibre cage and a single short-threaded cancellous screw that obliquely passes through the upper adjacent vertebral body, the interbody cage itself and through the lower adjacent vertebral body. This single-stage fusion method, which is in principle a combination of the Louis technique and modern cage surgery, is reported to have a lower rate of pseudoarthrosis formation than stand-alone cage techniques. In addition, it eliminates both the surgical trauma of paravertebral muscle retraction and the risk of neural damage by poorly located pedicular screws. This anterior approach allows decompression of neural structures within the anterior part of the spinal canal and the foraminal region. It is the purpose of this case report, to present the successful application of this novel technique in a 32-year-old woman who concurrently suffered from severe instability-related back pain from L4/5 isthmic spondylolisthesis and marked L5/S1 degenerative disc disease.

  11. Circumferential fusion: a comparative analysis between anterior lumbar interbody fusion with posterior pedicle screw fixation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Erik Y; Tanenbaum, Joseph E; Alonso, Andrea S; Xiao, Roy; Steinmetz, Michael P; Mroz, Thomas E; Savage, Jason W

    2018-03-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) or anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screws (ALIFPS) offer significantly higher radiographic fusion rates than other fusion techniques for L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS). As it stands, there is a relative paucity of comparative data of the two techniques. To define the clinical, radiographic, and financial differences between TLIF and ALIFPS for L5-S1 IS. A retrospective cohort study conducted at a single tertiary care center. Sixty-six patients who underwent either TLIF or ALIPFS for L5-S1 IS at a single tertiary care center between 2009 and 2014. Quality of life outcome scores including the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Sagittal balance parameters including: pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, segmental lordosis, total lordosis, degree of slip, disc height, and L1-axis S1 distance (LASD). Cost measures included in-hospital charges, hospital length of stay (LOS), and post-admission costs accrued over 1 year. Quality of life (QoL) outcome scores, radiographic data, and financial data were collected with a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Clinical results were investigated using the PDQ, PHQ-9, and EQ-5D. Radiographic measurements included lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, height of disc, L-1 axis S-1 distance, and the degree of slip. Cost data were generated based on patient-level resource utilization. Comparative data were presented as median with interquartile range (IQR). Continuous variables were compared using either independent Student t tests assuming unequal variance or Mann-Whitney U tests for parametric and nonparametric variables, respectively. The minimally clinical important difference (MCID) used for each questionnaire was as follows: PDQ (26), PHQ-9 (5), and EQ-5D (0.4). A total of 66 patients met inclusion criteria. In the ALIFPS cohort, PDQ scores

  12. Kinematic efficacy of supplemental anterior lumbar interbody fusion at lumbosacral levels in thoracolumbosacral deformity correction with and without pedicle subtraction osteotomy at L3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Benny T; Harris, Jonathan A; Gudipally, Manasa

    2017-01-01

    of operative construction (p ≤ 0.05). Across L4-S1 and L2-S1, all instrumented constructs significantly reduced motion, in both PSO- and non-PSO groups, during all loading modes (p ≤ 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest anterior interbody fusion minimally immobilizes motion segments, and interbody...... devices may primarily act to maintain disc height. Additionally, lumbar osteotomy destabilizes axial rotational stability at the osteotomy site, potentially further increasing mechanical demand on posterior instrumentation. Clinical studies are needed to assess the impact of this treatment strategy....

  13. A comparative study of vascular injection fluids in fresh-frozen and embalmed human cadaver forearms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doomernik, D.E.; Kruse, R.R.; Reijnen, M.M.; Kozicz, T.; Kooloos, J.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, various vascular injection products have been developed to facilitate anatomical dissections. This study aimed to compare the most commonly used vascular injection products in fresh-frozen and formalin-embalmed cadaver specimens. An overview of the properties, advantages and

  14. Fresh-frozen plasma use in a South African tertiary hospital | Visser ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite available guidelines on indications for fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion, inappropriate use is increasing worldwide. We evaluated FFP administration to patients admitted to the Steve Biko Academic Hospital over 4 months, including indications for use and completeness of requisition forms. Transfusions were ...

  15. THE LONG-TERM RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ISTHMIC SPONDYLOLISTHESIS USING ANTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shapovalov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyzed the long-term results of surgical treatment 47 patients with true spondylolisthesis. The follow up period ranged from 14 to 25 years. All patients underwent an isolated anterior interbody riving allograft fusion. The scales of VAS and ODI were used for subjective assessment of treatment outcomes; objective assessment was based on clinical and radiographic, CT and MRI outcomes. There were 42.6% (20 cases patients with good, 31.9% (15 cases with satisfactory and 25.5% (12 cases unsatisfactory results in the long-term follow-up. The main reasons of poor outcome were: the continued high degree of displacement of the vertebral body (17.6%, instability (38.3% and the disbalance of the lumbosacral spine (63.8%, persistent compression of neural structures (42.6%. Most patients had the combination of these factors that were existed against backdrop of progressive degenerative changes of the spine.

  16. Study on the anatomy of the lumbosacral anterior great vessels pertinent to L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery with computer tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liehua; Liang, Yong; Zhou, Qiang; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haoming; Li, Songtao; Zhao, Chen; Hou, Tianyong; Liu, Ling

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the anatomy of the lumbosacral anterior great vessels using computer tomography (CT) angiography before L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery. Sixty-two adult patients were selected. The location of the abdominal aortic bifurcation and common iliac venous confluence in the lumbar vertebrae and the anatomic parameters of the iliac vascular space (e.g., distances from the included angle vertex of the iliac vascular space to the median sagittal plane and to the inferior boundary of L5 and distances between the left and right iliac vessels on the inferior boundary of L5 and on the superior boundary of S1) were analysed. Overall, 67.73% of the 62 cases had an abdominal aortic bifurcation located at L4 and L4/5 intervertebral disc; 61.29%, the common iliac venous confluence located at L5. The four distances mentioned above were 0.98 cm ± 0.38 cm, 2.01 cm ± 1.26 cm, 3.11 cm ± 1.35 cm and 4.34 cm ± 1.10 cm, respectively. A classification system of types A, B and C was developed. The calculated L5/S1 intervertebral space exposure percentages of types A, B and C were 32.21%, 82.58% and 54.68%, respectively. During L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery, type B intervertebral discs can be exposed conveniently, preventing injury of the iliac vessels, which was also observed in 54.68% and 32.21% of the type C and type A discs, respectively. Because the type A intervertebral disc has minimal exposure, the risk of iliac vascular injury is relatively high in these patients.

  17. The NEtherlands Cervical Kinematics (NECK) Trial. Cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation; A double-blind randomised multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Arts (Mark); R. Brand (René); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco); M.E. van den Akker-van Marle (Elske)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Patients with cervical radicular syndrome due to disc herniation refractory to conservative treatment are offered surgical treatment. Anterior cervical discectomy is the standard procedure, often in combination with interbody fusion. Accelerated adjacent disc degeneration is

  18. Subsidence of Cylindrical Cage (AMSLU™ Cage) : Postoperative 1 Year Follow-up of the Cervical Anterior Interbody Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Young Il; Ko, Yong; Yi, Hyeong Joong; Lee, Seung Ku

    2007-01-01

    Objective There are numerous reports on the primary stabilizing effects of the different cervical cages for cervical radiculopathy. But, little is known about the subsidence which may be clinical problem postoperatively. The goal of this study is to evaluate subsidence of cage and investigate the correlation between radiologic subsidence and clinical outcome. Methods To assess possible subsidence, the authors investigated clinical and radiological results of the one-hundred patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion by using AMSLU™ cage during the period between January 2003 and June 2005. Preoperative and postoperative lateral radiographs were measured for height of intervertebral disc space where cages were placed. Intervertebral disc space was measured by dividing the sum of anterior, posterior, and midpoint interbody distance by 3. Follow-up time was 6 to 12 months. Subsidence was defined as any change in at least one of our parameters of at least 3 mm. Results Subsidence was found in 22 patients (22%). The mean value of subsidence was 2.21 mm, and mean subsidence rate was 22%. There were no cases of the clinical status deterioration during the follow-up period. No posterior or anterior migration was observed. Conclusion The phenomenon of subsidence is seen in substantial number of patients. Nevertheless, clinical and radiological results of the surgery were favorable. An excessive subsidence may result in hardware failure. Endplate preservation may enables us to control subsidence and reduce the number of complications. PMID:19096571

  19. Is Stand-Alone Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion a Safe and Efficacious Treatment for Isthmic Spondylolisthesis of L5-S1?

    OpenAIRE

    Viglione, Luke L.; Chamoli, Uphar; Diwan, Ashish D.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: A systematic review. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (sa-ALIF) for the treatment of symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5-S1 by assessing the level of available clinical and radiographic evidence. Methods: A systematic review utilizing Medline, Embase, and Scopus online databases was undertaken. Clinical, radiographic, and adverse outcome data were extracted for the relevant ist...

  20. DNA extraction from fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Gouda-Vossos, Amany; Dzamko, Nicolas; Halliday, Glenda; Huang, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human brain tissues are invaluable resources for molecular genetic studies of central nervous system diseases, especially neurodegenerative disorders. To identify the optimal method for DNA extraction from human brain tissue, we compared methods on differently-processed tissues. Fragments of LRRK2 and MAPT (257 bp and 483 bp/245 bp) were amplified for evaluation. We found that for FFPE samples, the success rate of DNA extraction was greater when using a commercial kit than a laboratory-based method (successful DNA extraction from 76% versus 33% of samples). PCR amplicon size and storage period were key factors influencing the success rate of DNA extraction from FFPE samples. In the fresh-frozen samples, the DNA extraction success rate was 100% using either a commercial kit (QIAamp DNA Micro) or a laboratory-based method (sample boiling in 0.1 mol/L NaOH, followed by proteinase K digestion, and then DNA extraction using Chelex-100) regardless of PCR amplicon length or tissue storage time. Although the present results demonstrate that PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA can be extracted from both fresh-frozen and FFPE samples, fresh brain tissue is recommended for DNA extraction in future neuropathological studies.

  1. Fracture of the L-4 vertebral body after use of a stand-alone interbody fusion device in degenerative spondylolisthesis for anterior L3-4 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yoon-Kwang; Jang, Ju-Hee; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Many studies attest to the excellent results achieved using anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for degenerative spondylolisthesis. The purpose of this report is to document a rare instance of L-4 vertebral body fracture following use of a stand-alone interbody fusion device for L3-4 ALIF. The patient, a 55-year-old man, had suffered intractable pain of the back, right buttock, and left leg for several weeks. Initial radiographs showed Grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis, with instability in the sagittal plane (upon 15° rotation) and stenosis of central and both lateral recesses at the L3-4 level. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion of the affected vertebrae was subsequently conducted using a stand-alone cage/plate system. Postoperatively, the severity of spondylolisthesis diminished, with resolution of symptoms. However, the patient returned 2 months later with both leg weakness and back pain. Plain radiographs and CT indicated device failure due to anterior fracture of the L-4 vertebral body, and the spondylolisthesis had recurred. At this point, bilateral facetectomies were performed, with reduction/fixation of L3-4 by pedicle screws. Again, degenerative spondylolisthesis improved postsurgically and symptoms eased, with eventual healing of the vertebral body fracture. This report documents a rare instance of L-4 vertebral body fracture following use of a stand-alone device for ALIF at L3-4, likely as a consequence of angular instability in degenerative spondylolisthesis. Under such conditions, additional pedicle screw fixation is advised.

  2. Late Results of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Interbody Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Da?l?, Murat; Er, Uygur; ?im?ek, Serkan; Bavbek, Murad

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for degenerative cervical disc disease. Overview of Literature Anterior spinal surgery originated in the mid-1950s and graft for fusion was also employed. Currently anterior cervical microdiscectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of cervical disc hernia. Artificial grafts and cages for fusion are preferred because of their ...

  3. Overpowering posterior lumbar instrumentation and fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody cages followed by posterior revision: a preliminary feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Abhijeet; Wigner, Nathan; Saville, Philip; Arlet, Vincent

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this study was to evaluate whether sagittal plane correction can be obtained from the front by overpowering previous posterior instrumentation and/or fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages in patients undergoing revision surgery for degenerative spinal conditions and/or spinal deformities. METHODS The authors report their experience with the application of hyperlordotic cages at 36 lumbar levels for ALIFs in a series of 20 patients who underwent revision spinal surgery at a single institution. Included patients underwent staged front-back procedures: ALIFs with hyperlordotic cages (12°, 20°, and 30°) followed by removal of posterior instrumentation and reinstrumentation from the back. Patients were divided into the following 2 groups depending on the extent of posterior instrumentation and fusion during the second stage: long constructs (≥ 6 levels with extension into thoracic spine and/or pelvis) and short constructs (lumbar lordosis increased from 44.3° to 59.8° (p lumbar levels that have pseudarthrosis from the previous posterior spinal fusion. Meticulous selection of levels for ALIF is crucial for safely and effectively performing this technique.

  4. Influence of Obesity on Complications, Clinical Outcome, and Subsidence After Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF): Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Rogers, Priya; Rao, Prashanth J; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2017-11-01

    The complications associated with obesity have been well described for posterior lumbar spinal surgery. However, the influence of obesity on anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is not well established. We aimed to compare complication risks, functional outcomes, and subsidence rates in normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients who underwent ALIF. A total of 137 consecutive patients undergoing ALIF surgery from 2012 to 2014 were followed prospectively. Patients were categorized into 3 groups according to their body mass index (BMI). Patients were evaluated preoperative and postoperatively. Outcome measures included Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, surgical complications, and subsidence. There was no significant difference between the BMI groups in terms of baseline age, proportion of men, levels operated, smoking status, diabetes status, or anterior, posterior, or average disc height. There was no difference in operative duration, blood loss, or hospital stay. At 12-month follow-up, no difference was found in terms of total complications, change in Short Form-12 mental or physical component scores, or Oswestry Disability Index scores. Average disc height was significant lower for the obese group (11.3 mm) compared with the normal-weight (14.4 mm) group. Fusion rate was also significantly lower for patients who were obese (60%) compared with normal-weight (88.2%) and overweight patients (76%) (P = 0.014). Delayed subsidence rates also were similar between normal-weight and overweight patients. There were no differences in functional outcomes or complications in patients with elevated BMI compared with normal-weight patients. Fusion rates were lower for patients were obese. Obesity should not be considered a contraindication to surgery in patients with appropriate indication to undergo ALIF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Successful treatment of ligneous conjunctivitis with topical fresh frozen plasma in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Özen Tunay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTA 6-month-old female infant presented to our clinic with bilateral eyelid swelling, yellowish-white membranes under both lids, and mucoid ocular discharge. Her aunt had similar ocular problems that were undiagnosed. The conjunctival membranes were excised and histopathological investigation of these membranes showed ligneous conjunctivitis. Further, laboratory examination revealed plasminogen deficiency. A good response was observed to topical fresh frozen plasma (FFP treatment without systemic therapy, and the membranes did not recur during the treatment. Topical FFP treatment may facilitate rapid rehabilitation and prevent recurrence in patients with ligneous conjunctivitis.

  6. Single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with mini-open anterior debridement and fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang; Li, Feng; Chen, Wenjian; Zeng, Heng; Chen, Anmin; Xiong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation for single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. This is a retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) approach. Patients underwent follow-up for 24 to 38 months. Clinical data, etiological examinations, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) lumbar function score, visual analog scale (VAS) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), postoperative complications, and the bony fusion rate were recorded. The mean operative time was 181.1 ± 22.6 minutes (range 155-240 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 173.2 ± 70.1 ml (range 100-400 ml). Infection was found in lumbar vertebrae L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 in 2, 6, and 14 patients, respectively. Bacterial cultures were positive in 15 patients, including 4 with Staphylococcus aureus, 6 with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 4 with Streptococcus, and 1 with Escherichia coli. Postoperative complications included urinary retention, constipation, and numbness in the thigh in 5, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Compared with before surgery, the VAS scores and ODI were significantly lower at the final follow-up, the JOA scores were significantly higher, and the ASIA grades had improved. All patients achieved good intervertebral bony fusion. Mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified ALIF approach results in little surgical trauma and intraoperative blood loss, acceptable postoperative complications, and is effective and safe for the treatment of single-level lumbar pyogenic

  7. Subsidence and nonunion after anterior cervical interbody fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae Jun; Yu, Chang Hun; Chang, Bong-Soon; Yeom, Jin Sup; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The purposes of the present study are to evaluate the subsidence and nonunion that occurred after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a stand-alone intervertebral cage and to analyze the risk factors for the complications. Thirty-eight patients (47 segments) who underwent anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and an autologous cancellous iliac bone graft from June 2003 to August 2008 were enrolled in this study. The anterior and posterior segmental heights and the distance from the anterior edge of the upper vertebra to the anterior margin of the cage were measured on the plain radiographs. Subsidence was defined as ≥ a 2 mm (minor) or 3 mm (major) decrease of the segmental height at the final follow-up compared to that measured at the immediate postoperative period. Nonunion was evaluated according to the instability being ≥ 2 mm in the interspinous distance on the flexion-extension lateral radiographs. The anterior and posterior segmental heights decreased from the immediate postoperative period to the final follow-up at 1.33 ± 1.46 mm and 0.81 ± 1.27 mm, respectively. Subsidence ≥ 2 mm and 3 mm were observed in 12 segments (25.5%) and 7 segments (14.9%), respectively. Among the expected risk factors for subsidence, a smaller anteroposterior (AP) diameter (14 mm vs. 12 mm) of cages (p = 0.034; odds ratio [OR], 0.017) and larger intraoperative distraction (p = 0.041; OR, 3.988) had a significantly higher risk of subsidence. Intervertebral nonunion was observed in 7 segments (7/47, 14.9%). Compared with the union group, the nonunion group had a significantly higher ratio of two-level fusion to one-level fusions (p = 0.001). Anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone cage with a large AP diameter while preventing anterior intraoperative over-distraction will be helpful to prevent the subsidence of cages. Two-level cervical fusion might require more careful attention for avoiding nonunion.

  8. A Multivariate Evaluation of Factors Affecting the Quality of Freshly Frozen Tissue Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Chen, Chin-Chuan; Liang, Kung-Hao; Chen, Chi-Yuan; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Ueng, Shir-Hwa; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chen, Tse-Ching; Hsueh, Chuen

    2017-08-01

    Well-prepared and preserved freshly frozen specimens are indispensable materials for clinical studies. To manage specimen quality and to understand the factors potentially affecting specimen quality during preservation processes, we analyzed the quality of RNA and genomic DNA of various tissues collected between 2002 and 2011 in Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan. During this period, a total of 1059 freshly frozen specimens from eight major cancer categories were examined. It was found that preservation duration, organ origin, and tissue type could all influence the quality of RNA samples. The increased preservation period correlated with decreased RNA quality; the brain, breast, and stomach RNA specimens displayed faster degradation rates than those of other organs, and RNA specimens isolated from tumor tissues were apparently more stable than those of other tissues. These factors could all be used as quality predictors of RNA quality. In contrast, almost all analyses revealed that the genomic DNA samples had good quality, which was not influenced by the aforementioned factors. The results assisted us in determining preservation factors that affect specimen quality, which could provide evidence for improving processes of sample collection and preservation. Furthermore, the results are also useful for researchers to adopt as the evaluation criteria for choosing specimen collection and preservation strategies.

  9. Effect of Smoking Status on Successful Arthrodesis, Clinical Outcome, and Complications After Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Fadhil, Matthew; Chang, Nicholas; Giang, Gloria; Gragnaniello, Cristian; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2018-02-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a surgical technique indicated for the treatment of several lumbar pathologies. Smoking has been suggested as a possible cause of reduced fusion rates after ALIF, although the literature regarding the impact of smoking status on lumbar spine surgery is not well established. This study aims to assess the impact of perioperative smoking status on the rates of perioperative complications, fusion, and adverse clinical outcomes in patients undergoing ALIF surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on a prospectively maintained database of 137 patients, all of whom underwent ALIF surgery by the same primary spine surgeon. Smoking status was defined by the presence of active smoking in the 2 weeks before the procedure. Outcome measures included fusion rates, surgical complications, Short-Form 12, and Oswestry Disability Index. Patients were separated into nonsmokers (n = 114) and smokers (n = 23). Univariate analysis demonstrated that the percentage of patients with successful fusion differed significantly between the groups (69.6% vs. 85.1%, P = 0.006). Pseudarthrosis rates were shown to be significantly associated with perioperative smoking. Results for other postoperative complications and clinical outcomes were similar for both groups. On multivariate analysis, the rate of failed fusion was significantly greater for smokers than nonsmokers (odds ratio 37.10, P = 0.002). The rate of successful fusion after ALIF surgery was found to be significantly lower for smokers compared with nonsmokers. No significant association was found between smoking status and other perioperative complications or adverse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. A minimum 3-year follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong-Yeob; Lee, Sang-Ho; Maeng, Dae-Hyeon

    2010-01-01

    The clinical and radiological outcomes of two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PSF) were evaluated in 24 consecutive patients who underwent two level ALIF with percutaneous PSF for segmental instability and were followed up for more than 3 years. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Sagittal alignment, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age of the patients at the time of operation was 56.3 years (range 39-70 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 39.4 months (range 36-42 months), VAS scores for back pain and leg pain, and ODI score decreased significantly (from 6.5, 6.8, and 46.9% to 3.0, 1.9, and 16.3%, respectively). Clinical success was achieved in 22 of the 24 patients. The mean segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 25.1deg, 39.2deg, and 32.6deg to 32.9deg, 44.5deg, and 36.6deg, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 21 patients. ASD was found in 8 of the 24 patients. No patient underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. Two-level ALIF with percutaneous PSF yielded satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes and could be a useful alternative to posterior fusion surgery. (author)

  11. Microparticle sizing by dynamic light scattering in fresh-frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, A S; Albanyan, A; Cardigan, R A; Mackie, I J; Harrison, P

    2009-04-01

    We have previously shown that fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) contains red blood cell-derived procoagulant microparticles (MPs) that are removable by 0.2 microm filtration. Given the limitations of current methods for accurately sizing MPs, we have applied the novel approach of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to characterize the size distributions of these MPs within FFP. Fresh-frozen plasma was prepared from blood Group A and O donations (n = 10 of each) after an overnight hold of whole blood at 4 degrees C. On the day of analysis, plasma was thawed to 37 degrees C and daughter aliquots were studied pre- and post-filtration (0.2 microm filtration device, Ceveron MFU-500, Technoclone). MP size and dispersity was assessed using a Zetasizer Nano S (Malvern Instruments Ltd), which employs a 173 degrees backscatter detector and an N5 Submicron Particle Size Analyser (Beckman Coulter) using multi-angle measurements (30.1 degrees , 62.6 degrees and 90 degrees ). The analysers presented MP size distribution graphically as intensity plots, mean size, standard deviation and polydispersity index. Of the instruments used, only the N5 utilizing a 30.1 degrees angle of measurement could detect MPs of the expected size distribution and demonstrate their removal by filtration. MPs (range of mean particle diameters: pre, 101-464 nm; post, 21-182 nm filtration) were significantly smaller post-filtration (P size of MPs from blood Group O (pre, 247 nm) and Group A (pre, 289 nm) samples (P = 0.44). Our data demonstrates that DLS offers a novel approach to assessing MP size and distribution, a technique that could be easily adopted as a means of assessing MPs within either FFP or other blood products.

  12. Extraction of RNA from fresh, frozen, and lyophilized tuber and root tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G N Mohan; Iyer, Suresh; Knowles, N Richard

    2007-03-07

    A method for isolating transcriptionally competent RNA from fresh, frozen, and lyophilized plant storage tissues containing high levels of starch and phenolics is described. The protocol avoids the use of guanidium salts, which often lead to the formation of a viscous gel during extraction of high starch-containing tissues, and instead uses a borate-Tris buffer in combination with high concentrations of NaCl, Na2SO3, and sodium dodecyl sulfate in the extraction medium. RNA was extracted from fresh, frozen, and lyophilized tissues of potato tubers, storage roots of sweet potato, radish, and turnip, and rhizomes of ginger. The yield of RNA from potato tubers averaged 281 microg g fresh weight(-1) and 1584 microg g dry weight(-1) from frozen and lyophilized samples, respectively. A260/A230 ratios of potato RNA extracts were 2.2 or greater, indicating minimal contamination by polyphenols and carbohydrates. Similarly, A260/A280 ratios exceeded 1.9, demonstrating minimal contamination of the RNA by tuber protein. While A260/A280 ratios of extracts from the other plant species were somewhat lower than those for potato (average = 1.56 and 1.80 for fresh and lyophilized samples, respectively), A260/A230 ratios averaged more than 2.0, and the RNA extracted from fresh and lyophilized samples of all species was intact, as demonstrated by denaturing agarose-formaldehyde gel electrophoresis. The protocol yielded RNA suitable for downstream molecular applications involving reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from all five species. Transcriptionally competent RNA was also recovered from lyophilized potato tuber tissue stored for 6 years (ambient temperature) by a simple modification to the protocol involving extraction in cold acetone. Lyophilization can thus be used to preserve RNA in high starch- and phenolic-containing plant tissues for studies on gene expression.

  13. Spray-dried plasma and fresh frozen plasma modulate permeability and inflammation in vitro in vascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wataha, K.; Menge, T.; Deng, X.; Shah, A.; Bode, A.; Holcomb, J.B.; Potter, D.; Kozar, R.; Spinella, P.C.; Pati, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After major traumatic injury, patients often require multiple transfusions of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to correct coagulopathy and to reduce bleeding. A spray-dried plasma (SDP) product has several logistical benefits over FFP use in trauma patients with coagulopathy. These benefits

  14. Evaluation of a multi-center randomised clinical trial on prophylactic transfusion of fresh frozen plasma: implications for future trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, M. C. A.; de Haan, R. J.; Vroom, M. B.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in critically ill patients with a coagulopathy is common. However, a lack of evidence of efficacy has resulted in a call for trials on the benefit of FFP in these patients. To date, conducting a trial on this subject has not been successful. Recently, a

  15. Fresh-frozen plasma resuscitation after traumatic brain injury and shock attenuates extracellular nucleosome levels and deoxyribonuclease 1 depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Oklu, Rahmi

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury and shock are among the leading causes of trauma-related mortality. We have previously shown that fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation reduces the size of brain lesion and associated swelling compared with crystalloids. We hypothesized that this effect would be associated...

  16. Fresh-frozen bone: case series of a new grafting material for sinus lift and immediate implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Viscioni, A

    2010-08-01

    Although autologous bone is considered to be the gold standard grafting material, it needs to be harvested from patients, a process that can be off-putting and can lead to donor site morbidity. For this reason, homologous fresh-frozen bone (FFB) was used in the current study as an alternative graft material.

  17. Fresh Frozen Plasma Modulates Brain Gene Expression in a Swine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury and Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) decreases brain lesion size and swelling in a swine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesized that brain gene expression profiles after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock would be modulated by FFP resu...

  18. Application of NeuroTrace staining in the fresh frozen brain samples to laser microdissection combined with quantitative RT-PCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Seico; Kakeyama, Masaki; Endo, Toshihiro; Yoshioka, Wataru; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2015-06-20

    The heterogeneity of the brain requires appropriate molecular biological approaches to account for its morphological complexity. Laser-assisted microdissection followed by transcript profiling by quantitative determination has been reported to be an optimal methodology. Nevertheless, not all brain regions can be identified easily without staining, restricting the accuracy and efficiency in sampling. The aim of the present study was to validate whether fixation and staining treatments are suitable for quantitative transcript expression analysis in laser microdissection (LMD) samples. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the absolute transcript expression levels and profiles of samples obtained from the hippocampal dentate gyrus from fresh frozen mice brain sections that had been fixed with ethanol and stained with NeuroTrace. The results were compared with those obtained from unfixed and unstained samples. We found that the quantitative relationship of transcript expression levels between various housekeeping genes and immediate early genes was preserved, although the preparation compromised the yield of the transcripts. In addition, histological and molecular integrities of the fixed and stained specimens were preserved for at least a week at room temperature. Based on the lobe specific profiles of transcripts in the anterior and posterior lobes of the pituitary, we confirmed that no cross-contamination on transcription expressions occurred as a result of the fixation and staining. We have provided detailed information of the procedures on ethanol fixation followed by NeuroTrace staining on the absolute quantitative RT-PCR analysis using microdissected fresh frozen mouse brain tissues. The present study demonstrated that quantitative transcript expression analysis can be conducted reliably on stained tissues. This method is suitable for applications in basic and clinical studies on particular transcript expressions in various regions of the brain.

  19. 78 FR 43888 - Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 253.100-Use of Units of Plasma and Fresh Frozen Plasma Which Have...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... and Fresh Frozen Plasma Which Have Been Thawed; Withdrawal of Compliance Policy Guide AGENCY: Food and... Units of Plasma and Fresh Frozen Plasma Which Have Been Thawed,'' issued October 1, 1980, and revised in... Plasma Which Have Been Thawed'' on October 1, 1980, and revised it in March 1995. FDA originally issued...

  20. Radiographic and Clinical Outcomes of Anterior and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Remi M; Alas, Haddy; Mosich, Gina M; Sharma, Akshay; Pourtaheri, Sina

    2017-06-15

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. Compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) to transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). ALIF and TLIF are 2 methods of achieving spinal arthrodesis. There are conflicting reports with no consensus on the optimal interbody technique to achieve successful radiographic and clinical outcomes. The goal of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes of ALIF to TLIF. A systematic search of multiple medical reference databases was conducted for studies comparing ALIF to TLIF. Studies that included stand-alone ALIFs were excluded. Meta-analysis was performed using the random-effects model for heterogeneity. Radiographic outcome measures included segmental and overall lumbar lordosis, and fusion rates. Clinical outcomes measures included Oswestry disability index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain. The search yielded 7 studies totaling 811 patients (ALIF=448, TLIF=363). ALIF was superior to TLIF in restoring segmental lumbar lordosis at L4-L5 and L5-S1 (L4-L5; P=0.013, L5-S1; P<0.001). ALIF was also superior to TLIF in restoring overall lumbar lordosis (P<0.001). However, no significant differences in fusion rates were noted between both techniques [odds ratio=0.905; 95% confidence interval, 0.458-1.789; P=0.775]. In addition, ALIF and TLIF were comparable with regards to ODI and VAS scores (ODI; P=0.184, VAS; P=0.983). For the restoration of lumbar lordosis, ALIF is superior to TLIF. However, TLIF is comparable to ALIF with regards to fusion rate and clinical outcomes.

  1. Justifying the clinical use of fresh frozen plasma-an audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, M.M.; Maqbool, S.; Butt, T.K.; Iqbal, S.; Mumtaz, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the appropriateness of fresh frozen plasma (FFP), uses in various haematological and clinical disorders, with reference to the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidelines through an audit. The data was collected from June 2001 to June 2004 from the request forms ordered by the clinicians for the transfusion of FFP at the Department of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Shalamar Hospital, Lahore. A total of 2075 healthy blood donors donated their whole blood for the preparation of fresh frozen plasma (FFP). All blood donors were screened for anti HCV, HBsAg, VDRL and HIV. Those 2075 FFP units were prepared on high-speed centrifuge and were rapidly stored at -30 degree C freezer. A total of 587 patients were transfused 2075 units of FFP for various clinical disorders. The percentage of FFP units, transfused appropriately and inappropriately, as defined by BCSH guidelines, was estimated. Out of 2075 FFP units, 335 (24.41%) FFP units were transfused to patients suffering from bleeding due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), 306 (22.30%) units used for massive transfusion and surgical bleeding, 236 (17.20%) units for bleeding due to chronic liver disease, 202 (14.72%) units used to control bleeding due to coagulation factor deficiencies, 84(6.12%) units for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), 75(5.46%) units prior to liver biopsy to correct prolonged prothrombin time (PT), 72(5.24%) units for haemorrhage due to haemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) and 62(4.51%) units to control bleeding due to warfarin overdosage, 425(60.45%) units used for nutritional support and hypovolaemia replacement, 131(18.63%) units for the reversal of prolonged INR in the absence of bleeding due to warfarin, 92 (13.08%) units used in ICU to correct prolonged PT without bleeding due to Vitamin K deficiency and 55(7.82%) units for chronic liver disease (CLD) to correct prolonged PT and APTT in the absence of bleeding. In summary, 1372 (66

  2. [Sodium and potassium content of some fresh, frozen and canned vegetables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarelli, M T; Faraj, L

    1986-09-01

    Sodium and potassium content was determined in fresh, frozen and canned green peas, corn and green beans, as well as in fresh and canned tomatoes. Flame photometry was the method used for this analysis, as the AOAC recommends. Among the fresh products tested, green beans yielded the lowest sodium and potassium contents, with 2.2 and 150.2 mg/100 g, respectively. The highest sodium content was found in green peas, with 31.8 mg/100 g, and the highest potassium values were determined in tomatoes and green peas, with 271.7 and 271.3 mg/100 g, values which are not statistically different. In regard to frozen products, green beans also presented the lowest values of these cations, with 3.0 mg/100 g sodium, and 111.0 mg/100 g potassium. The highest averages were detected in green peas, with a sodium content of 149.4 mg/100 g, and 145.1 mg/100 g potassium. In general, all canned products tested showed higher sodium and lower potassium values than those found in fresh or frozen products. The highest sodium content (317.3 mg/100 g) was found in canned green peas, and the lowest (127.4 mg/100 g), in canned tomatoes. With respect to potassium, the highest values corresponded to canned tomatoes, with 168.8 mg/100 g, and the lowest to corn, with 7.6 mg/100 g.

  3. In vitro kinetics of nerve agent degradation by fresh frozen plasma (FFP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Timo; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2014-02-01

    Great efforts have been undertaken in the last decades to develop new oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds (OP). So far, a broad-spectrum oxime effective against structurally diverse OP is still missing, and alternative approaches, e.g. stoichiometric and catalytic scavengers, are under investigation. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) has been used in human OP pesticide poisoning which prompted us to investigate the in vitro kinetics of OP nerve agent degradation by FFP. Degradation was rapid and calcium-dependent with the G-type nerve agents tabun, sarin, soman and cyclosarin with half-lives from 5 to 28 min. Substantially longer and calcium-independent degradation half-lives of 23-33 h were determined with the V-type nerve agents CVX, VR and VX. However, at all the tested conditions, the degradation of V-type nerve agents was several-fold faster than spontaneous hydrolysis. Albumin did not accelerate the degradation of nerve agents. In conclusion, the fast degradation of G-type nerve agents by FFP might be a promising tool, but would require transfusion shortly after poisoning. FFP does not seem to be suitable for detoxifying relevant agent concentrations in case of human poisoning by V-type nerve agents.

  4. Is aceruloplasminemia treatable? Combining iron chelation and fresh-frozen plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, L; Alberici, A; Buzzi, P; Marchina, E; Lanari, A; Arosio, C; Ciccone, A; Semeraro, F; Gasparotti, R; Padovani, A; Borroni, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of a patient with hereditary ceruloplasmin deficiency due to a novel gene mutation in ceruloplasmin gene (CP), treated with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and iron chelation therapy. A 59-year-old man with a past history of diabetes was admitted to our department due to progressive gait difficulties and cognitive impairment. Neurological examination revealed a moderate cognitive decline, with mild extrapyramidal symptoms, ataxia, and myoclonus. Brain T2-weighted MR imaging showed bilateral basal ganglia hypointensity with diffuse iron deposition. Increased serum ferritin, low serum copper concentration, undetectable ceruloplasmin, and normal urinary copper excretion were found. The genetic analysis of the CP (OMIM #604290) reported compound heterozygosity for two mutations, namely c.848G > A and c.2689_2690delCT. Treatment with FFP (500 mL i.v./once a week) and administration of iron chelator (Deferoxamine 1000 mg i.v/die for 5 days, followed by Deferiprone 500 mg/die per os) were undertaken. At the 6-month follow-up, clinical improvement of gait instability, trunk ataxia, and myoclonus was observed; brain MRI scan showed no further progression of basal ganglia T2 hypointensity. This case report suggests that the early initiation of combined treatment with FFP and iron chelation may be useful to reduce the accumulation of iron in the central nervous system and to improve the neurological symptoms.

  5. Adiponectin in Fresh Frozen Plasma Contributes to Restoration of Vascular Barrier Function After Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiyun; Cao, Yanna; Huby, Maria P; Duan, Chaojun; Baer, Lisa; Peng, Zhanglong; Kozar, Rosemary A; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E; Ko, Tien C

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of preventable deaths in civilian and military trauma. Use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients requiring massive transfusion is associated with improved outcomes. FFP contains significant amounts of adiponectin, which is known to have vascular protective function. We hypothesize that FFP improves vascular barrier function largely via adiponectin. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 19 severely injured patients in hemorrhagic shock (HS). Compared with normal individuals, plasma adiponectin levels decreased to 49% in HS patients before resuscitation (P < 0.05) and increased to 64% post-resuscitation (but not significant). In a HS mouse model, we demonstrated a similar decrease in plasma adiponectin to 54% but a significant increase to 79% by FFP resuscitation compared with baseline (P < 0.05). HS disrupted lung vascular barrier function, leading to an increase in permeability. FFP resuscitation reversed these HS-induced effects. Immunodepletion of adiponectin from FFP abolished FFP's effects on blocking endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro, and on improving lung vascular barrier function in HS mice. Replenishment with adiponectin rescued FFP's effects. These findings suggest that adiponectin is an important component in FFP resuscitation contributing to the beneficial effects on vascular barrier function after HS.

  6. Coagulation parameters as a guide for fresh frozen plasma transfusion practice: A tertiary hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Haslindawani W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The appropriate use of blood and blood products means the transfusion of safe blood products only to treat a condition leading to significant morbidity or mortality, which cannot be prevented or managed effectively by other means. The safety and effectiveness of transfusion depend on the appropriate clinical use of blood and blood products. This study was conducted to review the practice of fresh frozen plasma usage (FFP for transfusion, based on the coagulation profile, requested by various departments in the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM. Methodology: A retrospective review of blood bank records and coagulation profile results of the patients given FFP from October to December 2006, in Hospital USM was undertaken. The criteria set by the College of American Pathologists in 1994, were used as the guidelines. Results: One thousand six hundred and ninety-eight units of FFP were used during this study period. Only 806 (47.47% FFP units were deemed appropriate. 20.38% were based on studies without any coagulation tests prior to transfusion and 21.13% were transfused for mild prolongation of coagulation test results. About 6.41% requested FFP in the setting of normal coagulation results. Conclusion: Our results showed that a significant proportion of the FFP transfusion was not guided by the coagulation profile. We recommend that a continuous education on FFP transfusion may help to guide the appropriate request for FFP.

  7. Sigma metric analysis for performance of creatinine with fresh frozen serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Fengfeng; Zhang, Chuanbao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Six sigma provides an objective and quantitative methodology to describe the laboratory testing performance. In this study, we conducted a national trueness verification scheme with fresh frozen serum (FFS) for serum creatinine to evaluate its performance in China. Two different concentration levels of FFS, targeted with reference method, were sent to 98 laboratories in China. Imprecision and bias of the measurement procedure were calculated for each participant to further evaluate the sigma value. Quality goal index (QGI) analysis was used to investigate the reason of unacceptable performance for laboratories with σ creatinine had preferable sigma values. For the enzymatic method, 7.0% (5/71) to 45.1% (32/71) of the laboratories need to improve their measurement procedures (σ 1.2). Only 3.1-5.3% of the laboratories should improve both of the precision and trueness. Sigma metric analysis of the serum creatinine assays is disappointing, which was mainly due to the unacceptable analytical bias according to the QGI analysis. Further effort is needed to enhance the trueness of the creatinine measurement.

  8. A Change in Lumbar Sagittal Alignment After Single-level Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis With Normal Sagittal Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Yang, Seung Heon; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2017-08-01

    Retrospective analysis. The object is to assess the correlation between whole lumbar lordosis (LL) and the segmental angle (SA) after single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The restoration of the SA at lower lumbar spine is meaningful, considering it contributes approximately 60% of LL, and revision surgery due to flat back or adjacent segment pathology was necessary decades after the initial surgery. However, little is known about the change of whole lumbar curvature after single-level lower lumbar fusion surgery, especially for balanced spine. We included 41 consecutive patients (M:F=9:32; mean age, 59.8±9.3 y) with a single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery for low-grade degenerative spinal spondylolisthesis, with C7 plumb line of <5 cm and ≥2-year follow-up period. The operated levels were L4-L5 in 34 patients and L5-S1 in 7 patients. Whole LL, SA, pelvic tilt, and sacral slope were compared. According to the Macnab criteria, a favorable outcome (excellent, 21; good, 15) was achieved in 36/41 (88%; excellent, 21; good, 15) patients. LL and SA were significantly changed from -50.8±9.9 to -54.6±11.1 degrees and -15.6±6.1 to -18.7±5.1 degrees (P<0.01), and a positive correlation (r=0.43, P=0.01) was observed between LL and SA at postoperative month 24. The changes to the pelvic tilt and sacral slope were not significant. Whole lumbar sagittal alignment was influenced by single SA. Therefore, obtaining adequate segmental lordosis is desirable considering the effect on the whole spine for a long time.

  9. The NEtherlands Cervical Kinematics (NECK Trial. Cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation; a double-blind randomised multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker Elske

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with cervical radicular syndrome due to disc herniation refractory to conservative treatment are offered surgical treatment. Anterior cervical discectomy is the standard procedure, often in combination with interbody fusion. Accelerated adjacent disc degeneration is a known entity on the long term. Recently, cervical disc prostheses are developed to maintain motion and possibly reduce the incidence of adjacent disc degeneration. A comparative cost-effectiveness study focused on adjacent segment degeneration and functional outcome has not been performed yet. We present the design of the NECK trial, a randomised study on cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in patients with cervical disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18-65 years presenting with radicular signs due to single level cervical disc herniation lasting more than 8 weeks are included. Patients will be randomised into 3 groups: anterior discectomy only, anterior discectomy with interbody fusion, and anterior discectomy with disc prosthesis. The primary outcome measure is symptomatic adjacent disc degeneration at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Other outcome parameters will be the Neck Disability Index, perceived recovery, arm and neck pain, complications, re-operations, quality of life, job satisfaction, anxiety and depression assessment, medical consumption, absenteeism, and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multicenter trial, in which 3 surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses will be kept blinded of the allocated treatment for 2 years. The follow-up period is 5 years. Discussion Currently, anterior cervical discectomy with fusion is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of cervical disc herniation. Whether additional interbody fusion or disc prothesis is necessary and cost-effective will be determined by this trial

  10. Retrospective Study of Anterior Interbody Fusion Rates and Patient Outcomes of Using Mineralized Collagen and Bone Marrow Aspirate in Multilevel Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostin, Richard; O'Brien, Michael; McCarthy, Ian; Bess, Shay; Gupta, Munish; Klineberg, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Retrospective, single-center analysis of multilevel anterior fusion rates and health-related quality-of-life outcomes of mineralized collagen and bone marrow aspirate (BMA) in anterior interbody fusion cages for spine fusion surgery. To determine the ability and effectiveness of mineralized collagen and BMA to achieve multilevel anterior spinal fusion in adult spinal deformity patients when placed in carbon fiber reinforced polymer cages. High rates of postoperative pain and nonunion can result from spine fusion procedures. Factors that affect the success of fusion include patient comorbidities, position of implant, and mechanical and biological deficiencies, as well as the choice of bone graft replacement. Analysis of radiographic images and health-related quality-of-life outcomes was performed for a consecutive series of 22 prospectively enrolled adult spinal deformity patients with 104 total anterior fusion levels. Fusions were graded by 3 blinded surgeons not involved in the operative procedure; each fusion was graded on a 1-4 scale based on fusion mass appearance. Levels with an average fusion grade of 1-2.4 were classified as fused; levels with an average grade >2.5 were classified as not fused. The mean patient age was 51.5 years (range, 38-61) with 21 females. A total of 95% of anterior operative levels were graded as fused based on flexion/extension and full-length biplane radiographs at 1 year. Computed tomography grading showed a reduced fusion rate at 87% overall. There was a statistically significant improvement in the Oswestry Disability Index and Scoliosis Research Society 22-item questionnaire scores at 1 and 2 years after index surgery. Fusion rates in multilevel anterior spinal fusion using mineralized collagen and BMA are relatively low compared with fusion rates of 95% or more reported in the existing literature on long fusions with bone morphogenetic protein.

  11. Soluble type A substance in fresh-frozen plasma as a function of ABO and Secretor genotypes and Lewis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achermann, F J; Julmy, F; Gilliver, L G; Carrel, T P; Nydegger, U E

    2005-06-01

    Soluble ABO blood group substance (SAS) in fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and its cognate alloantibody titer reduction capacity (TRC) are not considered when prescribing this product for plasma exchange (PEX) therapy of ABO incompatible transplant recipients. SAS was quantified in 250 single FFPs using ELISA. Total and IgG class-specific anti-A TRCs of FFPs were measured using a microhemagglutination inhibition assay. SAS level depended not only on the A subtype (p p p p = 0.0003).

  12. Evaluation of fresh frozen plasma administration in dogs with pancreatitis: 77 cases (1995-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherton, Linda K; Streeter, Elizabeth M

    2009-12-01

    Compare outcome of dogs that did and did not receive fresh frozen plasma (FFP) for treatment of pancreatitis. Retrospective case series between 1995 and 2005. University referral hospital. Seventy-four dogs were enrolled with a total of 77 cases as 2 dogs had repeat episodes of pancreatitis. Diagnosis of pancreatitis was based on clinical signs, physical examination, and abdominal ultrasonographic examination. The medical database was searched for dogs with a diagnosis of pancreatitis. Information collected included signalment, vital signs, CBC, use of FFP, length of stay, use of antimicrobials and supplemental nutrition, surgical intervention, preexisting illness, evidence of a coagulopathy and outcome. Outcome was compared between those patients that did and did not receive FFP. Fifty-nine dogs survived to discharge. Two dogs with repeat pancreatitis survived to discharge after each episode. Thirteen dogs died and 2 were euthanized. FFP was administered to 20 dogs. Two dogs that were hospitalized for repeat pancreatitis did not receive FFP. Seven of 20 (35%) cases that received plasma died or were euthanized compared with 6 of 57 (12%) cases that did not receive plasma. Plasma administration was significantly related to outcome (Pdogs meeting criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome were not more likely to receive FFP. Other therapies included supplemental nutrition, antimicrobials, and surgical intervention, which did not affect outcome. Mortality rate for those dogs receiving plasma was higher than those that did not. Severity of illness scores were difficult to assign; however, preexisting illness, evidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and presence of a coagulopathy were not significantly different between the groups that did and did not receive FFP. No benefit for administration of FFP was noted. Additional investigation should be performed to confirm this result.

  13. Fusion and subsidence rate of stand alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion using PEEK cage with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrbalk, Eyal; Uri, Ofir; Parks, Ruth M; Musson, Rachel; Soh, Reuben Chee Cheong; Boszczyk, Bronek Maximilian

    2013-12-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is an established treatment for structural instability associated with symptomatic disk degeneration (SDD). Stand-alone ALIF offers many advantages, however, it may increase the risk of non-union. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) may enhance fusion rate but is associated with postoperative complication. The optimal dose of BMP-2 remains unclear. This study assessed the fusion and subsidence rates of stand-alone ALIF using the SynFix-LR interbody cage with 6 ml/level of BMP-2. Thirty-two ALIF procedures were performed by a single surgeon in 25 patients. Twenty-five procedures were performed for SDD without spondylolisthesis (SDD group) and seven procedures were performed for SDD with grade-I olisthesis (SDD-olisthesis group). Patients were followed-up for a mean of 17 ± 6 months. Solid fusion was achieved in 29 cases (90.6 %) within 6 months postoperatively. Five cases of implant subsidence were observed (16 %). Four of these occurred in the SDD-olisthesis group and one occurred in the SDD group (57 % vs. 4 % respectively; p = 0.004). Three cases of subsidence failed to fuse and required revision. The body mass index of patients with olisthesis who developed subsidence was higher than those who did not develop subsidence (29 ± 2.6 vs. 22 ± 6.5 respectively; p = 0.04). No BMP-2 related complications occurred. The overall fusion rate of stand-alone ALIF using the SynFix-LR system with BMP-2 was 90.6 %, comparable with other published series. No BMP-2 related complication occurred at a dose of 6 mg/level. Degenerative spondylolisthesis and obesity seemed to increase the rate of implant subsidence, and thus we believe that adding posterior fusion for these cases should be considered.

  14. Adjacent segment disease after anterior cervical interbody fusion: a multicenter retrospective study of 288 patients with long-term follow-up.

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    Litrico, S; Lonjon, N; Riouallon, G; Cogniet, A; Launay, O; Beaurain, J; Blamoutier, A; Pascal-Mousselard, H

    2014-10-01

    Cervical discectomy with interbody fusion is a common procedure in spinal surgery. The resultant biomechanical alterations accelerate degeneration of the adjacent segment, but the contribution of natural degeneration to adjacent segment disease is unclear. To assess the long-term rate of surgery to discs adjacent to cervical interbody fusion; and to assess the associated incidence of cervico-brachial neuralgia and radiological degeneration of adjacent discs. A multicenter retrospective study included anterior cervical discectomy patients at a minimum of 10 years' follow-up. Clinical variables comprised pain, use of analgesics and surgical revision. Functional assessment was performed on the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiologic degeneration was assessed on the Goffin score based on cervical spine X-ray. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients were contacted and filled out the clinical questionnaire. Among the patients, 153 underwent radiological reassessment. Mean age was 46 years (range, 16-73 years). Mean follow-up was 14.5 years (12-18 years). The rate of surgical revision on a disc adjacent to the primary level was 5.9%. Frequent attacks of cervico-brachial neuralgia were reported in 20.5% of cases. Radiologic adjacent segment degeneration was found in 81.3% of cases over follow-up. There was a significant correlation between degree of radiologic adjacent segment degeneration and NDI (P=0.02). Degeneration adjacent to discectomy/fusion is partly due to aging. The present findings, however, agree with the literature and indicate accelerated degeneration in adjacent segments. These findings should be taken into account in treatment decision-making and suggest a possible interest of more physiological surgery such as arthroplasty. IV - Multicenter retrospective study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The development of discopathy in lumbar discs adjacent to a lumbar anterior interbody spondylodesis. A retrospective matched-pair study with a postoperative follow-up of 16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, J R; Bohnen, L M

    1992-01-01

    Of 46 patients who underwent a lumbar or lumbo-sacral anterior interbody fusion at one or two levels, 16 were available for a follow-up of 16-20 years. The indications for operation were instability, degenerative disc disease, pseudarthrosis of a posterior fusion, and spondylolisthesis. Preoperative roentgenograms were compared with those made at follow-up 16 years (or more) later. In only a minority of patients was discopathy or instability found. The roentgenographic findings of the operated patients at a follow-up of at least 16 years were compared with those of a group of age- and sex-matched controls not previously treated for backache. We found that most degenerative changes of the adjacent discs occurred at a rate nearly similar to that in the corresponding levels of the controls. These results may suggest that lumbar anterior interbody spondylodesis does not accelerate the development of degenerative changes in adjacent discs.

  16. Redox Status, Procoagulant Activity, and Metabolome of Fresh Frozen Plasma in Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

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    Vassilis L. Tzounakas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTransfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP helps in maintaining the coagulation parameters in patients with acquired multiple coagulation factor deficiencies and severe bleeding. However, along with coagulation factors and procoagulant extracellular vesicles (EVs, numerous bioactive and probably donor-related factors (metabolites, oxidized components, etc. are also carried to the recipient. The X-linked glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD−, the most common human enzyme genetic defect, mainly affects males. By undermining the redox metabolism, the G6PD− cells are susceptible to the deleterious effects of oxidants. Considering the preferential transfusion of FFP from male donors, this study aimed at the assessment of FFP units derived from G6PD− males compared with control, to show whether they are comparable at physiological, metabolic and redox homeostasis levels.MethodsThe quality of n = 12 G6PD− and control FFP units was tested after 12 months of storage, by using hemolysis, redox, and procoagulant activity-targeted biochemical assays, flow cytometry for EV enumeration and phenotyping, untargeted metabolomics, in addition to statistical and bioinformatics tools.ResultsHigher procoagulant activity, phosphatidylserine positive EVs, RBC-vesiculation, and antioxidant capacity but lower oxidative modifications in lipids and proteins were detected in G6PD− FFP compared with controls. The FFP EVs varied in number, cell origin, and lipid/protein composition. Pathway analysis highlighted the riboflavin, purine, and glycerolipid/glycerophospholipid metabolisms as the most altered pathways with high impact in G6PD−. Multivariate and univariate analysis of FFP metabolomes showed excess of diacylglycerols, glycerophosphoinositol, aconitate, and ornithine but a deficiency in riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide, adenine, and arginine, among others, levels in G6PD− FFPs compared with control.ConclusionOur results point

  17. Comparison of chemical, microbiological and histological changes in fresh, frozen and double frozen rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

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    Peter Popelka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The final quality of fish meat depends on the chemical and microbiological quality of fish at the time of freezing as well as on other factors including storage temperature and freezing rate. Analysis of chemical composition (water, protein and fat content, expressible drip, total volatile nitrogen levels, microbiological analyses (total viable counts, Enterobacteriaceae, psychrotrophic bacteria and histological examinations on dorsal skeletal muscles were carried out to distinguish fresh, frozen and double frozen rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss. Significantly higher expressible drip and total volatile base nitrogen concentrations (P Enterobacteriaceae and psychrotrophic bacteria were determined in double frozen trout. The light microscopy of fresh trout muscles did not show any microstructural changes, whereas deformations of muscle fibres and optically empty areas were found in frozen trout. Remarkable defects of the muscle structure in double frozen trout were demonstrated and total disruption of muscle fibres was found. The freezing of trout resulted in various structural changes in the dorsal skeletal musculature. This is a first study comparing changes in fresh, frozen and repeatedly frozen trout. Chemical, microbiological and subsequent histological examinations can be used for revealing the foul practices confusing the consumer with offering thawed fish instead of fresh cooled fish.

  18. Subsidence as of 12 months after single-level anterior cervical inter-body fusion. Is it related to clinical outcomes?

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    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Yeom, Jin S; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2015-06-01

    Subsidence is a frequent phenomenon in the interbody fusion process in patients with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). There is little evidence of whether subsidence in the cervical spine has any impact on clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation of subsidence and clinical outcomes after ACDF and to consider reasons subsidence might not cause unfavorable clinical outcomes. A total of 158 consecutive patients who underwent single-level ACDF were included. The patients were divided into a subsidence group (S-group) and a no subsidence group (N-group), with subsidence defined as a decrease by ≥3 mm in total intervertebral height (TIH). We analyzed outcomes resulting from subsidence, particularly focusing on clinical outcomes and subsequent global and segmental kyphosis using a repeated measure analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA). Subsidence occurred in 74 patients (46.8%) as of a 12-month follow-up. The S-group included 58.6% with a stand-alone cage for interbody fusion (p = 0.002). Clinical outcomes improved significantly over time (neck pain, RM-ANOVA: F(1.3, 205) = 125.1, p subsidence and clinical outcomes between the S- and N-group (neck pain, RM-ANOVA: F(2,153) = 1.04, p = 0.356, partial η(2) = 0.229; arm pain, RM-ANOVA: F(2,153) = 0.56, p = 0.571, partial η(2) = 0.142). Segmental angle increased in both groups over time and showed a statistically significant difference between the S- and N-groups (RM-ANOVA: F(3,143) = 6.148, p = 0.001, partial η(2) = 0.959). Although, global cervical angle decreased generally and displayed no statically significant difference between the S- and N-group (RM-ANOVA: F(3,119) = 2.361, p = 0.075, partial η(2) = 0.056). Radiographic subsidence after ACDF occurred in 46.8% patients as of 12 months after the single-level ACDF. The lack of correlation between bad clinical outcome and radiographic subsidence may be due to

  19. Horizontal Resorption of Fresh-Frozen Corticocancellous Bone Blocks in the Reconstruction of the Atrophic Maxilla at 5 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Eugénio; Messias, Ana; Dias, Ricardo; Judas, Fernando; Salvoni, Alexander; Guerra, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    Reliable implant-supported rehabilitation of an alveolar ridge needs sufficient volume of bone. In order to achieve a prosthetic-driven positioning, bone graft techniques may be required. This prospective cohort study aims to clinically evaluate the amount of resorption of corticocancellous fresh-frozen allografts bone blocks used in the reconstruction of the severe atrophic maxilla. Twenty-two partial and totally edentulous patients underwent bone augmentation procedures with fresh-frozen allogenous blocks from the iliac crest under local anesthesia. Implants were inserted into the grafted sites after a healing period of 5 months. Final fixed prosthesis was delivered ± 4 months later. Ridge width analysis and measurements were performed with a caliper before and after grafting and at implant insertion. Bone biopsies were performed in 16 patients. A total of 98 onlay block allografts were used in 22 patients with an initial mean alveolar ridge width of 3.41 ± 1.36 mm. Early exposure of blocks was observed in four situations and one of these completely resorbed. Mean horizontal bone gain was 3.63 ± 1.28 mm (p allograph placement and the reopening stage was 0.49 ± 0.54 mm, meaning approximately 7.1% (95% confidence interval: [5.6%, 8.6%]) of total ridge width loss during the integration period. One hundred thirty dental implants were placed with good primary stability (≥ 30 Ncm). Four implants presented early failure before the prosthetic delivery (96.7% implant survival). All patients were successfully rehabilitated. Histomorphometric analysis revealed 20.9 ± 5.8% of vital bone in close contact to the remaining grafted bone. A positive strong correlation (adjusted R(2)  = 0.44, p = .003) was found between healing time and vital bone percentage. Augmentation procedures performed using fresh-frozen allografts from the iliac crest are a suitable alternative in the reconstruction of the atrophic maxilla with low resorption

  20. False-positive serology following intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in a patient with pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Hisashi; Honda, Haruki; Egami, Shohei; Yokoyama, Tomoaki; Fujimoto, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Makiko; Sugiura, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma are therapeutic options for patients with refractory pemphigus vulgaris. Passive acquisition of various clinically important antibodies through these therapies can occur, leading to false serology and negatively affecting patients' clinical care. It is recommended that dermatologists recognize the possibility of these phenomena and interpret them appropriately. Here, we report false-positive serology following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in a patient with refractory pemphigus vulgaris. We also discuss the measure for misinterpretation and unnecessary clinical intervention. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. Successful implementation of a packed red blood cell and fresh frozen plasma transfusion protocol in the surgical intensive care unit.

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    Benjamin E Szpila

    Full Text Available Blood product transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine if implementation of a restrictive protocol for packed red blood cell (PRBC and fresh frozen plasma (FFP transfusion safely reduces blood product utilization and costs in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU.We performed a retrospective, historical control analysis comparing before (PRE and after (POST implementation of a restrictive PRBC/FFP transfusion protocol for SICU patients. Univariate analysis was utilized to compare patient demographics and blood product transfusion totals between the PRE and POST cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed to determine if implementation of the restrictive transfusion protocol is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes after controlling for age, illness severity, and total blood products received.829 total patients were included in the analysis (PRE, n=372; POST, n=457. Despite higher mean age (56 vs. 52 years, p=0.01 and APACHE II scores (12.5 vs. 11.2, p=0.006, mean units transfused per patient were lower for both packed red blood cells (0.7 vs. 1.2, p=0.03 and fresh frozen plasma (0.3 vs. 1.2, p=0.007 in the POST compared to the PRE cohort, respectively. There was no difference in inpatient mortality between the PRE and POST cohorts (7.5% vs. 9.2%, p=0.39. There was a decreased risk of urinary tract infections (OR 0.47, 95%CI 0.28-0.80 in the POST cohort after controlling for age, illness severity and amount of blood products transfused.Implementation of a restrictive transfusion protocol can effectively reduce blood product utilization in critically ill surgical patients with no increase in morbidity or mortality.

  2. Comparison of fresh-frozen cadaver and high-fidelity virtual reality simulator as methods of laparoscopic training.

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    Sharma, Mitesh; Horgan, Alan

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare fresh-frozen cadavers (FFC) with a high-fidelity virtual reality simulator (VRS) as training tools in minimal access surgery for complex and relatively simple procedures. A prospective comparative face validity study between FFC and VRS (LAP Mentor(™)) was performed. Surgeons were recruited to perform tasks on both FFC and VRS appropriately paired to their experience level. Group A (senior) performed a laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy, Group B (intermediate) performed a laparoscopic incisional hernia repair, and Group C (junior) performed basic laparoscopic tasks (BLT) (camera manipulation, hand-eye coordination, tissue dissection and hand-transferring skills). Each subject completed a 5-point Likert-type questionnaire rating the training modalities in nine domains. Data were analysed using nonparametric tests. Forty-five surgeons were recruited to participate (15 per skill group). Median scores for subjects in Group A were significantly higher for evaluation of FFC in all nine domains compared to VRS (p < 0.01). Group B scored FFC significantly better (p < 0.05) in all domains except task replication (p = 0.06). Group C scored FFC significantly better (p < 0.01) in eight domains but not on performance feedback (p = 0.09). When compared across groups, juniors accepted VRS as a training model more than did intermediate and senior groups on most domains (p < 0.01) except team work. Fresh-frozen cadaver is perceived as a significantly overall better model for laparoscopic training than the high-fidelity VRS by all training grades, irrespective of the complexity of the operative procedure performed. VRS is still useful when training junior trainees in BLT.

  3. Stretching positions for the coracohumeral ligament: Strain measurement during passive motion using fresh/frozen cadaver shoulders

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    Izumi Tomoki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contracture of the coracohumeral ligament is reported to restrict external rotation of the shoulder with arm at the side and restrict posterior-inferior shift of the humeral head. The contracture is supposed to restrict range of motion of the glenohumeral joint. Methods To obtain stretching position of the coracohumeral ligament, strain on the ligament was measured at the superficial fibers of the ligament using 9 fresh/frozen cadaver shoulders. By sequential measurement using a strain gauge, the ligament strain was measured from reference length (L0. Shoulder positions were determined using a 3 Space Tracker System. Through a combination of previously reported coracohumeral stretching positions and those observed in preliminary measurement, ligament strain were measured by passive external rotation from 10° internal rotation, by adding each 10° external rotation, to maximal external rotation. Results Stretching positions in which significantly larger strain were obtained compared to the L0 values were 0° elevation in scapula plane with 40°, 50° and maximum external rotation (5.68%, 7.2%, 7.87%, 30° extension with 50°, maximum external rotation (4.20%, 4.79%, and 30° extension + adduction with 30°, 40°, 50° and maximum external rotation (4.09%, 4.67%, 4.78%, 5.05%(P Conclusions Significant strain of the coracohumeral ligament will be achieved by passive external rotation at lower shoulder elevations, extension, and extension with adduction.

  4. Activity of clotting factors in fresh-frozen plasma during storage at 4 degrees C over 6 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Heymann, Christian; Keller, Mareike Kristina; Spies, Claudia; Schuster, Michael; Meinck, Kristian; Sander, Michael; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Kiesewetter, Holger; Pruss, Axel

    2009-05-01

    Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) requires thawing, which delays availability. We investigated clotting factor activity and bacterial contamination of FFP when stored at 4 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C for 6 days. Plasma of 20 healthy plasma donors was sampled, frozen, and analyzed at baseline and repeatedly over a period of 6 days after thawing. The activity of fibrinogen, Factor (F)II, FV, FVII, FVIII, F IX, FX, XI, FXII, FXIII, antithrombin III (ATIII), von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF-Ag), protein C (PC), and free protein S (FPS) were determined and analyzed over time. Immediately after thawing there was a significant decrease of fibrinogen (-9%), FII (-7%), FV (-14%), FVII (-12%), FX (-11%), FXIII (-20%), PC (-7%), and ATIII (-4%), whereas FVIII (+8%), F IX (+1%), FXI (+11%), FXII (-1%), FPS (-1%), and VWF-Ag (-6%) remained stable without significant change. Over 6 days after thawing fibrinogen, ATIII (+2%) and VWF-Ag (+2%) remained stable whereas FXII (+2%), FXIII (+6%), and PC (+3%) changed significantly over time and increased at the end. FII (-8%), FV (-16%), FVII (-31%), FVIII (-47%), F IX (-12%), FX (-10%), FXI (-25%), and FPS (+/-0%) changed also significantly over time and decreased at the end. All clotting factors and inhibitors remained within the reference range requested by quality assurance regulations. No FFP bag showed bacterial contamination. This provides evidence for maintaining quality of thawed FFP and may improve rapid availability in emergency situations and reduce cost for health care givers.

  5. Fine structures and ion images on fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections by transmission electron and scanning ion microscopy

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    Takaya, K.; Okabe, M.; Sawataishi, M.; Takashima, H.; Yoshida, T

    2003-01-15

    Ion microscopy (IM) of air-dried or freeze-dried cryostat and semi-thin cryosections has provided ion images of elements and organic substances in wide areas of the tissue. For reproducible ion images by a shorter time of exposure to the primary ion beam, fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections were prepared by freezing the tissue in propane chilled with liquid nitrogen, cryocut at 60 nm, mounted on grids and silicon wafer pieces, and freeze-dried. Rat Cowper gland and sciatic nerve, bone marrow of the rat administered of lithium carbonate, tree frog and African toad spleen and buffy coat of atopic dermatitis patients were examined. Fine structures and ion images of the corresponding areas in the same or neighboring sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) followed by sector type and time-of-flight type IM. Cells in the buffy coat contained larger amounts of potassium and magnesium while plasma had larger amounts of sodium and calcium. However, in the tissues, lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium were distributed in the cell and calcium showed a granular appearance. A granular cell of the tree frog spleen contained sodium and potassium over the cell and magnesium and calcium were confined to granules.

  6. Improvement of Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Traumatic Brain Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock Following Treatment With Valproic Acid and Fresh Frozen Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolian, Vahagn C; Dekker, Simone E; Bambakidis, Ted; Higgins, Gerald A; Dennahy, Isabel S; Georgoff, Patrick E; Williams, Aaron M; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Alam, Hasan B

    2018-01-01

    Combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock are highly lethal. Following injuries, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier can be impaired, contributing to secondary brain insults. The status of the blood-brain barrier represents a potential factor impacting long-term neurologic outcomes in combined injuries. Treatment strategies involving plasma-based resuscitation and valproic acid therapy have shown efficacy in this setting. We hypothesize that a component of this beneficial effect is related to blood-brain barrier preservation. Following controlled traumatic brain injury, hemorrhagic shock, various resuscitation and treatment strategies were evaluated for their association with blood-brain barrier integrity. Analysis of gene expression profiles was performed using Porcine Gene ST 1.1 microarray. Pathway analysis was completed using network analysis tools (Gene Ontology, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and Parametric Gene Set Enrichment Analysis). Female Yorkshire swine were subjected to controlled traumatic brain injury and 2 hours of hemorrhagic shock (40% blood volume, mean arterial pressure 30-35 mmHg). Subjects were resuscitated with 1) normal saline, 2) fresh frozen plasma, 3) hetastarch, 4) fresh frozen plasma + valproic acid, or 5) hetastarch + valproic acid (n = 5 per group). After 6 hours of observation, brains were harvested for evaluation. Immunofluoroscopic evaluation of the traumatic brain injury site revealed significantly increased expression of tight-junction associated proteins (zona occludin-1, claudin-5) following combination therapy (fresh frozen plasma + valproic acid and hetastarch + valproic acid). The extracellular matrix protein laminin was found to have significantly improved expression with combination therapies. Pathway analysis indicated that valproic acid significantly modulated pathways involved in endothelial barrier function and cell signaling. Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma results in improved expression of

  7. Comparative analysis of activity of coagulation Factors V and VIII and level of fibrinogen in fresh frozen plasma and frozen plasma

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    Mitu Dogra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to analyse and compare the activity of factor V, VIII and fibrinogen level in fresh frozen plasma and frozen plasma frozen after 8 hrs but within 24 hours after phlebotomy. Materials and Methods: Fresh frozen plasma separated from whole blood within 8 hours was compared with plasma separated within 24 hours after phlebotomy in terms of coagulation factors V and VIII and level of fibrinogen by standard methods using semi automated coagulometer sysmex CA50. Results: Longer storage of whole blood before processing resulted in significant decrease (18.4% in activity of factor VIII but the fall in activity of factor V (6.52% or level of fibrinogen (1.81% was not significant. Discussion: These data suggest that there is good retention of coagulation factors in both types of plasma. Although there is significant fall in activity of factor VIII, but it is an acute phase reactant and raised in most of the diseases so it is suggested that frozen plasma would be an acceptable product for most patients requiring fresh frozen plasma.

  8. Tissue banking in a regional hospital: a promising future concept? First report on fresh frozen tissue banking in a hospital without an integrated institute of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Strauss und Torney, Marco; Güller, Ulrich; Rezaeian, Farid; Brosi, Philippe; Terracciano, Luigi; Zuber, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Vital tissue provided by fresh frozen tissue banking is often required for genetic tumor profiling and tailored therapies. However, the potential patient benefits of fresh frozen tissue banking are currently limited to university hospitals. The objective of the present pilot study--the first one in the literature--was to evaluate whether fresh frozen tissue banking is feasible in a regional hospital without an integrated institute of pathology. Patients with resectable breast and colon cancer were included in this prospective study. Both malignant and healthy tissue were sampled using isopentan-based snap-freezing 1 h after tumor resection and stored at -80 °C before transfer to the main tissue bank of a University institute of pathology. The initial costs to set up tissue banking were 35,662 US$. Furthermore, the running costs are 1,250 US$ yearly. During the first 13 months, 43 samples (nine samples of breast cancer and 34 samples of colon cancer) were collected from 41 patients. Based on the pathology reports, there was no interference with standard histopathologic analyses due to the sample collection. This is the first report in the literature providing evidence that tissue banking in a regional hospital without an integrated institute of pathology is feasible. The interesting findings of the present pilot study must be confirmed by larger investigations.

  9. Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 by fresh-frozen plasma treated with methylene blue and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Manuel; Luis-Hidalgo, Mar; Bracho, María Alma; Blanquer, Amando; Larrea, Luis; Villalba, José; Puig, Nieves; Planelles, Dolores; Montoro, José; González-Candelas, Fernando; Roig, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The risk of transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) has been minimized by introduction of nucleic acid testing (NAT) and pathogen inactivation (PI). This case report describes transmission of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) to two recipients despite these measures. In March 2009 a possible TTI of HIV-1 was identified in a patient that had received pooled buffy coat platelet concentrate (BC-PLT) in November 2005. The subsequent lookback study found two more patients who had received methylene blue (MB)-treated fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and red blood cells (RBCs) from the same donation. In November 2005 the donor had tested negative for both HIV antibodies and HIV-1 RNA by 44 minipool (44 MP) NAT. Repository samples of this donation and samples from the recipients were used for viral load (VL) and sequence analysis. HIV-1 RNA was detectable by individual donation (ID)-NAT in the repository sample from the 2005 window period donation and a VL of 135 copies/mL was measured. HIV-1 infection was confirmed in both recipients of both BC-PLT (65 mL of plasma) and MB-FFP (261 mL of plasma), but not in the patient that had received 4-week-old RBCs (20 mL of plasma). The sequence analysis revealed a close phylogenetic relationship between the virus strains isolated from the donor and recipients, compatible with TTI. Approximately 17,600 and 4400 virions in the MB-FFP and BC-PLT were infectious, but 1350 virions in the RBCs were not. ID-NAT would have prevented this transmission, but the combination of MP-NAT and MB-PI did not. © 2015 AABB.

  10. Unusual back pain caused by intervertebral disc degeneration associated with schmorl node at Th11/12 in a young athlete, successfully treated by anterior interbody fusion: a case report.

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    Fukuta, Shoji; Miyamoto, Kei; Iwata, Atsushi; Hosoe, Hideo; Iwata, Hisashi; Shirahashi, Koyo; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2009-03-01

    A case report describing thoracic intervertebral disc degeneration and spondylolisthesis associated with a Schmorl node in a young athlete, which was successfully treated by anterior interbody fusion (AIF). To describe a rare pathologic condition with a clinical outcome of a surgical intervention. Intervertebral degeneration and spondylolisthesis of the lower thoracic spine associated with a Schmorl node in a young athlete has not been reported. A 19-year-old male amateur soccer player presented with severe back pain during motion. This pain was associated with intervertebral disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis, and a Schmorl node at the Th11/12 level. He was surgically treated by AIF. The AIF resulted in a solid fusion, an improvement in sagittal alignment, and amelioration of symptoms. The AIF procedure was effective for lower thoracic symptomatic intervertebral disc degeneration and spondylolisthesis associated with a Schmorl node.

  11. Pathogen inactivation in fresh frozen plasma using riboflavin and ultraviolet light: Effects on plasma proteins and coagulation factor VIII

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    Stanojković Zoran

    2011-01-01

    characteristics of conventional plasma, so it could be used for the treatment of pathological conditions that demand transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, or in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpure when we use therapeutic exchange of plasma.

  12. [Pathogen inactivation in fresh frozen plasma using riboflavin and ultraviolet light: effects on plasma proteins and coagulation factor VII].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojković, Zoran; Antić, Ana

    2011-01-01

    , so it could be used for the treatment of pathological conditions that demand transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, or in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpure when we use therapeutic exchange of plasma.

  13. Comparison of outcomes and safety of using hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft in cervical cages for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion

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    Hosein Mashhadinezhad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   After cervical discectomy, autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies, but donor site–related complications can still occur. In this study we evaluate the use   of hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft for interbody fusion.     Methods:   From November 2008 to November 2011, 236 patients participated in this study. Peek cages were packed with autologous bone grafts taken from the iliac crest in 112 patients and hydroxyapatite (HA granules in 124 patients.   Patients were followed for 12 months. The patients’ neurological signs, results, and complications were fully recorded   throughout the procedure. Radiological imaging was done to assess the fusion rate and settling ratio.     Results:   Formation of bony bridges at the third month was higher in the autograft group versus the granule group. However, there was no difference between both groups at the 12-month follow-up assessment. No difference (     P > 0.05   was found regarding improvement in neurological deficit as well as radicular pain and recovery rate between the two groups. Conclusions:   Interbody fusion cage containing HA granules proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical and neurological outcome, radiographic measurement and fusion rate   in cage containing HA are similar and competitive with autograft packed cages.

  14. Comparison of outcomes and safety of using hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft in cervical cages for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Mashhadinezhad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   After cervical discectomy, autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies, but donor site–related complications can still occur. In this study we evaluate the use   of hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft for interbody fusion.     Methods:   From November 2008 to November 2011, 236 patients participated in this study. Peek cages were packed with autologous bone grafts taken from the iliac crest in 112 patients and hydroxyapatite (HA granules in 124 patients.   Patients were followed for 12 months. The patients’ neurological signs, results, and complications were fully recorded   throughout the procedure. Radiological imaging was done to assess the fusion rate and settling ratio.     Results:   Formation of bony bridges at the third month was higher in the autograft group versus the granule group. However, there was no difference between both groups at the 12-month follow-up assessment. No difference (     P > 0.05   was found regarding improvement in neurological deficit as well as radicular pain and recovery rate between the two groups. Conclusions:   Interbody fusion cage containing HA granules proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical and neurological outcome, radiographic measurement and fusion rate   in cage containing HA are similar and competitive with autograft packed cages.    

  15. Synergistic effects of fresh frozen plasma and valproic acid treatment in a combined model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang; Duggan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are major causes of trauma-related deaths and are especially lethal as a combined insult. Previously, we showed that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) decreased the size of the brain lesion and associated swelling in a swine...... model of combined TBI+HS. We have also shown separately that addition of valproic acid (VPA) to the resuscitation protocol attenuates inflammatory markers in the brain as well as the degree of TBI. The current study was performed to determine whether a combined FFP+VPA treatment strategy would exert...

  16. Fresh Frozen Plasma Resuscitation Provides Neuroprotection Compared to Normal Saline in a Large Animal Model of Traumatic Brain Injury and Polytrauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imam, Ayesha; Jin, Guang; Sillesen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    as well as cerebral perfusion pressures. Levels of cerebral eNOS were higher in the FFP-treated group (852.9 vs. 816.4 ng/mL; p=0.03), but no differences in brain levels of ET-1 were observed. Early administration of FFP is neuroprotective in a complex, large animal model of polytrauma, hemorrhage......Abstract We have previously shown that early treatment with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is neuroprotective in a swine model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it remains unknown whether this strategy would be beneficial in a more clinical polytrauma model. Yorkshire...

  17. No red cell alloimmunization or change of clinical outcome after using fresh frozen cancellous allograft bone for acetabular reconstruction in revision hip arthroplasty: a follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittag Falk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Possible immunization to blood group or other antigens and subsequent inhibition of remodeling or incorporation after use of untreated human bone allograft was described previously. This study presents the immunological, clinical and radiological results of 30 patients with acetabular revisions using fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft. Methods AB0-incompatible (donor-recipient bone transplantation was performed in 22 cases, Rh(D incompatible transplantation in 6 cases. The mean follow up of 23 months included measuring Harris hip score and radiological examination with evaluation of remodeling of the bone graft, implant migration and heterotopic ossification. In addition, all patients were screened for alloimmunization to Rh blood group antigens. Results Compared to the whole study group, there were no differences in clinical or radiological measurements for the groups with AB0- or Rh(D-incompatible bone transplantation. The mean Harris Hip Score was 80.6. X-rays confirmed total remodeling of all allografts with no acetabular loosening. At follow up, blood tests revealed no alloimmunization to Rh blood group donor antigens. Conclusions The use of fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft in acetabular revision is a reliable supplement to reconstruction. The risk of alloimmunization to donor-blood group antigens after AB0- or Rh-incompatible allograft transplantation with a negative long-term influence on bone-remodeling or the clinical outcome is negligible.

  18. Time-sequential changes of differentially expressed miRNAs during the process of anterior lumbar interbody fusion using equine bone protein extract, rhBMP-2 and autograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da-Fu; Zhou, Zhi-Yu; Dai, Xue-Jun; Gao, Man-Man; Huang, Bao-Ding; Liang, Tang-Zhao; Shi, Rui; Zou, Li-Jin; Li, Hai-Sheng; Bünger, Cody; Tian, Wei; Zou, Xue-Nong

    2014-03-01

    The precise mechanism of bone regeneration in different bone graft substitutes has been well studied in recent researches. However, miRNAs regulation of the bone formation has been always mysterious. We developed the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model in pigs using equine bone protein extract (BPE), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS), and autograft as bone graft substitute, respectively. The miRNA and gene expression profiles of different bone graft materials were examined using microarray technology and data analysis, including self-organizing maps, KEGG pathway and Biological process GO analyses. We then jointly analyzed miRNA and mRNA profiles of the bone fusion tissue at different time points respectively. Results showed that miRNAs, including let-7, miR-129, miR-21, miR-133, miR-140, miR-146, miR-184, and miR-224, were involved in the regulation of the immune and inflammation response, which provided suitable inflammatory microenvironment for bone formation. At late stage, several miRNAs directly regulate SMAD4, Estrogen receptor 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C for bone formation. It can be concluded that miRNAs play important roles in balancing the inflammation and bone formation.

  19. Lumbar interbody fusion: techniques, indications and comparison of interbody fusion options including PLIF, TLIF, MI-TLIF, OLIF/ATP, LLIF and ALIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Malham, Greg; Seex, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine is common in the ageing population, and is one of the most frequent causes of disability. Lumbar spondylosis may result in mechanical back pain, radicular and claudicant symptoms, reduced mobility and poor quality of life. Surgical interbody fusion of degenerative levels is an effective treatment option to stabilize the painful motion segment, and may provide indirect decompression of the neural elements, restore lordosis and correct deformity. The surgical options for interbody fusion of the lumbar spine include: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF), oblique lumbar interbody fusion/anterior to psoas (OLIF/ATP), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The indications may include: discogenic/facetogenic low back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy due to foraminal stenosis, lumbar degenerative spinal deformity including symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. In general, traditional posterior approaches are frequently used with acceptable fusion rates and low complication rates, however they are limited by thecal sac and nerve root retraction, along with iatrogenic injury to the paraspinal musculature and disruption of the posterior tension band. Minimally invasive (MIS) posterior approaches have evolved in an attempt to reduce approach related complications. Anterior approaches avoid the spinal canal, cauda equina and nerve roots, however have issues with approach related abdominal and vascular complications. In addition, lateral and OLIF techniques have potential risks to the lumbar plexus and psoas muscle. The present study aims firstly to comprehensively review the available literature and evidence for different lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) techniques. Secondly, we propose a set of recommendations and guidelines

  20. In vitro evaluation of the inhibitory effect of canine serum, canine fresh frozen plasma, freeze-thaw-cycled plasma, and Solcoseryl™ on matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Derek W Y; Chau, Ying; Yeung, Wai Kit; Westermeyer, Hans D

    2015-05-01

    Compare the efficacy of canine serum, fresh frozen plasma (FFP), freeze-thaw-cycled plasma (FTCP), and Solcoseryl(™) at inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9 in vitro. Matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 activity in the presence of serum, FFP, FTCP, or Solcoseryl(™) was assayed using a commercially available fluorogenic gelatinase activity kit. Matrix metalloproteinases 2 activity in the presence of serum, FFP, FTCP, and Solcoseryl(™) was 20.84%, 5.76%, 8.10%, and 83.03%, respectively of uninhibited MMP 2 activity. MMP 9 activity in the presence of serum, FFP, FTCP, and Solcoseryl(™) was 57.36%, 58.35%, 49.35%, and -8.69%, respectively of uninhibited MMP 9 activity. Serum, FFP, and FTCP exhibit similar levels of MMP 2 and 9 inhibitions. Solcoseryl(™) causes minimal MMP 2 inhibition, but profound MMP 9 inhibition. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  1. Biobanking of Fresh-Frozen Cancer Tissue: RNA Is Stable Independent of Tissue Type with Less Than 1 Hour of Cold Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang Yong; Jun, Jonghyun; Park, Miyeon; Park, Seo Kyu; Choi, Wonju; Park, Kyunghee; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Myoyong

    2018-02-01

    The effects of preanalytical variables in tissue processing and storage periods on RNA quality of tissues have been well documented in each type of cancer. However, few studies have been performed on a comparative assessment of the impacts across different cancer tissues, even though it is well known that RNase activity is highly variable in various tissue types and RNase-rich tissues have been found to yield low-quality RNA. We investigated the impacts of cold ischemia times and long-term storage on RNA integrity in various types of cancer tissue, which had been fresh-frozen and collected at the Samsung Medical Center Biobank. RNA quality was also evaluated with regard to histopathological variables. We analyzed RNA integrity number (RIN) data, which had been obtained from our quality control (QC) processes over the last 7 years. Approximately 2% of samples were randomly selected and processed to measure RIN quarterly and after 6 years of storage for QC purposes. Fresh-frozen tumor tissues yielded high-quality RNA regardless of tumor type and histopathological features. Up to 1-hour cold ischemia times and up to 6-year storage times did not adversely influence RNA integrity. Only 3 samples showed RIN of <7 out of a total of 396 analyzed tumor tissues. Tissue quality was not adversely affected by long-term storage or limited variations of cold ischemia times. The low-quality samples could be correlated with the structural composition or intratumoral heterogeneity of tissues. The strict application of standardized protocols for tissue collection is the key for high-quality biobanking.

  2. Comparison of rigid and semi-rigid instrumentation under acute load on vertebrae treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önen, Mehmet Reşid; Başgül, Cemile; Yılmaz, İlhan; Özkaya, Mustafa; Demir, Teyfik; Naderi, Sait

    2018-04-01

    Rigid and semi-rigid fixations are investigated several times in order to compare their biomechanical stability. Interbody fusion techniques are also preferable for maintaining the sagittal balance by protecting the disk height. In this study, the biomechanical comparison of semi-rigid and rigid fixations with posterior lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures is conducted under trauma. There were four different test groups to analyze the effect of acute load on treated ovine vertebrae. First and second groups were fixed with polyetheretherketone rods and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages, respectively. Third and fourth groups were fixed with titanium rods and posterior lumbar interbody fusion and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cages, respectively. The drop tests were conducted with 7 kg weight. There were six samples in each group so the drop test repeated 24 times in total. The test samples were photographed and X-rayed (laterally and anteroposteriorly) before and after drop test. Two fractures were observed on group 1. Conversely, there were no fractures observed for group 2. There were no anterior element fractures for both groups 1 and 2. However, one fracture seen on group 3 was anterior element fracture, whereas the other three were posterior element fractures. All three fractures were anterior element fractures for group 4. Treated vertebrae with polyetheretherketone rods and posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages showed the best durability to the drop tests among the groups. Semi-rigid fixation gave better results than rigid fixation according to failed segments. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages seem to be better option for semi-rigid fixation, however mentioned surgical disadvantages must be considered.

  3. Biomechanics of Nested Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; de Tranaltes, Kaylee; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Reyes, Phillip M; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Tumialán, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Arthrodesis is optimized when the structural graft occupies most of the surface area within a disc space. The transforaminal corridor inherently limits interbody size. To evaluate the biomechanical implications of nested interbody spacers (ie, a second curved cage placed behind a first) to increase disc space coverage in transforaminal approaches. Seven lumbar human cadaveric specimens (L3-S1) underwent nondestructive flexibility and axial compression testing intact and after transforaminal instrumentation at L4-L5. Specimens were tested in 5 conditions: (1) intact, (2) interbody, (3) interbody plus bilateral pedicle screws and rods (PSR), (4) 2 nested interbodies, and (5) 2 nested interbodies plus PSR. Mean range of motion (ROM) with 1 interbody vs 2 nested interbodies, respectively, was: flexion, 101% vs 85%; extension, 97% vs 92%; lateral bending, 127% vs 132%; and axial rotation, 145% vs 154%. One interbody and 2 nested interbodies did not differ significantly by loading mode (P > .10). With PSR, ROM decreased significantly compared with intact, but not between interbody and interbody plus PSR or 2 interbodies plus PSR (P > .80). Mean vertical height during compressive loading (ie, axial compressive stiffness) was significantly different with 2 nested interbodies vs 1 interbody alone (P < .001) (compressive stiffness, 89% of intact vs 67% of intact, respectively). Inserting a second interbody using a transforaminal approach is anatomically feasible and nearly doubles the disc space covered without affecting ROM. Compressive stiffness significantly increased with 2 nested interbodies, and foraminal height increased. Evaluation of the clinical safety and efficacy of nested interbodies is underway.

  4. Outcomes of interbody fusion cages used in 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: titanium cages versus polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2010-07-01

    A prospective study was performed in case with cervical spondylosis who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with titanium or polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. To find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical and radiographic results. Although use of autogenous iliac-bone grafts in ACDF for cervical disc diseases remain standard surgical procedure, donor site morbidity and graft collapse or breakage are concerns. Cage technology was developed to prevent these complications. However, there is no comparison regarding the efficacy between titanium and PEEK cage. January 2005 to January 2006, 53 patients who had 1 and 2-levels ACDF with titanium or PEEK cages were evaluated. We measured the rate and amount of interspace collapse, segmental sagittal angulations, and the radiographic fusion success rate. Odom criteria were used to assess the clinical results. The fusion rate was higher in the PEEK group (100% vs. 86.5%, P=0.0335). There was no significant difference between both groups in loss of cervical lordosis (3.2 + or - 2.4 vs. 2.8 + or - 3.4, P=0.166). The mean anterior interspace collapse (1.6 + or - 1.0 mm) in the titanium group was significantly higher than the collapse of the PEEK group (0.5 + or - 0.6 mm) (PPEEK group (PPEEK group achieved an 80% rate of successful clinical outcomes, compared with 75% in the titanium group (P=0.6642). The PEEK cage is superior to the titanium cage in maintaining cervical interspace height and radiographic fusion after 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical decompression procedures.

  5. Prospective Study of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Either Interbody Graft or Interbody Cage in the Treatment of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, A; Altaf, Farhaan; Jalgaonkar, Azal; Kakkar, Rahul; Sirigiri, P B R; Howieson, A; Crawford, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    A prospective study of 2 different fusion techniques for the treatment of single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis. To determine whether the addition of an intervertebral cage improves the clinical outcome and fusion rate of patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) after decompression for degenerative spondylolisthesis. The surgical approach that should be used for degenerative spondylolisthesis is a controversial issue. Decompression and PLIF with an interbody cage is widely used. Theoretical advantages in favor of PLIF include anterior column support, indirect foraminal decompression, restoration of lordosis, and reduction of the slip via ligamentotaxis. Despite numerous publications, the scientific support for the PLIF method is, however, weak. A prospective study was carried out including 59 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Average age of patients was 66 years: 34 males and 25 females. Patients were divided into 2 treatment groups: group 1-32 patients with PLIF with interbody graft and group 2-27 patients with PLIF with cage. Minimum 2-year follow-up. Outcomes were assessed by measuring preoperative and postoperative lordotic angles. SF-12 physical and mental health scores were recorded along with visual analogue scores for pain. Complications were also recorded. No significant difference in the postoperative lordotic angles was achieved between the 2 techniques. Nonsignificant difference in the clinical outcomes between both the techniques. We have found the use of a cage to achieve lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis does not confer any significant advantages in terms of restoration of lumbar lordosis, improvement in clinical symptoms, or relief of pain postoperatively.

  6. Endoscopic treatment for high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers: A randomized, controlled trial of epinephrine alone with epinephrine plus fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoostan, Mahsa; Karami-Horestani, Mohammad; Shavakhi, Ahmad; Sebghatollahi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency with substantial mortality. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP), a good source of coagulation factors, might be an ideal injection agent based on its physiologic properties. Therefore, we evaluated the role of FFP as a hemostatic agent in patients with high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. From August 2015 to April 2016, 108 consecutive patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers were admitted to our university hospital. They were randomly assigned to undergo injection of epinephrine alone (A) or epinephrine plus FFP (B). The primary outcomes assessed were the initial hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, hospital stay, blood transfusion, surgery rate, and 14-day mortality. Initial hemostasis was achieved in 47 of 50 patients (94%) in the Group A and 49 of 50 patients (98%) in the Group B ( P = 0.61). There were no significant differences in the rate of recurrent bleeding between Group A (14%) and Group B (8%) ( P = 0.52). We found no significant differences between Group A and Group B with respect to the surgery rate, bleeding death, procedure-related death, and duration of hospitalization ( P > 0.05). It is concluded the injection of epinephrine alone was equally effective as injection of epinephrine plus FFP to endoscopic hemostasis. Epinephrine alone and epinephrine plus FFP were not different in recurrent bleeding, rate of surgery, blood transfusion, or mortality.

  7. Endoscopic treatment for high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers: A randomized, controlled trial of epinephrine alone with epinephrine plus fresh frozen plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Khodadoostan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency with substantial mortality. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP, a good source of coagulation factors, might be an ideal injection agent based on its physiologic properties. Therefore, we evaluated the role of FFP as a hemostatic agent in patients with high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. Materials and Methods: From August 2015 to April 2016, 108 consecutive patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers were admitted to our university hospital. They were randomly assigned to undergo injection of epinephrine alone (A or epinephrine plus FFP (B. The primary outcomes assessed were the initial hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, hospital stay, blood transfusion, surgery rate, and 14-day mortality. Results: Initial hemostasis was achieved in 47 of 50 patients (94% in the Group A and 49 of 50 patients (98% in the Group B (P = 0.61. There were no significant differences in the rate of recurrent bleeding between Group A (14% and Group B (8% (P = 0.52. We found no significant differences between Group A and Group B with respect to the surgery rate, bleeding death, procedure-related death, and duration of hospitalization (P > 0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded the injection of epinephrine alone was equally effective as injection of epinephrine plus FFP to endoscopic hemostasis. Epinephrine alone and epinephrine plus FFP were not different in recurrent bleeding, rate of surgery, blood transfusion, or mortality.

  8. A Comparison of Fresh Frozen vs. Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens of Canine Mammary Tumors via Branched-DNA Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florenza Lüder Ripoli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mammary neoplasms are the tumors most affecting female dogs and women. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues are an invaluable source of archived biological material. Fresh frozen (FF tissue is considered ideal for gene expression analysis. However, strategies based on FFPE material offer several advantages. Branched-DNA assays permit a reliable and fast workflow when analyzing gene expression. The aim of this study was to assess the comparability of the branched-DNA assay when analyzing certain gene expression patterns between FF and FFPE samples in canine mammary tumors. RNA was isolated from 109 FFPE samples and from 93 FF samples of different canine mammary tissues. Sixteen (16 target genes (Tp53; Myc; HMGA1; Pik3ca; Mcl1; MAPK3; FOXO3; PTEN; GATA4; PFDN5; HMGB1; MAPK1; BRCA2; BRCA1; HMGA2; and Her2 were analyzed via branched-DNA assay (b-DNA. ACTB, GAPDH, and HPRT1 were used as data normalizers. Overall, the relative gene expression of the two different origins of samples showed an agreement of 63%. Still, care should be taken, as FFPE specimens showed lower expression of the analyzed targets when compared to FF samples. The fact that the gene expression in FFPE proved to be lower than in FF specimens is likely to have been caused by the effect of storage time. ACTB had the best performance as a data normalizer.

  9. Mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the surgical technique and advantages of the mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation. Clinical and radiographic results were assessed to determine the clinical outcomes in twelve consecutive patients selected for minimally invasive access (mini-open technique) for TLIF in Prasat Neurological Institute. A retrospective analysis was performed on 12 patients (age range, 38-74 yr; mean, 54. 8 yr) who underwent mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation between September 2006 and June 2008. The titanium pedicle screws were introduced bilaterally through the 3.5 cm length, skin incisions with Spine Classics MLD- system retractor, autologous bone graft were inserted to perform TLIF in all patients. Eight patients were augmented anterior column support with titanium interbody cage, unilateral cage insertion in four patients and the others were inserted bilaterally interbody cages. Six patients presented with low back pain and associated radiculopathy, and six presented with low back pain only. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L3-L4 in two patients, L4-L5 in four patients, L5-S1 in five patients, and two levels fusion in one patient. All patients were able to ambulate after spinal fusion. The patients were able to walk within 1.4 days (range 1-2 days). The hospital stay averaged 4.4 days (range 3-7 days). Periodic follow-up took place 1 to 21 months after surgery (mean, 7.4 months). The radiological fusion was archived in all nine patients who were operated on more than two months age. The other three patients who had been follow-up less than two months were probably fusion on the 1-month followed-up radiological examination. The use of mini-open technique for pedicle screw instrumentation with spinal fusion procedure provides excellent clinical results and may be an operation of choice for

  10. Performance of multiplicom's BRCA MASTR Dx kit on the detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in fresh frozen ovarian and breast tumor samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoer, Cindy; Garrec, Céline; Goossens, Dirk; Ellison, Gillian; Mills, John; Dzial, Mélina; El Housni, Hakim; Berwouts, Sarah; Concolino, Paola; Guibert-Le Guevellou, Virginie; Delnatte, Capucine; Del Favero, Jurgen; Capoluongo, Ettore; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2016-12-06

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled new approaches for detection of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). The search for germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is of importance with respect to oncogenetic and surgical (bilateral mastectomy, ovariectomy) counselling. Testing tumor material for BRCA mutations is of increasing importance for therapeutic decision making as the poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, olaparib, is now available to treat patients with specific forms of ovarian cancer and BRCA mutations. Molecular genetics laboratories should develop reliable and sensitive techniques for the complete analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This is a challenge due to the size of the coding sequence of the BRCA1/2 genes, the absence of hot spot mutations, and particularly by the lower DNA quality obtained from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) tissue. As a result, a number of analyses are uninterpretable and do not always provide a result to the clinician, limiting the optimal therapeutic management of patients. The availability of Fresh Frozen Tissue (FFT) for some laboratories and the excellent quality of the DNA extracted from it offers an alternative. For this reason, we evaluated Multiplicom's BRCA MASTR Dx assay on a set of 97 FFT derived DNA samples, in combination with the MID for Illumina MiSeq for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation detection. We obtained interpretable NGS results for all tested samples and showed > 99,7% sensitivity, specificity and accuracy.

  11. A Retrospective Propensity Score-Matched Early Thromboembolic Event Analysis of Prothrombin Complex Concentrate vs Fresh Frozen Plasma for Warfarin Reversal Prior to Emergency Neurosurgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Prateek; Abdullah, Kalil G; Ramayya, Ashwin G; Nayak, Nikhil R; Lucas, Timothy H

    2017-06-29

    Reversal of therapeutic anticoagulation prior to emergency neurosurgical procedures is required in the setting of intracranial hemorrhage. Multifactor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) promises rapid efficacy but may increase the probability of thrombotic complications compared to fresh frozen plasma (FFP). To compare the rate of thrombotic complications in patients treated with PCC or FFP to reverse therapeutic anticoagulation prior to emergency neurosurgical procedures in the setting of intracranial hemorrhage at a level I trauma center. Sixty-three consecutive patients on warfarin therapy presenting with intracranial hemorrhage who received anticoagulation reversal prior to emergency neurosurgical procedures were retrospectively identified between 2007 and 2016. They were divided into 2 cohorts based on reversal agent, either PCC (n = 28) or FFP (n = 35). The thrombotic complications rates within 72 h of reversal were compared using the χ 2 test. A multivariate propensity score matching analysis was used to limit the threat to interval validity from selection bias arising from differences in demographics, laboratory values, history, and clinical status. Thrombotic complications were uncommon in this neurosurgical population, occurring in 1.59% (1/63) of treated patients. There was no significant difference in the thrombotic complication rate between groups, 3.57% (1/28; PCC group) vs 0% (0/35; FFP group). Propensity score matching analysis validated this finding after controlling for any selection bias. In this limited sample, thrombotic complication rates were similar between use of PCC and FFP for anticoagulation reversal in the management of intracranial hemorrhage prior to emergency neurosurgical procedures. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing of RNA and DNA Isolated from Paired Fresh-Frozen and Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Samples of Human Cancer and Normal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Jakob; Thorsen, Kasper; Lund, Mette Katrine; Hein, Anne-Mette K.; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques; Vang, Søren; Nordentoft, Iver; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Hager, Henrik; Knudsen, Bjarne; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an invaluable resource for clinical research. However, nucleic acids extracted from FFPE tissues are fragmented and chemically modified making them challenging to use in molecular studies. We analysed 23 fresh-frozen (FF), 35 FFPE and 38 paired FF/FFPE specimens, representing six different human tissue types (bladder, prostate and colon carcinoma; liver and colon normal tissue; reactive tonsil) in order to examine the potential use of FFPE samples in next-generation sequencing (NGS) based retrospective and prospective clinical studies. Two methods for DNA and three methods for RNA extraction from FFPE tissues were compared and were found to affect nucleic acid quantity and quality. DNA and RNA from selected FFPE and paired FF/FFPE specimens were used for exome and transcriptome analysis. Preparations of DNA Exome-Seq libraries was more challenging (29.5% success) than that of RNA-Seq libraries, presumably because of modifications to FFPE tissue-derived DNA. Libraries could still be prepared from RNA isolated from two-decade old FFPE tissues. Data were analysed using the CLC Bio Genomics Workbench and revealed systematic differences between FF and FFPE tissue-derived nucleic acid libraries. In spite of this, pairwise analysis of DNA Exome-Seq data showed concordance for 70–80% of variants in FF and FFPE samples stored for fewer than three years. RNA-Seq data showed high correlation of expression profiles in FF/FFPE pairs (Pearson Correlations of 0.90 +/- 0.05), irrespective of storage time (up to 244 months) and tissue type. A common set of 1,494 genes was identified with expression profiles that were significantly different between paired FF and FFPE samples irrespective of tissue type. Our results are promising and suggest that NGS can be used to study FFPE specimens in both prospective and retrospective archive-based studies in which FF specimens are not available. PMID:24878701

  13. A Method to Correlate mRNA Expression Datasets Obtained from Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples: A Matter of Thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A M Mustafa

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling of tumors is a successful tool for the discovery of new cancer biomarkers and potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Reliable profiling is preferably performed on fresh frozen (FF tissues in which the quality of nucleic acids is better preserved than in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE material. However, since snap-freezing of biopsy materials is often not part of daily routine in pathology laboratories, one may have to rely on archival FFPE material. Procedures to retrieve the RNAs from FFPE materials have been developed and therefore, datasets obtained from FFPE and FF materials need to be made compatible to ensure reliable comparisons are possible.To develop an efficient method to compare gene expression profiles obtained from FFPE and FF samples using the same platform.Twenty-six FFPE-FF sample pairs of the same tumors representing various cancer types, and two FFPE-FF sample pairs of breast cancer cell lines, were included. Total RNA was extracted and gene expression profiling was carried out using Illumina's Whole-Genome cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (WG-DASL V3 arrays, enabling the simultaneous detection of 24,526 mRNA transcripts. A sample exclusion criterion was created based on the expression of 11 stably expressed reference genes. Pearson correlation at the probe level was calculated for paired FFPE-FF, and three cut-off values were chosen. Spearman correlation coefficients between the matched FFPE and FF samples were calculated for three probe lists with varying levels of significance and compared to the correlation based on all measured probes. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to verify performance of the included probe lists to compare matched FPPE-FF samples.Twenty-seven FFPE-FF pairs passed the sample exclusion criterion. From the profiles of 27 FFPE and FF matched samples, the best correlating probes were identified

  14. Synergistic effects of fresh frozen plasma and valproic acid treatment in a combined model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock.

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    Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang; Duggan, Michael; Sillesen, Martin; Hwabejire, John O; Jepsen, Cecilie H; DePeralta, Danielle; Liu, Baoling; Lu, Jennifer; deMoya, Marc A; Socrate, Simona; Alam, Hasan B

    2013-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are major causes of trauma-related deaths and are especially lethal as a combined insult. Previously, we showed that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) decreased the size of the brain lesion and associated swelling in a swine model of combined TBI+HS. We have also shown separately that addition of valproic acid (VPA) to the resuscitation protocol attenuates inflammatory markers in the brain as well as the degree of TBI. The current study was performed to determine whether a combined FFP+VPA treatment strategy would exert a synergistic effect. Yorkshire swine (42-50 kg) were instrumented to measure hemodynamic parameters, intracranial pressure, and brain tissue oxygenation. TBI was created through a 20-mm craniotomy using a computer-controlled cortical impactor: 15-mm cylindrical tip impactor at 4 m/s velocity, 100 ms dwell time, and 12-mm penetration depth. The TBI was synchronized with the initiation of volume-controlled hemorrhage (40 ± 5% of total blood volume). After a 2-hour period of shock, animals were randomized to 1 of 3 resuscitation groups (n = 5 per group): (1) 0.9% saline (NS); (2) FFP; and (3) FFP and VPA 300 mg/kg (FFP+VPA). The resuscitative volume for FFP was equivalent to the shed blood, whereas NS was 3 times this volume. VPA treatment was started 1 hour after hemorrhage. Animals were monitored for 6 hours post-resuscitation. At this time the brains were harvested, sectioned into 5-mm slices, and stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride to quantify the lesion size (mm(3)) and brain swelling (percent change compared with the uninjured side). The combined TBI+HS model resulted in a highly reproducible brain injury. Lesion size and brain swelling (mean value ± standard error of the mean) in the FFP+VPA group (1,459 ± 218 mm(3) and 13 ± 1%, respectively) were less than the NS group (3,285 ± 131 mm(3) [P < .001] and 37 ± 2% [P < .001], respectively), and the FFP alone

  15. Artrodese cervical anterior em três e quatro níveis com dispositivo intersomático não associado à placa cervical Artrodesis cervical anterior en tres y cuatro niveles con dispositivo intersomático no asociado a placa cervical Anterior cervical arthrodesis for three and four levels using stand-alone interbody cages without cervical plates

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    Marcel Luiz Benato

    2009-06-01

    en tercer y cuarto niveles; dolor axial y/o irradiada; con mínimo seis meses de postoperatorio. El criterio de exclusión fue la presencia de inestabilidad cervical traumática. Fueron evaluadas las tasas de consolidación, la presencia de síntomas, la tasa de complicaciones y la posición de los dispositivos intersomáticos (subsidente después de seis meses. RESULTADOS: todos los pacientes obtuvieron consolidación en tres meses, sin embargo, dos pacientes presentaron el fenómeno de subsidente, o sea, migración con consolidación en cifosis, sin alterar los resultados clínicos y la consolidación de la artrodesis a los seis meses de postoperatorio. Los pacientes presentaron mejoría del dolor preoperatorio y solo tres (15% presentaron dolor residual. No hubo complicaciones mayores. El tiempo de hospitalización fue de dos días. No fue utilizada inmovilización rígida en el postoperatorio. CONCLUSIÓN: fue obtenida consolidación con esta técnica en todos los casos. La técnica se mostró segura y promovió buenos resultados radiológicos y clínicos.evaluate the rates of fusion of the anterior cervical discectomy and arthrodesis for three and four levels using interbody cages (stand-alone without cervical plates six months after post-operative. METHODS: from November 2005 to July 2008, 20 patients were treated as proposed. The inclusion criteria were: cervical degenerative disease of three and four levels; axial and/or irradiated pain at least six months of follow-up. The exclusion criteria were: cervical traumatic instability. The fusion rate, clinical symptoms, rate of complications and the implant position were evaluated six months after post-operative. RESULTS: results were favorable in 100% of the patients, with residual pain in two cases. Fusion was found in 100% of the patients, except for two cases with minimum subsidence and fusion in a slight kyphotic position. There were not significant complications. The discharge of the hospital was performed

  16. Undetected iatrogenic lesions of the anterior femoral shaft during intramedullary nailing: a cadaveric study

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    Shepherd Lane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of undetected radiographically iatrogenic longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex during intramedullary nailing of the femur has not been well documented. Methods Cadaveric study using nine pairs of fresh-frozen femora from adult cadavers. The nine pairs of femora underwent a standardized antegrade intramedullary nailing and the detection of iatrogenic lesions, if any, was performed macroscopically and by radiographic control. Results Longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex was revealed in 5 of 18 cadaver femora macroscopically. Anterior splitting was not detectable in radiographic control. Conclusion Longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex during intramedullary nailing of the femur cannot be detected radiographically.

  17. Hormone Receptor Expression Analyses in Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Canine Mammary Tissue by a Bead Based Multiplex Branched DNA Assay: A Gene Expression Study in Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Samples.

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    Annika Mohr

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC is currently considered the method of choice for steroid hormone receptor status evaluation in human breast cancer and, therefore, it is commonly utilized for assessing canine mammary tumors. In case of low hormone receptor expression, IHC is limited and thus is complemented by molecular analyses. In the present study, a multiplex bDNA assay was evaluated as a method for hormone receptor gene expression detection in canine mammary tissues. Estrogen receptor (ESR1, progesterone receptor (PGR, prolactin receptor (PRLR and growth hormone receptor (GHR gene expressions were evaluated in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine mammary tissues. A set of 119 fresh frozen and 180 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE was comparatively analyzed and used for assay evaluation. Furthermore, a possible association between the hormone receptor expression in different histological subtypes of canine malignant mammary tumors and the castration status, breed and invasive growth of the tumor were analyzed. The multiplex bDNA assay proved to be more sensitive for fresh frozen specimens. Hormone receptor expression found was significantly decreased in malignant mammary tumors in comparison to non-neoplastic tissue and benign mammary tumors. Among the histological subtypes the lowest gene expression levels of ESR1, PGR and PRLR were found in solid, anaplastic and ductal carcinomas. In summary, the evaluation showed that the measurement of hormone receptors with the multiplex bDNA assay represents a practicable method for obtaining detailed quantitative information about gene expression in canine mammary tissue for future studies. Still, comparison with IHC or quantitative real-time PCR is needed for further validation of the present method.

  18. Miniopen Oblique Lateral L5-S1 Interbody Fusion: A Report of 2 Cases

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    Keijiro Kanno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF has been widely used for minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF, but an approach to L5-S1 is difficult because of the iliac crest. In the current study, we present 2 cases using minimally invasive oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF of L5-S1. The patients showed foraminal stenosis between L5 and S1 and severe low back and leg pain. The patients were placed in a lateral decubitus position and underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest without posterior decompression. Posterior screws were used in the patients. Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. OLIF surgery was minimally invasive and produced good surgical results without complications.

  19. Extreme lateral interbody fusion with posterior instrumentation for spondylodiscitis.

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    Blizzard, Daniel J; Hills, Christopher P; Isaacs, Robert E; Brown, Christopher R

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate our initial experience utilizing extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF; NuVasive, San Diego, CA, USA) with percutaneous posterior instrumentation to treat 11 spondylodiscitis patients between January 2011 and February 2014. Although medical management is the first line treatment for spondylodiscitis, many patients fail antibiotic therapy and bracing, or present with instability, neurologic deficits, or sepsis, requiring operative debridement and stabilization. High rates of fusion and infection clearance have been reported with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but this approach requires a morbid exposure, associated with non-trivial rates of vascular and peritoneal complications. XLIF is an increasingly popular interbody fusion technique which utilizes a fast and minimally invasive approach, sparing the anterior longitudinal ligament, and allowing sufficient visualization of the intervertebral discs and bodies to debride and place a large, lordotic cage. The outcome measures for this study included lumbar lordosis, sagittal balance, subsidence, fusion, pain, neurological deficit, and microbiology/laboratory evidence of infection. The mean follow-up time was 9.3 months. All patients had improvements in pain and neurological symptoms. The mean lordosis change was 11.0°, from 23.1° preoperatively to 34.0° postoperatively. Fusion was confirmed with CT scans in five of six patients. At the last follow-up, all patients had normalization of inflammatory markers, no symptoms of infection, and none required repeat surgical treatment for spondylodiscitis. XLIF with percutaneous posterior instrumentation is a minimally invasive technique with reduced morbidity for lumbar spine fusion which affords adequate exposure to the vertebral bodies and discs to aggressively debride necrotic and infected tissue. This study suggests that XLIF may be a safe and effective alternative to ALIF for the treatment of spondylodiscitis

  20. Radiographic and clinical evaluation of cage subsidence after stand-alone lateral interbody fusion.

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    Marchi, Luis; Abdala, Nitamar; Oliveira, Leonardo; Amaral, Rodrigo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2013-07-01

    Indirect decompression of the neural structures through interbody distraction and fusion in the lumbar spine is feasible, but cage subsidence may limit maintenance of the initial decompression. The influence of interbody cage size on subsidence and symptoms in minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion is heretofore unreported. The authors report the rate of cage subsidence after lateral interbody fusion, examine the clinical effects, and present a subsidence classification scale. The study was performed as an institutional review board-approved prospective, nonrandomized, comparative, single-center radiographic and clinical evaluation. Stand-alone short-segment (1- or 2-level) lateral lumbar interbody fusion was investigated with 12 months of postoperative follow-up. Two groups were compared. Forty-six patients underwent treatment at 61 lumbar levels with standard interbody cages (18 mm anterior/posterior dimension), and 28 patients underwent treatment at 37 lumbar levels with wide cages (22 mm). Standing lateral radiographs were used to measure segmental lumbar lordosis, disc height, and rate of subsidence. Subsidence was classified using the following scale: Grade 0, 0%-24% loss of postoperative disc height; Grade I, 25%-49%; Grade II, 50%-74%; and Grade III, 75%-100%. Fusion status was assessed on CT scanning, and pain and disability were assessed using the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Complications and reoperations were recorded. Pain and disability improved similarly in both groups. While significant gains in segmental lumbar lordosis and disc height were observed overall, the standard group experienced less improvement due to the higher rate of interbody graft subsidence. A difference in the rate of subsidence between the groups was evident at 6 weeks (p = 0.027), 3 months (p = 0.042), and 12 months (p = 0.047). At 12 months, 70% in the standard group and 89% in the wide group had Grade 0 or I subsidence, and 30% in the standard group

  1. [Costotransversectomy and interbody fusion for treatment of thoracic dyscopathy].

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    Sagan, Leszek M; Madany, Lukasz; Lickendorf, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Surgical treatment of a thoracic discopathy comprises 4% of all surgeries performed for discopathy. Therefore, analysis of efficacy of particular operative methods used in that scope is limited. We present our analyze modification of costotransversectomy with policarbone cage interbody fusion as the contribution to discussion on optimal operative treatment of thoracic discopathy. Results of the operative treatment of 14 cases of a thoracic discopathy are analyzed. In 12 cases neurological examination revealed radiculopathy and in 2 cases upper motor neuron involvement. All patients underwent MRI for estimation of level and morphology of discopathy. In one case there was two-level dyscopathy and in the other cases there was one-level discopathy localized in the region between fifth and twelve thoracic vertebrae. The follow up period was of 10 months to 6 years (mean 2 years and four months). During the surgery lateral upper aspect of the intervertebral disc on a one side was exposed. It was accomplished by removal of the head of the rib and the upper aspect of the pedicle located caudally to the intervertebral disc. The policarbone cage was introduced into the intervertebral space after discectomy. In the case with sudden preoperative deterioration of the lower extremities strength there was further postoperative deterioration. During follow up, continuous improvement was observed. In the 12th postoperative month the weakness was minimal. In the other cases immediate postoperative resolution of the pain syndrome and neurological deficits was observed. Postoperative imaging studies reveled appropriate decompression of the spinal canal and localization interbody implant. 1. Costotransversectomy approach leads to sufficient exposition of the anterior aspect of the spinal canal. 2. Our modification of interbody fusion with policarbone cage gives good results in fusion of compromised motion unit. It makes the approach more attractive in the light of remote surgery

  2. Posterolateral fusion with interbody for lumbar spondylolisthesis is associated with less repeat surgery than posterolateral fusion alone.

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    Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Weingart, Robby; Sciubba, Daniel; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Posterior or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (PLIF/TLIF) may improve the outcomes in patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. This study aims to compare outcomes after posterolateral fusion (PLF) only versus PLF with interbody fusion (PLF+PLIF/TLIF) in patients with spondylolisthesis. We retrospectively reviewed103 patients who underwent first-time instrumented lumbar fusions for degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis. Anterior techniques and multilevel interbody fusions were excluded. All patients were followed for at least 2 years postoperatively. Clinical outcomes including back pain, radiculopathy, weakness, sensory deficits, and loss of bowel/bladder function were ascertained from clinic notes. Radiographic measures were calculated with Tillard percentage of spondylolisthesis. Reoperation for progression of degenerative disease, a primary endpoint, was indicated for all patients with (1) persistent or new-onset neurological symptoms; and (2) radiographic imaging that correlated with clinical presentation. Of the 103 patients, 56.31% were managed with PLF and 43.69% with PLF+PLIF/TLIF. On radiographic studies, spondylolisthesis improved by a mean of 13.06% after PLF+PLIF/TLIF versus 5.67% after PLF (pspondylolisthesis. Patients with interbody fusions were less likely to undergo reoperation for degenerative disease progression compared to non-interbody fusions. However, greater listhesis correction and decreased reoperation in the PLF+PLIF/TLIF cohort should be weighed with favorable clinical outcomes in the PLF cohort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison between Prothrombin Complex Concentrate (PCC) and Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) for the Urgent Reversal of Warfarin in Patients with Mechanical Heart Valves in a Tertiary Care Cardiac Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariborz Farsad, Bahram; Golpira, Reza; Najafi, Hamideh; Totonchi, Ziae; Salajegheh, Shirin; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Hashemian, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) reverse oral anticoagulants such as Warfarin. We compared the standard dosage of FFP and PCC in terms of efficacy and safety for patients with mechanical heart valves undergoing interventional procedures while receiving Warfarin. Fifty patients were randomized (25 for each group) with mechanical heart valves [international normalized ratio (INR) >2.5]. FFP dosage was administered based on body weight (10-15 mL/Kg), while PCC dosage was administered based on both body weight and target INR. INR measurements were obtained at different time after PCC and FFP infusion. The mean ± SD of INR pre treatment was not significantly different between the PCC and FFP groups. However, over a 48-hour period following the administration of PCC and FFP, 76% of the patients in the PCC group and only 20% of the patients in the FFP group reached the INR target. Five (20%) patients in the PCC group received an additional dose of PCC, whereas 17 (68%) patients in the FFP group received a further dose of FFP (P=0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in Hb and Hct before and during a 48-hour period after PCC and FFP infusion. As regards safety monitoring and adverse drug reaction screening in the FFP group, the INR was high (INR > 2.5) in 86% of the patients. There was no report of hemorrhage in both groups. PCC reverses anticoagulation both effectively and safely while having the advantage of obviating the need to extra doses.

  4. RESULTS OF TREATMENT OF CERVICAL DISCOPATHY WITH PEEK INTERBODY CAGES AT THREE LEVELS WITHOUT PLATE FIXATION

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    Amado González Moga

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To present the results of treatment of patients with cervical discopathy by anterior cervical approach, discectomy and placement of a PEEK interbody cage without anterior plate fixation. Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional study from March 2013 to March 2015. Sixteen patients with radiculopathy or clinical signs of myelopathy were included; all patients underwent cervical surgery through anterior approach, discectomy, and placement of PEEK cages on three levels. Decompression levels were determined according to the correlation between preoperative radiological and clinical findings. Results: Sixteen patients predominantly male were included, with mean age of 50 years at the onset of the condition. Ten patients had involvement of C4-C5, C5-C6, C6-C7 levels, and six patients C3-C4, C4-C5 and C5-C6. Fourteen patients had cervicobrachialgia and two myelopathy. The preoperative visual analog scale average was 8/10 and the average postoperative value at 6 months was 3/10. At 6 months, there was no radiological evidence of recurrence. One patient had non-fatal complications. Conclusions: The treatment of cervical discopathy by anterior approach with interbody fusion with PEEK cage on three levels, with no plate fixation seemed to be safe and effective with better long-term results in terms of pain and myelopathy. The clinical results compare favorably with other similar series and, most importantly, the complications associated with anterior fixation plate are avoided.

  5. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with expandable versus static interbody devices: radiographic assessment of sagittal segmental and pelvic parameters.

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    Hawasli, Ammar H; Khalifeh, Jawad M; Chatrath, Ajay; Yarbrough, Chester K; Ray, Wilson Z

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has been adopted as an alternative technique to hasten recovery and minimize postoperative morbidity. Advances in instrumentation technologies and operative techniques have evolved to maximize patient outcomes as well as radiographic results. The development of expandable interbody devices allows a surgeon to perform MIS-TLIF with minimal tissue disruption. However, sagittal segmental and pelvic radiographic outcomes after MIS-TLIF with expandable interbody devices are not well characterized. The object of this study is to evaluate the radiographic sagittal lumbar segmental and pelvic parameter outcomes of MIS-TLIF performed using an expandable interbody device. METHODS A retrospective review of MIS-TLIFs performed between 2014 and 2016 at a high-volume center was performed. Radiographic measurements were performed on lateral radiographs before and after MIS-TLIF with static or expandable interbody devices. Radiographic measurements included disc height, foraminal height, fused disc angle, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, and pelvic tilt. Mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis were calculated for each radiograph. RESULTS A total of 48 MIS-TLIFs were performed, predominantly at the L4-5 level, in 44 patients. MIS-TLIF with an expandable interbody device led to a greater and more sustained increase in disc height when compared with static interbody devices. Foraminal height increased after MIS-TLIF with expandable but not with static interbody devices. MIS-TLIF with expandable interbody devices increased index-level segmental lordosis more than with static interbody devices. The increase in segmental lordosis was sustained in the patients with expandable interbody devices but not in patients with static interbody devices. For patients with a collapsed disc space, MIS-TLIF with an expandable interbody device provided superior and longer-lasting increases in

  6. Transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion in the treatment of thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation with spinal cord injury.

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    Ai-Min Wu

    Full Text Available A retrospective clinical study.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion in the treatment of thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation with spinal cord injury.Twenty-six spinal cord injured patients with thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation were treated by transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and complications were recorded; the Cobb angle and compressive rate (CR of the anterior height of two adjacent vertebrae were measured; and the nerve injury was assessed according to sensory scores and motor scores of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury.The operative time was 250±57 min, and intraoperative blood loss was 440±168 ml. Cerebrospinal leakage was detected and repaired during the operation in two patients. A total of 24 of 26 patients were followed up for more than 2 years. ASIA sensory scores and motor scores were improved significantly at 3 months and 6 months after operation; the Cobb angle and CR of the anterior height of two adjacent vertebrae were corrected and showed a significant difference at post-operation; and the values were maintained at 3 months after operation and the last follow-up.We showed that transforaminal decompression together with interbody fusion is an alternative method to treat thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation.

  7. Load-sharing through elastic micro-motion accelerates bone formation and interbody fusion.

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    Ledet, Eric H; Sanders, Glenn P; DiRisio, Darryl J; Glennon, Joseph C

    2018-02-13

    Achieving a successful spinal fusion requires the proper biological and biomechanical environment. Optimizing load-sharing in the interbody space can enhance bone formation. For anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), loading and motion are largely dictated by the stiffness of the plate, which can facilitate a balance between stability and load-sharing. The advantages of load-sharing may be substantial for patients with comorbidities and in multilevel procedures where pseudarthrosis rates are significant. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel elastically deformable, continuously load-sharing anterior cervical spinal plate for promotion of bone formation and interbody fusion relative to a translationally dynamic plate. An in vivo animal model was used to evaluate the effects of an elastically deformable spinal plate on bone formation and spine fusion. Fourteen goats underwent an ACDF and received either a translationally dynamic or elastically deformable plate. Animals were followed up until 18 weeks and were evaluated by plain x-ray, computed tomography scan, and undecalcified histology to evaluate the rate and quality of bone formation and interbody fusion. Animals treated with the elastically deformable plate demonstrated statistically significantly superior early bone formation relative to the translationally dynamic plate. Trends in the data from 8 to 18 weeks postoperatively suggest that the elastically deformable implant enhanced bony bridging and fusion, but these enhancements were not statistically significant. Load-sharing through elastic micro-motion accelerates bone formation in the challenging goat ACDF model. The elastically deformable implant used in this study may promote early bony bridging and increased rates of fusion, but future studies will be necessary to comprehensively characterize the advantages of load-sharing through micro-motion. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia

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    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. Patient concerns: A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Diagnoses: Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. Interventions: We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. Outcomes: No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Lessons: Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:29245270

  9. Titanium vs. polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody fusion: Meta-analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Scott; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Mohamad; Torner, James C; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2017-10-01

    Spinal interbody fusion is a standard and accepted method for spinal fusion. Interbody fusion devices include titanium (Ti) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with distinct biomechanical properties. Titanium and PEEK cages have been evaluated in the cervical and lumbar spine, with conflicting results in bony fusion and subsidence. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we reviewed the available literature evaluating Ti and PEEK cages to assess subsidence and fusion rates. Six studies were included in the analysis, 3 of which were class IV evidence, 2 were class III, and 1 was class II. A total of 410 patients (Ti-228, PEEK-182) and 587 levels (Ti-327, PEEK-260) were studied. Pooled mean age was 50.8years in the Ti group, and 53.1years in the PEEK group. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 4 studies (395 levels) and transforaminal interbody fusion in 2 studies (192 levels). No statistically significant difference was found between groups with fusion (OR 1.16, 95% C.I 0.59-2.89, p=0.686, I 2 =49.7%) but there was a statistically significant the rate of subsidence with titanium (OR 3.59, 95% C.I 1.28-10.07, p=0.015, I 2 =56.9%) at last follow-up. Titanium and PEEK cages are associated with a similar rate of fusion, but there is an increased rate of subsidence with titanium cage. Future prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate these cages using surgical and patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Ossification of the Yellow Ligament in the Lumbar Spine: First Reported Case

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    Kengo Fujii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL occurs in the lumbar spine and extends to the lateral wall of the spinal canal, facetectomy is required to remove all of the ossified lesion and achieve decompression. Subsequent posterior fixation with interbody fusion will then be necessary to prevent postoperative progression of the ossification and intervertebral instability. The technique of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF has recently been introduced. Using this procedure, surgeons can avoid excess blood loss from the extradural venous plexus and detachment of the ossified lesion and the ventral dura mater is avoidable. We present a 55-year-old male patient with OYL at L3/4 and anterior spondylolisthesis of L4 vertebra, with concomitant ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, who presented with a severe gait disturbance. He underwent a 2-stage operation without complications: LLIF for L3/4 and L4/5 was performed at the initial surgery, and posterior decompression fixation using pedicle screws from L3 to L5 was performed at the second surgery. His postoperative progress was favorable, and his interbody fusion was deemed successful. Here, we present the first reported case of LLIF for OYL of the lumbar spine. This procedure can be a good option for OYL of the lumbar spine.

  11. Visceral, vascular, and wound complications following over 13,000 lateral interbody fusions: a survey study and literature review.

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    Uribe, Juan S; Deukmedjian, Armen R

    2015-04-01

    Minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS-LIF) has become a popular less invasive treatment option for degenerative spinal disease, deformity, and trauma. While MIS-LIF offers several advantages over traditional anterior and posterior approaches, the procedure is not without risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of visceral, vascular, and wound complications following MIS-LIF performed by experienced surgeons. A survey was conducted by experienced (more than 100 case experience) MIS-LIF surgeons active in the society of lateral access surgery (SOLAS) to collect data on wound infections and visceral and vascular injuries. Of 77 spine surgeons surveyed, 40 (52 %) responded, including 25 (63 %) orthopedic surgeons and 15 (38 %) neurosurgeons, with 20 % practicing at an academic institution and 80 % in community practice. Between 2003 and 2013, 13,004 patients were treated with MIS-LIF by the 40 surgeons who responded to the survey. Of those patients, 0.08 % experienced a visceral complication (bowel injury), 0.10 % experienced a vascular injury, 0.27 % experienced a superficial wound infection, and 0.14 % experienced a deep wound infection. The incidence of surgical site infections and vascular and visceral complications following MIS-LIF in this large series was low and compared favorably with rates for alternative interbody fusion approaches. Although technically demanding, MIS-LIF is a reproducible approach for interbody fusion with a low risk of vascular and visceral complications and infections.

  12. Degenerative spondylolisthesis: contemporary review of the role of interbody fusion.

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    Baker, Joseph F; Errico, Thomas J; Kim, Yong; Razi, Afshin

    2017-02-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a common presentation, yet the best surgical treatment continues to be a matter of debate. Interbody fusion is one of a number of options, but its exact role remains ill defined. The aim of this study was to provide a contemporary review of the literature to help determine the role, if any, of interbody fusion in the surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis. A systematic review of the literature since 2005 was performed. Details on study size, patient age, surgical treatments, levels of slip, patient reported outcome measures, radiographic outcomes, complications and selected utility measures were recorded. Studies that compared a cohort treated with interbody fusion and at least one other surgical intervention for comparison were included for review. Only studies examining the effect in degenerative spondylolisthesis were included. Two authors independently reviewed the manuscripts and extracted key data. Thirteen studies were included in the final analysis. A total of 565 underwent interbody fusion and 761 underwent other procedures including decompression alone, interspinous stabilisation and posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation. Most studies were graded Level III evidence. Heterogeneous reporting of outcomes prevented formal statistical analysis. However, in general, studies reviewed concluded no significant clinical or radiographic difference in outcome between interbody fusion and other treatments. Two small studies suggested interbody fusion is a better option in cases of definite instability. Interbody fusion only provided outcomes as good as instrumented posterolateral fusion. However, most studies were Level III, and hence, we remain limited in defining the exact role of interbody fusion-cases with clear instability appear to be most appropriate. Future work should use agreed-upon common outcome measures and definitions.

  13. Mechanical evaluation of posterior wiring as a supplement to anterior cervical plate fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raj D; Wang, Mei; Singrakhia, Manoj D; McGrady, Linda M

    2004-10-15

    An in vitro experimental study was performed to examine 3-dimensional biomechanical stability of cervical fixations. To determine whether posterior interspinous wiring contributes to the rigidity of a single-level motion segment that has been plated anteriorly, and to determine the effects of this combined fixation on intradiscal pressure and spinal motion at the adjacent segments. Combined anterior and posterior column fixation is being increasingly used in a variety of clinical situations that do not involve complete disruption of the motion segment. The biomechanical validity of combined anterior posterior fixation in the absence of overt posterior ligamentous disruption has not been studied. Six human fresh-frozen cadaveric cervical spines (C3-T1) were used. Three-dimensional intersegmental motion and intradiscal pressure were measured while the spine was loaded in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion (up to 2.5 Nm). Fixation stability at the operative level (C5-C6) and influence of the fixation on adjacent segments were evaluated after an anterior plating procedure and combined anterior plating and posterior wiring. Comparing the combined approach with anterior plating alone, significant reductions in C5-C6 motion was noted: 49% in flexion (P torsion (P bending was not significant (18% and 12%, respectively). The improved fixation had minimal influence on the adjacent segments. Combined anterior posterior fixation further reduces the segmental motion by almost 50% in flexion and extension, 33% and 39% in torsion, and does not significantly alter intradiscal pressure and spinal motion at adjacent segments.

  14. CHANGES IN RADIOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS AFTER MINIMALLY INVASIVE LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Vialle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study aims to evaluate changes in lumbosacral parameters after minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether interbody cage shape (crescent shaped or rectangular would influence the results. Method : Retrospective analysis of 70 patients who underwent one or two level lumbar interbody fusion through a minimally invasive posterolateral approach. This included midline preservation and unilateral facetectomy. Pre- and postoperative (three to six months postoperative radiographs were used for measuring lumbar lordosis (LL, segmental lordosis (SL at the level of interbody fusion, and sacral slope (SS. Further analyses divided the patients into Roussouly lumbar subgroups. Results : LL was significantly reduced after surgery (59o:39o, p=0.001 as well as the SS (33.8o:31.2o, p=0.05. SL did not change significantly (11.4:11.06, p=0.85. There were no significant differences when comparing patients who received crescent shaped cage (n=27 and rectangular cage (n=43. Hypolordotic patients (Roussouly types 1 and 2 had radiographic improvement in comparison to normolordotic and hyperlordotic groups (types 3 and 4. Conclusion : Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion caused reduction in lumbosacral parameters. Cage shape had no influence on the results.

  15. Impaction durability of porous polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and titanium-coated PEEK interbody fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstrick, F Brennan; Klosterhoff, Brett S; Westerlund, L Erik; Foley, Kevin T; Gochuico, Joanna; Lee, Christopher S D; Gall, Ken; Safranski, David L

    2018-01-31

    Various surface modifications, often incorporating roughened or porous surfaces, have recently been introduced to enhance osseointegration of interbody fusion devices. However, these topographical features can be vulnerable to damage during clinical impaction. Despite the potential negative impact of surface damage on clinical outcomes, current testing standards do not replicate clinically relevant impaction loading conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare the impaction durability of conventional smooth polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) cervical interbody fusion devices with two surface-modified PEEK devices that feature either a porous structure or plasma-sprayed titanium coating. A recently developed biomechanical test method was adapted to simulate clinically relevant impaction loading conditions during cervical interbody fusion procedures. Three cervical interbody fusion devices were used in this study: smooth PEEK, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated PEEK, and porous PEEK (n=6). Following Kienle et al., devices were impacted between two polyurethane blocks mimicking vertebral bodies under a constant 200 N preload. The posterior tip of the device was placed at the entrance between the polyurethane blocks, and a guided 1-lb weight was impacted upon the anterior face with a maximum speed of 2.6 m/s to represent the strike force of a surgical mallet. Impacts were repeated until the device was fully impacted. Porous PEEK durability was assessed using micro-computed tomography (µCT) pre- and postimpaction. Titanium-coating coverage pre- and postimpaction was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Changes to the surface roughness of smooth and titanium-coated devices were also evaluated. Porous PEEK and smooth PEEK devices showed minimal macroscopic signs of surface damage, whereas the titanium-coated devices exhibited substantial visible coating loss. Quantification of the porous PEEK deformation

  16. Comparing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Mao, Keya; Qiang, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although spondylolisthesis was traditionally treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) was recently proposed as an alternative treatment for spondylolisthesis. However, no studies have focused on the comparison of these 2 techniques’ outcome on spondylolisthesis. The operative reports and perioperative data of patients who underwent single-level primary open PLIF (n = 29) and MIS-TLIF (n = 26) for I/II spondylolisthesis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients’ demographics, operative blood loss, hospital length of stay, creatine kinase (CK) level, radiographic fusion, complications, and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. Radiographic fusion was assessed using the Bridwell grading criteria. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes included the visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Average follow-up was 28 ± 3.6 months (range 24–32 months). Bed rest time, hospital stay, estimated blood loss, and operative time in the MIS-TLIF group were significantly lower than those in the PLIF group (P  .05). Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF for grade I/II spondylolisthesis can achieve similar reduction and fusion results with better short-term quality of life, shorter hospital stays, less estimated blood loss, and shorter operative times. PMID:28906383

  17. Biomechanical Analysis of an Expandable Lumbar Interbody Spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; Palma, Atilio E; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Kelly, Brian P; Kaibara, Taro

    2018-03-13

    Recently developed expandable interbody spacers are widely accepted in spinal surgery; however, the resulting biomechanical effects of their use have not yet been fully studied. We analyzed the biomechanical effects of an expandable polyetheretherketone interbody spacer inserted through a bilateral posterior approach with and without different modalities of posterior augmentation. Biomechanical nondestructive flexibility testing was performed in 7 human cadaveric lumbar (L2-L5) specimens followed by axial compressive loading. Each specimen was tested under 6 conditions: 1) intact, 2) bilateral L3-L4 cortical screw/rod (CSR) alone, 3) WaveD alone, 4) WaveD + CSR, 5) WaveD + bilateral L3-L4 pedicle screw/rod (PSR), and 6) WaveD + CSR/PSR, where CSR/PSR was a hybrid construct comprising bilateral cortical-level L3 and pedicle-level L4 screws interconnected by rods. The range of motion (ROM) with the interbody spacer alone decreased significantly compared with the intact condition during flexion-extension (P = 0.02) but not during lateral bending or axial rotation (P ≥ 0.19). The addition of CSR or PSR to the interbody spacer alone condition significantly decreased the ROM compared with the interbody spacer alone (P ≤ 0.002); and WaveD + CSR, WaveD + PSR, and WaveD + CSR/PSR (hybrid) (P ≥ 0.29) did not differ. The axial compressive stiffness (resistance to change in foraminal height during compressive loading) with the interbody spacer alone did not differ from the intact condition (P = 0.96), whereas WaveD + posterior instrumentation significantly increased compressive stiffness compared with the intact condition and the interbody spacer alone (P ≤ 0.001). The WaveD alone significantly reduced ROM during flexion-extension while maintaining the axial compressive stiffness. CSR, PSR, and CSR/PSR hybrid constructs were all effective in augmenting the expandable interbody spacer system and improving its stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia.

  19. The effects of tibiofibularis anterior ligaments on ankle joint biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Erduran, Mehmet; Baktıroğlu, Lütfü; Büdeyri, Aydın; Yıldız, Didem Venüs; Havıtçıoğlu, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of anterior inferior tibiofibularis ligament (AITFL) deficient human ankle under axial loading of ankle at stance phase of gait. In order to investigate the contribution of AITFL to ankle stability, an in vitro sequential experimental setup was simulated. The measurement of posterior displacement of distal tibia and anterior displacement of the foot, in neutral position, secondary to axial compression, was performed by two non-contact video extensometers. Eight freshly frozen, anatomically intact, cadaveric human ankle specimens were included and tested. An axial compression test machine was utilized from 0 to 800 Newtonswith a loading speed of 5 mm/min in order to simulate the axial weight-bearing sequence of the ankle at stance phase of human gait. There was a statistically significant difference between anteroposterior displacement values for AITFL-Intact and AITFL-Dissected specimens (p≤0.05). Mean AITFL-Intact and mean AITFL-Dissected ankle anteroposterior displacement was 1.28±0.47 mm and 2.06±0.7 mm, respectively. This study determined some numerical and quantitative data about the biomechanical properties of AITFL in neutral foot position. In the emergency department, diagnosis and treatment of AITFL injury, due to ankle distortion, is important. In AITFL injuries, ankle biomechanics is affected, and ankle instability occurs.

  20. Intraoperative antepulsion of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal fusion surgery techniques develop together with technologic advancements. New complications are seen as the result of new techniques and these may be very severe due to spinal cord and vascular structures in the lumbar region. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage (PLIFC) was shown to enhance spinal ...

  1. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone cage after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Chan; Chung, Hung-Tae; Cho, Jae-Lim; Kim, Dong-Jun; Chung, Nam-Su

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective case series. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of cage subsidence after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) conducted using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage, and to identify associated risk factors. Although various rates of cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion have been reported, few studies have addressed subsidence rate after MITLIF using PEEK cage. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone MITLIF using a PEEK cage with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included in this study. Cage subsidence was defined to have occurred when a cage was observed to sink into an adjacent vertebral body by ≥2 mm on the postoperative or serial follow-up lateral radiographs. The demographic variables considered to affect cage subsidence were the following: age, sex, body mass index, bone mineral density, diagnosis, number of fusion segment, and the quality/quantity of back muscle, and the cage-related variables considered were: level of fusion, intervertebral angle, cage size, cage position, and postoperative distraction of disc height. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to explore relations between these variables and cage subsidence. : For the 122 cages inserted, the rate of cage subsidence was 14.8% (18 cages), and cage subsidence occurred within 7.2±8.5 (1-25) months of surgery. The odds ratios for factors found to significantly increase the risk of cage subsidence were; 1.950 (95% confidence interval, 1.002-4.224) for L5-S1 level, and 1.018 (95% confidence interval, 1.000-1.066) for anterior cage position. The rate of PEEK cage subsidence after MITLIF was relatively low. End-plate manipulation and cage insertion during MITLIF were not influenced by a small operation window.

  2. Fibular allograft and anterior plating for dislocations/fractures of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnarain A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subaxial cervical spine dislocations are common and often present with neurological deficit. Posterior spinal fusion has been the gold standard in the past. Pain and neck stiffness are often the presenting features and may be due to failure of fixation and extension of fusion mass. Anterior spinal fusion which is relatively atraumatic is thus favored using autogenous grafts and cages with anterior plate fixation. We evaluated fresh frozen fibular allografts and anterior plate fixation for anterior fusion in cervical trauma. Materials and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with single-level dislocations or fracture dislocations of the subaxial cervical spine were recruited in this prospective study following a motor vehicle accident. There were 38 males and 22 females. The mean age at presentation was 34 years (range 19-67 years. The levels involved were C5/6 ( n = 36, C4/5 ( n = 15, C6/7 ( n = 7 and C3/4 ( n = 2. There were 38 unifacet dislocations with nine posterior element fractures and 22 were bifacet dislocations. Twenty-two patients had neurological deficit. Co-morbidities included hypertension ( n = 6, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus ( n = 2 and asthma ( n = 1. All patients were initially managed on skull traction. Following reduction further imaging included Computerized Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Patients underwent anterior surgery (discectomy, fibular allograft and plating. All patients were immobilized in a Philadelphia collar for eight weeks (range 7-12 weeks. Eight patients were lost to follow-up within a year. Follow-up clinical and radiological examinations were performed six-weekly for three months and subsequently at three-monthly intervals for 12 months. Pain was analyzed using the visual analogue scale (VAS. The mean follow-up was 19 months (range 14-39 months. Results: Eight lost to followup, hence 52 patients were considered for final evaluation. The neurological recovery was 1.1 Frankel

  3. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion andin SituScrew Fixation for Rostral Adjacent Segment Stenosis of the Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Hoon; Kwon, Shin Won; Moon, Jung Hyeon; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Heo, Won

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the detailed surgical technique and short-term clinical and radiological outcomes of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and in situ lateral screw fixation using a conventional minimally invasive screw fixation system (MISF) for revision surgery to treat rostral lumbar adjacent segment disease. The medical and radiological records were retrospectively reviewed. The surgery was indicated in 10 consecutive patients with rostral adjacent segment stenosis and instability. After the insertion of the interbody cage, lateral screws were inserted into the cranial and caudal vertebra using the MISF through the same LLIF trajectory. The radiological and clinical outcomes were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 3-48 months). Transient sensory changes in the left anterior thigh occurred in 3 patients, and 1 patient experienced subjective weakness; however, these symptoms normalized within 1 week. Back and leg pain were significantly improved ( p fusion was confirmed in 7 patients. Subsidence and mechanical failure did not occur in any patients. This study demonstrates that LLIF and in situ lateral screw fixation may be an alternative surgical option for rostral lumbar adjacent segment disease.

  4. Salvage Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation Using Polymethyl Methacrylate in Patients with Failed Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dong-Ju; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Kim, Jin-Sung; Jeon, Sang-Hyeop; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Percutaneous vertebral augmentation with cement is used as a salvage procedure for failed instrumentation. Few studies have reported the use of this procedure for failed anterior lumbar fusion in elderly patients with osteoporosis and other complicated diseases who have undergone a previous major operation. Between January 2007 and December 2015, the clinical and radiographic results of 8 patients with osteoporosis who showed subsidence and migration of the implant after an initial operation were examined. After the development of implant failure, the patients underwent vertebral augmentation with polymethyl methacrylate. Mean patient age was 73.4 years (range, 67-78 years), and mean bone mineral density was -2.96 (range, -2.1 to -3.8). The mean radiologic follow-up period between augmentation and the last follow-up examination was 16 months (range, 3-38 months). Although the subjective clinical outcome was not satisfying to the patients, no loss of correction, fractures, or screw loosening occurred during the follow-up period. The injection of cement around the instrument might help to stabilize it by providing strength to the axis and preventing further loosening. This salvage procedure could be an alternative in the management of cases with failed interbody fusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  6. A new bone surrogate model for testing interbody device subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony G; Aiyangar, Ameet K; Anderson, Paul A; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn

    2011-07-15

    An in vitro biomechanical study investigating interbody device subsidence measures in synthetic vertebrae, polyurethane foam blocks, and human cadaveric vertebrae. To compare subsidence measures of bone surrogates with human vertebrae for interbody devices varying in size/placement. Bone surrogates are alternatives when human cadaveric vertebrae are unavailable. Synthetic vertebrae modeling cortices, endplates, and cancellous bone have been developed as an alternative to polyurethane foam blocks for testing interbody device subsidence. Indentors placed on the endplates of synthetic vertebrae, foam blocks, and human vertebrae were subjected to uniaxial compression. Subsidence, measured with custom-made extensometers, was evaluated for an indentor seated either centrally or peripherally on the endplate. Failure force and indentation stiffness were determined from force-displacement curves. Subsidence measures in human vertebrae varied with indentor placement: failure forces were higher and indentors subsided less with peripheral placement. Subsidence measures in foam blocks were insensitive to indentor size/placement; they were similar to human vertebrae for centrally placed but not for peripherally placed indentors. Although subsidence measures in synthetic vertebrae were sensitive to indentor size/placement, failure force and indentation stiffness were overestimated, and subsidence underestimated, for both centrally placed and peripherally placed indentors. The synthetic endplate correctly represented the human endplate geometry, and thus, failure force, stiffness, and subsidence in synthetic vertebrae were sensitive to indentor size/placement. However, the endplate was overly strong and thus synthetic vertebrae did not accurately model indentor subsidence in human cadaveric vertebrae. Foam blocks captured subsidence measures more accurately than synthetic vertebrae for centrally placed indentors, but because of their uniform density were not sufficiently robust to

  7. Combined posteroanterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in thoracolumbar burst fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Rene; Lindtner, Richard Andreas; Lill, Markus; Blauth, Michael; Krappinger, Dietmar; Kammerlander, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The optimal treatment strategy for burst fractures of the thoracolumbar junction is discussed controversially in the literature. Whilst 360° fusion has shown to result in better radiological outcome, recent studies have failed to show its superiority concerning clinical outcome. The morbidity associated with the additional anterior approach may account for these findings. The aim of this prospective observational study was therefore to compare two different techniques for 360° fusion in thoracolumbar burst fractures using either thoracoscopy or a transforaminal approach (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)) to support the anterior column. Posterior reduction and short-segmental fixation using angular stable pedicle screw systems were performed in all patients as a first step. Monocortical strut grafts were used for the anterior support in the TLIF group, whilst tricortical grafts or titanium vertebral body replacing implants of adjustable height were used in the combined posteroanterior group. At final follow-up, the radiological outcome was assessed by performing X-rays in a standing position. The clinical outcome was measured using five validated outcome scores. The morbidity associated with the approaches and the donor site was assessed as well. There were 21 patients in the TLIF group and 14 patients in the posteroanterior group included. The postoperative loss of correction was higher in the TLIF group (4.9°±8.3° versus 3.4°±6.4°, p>0.05). There were no significant differences regarding the outcome scores between the two groups. There were no differences in terms of return to employment, leisure activities and back function either. More patients suffered from donor-site morbidity in the TLIF group, whilst the morbidity associated with the surgical approach was higher in the posteroanterior group. The smaller donor-site morbidity in the posteroanterior group is counterbalanced by an additional morbidity associated with the anterior approach

  8. Acute hospital costs after minimally invasive versus open lumbar interbody fusion: data from a US national database with 6106 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Y; Lerner, Jason; Lesko, James; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-08-01

    Retrospective multi-institutional database review. To determine if minimally invasive interbody fusion is associated with cost savings when compared with open surgery. Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgeries are increasingly recognized as equivalent to open procedures. Although these techniques have been advocated for reducing pain, disability, and length of hospitalization, to date there has been little data demonstrating these benefits. This study analyzed inpatient hospital records from the Premier Perspective database (2002 to 2009), including patients who underwent a posterior lumbar fusion with interbody cage placement by ICD-9 code, and had implant charge codes that allowed determination if MIS pedicle screws were utilized. Exclusion criteria included a refusion surgery, deformity, >2 levels, and anterior fusion. Total costs were adjusted for covariates (age, sex, race, hospital geography and setting, payor, and comorbidities) using an analysis of covariance model. A total of 6106 patients were identified (1667 MIS and 4439 open). Length of stay (LOS) for 1-level MIS surgery averaged of 3.35 days versus 3.6 days for open surgery (P≤0.006). For 2-level MIS surgery LOS averaged of 3.4 days versus 4.03 days for open surgery (P≤0.001). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $29,187 for 1-level MIS procedures versus $29,947 for open surgery, a nonsignificant difference (P=0.55). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $2106 lower for 2-level MIS surgery (total costs of $33,879 for MIS vs. $35,984 for open surgery, P=0.0023). Cost savings were attributable primarily to lower room and board ($857), operating room ($359), pharmacy ($304), and laboratory ($166) costs in the MIS group. High variances in the 2-level open surgery with prolonged hospital stay also accounted for overall cost differences. This data from a large nationwide sample of hospitalizations demonstrates that MIS lumbar interbody fusion results in a

  9. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with cages and local bone graft in the treatment of spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillier, Hans; Birkenmaier, Christof; Rauch, Alexander; Weiler, Christoph; Kauschke, Thomas; Refior, Hans Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) implants are increasingly being used for 360 degrees fusion after decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis combined with degenerative instability. Both titanium and PEEK (PolyEtherEtherKetone) implants are commonly used. Assessing the clinical and radiological results as well as typical complications, such as migration of the cages, is important. In addition, questions such as which radiological parameters can be used to assess successful fusion, and whether the exclusive use of local bone graft is sufficient, are frequently debated. We prospectively evaluated 30 patients after PLIF instrumentation for degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis, over a course of 42 months. In all cases, titanium cages and local bone graft were used for spondylodesis. The follow-up protocol of these 30 cases included standardised clinical and radiological evaluation at 3, 6, 12 and 42 months after surgery. Overall satisfactory results were achieved. With one exception, a stable result was achieved with restoration of the intervertebral space in the anterior column. After 42 months of follow-up in most cases, a radiologically visible loss of disc space height can be demonstrated. Clinically relevant migration of the cage in the dorsal direction was detected in one case. Based on our experience, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) can be recommended for the treatment of monosegmental and bisegmental spinal stenosis, with or without segmental instability. Postoperative evaluation is mainly based on clinical parameters since the titanium implant affects the diagnostic value of imaging studies and is responsible for artefacts. The results observed in our group of patients suggest that local autologous bone graft procured from the posterior elements after decompression is an adequate material for bone grafting in this procedure.

  10. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion for the correction of spondylolisthesis and adult degenerative scoliosis in high-risk patients: early radiographic results and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Brad; Briski, David; Qadir, Rabah; Godoy, Gustavo; Houston, Allison Howard; Rudman, Ernest; Zavatsky, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is not associated with many of the complications seen in other interbody fusion techniques. This study used computed tomography (CT) scans, the radiographic gold standard, to assess interbody fusion rates achieved utilizing the LLIF technique in high-risk patients. We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent LLIF between January 2008 and July 2013. Forty-nine patients underwent nonstaged or staged LLIF on 119 levels with posterior correction and augmentation. Per protocol, patients received CT scans at their 1-year follow-up. Of the 49 patients, 21 patients with LLIF intervention on 54 levels met inclusion criteria. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists and the senior surgeon (JZ) assessed fusion. Of the 21 patients, 6 patients had had previous lumbar surgery, and the cohort's comorbidities included osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking, among others. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (57.1%) patients and included anterior thigh pain and weakness in 6 patients, all of which resolved by 6 months. Two cases of proximal junctional kyphosis occurred, along with 1 case of hardware pullout. Two cases of abdominal atonia occurred. By CT scan assessment, each radiologist found fusion was achieved in 53 of 54 levels (98%). The radiologists' findings were in agreement with the senior surgeon. Several studies have evaluated LLIF fusion and reported fusion rates between 88%-96%. Our results demonstrate high fusion rates using this technique, despite multiple comorbidities in the patient population. Spanning the ring apophysis with large LLIF cages along with supplemental posterior pedicle screw augmentation can enhance stability of the fusion segment and increase fusion rates.

  11. Outcomes of oblique lateral interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar disease in patients under or over 65 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chengzhen; Jaiswal, Milin S; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Hur, Jung-Woo; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2018-02-20

    Oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) offers the solution to problems of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). However, OLIF technique for degenerative spinal diseases of elderly patients has been rarely reported. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical and radiological results of OLIF technique for degenerative spinal diseases in patients under or over 65 years of age. Sixty-three patients who underwent OLIF procedure were enrolled, including 29 patients who were less than 65 years of age and 34 patients who were over 65 years of age. Fusion rate, change of disc height and lumbar lordotic angle, Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), return to daily activity, patient's satisfaction rate (PSR), and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. The mean NRS scores for back and leg pain decreased, respectively, from 4.6 and 5.9 to 2.3 and 1.8 in the group A (less than 65 years) and from 4.5 and 6.8 to 2.6 and 2.2 in the group B (over 65 years) at the final follow-up period. The mean ODI scores improved from 48.4 to 24.0% in the group A and from 46.5 to 25.2% in the group B at the final follow-up period. In both groups, the NRS and ODI scores significantly changed preoperatively to postoperatively (p degenerative lumbar diseases in elderly patients showed favorable clinical and radiological outcomes.

  12. Comparing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis: A STROBE-compliant observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Mao, Keya; Qiang, Xiaojun

    2017-09-01

    Although spondylolisthesis was traditionally treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) was recently proposed as an alternative treatment for spondylolisthesis. However, no studies have focused on the comparison of these 2 techniques' outcome on spondylolisthesis.The operative reports and perioperative data of patients who underwent single-level primary open PLIF (n = 29) and MIS-TLIF (n = 26) for I/II spondylolisthesis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients' demographics, operative blood loss, hospital length of stay, creatine kinase (CK) level, radiographic fusion, complications, and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. Radiographic fusion was assessed using the Bridwell grading criteria. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes included the visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI).Average follow-up was 28 ± 3.6 months (range 24-32 months). Bed rest time, hospital stay, estimated blood loss, and operative time in the MIS-TLIF group were significantly lower than those in the PLIF group (P  .05).Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF for grade I/II spondylolisthesis can achieve similar reduction and fusion results with better short-term quality of life, shorter hospital stays, less estimated blood loss, and shorter operative times.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of lateral interbody fusion strategies for adjacent segment degeneration in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Melodie F; Robinson, Samuel T; Maldonado, Ruben C; Rawlinson, Jeremy; Liu, John; Acosta, Frank L

    2017-07-01

    Surgical treatment of symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) typically involves extension of previous instrumentation to include the newly affected level(s). Disruption of the incision site can present challenges and increases the risk of complication. Lateral-based interbody fusion techniques may provide a viable surgical alternative that avoids these risks. This study is the first to analyze the biomechanical effect of adding a lateral-based construct to an existing fusion. The study aimed to determine whether a minimally invasive lateral interbody device, with and without supplemental instrumentation, can effectively stabilize the rostral segment adjacent to a two-level fusion when compared with a traditional posterior revision approach. This is a cadaveric biomechanical study of lateral-based interbody strategies as add-on techniques to an existing fusion for the treatment of ASD. Twelve lumbosacral specimens were non-destructively loaded in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion. Sequentially, the tested conditions were intact, two-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) (L3-L5), followed by lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedures at L2-L3 including interbody alone, a supplemental lateral plate, a supplemental spinous process plate, and then either cortical screw or pedicle screw fixation. A three-level TLIF was the final instrumented condition. In all conditions, three-dimensional kinematics were tracked and range of motion (ROM) was calculated for comparisons. Institutional funds (Spine. The addition of a lateral interbody device superadjacent to a two-level fusion significantly reduced motion in flexion, extension, and lateral bending (pfusion construct, demonstrating ROM comparable with a traditional three-level TLIF. The data presented suggest that a lateral-based interbody fusion supplemented with additional minimally invasive instrumentation may provide comparable stability with a traditional posterior revision approach

  14. Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion and transpsoas approach-related morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, David J; Slimack, Nicholas P; Acosta, Frank L; Koski, Tyler R; Fessler, Richard G; Liu, John C

    2011-10-01

    Recently, the minimally invasive, lateral retroperitoneal, transpsoas approach to the thoracolumbar spinal column has been described by various authors. This is known as the minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the approach-related morbidity associated with the minimally invasive transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine. To date, there have been only a couple of reports regarding the morbidity of the transpsoas muscle approach. A nonrandomized, prospective study utilizing a self-reported patient questionnaire was conducted between January 2006 and June 2008 at Northwestern University. Data were collected in 53 patients with a follow-up period ranging from 6 months to 3.5 years. Only 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Thirty-six percent (19 of 53) of patients reported subjective hip flexor weakness, 25% (13 of 53) anterior thigh numbness, and 23% (12 of 53) anterior thigh pain. However, 84% of the 19 patients reported complete resolution of their subjective hip flexor weakness by 6 months, and most experienced improved strength by 8 weeks. Of those reporting anterior thigh numbness and pain, 69% and 75% improved to their baseline function by the 6-month follow-up evaluations, respectively. All patients with self-reported subjective hip flexor weakness underwent examinations during subsequent clinic visits after surgery; however, these examinations did not confirm a motor deficit less than Grade 5. Subset analysis showed that the L3-4 and L4-5 levels were most often affected. The minimally invasive, transpsoas muscle approach to the lumbar spine has a number of advantages. The data show that a percentage of the patients undergoing the transpsoas approach will have temporary sensory and motor symptoms related to this approach. The majority of the symptoms are thought to be related to psoas muscle inflammation and/or stretch injury to the genitofemoral nerve due to the surgical corridor traversed during the

  15. Symptomatic ectopic bone formation after off-label use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan-Fu; Smith, Zachary A; Stiner, Eric; Armin, Sean; Sheikh, Hormoz; Khoo, Larry T

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) has been approved for use in the lumbar spine in conjunction with the lumbar tapered cage. However, off-label use of this osteoinductive agent is observed with anterior fusion applications as well as with both posterior lumbar interbody fusion and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Complications using rhBMP-2 in the cervical spine have been reported. Although radiographic evidence of ectopic bone in the lumbar spine has been described following rhBMP-2 use, this finding was not previously believed to be of clinical relevance. This study was a retrospective review of 4 patients who underwent minimally invasive spinal TLIF (MIS-TLIF) in which bone fusion was augmented with rhBMP-2 applied to an absorbable collagen sponge. Case presentations, operative findings, imaging data, and follow-up findings were reviewed. Four cases with delayed symptomatic neural compression following the off-label use of rhBMP-2 with MIS-TLIF were identified. Although previously believed to be only a radiographic finding, the development of ectopic bone following rhBMP-2 use in lumbar fusion can be clinically significant. This paper describes 4 cases of delayed neural compression following MIS-TLIF. The reader should be aware of this potential complication following the off-label use of rhBMP-2 in the lumbar spine.

  16. Additional sagittal correction can be obtained when using an expandable titanium interbody device in lumbar Smith-Peterson osteotomies: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qandah, Nicholas A; Klocke, Noelle F; Synkowski, Jordan J; Chinthakunta, Suresh R; Hussain, Mir M; Salloum, Kanaan G; Marvin, Eric A; Bucklen, Brandon S

    2015-03-01

    Insertion of intervertebral fusion devices between consecutive Smith-Peterson osteotomies (SPOs) provides an anterior fulcrum during compression, which has been documented to improve achievable Cobb angle correction. Extension of these principles to an expandable device would theoretically provide greater surgical adjustment for flatback and scoliotic cases than a static cage. To investigate whether an expandable titanium interbody device would produce greater sagittal correction than a static spacer when used during SPO procedures. Cadaveric research was performed. Seven T10-S1 human specimens were used. Cobb angle changes and range of motion are the physiological measures. No self-report/functional measures were applicable. Bilateral pedicle screws were placed (T11-L5) before Smith-Petersen osteotomy creation from L2 to L4. A transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion titanium expandable implant was placed in each disc space from L2-L3 to L4-L5, which is currently an off-label use of this implant. Initial placement simulated a static spacer, and then incremental device expansion was performed to obtain an intermediate and final height. Lateral fluoroscopic images were taken for Cobb angle evaluation between L2 and L5, and range of motion as observed during application of pure bending moments was captured using a six degree-of-freedom spine simulator. A one-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc analysis was performed to determine significant differences (pcompany, where some authors are salaried employees; another author has been a paid consultant elsewhere. These financial associations were not believed to bias the results. Change in Cobb angle from L2 to L5 was significantly greater with the interbody spacer compared with SPO alone. Despite an obvious increase in lordosis with expansion height, there were no significant differences between implant expansion states for the L2-L5 Cobb angle. All instrumented constructs were statistically equivalent in every

  17. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  18. Analysis of Internet Information on Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belayneh, Rebekah; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-07-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a surgical technique that is being increasingly used. The authors' objective was to examine information on the Internet pertaining to the LLIF technique. An analysis was conducted of publicly accessible websites pertaining to LLIF. The following search engines were used: Google (www.google.com), Bing (www.bing.com), and Yahoo (www.yahoo.com). DuckDuckGo (www.duckduckgo.com) was an additional search engine used due to its emphasis on generating accurate and consistent results while protecting searchers' privacy and reducing advertisements. The top 35 websites providing information on LLIF from the 4 search engines were identified. A total of 140 websites were evaluated. Each web-site was categorized based on authorship (academic, private, medical industry, insurance company, other) and content of information. Using the search term lateral lumbar interbody fusion, 174,000 Google results, 112,000 Yahoo results, and 112,000 Bing results were obtained. DuckDuckGo does not display the number of results found for a search. From the top 140 websites collected from each website, 78 unique websites were identified. Websites were authored by a private medical group in 46.2% of the cases, an academic medical group in 26.9% of the cases, and the biomedical industry in 5.1% of the cases. Sixty-eight percent of websites reported indications, and 24.4% reported contraindications. Benefits of LLIF were reported by 69.2% of websites. Thirty-six percent of websites reported complications of LLIF. Overall, the quality of information regarding LLIF on the Internet is poor. Spine surgeons and spine societies can assist in improving the quality of the information on the Internet regarding LLIF. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e701-e707.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Evaluation of hip flexion strength following lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Po; Regev, Gilad J; Chan, Justin; Zhang, Bing; Taylor, William; Kim, Choll W; Garfin, Steven R

    2013-10-01

    Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a minimally invasive procedure that is designed to achieve a solid interbody fusion while minimizing the damage to the surrounding soft tissue. Although short-term results have been promising, few data have been published to date regarding its risks and complication rate. The aim was to evaluate the extent of injury to the psoas muscle after the LIF procedure by measuring hip flexion strength. A prospective case series was used in the study. Hip flexion strength was measured using a handheld digital dynamometer while the patient was seated on a chair; the examiner held the device against the patient's attempt to flex the hip. Both sides were measured to compare the operated and nonoperated psoas muscles. Each side was measured three times and the average amount (in pounds) was recorded. Measurements were done before and after surgery on Day 2-3, at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and at 3 and 6 months. Thirty-three patients were recruited for this study. Mean preoperative hip flexion strength values were 20.7±3.47 lb and 21.3±4.31 lb for operated and nonoperated legs, respectively, with no significant difference (p=.85). With a mean of 11.2±2.24 lb postoperative measurements on Day 2, the operated side showed statistically significant reduction of strength (p=.0001). The nonoperated side was also weaker postoperatively, but not significantly (mean=19.12±1.74 lb; p=.097). From the first follow-up visit at 2 weeks, the values on the operated leg had returned to baseline values (20.6, p=.97) and were not significantly different from preoperative values on either side. Hip flexion was weakened immediately after the LIF procedure, which may be attributed to psoas muscle injury during the procedure. However, this damage was temporary, with almost complete return to baseline values by 2 weeks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Flat midsubstance of the anterior cruciate ligament with tibial "C"-shaped insertion site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebold, Rainer; Schuhmacher, Peter; Fernandez, Francis; Śmigielski, Robert; Fink, Christian; Brehmer, Axel; Kirsch, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    This anatomical cadaver study was performed to investigate the flat appearance of the midsubstance shape of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and its tibial "C"-shaped insertion site. The ACL midsubstance and the tibial ACL insertion were dissected in 20 cadaveric knees (n = 6 fresh frozen and n = 14 paraffined). Magnifying spectacles were used for all dissections. Morphometric measurements were performed using callipers and on digital photographs. In all specimens, the midsubstance of the ACL was flat with a mean width of 9.9 mm, thickness of 3.9 mm and cross-sectional area of 38.7 mm(2). The "direct" "C"-shaped tibial insertion runs from along the medial tibial spine to the anterior aspect of the lateral meniscus. The mean width (length) of the "C" was 12.6 mm, its thickness 3.3 mm and area 31.4 mm(2). The centre of the "C" was the bony insertion of the anterior root of the lateral meniscus overlayed by fat and crossed by the ACL. No posterolateral (PL) inserting ACL fibres were found. Together with the larger "indirect" part (area 79.6 mm(2)), the "direct" one formed a "duck-foot"-shaped footprint. The tibial ACL midsubstance and tibial "C"-shaped insertion are flat and are resembling a "ribbon". The centre of the "C" is the bony insertion of the anterior root of the lateral meniscus. There are no central or PL inserting ACL fibres. Anatomical ACL reconstruction may therefore require a flat graft and a "C"-shaped tibial footprint reconstruction with an anteromedial bone tunnel for single bundle and an additional posteromedial bone tunnel for double bundle.

  1. Quantitative radiographic assessment of the anatomic attachment sites of the anterior and posterior complexes of the proximal tibiofibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Daniel Cole; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Slette, Erik L; LaPrade, Robert F

    2018-04-01

    Quantitative guidelines for radiographic identification of the anterior and posterior ligaments of the proximal tibiofibular joint have not been well defined. The purpose of this study was to provide reproducible, quantitative descriptions of radiographic landmarks identifying the anterior and posterior ligament complexes of the proximal tibiofibular joint. It was hypothesized that consistent quantitative data regarding the radiographic location of the anterior and posterior proximal tibiofibular joint ligament complexes could be identified. The footprint centers of the individual ligament bundles of the anterior and posterior complexes of the proximal tibiofibular joint were labeled with radio-opaque markers in ten non-paired, fresh-frozen cadaveric knee specimens. Anteroposterior (AP) and lateral radiographs of the proximal tibiofibular joint were obtained, and distances between the markers and pertinent radiographic landmarks were recorded. On AP radiographs, the tibial span of the anterior complex was 12.8 ± 3.9 mm and started at a median of 11.4 mm distal to the tibial plateau; the fibular span was 11.6 ± 6.8 mm and started at a median of 5.1 mm from the apex of the fibular styloid. The tibial span of the posterior complex was 11.7 ± 8.4 mm and began at a median of 12.1 mm distal to the tibial plateau; the fibular span was 11.8 ± 7.9 mm and began at a median of 3.1 mm distal to the apex of the fibular styloid. Values were similar for lateral radiographs. The attachment locations of the proximal tibiofibular anterior and posterior complexes could be quantitatively correlated to reliable osseous landmarks and radiographic lines. This information will allow for consistent radiographic assessments of proper tunnel placement intraoperatively and postoperatively during anatomic reconstructions of the proximal tibiofibular joint.

  2. Lumbar sagittal contour after posterior interbody fusion: threaded devices alone versus vertical cages plus posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemme, W R; Owens, B D; Dhawan, A; Zeidman, S; Polly, D W

    2001-03-01

    An observational radiographic study examining lumbar sagittal contour of patients undergoing posterior interbody arthrodesis. To compare operative alterations of lumbar sagittal contour after posterior interbody fusion using threaded interbody devices alone versus vertical cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation. Technique-related alterations of lumbar sagittal contour during interbody arthrodesis have received little attention in the spinal literature. Standing lumbar radiographs were measured for preoperative and postoperative segmental lordosis at levels undergoing posterior interbody arthrodesis using either stand-alone side-by-side threaded devices or vertical cages combined with posterior transpedicular compression instrumentation. Sagittal plane segmental correction (or loss of correction) was calculated and statistically compared. The radiographs of 30 patients (34 spinal segments) undergoing lumbar or lumbosacral arthrodesis were compared. Seventeen patients (18 segments) had undergone interbody fusion using threaded cages,whereas 13 patients (16 segments) underwent fusion using vertically oriented mesh cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation. Preoperative segmental lordosis averaged 8 degrees for both groups. For patients undergoing fusion with threaded cages, there was a mean lordotic loss of 3 degrees/segment. For patients undergoing fusion with vertically oriented mesh cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation,there was a mean lordotic gain of 5 degrees/segment. This difference in segmental sagittal plane contour was highly significant (P = 0.00). Threaded fusion devices placed under interbody distraction with the endplates parallel fail to preserve or reestablish segmental lordosis. Vertical cages, however, when combined with posterior compression instrumentation, not only maintain segmental lordosis, but also can correct sagittal plane deformity.

  3. Short-term outcomes of lateral lumbar interbody fusion without decompression for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis at L4-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter G; Nunley, Pierce D; Cavanaugh, David; Kerr, Eubulus; Utter, Philip Andrew; Frank, Kelly; Stone, Marcus

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recently, authors have called into question the utility and complication index of the lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedure at the L4-5 level. Furthermore, the need for direct decompression has also been debated. Here, the authors report the clinical and radiographic outcomes of transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion, relying only on indirect decompression to treat patients with neurogenic claudication secondary to Grade 1 and 2 spondylolisthesis at the L4-5 level. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective evaluation of 18 consecutive patients with Grade 1 or 2 spondylolisthesis from a prospectively maintained database. All patients underwent a transpsoas approach, followed by posterior percutaneous instrumentation without decompression. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and SF-12 were administered during the clinical evaluations. Radiographic evaluation was also performed. The mean follow-up was 6.2 months. RESULTS Fifteen patients with Grade 1 and 3 patients with Grade 2 spondylolisthesis were identified and underwent fusion at a total of 20 levels. The mean operative time was 165 minutes for the combined anterior and posterior phases of the operation. The estimated blood loss was 113 ml. The most common cage width in the anteroposterior dimension was 22 mm (78%). Anterior thigh dysesthesia was identified on detailed sensory evaluation in 6 of 18 patients (33%); all patients experienced resolution within 6 months postoperatively. No patient had lasting sensory loss or motor deficit. The average ODI score improved 26 points by the 6-month follow-up. At the 6-month follow-up, the SF-12 mean Physical and Mental Component Summary scores improved by 11.9% and 9.6%, respectively. No patient required additional decompression postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS This study offers clinical results to establish lateral lumbar interbody fusion as an effective technique for the treatment of Grade 1 or 2 degenerative spondylolisthesis at L4-5. The use of this surgical

  4. Cervical disc prosthesis replacement and interbody fusion — a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu–Hua, Jia

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the new functional intervertebral cervical disc prosthesis replacement and the classical interbody fusion operation, including the clinical effect and maintenance of the stability and segmental motion of cervical vertebrae. Twenty-four patients with single C5-6 intervertebral disk hernias were specifically selected and divided randomly into two groups: One group underwent artificial cervical disc replacement and the other group received interbody fusion. All patients were followed up and evaluated. The operation time for the single disc replacement was (130 ± 50) minutes and interbody fusion was (105 ± 53) minutes. Neurological or vascular complications were not observed during or after operation. There was no prosthesis subsidence or extrusion. The JOA score of the group with prosthesis replacement increased from an average of 8.6 to 15.8. The JOA score of the group with interbody fusion increased from an average of 9 to 16.2. The clinical effect and the ROM of the adjacent space of the two groups showed no statistical difference. The short follow-up time does not support the advantage of the cervical disc prosthesis. The clinical effect and the maintenance of the function of the motion of the intervertebral space are no better than the interbody fusion. At least 5 years of follow-up is needed to assess the long-term functionality of the prosthesis and the influence on adjacent levels. PMID:17180356

  5. Effects of Strontium Ranelate on Spinal Interbody Fusion Surgery in an Osteoporotic Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Ting Tsai

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a bone disease that afflicts millions of people around the world, and a variety of spinal integrity issues, such as degenerative spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis, are frequently concomitant with osteoporosis and are sometimes treated with spinal interbody fusion surgery. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of strontium ranelate (SrR treatment of osteoporosis in improving bone strength, promoting bone remodeling, and reducing the risk of fractures, but its effects on interbody fusion surgery have not been adequately investigated. SrR-treated rats subjected to interbody fusion surgery exhibited significantly higher lumbar vertebral bone mineral density after 12 weeks of treatment than rats subjected to the same surgery but not treated with SrR. Furthermore, histological and radiographic assessments showed that a greater amount of newly formed bone tissue was present and that better fusion union occurred in the SrR-treated rats than in the untreated rats. Taken together, these results show significant differences in bone mineral density, PINP level, histological score, SrR content and mechanical testing, which demonstrate a relatively moderate effect of SrR treatment on bone strength and remodeling in the specific context of recovery after an interbody fusion surgery, and suggest the potential of SrR treatment as an effective adjunct to spinal interbody fusion surgery for human patients.

  6. Evaluation of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) titanium composite interbody spacer in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model: biomechanical, microcomputed tomographic, and histologic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilvray, Kirk C; Waldorff, Erik I; Easley, Jeremiah; Seim, Howard B; Zhang, Nianli; Linovitz, Raymond J; Ryaby, James T; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2017-12-01

    The most commonly used materials used for interbody cages are titanium metal and polymer polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Both of these materials have demonstrated good biocompatibility. A major disadvantage associated with solid titanium cages is their radiopacity, limiting the postoperative monitoring of spinal fusion via standard imaging modalities. However, PEEK is radiolucent, allowing for a temporal assessment of the fusion mass by clinicians. On the other hand, PEEK is hydrophobic, which can limit bony ingrowth. Although both PEEK and titanium have demonstrated clinical success in obtaining a solid spinal fusion, innovations are being developed to improve fusion rates and to create stronger constructs using hybrid additive manufacturing approaches by incorporating both materials into a single interbody device. The purpose of this study was to examine the interbody fusion characteristic of a PEEK Titanium Composite (PTC) cage for use in lumbar fusion. Thirty-four mature female sheep underwent two-level (L 2 -L 3 and L 4 -L 5 ) interbody fusion using either a PEEK or a PTC cage (one of each per animal). Animals were sacrificed at 0, 8, 12, and 18 weeks post surgery. Post sacrifice, each surgically treated functional spinal unit underwent non-destructive kinematic testing, microcomputed tomography scanning, and histomorphometric analyses. Relative to the standard PEEK cages, the PTC constructs demonstrated significant reductions in ranges of motion and a significant increase in stiffness. These biomechanical findings were reinforced by the presence of significantly more bone at the fusion site as well as ingrowth into the porous end plates. Overall, the results indicate that PTC interbody devices could potentially lead to a more robust intervertebral fusion relative to a standard PEEK device in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment and classification of subsidence after lateral interbody fusion using serial computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malham, Gregory M; Parker, Rhiannon M; Blecher, Carl M; Seex, Kevin A

    2015-07-24

    OBJECT Intervertebral cage settling during bone remodeling after lumbar lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a common occurrence during the normal healing process. Progression of this settling with endplate collapse is defined as subsidence. The purposes of this study were to 1) assess the rate of subsidence after minimally invasive (MIS) LIF by CT, 2) distinguish between early cage subsidence (ECS) and delayed cage subsidence (DCS), 3) propose a descriptive method for classifying the types of subsidence, and 4) discuss techniques for mitigating the risk of subsidence after MIS LIF. METHODS A total of 128 consecutive patients (with 178 treated levels in total) underwent MIS LIF performed by a single surgeon. The subsidence was deemed to be ECS if it was evident on postoperative Day 2 CT images and was therefore the result of an intraoperative vertebral endplate injury and deemed DCS if it was detected on subsequent CT scans (≥ 6 months postoperatively). Endplate breaches were categorized as caudal (superior endplate) and/or cranial (inferior endplate), and as ipsilateral, contralateral, or bilateral with respect to the side of cage insertion. Subsidence seen in CT images (radiographic subsidence) was measured from the vertebral endplate to the caudal or cranial margin of the cage (in millimeters). Patient-reported outcome measures included visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey physical and mental component summary scores. RESULTS Four patients had ECS in a total of 4 levels. The radiographic subsidence (DCS) rates were 10% (13 of 128 patients) and 8% (14 of 178 levels), with 3% of patients (4 of 128) exhibiting clinical subsidence. In the DCS levels, 3 types of subsidence were evident on coronal and sagittal CT scans: Type 1, caudal contralateral, in 14% (2 of 14), Type 2, caudal bilateral with anterior cage tilt, in 64% (9 of 14), and Type 3, both endplates bilaterally, in 21% (3 of 14). The mean subsidence in the DCS

  8. Segmental stability and compressive strength of posterior lumbar interbody fusion implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantrizos, A; Baramki, H G; Zeidman, S; Steffen, T

    2000-08-01

    Human cadaveric study on initial segmental stability and compressive strength of posterior lumbar interbody fusion implants. To compare the initial segmental stability and compressive strength of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion construct using a new cortical bone spacer machined from allograft to that of titanium threaded and nonthreaded posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages, tested as stand-alone and with supplemental pedicle screw fixation. Cages were introduced to overcome the limitations of conventional allografts. Radiodense cage materials impede radiographic assessment of the fusion, however, and may cause stress shielding of the graft. Multisegmental specimens were tested intact, with posterior lumbar interbody fusion implants inserted into the L4/L5 interbody space and with supplemental pedicle screw fixation. Three posterior lumbar interbody fusion implant constructs (Ray Threaded Fusion Cage, Contact Fusion Cage, and PLIF Allograft Spacer) were tested nondestructively in axial rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral bending. The implant-specimen constructs then were isolated and compressed to failure. Changes in the neutral zone, range of motion, yield strength, and ultimate compressive strength were analyzed. None of the stand-alone implant constructs reduced the neutral zone. Supplemental pedicle screw fixation decreased the neutral zone in flexion-extension and lateral bending. Stand-alone implant constructs decreased the range of motion in flexion and lateral bending. Differences in the range of motion between stand-alone cage constructs were found in flexion and extension (marginally significant). Supplemental posterior fixation further decreased the range of motion in all loading directions with no differences between implant constructs. The Contact Fusion Cage and PLIF Allograft Spacer constructs had a higher ultimate compressive strength than the Ray Threaded Fusion Cage. The biomechanical data did not suggest any implant construct to

  9. New cage for posterior minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion: a study in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Wu, Xiao-tao; Zhuang, Su-yang; Bao, Jun-ping; Shi, Rui

    2014-02-01

    To design a new type of interbody fusion device made of nickel titanium NiTi shape memory alloy and to compare segmental stiffness after various posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures in vitro and in vivo. Twelve sheep lumbar functional spinal units were randomly allocated to four groups. One acted as controls (N); the other three were treated with autogenous iliac crest bone dowel graft (L), a threaded cylindrical titanium (KC) interbody fusion device (TFC) or a new type of interbody fusion device made of NiTi shape memory alloy (NT) containing autogenous iliac crest graft. In addition, 15 sheep were allocated to three groups; one served as controls and the other two underwent TFC (KC) or NiTi-FC (NT). Nondestructive mechanical tests were performed in pure compression, extension, lateral bending and torsion. The operated spines were photographed regularly to assess changes in interbody height and degree of fusion. The animals were killed at 6 months for histologic testing. Biomechanical tests showed both the strength and axial stiffness of the NT and KC groups were significantly higher than those of the control group and L group (P destructive load of the NiTi-TFC was 11 200 N and the safety coefficient was above 1.2. Radiological observations revealed that the bone callus around the interbody fusion device were gradually increased postoperatively (2 months, no obvious; 4 months, poorly define; 6 months, dense). The KC and NT group had lost 16% and 16.5% of their postoperative height but remained well above normal disc height (P < 0.05). Histologic examination showed new trabeculation connected with that of the host. The mechanical characteristics of the NiTi-TFC are excellent and it is safe and reliable. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Repeated adjacent-segment degeneration after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Shinya; Oda, Takenori; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Maeno, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important sequelae affecting long-term results is adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Although several reports have described the incidence rate, there have been no reports of repeated ASD. The purpose of this report was to describe 1 case of repeated ASD after PLIF. A 62-year-old woman with L-4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent PLIF at L4-5. At the second operation, L3-4 PLIF was performed for L-3 degenerative spondylolisthesis 6 years after the primary operation. At the third operation, L2-3 PLIF was performed for L-2 degenerative spondylolisthesis 1.5 years after the primary operation. Vertebral collapse of L-1 was detected 1 year after the third operation, and the collapse had progressed. At the fourth operation, 3 years after the third operation, vertebral column resection of L-1 and replacement of titanium mesh cages with pedicle screw fixation between T-4 and L-5 was performed. Although the patient's symptoms resolved after each operation, the time between surgeries shortened. The sacral slope decreased gradually although each PLIF achieved local lordosis at the fused segment.

  11. Incidence and impact of implant subsidence after stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocahut, N; Audureau, E; Poignard, A; Delambre, J; Queinnec, S; Flouzat Lachaniette, C-H; Allain, J

    2017-12-30

    Few data are available on the occurrence after stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) of implant subsidence, whose definition and incidence vary across studies. The primary objective of this work was to determine the incidence of subsidence 1 year postoperatively, using an original measurement method, whose validity was first assessed. The secondary objective was to assess the clinical impact of subsidence. Implant subsidence after stand-alone LLIF is a common complication that can adversely affect clinical outcomes. Of 69 included patients who underwent stand-alone LLIF, 67 (97%) were re-evaluated at least 1 year later. Furthermore, 63 (91%) patients had two available computed tomography (CT) scans for assessing subsidence, one performed immediately after surgery and the other 1 year later. Reproducibility of the original measurement method was assessed in a preliminary study. Subsidence was defined as at least 4mm loss of fused space height. The incidence of subsidence was 32% (20 patients). Subsidence was global in 7 (11%) patients and partial in 13 (21%) patients. Mean loss of height was 5.5±1.5mm. Subsidence predominated anteriorly in 50% of cases. The lordotic curvature of the fused segment was altered in 50% of patients, by a mean of 8°±3°. Fusion was achieved in 67/69 (97%) patients. The Oswestry score and visual analogue scale scores for low-back and nerve-root pain were significantly improved after 1 year in the overall population and in the groups with and without subsidence. Reproducibility of our measurement method was found to be excellent. Subsidence was common but without significant clinical effects after 1 year. Nevertheless, subsidence can be associated with pain and can result in loss of lumbar lordosis, which is a potential risk factor for degenerative disease of the adjacent segments. A score for predicting the risk of subsidence will now be developed by our group as a tool for improving patient selection to stand-alone LLIF

  12. Evaluation of a novel tool for bone graft delivery in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

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    Kleiner JB

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey B Kleiner, Hannah M Kleiner, E John Grimberg Jr, Stefanie J Throlson The Spine Center of Innovation, The Medical Center of Aurora, Aurora, CO, USA Study design: Disk material removed (DMR during L4-5 and L5-S1 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (T-LIF surgery was compared to the corresponding bone graft (BG volumes inserted at the time of fusion. A novel BG delivery tool (BGDT was used to apply the BG. In order to establish the percentage of DMR during T-LIF, it was compared to DMR during anterior diskectomy (AD. This study was performed prospectively. Summary of background data: Minimal information is available as to the volume of DMR during a T-LIF procedure, and the relationship between DMR and BG delivered is unknown. BG insertion has been empiric and technically challenging. Since the volume of BG applied to the prepared disk space likely impacts the probability of arthrodesis, an investigation is justified. Methods: A total of 65 patients with pathology at L4-5 and/or L5-S1 necessitating fusion were treated with a minimally invasive T-LIF procedure. DMR was volumetrically measured during disk space preparation. BG material consisting of local autograft, BG extender, and bone marrow aspirate were mixed to form a slurry. BG slurry was injected into the disk space using a novel BGDT and measured volumetrically. An additional 29 patients who were treated with L5-S1 AD were compared to L5-S1 T-LIF DMR to determine the percent of T-LIF DMR relative to AD. Results: DMR volumes averaged 3.6±2.2 mL. This represented 34% of the disk space relative to AD. The amount of BG delivered to the disk spaces was 9.3±3.2 mL, which is 2.6±2.2 times the amount of DMR. The BGDT allowed uncomplicated filling of the disk space in <1 minute. Conclusion: The volume of DMR during T-LIF allows for a predictable volume of BG delivery. The BGDT allowed complete filling of the entire prepared disk space. The T-LIF diskectomy debrides 34% of the disk

  13. Clinical outcomes and considerations of the lumbar interbody fusion technique for lumbar disk disease in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dae-Woong; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Young-Eun; Kuh, Sung-Uk

    2013-08-01

    The posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) techniques are commonly used surgical methods for wide indications such as degeneration or trauma. Although they are rarely required for lumbar disk disease in younger patients, there are a few children and adolescents who are indicated for PLIF or TLIF for other reasons, such as congenital severe stenosis with or without lumbar instability that requires wide decompression or severe bony spur that need to be removed. In such cases, different pathophysiology and outcomes are expected compared with adult patients. We retrospectively reviewed data of 23 patients who underwent PLIF or TLIF surgery when less than 20 years old. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed during a mean of 36.4 months follow-up period. The indications of lumbar interbody fusion, success of fusion, complications, and visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed. Radiographs of all patients taken 6 months after the surgery showed fusion. Clinical outcome was also satisfactory, with improvement of VAS score from 7.7 preoperatively to 2.3 at 6 months after surgery. Only one patient had reoperation due to adjacent segment disease. For adolescent patients with severe bony spur, massive central disk rupture, or severe spondylolisthesis, lumbar interbody fusion surgery has good surgical outcome with few complications.

  14. Clinical and radiological outcome of minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion in primary versus revision surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hentenaar, B.; Spoor, A. B.; Malefijt, J. de Waal; Diekerhof, C. H.; den Oudsten, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to compare the clinical and radiological outcome of minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MI-PLIF) in revision and primary cases. Methods In a retrospective study, we compared the clinical and radiological results of MI-PLIF for lytic

  15. Outcome in the treatment of discopathy by interbody fusion with the posterior approach using metal cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milecki, Marcin; Lukawski, Stanisław; Rapała, Kazimierz; Białecki, Jerzy

    2004-06-30

    Background. Discopathy most often occurs in persons from 20 to 50 years old, in the period of greatest physical and intellectual capacity, and thus poses a major social problem. The goal of our research was to evaluation the outcome of interbody fusion performed with metal cages. Material and methods. We operated 52 patients ranging in age from 29 to 60, who presented with prolapse of the nucleus pulposus (21 patients), instability (8 patients), lumbar stenosis (11 patients), and recurrent discopathy with spondylolisthesis (12 patients). Interbody fusion was performed on these patients from the posterior approach using metal implants. Results. Applying both subjective and radiological criteria, we obtained good outcome in 36 cases, satisfactory in 12 cases, and unsatisfactory in 4 cases. A follow-up at 4 years after surgery showed that the solution was effective in preventing lumbar stenosis and intervertebral instability. However, there were still difficulties in the assessment of bone union. Conclusions. Maintaining or expanding the height of the interbody space by using implants is indicated by radiography in our material to be the most important surgical intervention justifying the use of this method. Interbody fusion in discopathy using metal implants is a logical solution to prevent secondary stenosis of the vertebral canal and intervertebral instability. The outcomes obtained at 4-year follow-up should be regarded as satisfactory.

  16. Which Approach Is Advantageous to Preventing Development of Adjacent Segment Disease? Comparative Analysis of 3 Different Lumbar Interbody Fusion Techniques (ALIF, LLIF, and PLIF) in L4-5 Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Woo; Yoon, Kang-Jun; Ha, Sang-Soo

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare radiologic and clinical outcomes in patients with L4-5 lumbar spondylolisthesis who have undergone either instrumented anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF), or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), especially with regard to the development of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Eighty-two patients with preoperative L4-5 spondylolisthesis and minimal ASD who underwent instrumented L4-5 fusion were divided into 3 groups according to the surgical approach used for treatment (ALIF: 27 patients, LLIF: 24 patients, PLIF: 31 patients). Radiographic measurements including preoperative and postoperative foraminal and disk height, segmental and lumbar lordosis, percentage of vertebral slippage, and reduction rate were reviewed. The incidence of ASD and clinical outcomes were evaluated and compared between the 3 groups. ASD was found in 37.0% (10/27), 41.7% (10/24), and 64.5% (20/31) of the patients in the ALIF, LLIF, and PLIF groups, respectively (mean follow-up duration: 35.42 ± 9.35 months). The ALIF and LLIF groups had significantly increased disk and foraminal height compared with the PLIF group. The ALIF group had significantly improved lordosis compared with the PLIF and LLIF groups. There were no statistically significant intergroup differences in clinical outcomes assessed by visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index. The 3 different fusion techniques investigated can all produce good outcomes in treating lumbar spondylolisthesis in L4-5, but ALIF and LLIF are more advantageous in preventing the development of ASD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Single-tunnel double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of hamstring tendon graft: can it restore normal knee joint kinematics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadikota, Hemanth R; Wu, Jia-Lin; Seon, Jong Keun; Sutton, Karen; Gill, Thomas J; Li, Guoan

    2010-04-01

    Anatomical reconstruction techniques that can restore normal joint kinematics without increasing surgical complications could potentially improve clinical outcomes and help manage anterior cruciate ligament injuries more efficiently. Single-tunnel double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of hamstring tendon graft can more closely restore normal knee anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and internal-external kinematics than can conventional single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Kinematic responses after single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and single-tunnel double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of hamstring tendon graft were compared with the intact knee in 9 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knee specimens using a robotic testing system. Kinematics of each knee were determined under an anterior tibial load (134 N), a simulated quadriceps load (400 N), and combined torques (10 N.m valgus and 5 N.m internal tibial torques) at 0 degrees , 15 degrees , 30 degrees , 60 degrees , and 90 degrees of flexion. Anterior tibial translations were more closely restored to the intact knee level after single-tunnel double-bundle reconstruction with anatomical placement of hamstring tendon graft than with a single-bundle reconstruction under the 3 external loading conditions. Under simulated quadriceps load, the mean internal tibial rotations after both reconstructions were lower than that of the anterior cruciate ligament-intact knee with no significant differences between these 3 knee conditions at 0 degrees and 30 degrees of flexion (P > .05). The increased medial tibial shifts of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees were restored to the intact level by both reconstruction techniques under the 3 external loading conditions. Single-tunnel double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of

  18. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability

    OpenAIRE

    GUO, SHUGUANG; SUN, JUNYING; TANG, GENLIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47?72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column...

  19. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... expressly or implicitly refers to the food on labels or labeling, including use in a brand name and use as a... in a manner that suggests or implies that the food is unprocessed, means that the food is in its raw... fresh,” when used on the label or in labeling of a food, mean that the food was quickly frozen while...

  20. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

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    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  1. Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis: A case series

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    Miller Larry E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traditional surgical management of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis is technically challenging and is associated with significant complications. The advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques offers patients treatment alternatives with lower operative morbidity risk. The combination of percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and an axial presacral approach for lumbosacral discectomy and fusion offers an alternative procedure for the surgical management of low-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Case presentation Three patients who had L5-S1 grade 2 spondylolisthesis and who presented with axial pain and lumbar radiculopathy were treated with a minimally invasive surgical technique. The patients-a 51-year-old woman and two men (ages 46 and 50-were Caucasian. Under fluoroscopic guidance, spondylolisthesis was reduced with a percutaneous pedicle screw system, resulting in interspace distraction. Then, an axial presacral approach with the AxiaLIF System (TranS1, Inc., Wilmington, NC, USA was used to perform the discectomy and anterior fixation. Once the axial rod was engaged in the L5 vertebral body, further distraction of the spinal interspace was made possible by partially loosening the pedicle screw caps, advancing the AxiaLIF rod to its final position in the vertebrae, and retightening the screw caps. The operative time ranged from 173 to 323 minutes, and blood loss was minimal (50 mL. Indirect foraminal decompression and adequate fixation were achieved in all cases. All patients were ambulatory after surgery and reported relief from pain and resolution of radicular symptoms. No perioperative complications were reported, and patients were discharged in two to three days. Fusion was demonstrated radiographically in all patients at one-year follow-up. Conclusions Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction combined with axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion offers a promising and minimally invasive alternative for the management

  2. Fixed-Angle, Posteriorly Connected Anterior Cage Reconstruction Improves Stiffness and Decreases Cancellous Subsidence in a Spondylectomy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Matthew W; Guss, Andrew; Bachus, Kent N; Spiker, W Ryan; Lawrence, Brandon D; Brodke, Darrel S

    2016-05-01

    An idealized biomechanical model. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a construct designed to minimize intervertebral cage subsidence and maximize stiffness. Reconstruction after vertebral resection typically involves posterior segmental fixation and anterior interbody support. However, poor bone density, adjuvant radiation, or the oncologic need for endplate resection make interbody device subsidence and resultant instrumentation failure a significant concern. An idealized thoracolumbar spondylectomy reconstruction model was constructed using titanium segmental instrumentation and Delrin plastic. In vivo mechanical stress was simulated on a custom multi-axis spine simulator. Rigid body position in space was measured using an optical motion-capture system. Cancellous subsidence was modeled using a 1 cm thick wafer of number 3 closed-cell Sawbones foam at one endplate. Ten foam specimens were tested in a control state consisting of posterior segmental fixation with a free interbody cage. Ten additional foam specimens were tested in the test state, with the Delrin interbody cage "connected" to the posterior rods using two additional pedicle screws placed into the cage. Foam indentation was quantified using a precision digital surface-mapping device, and subsidence volume calculated using geometric integration. The control group exhibited significantly greater foam indentation after cycling, with a mean subsidence volume of 1906 mm [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1810-2001] than the connected cage group subsidence volume of 977 mm (95% CI 928-1026 mm; P subsidence compared with a traditional unconnected cage. N/A.

  3. Comparison Between Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tao; Hu, Shi-Yu; Zhang, Yuan-Tao; Zheng, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Zhe; Yang, Xin-Jian

    2018-04-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety in the management of lumbar diseases performed by either posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Interbody fusion is considered the "gold standard" in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases. Both PLIF and TLIF have been advocated, and it remains controversial as to the best operative technique. The electronic databases including Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane library were searched to identify relevant studies up to September 2017. The primary outcomes were fusion rate, complications, and clinical satisfaction. The secondary outcomes were length of hospitalization, operation time, blood loss, postoperative visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 16 studies involving 1502 patients (805 patients in PLIF group and 697 in TLIF group) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in terms of fusion rate (P > 0.05) and clinical satisfaction (P > 0.05) between the 2 groups. TLIF was superior to PLIF with significantly lower incidence of nerve root injury (P 0.05) and graft malposition (P > 0.05). PLIF required significant longer operation time (P degenerative lumbar diseases. However, TLIF was superior to PLIF with shorter operation time, less blood loss, and lower incidence of nerve root injury and dural tear. There is no significant difference between both groups regarding wound infection and graft malposition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rate of graft bone filling by transforaminal lumber interbody fusion (TLIF) with mesh cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kazuto; Kawaji, Youichi; Matsuba, Atsushi; Kouda, Hisao

    2007-01-01

    Compared to posterior lumber interbody fusion (PLIF), the transforaminal lumber interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure has a latent disadvantage in terms of bone grafting because of being a unilateral approach. We calculated the rate of graft bone filling in TLIF cases by postoperative CT and evaluated the clinical results. The rate of filling in the TLIF cases was not significantly less than in the PLIF cases. The results also showed no significant difference between TLIF and PLIF. An adequate amount of bone were grafted into the intervertebral space even by the unilateral TLIF approach, however the procedure is not easy. An incidental dural tear occurred in 1 case each treated by TLIF and PLIF. The exposure of the dural tube increases the risk of epidural bleeding and neural tissue injury. We recommend TLIF for discopathy, foraminal stenosis, and repeat surgery to avoid latent risk. (author)

  5. EFFICACY OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN EXPERIMENTAL INSTRUMENTED INTERBODY SPINAL FUSION

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    Gianfilippo Caggiari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to analyze the influence of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP on bone growth in experimental instrumented interbody spinal fusion (IISF. Methods. 16 adult sheep underwent IISF at L3–L4 level using a cylindrical threaded expanding titanium cage with morselized iliac crest cancellous autograft. In 8 animals (Group I this was augmented with PRP, in the remaining 8 (Group II, it was not. Radiographs of the spine were taken preoperatively and at 1, 3, and 6 months, moreover autoptic vertebral samples were obtained and evaluated histologically and by CT scan at 8 months. Results. Histological analysis revealed more evident new bone formation with bony bridge into the cages in Group I than Group II. There were relevant differences between the groups with regard to interbody fusion calculated using trabecular bone score (p<0.05.

  6. Pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis treated with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: safety and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Aiyer, Siddharth N; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Maheswaran, Anupama; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to study the safety and outcomes of posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for treating pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis. Retrospective analysis was performed on prospectively collected data of 27 consecutive cases of lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with posterior instrumentation and TLIF between January 2009 and December 2012. Cases were analysed for safety, radiological and clinical outcomes of transforaminal interbody fusion using bone graft ± titanium cages. Interbody metallic cages with bone graft were used in 17 cases and ten cases used only bone graft. Indications for surgical treatment were failed conservative management in 17, neurodeficit in six and significant bony destruction in four. There were no cases reporting cage migration, loosening, pseudoarthrosis or recurrence of infection at a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Kirkaldy-Willis criteria, which showed 14 excellent, nine good, three fair and one poor result. Mean focal deformity improved with the use of bone graft ± interbody cages, and the deformity correction was maintained at final follow-up. Mean pre-operative focal lordosis for the graft group was 8.5° (2-16.5°), which improved to 10.9 °(3.3-16°); mean pre-operative focal lordosis in the group treated with cages was 6.7 °(0-15°), which improved to 7°(0-15°) . TLIFs with cages in patients with pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis allows for acceptable clearance of infection, satisfactory deformity correction with low incidence of cage migration, loosening and infection recurrence.

  7. Biomechanical evaluation of a spherical lumbar interbody device at varying levels of subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Steven A.; Isaza, Jorge E.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ulf Fernström implanted stainless steel ball bearings following discectomy, or for painful disc disease, and termed this procedure disc arthroplasty. Today, spherical interbody spacers are clinically available, but there is a paucity of associated biomechanical testing. The primary objective of the current study was to evaluate the biomechanics of a spherical interbody implant. It was hypothesized that implantation of a spherical interbody implant, with combined subsidence into the vertebral bodies, would result in similar ranges of motion (RoM) and facet contact forces (FCFs) when compared with an intact condition. A secondary objective of this study was to determine the effect of using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) versus a cobalt chrome (CoCr) implant on vertebral body strains. We hypothesized that the material selection would have a negligible effect on vertebral body strains since both materials have elastic moduli substantially greater than the annulus. Methods A finite element model of L3-L4 was created and validated by use of ROM, disc pressure, and bony strain from previously published data. Virtual implantation of a spherical interbody device was performed with 0, 2, and 4 mm of subsidence. The model was exercised in compression, flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. The ROM, vertebral body effective (von Mises) strain, and FCFs were reported. Results Implantation of a PEEK implant resulted in slightly lower strain maxima when compared with a CoCr implant. For both materials, the peak strain experienced by the underlying bone was reduced with increasing subsidence. All levels of subsidence resulted in ROM and FCFs similar to the intact model. Conclusions The results suggest that a simple spherical implant design is able to maintain segmental ROM and provide minimal differences in FCFs. Large areas of von Mises strain maxima were generated in the bone adjacent to the implant regardless of whether the implant was PEEK or Co

  8. Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Adult Low-Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after fusion surgery for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) has been reported to be relatively low compared with other lumbar disease entities. However, there has been no study of symptomatic ASP incidence using posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with pedicle screw instrumentation. We investigated the incidence of symptomatic ASP after PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation for adult low-grade IS and identified s...

  9. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR ISTHMIC SPONDYLOLISTHESIS USING ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR EXPOSURES

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    V. V. Rudenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective - to compare results of spondylolisthesis treatment using different surgical technologies. Material and methods: 84 patients (aged from 19 till 67 with spondylolisthesis of 1-3 degree (H.W Meyerding were operated. Two methods of surgical exposures were used for decompression and stabilization. Anterior decompression and stabilization exposures from retroperitoneal access were used for the first group of patients. The second group was operated using posteriolateral interbody fusion with transpedicular screw fixation. The following results were estimated after operation: the level of patients’ postoperative adaptation period and the rate of neurological and orthopedic rehabilitation during the postoperative period. Conclusions. The obtained functional results show no difference for both groups where posterior and anterior exposures were used for spondylolisthesis surgical treatment of 1-3 degree.

  10. [Treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Li, Li-Jun; Tan, Jun

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effect of treating degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery. From Jan. 2006 to Jan. 2009, one hundred fifty patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery were analyzed retrospectively. The diagnosis was degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis in 84 cases of grade I, and 66 cases of grade II. There were 88 males and 62 females. Preoperatively, at 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, the pain was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring system and therapeutic effect was observed with modified Prolo scoring system. In complications, dural tear happened in 3 cases, biological glues were used for dural tear sealing and neither cerebrospinal fluid leak was found. One case suffered from intervertebral Infection and muscle weakness of foot was found in one case, either was cured after symptomatic treatment. Operative time averaged 160 minutes (120-280 min). Estimated blood loss averaged 210 ml (100-450 ml). The postoperative follow-up ranged from 6 to 36 months (averaged 15.2 months). Preoperatively,at 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, VAS scores were respectively 7.9 +/- 2.1, 2.2 +/- 0.6, 3.2 +/- 1.1 (P surgery transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion technique is indicated for lumbar vertebral instability, localized intervertebral disc disorder and lumbar spondylolisthesis with stenotic nerve root or tube below grade II. This technique has advantages of minimal invasion and early functional recovery.

  11. POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION AND INSTRUMENTED POSTEROLATERAL FUSION IN ADULT SPONDYLOLISTHESIS: ASSESSMENT AND CLINICAL OUTCOME

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    Rajarajan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study is to assess and compare the outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and posterolateral fusion (PLF in adult isthmic spondylosthesis. BACKGROUND: Posterolateral fusion has been considered the best method and widely been used for surgical treatment of adult spondylolisthesis.Superior results have subsequently been reported with interbody fusion with cages and posterior instrumentation MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty six patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis were operated. One group (20 patients had decompression and posterolateral fusion (PLF with a pedicle screw system; other group (16 patients was treated by decompression, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and a Pedicle screw system. In both groups adequate decompression was done RESULTS: Seventy seven percent of the patients had a good result with (PLIF and 68 percent with posterolateral fusion (PLF. However there was no statistical difference in cases with low grade slipping, whereas the difference was significant for cases with high grade slipping. Fusion rate was 93% with (PLIF and 68% with (PLF, but without any significant incidence in the functional outcome. 78% has relief of sciatica and neurogenic claudication. CONCLUSION: Based on these findings we found that for high grade spondylolisthesis which requires reduction or if the disc space is still high posterior lumbar inter body fusion is preferable. For low grade spondylolisthesis or if the disc space is narrow posterolateral fusion is preferable. A successful result of fusion operation depends on adequate decompression which relieves radicular symptoms.

  12. Simultaneous Lateral Interbody Fusion and Posterior Percutaneous Instrumentation: Early Experience and Technical Considerations

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    Doniel Drazin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar fusion surgery involving lateral lumbar interbody graft insertion with posterior instrumentation is traditionally performed in two stages requiring repositioning. We describe a novel technique to complete the circumferential procedure simultaneously without patient repositioning. Twenty patients diagnosed with worsening back pain with/without radiculopathy who failed exhaustive conservative management were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients with both procedures simultaneously from a single lateral approach and 10 control patients with lateral lumbar interbody fusion followed by repositioning and posterior percutaneous instrumentation were analyzed. Pars fractures, mobile grade 2 spondylolisthesis, and severe one-level degenerative disk disease were matched between the two groups. In the simultaneous group, avoiding repositioning leads to lower mean operative times: 130 minutes (versus control 190 minutes; p=0.009 and lower intraoperative blood loss: 108 mL (versus 93 mL; NS. Nonrepositioned patients were hospitalized for an average of 4.1 days (versus 3.8 days; NS. There was one complication in the control group requiring screw revision. Lateral interbody fusion and percutaneous posterior instrumentation are both readily accomplished in a single lateral decubitus position. In select patients with adequately sized pedicles, performing simultaneous procedures decreases operative time over sequential repositioning. Patient outcomes were excellent in the simultaneous group and comparable to procedures done sequentially.

  13. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF. Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique.

  14. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Ali; Smith, Zachary A.; Lawton, Cort D.; Fessler, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique. PMID:22928099

  15. One- and two-incision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a biomechanical comparison including the effect of simulated closed-chain exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalldorf, P G; Alexander, J; Lintner, D M

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of simulated closed-chain exercise on anterior translation in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed knee comparing patellar tendon grafts secured with endoscopic and two-incision techniques. ACL reconstructions, were performed on five matched pairs of fresh frozen cadaver lower extremities. One of each pair had endoscopic (inside-out) placement of the femoral interference screw and other had outside-in femoral screw placement. A model for closed-chain exercise was developed to simulate half squat exercises using a custom apparatus on the Material Testing machine with a 356 N (80 lb) axial load and 40 N (9 lb) static hamstring force. Knee motion from near full extension to 60 degrees flexion was achieved by varying the quadricep force. One thousand squats were performed, and KT-1000 arthometry was done before and after cycling each specimen. The femur-graft-tibia constructs were then stressed to failure. Closed-chain cycling resulted in no significant change in anterior translation in either group. The mean maximum load to failure of the femur-graft-tibia construct was 340.4N in the one-incision group and 434.2 N in the two-incision group. P=.048 was considered statistically significant. Anterior translation did not increase after 1,000 simulated half knee bends in either the one- or two-incision groups. Shallow knee bends are an important part of aggressive rehabilitation programs, and our data support the position that these closed-chain exercises do not deleteriously affect the graft. Though the maximum strength to failure differed significantly between the one- and two-incision groups, both techniques offered sufficient strength to withstand an aggressive simulated rehabilitation protocol.

  16. Arthroscopically blind anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using only navigation guidance: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sin Hyung; Moon, Sang Won; Lee, Byung Hoon; Park, Sehyung; Kim, Youngjun; Lee, Deukhee; Lim, Sunghwan; Wang, Joon Ho

    2016-10-01

    To develop a preoperative planning and navigation system for anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to evaluate the accuracy and the efficacy of anatomical ACL reconstruction using only navigation guidance. A three-dimensional (3D) preoperative planning and navigation system was developed from open source libraries. Twenty knees from 10 fresh-frozen human cadavers underwent navigation-only guided double-bundle ACL reconstruction using the transportal technique. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed after ACL reconstruction to create a 3D surface model of the distal femur. We evaluated the tunnel position by Bernard's quadrant method, the tunnel orientation by measuring the tunnel angle in three projected planes, and the incidence of posterior cortical damage. Then, we compared preoperative planning with the postoperative results. The difference in tunnel position between preoperative planning and the postoperative results was a mean of 2.50±1.75mm (range, 0.77 to 5.85mm) in the anteromedial (AM) tunnel and a mean of 3.53±2.20mm (range, 0.39 to 7.92mm) in the posterolateral (PL) tunnel. The difference in tunnel orientation was a mean of 6.74±6.70° (range, 0.35 to 25.6°) in the AM tunnel and a mean of 5.73±3.51° (range, 1.58 to 15.04°) in the PL tunnel. No statically significant difference was observed. Posterior cortical damage developed in seven cases (35%). Our navigation-only guided ACL reconstruction produced consistent femoral tunnel position and orientation results. The accuracy and consistency of femoral tunneling were improved by using the preoperative planning and navigation system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The effect of the shoe-surface interface in the development of anterior cruciate ligament strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Mark C; Hillstrom, Howard; Voos, James E; Miller, Anna N; Kraszewski, Andrew P; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Warren, Russell F; Allen, Answorth A; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    The shoe-surface interface has been implicated as a possible risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The purpose of this study is to develop a biomechanical, cadaveric model to evaluate the effect of various shoe-surface interfaces on ACL strain. There will be a significant difference in ACL strain between different shoe-surface combinations when a standardized rotational moment (a simulated cutting movement) is applied to an axially loaded lower extremity. The study design was a controlled laboratory study. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric lower extremities were thawed and the femurs were potted with the knee in 30 deg of flexion. Each specimen was placed in a custom-made testing apparatus, which allowed axial loading and tibial rotation but prevented femoral rotation. For each specimen, a 500 N axial load and a 1.5 Nm internal rotation moment were placed for four different shoe-surface combinations: group I (AstroTurf-turf shoes), group II (modern playing turf-turf shoes), group III (modern playing turf-cleats), and group IV (natural grass-cleats). Maximum strain, initial axial force and moment, and maximum axial force and moment were calculated by a strain gauge and a six component force plate. The preliminary trials confirmed a linear relationship between strain and both the moment and the axial force for our testing configuration. In the experimental trials, the average maximum strain was 3.90, 3.19, 3.14, and 2.16 for groups I-IV, respectively. Group IV had significantly less maximum strain (pcleat combination produced less strain in the ACL than the other combinations. The favorable biomechanical properties of the cleat-grass interface may result in fewer noncontact ACL injuries.

  18. One-Level or Multilevel Interbody Fusion for Multilevel Lumbar Degenerative Diseases: A Prospective Randomized Control Study with a 4-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiefeng; Shi, Lei; Luo, Yibin; Chen, Deyu; Chen, Yu

    2018-02-01

    The treatment of multilevel lumbar degenerative disease (LDD) is complicated and challenging, and the optimal surgical strategy remains controversial. To compare the differences in clinical and radiologic outcomes and in complications after 1-level interbody fusion versus multilevel interbody fusion for the treatment of multilevel LDD. A total of 100 patients with multilevel LDD were randomized in a 1:1 ratio into the 1-level interbody fusion group or the multilevel interbody fusion group. Clinical and radiologic results and major complications in the 2 groups were analyzed. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale for radicular and back pain, the Oswestry Disability Index, and the short-form 36 physical score. Clinical status was assessed by the Whitecloud classification. Radiologic evaluation included assessment of lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, and sacral slope. There were no significant differences in clinical and radiologic results between the 2 groups. Procedure duration and intraoperative blood loss were significantly greater in the multilevel interbody fusion group than in the 1-level interbody fusion group; the multilevel interbody fusion group also had greater incidences of temporary nerve root palsy, wound infection, and adjacent segment disease. A hybrid technique including 1-level interbody fusion and multilevel posterolateral fusion is recommended for patients with multilevel LDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis and degenerative spondylosis: 5-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yung; Ha, Joong Won; Lee, Yun Tae; Sung, Na Young

    2014-06-01

    Multiple studies have reported favorable short-term results after treatment of spondylolisthesis and other degenerative lumbar diseases with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. However, to our knowledge, results at a minimum of 5 years have not been reported. We determined (1) changes to the Oswestry Disability Index, (2) frequency of radiographic fusion, (3) complications and reoperations, and (4) the learning curve associated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at minimum 5-year followup. We reviewed our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion to treat low-grade spondylolisthesis and degenerative lumbar diseases and did not need a major deformity correction. This represented 63% (124 of 198) of the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures we performed for those indications during the study period (2003-2007). Eighty-three (67%) patients had complete 5-year followup. Plain radiographs and CT scans were evaluated by two reviewers. Trends of surgical time, blood loss, and hospital stay over time were examined by logarithmic curve fit-regression analysis to evaluate the learning curve. At 5 years, mean Oswestry Disability Index improved from 60 points preoperatively to 24 points and 79 of 83 patients (95%) had improvement of greater than 10 points. At 5 years, 67 of 83 (81%) achieved radiographic fusion, including 64 of 72 patients (89%) who had single-level surgery. Perioperative complications occurred in 11 of 124 patients (9%), and another surgical procedure was performed in eight of 124 patients (6.5%) involving the index level and seven of 124 patients (5.6%) at adjacent levels. There were slowly decreasing trends of surgical time and hospital stay only in single-level surgery and almost no change in intraoperative blood loss over time, suggesting a challenging learning curve. Oswestry Disability Index scores improved for patients with spondylolisthesis

  20. Direct lateral approach to lumbar fusion is a biomechanically equivalent alternative to the anterior approach: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Cory J; Coughlin, Dezba G; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Serhan, Hassan A; Hu, Serena S

    2012-05-01

    A human cadaveric biomechanical study of lumbar mobility before and after fusion and with or without supplemental instrumentation for 5 instrumentation configurations. To determine the biomechanical differences between anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) with and without supplementary instrumentation. Some prior studies have compared various surgical approaches using the same interbody device whereas others have investigated the stabilizing effect of supplemental instrumentation. No published studies have performed a side-by-side comparison of standard and minimally invasive techniques with and without supplemental instrumentation. Eight human lumbosacral specimens (16 motion segments) were tested in each of the 5 following configurations: (1) intact, (2) with ALIF or DLIF cage, (3) with cage plus stabilizing plate, (4) with cage plus unilateral pedicle screw fixation (PSF), and (5) with cage plus bilateral PSF. Pure moments were applied to induce specimen flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Three-dimensional kinematic responses were measured and used to calculate range of motion, stiffness, and neutral zone. Compared to the intact state, DLIF significantly reduced range of motion in flexion, extension, and lateral bending (P = 0.0117, P = 0.0015, P = 0.0031). Supplemental instrumentation significantly increased fused-specimen stiffness for both DLIF and ALIF groups. For the ALIF group, bilateral PSF increased stiffness relative to stand-alone cage by 455% in flexion and 317% in lateral bending (P = 0.0009 and P < 0.0001). The plate increased ALIF group stiffness by 211% in extension and 256% in axial rotation (P = 0.0467 and P = 0.0303). For the DLIF group, bilateral PSF increased stiffness by 350% in flexion and 222% in extension (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0008). No differences were observed between ALIF and DLIF groups supplemented with bilateral PSF. Our data support that the direct lateral approach

  1. Fresh Frozen Plasma Should be Given Earlier to Patients Requiring Massive Transfusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez, Ernest A; Moore, Frederick A; Holcomb, John B; Miller, Charles C; Kozar, Rosemary A; Todd, S. R; Cocanour, Christine S; Balldin, Bjorn C; McKinley, Bruce A

    2007-01-01

    .... The hypothesis for this study is that our pre-intensive care unit (ICU) massive transfusion (MT) protocol does not adequately correct coagulopathy, and that early uncorrected coagulopathy is predictive of mortality.

  2. Fresh, Frozen or Canned Fruits and Vegetables: All Can Be Healthy Choices!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... milk and yogurt. Mix frozen berries into baked goods and oatmeal. Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Fresh fruits & vegetables are easy, portable choices. Whenever you leave the house, get into the habit of stashing a fresh snack in your purse or backpack; think: apple, orange, ...

  3. Highly Effective DNA Extraction Method from Fresh, Frozen, Dried and Clotted Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, with the tremendous potential of genomics and other recent advances in science, the role of science to improve reliable DNA extraction methods is more relevant than ever before. The ideal process for genomic DNA extraction demands high quantities of pure, integral and intact genomic DNA (gDNA from the sample with minimal co-extraction of inhibitors of downstream processes. Here, we report the development of a very rapid, less-hazardous, and high throughput protocol for extracting of high quality DNA from blood samples. Methods: Dried, clotted and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA treated fresh and frozen blood samples were extracted using this method in which the quality and integrity of the extracted DNA were corroborated by agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR reaction and DNA digestion using restricted enzyme. The UV spectrophotometric and gel electrophoresis analysis resulted in high A260/A280 ratio (>1.8 with high intactness of DNA. Results: PCR and DNA digestion experiments indicated that the final solutions of extracted DNA contained no inhibitory substances, which confirms that the isolated DNA is of good quality. Conclusion: The high quality and quantity of current method, no enzymatic processing and accordingly its low cost, make it appropriate for DNA extraction not only from human but also from animal blood samples in any molecular biology labs.

  4. Fatal Hemorrhagic Shock: The Superiority of Compatible Fresh Frozen Plasma as a Resuscitation Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    for typescript preparation and Fred J. Tillman, Carol C. Buchalter, L. Denise Witcher , Berry F. Williams, Wyne P. Lee, and Daniel J. Smith for... Witcher LD, Langford MJ. Fatal Hemorrhagic Shock: Caution in the use of acetate crystalloid solutions. Institute Report No. 181, San Francisco: Letterman

  5. Fresh, frozen, or ambient food equivalents and their impact on food waste generation in Dutch households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Anke M.; Nijenhuis, Mariska; Boer, Eric P.J.; Kremer, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    In Europe, it is estimated that more than 50% of total food waste - of which most is avoidable - is generated at household level. Little attention has been paid to the impact on food waste generation of consuming food products that differ in their method of food preservation. This exploratory study

  6. Evaluation of coagulation factors in fresh frozen plasma treated with riboflavin and ultraviolet light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antić Ana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Pathogen inactivation in blood products using riboflavin and ultraviolet (UV light represents a proactive approach to blood safety, not only for known infectious agents but also for new ones or not yet recognized as threats to the blood supply. This method inactivates a virus, bacteria, fungus, or protozoan pathogen from the blood product without damaging its function or shelf-life. The aim of the study was to study the influence of photoinactivation using riboflavin on the concentration of coagulation factors and coagulation inhibitors in plasma that was treated before freezing. Methods. The examination included 30 units of plasma, separated from whole blood donated by voluntary blood donors around 6 h from the moment of collection. They were treated by riboflavin (35 mL and UV rays (6.24 J/mL, 265-370 nm on Mirasol aparature (Caridian BCT Biotechnologies, USA in approximate duration of 6 min. The samples for examining were taken before (K - control units and after illumination (I - illuminated units. Results. Comparing the middle values of coagulation factors in the control and illuminated units we noticed their statistically significant decrease in illuminated units (p < 0.001, but the activity of coagulation ones was still in the reference range. The most sensitive coagulation factors to photoinactivation were FVIII, FIX and FXI (21.99%, 20.54% and 17.26% loss, respectively. Anticoagulant factors were better preseved than coagulation factors. Conclusion. Plasma separated from whole blood donation within 6 h, treated with riboflavin and UV light within 6 h from separation and frozen at temperature below -30ºC within 24 h, shows good retention of pro- and anticoagulation activity.

  7. Fresh, frozen, or ambient food equivalents and their impact on food waste generation in Dutch households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Anke M; Nijenhuis-de Vries, Mariska A; Boer, Eric P J; Kremer, Stefanie

    2017-09-01

    In Europe, it is estimated that more than 50% of total food waste - of which most is avoidable - is generated at household level. Little attention has been paid to the impact on food waste generation of consuming food products that differ in their method of food preservation. This exploratory study surveyed product-specific possible impacts of different methods of food preservation on food waste generation in Dutch households. To this end, a food waste index was calculated to enable relative comparisons of the amounts of food waste from the same type of foods with different preservation methods on an annual basis. The results show that, for the majority of frozen food equivalents, smaller amounts were wasted compared to their fresh or ambient equivalents. The waste index (WI) proposed in the current paper confirms the hypothesis that it may be possible to reduce the amount of food waste at household level by encouraging Dutch consumers to use (certain) foods more frequently in a frozen form (instead of fresh or ambient). However, before this approach can be scaled to population level, a more detailed understanding of the underlying behavioural causes with regard to food provisioning and handling and possible interactions is required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Subsidence after single-level anterior cervical fusion with a stand-alone cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Young; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju; Hur, Hyuk; Jang, Jae-Won; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the risk factors for subsidence in patients treated with stand-alone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages for single-level degenerative cervical disease. Seventy-seven consecutive patients who underwent single-level stand-alone ACDF with a PEEK cage between 2005 and 2012 were included. Subsidence was defined as a decrease in the interbody height of more than 3mm on radiographs at the 1-year follow-up compared with that in the immediate post-operative image. Patients were divided into the subsidence and non-subsidence groups. The following factors were investigated in relation to the occurrence of subsidence: age, pre-operative overall cervical sagittal angle, segmental angle of the operated level, interbody height, cage height, cage devices and cage location (distance between anterior margin of the body endplate and that of the cage). The clinical outcomes were assessed with visual analog scale, modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score and neck disability index. Twenty-six out of the 77 (33.8%) patients had radiological signs of cage subsidence. Solid fusion was achieved in 25 out of the 26 patients (96.2%) in the subsidence group and in 47 out of the 51 patients (92.2%) in the non-subsidence group. More than 3mm distance between anterior margin of the vertebral body and that of the cage was significantly associated with subsidence (psubsidence did not correlate with fusion rate or clinical outcomes. Cage location was the only significant risk factor. Therefore, cage location should be taken into consideration during stand-alone ACDF using PEEK cages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Restoration of lumbopelvic sagittal alignment and its maintenance following transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF): comparison between straight type versus curvilinear type cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Tae; Shin, Myung-Hoon; Lee, Ho-Jin; Choi, Du-Yong

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate a radiological and clinical difference between the curvilinear type cages compared to the straight type cages for the restoration of lumbopelvic sagittal alignment and its maintenance after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure. 68 patients who underwent single-level TLIF using either the straight type or curvilinear type cage were retrospectively reviewed. Assessment of the lumbopelvic parameters and the height of disc space was performed before surgery as well as 2 days, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Clinical outcome was assessed using VAS and ODI. The curvilinear type cages were positioned more anteriorly than the straight type. Restoration of the segmental lordosis (SL) in the curvilinear group was significantly greater than the straight group and at 12 months of follow-up, the straight group showed greater decrease in the disc height than the curvilinear group. The straight group failed to show improvement of lumbar lordosis (LL), while the curvilinear group showed significant restoration of LL and could maintain it to the 6 months of follow-up. In both groups, pelvic tilt was significantly decreased and it lasted to 6 months in the straight group; whereas in the curvilinear group, it was maintained to the last follow-up of 12 months. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean VAS and ODI score over the follow-up period. This study demonstrates that the curvilinear type cage is superior to the straight type cage in improving the SL and maintaining both the restored lumbopelvic parameters and elevated disc height. These results could be attributable to the anterior position of the curvilinear cage which permits easy restoration of segmental lordosis and less sinking of cages.

  10. Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma for Bone Fusion in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Go; Kamoda, Hiroto; Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhidee; Ito, Michihiro; Yamashita, Masaomi; Furuya, Takeo; Akazawa, Tsutomu; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Ohtori, Seiji

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective case series. To examine the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for bone fusion in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using local bone grafting. Several authors have reported the efficacy of PRP for bone union in animal models. However, the use of PRP for bone fusion in TLIF surgery has not been fully explored. Twenty patients underwent single-level TLIF surgery because of L4 spondylolisthesis. An interbody fusion cage and local bone were used in nine patients (control group) and an interbody fusion cage, local bone, and PRP were used in 11 patients (PRP group). PRP was prepared from the patients' blood samples (400 mL) immediately before surgery. The duration of bone union and postoperative bone fusion rate were assessed using plain radiography at every 3 months postoperatively and computed tomography at 12 or 24 months postoperatively, respectively. Lower back pain, leg pain, and leg numbness were evaluated using the visual analog scale preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. The platelet count was 8.7 times higher in PRP than in blood. The bone union rate was significantly superior in the PRP group than in the control group (91% and 77%, respectively; p =0.035), whereas the average duration of bone union was not significantly different between the groups (7.7±0.74 and 10.0±2.00 months, respectively; p =0.131). There was no significant difference in lower back pain, leg pain, and leg numbness in both groups during follow-up ( p >0.05). Our study suggests that the use of PRP in TLIF surgery increases bone fusion rate.

  11. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone intervertebral cages in minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien V; Baaj, Ali A; Dakwar, Elias; Burkett, Clinton J; Murray, Gisela; Smith, Donald A; Uribe, Juan S

    2012-06-15

    A retrospective review. The objective is to evaluate subsidence related to minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion by reviewing our experience with this procedure. Polyetheretherketone intervertebral cages of different lengths, widths, and heights filled with various allograft types are commonly used as spacers in lumbar fusions. Subsidence is a potential complication. To date, there are no published reports specifically addressing subsidence, because it relates to a series of patients undergoing minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion. An institutional review board-approved, retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was conducted. One hundred forty consecutive patients who underwent this procedure between L1 and L5 during a 2-year period were included. All patients had T scores of -2.5 or more. Postoperative radiographs during routine follow-ups were reviewed for subsidence, defined as any violation of the vertebral end plate. Radiographical subsidence occurred in 14.3% (20 of 140), whereas clinical subsidence occurred in 2.1%. Subsidence occurred in 8.8% (21 of 238) of levels fused. Construct length had a significant positive correlation with increasing subsidence rates. Subsidence rates decreased progressively with lower levels in the lumbar spine, but had a higher than expected rate at L4-L5. Subsidence rates of 14.1% (19 of 135) and 1.9% (2 of 103) were associated with 18-and 22-mm-wide cages, respectively. No significant trends were observed with cage lengths. Supplemental lateral plates had a higher rate of subsidence than bilateral pedicle screws. Subsidence occurred at the superior end plate 70% of the time. The use of wider intervertebral cages leads to a significantly lower rate of subsidence, but a longer cage does not necessarily offer a similar advantage. Wide cages are protective against subsidence, and the widest cages should be used whenever feasible for interbody

  12. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  13. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Novel Apatite-Wollastonite Ceramic Cage Design for Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Finite Element Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Celal; Şenköylü, Alpaslan; Aktaş, Erdem; Sarıkaya, Baran; Sipahioğlu, Serkan; Gürbüz, Rıza; Timuçin, Muharrem

    2018-01-01

    Cage design and material properties play a crucial role in the long-term results, since interbody fusions using intervertebral cages have become one of the basic procedures in spinal surgery. Our aim is to design a novel Apatite-Wollastonite interbody fusion cage and evaluate its biomechanical behavior in silico in a segmental spinal model. Mechanical properties for the Apatite-Wollastonite bioceramic cages were obtained by fitting finite element results to the experimental compression behavior of a cage prototype. The prototype was made from hydroxyapatite, pseudowollastonite, and frit by sintering. The elastic modulus of the material was found to be 32 GPa. Three intact lumbar vertebral segments were modelled with the ANSYS 12.0.1 software and this model was modified to simulate a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion. Four cage designs in different geometries were analyzed in silico under axial loading, flexion, extension, and lateral bending. The K2 design had the best overall biomechanical performance for the loads considered. Maximum cage stress recorded was 36.7 MPa in compression after a flexion load, which was within the biomechanical limits of the cage. Biomechanical analyses suggest that K2 bioceramic cage is an optimal design and reveals essential material properties for a stable interbody fusion.

  15. Shape optimization for the subsidence resistance of an interbody device using simulation-based genetic algorithms and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Chi

    2013-07-01

    Subsidence of interbody devices into the vertebral body might result in serious clinical problems, especially when the devices are not well designed and analyzed. Recently, some novel designs were proposed to reduce the risk of subsidence, but those designs are based on the researcher's experience. The purpose of this study was to discover the interbody device design with excellent subsidence resistance by changing the device's shape. The three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models, which consisted of the interbody device and vertebral body, were created first. Then, the simulation-based genetic algorithm, which combined the finite element model and the searching algorithm, was developed by using ANSYS® Parametric Design Language. Finally, the numerical results were carefully validated with the use of biomechanical tests. The optimum shape design obtained in this study looks like a flower with many petals and it has excellent subsidence resistance when compared with the other designs provided by the past studies. The results of the present study could help surgeons to understand the subsidence resistance of interbody devices in terms of their shapes and has directly provided the design rationales to engineers. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  16. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  17. THE COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT THE NERVE ROOT COMPRESS SYNDROME USING THE ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR APPROACHES OF PATIENTS WITH COMBINED LATERAL LUMBAR STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. B. Kolotov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the therapeutic possibility of the decompressiveviedecompressive with stabilization surgeries using the standard posterior and anterior retroperitoneal approaches in patients with combination of inherent and obtaining lateral stenosis and to demonstrate the adequacy of using. At the main group we removed the herniated disc with stabilization using anterior and posterior approaches – 82 patients. The control group was treated by standard microdiscectomy – 40 patients. More excellent and good results were in the main group where decompression was combined with stabilization, and at the same group were less negative results. The decompressive-stabilizing surgery with anterior interbody fusion is a pathogenetic and technically adequate treatment for combined lateral stenosis.

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Caputo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The use of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF and other lateral access surgery is rapidly increasing in popularity. However, limited data is available regarding its use in scoliosis surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of adults with degenerative lumbar scoliosis treated with XLIF. Methods. Thirty consecutive patients with adult degenerative scoliosis treated by a single surgeon at a major academic institution were followed for an average of 14.3 months. Interbody fusion was completed using the XLIF technique with supplemental posterior instrumentation. Validated clinical outcome scores were obtained on patients preoperatively and at most recent follow-up. Complications were recorded. Results. The study group demonstrated improvement in multiple clinical outcome scores. Oswestry Disability Index scores improved from 24.8 to 19.0 (P < 0.001. Short Form-12 scores improved, although the change was not significant. Visual analog scores for back pain decreased from 6.8 to 4.6 (P < 0.001 while scores for leg pain decreased from 5.4 to 2.8 (P < 0.001. A total of six minor complications (20% were recorded, and two patients (6.7% required additional surgery. Conclusions. Based on the significant improvement in validated clinical outcome scores, XLIF is effective in the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis.

  19. Single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulizi, Yakefu; Liang, Wei-Dong; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Maimaiti, Maierdan; Sheng, Wei-Bin

    2017-07-14

    Spinal brucellosis is a less commonly reported infectious spinal pathology. There are few reports regarding the surgical treatment of spinal brucellosis in existing literature. This retrospective study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral spinal brucellosis. From February 2012 to April 2015, 32 consecutive patients (19 males and 13 females, mean age 53.7 ± 8.7) with lumbosacral brucellosis treated by transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation were enrolled. Medical records, imaging studies, laboratory data were collected and summarized. Surgical outcomes were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale. The changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), clinical symptoms and complications were investigated. Graft fusion was evaluated using Bridwell grading criteria. The mean follow-up period was 24.9 ± 8.2 months. Back pain and radiating leg pain was relieved significantly in all patients after operation. No implant failures were observed in any patients. Wound infection was observed in two patients and sinus formation was observed in one patient. Solid bony fusion was achieved in 30 patients and the fusion rate was 93.8%. The levels of ESR and CRP were returned to normal by the end of three months' follow-up. VAS and ODI scores were significantly improved (P brucellosis.

  20. Torsional Appearance of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Explaining "Ribbon" and Double-Bundle Concepts: A Cadaver-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noailles, Thibaut; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Sanchez, Matthieu; Beaufils, Philippe; Pujol, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) torsion in 90° knee flexion on the morphological appearance of the ACL. Sixty knees from fresh frozen anatomical specimens were dissected. Eighteen knees were excluded according to selection criteria (torn ACL, mucoid degeneration of the ACL, arthritic lesions of the notch, or knees harboring synovial inflammatory pathologies). After the removal of the synovial membrane, the morphology of the ligamentous fibers of the ACL and the twist were analyzed. Twisting of the ACL was measured using a goniometer in 90° knee flexion and defined by the angle of external rotation of the femur on the axis of the tibia required to visualize a flat ACL. The orientation of tibial and femoral footprint was described in a coronal plane for the tibia and a sagittal plane for the femur. In the 42 knees that were finally included, the ACL was always displayed as a single ribbon-like structure. The torsion of the fibers was on average 83.6° (± 9.4°) in 90° knee flexion. The twisting could be explained by the different orientations of the femoral (vertical in a sagittal plane) and tibial (horizontal in a coronal plane) footprints. An intraligamentous proximal cleavage area was encountered in 11 cases (i.e., 26%). The ACL is a twisted structure with 83.6° of external torsion of fibers in 90° knee flexion. It is the torsion in the fibers, due to the relative position of bone insertions, which gives the ACL the appearance of being double bundle. The concept of the torsional flat structure of the native ACL may be of importance during ACL reconstruction, both in terms of graft choice (flat rather than cylindrical) and of technical positioning (torsion). Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Strain Distribution in the Anterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament, Posterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament, and Interosseous Membrane Using Digital Image Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Daorong; Wang, Yibei; Jiang, Chunyu; Fu, Maoqing; Li, Shiqi; Qian, Lei; Sun, Peidong; Ouyang, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Ligament repair and augmentation techniques can stabilize syndesmosis injuries. However, little is known about the mechanical behavior of syndesmotic ligaments. The aim of this study was to analyze full-field strain, strain trend under foot rotation, and subregional strain differences of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL), posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL), and interosseous membrane (IOM). Eleven fresh-frozen lower limbs were dissected to expose the AITFL, PITFL, and IOM. The foot underwent rotation from 0° to 25° internal and 35° external, with 3 ankle positions (neutral, 15° dorsiflexion, and 25° plantarflexion) and a vertical load of 430 N. Ligament strain was recorded using digital image correlation. The mean strain on the AITFL with 35° external rotation was greater in the proximal portion compared with distal portion in the neutral position ( P = .009) and dorsiflexion ( P = .003). The mean strain in the tibial insertion and midsubstance near tibial insertion were greater when compared with other regions ( P = .018 and P = .009). The subregions of mean strain in the PITFL and IOM groups were not significantly different. The strain trend of AITFL, PITFL, and IOM showed common transformation, just when the foot was externally rotated. The findings of this study show that a significantly high strain was observed on the proximal part and the midsubstance near the Chaput tubercle of the AITFL when the ankle was externally rotated. All 3 ligaments resisted the torque in the syndesmosis by external rotation of the foot. This study allows for better understanding of the mechanical behavior of the syndesmosis ligaments, which could influence the repair technique and AITFL augmentation techniques.

  2. Anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications in a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasiou, Anastasia; Giannis, Theofanis; Brotis, Alexandros G; Siasios, Ioannis; Georgiadis, Iordanis; Gatos, Haralampos; Tsianaka, Eleni; Vagkopoulos, Konstantinos; Paterakis, Konstantinos; Fountas, Kostas N

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cervical spine procedures have been associated with satisfactory outcomes. However, the occurrence of troublesome complications, although uncommon, needs to be taken into consideration. The purpose of our study was to assess the actual incidence of anterior cervical spine procedure-associated complications and identify any predisposing factors. A total of 114 patients undergoing anterior cervical procedures over a 6-year period were included in our retrospective, case-control study. The diagnosis was cervical radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy due to degenerative disc disease, cervical spondylosis, or traumatic cervical spine injury. All our participants underwent surgical treatment, and complications were recorded. The most commonly performed procedure (79%) was anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Fourteen patients (12.3%) underwent anterior cervical corpectomy and interbody fusion, seven (6.1%) ACDF with plating, two (1.7%) odontoid screw fixation, and one anterior removal of osteophytes for severe Forestier's disease. Mean follow-up time was 42.5 months (range, 6-78 months). The overall complication rate was 13.2%. Specifically, we encountered adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration in 2.7% of our cases, dysphagia in 1.7%, postoperative soft tissue swelling and hematoma in 1.7%, and dural penetration in 1.7%. Additionally, esophageal perforation was observed in 0.9%, aggravation of preexisting myelopathy in 0.9%, symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in 0.9%, mechanical failure in 0.9%, and superficial wound infection in 0.9%. In the vast majority anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications are minor, requiring no further intervention. Awareness, early recognition, and appropriate management, are of paramount importance for improving the patients' overall functional outcome.

  3. Medial Posterior Capsular Plication Reduces Anterior Shoulder Instability Similar to Remplissage Without Restricting Motion in the Setting of an Engaging Hill-Sachs Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Chen, Xiang; Camp, Christopher L; Kontaxis, Andreas; Dines, Joshua S; Gulotta, Lawrence V

    2017-07-01

    Numerous surgical options for the management of engaging Hill-Sachs lesions exist, of which remplissage has emerged as one of the most popular arthroscopic techniques. Remplissage is not without disadvantages, however, and has been demonstrated to potentially result in a loss of external rotation (ER) due to nonanatomic tethering of the infraspinatus tendon and a potential decrease in infraspinatus strength clinically. The efficacy of posterior medial capsular plication in addition to Bankart repair was examined as an arthroscopic management strategy for an engaging Hill-Sachs defect. Controlled laboratory study. Eight fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders were utilized for the study. After testing baseline translation and motion, 30% Hill-Sachs lesions were created in each specimen. Three experimental groups were assembled: (1) isolated Bankart repair (HSD), (2) Bankart repair with remplissage (RM), and (3) Bankart repair with posterior medial capsular plication (PL). Biomechanical testing was performed to determine anterior translation, range of motion, and Hill-Sachs engagement. Translation and motion measurements were normalized to the baseline laxity values for each specimen. A significant reduction in anterior translation was noted at 60° of abduction and 60° of ER for both the PL and RM groups compared with the HSD group throughout most of the joint loads tested ( P Hill-Sachs engagement as compared with remplissage in the setting of an engaging Hill-Sachs defect. Medial posterior capsular plication results in less restriction of ER compared with remplissage without any significant limitation of internal rotation. Posterior medial capsular plication reduces translation and engagement similarly to remplissage, without any restriction in motion.

  4. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation.Methods: Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reco...

  5. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  6. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thighbone where the kneecap normally rests is too shallow. You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  7. Identifying anterior segment crystals.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, I W; Brooks, A M; Reinehr, D P; Grant, G B; Gillies, W E

    1991-01-01

    A series of 22 patients with crystals in the anterior segment of the eye was examined by specular microscopy. Of 10 patients with hypermature cataract and hyperrefringent bodies in the anterior chamber cholesterol crystals were identified in four patients and in six of the 10 in whom aspirate was obtained cholesterol crystals were demonstrated in three, two of these having shown crystals on specular microscopy. In 10 patients with intracorneal crystalline deposits, cholesterol crystals were f...

  8. Axial lumbar interbody fusion: a 6-year single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeilstra DJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dick J Zeilstra,1 Larry E Miller,2,3 Jon E Block3 1Bergman Clinics, Naarden and NedSpine, Ede, The Netherlands; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, USA; 3The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA Introduction: The aim of this study is to report our 6-year single-center experience with L5–S1 axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF. Methods: A total of 131 patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease refractory to nonsurgical treatment were treated with AxiaLIF at L5–S1, and were followed for a minimum of 1 year (mean: 21 months. Main outcomes included back and leg pain severity, Oswestry Disability Index score, working status, analgesic medication use, patient satisfaction, and complications. Computed tomography was used to determine postoperative fusion status. Results: No intraoperative complications, including vascular, neural, urologic, or bowel injuries, were reported. Back and leg pain severity decreased by 51% and 42%, respectively, during the follow-up period (both P < 0.001. Back function scores improved 50% compared to baseline. Clinical success, defined as improvement ≥30%, was 67% for back pain severity, 65% for leg pain severity, and 71% for back function. The employment rate increased from 47% before surgery to 64% at final follow-up (P < 0.001. Less than one in four patients regularly used analgesic medications postsurgery. Patient satisfaction with the AxiaLIF procedure was 83%. The fusion rate was 87.8% at final follow-up. During follow-up, 17 (13.0% patients underwent 18 reoperations on the lumbar spine, including pedicle screw fixation (n = 10, total disc replacement of an uninvolved level (n = 3, facet screw fixation (n = 3, facet screw removal (n = 1, and interbody fusion at L4–L5 (n = 1. Eight (6.1% reoperations were at the index level. Conclusion: Single-level AxiaLIF is a safe and effective means to achieve lumbosacral fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease. Keywords: Axia

  9. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Unilateral Fixation for Degenerative Lumbar Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Wang; Hu, Yong-Cheng; Wu, Zhan-Yong; Wu, Hua-Rong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Lian-Suo; Xu, Wei-Kun; Fan, Hui-Long; Cai, Jin-Sheng; Ma, Jian-Qing

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of the minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation using a tubular retractor in the management of degenerative lumbar disease. A retrospective analysis was conducted to analyze the clinical outcome of 58 degenerative lumbar disease patients who were treated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation during December 2012 to January 2015. The spine was unilaterally approached through a 3.0-cm skin incision centered on the disc space, located 2.5 cm lateral to the midline, and the multifidus muscles and longissimus dorsi were stripped off. After transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion the unilateral pedicle screw fixation was performed. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the MacNab score were applied to evaluate clinical effects. The operation time, peri-operative bleeding, postoperative time in bed, hospitalization costs, and the change in the intervertebral height were analyzed. Radiological fusion based on the Bridwell grading system was also assessed at the last follow-up. The quality of life of the patients before and after the operation was assessed using the short form-36 scale (SF-36). Fifty-eight operations were successfully performed, and no nerve root injury or dural tear occurred. The average operation time was 138 ± 33 min, intraoperative blood loss was 126 ± 50 mL, the duration from surgery to getting out of bed was 46 ± 8 h, and hospitalization cost was 1.6 ± 0.2 ten thousand yuan. All of the 58 patients were followed up for 7-31 months, with an average of 14.6 months. The postoperative VAS scores and ODI score were significantly improved compared with preoperative data (P degenerative lumbar disease, and the short-term clinical outcome is satisfactory

  10. Deep surgical site infection after anterior decompression and fusion with plate fixation for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qunfeng; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Liang; Lu, Xuhua; Ni, Bin

    2016-02-01

    To analyze the diagnosis and management of deep surgical site infection (SSI) with implant involved after anterior decompression and fusion for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy/myelopathy (CSR/CSM). Data of the patients who underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion with plate fixation due to CSR/CSM were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with postoperative deep SSI with implant involved were identified and analyzed. A total of 1287 patients were finally included. Five patients (0.4%) were found to be with deep SSI. Bone fusion was not obtained when SSI was confirmed in each patient. Three cases were cured using one or two debridement and postoperative antibiotic therapy. Two cases with delayed diagnosis needed anterior implants removal, interbody fusion with autologous iliac bone and posterior lateral mass screw fixation at the first/second debridement. One of the two patients developed esophagus perforation after a second debridement and experienced one-month open drainage. All of the patients were cured without relapse of infection. For early deep SSI after anterior cervical decompression and fusion, surgical debridement was effective to eradicate infection. But for cases with delayed diagnosis, anterior debridement with prophylactic implant removal and posterior reconstruction was an ideal option. Esophagus perforation complicated with multiple debridements should be paid attention to and avoided. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Biomechanical Evaluation of Glenoid Reconstruction With an Implant-Free J-Bone Graft for Anterior Glenoid Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzenberger, Leo; Dyrna, Felix; Obopilwe, Elifho; Heuberer, Philipp R; Arciero, Robert A; Anderl, Werner; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2017-10-01

    The anatomic restoration of glenoid morphology with an implant-free J-shaped iliac crest bone graft offers an alternative to currently widely used glenoid reconstruction techniques. No biomechanical data on the J-bone grafting technique are currently available. To evaluate (1) glenohumeral contact patterns, (2) graft fixation under cyclic loading, and (3) the initial stabilizing effect of anatomic glenoid reconstruction with the implant-free J-bone grafting technique. Controlled laboratory study. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders and J-shaped iliac crest bone grafts were used for this study. J-bone grafts were harvested, prepared, and implanted according to a previously described, clinically used technique. Glenohumeral contact patterns were measured using dynamic pressure-sensitive sensors under a compressive load of 440 N with the humerus in (a) 30° of abduction, (b) 30° of abduction and 60° of external rotation, (c) 60° of abduction, and (d) 60° of abduction and 60° of external rotation. Using a custom shoulder-testing system allowing positioning with 6 degrees of freedom, a compressive load of 50 N was applied, and the peak force needed to translate the humeral head 10 mm anteriorly at a rate of 2.0 mm/s was recorded. All tests were performed (1) for the intact glenoid, (2) after the creation of a 30% anterior osseous glenoid defect parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glenoid, and (3) after anatomic glenoid reconstruction with an implant-free J-bone graft. Furthermore, after glenoid reconstruction, each specimen was translated anteriorly for 5 mm at a rate of 4.0 mm/s for a total of 3000 cycles while logging graft protrusion and mediolateral bending motions. Graft micromovements were recorded using 2 high-resolution, linear differential variable reluctance transducer strain gauges placed in line with the long leg of the graft and the mediolateral direction, respectively. The creation of a 30% glenoid defect significantly decreased glenohumeral

  12. An In Vitro Robotic Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament, Part 2: Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitri, Marco; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Williams, Brady T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cruz, Raphael Serra; Dornan, Grant J; Goldsmith, Mary T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Recent biomechanical studies have demonstrated that an extra-articular lateral knee structure, most recently referred to as the anterolateral ligament (ALL), contributes to overall rotational stability of the knee. However, the effect of anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLR) in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) has not been biomechanically investigated or validated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical function of anatomic ALLR in the setting of a combined ACL and ALL injury. More specifically, this investigation focused on the effect of ALLR on resultant rotatory stability when performed in combination with concomitant ACLR. It was hypothesized that ALLR would significantly reduce internal rotation and axial plane translation laxity during a simulated pivot-shift test compared with isolated ACLR. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were evaluated with a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system. Knee kinematics were evaluated with simulated clinical examinations including a simulated pivot-shift test consisting of coupled 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torques, a 5-N·m internal rotation torque, and an 88-N anterior tibial load. Kinematic differences between ACLR with an intact ALL, ACLR with ALLR, and ACLR with a deficient ALL were compared with the intact state. Single-bundle ACLR tunnels and ALLR tunnels were placed anatomically according to previous quantitative anatomic attachment descriptions. Combined anatomic ALLR and ACLR significantly improved the rotatory stability of the knee compared with isolated ACLR in the face of a concurrent ALL deficiency. During a simulated pivot-shift test, ALLR significantly reduced internal rotation and axial plane tibial translation when compared with ACLR with an ALL deficiency. Isolated ACLR for the treatment of a combined ACL and ALL injury was not able to restore stability of the knee, resulting in a significant increase in

  13. Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with 3D-Navigation Guided Cortical Bone Trajectory Screws for L4/5 Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: 1-Year Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ibrahim; Virk, Michael S; Link, Thomas W; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Elowitz, Eric

    2018-02-01

    We describe our technique and evaluate clinical and radiographic outcomes for patients undergoing L4/5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion with 3D-navigation guided cortical bone trajectory screws (PLIF-CBT) for grade 1 or 2 degenerative spondylolisthesis with a minimum follow-up time of 12 months. A single-institution series of 18 patients was evaluated with data prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed. Pain and disability scores were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of 12 months postoperatively, including back and bilateral leg pain visual analog scores (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. Radiographic fusion was assessed as complete, partial, or none based on the presence of bridging bones across the disc space, posterior elements, or both. Patients demonstrated statistically significant reductions in back pain VAS (P = 0.0025), leg pain VAS (P fusion at an average of 14.9 months postoperatively was available for 16/18 patients, with 6 patients demonstrating fusion (4/6 with complete fusion; 2/6 with partial fusion). There were no instances of intraoperative complications or delayed complications requiring subsequent interventions. PLIF-CBT can be performed in a safe and reproducible fashion with excellent clinical outcomes at 1 year postoperatively. The outcomes did not correlate with fusion status, which was unexpectedly low at 37.5% without significant hardware abnormalities necessitating reoperations. PLIF-CBT offers several perioperative advantages compared with traditional open PLIF and requires longer-term studies to demonstrate its durability with regard to improvement in clinical pain and radiographic endpoints, including anterior and/or posterior element fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary investigation of clinical application of percutaneous posterior lumbar interbody fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jiang; Jiao Wencang; Chen Xiangrong; Li Xiaoyu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the feasibility, key technology, indications and clinical outcome of percutaneous lumbar interbody fusion. Methods: Clinical data from 32 cases [16 male, 16 female, age range 31-77 years, average disease duration (5.0±2.0) years] underwent percutaneous nucleotomy and endplate curettage was retrospectively analyzed. After percutaneous nucleotomy and endplate curettage, one expandable spinal spacer B-twin was introduced into the intervertebral space and some allograft cancellous bone implanted around the B-twin. Indications for treatment included degenerative lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with intervertebral distability or I degree spondylolisthesis (21 cases), LDH with intervertebral space collapse (10 cases) and lumbar discogenic pain (1 case). The symptoms and function of all patients were evaluated before, 3 months and 12 months after the operation by clinical outcome judgment criterion of surgical treatment for low back pain formulated by JOA, and the rate of clinical improvement and treatment efficacy were calculated. The JOA scales preoperatively, postoperatively and on the final follow-up was compared using ANOVA in SPSS. The changes before and after surgery with the JOA score and the the rate of clinical improvement between 3 months and 12 months after the operation was also compared using χ 2 test. Results: The average operation time 1 hour and blood loss 0.05). Conclusions: Percutaneous posterior lumbar interbody fusion with B-twin expandable fusion cage could lead to satisfactory outcome in the treatment of degenerative disc disease and intervertebral instability, which minimize surgical soft tissue and trauma spinal damage, does not destroy the structure of spinal stability. The long-term outcome, complications and fusion rate need further observing. (authors)

  15. The Effect of Cervical Interbody Cage Morphology, Material Composition, and Substrate Density on Cage Subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Paul B; Puttlitz, Christian; Lewis, Chad; Bal, B Sonny; McGilvray, Kirk

    2017-02-01

    Interbody cages used in spinal fusion surgery can subside into the adjacent vertebral bodies after implantation, leading to loss of spinal height, malalignment, and possible radicular symptoms. Several factors may contribute to cage subsidence. This in vitro investigation examined the possible contribution of substrate density, cage contact area (ie, cage footprint), cage filling, cage end plate surface texture, and cage material composition on the magnitude of subsidence. Commercially available cervical interbody cages of two sizes (16 × 12 mm and 17 × 14 mm) were implanted between foam blocks of two different densities and were cyclically loaded. Cages were made of titanium alloy (Ti4Al6V), silicon nitride ceramic (Si3N4), or polyether ether ketone (n = 8 cages of each material type). Additional testing was performed on Si3N4 cages of the smaller size with nontextured surfaces and with filled cores. Subsidence measurements showed that lower foam density had the greatest influence on subsidence, followed by smaller cage footprint. Cage material had no effect on subsidence. In the additional testing of small-footprint Si3N4 cages, the cages in which the core was filled with a load-bearing porous material had less subsidence in lower-density foam than the cages with an empty core had, whereas cage end plate surface texture had no effect on subsidence. Ranking of the relative impact of these factors indicated that substrate density had the greatest contribution to the measured subsidence (approximately 1.7 times and approximately 67 times greater than the contributions of cage footprint area and material, respectively). The contribution of cage footprint area to subsidence was found to be 40 times greater than the contribution of cage material to subsidence.

  16. Stand-Alone Lateral Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Low-Grade Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Marchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to investigate the stand-alone lateral interbody fusion as a minimally invasive option for the treatment of low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis with a minimum 24-month followup. Prospective nonrandomized observational single-center study. 52 consecutive patients (67.6±10 y/o; 73.1% female; 27.4±3.4 BMI with single-level grade I/II single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis without significant spine instability were included. Fusion procedures were performed as retroperitoneal lateral transpsoas interbody fusions without screw supplementation. The procedures were performed in average 73.2 minutes and with less than 50cc blood loss. VAS and Oswestry scores showed lasting improvements in clinical outcomes (60% and 54.5% change, resp.. The vertebral slippage was reduced in 90.4% of cases from mean values of 15.1% preoperatively to 7.4% at 6-week followup (P<0.001 and was maintained through 24 months (7.1%, P<0.001. Segmental lordosis (P<0.001 and disc height (P<0.001 were improved in postop evaluations. Cage subsidence occurred in 9/52 cases (17% and 7/52 cases (13% spine levels needed revision surgery. At the 24-month evaluation, solid fusion was observed in 86.5% of the levels treated. The minimally invasive lateral approach has been shown to be a safe and reproducible technique to treat low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis.

  17. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion for aged patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: is intentional surgical reduction essential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao-Feng; Hou, Tie-Sheng; Xu, Jian-Guang; Zeng, Bing-Fang; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Zhao, Cheng; Li, Hao

    2013-10-01

    Surgical reduction and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is commonly used to recover segmental imbalance in degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, whether intentional reduction of the slipped vertebra during PLIF is essential in aged patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of surgical reduction and fusion in situ among aged patients who underwent PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis. A prospective randomized clinical trial on the surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis patients aged older than 70 years. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 73 patients aged 70 years or older with single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis requiring surgical treatment were included in this study. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Radiographic outcomes included percentage of vertebral slippage, focal lordosis, and disc height. The 73 patients were randomly assigned to two groups treated using surgical reduction (Group A, n=36) and fusion in situ (Group B, n=37). Both groups were followed up for an average of 33.2 months (range, 24-54 months). The clinical and radiographic outcomes were compared between the two groups. Surgical complications were similar in the two groups. The average operative time and blood loss during surgery did not insignificantly differ (p>.05) between the two groups. Spondylolisthesis, disc height, and focal lordosis were significantly improved postoperatively in both groups. There was no obvious difference in clinical outcomes, as assessed using the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores, although the radiographic outcomes were considerably better in Group A than in Group B. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screws fixation, with or without intraoperative reduction, provides good outcomes in the surgical treatment of

  18. Radiographic Restoration of Sagittal Spinopelvic Alignment After Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling-De; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Wang, Feng; Kong, Fan-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong

    2016-03-01

    A retrospective study. This study was aimed to analyze the changes in spinopelvic parameters after surgical correction of degenerative spondylolisthesis and to determine which deformity is most responsible for changes in sagittal spinopelvic alignment. The basic deformities of degenerative spondylolisthesis are forward slippage of the vertebral body, segmental kyphotic angle, and loss of disk height. Correction of those deformities during surgery will subsequently affect the spinopelvic parameters. A few studies have reported the changes of sagittal spinopelvic alignment after surgical treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis. However, there appears to be relatively little information regarding degenerative spondylolisthesis. Fifty-three patients with L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis were included. All patients underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation. Back pain, as the clinical outcome, was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS). The preoperative and postoperative spinopelvic parameters, including sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar lordosis (LL), and L1 axis S1 distance were measured, and then the correlations between spinopelvic parameters and local deformity parameters such as slip degree, slip angle (SA), and height of the intervertebral disk were evaluated. After surgical correction of local deformity, all spinopelvic parameters changed subsequently: PT and L1 axis S1 distance had a decrease, SS and LL had an increase. VAS score decreased from 6.1±2.3 before surgery to 2.4±1.7 at the final follow-up assessment. Patients with VAS score changes ≥3 showed significantly higher SS and LL, and lower PT compared with those with VAS score changes spondylolisthesis with posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation resulted in relief of back pain, which may be associated with improvement of sagittal spinopelvic alignment. Surgeons should consider deformity parameters, especially the SA, in the surgical

  19. Minimally invasive presacral approach for revision of an Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod due to fall-related lumbosacral instability: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Anders

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The purpose of this study was to describe procedural details of a minimally invasive presacral approach for revision of an L5-S1 Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility with marked thoracolumbar scoliosis, osteoarthritic changes characterized by high-grade osteophytes, and significant intervertebral disc collapse and calcification. Our patient required crutches during ambulation and reported intractable axial and radicular pain. Multi-level reconstruction of L1-4 was accomplished with extreme lateral interbody fusion, although focal lumbosacral symptoms persisted due to disc space collapse at L5-S1. Lumbosacral interbody distraction and stabilization was achieved four weeks later with the Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion System (TranS1 Inc., Wilmington, NC, USA and rod implantation via an axial presacral approach. Despite symptom resolution following this procedure, our patient suffered a fall six weeks postoperatively with direct sacral impaction resulting in symptom recurrence and loss of L5-S1 distraction. Following seven months of unsuccessful conservative care, a revision of the Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod was performed that utilized the same presacral approach and used a larger diameter implant. Minimal adhesions were encountered upon presacral re-entry. A precise operative trajectory to the base of the previously implanted rod was achieved using fluoroscopic guidance. Surgical removal of the implant was successful with minimal bone resection required. A larger diameter Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod was then implanted and joint distraction was re-established. The radicular symptoms resolved following revision surgery and our patient was ambulating without assistance on post-operative day one. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions The Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion distraction rod may be revised and replaced with a larger diameter rod using

  20. Outcomes of autograft alone versus PEEK+ autograft interbody fusion in the treatment of adult lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Han, Dunfu; Cao, Zhenglin; Guan, Honggang; Xuan, Tianhang

    2017-04-01

    Bone resulting from a complete resection of the posterior arch can be cut into an autograft bone that contains the facet joint structure and morselised bone for interbody fusion. However, whether a strut autograft that contains this trimmed facet joint can produce the same clinical and radiographic outcomes as a cage for interbody fusion remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of a local facet joint autograft alone to those of polyetheretherketone (PEEK)+autograft for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. A retrospective analysis was performed on 84 patients with single lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis who were treated with a local facet joint autograft alone (group A; n=44) or PEEK+autograft (group B; n=40) in PLIF with a minimum follow-up period of 24 months. Pain and disability were assessed using the visual analogue scale, Oswestry disability index and Kirkaldy-Willis criteria. In the radiological evaluation, disc height, slippage reduction, and fusion status were examined. Postoperative complications were also monitored. At the last follow-up examination, 84.1% (37/44) of the patients in group A and 82.5% (33/40) of the patients in group B had a good outcome, and there were no significant differences between the two groups. Boh Methods led to significant improvements in disc height, and while PEEK+autograft produced a smaller loss in disc height, the difference was insignificant. The improvements in slippage and the fusion and complication rates between the two groups were similar. There were no significant differences in the clinical outcomes or radiographic improvements of both fusion methods in the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. An autograft excised from a complete posterior arch containing a facet joint for interbody fusion is effective and affordable for treating isthmic spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Low incidence of adjacent segment disease after posterior lumbar interbody fusion with minimum disc distraction: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Takahiro; Honda, Hirotsugu; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Kaito, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected data. To investigate the incidence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) and identify possible risk factors for ASD after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with minimum disc distraction by selecting low-height interbody cages. Excessive disc space distraction is reportedly 1 of the risk factors for ASD after PLIF; however, the incidence and other risk factors of ASD after PLIF with minimum disc distraction remain unclear. Forty-one consecutive patients who underwent PLIF at L4-L5 and were postoperatively followed up for a minimum of 2 years were included. The height and shape (box or bullet shape) of interbody cages was determined according to the disc height and morphology of the intervertebral space assessed on preoperative computed tomography scans to avoid excessive distraction. The incidence of radiographic and symptomatic ASD was evaluated and all demographic and radiographic parameters were compared between patients with and without ASD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for ASD among the variables with P < .20 in univariate analysis. The overall incidence of ASD was 12.2% (5/41 patients): radiographic ASD, 7.3% (3 patients); symptomatic ASD, 4.9% (2 patients). Multivariate analysis revealed preoperative retrolisthesis of L3 on extension as the sole risk factor for ASD after PLIF with minimum disc distraction (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-4.05; P = .049). The incidence of ASD in this study was lower than that of ASD in our previous study about PLIF with distraction of disc space (12.2% vs. 31.8%). Minimum disc distraction by selection of low-height interbody cages is a simple and effective method to prevent ASD at the surgeons' discretion, although preexisting retrolisthesis at the adjacent upper segment should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health

  2. Posterior Decompression, Lumber Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation in the Treatment of Upper Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG Zhan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the clinical outcomes of posterior decompression, interbody fusion and internal fixationfor the treatment of the upper lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Methods: Twelve patients with the upper lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated by posterior decompression, interbosy fusion and internal fixation. The time of the operation, the amount of bleeding and the clinical efficacy were evaluated. Results: The time of operation was (143±36 min and the amount of bleeding during operation was (331.5±47.9 mL. There was no spinal cord and injuries, nerve injury, epidural damage and leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. All patients were followed up for 10~19 months with the average being 12.6 months. The functional scoring of Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA before the operation was (11.4±3.3 scores and final score after follow-up was (22.9±3.1 scores and there were statistical difference (P<0.01. Lumber interbody fusion of all patients completed successfully and the good rate after the operation was 91.7%. Conclusion: Posterior decompression, interbody fusion and internal fixation for the treatment of the upper lumbar intervertebral disc herniation was characterized by full exposure, safety and significant efficacy.

  3. Posterior lumber interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation for the management of spondylolisthesis: An analysis of 40 cases

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    Md. Rezaul Amin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Spondylolisthesis is forward slipping of upper vertebra in relations to its lower one, commonest is L4-L5. The ideal surgical treatment of spondylolisthesis is still controversial. Posterior lumber interbody fusion with pedicle fixation is one of treatment choices for the lumber spondylolisthesis. Forty patients who operated through posterior lumber interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation by single surgeon was included from January 2012 to March 2015. Periodical follow-up was done both clinically and radiologically up to 6 months. Patient outcome was completed based on pain relief graphic rating scale and Oswestry disability index. In our series, the excellent outcome were 25 patients (62.5%, good were 12 patients (30%, and fair were 3 patients (7.5%. There were no poor outcome and no new neurological deficit. This study concludes that posterior lumber inter-body fusion with pedicle is an effective treatment for the lumber spondylolisthesis. It helps to maintain the biomechanics, associated with less complication and improve the quality of life of patient.

  4. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion using traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Several biomechanical studies have demonstrated the favorable mechanical properties of the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw. However, no reports have examined surgical outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with CBT screw fixation for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) compared with those after PLIF using traditional pedicle screw (PS) fixation. The purposes of this study were thus to elucidate surgical outcomes after PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS and to compare these results with those after PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS (CBT group; mean followup 35 months). A historical control group consisted of 82 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with traditional PS fixation (PS group; mean follow-up 40 months). Clinical status was assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale score. Fusion status was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT. The need for additional surgery and surgery-related complications was also evaluated. RESULTS The mean JOA score improved significantly from 13.7 points before surgery to 23.3 points at the latest follow-up in the CBT group (mean recovery rate 64.4%), compared with 14.4 points preoperatively to 22.7 points at final follow-up in the PS group (mean recovery rate 55.8%; p 0.05). Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease developed in 3 patients from the CBT group (3.2%) compared with 9 patients from the PS group (11.0%, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS provided comparable improvement of clinical symptoms with PLIF using traditional PS fixation. However, the successful fusion rate tended to be lower in the CBT group than in the PS group, although the difference was not statistically significant between the 2 groups.

  5. Risk factors for adjacent segment disease after posterior lumbar interbody fusion and efficacy of simultaneous decompression surgery for symptomatic adjacent segment disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikata, Tomohiro; Kamata, Michihiro; Furukawa, Mitsuru

    2014-04-01

    A retrospective study. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) increases mechanical stress and can cause degenerative changes at the adjacent segment. However, the precise causes of adjacent segment disease (ASD) after PLIF are not known, and it is unclear whether simultaneous decompression surgery for symptomatic ASD is effective. To study, radiographically and symptomatically, the risk factors for adjacent segment disease (ASD) in the lumbar spine after L4/5 PLIF and to examine whether decompression surgery for the adjacent segment (L3/4) reduces the occurrence of symptomatic ASD. Fifty-four patients who underwent L4/5 PLIF for L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis and could be followed up for at least 2 years were included. Of these, 37 were treated simultaneously with decompression surgery at L3/4. We measured radiographic changes and assessed symptoms from the cranial adjacent segment. Thirty-one patients (57.4%) met radiologic criteria for ASD. The length of follow-up (P=0.004) and simultaneous decompression surgery at L3/4 (P=0.009) were statistically significant factors for radiologic diagnosis of ASD. Seven patients (13.0%) had symptomatic ASD: 6 in the decompression group (16.2%) and 1 in the PLIF-only group (5.9%). Simultaneous decompression surgery did not reduce the incidence of symptomatic ASD (P=0.256). Local lordosis at the fused segment (P=0.005) and the sagittal angle of the facet joint at L3/4 (P=0.024) were statistically significant predictors of symptomatic ASD, which was accompanied by postoperative anterior listhesis above the fused segment (S group, 8.4%±8.0%; nonsymptomatic group: -0.7%±5.0%, P=0.024). Patients whose facet joint at the adjacent segment had a more sagittal orientation had postoperative anterior listhesis, which caused symptomatic ASD. Simultaneous decompression surgery without fusion at the adjacent level was not effective for these patients, but rather, there was a possibility that it induced symptomatic ASD.

  6. anterior hyaloidal fibrovascular proliferation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okonkwo

    It most commonly occurs after phakic vitrectomy and scleral buckling for diabetic traction retinal detachment. It usually manifests with haemorrhage into the vitreous cavity or anterior hyaloid 3 to 12 weeks after vitrectomy and is the result of fibrovascular proliferation from the peripheral retina extending toward the equator of ...

  7. Retrospective analysis of arthrodesis from various options after anterior cervical discectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaysagar Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anterior cervical discectomy is a surgical procedure performed to treat a herniated/degenerated disc in the cervical region. There have been various studies comparing arthrodesis rates among various procedures. Our patients belonged to varied socioeconomic background and underwent anterior cervical microdiscectomy without/with instrumentation. Aim: The present study was performed to study and compare the arthrodesis rates in the patients operated for anterior cervical microdiscectomy with and without fusion/instrumentation procedures at our institution. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study performed at Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Bengaluru. Pre- and post-operative X-rays were assessed in 96 patients who had undergone anterior cervical discectomy with/without fusion from June 2012 to June 2015. Radiographic arthrodesis was assessed in all patients. An arbitrary grading was designed by us and categorized into Grade I to IV. The criteria considered for adequate arthrodesis in this study were: (a <2° movement on dynamic X-rays, (b restored disc space height (±2 mm accepted, and (c evidence of solid bone mass around disc space. Arthrodesis was categorized as Grade I if all the above 3 criteria on X-rays was fulfilled, Grade II if any 2 of the criteria was fulfilled, Grade III if any 1 of the criteria was fulfilled, and Grade IV when pseudoarthrosis/none of the criteria was fulfilled. Grade I arthrodesis was noted in about 79 patients (82.2%, Grade II in 14 patients, and only 3 patients had Grade III arthrodesis. There were no patients with absent arthrodesis/pseudoarthrosis. Results: Satisfactory arthrodesis was noted in 82% of the total patients, with patients undergoing fusion ± instrumentation procedure having better results. Conclusions: Arthrodesis by an interbody graft/implant with/without plating increases chances of success as compared to anterior cervical discectomy alone

  8. Surgical results of a one-stage combined anterior lumbosacral fusion and posterior percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yuan Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lumbosacral fusion through either an anterior or a posterior approach to achieve good lordosis and stability is always a challenging surgical operation and is often accompanied by a higher rate of pseudarthrosis than when other lumbar segments are involved. This study evaluated the clinical and radiological results of lumbosacral fusions achieved through a combined anterior and posterior approach. Materials and Methods: From June 2008 to 2012, 20 patients who had L5–S1 instability and stenosis were consecutively treated, first by anterior interbody fusion using an allogenous strut bone graft through the pararectus approach and then by posterior pedicle screw fixation. A minimum of 1-year of clinical and radiological follow-up was conducted. Intraoperative blood loss, surgical time, and any surgery-related complications were recorded. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS and the patient's Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score. After 1 year, radiological outcomes were assessed by analyzing pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and segmental lordosis using static plain films, while fusion stability was assessed using dynamic plain films. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss were 215 min and 325 cc, respectively. After 1 year, the VAS and ODI scores had significantly improved, and stable fusion with good lordotic curvature was obtained in all cases. Conclusion: The surgical results of the combined procedure are satisfactory in terms of the functional and radiological outcomes. Our method offers advantages regarding both anterior fusion and posterior fixation.

  9. Ribbon like appearance of the midsubstance fibres of the anterior cruciate ligament close to its femoral insertion site: a cadaveric study including 111 knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmigielski, Robert; Zdanowicz, Urszula; Drwięga, Michał; Ciszek, Bogdan; Ciszkowska-Łysoń, Beata; Siebold, Rainer

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the configuration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) from its direct femoral insertion to midsubstance was found to be flat. This might have an important impact for anatomical ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this anatomical study was to evaluate the macroscopic appearance of the ACL from femoral to midsubstance. The ACL was dissected in 111 human fresh frozen cadaver knees from its femoral insertion to midsubstance, and the shape was described. The anatomical findings were documented on digital photographs and on video. Thirty knees were sent for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology of the femoral ACL insertion. Two millimetres from its direct femoral insertion, the ACL fibres formed a flat ribbon in all dissected knees without a clear separation between AM and PL bundles. The ribbon was in exact continuity of the posterior femoral cortex. The width of the ribbon was between 11.43 and 16.18 mm and the thickness of the ACL was only 2.54-3.38 mm. 3D CT, MRI and the histological examination confirmed above findings. This is a detailed anatomical study describing the ribbon-like structure of the ACL from its femoral insertion to midsubstance. A key point was to carefully remove the surface fibrous membrane of the ACL. A total of 2-3 mm from its bony femoral insertion, the ACL formed a flat ribbon without a clear separation between AM and PL bundles. The ribbon was in exact continuity of the posterior femoral cortex. The findings of a flat ligament may change the future approach to femoral ACL footprint and midsubstance ACL reconstruction and to graft selection.

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100230.htm Anterior cruciate ligament repair - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a ligament in the center of ...

  11. Multidisciplinary management of anterior diastemata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Herkrath, Fernando José; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino

    2007-01-01

    Anterior diastemata may compromise the harmony of a patient's smile. Consideration of etiologic factors, previous gingival conditioning, and individual treatment planning are essential in the proper management of anterior diastemata. An integrated orthodontic-restorative approach may enhance...

  12. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage filled with cancellous allograft in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2007-01-01

    From July 2004 to June 2005, 19 patients with 25 discs underwent anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) in which polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages were filled with freeze-dried cancellous allograft bone. This kind of bone graft was made from femoral condyle that was harvested during total knee arthroplasty. Patient age at surgery was 52.9 (28–68) years. All patients were followed up at least 1 year. We measured the height of the disc and segmental sagittal angulation by pre-operative and post-operative radiographs. CT scan of the cervical spine at 1 year was used to evaluate fusion rates. Odom's criteria were used to assess the clinical outcome. All interbody disc spaces achieved successful union at 1-year follow-up. The use of a PEEK cage was found to increase the height of the disc immediately after surgery (5.0 mm pre-operatively, 7.3 mm immediately post-operatively). The final disc height was 6.2 mm, and the collapse of the disc height was 1.1 mm. The segmental lordosis also increased after surgery (2.0° pre-operatively, 6.6° immediately post-operatively), but the mean loss of lordosis correction was 3.3° at final follow-up. Seventy-four percent of patients (14/19) exhibited excellent/good clinical outcomes. Analysis of the results indicated the cancellous allograft bone-filled PEEK cage used in ACDF is a good choice for patients with cervical disc disease, and avoids the complications of harvesting iliac autograft. PMID:17639386

  13. Mini-invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion through Wiltse Approach to Treating Lumbar Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Tian, Yong-hao; Zheng, Yan-ping; Liu, Xin-yu; Wang, Hu-hu

    2016-02-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy of mini-invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) through the Wiltse approach for treating lumbar spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. In this retrospective controlled study, 69 cases with lumbar spondylolytic spondylolisthesis treated in Qilu hospital from April to November 2014 were randomly assigned to Wiltse approach (31 cases, 16 male, 15 female; mean age 45.1 years) and traditional approach groups (38 cases, 21 male, 17 female; 47.2 years. In the Wiltse approach group, the affected level was L4, 5 in 19 cases and L5 S1 in 12, 9 of whom had low back pain (LBP) only and 21 both LBP and leg pain. There were 17 cases of I degree and 14 of II degree spondylolisthesis. Pre-operative Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 13.1 ± 2.6; visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP 7.4 ± 1.2; VAS for leg pain 6.1 ± 2.0 and Oswestry disability index (ODI) score 42.2% ± 1.2%. In the traditional approach group, the affected level was L4, 5 in 22 cases and L5 S1 in 16, 11 of whom had LBP only and 27 both LBP and leg pain. There were 21 cases of I degree and 17 of II degree spondylolisthesis. Pre-operative JOA score was 12.8 ± 1.2; VAS for LBP 6.9 ± 1.1; VAS for leg pain 7.1 ± 2.0 and ODI score 41.2% ± 2.0%. The JOA score, VAS for LBP and leg pain, ODI dynamic X-rays, CT and/or MR were evaluated 3 and 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. There were no differences in sex, age, affected levels, spondylolisthesis degree, pre-operative JOA score, VAS for LBP or leg pain and ODI score between the two groups (P > 0.05). The incision length, blood loss and time to achieving exposure were better in the Wiltse approach than the traditional approach group (P 0.05). The interbody fusion rate was not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). There were no complications of internal fixation in either group. TLIF via both approaches has satisfactory clinical efficacy. TLIF through the Wiltse approach significantly reduces the

  14. Surgical outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation for lumbar spondylolisthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, Motoi; Kuno, Shigehiko; Inoue, Tatsushi

    2009-01-01

    Problems of lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment are many surgical tactics, elderly patient, osteoporosis, complications and recurrence of the symptoms. PLIF (posterior lumbar interbody fusion) and PS (pedicle screw) fixation technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis provide good patient satisfaction. Good outcome has been reported by only laminectomy alone, but patient satisfaction becomes worse year after year. The role of instrumentation for lumbar spondylolisthesis is decompression of the nerve root, correction of lumbar pathologies, bony fusion and early mobilization. We show our surgical technique and long term outcome of PLIF with PS for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Three hundred and fifty cases of lumbar spondylolisthesis were operated on in Department of Neurosurgery, Fujita Health University during the period of from December 1992 to August 2008. Patient background: age 16-84 years old (mean 62.5), Gender: male 153, female 197. Follow-up period 1-180 months (mean 61.2). Degenerative: 255, Isthmic: 63, Dysplastic: 10, Fracture: 5 and scoliosis 16 cases. Surgical procedure was PS with interbody fusion cage: 331, Hybrid cage (titanium cage with hydroxyapatite) 314, PS with Cerabone: 2 and PS with autograft: 17. CT was done to evaluate bony fusion postoperatively. Post operative improvements by JOA (Japan Orthopedic Association) score is 11.4 before surgery, 24.1 (post op. within 2 years), 25.4 (post op. 2-5 years), 25.0 (post op. 5-10 years) and 22.4 (post op. 10-15 years). Significant improvements were observed in %Slip and Slip angle but no remarkable change was observed in lumbar lordotic angle by postoperative X-ray evaluation. No root injury, and systemic complication except 4 cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during surgery. Two cases were reoperated in whom cage with autograft migration due to pseudoarthrosis. Two cases had to undergo screw and cage system removal due to infection. Two cases of adjacent level stenosis had to undergo operation 10

  15. Anterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyadhar P. Mali

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the clinical presentation and management of four patients with anterior urethral valves; a rare cause of urethral obstruction in male children. One patient presented antenatally with oligohydramnios, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder thickening suggestive of an infravesical obstruction. Two other patients presented postnatally at 1 and 2 years of age, respectively, with poor stream of urine since birth. The fourth patient presented at 9 years with frequency and dysuria. Diagnosis was established on either micturating cystourethrogram (MCU (in 2 or on cystoscopy (in 2. All patients had cystoscopic ablation of the valves. One patient developed a postablation stricture that was resected with an end-to-end urethroplasty. He had an associated bilateral vesicoureteric junction (VUJ obstruction for which a bilateral ureteric reimplantation was done at the same time. On long-term follow-up, all patients demonstrated a good stream of urine. The renal function is normal. Patients are continent and free of urinary infections. Anterior urethral valves are rare obstructive lesions in male children. The degree of obstruction is variable, and so they may present with mild micturition difficulty or severe obstruction with hydroureteronephrosis and renal impairment. Hence, it is important to evaluate the anterior urethra in any male child with suspected infravesical obstruction. The diagnosis is established by MCU or cystoscopy and the treatment is always surgical, either a transurethral ablation or an open resection. The long-term prognosis is good.

  16. Clinico-radiological profile of indirect neural decompression using cage or auto graft as interbody construct in posterior lumbar interbody fusion in spondylolisthesis: Which is better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q R Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Study design: A prospective clinical study of posterior lumbar interbody fusion in grade I and II degenerative spondylolisthesis was conducted between Mar 2007 and Aug 2008. Purpose: The objective was to assess the clinicoradiological profile of structural v/s nonstructural graft on intervertebral disc height and its consequences on the low back pain (LBP assessed by Visual analog score (VAS score and oswestry disability index (ODI . This study involved 28 patients. Inclusion criteria: Age of 30-70 years, symptomatic patient with disturbed Activities of daily living (ADL, single-level L4/L5 or L5/S1 grade I or grade II degenerative spondylolisthesis. Exclusion criteria: Patients with osteoporosis, recent spondylodiscitis, subchondral sclerosis, visual and cognitive impairment and all other types of spondylolisthesis. All the patients underwent short-segment posterior fixation using CD2 or M8 instrumentation, laminectomy discectomy, reduction and distraction of the involved vertebral space. In 53.5% (n = 15 of the patients, snugly fitted local bone chips were used while in 46.4% (n = 13 of the patients, cage was used. Among the cage group, titanium cage was used in nine (32.1% and PEEK cages were used in four (14.2% patients. In one patient, a unilateral PEEK cage was used. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Among the 28 patients, 67.8% (n = 19 were females and 32.14% (n = 9 were males. 68.24% (n = 18 had L4/L5 and 35.71% (n = 10 had L5/S1 spondylolisthesis. 39.28% (n = 11 were of grade I and 60.71% (n = 17 were of grade II spondylolisthesis. Conclusions: There was a statistically significant correlation (P < 0.012 and P < 0.027 between the change in disc height achieved and the improvement in VAS score in both the graft group and the cage group. The increment in disc height and VAS score was significantly better in the cage group (2 mm ± SD vis-a-vis 7.2 [88%] than the graft group (1.2 mm ± SD vis-a-vis 5 [62 %].

  17. Early postoperative dislocation of the anterior Maverick lumbar disc prosthesis: report of 2 cases.

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    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Seex, Kevin A; Eisermann, Lukas G; Claydon, Matthew H; Malham, Gregory M

    2013-08-01

    The authors report on 2 cases of anterior dislocation of the Maverick lumbar disc prosthesis, both occurring in the early postoperative period. These cases developed after experience with more than 50 uneventful cases and were therefore thought to be unrelated to the surgeon's learning curve. No similar complications have been previously reported. The anterior Maverick device has a ball-and-socket design made of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum metal plates covered with hydroxyapatite. The superior and inferior endplates have keels to resist translation forces. The patient in Case 1 was a 52-year-old man with severe L4-5 discogenic pain; and in Case 2, a 42-year-old woman with disabling L4-5 and L5-S1 discogenic back pain. Both patients were without medical comorbidities and were nonsmokers with no risk factors for osteoporosis. Both had undergone uneventful retroperitoneal approaches performed by a vascular access surgeon. Computed tomography studies on postoperative Day 2 confirmed excellent prosthesis placement. Initial recoveries were uneventful. Two weeks postoperatively, after stretching (extension or hyperextension) in bed at home, each patient suffered the sudden onset of severe abdominal pain with anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis. The patients were returned to the operating room and underwent surgery performed by the same spinal and vascular surgeons. Removal of the Maverick prosthesis and anterior interbody fusion with a separate cage and plate were performed. Both patients had recovered well with good clinical and radiological recovery at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Possible causes of the anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis include the following: 1) surgeon error: In both cases the keel cuts were neat, and early postoperative CT confirmed good placement of the prosthesis; 2) equipment problem: The keel cuts may have been too large because the cutters were worn, which led to an inadequate press fit of the implants; 3) prosthesis

  18. Bony ingrowth potential of 3D printed porous titanium alloy: a direct comparison of interbody cage materials in an in vivo ovine lumbar fusion model.

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    McGilvray, Kirk; Easley, Jeremiah; Seim, Howard B; Regan, Daniel; Berven, Sigurd H; Hsu, Wellington K; Mroz, Thomas E; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2018-02-26

    There is significant variability in the materials commonly used for interbody cages in spine surgery. It is theorized that 3-D printed interbody cages utilizing porous titanium material can provide more consistent bone ingrowth and biological fixation. The purpose of this study was to provide an evidence-based approach to decision making regarding interbody materials for spinal fusion. Comparative animal study. A skeletally mature ovine lumbar fusion model was utilized for this study. Interbody fusions were performed at (L2-L3 and L4-L5) in 27 mature sheep using three different interbody cages (i.e., polyetheretherketone [PEEK], plasma sprayed porous titanium coated PEEK [PSP], and 3-D printed porous titanium alloy cage [PTA]). Non-destructive kinematic testing was performed in the three primary directions of motion. The specimens were then analyzed using micro-computed tomography (µCT); quantitative measures of the bony fusion were performed. Histomorphometric analyses were also performed in the sagittal plane through the interbody device. Outcome parameters were compared between cage designs and time-points. Flexion-extension range of motion (ROM) was statistically reduced for the PTA group as compared to the PEEK cages at 16 weeks (p-value = 0.02). Only the PTA cages demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in ROM and increase in stiffness across all three loading directions between the 8-week and 16-week sacrifice time-points (p-value ≤ 0.01). Micro-CT data demonstrated significantly greater total bone volume within the graft window for the PTA cages at both 8-weeks and 16-weeks compared to the PEEK cages (p-value < 0.01). A direct comparison of interbody implants demonstrates significant and measurable differences in biomechanical, µCT, and histologic performance in an ovine model. The 3-D printed porous titanium interbody cage resulted in statistically significant reductions in ROM, increases in the bone ingrowth profile, as well as average

  19. CORRECTION OF SEVERE STIFF SCOLIOSIS THROUGH EXTRAPLEURAL INTERBODY RELEASE AND OSTEOTOMY (LIEPO

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    Cleiton Dias Naves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To report a new technique for extrapleural interbody release with transcorporal osteotomy of the inferior vertebral plateau (LIEPO and to evaluate the correction potential of this technique and its complications. Method: We included patients with scoliosis with Cobb angle greater than 90° and flexibility less than 25% submitted to surgical treatment between 2012 and 2016 by the technique LIEPO at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics (INTO. Sagittal and coronal alignment, and the translation of the apical vertebra were measured and the degree of correction of the deformity was calculated through the pre and postoperative radiographs, and the complications were described. Results: Patients had an average bleed of 1,525 ml, 8.8 hours of surgical time, 123° of scoliosis in the preoperative period, and a mean correction of 66%. There was no case of permanent neurological damage and no surgical revision. Conclusion: The LIEPO technique proved to be effective and safe in the treatment of severe stiff scoliosis, reaching a correction potential close to the PEISR (Posterior extrapleural intervertebral space release technique and superior to that of the pVCR (posterior Vertebral Column Resection with no presence of infection and permanent neurological deficit. New studies are needed to validate this promising technique.

  20. Standard versus Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Prospective Randomized Study

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    Daniel Serban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic spondylolisthesis patients may benefit from surgical decompression and stabilization. The standard (S technique is a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF. Newer, minimally invasive (MI techniques seem to provide similar results with less morbidity. We enrolled patients with at least 6 months of symptoms and image-confirmed low-grade spondylolisthesis, at a single academic institution, between 2011 and 2015. The patients were randomized to either S or MI TLIF. The primary outcome measure was the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI improvement at 1 year. Secondary outcome measures included length of operation, estimated blood loss, length of hospitalization, and fusion rates at 1 year. Forty patients were enrolled in each group. The differences in mean operative time and estimated blood loss were not statistically significant between the two groups. The patients were discharged after surgery at 4.12 days for the S TLIF group and 1.92 days for the MI TLIF group. The ODI improvement was similar and statistically significant in both groups. The fusion was considered solid in 36 (90% of patients at 1 year in both groups. In conclusion, the two techniques provided similar clinical and radiological outcomes at 1 year. The patients undergoing MI TLIF had a shorter hospital stay. This trial is registered with NCT03155789.

  1. Clinical outcomes of two minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for lumbar degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yonghao; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-10-01

    There are two modified TLIF, including MIS-TLIF and TLIF through Wiltse approach (W-TLIF). Although both of the two minimally invasive surgical procedures can be effective in the treatment for lumbar degenerative diseases, no comparative analysis has been made so far regarding their clinical outcomes. To compare the clinical outcomes of MIS-TLIF and W-TLIF for the treatment for single-segment degenerative lumbar diseases. Ninety-seven patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disorders were included in this study. Forty-seven underwent MIS-TLIF surgery (group A). For group B, fifty patients underwent W-TLIF. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, the visual analog scale (VAS) of low back pain (LBP) and leg pain, MRI score and atrophy rate of CSA, interbody fusion rate were assessed during the postoperative follow-up. Incision length, blood loss, operative time, CPK, and postoperative incision pain VAS were better in group A (P degenerative disease. MIS-TLIF has less blood loss, shorter surgical incision, and less lower postoperative back pain, while W-TLIF is less expensive for hospital stay with lower exposure to X-rays.

  2. Accidental Durotomy in Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Frequency, Risk Factors, and Management

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    Jan-Helge Klingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the frequency, risk factors, and management of accidental durotomy in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF. Methods. This single-center study retrospectively investigates 372 patients who underwent MIS TLIF and were mobilized within 24 hours after surgery. The frequency of accidental durotomies, intraoperative closure technique, body mass index, and history of previous surgery was recorded. Results. We identified 32 accidental durotomies in 514 MIS TLIF levels (6.2%. Analysis showed a statistically significant relation of accidental durotomies to overweight patients (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2; P=0.0493. Patient age older than 65 years tended to be a positive predictor for accidental durotomies (P=0.0657. Mobilizing patients on the first postoperative day, we observed no durotomy-associated complications. Conclusions. The frequency of accidental durotomies in MIS TLIF is low, with overweight being a risk factor for accidental durotomies. The minimally invasive approach seems to minimize durotomy-associated complications (CSF leakage, pseudomeningocele because of the limited dead space in the soft tissue. Patients with accidental durotomy can usually be mobilized within 24 hours after MIS TLIF without increased risk. The minimally invasive TLIF technique might thus be beneficial in the prevention of postoperative immobilization-associated complications such as venous thromboembolism. This trial is registered with DRKS00006135.

  3. Digitalized design of extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: a computer-based simulation and cadaveric study.

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    Mingjie Yang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study aims to investigate the feasibility of a novel lumbar approach named extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF, a newly emerging minimally invasive technique for treating degenerative lumbar disorders, using a digitalized simulation and a cadaveric study. METHODS: The ELIF surgical procedure was simulated using the Mimics surgical simulator and included dissection of the superior articular process, dilation of the vertebral foramen, and placement of pedicle screws and a cage. ELIF anatomical measures were documented using a digitalized technique and subsequently validated on fresh cadavers. RESULTS: The use of the Mimics allowed for the vivid simulation of ELIF surgical procedures, while the cadaveric study proved the feasibility of this novel approach. ELIF had a relatively lateral access approach that was located 8-9 cm lateral to the median line with an access depth of approximately 9 cm through the intermuscular space. Dissection of the superior articular processes could fully expose the target intervertebral discs and facilitate a more inclined placement of the pedicle screws and cage with robust enhancement. CONCLUSIONS: According to the computer-based simulation and cadaveric study, it is feasible to perform ELIF. Further research including biomechanical study is needed to prove ELIF has a superior ability to preserve the posterior tension bands of the spinal column, with similar effects on spinal decompression, fixation, and fusion, and if it can enhance post-fusion spinal stability and expedites postoperative recovery.

  4. Digitalized design of extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: a computer-based simulation and cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingjie; Zeng, Cheng; Guo, Song; Pan, Jie; Han, Yingchao; Li, Zeqing; Li, Lijun; Tan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of a novel lumbar approach named extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF), a newly emerging minimally invasive technique for treating degenerative lumbar disorders, using a digitalized simulation and a cadaveric study. The ELIF surgical procedure was simulated using the Mimics surgical simulator and included dissection of the superior articular process, dilation of the vertebral foramen, and placement of pedicle screws and a cage. ELIF anatomical measures were documented using a digitalized technique and subsequently validated on fresh cadavers. The use of the Mimics allowed for the vivid simulation of ELIF surgical procedures, while the cadaveric study proved the feasibility of this novel approach. ELIF had a relatively lateral access approach that was located 8-9 cm lateral to the median line with an access depth of approximately 9 cm through the intermuscular space. Dissection of the superior articular processes could fully expose the target intervertebral discs and facilitate a more inclined placement of the pedicle screws and cage with robust enhancement. According to the computer-based simulation and cadaveric study, it is feasible to perform ELIF. Further research including biomechanical study is needed to prove ELIF has a superior ability to preserve the posterior tension bands of the spinal column, with similar effects on spinal decompression, fixation, and fusion, and if it can enhance post-fusion spinal stability and expedites postoperative recovery.

  5. Total 3D Airo® Navigation for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

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    Xiaofeng Lian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A new generation of iCT scanner, Airo®, has been introduced. The purpose of this study is to describe how Airo facilitates minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF. Method. We used the latest generation of portable iCT in all cases without the assistance of K-wires. We recorded the operation time, number of scans, and pedicle screw accuracy. Results. From January 2015 to December 2015, 33 consecutive patients consisting of 17 men and 16 women underwent single-level or two-level MIS-TLIF operations in our institution. The ages ranged from 23 years to 86 years (mean, 66.6 years. We treated all the cases in MIS fashion. In four cases, a tubular laminectomy at L1/2 was performed at the same time. The average operation time was 192.8 minutes and average time of placement per screw was 2.6 minutes. No additional fluoroscopy was used. Our screw accuracy rate was 98.6%. No complications were encountered. Conclusions. Airo iCT MIS-TLIF can be used for initial planning of the skin incision, precise screw, and cage placement, without the need for fluoroscopy. “Total navigation” (complete intraoperative 3D navigation without fluoroscopy can be achieved by combining Airo navigation with navigated guide tubes for screw placement.

  6. Sagittal Alignment as Predictor of Adjacent Segment Disease After Lumbar Transforaminal Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Wang, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Li-Wei; Huang, Hui; Fu, Na-Xin

    2018-02-01

    This study was carried out to explore the diagnostic value of sagittal measurements for adjacent segment disease after lumbar transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF). A total of 163 subjects who underwent TLIF for lumbar disease were initially enrolled in the study from July 2013 to August 2017. Sagittal alignment including thoracic inlet and spinopelvic parameters was measured by using preoperative full-length freestanding radiographs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate these parameters as the diagnostic index for adjacent segment disease (ASD). A total of 153 patients completed the final follow-up, and the mean follow-up period was 40.6 months. There were 53 (35.3%) cases with ASD found after the TLIF in the enrolled subjects. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis confirmed that preoperative pelvic tilt (PT) of more than 24.1° and thoracic kyphosis (TK) of more than 23.3° were significant risk factors of ASD after TLIF (P < 0.05). We confirmed that PT of more than 24.3° and TK of more than 23.3° could be regarded as predictors of ASD after lumbar TLIF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation exposure during the lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedure and techniques to reduce radiation dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is widely used in spine surgery to assist with graft and hardware placement. Previous studies have not measured radiation exposure to a surgeon during minimally invasive lateral lumbar spine surgery for single-level discectomy and interbody cage insertion. This study was performed to model and measure radiation exposure to a surgeon during spine surgery using the direct lateral lumbar procedure. The study was performed using a mannequin substituting for the surgeon and a cadaver substituting for the patient. Radiation was measured with dosimeters attached to 6 locations on the mannequin using a OEC Medical Systems 9800 C-arm fluoroscope (OEC Medical Systems, Salt Lake City, Utah). Three different fluoroscopy setups were tested: a standard imaging setup, a standard setup using pulsed-mode fluoroscopy, and a reversed setup. The experiment was tested 5 times per setup, and the dosimeters' values were recorded. The highest amount of radiation exposure occurred when obtaining an anteroposterior view of the spine in the standard setup. Compared with the standard setup, the pulsed-mode setting decreased the radiation exposure to the mannequin by a factor of 6 times (P exposure to the mannequin by a factor of 6 times (P exposure to the eye level (P exposure. Radiation exposure to the surgeon can be greatly minimized by using either a pulsed imaging mode or the reversed setup. The reversed setup has the lowest amount of radiation exposure to the eye level.

  8. Combined anterior C2-C3 fusion and C2 pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of unstable hangman's fracture: a contrast to anterior approach only.

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    Xie, Ning; Khoo, Larry T; Yuan, Wen; Ye, Xiao-Jian; Chen, De-Yu; Xiao, Jian-Ru; Ni, Bin

    2010-03-15

    A retrospective clinical study was used to evaluate the effect of a new surgical treatment of the hangman's fractures. To determine the treatment efficacy of combined anterior C2-C3 reduction and fusion and posterior compressive C2 pedicle screw fixation for the management of unstable hangman's fractures. The classification of hangman's fractures as proposed by Levine-Edwards was used to classify and guide the treatment of these injuries. Most of these fractures respond to a variety of conservative therapies, but recently, earlier surgery has been increasingly advocated by authors from several countries for the rapid stabilization of these fractures. If surgery is indicated, an anterior approach using a C2-C3 reduction and fusion is preferred usually. Another well-accepted surgical method is the direct transpedicular osteosynthesis by the dorsal approach. However, there was rare report of the combined use of these 2 techniques. A group of 45 surgical patients were all diagnosed with radiograph, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 3D CT scans. Initial and final radiographs were measured for anterior translation and angulation of the C2-C3 complex. Initial external skull traction with extension was used in all patients after admission to reduce the fracture. Then an anterior C2-C3 discectomy followed by an interbody fusion and locking plate fixation was performed. Intraoperative reduction was confirmed by fluoroscopic control. About 29 patients therefore received anterior surgeries only since satisfactory reduction was achieved during the procedure. For the 16 patients who had persistent large residual gaps after the anterior procedure, additional same stage posterior C2 compressive pedicle screws were placed. Clinical and radiologic comparisons were performed in these 2 groups. The follow-up ranged from 24 to 54 months, with an average 33.6 months. There was radiographic evidence of continuity of the fracture and the bone graft seen at 4.7 months on average. Neck

  9. Perawatan Ortodontik Gigitan Terbuka Anterior

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    Yuniar Zen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior telah lama dianggap sebagai tantangan bagi ortodontis. Prevalensi gigitan terbuka anterior antara 3,5% hingga 11% terdapat pada berbagai usia dan kelompok etnis, serta ada sekitar 17% pasien ortodonti memiliki gigitan terbuka. Stabilitas hasil perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior sangat sulit, karena adanya kombinasi diskrepansi anteroposterior dengan gigitan terbuka skeletal sehingga dibutuhkan tingkat keterampilan diagnosis dan klinis yang tinggi. Etiologi gigitan terbuka anterior sangat kompleks karena dapat melibatkan skeletal, dental, dan faktor-faktor habitual. Eliminasi faktor etiologi merupakan hal yang penting dalam perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior. Berbagai cara perawatan untuk koreksi gigitan terbuka anterior diantaranya bedah ortognatik dan perawatan ortodontik kamuflase, seperti high-pull headgear, chincup, bite blocks, alatfungsional, pencabutan gigi, multi-loop edgewise archwires dan mini implan. Stabilitas hasil perawatan adalah kriteria yang paling penting dalam menentukan cara perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior. Orthodontic Treatment of Anterior Open Bite. An anterior open bite therapy has long been considered a challenge to orthodontist. The prevalence of anterior openbite range from 3,5 % to 11% among various age and ethnic groups and it has been shown that approximately 17% of orthodontic patients have open bite. Stability of treatment result of anterior open bite with well-maintained results is difficult, because the combination of anteroposteriorly discrepancy with skeletal open bite requires the highest degree of diagnostic and clinical skill. The etiology is complex, potentially involving skeletal, dental and habitual factors. The importance of an anterior open bite therapy is to eliminate the cause of the open bite. Various treatment modalities for the correction of an anterior open bite have been proposed, orthognatic surgery and orthodontic camouflage treatment such as high

  10. Anterior knee pain

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    LLopis, Eva [Hospital de la Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain) and Carretera de Corbera km 1, 46600 Alzira Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: ellopis@hospital-ribera.com; Padron, Mario [Clinica Cemtro, Ventisquero de la Condesa no. 42, 28035 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mario.padron@clinicacemtro.com

    2007-04-15

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries.

  11. Short-term alendronate treatment does not maintain a residual effect on spinal fusion with interbody devices and bone graft after treatment withdrawal: an experimental study on spinal fusion in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Baoding; Zou, Xuenong; Li, Haisheng; Xue, Qingyun; Bünger, Cody

    2013-02-01

    Whether alendronate treatment has a residual effect on bone ingrowth into porous biomaterial in humans or experimental animals after treatment withdrawal is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate bone ingrowth into porous tantalum and carbon fiber interbody implants after discontinuing alendronate treatment in experimental spinal fusion in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into two groups of each 12 pigs. The pigs underwent anterior intervertebral lumbar arthrodeses at L2-3, L4-5 and L6-7. Each level was randomly allocated to one of the three implants: a porous tantalum ring with pedicle screw fixation, a porous tantalum ring or a carbon fiber cage with anterior staple fixation. The central hole of implants was packed with an autograft. Alendronate was given orally for the first 3 months to one of the two groups. The pigs were observed for 6 months postoperatively. Histology and micro-CT scans were done at the endpoint. The spinal fusion rates of each implant showed no differences between two treatment groups. Furthermore, no differences were found between two groups as for bone ingrowth into the central holes of implants and bone-implant interface in each implant, or as for the pores of tantalum implants. Trabecular bone microarchitecture in the central hole of the carbon fiber cage did not differ between two treatment groups. The application of ALN, with a dose equivalent to that given to humans during the first 3 months after surgery, does not maintain a residual effect on spinal fusion with porous tantalum ring and autograft after treatment withdrawal in a porcine ALIF model.

  12. Evaluating anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Engene; Kraft, Michael C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints account for about 20% to 30% of all primary care office visits; of these visits, discomfort in the knee, shoulder, and back are the most prevalent musculoskeletal symptoms. Having pain or dysfunction in the front part of the knee is a common presentation and reason for a patient to see a health care provider. There are a number of pathophysiological etiologies to anterior knee pain. This article describes some of the common and less common causes, and includes sections on diagnosis and treatment for each condition as well as key points. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The anterior cingulate cortex

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    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC has a role in attention, analysis of sensory information, error recognition, problem solving, detection of novelty, behavior, emotions, social relations, cognitive control, and regulation of visceral functions. This area is active whenever the individual feels some emotions, solves a problem, or analyzes the pros and cons of an action (if it is a right decision. Analogous areas are also found in higher mammals, especially whales, and they contain spindle neurons that enable complex social interactions. Disturbance of ACC activity is found in dementias, schizophrenia, depression, the obsessive-compulsive syndrome, and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  14. Endoscope-Assisted Abscess Drainage Secondary to Endoscope-Assisted Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: 1-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Karthik; Burks, Steven Shelby; Chieng, Lee Onn; Veeravagu, Anand; Wang, Michael Y

    2017-11-01

    Endoscopic discectomy and fusions have been gaining popularity in the recent past and are noted to be safe for their application in elderly population. The procedure involves ultra-small incision for discectomy followed by placement of percutaneous screws in awake patients. Treatment of advanced spinal pathology with endoscope-assisted techniques is challenging. Although not common with the endoscopic approach, postoperative infection can be problematic, as there are no established guidelines on its management. A 76-year-old female patient underwent lumbar 4-5 endoscopic-assisted transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for severe degenerative changes leading to back and radicular leg pain. She did well postoperatively and was discharged home the following day. She presented to the outside hospital with new onset of severe back pain, sepsis, and positive methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus with blood culture and demonstrated no improvement while on antibiotics. Initial magnetic resonance imaging revealed postoperative changes only. With positive blood culture and localized pain, she was then offered to undergo a percutaneous drainage of the abscess. Under local anesthesia and intravenous sedation, a small pocket of collection was found along the endoscopic trajectory from previous surgery. After evacuation of the collection, the interbody device was irrigated with vancomycin through endoscope. Postoperatively, immediate symptomatic improvement was noted in back pain. She was discharged home on oxacillin and continues to do well at 12 months' follow-up with excellent fusion. The present case illustrates the successful treatment of a surgical-site infection after endoscope-assisted transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion via a repeat percutaneous endoscopic approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomechanics of lumbar cortical screw-rod fixation versus pedicle screw-rod fixation with and without interbody support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Orribo, Luis; Kalb, Samuel; Reyes, Phillip M; Chang, Steve W; Crawford, Neil R

    2013-04-15

    Seven different combinations of posterior screw fixation, with or without interbody support, were compared in vitro using nondestructive flexibility tests. To study the biomechanical behavior of a new cortical screw (CS) fixation construct relative to the traditional pedicle screw (PS) construct. The CS is an alternative to the PS for posterior fixation of the lumbar spine. The CS trajectory is more sagittally and cranially oriented than the PS, being anchored in the pars interarticularis. Like PS fixation, CS fixation uses interconnecting rods fastened with top-locking connectors. Stability after bilateral CS fixation was compared with stability after bilateral PS fixation in the setting of intact disc and with direct lateral interbody fixation (DLIF) or transforaminal lateral interbody fixation (TLIF) support. Standard nondestructive flexibility tests were performed in cadaveric lumbar specimens, allowing non-paired comparisons of specific conditions from 28 specimens (4 groups of 7) within a larger experiment of multiple hardware configurations. Condition tested and group from which results originated were as follows: (1) intact (all groups); (2) with L3-L4 bilateral PS-rods (group 1); (3) with bilateral CS-rods (group 2); (4) with DLIF (group 3); (5) with DLIF + CS-rods (group 4); (6) with DLIF + PS-rods (group 3); (7) with TLIF + CS-rods (group 2), and (8) with TLIF + PS-rods (group 2). To assess spinal stability, the mean range of motion, lax zone, and stiff zone at L3-L4 were compared during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. With intact disc, stability was equivalent after PS-rod and CS-rod fixation, except that PS-rod fixation was stiffer during axial rotation. With DLIF support, there was no significant difference in stability between PS-rod and CS-rod fixation. With TLIF support, PS-rod fixation was stiffer than CS-rod fixation during lateral bending. Bilateral CS-rod fixation provided about the same stability in cadaveric specimens

  16. A STUDY OF POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION WITH LOCALLY HARVESTED SPINOLAMINECTOMY BONE GRAFT AND PEDICLE SCREW FIXATION IN SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

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    Pardhasaradhi M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF create intervertebral fusion by means of a posterior approach. Successful results have been reported with allograft, various cages (for interbody support, autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein‐2. Interbody fusion techniques facilitate reduction and enhance fusion. Corticocancellous laminectomy bone chips alone can be used as a means of spinal fusion in patients with single level instrumented PLIF. This has got a good fusion rate. PLIF with cage gives better fusion on radiology than PLIF with iliac bone graft, but no statistical difference in the clinical outcome. Cage use precludes complications associated with iliac bone harvesting. The reported adjacent segment degeneration was 40.5% and reoperation was 8.1% after 10 years of follow up. MATERIALS AND METHODS 30 cases of spondylolisthesis who attended the Orthopaedic Outpatient Department of Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, from 2014 to 2016 were taken up for study. All the cases were examined clinically and confirmed radiologically. The patient’s age, sex, symptoms and duration were noted and were examined clinically for the status of the spine. Straight leg raising test was done and neurological examination of the lower limbs performed. All the patients were subjected to the radiological examination of the lumbosacral spine by taking anteroposterior, lateral (flexion and extension views, oblique views to demonstrate spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. MRI and x-rays studies were done in all the cases to facilitate evaluation of the root compression disk changes and spinal cord changes. RESULTS In our study, we followed all the 30 patients after the surgery following procedure of removal of loose lamina, spinous process and fibrocartilaginous mass, PLIF with only the laminectomy bone mass and CD screw system fixation up to 2 years. 12 patients (40% had excellent

  17. Investigation of different cage designs and mechano-regulation algorithms in the lumbar interbody fusion process - a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, Sergio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Rohlmann, Antonius; Putzier, Michael; Simón, Antonio; Duda, Georg; Checa, Sara

    2014-04-11

    Lumbar interbody fusion cages are commonly used to treat painful spinal degeneration and instability by achieving bony fusion. Many different cage designs exist, however the effect of cage morphology and material properties on the fusion process remains largely unknown. This finite element model study aims to investigate the influence of different cage designs on bone fusion using two mechano-regulation algorithms of tissue formation. It could be observed that different cages play a distinct key role in the mechanical conditions within the fusion region and therefore regulate the time course of the fusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of subsidence on clinical outcomes and radiographic fusion rates in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, Isaac O; Jain, Deeptee; Owens, Timothy Ryan; Gottfried, Oren; Hodges, Tiffany R; Nimjee, Shahid M; Bagley, Carlos A

    2014-02-01

    Systematic review. To provide a systematic review of published literature on the impact of subsidence on clinical outcomes and radiographic fusion rates after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with plates or without plates. Subsidence of interbody implants is common after anterior cervical spine fusions. The impact of subsidence on fusion rates and clinical outcomes is unknown. Systematic literature review on published articles on anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, which objectively measured graft subsidence, radiographic fusion rates, and clinical outcomes between April 1966 and December 2010. A total of 35 articles that measured subsidence and provided fusion rates and/or clinical outcomes were selected for inclusion. The mean subsidence rate ranged from 19.3% to 42.5%. The rate of subsidence based on the type of implant ranged from 22.8% to 35.9%. The incidence of subsidence was not impacted by the type of implant (P=0.98). The overall fusion rate of the combined studies was 92.8% and was not impacted by subsidence irrespective of subsidence definition or the measurement technique used (P=0.19). Clinical outcomes were evaluated in 27 of 35 studies with all studies reporting an improvement in patient outcomes postoperatively. Subsidence irrespective of the measurement technique or definition does not appear to have an impact on successful fusion and/or clinical outcomes. A validated definition and standard measurement technique for subsidence is needed to determine the actual incidence of subsidence and its impact on radiographic and clinical outcomes.

  19. [Anterior guidance in complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, J; Trevelo, A

    1990-01-01

    Although the anterior guidance in complete dentures is not really a guide, the arrangement of the anterior maxillary and mandibular prosthetic teeth, defines a propulsive line called the virtual anterior guidance, a part from the cinematic criterias. The influence of this guide on cuspal movement is superior, in all mandibular points, to the influence of the condylar pathway. If this line is not respected, the practitioner may have to do excessive grindings during occlusal adjustments.

  20. Multidisciplinary management of anterior diastemata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Herkrath, Fernando José; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino

    2007-01-01

    Anterior diastemata may compromise the harmony of a patient's smile. Consideration of etiologic factors, previous gingival conditioning, and individual treatment planning are essential in the proper management of anterior diastemata. An integrated orthodontic-restorative approach may enhance...... the aesthetic results when orthodontic therapy itself is not feasible. This article presents integrated orthodonticrestorative solutions of anterior diastemata, associated with the conditioning of the gingival tissue with composite resin, and discusses the most relevant aspects related to their etiology...

  1. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  2. Characterization of a novel caudal vertebral interbody fusion in a rat tail model: An implication for future material and mechanical testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Yeh

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: The rat caudal disc interbody fusion model proved to be an efficient, repeatable and easily accessible model. Future research into adjuvant treatments like growth factor injection and alternative fusion materials under conditions of osteoporosis using this model would be worthwhile.

  3. Fusion Rate and Clinical Outcomes in Two-Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Hiroyuki; Takenaka, Shota; Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Tobimatsu, Hidekazu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Furuya, Masayuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2018-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become a general surgical method for degenerative lumbar diseases. Although many reports have focused on single-level PLIF, few have focused on 2-level PLIF, and no report has covered the fusion status of 2-level PLIF. The purpose of this study is to investigate clinical outcomes and fusion for 2-level PLIF by using a combination of dynamic radiographs and multiplanar-reconstruction computed tomography scans. This study consisted of 48 consecutive patients who underwent 2-level PLIF for degenerative lumbar diseases. We assessed surgery duration, estimated blood loss, complications, clinical outcomes as measured by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, lumbar sagittal alignment as measured on standing lateral radiographs, and fusion status as measured by dynamic radiographs and multiplanar-reconstruction computed tomography. Patients were examined at a follow-up point of 4.8 ± 2.2 years after surgery. Thirty-eight patients who did not undergo lumbosacral fusion comprised the lumbolumbar group, and 10 patients who underwent lumbosacral fusion comprised the lumbosacral group. The mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved from 12.1 to 22.4 points by the final follow-up examination. Sagittal alignment also was improved. All patients had fusion in the cranial level. Seven patients had nonunion in the caudal level, and the lumbosacral group (40%) had a significantly poorer fusion rate than the lumbolumbar group (97%) did. Surgical outcomes of 2-level PLIF were satisfactory. The fusion rate at both levels was 85%. All nonunion was observed at the caudal level and concentrated at L5-S level in L4-5-S PLIF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Uninstrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Have Technological Advances in Stabilizing the Lumbar Spine Truly Improved Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolo, Laura M; Oklund, Sally A; Zawadzki, Nadine; Desai, Manisha; Prolo, Donald J

    2018-04-06

    Since 1980s numerous operations have replaced posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with human bone. These often involve expensive implants and complex procedures. Escalating expenditures in lumbar fusion surgery warrant re-evaluation of classical PLIF with allogeneic ilium and without instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term fusion rate and clinical outcomes of allo-PLIF. Between 1981-2006 321 patients ages 12-80, underwent 339 one- or two-level allo-PLIFs for degenerative instability and were followed 1-28 years. Fusion status was determined by radiographs and as available, by CT scans. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Economic/Functional Outcome Scale. 308 of the 321 patients were followed postoperatively (average 6.7 years, range 1-28); 297 (96%) fused. Fusion rates were lower for patients with substance abuse (89%, p=0.007). Clinical outcomes in 87% of patients were excellent (52%) or good (35%). Economic/Functional Outcome Scale scores following initial allo-PLIF on average increased 5.2 points. Successful fusion correlated with nearly a 2-point gain in outcome score (p=0.001). A positive association between a patient characteristic and outcome was observed only with age 65 and greater; whereas negative associations in clinical outcomes were observed with mental illness, substance abuse, heavy stress to low back, or industrial injuries. Total complication rate was 7%. With three decades of follow-up we found successful clinical outcomes are highly correlated with solid fusion using only allogeneic iliac bone. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Graft subsidence as a predictor of revision surgery following stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; McDowell, Michael M; Panczykowski, David M; Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a less invasive surgical option commonly used for a variety of spinal conditions, including in high-risk patient populations. LLIF is often performed as a stand-alone procedure, and may be complicated by graft subsidence, the clinical ramifications of which remain unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize further the sequelae of graft subsidence following stand-alone LLIF. METHODS A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was conducted on consecutive patients who underwent stand-alone LLIF between July 2008 and June 2015; 297 patients (623 levels) met inclusion criteria. Imaging studies were examined to grade graft subsidence according to Marchi criteria, and compared between those who required revision surgery and those who did not. Additional variables recorded included levels fused, DEXA (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) T-score, body mass index, and routine demographic information. The data were analyzed using the Student t-test, chi-square analysis, and logistic regression analysis to identify potential confounding factors. RESULTS Of 297 patients, 34 (11.4%) had radiographic evidence of subsidence and 18 (6.1%) required revision surgery. The median subsidence grade for patients requiring revision surgery was 2.5, compared with 1 for those who did not. Chi-square analysis revealed a significantly higher incidence of revision surgery in patients with high-grade subsidence compared with those with low-grade subsidence. Seven of 18 patients (38.9%) requiring revision surgery suffered a vertebral body fracture. High-grade subsidence was a significant predictor of the need for revision surgery (p subsidence following stand-alone LLIF required revision surgery. When evaluating patients for LLIF, supplemental instrumentation should be considered during the index surgery in patients with a significant risk of graft subsidence.

  6. Elimination of Subsidence with 26-mm-Wide Cages in Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gernot; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Gandevia, Lena; Hussain, Ibrahim; Nakhla, Jonathan; Zubkov, Micaella; Härtl, Roger

    2017-08-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (ELIF) has gained popularity as a minimally invasive technique for indirect decompression. However, graft subsidence potentially threatens long-term success of ELIF. This study evaluated whether 26-mm-wide cages can eliminate subsidence and subsequent loss of decompression in ELIF. Patients undergoing ELIF surgery using a 26-mm-wide cage were analyzed retrospectively. Patient demographics and perioperative data for radiographic and clinical outcomes were recorded. Radiographic parameters included regional sagittal lumbar lordosis and foraminal and disc height. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale. Subsidence of 26-mm-wide cages was compared with previous outcomes of patients undergoing ELIF using 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages. There were 21 patients and 28 spinal segments analyzed. Radiographic outcome measures such as disc and foraminal height revealed significant improvement at follow-up compared with before surgery (P = 0.001). Postoperative to last follow-up cage subsidence translated into 0.34 mm ± 0.26 and -0.55 mm ± 0.64 in disc and foraminal height loss, respectively. Patients with 26-mm-wide cages experienced less subsidence by means of disc (26 mm vs. 18 mm and 22 mm, P ≤ 0.05) and foraminal height (26 mm vs. 18 mm, P = 0.005; 26 mm vs. 22 mm, P = 0.208) loss compared with patients receiving 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages. The 26-mm-wide cages almost eliminated cage subsidence in ELIF. Compared with 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages, 26-mm-wide cages significantly reduced cage subsidence in ELIF at midterm follow-up. A 26-mm-wide cage should be used in ELIF to achieve sustained indirect decompression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The Correlation Between Cage Subsidence, Bone Mineral Density, and Clinical Results in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyu Won; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Do-Yoon; Shim, Hee Jong

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected radiographic and clinical data. This study aims to investigate the relationship between cage subsidence and bone mineral density (BMD), and to reveal the clinical implications of cage subsidence. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become one of the standard treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. However, cage subsidence might result in recurrent foraminal stenosis and deteriorate the clinical results. Furthermore, numbers of osteoporosis patients who underwent PLIF are increasing. Therefore, the information on the correlations between cage subsidence, BMD, and clinical results will be of great significance. A total 139 segments was included in this retrospective study. We examined functional rating index (Visual Analogue Scale for pain, Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form-36 score) preoperatively, and investigated their changes after postoperative 1 year. Correlation between cage subsidence and clinical scores was investigated. Plain anteroposterior and lateral radiograph were taken preoperatively and postoperatively and during follow-up. Preoperative BMD and subsidence measured by postoperative 1 year 3-dimensional computed tomography were achieved and their correlation was assessed. All postoperative clinical scores improved significantly compared with preoperative ones (pain Visual Analogue Scale: 7.34-2.89, Oswestry Disability Index: 25.34-15.86, Short Form-36: 26.45-16.46, all Psubsidence (r=-0.285, Psubsidence (>3 mm) compared with the segments in which T score were higher than -3.0 (P=0.012), and its odds ratio was 8.44. Subsidence had no significant correlation with all clinical scores. This study revealed that cage subsidence is relevant to BMD. However, it was demonstrated that subsidence is not related to the clinical deterioration. Therefore, PLIF procedure which is conducted carefully can be a good surgical option to treat lumbar degenerative disease for osteoporotic patients.

  8. Symptomatic adjacent segment pathology after posterior lumbar interbody fusion for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after fusion surgery for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) has been reported to be relatively low compared with other lumbar disease entities. However, there has been no study of symptomatic ASP incidence using posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with pedicle screw instrumentation. We investigated the incidence of symptomatic ASP after PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation for adult low-grade IS and identified significant risk factors for symptomatic ASP. We retrospectively studied records of 40 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Japan. The patients were followed for ≥ 4 years. Patients' medical records were retrospectively examined for evidence of symptomatic ASP. Age at time of surgery, sex, fusion level, whole lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, preexisting laminar inclination angle, and facet tropism at the cranial fusion segment were analyzed to identify risk factors for symptomatic ASP. Four patients (ASP group) developed symptomatic ASP at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion. There were no significant differences in age, sex, fusion level, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, or facet tropism at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion between the ASP and the non-ASP groups. In contrast, laminar inclination angle at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was significantly higher in the ASP group than in the non-ASP group. Four patients (10%) developed symptomatic ASP after PLIF with transpedicular fixation for adult low-grade IS. Preexisting laminar horizontalization at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was a significant risk factor for symptomatic ASP.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of posterior lumbar interbody fusion in the Japanese universal health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takahito; Miwa, Toshitada; Iwasaki, Motoki; Oda, Takenori

    2018-03-01

    Globally, the cost-effectiveness of spinal surgery is becoming increasingly important. However, these data are limited to a few countries. The purpose of our study was to examine the cost/quality adjusted life year (cost/QALY) gained for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in the Japanese universal health insurance system. Fifty five patients underwent PLIF for lumbar degenerative spinal canal stenosis between July 2013 and September 2015 was included. Effectiveness was measured using Euro QOL 5-dimension (EQ-5D), Short-Form 8 physical component summary (PCS), and visual analog scale (VAS). The cost was calculated from the perspective of the public healthcare payer. Effectiveness and cost were measured one year after surgery. QALYs were calculated by multiplying the utility value (EQ-5D) and life years. Only direct costs were included on the basis of actual reimbursements. Cost/QALY at a 5-year time horizon with a 2% discount rate was estimated. Sensitivity analysis was performed by varying the time horizon (2 years or 10 years). The exchange rate was defined as US $1 to Japanese 100 yen. Mean total cost one year after surgery was ¥2,802,900 ($28029). Operative cost was ¥1,779,700 ($17797). Mean gained score was 0.22 in EQ-5D, 10.3 in PCS, and -44 in VAS. Cost/QALY was ¥2,697,500 ($26975). Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that cost/QALY at a 10-year time horizon was ¥1,428,300 ($14283) and that cost/QALY at a 2-year time horizon was ¥6,435,400 ($64354). Clinical outcomes after PLIF improved beyond minimum clinical improvement difference. Cost/QALY was below the widely-accepted benchmark (cost/QALY < $50000). PLIF could be regarded as cost-effective interventions. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mast Quadrant-assisted Minimally Invasive Modified Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Single Incision Versus Double Incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Lei Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of minimally invasive techniques is to make every effort to reduce tissue damage. Certainly, reducing skin incision is an important part of these techniques. This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of Mast Quadrant-assisted modified transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF with a small single posterior median incision. Methods: During the period of March 2011 to March 2012, 34 patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disease underwent the minimally invasive modified TLIF assisted by Mast Quadrant with a small single posterior median incision (single incision group. The cases in this group were compared to 37 patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disease in the double incision group. The perioperative conditions of patients in these two groups were statistically analyzed and compared. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scores, Visual Analog Scale (VAS scores, and sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators before operation and 3, 12 months postoperation were compared. Results: A total of 31 and 35 cases in the single incision and double incision groups, respectively, completed at least 12 months of systemic follow-up. The differences in perioperative conditions between the two groups were not statistically significant. The incision length of the single incision group was significantly shorter than that of the double incision group (P < 0.01. The ODI and VAS scores of patients in both groups improved significantly at 3 and 12 months postoperation. However, these two indicators at 3 and 12 months postoperation and the sacrospinalis muscle damage evaluation indicators at 3 months postoperation did not differ significantly between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05. Conclusions: Mast Quadrant-assisted modified TLIF with a small single posterior median incision has excellent clinical feasibility compared to minimally invasive TLIF with a double paramedian incision.

  11. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Isthmic Spondylolisthesis: In Situ Versus Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Gu, Guangfei; Zhu, Yanjie; Guan, Xiaofei; Hu, Annan; Wu, Xinbo; Zhang, Hailong; He, Shisheng

    2016-06-01

    The study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of reduction versus in situ fusion with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for isthmic spondylolisthesis. Demographic, preoperative, and postoperative data were collected from the medical records. Radiographic fusion was assessed by use of the grading criteria of Bridwell. Preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes including visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, Japanese Orthopedic Association scale and improvement rate were calculated. Patient satisfaction was assessed with the criteria of Macnab (excellent, good, fair, poor). There were 24 patients (11 male) in the reduction group and 21 patients (10 male) in the in situ fusion group. The average follow-up was 34.75 ± 8.06 months in reduction group and 31.05 ± 6.52 months in the in situ fusion group (P = 0.101). There were no significant differences in hospital stay, estimated blood loss, blood transfusion, operation time, fusion grading, and complications between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Spinal fusion rate was 91.67% (22/24) in the reduction group and 85.71% (18/21) in the in situ group (P = 0.835). There were no significant differences in Japanese Orthopedic Association scale, visual analog scale, and Oswestry Disability Index score between the 2 groups whenever preoperatively, 3-month postoperatively, or at the last follow-up (P > 0.05). According to the criteria of Macnab, the rate of excellent and good was 83.33% in reduction group and 80.95% in the in situ group (P = 0.899). MIS-TLIF with reduction did not induce significantly better patient-reported outcomes, spinal fusion rate, perioperative outcomes, or fewer complications in isthmic spondylolisthesis. Intentional reduction may not be a requirement in MIS-TLIF for isthmic spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lumbar interbody fusion: a parametric investigation of a novel cage design with and without posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2012-03-01

    A finite element model of the L4-L5 human segment was employed to carry out a parametric biomechanical investigation of lumbar interbody fusion with a novel "sandwich" cage having an inner stiff core and two softer layers in the areas close to the endplates, with and without posterior fixation. Considered cage designs included: (a) cage in a homogeneous material with variable elastic modulus (19-2,000 MPa), (b) "sandwich" cage having an inner core (E=2,000 MPa) and softer layers (E=19 MPa) with variable thickness (1-2.5 mm). The latter cage was also considered in combination with posterior rods made with a material having variable elastic modulus (19-210,000 MPa). All the models were loaded with 500 N compression and moments of 7.5 Nm in flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. The homogeneous cage stabilized the segment in flexion, lateral bending and axial rotation; in extension there was a destabilization up to 60% and remarkable cage movement (1 mm). The "sandwich" cage limited this phenomenon (cage movement<0.6 mm), effectively stabilized the segment in the other directions and lowered the maximal contact pressure on the endplates, reducing the risk of subsidence. Posterior fixation reduced spinal flexibility and cage movement. The soft layers of the "sandwich" cage had the potential to limit the risk of cage subsidence and to preserve a significant loading of the structure even in combination with flexible posterior instrumentation, which may have a beneficial effect in promoting bony fusion.

  13. Effects of Addition of Preoperative Intravenous Ibuprofen to Pregabalin on Postoperative Pain in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Ulaş Pınar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Ibuprofen and pregabalin both have independent positive effects on postoperative pain. The aim of the study is researching effect of 800 mg i.v. ibuprofen in addition to preoperative single dose pregabalin on postoperative analgesia and morphine consumption in posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery. Materials and Methods. 42 adult ASA I-II physical status patients received 150 mg oral pregabalin 1 hour before surgery. Patients received either 250 ml saline with 800 mg i.v. ibuprofen or saline without ibuprofen 30 minutes prior to the surgery. Postoperative analgesia was obtained by morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA and 1 g i.v. paracetamol every six hours. PCA morphine consumption was recorded and postoperative pain was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS in postoperative recovery room, at the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, 24th, 36th, and 48th hours. Results. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in ibuprofen group in recovery room, at the 1st, 2nd, 36th, and 48th hours. Total morphine consumption was lower in ibuprofen group at the 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 48th hours. Conclusions. Multimodal analgesia with preoperative ibuprofen added to preoperative pregabalin safely decreases postoperative pain and total morphine consumption in patients having posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery, without increasing incidences of bleeding or other side effects.

  14. Single- versus dual-rod anterior instrumentation of thoracolumbar curves in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Mithun; Yang, Yi; Liew, Susan; Turner, Peter L; Torode, Ian P

    2016-10-01

    Single or dual-rod instrumentation can be used for the anterior fixation of the spine in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). We aim to compare the complications, radiographic and functional outcomes of patients with AIS who have undergone single and dual-rod instrumentation. This is a multi-centre study involving the Royal Children's, Royal Melbourne and Epworth hospitals. Three primary surgeons were involved to ensure homogeneity of surgical technique and implants. Patients with AIS and thoracolumbar curves (Lenke 5 and 6) undergoing anterior instrumentation from 1st January 2000 to 30th June 2013 were included. Radiographic data were collected from X-rays. The functional outcome was measured through the Scoliosis Research Society questionnaire (SRS-30). The study included 58 patients (38 single-rod and 20 dual-rod patients). Thirty-nine patients were classified with Lenke 5 curves, while 19 patients had Lenke 6 curves. Structural interbody supports were used in 95 % of cases. In the preoperative to postoperative period, patients with single rods had an improvement of 75 and 51 % for primary and secondary curves, respectively, while patients with dual rods had an improvement of 70 and 38 % for primary and secondary curves, respectively. There were no cases of pseudoarthrosis or metalware failure in either group. Two patients (one single-rod and one dual-rod patient) required further unplanned posterior fusion. 91 % of patients were satisfied with the results of their back management. Pseudoarthrosis and metalware failure are rare complications of anterior instrumentation. Our study found no significant difference in functional or radiographic outcome between single and dual-rod instrumentation. Level III.

  15. Treatment of cervical radiculopathy by anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman A Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since the pioneering days of the anterior cervical approach introduced by Cloward et al. in the early 1950s, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF has been the standard procedure for most discogenic and degenerative cervical spinal lesions. Although traditional interbody fusion using iliac bone can maintain the patency of the neuroforamen and ensure solid fusion, selection of patients, and of surgical procedure for ACDF is a continuous challenge. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the results of cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical cages in treatment of cervical radiculopathy clinically and radiologically. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy were operated upon using this technique. They were 15 males and 3 females. Clinical and radiological assessment, visual analog scale (VAS for neck and arm and modified Oswestery neck disability index (NDI were done preoperatively and at 4 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Polyetheretherketone (Peek cages filled with iliac bone graft were used after cervical discectomy. The levels operated upon were C 5-6 in 16 patients and C4-5 in 2 patients. Results: Marked clinical improvement as regard arm and neck pain, and NDI was observed. The pre and post operative mean and standard deviations (SD of the various scores were as follows. VAS for pain in arm reduced from mean of 8 (SD 1.76 to mean 0.4 (SD 0.4, VAS for neck pain reduced from mean of 3.5 (SD 1.58 to mean of 0.8 (SD 0.47, and NDI from mean of 20.2 (SD 0.89 to 2.1(SD 1.05. Fusion occurred in all patients. Subjectively 79% of the patients reported marked improvement in neck pain, and 95% reported marked reduction in arm pain. Conclusion: Anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion resulted in high fusion rate with minimal preservation of lordosis.

  16. Comparison of allograft and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage subsidence rates in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yson, Sharon C; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Santos, Edward Rainier G

    2017-04-01

    Structural allografts and PEEK cages are commonly used interbody fusion devices in ACDF. The subsidence rates of these two spacers have not yet been directly compared. The primary aim of this study was to compare the subsidence rate of allograft and PEEK cage in ACDF. The secondary aim was to determine if the presence of subsidence affects the clinical outcome. We reviewed 67 cases (117 levels) of ACDF with either structural allograft or PEEK cages. There were 85 levels (48 cases) with PEEK and 32 levels (19 cases) with allograft spacers. Anterior and posterior disc heights at each operative level were measured at immediate and 6months post-op. Subsidence was defined as a decrease in anterior or posterior disc heights >2mm. NDI of the subsidence (SG) and non-subsidence group (NSG) were recorded. Chi-square test was used to analyze subsidence rates. T-test was used to analyze clinical outcomes (α=0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between subsidence rates of the PEEK (29%; 25/85) and allograft group (28%; 9/32) (p=0.69). Overall mean subsidence was 2.3±1.7mm anteriorly and 2.6±1.2mm posteriorly. Mean NDI improvement was 11.7 (from 47.1 to 35.4; average follow-up: 12mos) for the SG and 14.0 (from 45.8 to 31.8; average follow-up: 13mos) for the NSG (p=0.74). Subsidence rate does not seem to be affected by the use of either PEEK or allograft as spacers in ACDF. Furthermore, subsidence alone does not seem to be predictive of clinical outcomes of ACDF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone cage packed with local autobone : assessment of bone fusion and subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Ill; Cho, Dae-Chul; Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Sung, Joo-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    It remains debatable whether cervical spine fusion cages should be filled with any kind of bone or bone substitute. Cortical and subcortical bone from the anterior and posterior osteophytes of the segment could be used to fill the cage. The purposes of the present study are to evaluate the clinical outcomes and radiological outcomes including bone fusion and subsidence that occurred after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a stand-alone cage packed with local autobone graft. Thirty-one patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage packed with local autobone graft from July 2009 to december 2011 were enrolled in this study. Bone fusion was assessed by cervical plain radiographs and computed tomographic scan. Nonunion was evaluated according to the absence of bony bridge on computed tomographic scan. Subsidence was defined as a ≥2 mm decrease of the interbody height at the final follow-up compared to that measured at the immediate postoperative period. Subsidence was observed in 7 patients (22.6%). Of 7 patients with subsidence greater 2 mm, nonunion was developed in 3. Three patients with subsidence greater 2 mm were related with endplate damage during intraoperative endplate preparation. Solid bone fusion was achieved in 28 out of 31 patients (90.3%). With proper patient selection and careful endplate preparation, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a stand-alone PEEK cage packed with local autobone graft could be a good alternative to the standard ACDF techniques with plating.

  18. Inestabilidad Anterior de Hombro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo David Flint Kuran

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ción La luxación recidivante de hombro es una patología frecuente en pacientes jóvenes, laboralmente activos. Existen numerosas técnicas quirúrgicas para la inestabilidad glenohumeral. La técnica de Bristow, discutida por no ser anatómica y por sus complicaciones, continúa vigente debido al bajo índice de reluxaciones. Los objetivos fueron determinar el índice de recidiva, alteraciones funcionales e índice de consolidación del injerto. Materiales­ y­ Métodos Se evaluaron 24 pacientes del sexo masculino, de entre 19 y 40 años, operados por luxación anterior recidivante de hombro según la técnica de Bristow, entre enero de 2003 y agosto de 2011. Se evaluó la tasa de reluxación, la función articular según el puntaje de Constant y el posicionamiento del injerto con respecto a la superficie articular con tomografía y radiografías para evaluar la consolidación del injerto. Se registraron las complicaciones quirúrgicas. Resultados ­Todos los pacientes eran hombres, con rango de edad de 19 a 40 años. La causa fue traumática en 24 pacientes. Dieciséis pacientes presentaron más de 3 episodios de luxación prequirúrgicos. Según la escala de Constant, 21 obtuvieron entre 96 y 100 puntos, y los restantes, entre 90 y 95 puntos. No hubo nuevos episodios de luxaciones. La tomografía mostró la consolidación en todos los casos. Un paciente tuvo una imagen osteolítica alrededor del tornillo, sin compromiso funcional del hombro. Conclusión La técnica de Bristow para tratar la luxación anterior recidivante de hombro provocó un bajo índice de complicaciones, con resultados funcionales entre excelentes y buenos. No hubo episodios de reluxación y se logró la consolidación del injerto óseo en todos los casos.

  19. Fresh frozen plasma resuscitation attenuates platelet dysfunction compared with normal saline in a large animal model of multisystem trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Johansson, Pär I; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2014-01-01

    to multisystem trauma (traumatic brain injury, liver injury, rib fracture, and soft tissue injury) with hemorrhagic shock (40% of estimated blood volume). Animals were left in shock (mean arterial pressure, 30-35 mm Hg) for 2 hours followed by resuscitation with three times shed volume NS (n = 6) or one times...... factor β [TGF-β], sP-Selectin, and CD40L) as well as endothelial injury (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1], vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 [VCAM-1]) were also assayed. Thromboelastography was used to measure clotting activity. RESULTS: ADP-induced platelet aggregation was significantly higher...

  20. Comparison of Accuracy of Whole-Exome Sequencing with Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Tissue Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensel Oh

    Full Text Available Formalin fixing with paraffin embedding (FFPE has been a standard sample preparation method for decades, and archival FFPE samples are still very useful resources. Nonetheless, the use of FFPE samples in cancer genome analysis using next-generation sequencing, which is a powerful technique for the identification of genomic alterations at the nucleotide level, has been challenging due to poor DNA quality and artificial sequence alterations. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of matched frozen samples and FFPE samples of tissues from 4 cancer patients and compared the next-generation sequencing data obtained from these samples. The major differences between data obtained from the 2 types of sample were the shorter insert size and artificial base alterations in the FFPE samples. A high proportion of short inserts in the FFPE samples resulted in overlapping paired reads, which could lead to overestimation of certain variants; >20% of the inserts in the FFPE samples were double sequenced. A large number of soft clipped reads was found in the sequencing data of the FFPE samples, and about 30% of total bases were soft clipped. The artificial base alterations, C>T and G>A, were observed in FFPE samples only, and the alteration rate ranged from 200 to 1,200 per 1M bases when sequencing errors were removed. Although high-confidence mutation calls in the FFPE samples were compatible to that in the frozen samples, caution should be exercised in terms of the artifacts, especially for low-confidence calls. Despite the clearly observed artifacts, archival FFPE samples can be a good resource for discovery or validation of biomarkers in cancer research based on whole-exome sequencing.

  1. Long-term retrospective study of implants placed after sinus floor augmentation with fresh-frozen homologous block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livingstom Rubens Sousa Rocha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze and follow-up implants placed in the posterior maxillary regions previously grafted with homologous bone. Materials and Methods: Forty-one grafts with homologous bone blocks were performed in maxillary sinuses, and 121 implants were placed in premolar and molar regions approximately 6 months after the grafts. Patients were followed up for periods varying from 12 to 124 months after rehabilitation. Results: The results showed two implant failures, for a 98.3% success rate during the follow-up period. Discussion: The implants placed had an average torque of 40 N-cm, regardless of the, design, diameter, and length of the implants used. Conclusion: After following up on the implants placed in this study, we concluded that those placed in regions of the maxillary sinuses previously grafted with homologous bone blocks had high long-term success rates and met the functional masticatory requirements.

  2. Fast and Simple Protocols for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics of Small Fresh Frozen Uterine Tissue Sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapic, I.; Uwugiaren, N.; Jansen, P.J.; Corthals, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Human tissues are an important link between organ-specific spatial molecular information, patient pathology, and patient treatment options. However, patient tissues are uniquely obtained by time and location, and limited in their availability and size. Currently, little knowledge exists about

  3. Fresh frozen plasma versus prothrombin complex concentrate in patients with intracranial haemorrhage related to vitamin K antagonists (INCH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Poli, Sven; Griebe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Haematoma expansion is a major cause of mortality in intracranial haemorrhage related to vitamin K antagonists (VKA-ICH). Normalisation of the international normalised ratio (INR) is recommended, but optimum haemostatic management is controversial. We assessed the safety and efficacy ...

  4. Anterior ankle arthrodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gordon L; Sayres, Stephanie C; O’Malley, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common procedure that resolves many conditions of the foot and ankle; however, complications following this procedure are often reported and vary depending on the fixation technique. Various techniques have been described in the attempt to achieve ankle arthrodesis and there is much debate as to the efficiency of each one. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of anterior plating in ankle arthrodesis using customised and Synthes TomoFix plates. We present the outcomes of 28 ankle arthrodeses between 2005 and 2012, specifically examining rate of union, patient-reported outcomes scores, and complications. All 28 patients achieved radiographic union at an average of 36 wk; the majority of patients (92.86%) at or before 16 wk, the exceptions being two patients with Charcot joints who were noted to have bony union at a three year review. Patient-reported outcomes scores significantly increased (P plate offers added compression and provides a rigid fixation for arthrodesis stabilization. PMID:24649408

  5. Effect of one- or two-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion on global sagittal balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Hwan; Joo, Youn-Suk; Lim, Cheongsu; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Choon Sung

    2017-12-01

    Sagittal imbalance is associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients with degenerative lumbar disease. However, there is no consensus on the impact of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) on local and global sagittal balance. To reveal the effect of one- or two-level PLIF on global sagittal balance. A retrospective case-control study. This study included 88 patients who underwent a one- or two-level PLIF for spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis. Clinical and radiological parameters were measured pre- and postoperatively. All patients were followed up for >2 years. Clinical outcomes included a visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and EuroQol 5-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D). Radiological parameters were measured using whole-spine standing lateral radiographs. Fusion, loosening, subsidence rates, and adverse events were also evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups according to their preoperative C7-S1 sagittal vertical axis (SVA): Group N: SVA≤5 cm vs Group I: SVA>5 cm; they were also divided according to postoperative changes in C7-S1 SVA. Clinical and radiological outcomes were compared between the groups. All clinical outcomes and radiological parameters improved postoperatively. C7-S1 SVA improved (-1.6 cm) after L3-L5 fusion, but it was compromised (+3.6 cm) after L4-S1 fusion (p=.001). Preoperative demographic and clinical data showed no difference except in the anxiety or depression domain of EQ-5D. No differences were found in postoperative clinical outcomes. Lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, and thoracic kyphosis slightly improved in Group N, whereas C7-S1 SVA decreased from 9.5 cm to 3.8 cm (pfusion (L3-L5 vs L4-S1, p=.033). Global sagittal balance improved after short-level lumbar fusion surgery in patients having spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis who showed preoperative sagittal imbalance. Restoration of sagittal balance predominantly occurred after L3-L4, L4-L5, or L3-L5 PLIF. However, no such restoration was

  6. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Spondylolisthesis: Comparison Between Isthmic and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Yeol; Park, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2015-11-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is a common surgical option for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). However, its effectiveness for isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) is still controversial. No current studies have directly compared perioperative and postoperative results including various radiological parameters between IS and DS after MIS TLIF. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical and radiological results between isthmic and degenerative spondylolisthesis after MIS TLIF. This is a retrospective study of 41 patients who underwent MIS TLIF for single-segment, grade 1 or 2 IS (n = 18) and DS (n = 23). The same surgical techniques and procedure were applied to both groups. Perioperative outcomes (operation time, blood loss, hospital stay, complications); clinical outcomes (visual analog scale [VAS], Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]); radiological parameters (disk height, degree of spondylolisthesis, slip angle, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, sacropelvic parameters: pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tile); and fusion rates using computed tomography scanning were compared between groups at 1 year postoperatively. There were no significantly different perioperative results between groups. Mean VAS and ODI scores improved significantly postoperatively in both groups but were not significantly different between groups at each follow-up point. Radiological parameters were not significantly different between groups except disk height and degree of spondylolisthesis. The disk heights were increased postoperatively (IS: 6.79-9.22 mm; DS: 8.18-8.97 mm) in both groups, and there were significant differences preoperatively. In addition, disk height restoration was greater for IS than DS (2.43 mm vs. 0.79 mm, P = 0.01). However, postoperative disk heights were not significantly different between groups. The degree of spondylolisthesis was significantly different between groups both preoperatively (16.77% vs. 11.33%, P

  7. Preventive Effect of Dynamic Stabilization Against Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Naohiro; Kawamura, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Daiki; Shimizu, Takaki; Sasagawa, Takeshi; Masuyama, Shigeru; Hirao, Yujiro; Kunogi, Junichi

    2017-01-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To investigate the effects of dynamic stabilization with sublaminar taping (ST) on the upper segment adjacent to posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Hybrid procedures such as dynamic stabilization for adjacent segment in addition to spinal fusion have been developed for reduction of the mechanical stress and prevention of adjacent segment pathology (ASP). However, a few reports are available on hybrid procedures and their efficacy is still controversial. Of the 116 patients who underwent L4/5 PLIF between August 2006 and September 2012, 76 patients with minimum 2-year follow up were included in this study. Fifty three patients underwent L4/5 PLIF with hybrid procedure using ST on L3 lamina (group U), and 23 patients underwent conventional L4/5 PLIF (group C). The adjacent segment degeneration (ASDeg) was determined by measurements of radiograph, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging; the adjacent segment disease (ASDis) was evaluated on medical records. The incidence of ASDeg at L3/4 segment of group U (3.7%) was significantly less than that of group C (30.4%) (P = 0.003), although there were no significant differences at L2/3 (group U, 7.5%; group C, 13%) or L5/S1 segment (group U, 5.7%; group C, 8.7%). On the other hand, no significant difference was found between two groups in the incidence of ASDis in L2/3 to L5/S1 levels, and no patient underwent reoperation. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses for L3/4 segment ASDeg revealed that the difference of surgical procedure was the only significant factor. The current study showed that L4/5 PLIF with hybrid procedure using ST on L3 lamina significantly reduced the incidence of L3/4 ASDeg as compared with the conventional L4/5 PLIF without compromising L2/3 or L5/S1 segment. Although further studies and longer follow up are necessary, the hybrid procedure is expected to be effective for preventing ASP. 4.

  8. Risk Factors of Adjacent Segment Disease After Transforaminal Inter-Body Fusion for Degenerative Lumbar Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Koji; Hoshino, Masahiro; Omori, Keita; Igarashi, Hidetoshi; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuruta, Takashi; Matsumoto, Koji; Iriuchishima, Takanori; Ajiro, Yasumitsu; Matsuzaki, Hiromi

    2017-01-15

    A retrospective study. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) after transforaminal inter-body fusion (TLIF) for degenerative lumbar disease. ASD is a major complication after spinal fusion. Many reports have been published concerning the risk factors for ASD after TLIF. A number of quantitative relationships to spino-pelvic parameters have been established. A retrospective cohort study was carried out to investigate spino-pelvic alignment in patients with ASD after TLIF. This study evaluated 263 subjects (150 subjects undergoing floating fusion (FF group), and 113 patients undergoing lumbosacral fusion (LF group)) who underwent TLIF from 2009 to 2012. The mean follow-up period was 37.6 months. Several parameters were measured using pre- and postoperative full-length free-standing radiographs, including lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral slope (SS), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and PI-LL. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate these parameters as potential risk factors of early onset radiographic ASD. Radiographic ASD was found in 65 cases (43.3%) in the FF group, and 49 cases (43.3%) in the LF group. LL improved by 7.5° and 3.9° in each group respectively after TLIF. However, PT worsened by 6.4° in the LF group. When comparing with ASD positive cases and ASD negative cases, a significant difference in preoperative PT was observed in both FF (P = 0.001) and LF groups (P = 0.0001). Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that preoperative PT of more than 22.5° was a significant risk factor of the incidence of ASD after TLIF (P = 0.02; odds ratio: 5.1, 95% CI: 1.62-9.03). Patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance have a statistically significant increased risk of ASD. The risk of ASD incidence was 5.1 times greater in subjects with preoperative PT of more than 22.5°.

  9. Do intraoperative radiographs predict final lumbar sagittal alignment following single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Khalid M I; Eranki, Aditya P; Paquette, Scott; Boyd, Michael; Street, John; Kwon, Brian K; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2018-02-16

    OBJECTIVE The study aimed to determine if the intraoperative segmental lordosis (as calculated on a cross-table lateral radiograph following a single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion [TLIF] for degenerative spondylolisthesis/low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis) is maintained at discharge and at 6 months postsurgery. METHODS The authors reviewed images and medical records of patients ≥ 16 years of age with a diagnosis of an isolated single-level, low-grade spondylolisthesis (degenerative or isthmic) with symptomatic spinal stenosis treated between January 2008 and April 2014. Age, sex, surgical level, surgical approach, and facetectomy (unilateral vs bilateral) were recorded. Upright standardized preoperative, early, and 6-month postoperative radiographs, as well as intraoperative lateral radiographs, were analyzed for the pelvic incidence, segmental lumbar lordosis (SLL) at the TILF level, and total LL (TLL). In addition, the anteroposterior position of the cage in the disc space was documented. Data are presented as the mean ± SD; a p value level using a bullet-shaped cage. A bilateral facetectomy was performed in 17 patients (20.2%), and 89.3% of procedures were done at the L4-5 and L5-S1 segments. SLL significantly improved intraoperatively from 15.8° ± 7.5° to 20.9° ± 7.7°, but the correction was lost after ambulation. Compared with preoperative values, at 6 months the change in SLL was modest at 1.8° ± 6.7° (p = 0.025), whereas TLL increased by 4.3° ± 9.6° (p level of surgery, and use of a bilateral facetectomy did not significantly affect postoperative LL. CONCLUSIONS Following a single-level TLIF procedure using a bullet-shaped cage, the intraoperative improvement in SLL is largely lost after ambulation. The improvement in TLL over time is probably due to the decompression part of the procedure. The approach, level of surgery, bilateral facetectomy, and position of the cage do not seem to have a significant effect on LL achieved

  10. Vertebral Body Hounsfield Units are Associated With Cage Subsidence After Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jie; Li, Kang; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Jie

    2017-10-01

    To assess the association between Hounsfield units (HU) measurement and cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with unilateral fixation becomes a popular treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. Cage subsidence is a potentially devastating complication after lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral fixation. Recently, a new technique for assessing bone mineral density using HU values from computed tomography has been proposed. Bone quality is believed to be one of the important factors that cause cage subsidence after TLIF. Cage subsidence after single-level (L4/5) TLIF with unilateral fixation was prospectively documented at a single institution between 2013 and 2014. Patients with cage subsidence were matched 1:1 to a control cohort without cage subsidence on the basis of age and sex. HU values were measured from the preoperative computed tomography. All patients received computed tomographic scans at a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Sagittal images were evaluated for evidence of cage subsidence. Eighteen patients with cage subsidence were well matched 1:1 to a cohort without cage subsidence and had complete imaging data. The global lumbar HU values were significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence than in the controls (112.4±10.08 vs. 140.2±10.17; P=0.0015). Similarly, a regional assessment of HU across the fusion levels was significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence (113.4±10.47 vs. 127.9±8.13; P=0.0075). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic cure were 0.715 and 0.636 for global and regional assessment, respectively. The best cut-offs for global and regional assessment were 132 (sensitivity: 83.3%; specificity: 61.1%) and 122 (sensitivity: 72.2%; specificity: 55.6%), respectively. Lower preoperative HU values is associated with cage subsidence after TLIF with unilateral fixation. HU measurement may be used as a predictor of cage subsidence after

  11. Anterior segment indocyanine green angiography in anterior scleritis and episcleritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guex-Crosier, Yan; Durig, Jacques

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the pattern of anterior segment indocyanine green (ICG) angiography in episcleritis and scleritis. Prospective comparative (paired-eye) observational case series. Twenty subjects presenting clinical diseases compatible with episcleritis or scleritis. Anterior segment ICG angiography was performed according to a standard protocol in subjects presenting either episcleritis or scleritis. Photographs of the anterior segment were taken in the early phase (up to 3 minutes after dye injection), intermediate phase (10-12 minutes) and late phase (30-45 minutes). The inflamed zones were compared with the same regions of the controlateral eye. The amount of protein ICG exudation was scored by a masked observer as follows: zero for no exudation, one for slight exudation, two for moderate exudation, and three for severe exudation. Evaluation of dye leakage, which reflects protein exudation, with anterior segment ICG angiography in episcleritis and scleritis. Twenty subjects with a mean age of 43 +/- 15 years (7 male, 13 female) were enrolled in the study. Thirteen subjects had anterior scleritis (7 nodular, 5 diffuse, and 1 scleromalacia perforans), and 7 subjects had episcleritis. Only 1 out of 7 subjects with episcleritis showed a slight ICG leakage (a score of one), whereas all subjects with scleritis had ICG leakage scores of one or more (P = 0.0005, Fisher exact test). ICG angiography of the anterior segment of the eye is a good clinical test to differentiate episcleritis from scleritis.

  12. Titanium cages versus autogenous iliac crest bone grafts in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion treatment of patients with cervical degenerative diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ming-Hao; Zhang, Fan; Yin, Jun; Xu, Hao-Cheng; Lyu, Fei-Zhou

    2017-05-01

    A systematic review and partial meta-analysis is conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of anterior cervical decompression and fusion procedures employing either rectangular titanium cages or iliac crest autografts in patients suffering from cervical degenerative disc diseases. Medline, PubMed, CENTRAL, and Google Scholar databases were searched up to June 2015, using the key words cervical discectomy; bone transplantation; titanium cages; and iliac crest autografts. Outcomes of interbody fusion rates were compared using odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Values of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, and visual analog scale before and after operation were also compared. The rate of interbody fusion was similar between patients in the iliac crest autograft and titanium cage groups (pooled OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.07 to 1.66, P = .178). The overall analysis showed that patients in the two groups did not have significantly different post-surgery Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (pooled difference in means = -0.05, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.63, P = .876). Improvement in arm and neck pain scores were assessed with a visual analog scale and differed significantly between patients in the iliac crest autograft and titanium cage groups (pooled difference in means = 0.16, 95% CI = -0.44 to 0.76, P = .610; and pooled difference in means = -0.44, 95% CI = -2.23 to 1.36, P = .634, respectively). Our results suggest that the use of titanium cages constitutes a safe and efficient alternative to iliac crest bone autografts for anterior cervical discectomy with fusion.

  13. Ceramic granules enhanced with B2A peptide for lumbar interbody spine fusion: an experimental study using an instrumented model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Bryan W; Atkinson, Brent L; Hu, Nianbin; Kikkawa, Jun; Jenis, Louis; Bryant, Joseph; Zamora, Paul O; McAfee, Paul C

    2009-04-01

    New generations of devices for spinal interbody fusion are expected to arise from the combined use of bioactive peptides and porous implants. The purpose of this dose-ranging study was to evaluate the fusion characteristics of porous ceramic granules (CGs) coated with the bioactive peptide B2A2-K-NS (B2A) by using a model of instrumented lumbar interbody spinal fusion in sheep. Instrumented spinal arthrodesis was performed in 40 operative sites in 20 adult sheep. In each animal, posterior instrumentation (pedicle screw and rod) and a polyetheretherketone cage were placed in 2 single-level procedures (L2-3 and L4-5). All cages were packed with graft material prior to implantation. The graft materials were prepared by mixing (1:1 vol/vol) CGs with or without a B2A coating and morselized autograft. Ceramic granules were coated with B2A at 50, 100, 300, and 600 microg/ml granules (50-B2A/CG, 100-B2A/CG, 300-B2A/CG, and 600-B2A/CG, respectively), resulting in 4 B2A-coated groups plus a control group (uncoated CGs). Graft material from each of these groups was implanted in 8 operative sites. Four months after arthrodesis, interbody fusion status was assessed with CT, and the interbody site was further evaluated with quantitative histomorphometry. All B2A/CG groups had higher CT-confirmed interbody fusion rates compared with those in controls (CGs only). Seven of 8 sites were fused in the 50-B2A/CG, 100-B2A/CG, and 300-B2A/CG groups, whereas 5 of 8 sites were fused in the group that had received uncoated CGs. New woven and lamellar bone spanned the fusion sites with excellent osseointegration. There was no heterotopic ossification or other untoward events attributed to the use of B2A/CG in any group. Each B2A/CG treatment produced more new bone than that in the CG group. Bioactive treatment with B2A effectively enhanced the fusion capacity of porous CGs. These findings suggest that B2A/CG may well represent a new generation of biomaterials for lumbar interbody fusion and

  14. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  15. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurlo, J.V.; Towers, J.D.; Golla, S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  16. Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease: Long-term Changes in Sagittal Alignment and Their Clinical Implications After Cervical Interbody Fusion Cage Subsidence: A Prospective Study With Standalone Lordotic Tantalum Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé-Bermejo, Félix; Morales-Valencia, Julián A; Moreno-Pérez, Javier; Marfil-Pérez, Juan; Díaz-Dominguez, Elena; Piñera, Angel R; Alvarez, Luis

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective, observational study of prospectively collected outcomes. To investigate the long-term clinical course of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with interbody fusion cages (ACDF-IFC) with lordotic tantalum implants and to correlate the radiologic findings with the clinical outcomes, with special emphasis on the significance and the influence of implant subsidence. Cage subsidence is the most frequently reported complication after ACDF-IFC. However, most reports fail to correlate cage subsidence with lower fusion rates or with unsatisfactory clinical results. Forty-one consecutive patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical disk disease with failure of conservative treatment were included. All patients underwent 1-/2-level ACDF-IFC with lordotic tantalum implants. The mean follow-up was 4.91 years. The final follow-up fusion rate was 96.96% (32/33). The interspace height (IH) at the affected levels was significantly incremented after implant insertion, and despite a gradual loss in the height over time, the final follow-up IH was significantly higher than that measured preoperatively (Psubsidence (>3 mm) occurred in 11 disk spaces (26.82%). Preoperative and postoperative IH were significantly higher in subsidence patients; however, there was no difference in the final follow-up IH (P>0.05). Patients with ≥3 years of follow-up (n=29) did not demonstrate further significant subsidence beyond the second year. Regarding C1-C7 lordosis, the segmental Cobb angle, the cervical Visual Analogue Scale, and Neck Disability Index questionnaires, no difference between patients with or without final follow-up endplate subsidence was encountered. Until fusion occurs, tantalum cage settlement into the vertebral body is to be expected. Further subsidence could be the result of segmental adaptative changes. Graft subsidence did not affect the clinical outcome in any of our patients during long-term follow-up. The occurrence of dynamical implant subsidence had

  17. Toxic anterior segment syndrome following deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Sevimli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present the case of a 31-year-old patient with toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS that developed after undergoing deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK. She had keratoconus, and despite wearing hard contact lenses for many years in the left eye, her vision had deteriorated; therefore, DALK was performed on this eye. The preoperative visual acuity (VA was finger counting at 3 m. Routine DALK was performed using the "big-bubble" technique. The corneal entry incision was hydrated at the end of the surgery, which was terminated by air injection into the anterior chamber. On postoperative day 1, VA was at the level of hand movements, and the cornea was edematous. Topical high-dose dexamethasone and oral steroids were initiated considering the diagnosis of TASS. Subsequently, the patient's VA increased, and the corneal edema decreased. We believe that the use of re-sterilized cannulas may have been the likely cause of TASS. Although DALK can be performed without interfering with the anterior chamber, one should keep in mind that TASS may occur in response to the solution used to hydrate the incision site and the air injected into the anterior chamber.

  18. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Golanó, P.; Clavero, J.A.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly

  19. Usefulness of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with plate augmentation for anterior arthrodesis in traumatic cervical spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Gyu-Hyung; Song, Ji-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Even though many clinical reports about cages have been documented in patients with degenerative disorders, reports were scarce for traumatic injury cases, and those cases using metal cages were restricted to only one-level injury. To evaluate the usefulness of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and plate construction in anterior interbody fusions (AIF) for traumatic cervical spine injuries by analyzing radiographic changes and clinical outcomes. Retrospective study. Fifty-eight patients (91 levels) underwent cage and plate construction for treatment of traumatic cervical spine injury. The fusion rate, fusion time, changes of Cobb angle, subsidence rate, and adjacent level changes were assessed as a radiographic outcome. Clinical analysis includes the recovery rate on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale and the presence of the complications. We evaluated 58 patients (91 levels) who underwent surgery and had at least 24 months in follow-up study. Radiographic evaluation included the assessment of interbody fusion rate, fusion time, changes of Cobb angle, subsidence rate, and adjacent level changes. Clinical assessment was done by analyzing recovery state of ASIA impairment scale from preoperative period to the last follow-up and by evaluating complications. Fifty-four cases showed bony fusion within 3 months after the surgery. The mean Cobb angle between the vertebral bodies was 2.54 degrees before operation, 9.13 degrees after operation, and 8.39 degrees at the latest follow-up. The mean intervertebral disc height was increased by 3.01 mm after the operation, but the mean height was 2.17 mm shorter at the last follow-up than after postoperation. In terms of clinical results, five Grade A cases and one Grade B case as assessed by the ASIA impairment scale were unchanged until the last follow-up. Twenty-three cases of Grade C, 16 cases of Grade D, and 13 cases of Grade E improved to seven cases, 26 cases, and 19 cases, respectively. Three

  20. Results of lumbar spondylodeses using different bone grafting materials after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonderHoeh, Nicolas Heinz; Voelker, Anna; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2017-11-01

    Can a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HA) and autologous bone from decompression sites produce similar results when used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)? In the current literature, autologous iliac crest bone grafts (ICBGs) have been reported the gold standard for this procedure. Indeed, to date, no clinical data have confirmed that a mixture of equal volumes of HA and local autologous bone produce similar results in term of fusion as the same volume of autologous ICBG alone. Study design/setting This study was approved by the local ethics committee and completed in a prospective, randomized, single-blinded manner. The results of lumbar fusion using TLIF and different bone grafting materials were compared. Patient sample The patient sample included patients with spinal lumbar degenerative disease. Outcome measures The clinical outcome was determined using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The radiological outcomes and fusion rates were determined with radiographs evaluated using the McAfee criteria and computed tomography (CT) data evaluated by the Williams criteria. Three blinded investigators (one radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons) assessed the data. The secondary variables included donor site morbidity. Methods The patients were admitted to our department for orthopedic surgery with degenerative lumbar pathologies (L2-S1) that required stabilization in one or two segments using a TLIF procedure. The patients were 18-80 years old. Only those patients who had degenerative lumbar pathologies and agreed to be educated about the study were included. The patients were divided into the following two randomized groups: group A: TLIF procedure using autologous ICBGs alone; and group B: TLIF procedure using local bone from decompression site mixed with hydroxyapatite. Each group received equal graft volumes. The mixture in group B consisted of equal volumes of local autograft (5 cc) and synthetic

  1. A perioperative cost analysis comparing single-level minimally invasive and open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kern; Nandyala, Sreeharsha V; Marquez-Lara, Alejandro; Fineberg, Steven J; Oglesby, Mathew; Pelton, Miguel A; Andersson, Gunnar B; Isayeva, Darya; Jegier, Briana J; Phillips, Frank M

    2014-08-01

    Emerging literature suggests superior clinical short- and long-term outcomes of MIS (minimally invasive surgery) TLIFs (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion) versus open fusions. Few studies to date have analyzed the cost differences between the two techniques and their relationship to acute clinical outcomes. The purpose of the study was to determine the differences in hospitalization costs and payments for patients treated with primary single-level MIS versus open TLIF. The impact of clinical outcomes and their contribution to financial differences was explored as well. This study was a nonrandomized, nonblinded prospective review. Sixty-six consecutive patients undergoing a single-level TLIF (open/MIS) were analyzed (33 open, 33 MIS). Patients in either cohort (MIS/open) were matched based on race, sex, age, smoking status, medical comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity index), payer, and diagnosis. Every patient in the study had a diagnosis of either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis and stenosis. Operative time (minutes), length of stay (LOS, days), estimated blood loss (EBL, mL), anesthesia time (minutes), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores, and hospital cost/payment amount were assessed. The MIS and open TLIF groups were compared based on clinical outcomes measures and hospital cost/payment data using SPSS version 20.0 for statistical analysis. The two groups were compared using bivariate chi-squared analysis. Mann-Whitney tests were used for non-normal distributed data. Effect size estimate was calculated with the Cohen d statistic and the r statistic with a 95% confidence interval. Average surgical time was shorter for the MIS than the open TLIF group (115.8 minutes vs. 186.0 minutes respectively; p=.001). Length of stay was also reduced for the MIS versus the open group (2.3 days vs. 2.9 days, respectively; p=.018). Average anesthesia time and EBL were also lower in the MIS group (pFinancial analysis demonstrated lower total hospital direct

  2. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  3. [Biomechanicsl evaluation of a stand-alone interbody fusion cage based on porous TiO2/glass-ceramic on the human cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korinth, M C; Moersch, S; Ragoss, C; Schopphoff, E

    2003-12-01

    Recently, there has been a rapid increase in the use of cervical spine interbody fusion cages, differing in design and biomaterial used, in competition to autologous iliac bone graft and bone cement (PMMA). Limited biomechanical differences in primary stability, as well as advantages and disadvantages of each cage or material have been investigated in studies, using an in vitro human cervical spine model. 20 human cervical spine specimens were tested after fusion with either a cubical stand-alone interbody fusion cage manufactured from a new porous TiO2/glass composite (Ecopore) or PMMA after discectomy. Non-destructive biomechanical testing was performed, including flexion/extension and lateral bending using a spine testing apparatus. Three-dimensional segmental range of motion (ROM) was evaluated using an ultrasound measurement system. ROM increased more in flexion/extension and lateral bending after PMMA fusion (26.5%/36.1%), then after implantation of the Ecopore-cage (8.1%/7.8%). In this first biomechanical in vitro examination of a new porous ceramic bone replacement material a) the feasibility and reproducibility of biomechanical cadaveric cervical examination and its applicability was demonstrated, b) the stability of the ceramic cage as a stand alone interbody cage was confirmed in vitro, and c) basic information and knowledge for our intended biomechanical and histological in vivo testing, after implantation of Ecopore in cervical sheep spines, were obtained.

  4. Comparison of Long terms Follow up Results in Patients with Cervical Disk DiseaseTreated With Anterior PEEK CageImplantation and Without it in Rasoul Akram Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Abolfazl Motiei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Anterior interbody fusion of the cervical spine have become the gold standard for treating spinal diseases, hence the aim of this study was to compare long term follow up results in patients with cervical disk disease treated with anterior PEEK cage implantation and without it in anterior approach. Methods: Retrospectively 63 patients with known cervical discogenic disorders who went under surgery with and without cage implantation were enrolled. The neurological examination and neurologic function were assessed by using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA scoring system and neurological cervical spine scale (NCSS before and 8 years after surgery in each patient and at the end all complications were recorded. Results: In the first group, there were 15 males and 14 females (mean age: 49±10 years and in the second group there were 27 male and 7 female (mean age: 47±9 years. The NCSS score was significantly different between two groups after surgery (p=0.035 but there was no significant difference before surgery (p=0.163. No statistical significance difference was also observed in JOA score and complications before and after procedure, but JOA post surgery score between two groups had significant difference (p=0.047 . Conclusion: In conclusion, present study showed that PEEK cage implantation is a highly useful alternative to the conventional treatment methods.

  5. Surgical management of C-type subaxial cervical fractures using cervical traction followed by anterior cervical discectomy and fusion within 12 h after the trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Pasquale; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Rizzi, Gaetano; Berardi, Arturo; Merlicco, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    This was a retrospective cohort study. To report our 10-year experience of closed reduction using Crutchfield traction followed by anterior cervical discectomy and fusion within 12 h from injury for C-type subaxial cervical fractures (according to the AOSpine classification system). Clinical records and neuroimaging were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical details were provided. A total of 22 patients were included in the study. The cervical fracture was diagnosed after whole-body computed tomography scan on admission in all cases. Crutchfield traction was applied within 1-5 h from the diagnosis. Surgery consisting of anterior microdiscectomy and fusion with interbody cage and plating was performed 6-12 h after traction positioning. Most patients (19, 86%) had spinal cord injury: 7 were Frankel A (31%), 3 Frankel B (14%), 6 Frankel C (27%), 3 Frankel D (14%), and 3 Frankel E (14%). No neurologic deterioration was observed after the treatment. In 10 cases (45%), neurological symptoms improved 1 year after the trauma. Two patients (10%) died for complication related to spinal cord transition or other organ damage. Early reduction gives the best chance of recovery for patients affected by C-type subaxial cervical fracture. Rapid traction is more often successful and safer than manipulation under anesthesia. After close reduction achieving, anterior microdiscectomy, cage, and plating implant seem to be safe and effective with a low rate of complications.

  6. Anterior ethmoid anatomy facilitates dacryocystorhinostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, W K; Moore, C A; Linberg, J V

    1990-12-01

    The ethmoid air cell labyrinth lies adjacent to the medial orbital wall, extending even beyond the sutures of the ethmoid bone. Its anatomic relationship to the lacrimal sac fossa is important in lacrimal surgery. We evaluated computed tomographic scans of 190 orbits with normal ethmoid anatomy to define the anatomic relationship of anterior ethmoid air cells to the lacrimal sac fossa. In 93% of the orbits, the cells extended anterior to the posterior lacrimal crest, with 40% entering the frontal process of the maxilla. This anatomic relationship may be used to facilitate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. During a 10-year period (310 cases), one of us routinely entered the anterior ethmoid air cells to initiate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. This technique has helped to avoid lacerations of the nasal mucosa.

  7. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: reducing anterior tibial subluxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Duerr, Eric R. H.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2016-01-01

    To measure and compare the amount of anterior tibial subluxation (ATS) after anatomic ACL reconstruction for both acute and chronic ACL-deficient patients. Fifty-two patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated after primary, unilateral, anatomic ACL reconstruction. Post-operative true

  8. Fracture of the anterior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skie, M C; Ebraheim, N A; Woldenberg, L; Randall, K

    1995-04-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed 33 cases of fracture involving the anterior colliculus of the medial malleolus to examine clinical results of operative treatment for these fractures. Although this injury appears innocuous, it can be difficult to obtain stable fixation of the fragment intraoperatively, and painful nonunion can result. A simple reduction maneuver and method of tension band fixation are described.

  9. A protocol of a randomized controlled multicenter trial for surgical treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis: the Lumbar Interbody Fusion Trial (LIFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kunder, Suzanne L; Rijkers, Kim; van Kuijk, Sander M J; Evers, Silvia M A A; de Bie, Rob A; van Santbrink, Henk

    2016-10-06

    With a steep increase in the number of instrumented spinal fusion procedures, there is a need for comparative data to develop evidence based treatment recommendations. Currently, the available data on cost and clinical effectiveness of the two most frequently performed surgeries for lumbar spondylolisthesis, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), are not sufficient. Therefore, current guidelines do not advise which is the most appropriate surgical treatment strategy for these patients. Non-randomized studies comparing TLIF and PLIF moreover suggest that TLIF is associated with fewer complications, less blood loss, shorter surgical time and hospital duration. TLIF may therefore be more cost-effective. The results of this study will provide knowledge on short- and long-term clinical and economical effects of TLIF and PLIF procedures, which will lead to recommendations for treating patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. Multicenter blinded Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT; blinding for the patient and statistician, not for the clinician and researcher). A total of 144 patients over 18 years old with symptomatic single level lumbar degenerative, isthmic or iatrogenic spondylolisthesis whom are candidates for LIF (lumbar interbody fusion) surgery through a posterior approach will be randomly allocated to TLIF or PLIF. The study will consist of three parts: 1) a clinical effectiveness study, 2) a cost-effectiveness study, and 3) a process evaluation. The primary clinical outcome measures are: change in disability measured with Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and change in quality adjusted life years (QALY) measured with EQ-5D-5L. Secondary clinical outcome measures are: Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36), VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), complications, productivity related costs (iPCQ) and medical costs (iMCQ). Measurements will be carried out at five fixed time points (pre

  10. Válvula de uretra anterior Anterior urethral valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Tucci Jr.

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: apresentar os aspectos clínicos, diagnósticos e terapêuticos de pacientes portadores de válvula da uretra anterior. Descrição: em dois neonatos, o diagnóstico presuntivo de patologia obstrutiva do trato urinário foi sugerido pela ultra-sonografia realizada no período pré-natal, confirmando-se o diagnóstico de válvula de uretra anterior pela avaliação pós-natal. Os pacientes foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico paliativo, com vesicostomia temporária e, posteriormente, definitivo, pela fulguração endoscópica das válvulas. Ambos evoluíram com função renal normal. Comentários: a válvula da uretra anterior é anomalia rara que deve ser considerada em meninos com quadro radiológico pré-natal sugestivo de obstrução infravesical, secundariamente à hipótese mais comum de válvula da uretra posterior. Ressaltamos a utilização da vesicostomia como derivação urinária temporária nestes casos, prevenindo potenciais complicações pela manipulação da uretra do recém-nascido.Objective: to discuss clinical signs, diagnostic tools and therapeutics of anterior urethral valves, an obstructive anomaly of the urinary system in males. Description: signs of urinary tract obstruction were identified on pre-natal ultrasound in two male fetuses and the diagnosis of anterior urethral valves was made through post-natal evaluation. As an initial treatment, vesicostomy was performed in both patients. Later, the valves were fulgurated using an endoscopic procedure. During the follow-up period both patients presented normal renal function. Comments: anterior urethral valves are a rare form of urethral anomaly that must be ruled out in boys with pre-natal ultrasound indicating infravesical obstruction. Vesicostomy used as an initial treatment rather than transurethral fulguration may prevent potential complications that can occur due to the small size of the neonatal urethra.

  11. The impact of sagittal balance on clinical results after posterior interbody fusion for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: A Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Sung-Soo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparatively little is known about the relation between the sagittal vertical axis and clinical outcome in cases of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lumbar sagittal balance affects clinical outcomes after posterior interbody fusion. This series suggests that consideration of sagittal balance during posterior interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis can yield high levels of patient satisfaction and restore spinal balance Methods A retrospective study of clinical outcomes and a radiological review was performed on 18 patients with one or two level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients were divided into two groups: the patients without improvement in pelvic tilt, postoperatively (Group A; n = 10 and the patients with improvement in pelvic tilt postoperatively (Group B; n = 8. Pre- and postoperative clinical outcome surveys were administered to determine Visual Analogue Pain Scores (VAS and Oswestry disability index (ODI. In addition, we evaluated full spine radiographic films for pelvic tilt (PT, sacral slope (SS, pelvic incidence (PI, thoracic kyphosis (TK, lumbar lordosis (LL, sacrofemoral distance (SFD, and sacro C7 plumb line distance (SC7D Results All 18 patients underwent surgery principally for the relief of radicular leg pain and back pain. In groups A and B, mean preoperative VAS were 6.85 and 6.81, respectively, and these improved to 3.20 and 1.63 at last follow-up. Mean preoperative ODI were 43.2 and 50.4, respectively, and these improved to 23.6 and 18.9 at last follow-up. In spinopelvic parameters, no significant difference was found between preoperative and follow up variables except PT in Group A. However, significant difference was found between the preoperative and follows up values of PT, SS, TK, LL, and SFD/SC7D in Group B. Between parameters of group A and B, there is borderline significance on preoperative PT, preoperative LL and last

  12. Treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by using minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao WU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss clinical therapeutic effects of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS.  Methods A total of 32 DLS patients treated by MIS-TLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation from January 2013 to September 2015 in Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University were retrospectively reviewed. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 scores were assessed and compared between preoperation and one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up. Lumbar lordosis angle, coronal Cobb angle, coronal and sagittal body shifting, complication, the degree of spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification and the rate of spondylolisthesis were measured according to preoperative and postoperative spinal X-ray examination. Fusion rate was evaluated according to X-rays or CT in the last follow-up, and MRI was used to assess the degree of decompression.  Results Thirty-two patients were under test with mean operation time 160 min, intraoperative blood loss 120 ml, postoperative hospital stay 7.22 d and follow-up 10.83 months. Decompression and fusion levels ranged from L2-S1 and interbody fusion was performed in 32 patients and 41 levels were fused. Compared with preoperation, the VAS and ODI scores were significantly increased at one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up (P = 0.000, for all, while SF-36 score (P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, lumbar lordotic angle (P = 0.000, for all, coronal Cobb angle (P = 0.000, for all and slippage rate (P = 0.000, for all were significantly decreased. The fusion rate was 92.22%, and the improvement rate of ODI was (80.51 ± 6.02% in the last follow-up. There were 3 cases appeared complications, including one case of infection and 2 cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF fistula, and were

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000681.htm Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury - aftercare To use the sharing features ... that connects a bone to another bone. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located inside your knee joint and ...

  14. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  15. 38 CFR 3.379 - Anterior poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anterior poliomyelitis. 3... Specific Diseases § 3.379 Anterior poliomyelitis. If the first manifestations of acute anterior poliomyelitis present themselves in a veteran within 35 days of termination of active military service, it is...

  16. Epidermoid cyst in Anterior, Middle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankane Vivek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are benign slow growing more often extra-axial tumors that insinuate between brain structures, we present the clinical, imaging, and pathological findings in 35 years old female patients with atypical epidermoid cysts which was situated anterior, middle & posterior cranial fossa. NCCT head revealed hypodense lesion over right temporal and perisylvian region with extension in prepontine cistern with mass effect & midline shift and MRI findings revealed a non-enhancing heterogeneous signal intensity cystic lesion in right frontal & temporal region extending into prepontine cistern with restricted diffusion. Patient was detoriated in night of same day of admission, emergency Fronto-temporal craniotomy with anterior peterousectomy and subtotal resection was done. The histological examination confirms the epidermoid cyst. The timing of ectodermal tissue sequestration during fetal development may account for the occurrence of atypical epidermoid cysts.

  17. [Anterior chest wall examination reviewed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, A; Santilli, D; Trotta, F

    2002-01-01

    Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondyloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the "activity" of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  18. Chronic Anterior Uveitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Cristóbal; Frick, Mercedes M; LaMattina, Kara; Schlaen, Ariel; Khoury, Marina; Lopez, Matilde María; Hurtado, Erika; Espada, Graciela

    2016-08-01

    To describe the visual prognosis and remission rate of chronic anterior uveitis in pediatric patients. A retrospective case series of children with chronic anterior uveitis treated in the University of Buenos Aires. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was defined according to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology criteria. Uveitis remission was defined according to SUN criteria. There were 35 pediatric patients (61 eyes), mean age of uveitis onset was 7.69 ± 3 years, 60% were females and 74% had bilateral disease, median follow-up was 60 months (range: 12-192 months). JIA was more frequent in females (80.95 vs 21.43; pgood Received 30 August 2015; revised 6 March 2016; accepted 14 March 2016; published online 18 May 2016.

  19. Minimally invasive lateral transpsoas interbody fusion using a stand-alone construct for the treatment of adjacent segment disease of the lumbar spine: review of the literature and report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palejwala, Sheri K; Sheen, Whitney A; Walter, Christina M; Dunn, Jack H; Baaj, Ali A

    2014-09-01

    We describe 3 patients who presented with radiographic signs and clinical symptoms of adjacent segment disease several years after undergoing L4-S1 posterior pedicle screw fusion. All patients underwent successful lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) at 1-2 levels above their previous constructs, using stand-alone cages, with complete resolution of radiculopathy and a significant improvement in low-back pain. In addition to a thorough analysis of these cases, we review the pertinent literature regarding treatment options for adjacent segment disease and the applications of the lateral lumbar interbody technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion: Analogous procedures in decreasing the index of disability in patients with spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijani, Babak; Emamhadi, Mohamahreza; Behzadnia, Hamid; Aramnia, Ali; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Ramtinfar, Sara; Leili, Ehsan Kazemnejad; Golmohamadi, Shabnam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the disability in patients with spondylolisthesis who assigned either to posterolateral fusion (PLF) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to compare it between two groups. In a prospective observational study, 102 surgical candidates with low-grade degenerative and isthmic spondylolisthesis enrolled from 2012 to 2014, and randomly assigned into two groups: PLF and PLIF. Evaluation of disability has been done by a questionnaire using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The questionnaire was completed by all patients before the surgery, the day after surgery, after 6 months and after 1-year. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age and sex distribution and pre-operation ODI between groups (P > 0.05). Comparison of the mean ODI scores of two groups over the whole study period showed no significant statistical difference (P = 0.074). ODIs also showed no significant differences between two groups the day after surgery, 6(th) months and 1-year after surgery (P = 0.385, P = 0.093, P = 0.122 and P = 433) respectively. Analyzing the course of ODI over the study period, showed a significant descending pattern for either of groups (P disability of patients with spondylolisthesis, and none of the fusion techniques were related to a better outcome in terms of disability.

  1. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using unilateral pedicle screw fixation plus contralateral translaminar facet screw fixation in lumbar degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fubing; Jiang, Chun; Cao, Yuanwu; Jiang, Xiaoxing; Feng, Zhenzhou

    2014-07-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has been used in lumbar degenerative diseases. Some researchers have applied unilateral fixation in TLIF to reduce operational trauma without compromising the clinical outcome, but it is always suspected biomechanically unstable. The supplementary contralateral translaminar facet screw (cTLFS) seemed to be able to overcome the inherent drawbacks of unilateral pedicle screw (uPS) fixation theoretically. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of TLIF using uPS with cTLFS fixation in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD). 50 patients (29 male) underwent the aforementioned surgical technique for their LDD between December 2009 and April 2012. The results were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS) of the leg and back, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were recorded. The radiographic examinations in form of X-ray, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging was done preoperatively and 1 week, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months postoperatively. The student t-test was used for comparison between the preoperative values and postoperative counterparts. P degenerative diseases short termly.

  2. Incidence of vascular complications during lateral lumbar interbody fusion: an examination of the mini-open access technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueper, Janina; Fantini, Gary A; Walker, Brendon R; Aichmair, Alexander; Hughes, Alexander P

    2015-04-01

    This article examines the incidence and management of vascular injury during Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion (LLIF). The details of the mini-open access technique are presented. A total of 900 patients who underwent a LLIF at an average 1.94 levels (range: 1-5 levels) by one of six fellowship trained surgeons on 1,754 levels from 2006 to 2013 were identified. The incidence of intraoperative vascular injury was retrospectively determined from the Operative Records. The management of vascular injury was evaluated. The mini-open access adapted by our institution for LLIF is described. The incidence of major vascular complication in our series was 1/900. The incidence of minor vascular injury was 4/900. The overall incidence of vascular injury was calculated to be 0.056 % per case and 0.029 % per level. All minor vascular injuries were identified to be segmental vessel lacerations, which were readily ligated under direct visualization without further extension of the incision with no clinical sequelae. The laceration of the abdominal aorta, the major vascular complication of this series, was emergently repaired through an exploratory laparotomy. None of the patients suffered long-term sequelae from their intraoperative vascular injuries. The mini-open lateral access technique for LLIF provides for minimal risk of vascular injury to the lumbar spine. In the rare event of minor vascular injury, the mini-open access approach allows for immediate visualization, confirmation and repair of the vessel with no long-term sequelae.

  3. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a risk factor for further surgery in short-segment lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Bungo; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Kimura, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Takayoshi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate the effect of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) on the clinical results of short-segment lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. The 208 patients who underwent one- or two-level LIF were selected as the subjects of this study. Patients with prior lumbar fusion surgery or follow-up adjacent segment disease (ASD). The Cox proportional-hazards model was used to identify possible risk factors (DISH, age, sex, number of levels fused, level of the lowest instrumented vertebra, and laminectomy adjacent to the index fused levels) for further surgery. Among the 208 patients (39 with DISH), 21 patients required further surgery during follow-up. Cox analysis showed that DISH (hazard ratio = 5.46) and two-level fusion (hazard ratio = 2.83) were significant independent predictors of further surgery. Age, sex, level of the lowest instrumented vertebra, and laminectomy adjacent to the index fused levels were not significant predictors. DISH after short-segment LIF surgery is a significant risk factor for further surgery because of pseudoarthrosis or ASD.

  4. Comparison of Topping-off and posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery in lumbar degenerative disease: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-ying; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Bo; Wang, Hui-min; Jin, Zhao-hui; Zhu, Zhen-qi; Miao, Ke-nan

    2012-11-01

    Topping-off surgery is a newly-developed surgical technique which combines rigid fusion with an interspinous process device in the adjacent segment to prevent adjacent segment degeneration. There are few reports on Topping-off surgery and its rationality and indications remains highly controversial. Our study aims to investigate the short-term and mid-term clinical results of Topping-off surgery in preventing adjacent segment degeneration when mild or moderate adjacent segment degeneration existed before surgery. The 25 cases that underwent L5-S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) + L4-L5 interspinous process surgeries between April 2008 and March 2010 formed Topping-off group. The 42 cases undergoing L5-S1 PLIF surgery formed PLIF group. Both groups matched in gender, age, body mass index and Pfirrmann grading (4 to 6). The patients were evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) and Japanese orthopaedic association (JOA) scores before surgery and in the last follow-up. Modic changes of endplates were recorded. The follow-up averaged 24.8 and 23.7 months. No symptomatic or radiological adjacent segment degeneration was observed. There was no significant difference in intraoperative blood loss or postoperative drainage. VAS and lumbar JOA scores improved significantly in both groups (t = 12.1 and 13.5, P adjacent segment degeneration, restrict the adjacent segment's ROM in extension and prevent excessive olisthesis of adjacent segment in both extension and flexion.

  5. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L5-S1 through a Unilateral Approach: Technical Feasibility and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Suh Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Minimally invasive spinal transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 is technically more demanding than it is at other levels because of the anatomical and biomechanical traits. Objective. To determine the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIS-TLIF for treatment of single-level spinal stenosis low-grade isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis at L5-S1. Methods. Radiological data and electronic medical records of patients who underwent MIS-TLIF between May 2012 and December 2014 were reviewed. Fusion rate, cage position, disc height (DH, disc angle (DA, disc slope angle, segmental lordotic angle (SLA, lumbar lordotic angle (LLA, and pelvic parameters were assessed. For functional assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS, Oswestry disability index (ODI, and patient satisfaction rate (PSR were utilized. Results. A total of 21 levels in 21 patients were studied. DH, DA, SLA, and LLA had increased from their preoperative measures at the final follow-up. Fusion rate was 86.7% (18/21 at 12 months’ follow-up. The most common cage position was anteromedial (15/21. The mean VAS scores for back and leg pain mean ODI scores improved significantly at the final follow-up. PSR was 88%. Cage subsidence was observed in 33.3% (7/21. Conclusions. The clinical and radiologic outcomes after MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 in patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis are generally favorable.

  6. Single-Level Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Adjacent Segment Disease: A Retrospective Two-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichmair, Alexander; Alimi, Marjan; Hughes, Alexander P; Sama, Andrew A; Du, Jerry Y; Härtl, Roger; Burket, Jayme C; Lampe, Lukas P; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2017-05-01

    A retrospective case series. The aim of this study was to assess the postoperative outcome after single-level lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for adjacent segment disease (ASD). Although there is a plethora of literature on ASD following traditional arthrodesis techniques, literature on ASD following LLIF is limited. Vice versa, the surgical outcome after LLIF for the treatment of ASD remains to be elucidated. Patients who underwent single-level LLIF for ASD at two institutions (March 2006-April 2012) were included, and the medical records, operative reports, radiographic imaging studies, and office records reviewed. Out of 523 LLIF patients, 52 met the inclusion criteria, and were postoperatively followed for 16.1 ± 9.8 months (range: 5-44). When comparing the pre-operative data with both the first and most recent follow-up postoperatively, LLIF resulted in a reduction in back pain (P fusion rate in patients who underwent circumferential fusion than the standalone subgroup (87.5% vs. 53.8%; P = 0.173). LLIF may be an effective surgical treatment option for ASD with regard to both the clinical and radiographic outcome in a large proportion of cases. Although standalone LLIF is associated with a narrower spectrum of adverse effects than circumferential fusion, posterior instrumentation may be necessary to increase segmental stability. 4.

  7. Preserving Posterior Complex Can Prevent Adjacent Segment Disease following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgeries: A Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Peng; Du, Cheng-Fei; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Chen, Xuan-Wei; Wu, Gui; Li, Zhe-Cheng; Ye, Jin-Duo; Lin, Jian-Hua; Wang, Li Zhen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the biomechanical effects of the lumbar posterior complex on the adjacent segments after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgeries. A finite element model of the L1-S1 segment was modified to simulate PLIF with total laminectomy (PLIF-LAM) and PLIF with hemilaminectomy (PLIF-HEMI) procedures. The models were subjected to a 400N follower load with a 7.5-N.m moment of flexion, extension, torsion, and lateral bending. The range of motion (ROM), intradiscal pressure (IDP), and ligament force were compared. In Flexion, the ROM, IDP and ligament force of posterior longitudinal ligament, intertransverse ligament, and capsular ligament remarkably increased at the proximal adjacent segment in the PLIF-LAM model, and slightly increased in the PLIF-HEMI model. There was almost no difference for the ROM, IDP and ligament force at L5-S1 level between the two PLIF models although the ligament forces of ligamenta flava remarkably increased compared with the intact lumbar spine (INT) model. For the other loading conditions, these two models almost showed no difference in ROM, IDP and ligament force on the adjacent discs. Preserved posterior complex acts as the posterior tension band during PLIF surgery and results in less ROM, IDP and ligament forces on the proximal adjacent segment in flexion. Preserving the posterior complex during decompression can be effective on preventing adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following PLIF surgeries.

  8. Anterior cingulotomy for intractable pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Agarwal, MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Conservative therapy is often the first-line treatment for many symptoms of various disease processes, including pain. Nevertheless, if pharmacological or medical management fails for those patients with severe and chronic pain, a surgical strategy may be a reasonable option. First performed for psychiatric disorders, cingulotomy now has been recognized as a viable option for the management of pain. The authors review the literature on anterior cingulotomy for intractable pain to provide guidelines for management and expected outcomes.

  9. Anterior shoulder dislocations in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronen, J G

    1986-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocations, primary and recurrent, are among the most disabling injuries to the shoulder that can plague the athlete. The diagnosis is easily made by the following: the physical appearance of the shoulder; loss of capability by the athlete to internally and externally rotate the shoulder with the elbow at his side; by evaluating the mechanism of injury; and x-rays. Anterior shoulder dislocations should be reduced as soon as possible after diagnosis, to minimise the stretching effect on the neurovascular structures while the humeral head is dislocated. The reduction is not done to allow the athlete to return immediately to sport. Use of a simple traction method in the first 10 to 15 minutes following the injury will result in a successful reduction in the vast majority of dislocations. Reduction of the humeral head can be confirmed by the athlete regaining the capability to internally and externally rotate his shoulder with his elbow at his side. Following reduction, the athlete should begin a treatment regimen which includes a restrengthening programme emphasising the muscles of internal rotation and adduction plus rigid restrictions of activities until the goals of the rehabilitation programme are satisfied. The author's experience with this treatment regimen with athletes at the United States Naval Academy, has shown a decrease of the recurrence rate of primary anterior shoulder dislocations to 25% versus the 80% recurrence rate we have become familiar with from studies done which did not stress specific rehabilitation programmes. The athlete should also be instructed in a self-performed traction method for reduction should a redislocation occur, to minimise the stretching effect on the neurovascular structures and allow relief from discomfort. Surgery for primary and recurrent anterior dislocations should only be considered when the athlete fails to achieve the desired goals after participating in a specific, progressive, adequate

  10. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    OpenAIRE

    F. Trotta; D. Santilli; A. Lo Monaco

    2011-01-01

    Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as er...

  11. Characterization of a novel caudal vertebral interbody fusion in a rat tail model: An implication for future material and mechanical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Chun; Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Niu, Chi-Chien; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-02-01

    Of the proposed animal interbody fusion models, rat caudal discs have gained popularity in disc research due to their strong resemblance to human discs with respect to geometry, composition and mechanical properties. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate an efficient, repeatable and easily accessible animal model of interbody fusion for future research into mechanical testing and graft materials. Twelve 12-week-old female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent caudal interbody fusion of the third and fourth coccygeal vertebrae of the tail. Serial radiological evaluation, and histological evaluation and manual palpation after sacrifice were performed to assess the fusion quality. Mechanical testing of functional units (FUs) of non-operated and operated segments was compared using a three-point bending test. At postoperative 12 weeks, callus formation was observed at the fusion sites in all rats, with the mean radiological evaluations of 2.75/3 according to the Bransford classification. Newly formed bone tissue was also observed in all rats with the mean histological score of 5.85/7, according to the Emery grading system. No palpable gaps and obvious change of bending stiffness was observed in the operated segments. The mean bending stiffness of the FUs was statistically higher than that of the control FUs (26.57 ± 6.71 N/mm vs. 12.45 ± 3.21 N/mm, p materials under conditions of osteoporosis using this model would be worthwhile. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. One-Level Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Approach: Is Transforaminal Lateral Interbody Fusion Mandatory?: A Randomized Controlled Trial With 2-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challier, Vincent; Boissiere, Louis; Obeid, Ibrahim; Vital, Jean-Marc; Castelain, Jean-Etienne; Bénard, Antoine; Ong, Nathalie; Ghailane, Soufiane; Pointillart, Vincent; Mazas, Simon; Mariey, Rémi; Gille, Olivier

    2017-04-15

    A monocentric open-label randomized controlled trial (MRCT). Comparison of clinical and radiological outcomes between isolated instrumented posterior fusion (PLF) and associated instrumented posterior fusion and interbody fusion by transforaminal approach (PLF + TLIF) for patients suffering from one-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) undergoing surgery. DS is a common cause of symptomatic lumbar stenosis. PLF has shown better clinical outcome than decompression with noninstrumented posterolateral fusion. TLIF with interbody cage showed better fusion rate than PLF. There is a need for randomized controlled trials to compare PLF with and without TLIF as to clinical and radiological outcomes. This is a MRCT comparing PLF and TLIF techniques in surgical treatment of DS. Sixty patients were included in a secured database from 2009 to 2011 and randomized into two groups: 30 PLF with posterior pedicle screws and intertransverse autologuous graft, and 30 TLIF in which an interbody fusion by transforaminal approach was added. Data included clinical (pain and disability), surgical (blood loss and operating time), and radiological (alignment and fusion) parameters at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Comparison was made by Student t test and Chi-square test. There was a significant improvement in each group for pain and disability but no difference between the groups. Radiographic assessment showed better posterolateral fusion rate for TLIF without superiority in segmental lordosis improvement. A case of deformity cascade with spino-pelvic mismatch at baseline was noted in PLF. Posterior decompression and instrumented fusion is an efficient technique that proved its significant clinical benefit in the surgical treatment of DS. TLIF did not show its superiority neither in clinical nor alignment parameters despite a better fusion rate. These results suggest that TLIF is not mandatory in this specific indication. Sagittal alignment analysis by standing full

  13. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for treatment of massive lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chang-Qing; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Large lumbar or lumbosacral (LS) disc herniations usually expand from the paramedian space to the neuroforamen and compress both the transversing (lower) and the exiting (upper) nerve roots, thus leading to bi-radicular symptoms. Bi-radicular involvement is a statistically significant risk factor for poor outcome in patients presenting with far lateral or foraminal disc herniation after facet preserving microdecompression. There is evidence showing that patients suffering from large lumbar disc herniations treated with interbody fusion have significant superior results in comparison with those who received a simple discectomy. We report our experiences on managing large LS disc herniation with bi-radicular symptoms by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using one diagonal fusion cage with unilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation. Twenty-three patients who suffered from single level lumbar or LS disc herniation with bi-radicular symptoms treated with unilateral decompression and TLIF using one diagonal fusion cage with ipsilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation operated between January 2005 and December 2009, were included in this study. Operation time and blood loss were recorded. The pain and disability status were pre- and postoperatively evaluated by the visual analog score (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Interbody bony fusion was detected by routine radiographs and computed tomography scan. Adjacent segment degeneration was detected by routine radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging examination. Overall outcomes were categorized according to modified Macnab classification. The patients were followed up for an average of 44.7 months. Pain relief in the VAS and improvement of the ODI were significant after surgery and at final followup. No severe complications occurred during hospital stay. Interbody bony fusion was achieved in every case. No cage retropulsion was observed, while 3 cases experienced cage subsidence. Adjacent segment degeneration

  14. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion vs. posterolateral instrumented fusion: cost-utility evaluation along side an RCT with a 2-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann Demant; Hoy, K.; Bunger, C.

    2014-01-01

    -utility of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) compared to posterolateral instrumented fusion (PLF) from the societal perspective. 100 Patients were randomized to TLIF or PLF (51/49) and followed for 2 years. Cost data were acquired from national registers, and outcomes were measured using the Oswestry Disability...... Index and SF-6D questionnaires. Conventional cost-effectiveness methodology was employed to estimate net benefit and to illustrate cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. The statistical analysis was based on means and bootstrapped confidence intervals. Results showed no statistically significant...

  15. An In Vitro Robotic Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament, Part 1: Secondary Role of the Anterolateral Ligament in the Setting of an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Matthew T; Nitri, Marco; Williams, Brady T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cruz, Raphael Serra; Dornan, Grant J; Goldsmith, Mary T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations have described the structural and functional behavior of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee through pull-apart and isolated sectioning studies. However, the secondary stabilizing role of the ALL in the setting of a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has not been fully defined for common simulated clinical examinations, such as the pivot-shift, anterior drawer, and internal rotation tests. Combined sectioning of the ALL and ACL would lead to increased internal rotation and increased axial plane translation during a pivot-shift test when compared with isolated sectioning of the ACL. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees were subjected to a simulated pivot-shift test with coupled 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torques from 0° to 60° of knee flexion and a 5-N·m internal rotation torque and an 88-N anterior tibial load, both from 0° to 120° of knee flexion via a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system. Kinematic changes were measured and compared with the intact state for isolated sectioning of the ACL and combined sectioning of the ACL and ALL. Combined sectioning of the ACL and ALL resulted in a significant increase in axial plane tibial translation during a simulated pivot shift at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 60° of knee flexion and a significant increase in internal rotation at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°, 105°, and 120° when compared with the intact and ACL-deficient states. Based on the model results, ALL sectioning resulted in an additional 2.1 mm (95% CI, 1.4-2.9 mm; P < .001) of axial plane translation during the pivot shift when compared with ACL-only sectioning, when pooling evidence over all flexion angles. Likewise, when subjected to IR torque, the ACL+ALL-deficient state resulted in an additional 3.2° of internal rotation (95% CI, 2.4°-4.1°; P < .001) versus the intact state, and the additional sectioning of the ALL increased internal rotation by 2.7° (95

  16. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect on adjacent motion segments remains unclear.

  17. Gnathostomiasis of the anterior chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barua P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular involvement with Gnathostoma spinigerum occurs years after the initial infection that is acquired by ingestion of poorly cooked, pickled seafood or water contaminated with third stage larvae. Here we report a case of gnathostomiasis of the left eye of a 32-year-old lady hailing from Meghalaya, India. Her vision had deteriorated to hand movement. Slit lamp examination revealed a live, actively motile worm in the anterior chamber, which was extracted by supra temporal limbal incision and visual acuity was restored.

  18. Clinical study on minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao WU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the operative essentials and therapeutic effects of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS.  Methods A total of 17 DLS patients without prior spinal diseases were treated by MIS-TLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation from January 2013 to September 2015 in Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, and postoperative complication were recorded in each patient. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI were used to evaluate postoperative improvement of low back and leg pain, and clinical effects were assessed according to Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. Coronal Cobb angle, sagittal lordosis angle and spinal deviation distances on coronal and sagittal plane were measured before operation, one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up in spinal full-length X-ray examination. Fusion rate was calculated according to X-ray or CT scan, and the degree of decompression was evaluated by MRI.  Results Decompression and fusion levels ranged from T12-S1 vertebrae, and interbody fusion was performed in 17 patients and 56 levels were fused. Average operation time was 200 min (180-300 min, intraoperative blood loss was 320 ml (200-1000 ml and hospital stay was 8.21 d (5-12 d. All patients were followed-up for 12.13 months (5-24 months. Compared with preoperation, VAS (P = 0.000, for all and ODI scores (P = 0.000, for all decreased significantly, SF-36 score increased (P = 0.000, for all, coronal Cobb angle (P = 0.000, for all, sagittal lordosis angle (P = 0.000, for all, coronal and sagittal deviation (P = 0.000, for all decreased significantly one week and 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up. The improvement rate of ODI was (86.51 ± 6.02%, fusion rate of vertebral bodies

  19. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  20. [Anterior skull-base schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Miranda, Miguel; De la O Ríos, Elier; Vargas-Valenciano, Emmanuelle; Moreno-Medina, Eva

    Schwannomas are nerve sheath tumours that originate in Schwann cells. They are usually solitary and sporadic and manifest on peripheral, spinal or cranial nerves. Intracranial schwannomas tend to manifest on the eighth cranial nerve, particularly in patients with neurofibromatosis type2. Anterior skull-base schwannomas represent less than 1% of all intracranial schwannomas. They are more frequent in young people and are typically benign. These tumours represent a diagnostic challenge due to their rarity and difficult differential diagnosis, and numerous theories have been postulated concerning their origin and development. In this article, we present the case of a 13-year-old male with a single anterior cranial-base tumour not associated with neurofibromatosis who presented with headache, papilloedema, eye pain and loss of visual acuity. Complete resection of the tumour was performed, which was histopathologically diagnosed as a schwannoma. The patient made a complete clinical recovery with abatement of all symptoms. We conducted a review of the literature and found 66 cases worldwide with this diagnosis. We describe the most relevant epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this kind of tumour and its relation with the recently discovered and similar olfactory schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Is Body Mass Index a Risk Factor for Revision Procedures After Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Bohl, Daniel D; Yom, Kelly H; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Singh, Kern

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To determine if an association exists between body mass index (BMI) and the rate of revision surgery after single-level minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). MIS TLIF is an effective treatment for lumbar degenerative disease. Previous studies in the orthopedic literature have associated increased BMI with increased postoperative complications and need for revision. Few studies have evaluated the association between BMI and the risk for revision after minimally invasive spinal procedures. A surgical registry of patients who underwent a single-level MIS TLIF for degenerative pathology between 2005 and 2014 was reviewed. Patients were stratified based on BMI category: normal weight (BMIrevision fusion procedure within 2 years after MIS TLIF using multivariate Cox proportional hazards survival analysis modeling. In total, 274 patients were analyzed; of these, 52 (18.98%) were normal weight, 101 (36.86%) were overweight, 62 (22.63%) were obese I, and 59 (21.53%) were obese II-III. On multivariate Cox proportional hazards survival analysis modeling, BMI category was not associated with undergoing a revision procedure within 2 years after MIS TLIF (P=0.599). On multivariate analysis, younger age (P=0.004) was associated with increased risk of undergoing a revision after MIS TLIF. The results of this study suggest that increasing BMI is not a risk factor for undergoing a revision procedure after MIS TLIF. As such, patients with high BMI should be counseled regarding having similar rates of needing a revision procedure after MIS TLIF as those with lower BMI. Level IV.

  2. Lumbar spine stability after combined application of interspinous fastener and modified posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuchun; Zhu, Lei; Su, Qing

    2014-05-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and internal fixation are commonly performed for the treatment of lower back pain due to lumbar spinal degeneration. We have developed a novel interspinous fixation device, the interspinous fastener (ISF) for potential use in the surgical management of degenerative spinal disease. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro biomechanical characteristics of calf lumbar spine specimens after ISF fixation with modified PLIF. Ten lumbar spine (L3-L6) specimens from ten fresh calf cadavers (8-10 weeks of age) were used. Each specimen underwent sequential testing for each of the following four groups: no instrumentation (INTACT); interspinous fusion device fixation + PLIF (ISF); unilateral pedicle screw and titanium rod fixation + PLIF (UPS); bilateral pedicle screw and titanium rod fixation + PLIF (BPS). Outcome measures included angular range of motion (ROM) during unloaded and loaded (8 Nm) flexion, extension, left bending, right bending, left torsion and right torsion. For all unloaded and loaded assessments, ROM was significantly higher in the INTACT group compared with all other groups (P < 0.05). Similarly, ROM was significantly higher in the UPS group (indicating decreased stability) compared with the ISF and BPS groups (P < 0.05). The only significant difference between the ISF and BPS groups was in the ROM with unloaded extension (higher in the BPS group, P = 0.006). We found that ISF fixation with PLIF of the lower lumbar spine provided biomechanical stability that was equivalent to that associated with bilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation with PLIF. The ISF shows potential as an alternative means of fixation in the surgical management of degenerative spinal disease.

  3. Impaired bone mineral density as a predictor of graft subsidence following minimally invasive transpsoas lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2015-04-01

    The LLIF procedure is a useful stand-alone and adjunct surgical approach for many spinal conditions. One complication of LLIF is subsidence of the interbody graft into the vertebral bodies, resulting in severe pain, impaired arthrodesis and potentially fracture of the body. Low bone density, as measured by T score on DEXA scanning, has also been postulated to increase the risk of subsidence. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was performed on all patients who underwent LLIF at this institution consisting of 712 levels in 335 patients. Patients with subsidence following LLIF were recorded. We utilized the T score obtained from the femoral neck DEXA scans, which is used to determine overall fracture risk. The T score of patients with subsidence was compared to those without subsidence. 20 of 57 (35 %) patients without subsidence had a DEXA T score between -1.0 and -2.4 consistent osteopenia, one patient (1.8 %) exhibited a T score less than -2.5, consistent with osteoporosis. 13 patients of 23 (57 %) with subsidence exhibited a T score between -1.0 and -2.4, consistent with osteopenia, five (22 %) exhibited a T score of -2.5 or less, consistent with osteoporosis. The mean DEXA T score in patients with subsidence was -1.65 (SD 1.04) compared to -0.45 (SD 0.97) in patients without subsidence (p subsidence. Further, they are at an increased risk of requiring additional surgery. In patients with poor bone quality, consideration could be made to supplement the LLIF cage with posterior instrumentation.

  4. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) for Spondylolisthesis in 282 Patients: In Situ Arthrodesis versus Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Auffinger, Brenda; Wong, Ricky H; Lam, Sandi K; Lawton, Cort D; Nixon, Alexander T; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Smith, Zachary A; Fessler, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    The benefits of spondylolisthesis reduction via minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) remain poorly understood. The purpose was to compare the complications, perioperative factors, and fusion rates in patients undergoing MI-TLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis between those in whom reduction was or was not performed. 1) patients who underwent a 1, 2, or 3 level MI-TLIF and 2) had a preoperative diagnosis of degenerative spondylolisthesis (Meyerding grade >0). >10° coronal curves, significant sagittal malalignment, infection, and preoperative hardware failure. Patients were grouped on the basis of those who underwent reduction of the spondylolisthesis by at least 1 Meyerding grade (RED) and those who did not (NORED). A total of 282 patients were included: RED (162, 57.4%) and NORED (120, 42.6%). Mean ages (61.68 ± 10.43 vs. 61.88 ± 11.76 years, respectively, P > 0.05) and operative times (P > 0.05) were statistically similar. RED had a significantly larger EBL (280.2 ± 24.03 vs. 212.61 ± 17.54, P 0.05, for all). RED had a significantly higher percentage of patients with a successful fusion at 1 year than NORED (84.50% vs. 70.83%, P spondylolisthesis was not associated with an increase in operative time, length of stay, and perioperative and postoperative complications compared with fusion in situ. Reduction was associated with higher blood loss but also a higher rate of fusion success at 1 year. Overall, reduction did not incur additional risk and had positive perioperative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomechanical Analysis of a Newly Developed Shape Memory Alloy Hook in a Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) In Vitro Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yuexing; Li, Jiukun; Zhou, Si; Tian, Shunliang; Xiang, Yucheng; Liu, Xingmo; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH) in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) model. Methods Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2) were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH); bilateral SMAH (BSMAH); unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS); and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS). The L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM) were recorded by a Motion Analysis System. Results Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p0.05). Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05). Conclusions Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4–5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:25474112

  6. Effect of lumbar lordosis on the adjacent segment in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Du, Lin; Xie, Youzhuan; Zhao, Jie

    2018-02-21

    Here we used a finite element (FE) analysis to investigate the biomechanical changes caused by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) at the L4-L5 level by lumbar lordosis (LL) degree. A lumbar FE model (L1-S5) was constructed based on computed tomography scans of a 30-year-old healthy male volunteer (pelvic incidence = 50°, LL = 52°). We investigated the influence of LL on the biomechanical behavior of the lumbar spine after TLIF in L4-L5 fusion models with 57°, 52°, 47°, and 40° LL. The LL was defined as the angle between the superior endplate of L1 and the superior endplate of S1. A 150-N vertical axial pre-load was imposed on the superior surface of L3. A 10-N·m moment was simultaneously applied on the L3 superior surface along the radial direction to simulate the four basic physiological motions of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion in the numerical simulations. The range of motion (ROM) and intradiscal pressure (IDP) of L3-L4 were evaluated and compared in the simulated cases. In all motion patterns, the ROM and IDP were both increased after TLIF. In addition, the decrease in lordosis generally increased the ROM and IDP in all motion patterns. The current FE analysis indicated that decreased spinal lordosis may evoke overstress of the adjacent segment and increase the risk of the pathological development of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD); thus, ASD should be considered when planning a spinal fusion procedure. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Biomechanical analysis of a newly developed shape memory alloy hook in a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wang

    Full Text Available The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF model.Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2 were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH; bilateral SMAH (BSMAH; unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS; and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS. The L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM were recorded by a Motion Analysis System.Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p0.05. Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05.Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4-5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration.

  8. Trends Analysis of rhBMP Utilization in Single-Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Lifeng; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Buser, Zorica; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C; Meisel, Hans-Joerg

    2017-10-01

    Retrospective study. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) has been widely used in spinal fusion surgery, but there is little information on rhBMP-2 utilization in single-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the trends and demographics of rhBMP-2 utilization in single-level PLIF. Patients who underwent single-level PLIF from 2005 to 2011 were identified by searching ICD-9 diagnosis and procedure codes in the PearlDiver Patient Records Database, a national database of orthopedic insurance records. The year of procedure, age, gender, and region of the United States were recorded for each patient. Results were reported for each variable as the incidence of procedures identified per 100 000 patients searched in the database. A total of 2735 patients had single-level PLIF. The average rate of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 maintained at a relatively stable level (28% to 31%) from 2005 to 2009, but decreased in 2010 (9.9%) and 2011 (11.8%). The overall incidence of single-level PLIF without rhBMP-2 (0.68 cases per 100 000 patients) was statistically higher ( P level PLIF with rhBMP-2 (0.21 cases per 100 000 patients). The average rate of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 utilization was the highest in West (30.1%), followed by Midwest (26.9%), South (20.5%), and Northeast (17.8%). The highest incidence of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 was observed in the age group level PLIF. There was a 3-fold increase in the rate of PLIF without rhBMP-2 compared to PLIF with rhBMP-2, with both procedures being mainly done in patients less than 65 years of age.

  9. [Effect evaluation of over 5 year follow up of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Ying, Jin-He; Xie, Pan-Pan; Wu, Xiao-Guang

    2016-07-25

    To evaluate the clinical effects of over 5 year follow up of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion(TLIF) in treating lumbar degenerative diseases. The clinical data of 24 patients with lumbar degenerative disease underwent unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion from March 2007 to October 2009, were retrospectively analyzed. There were 13 males and 11 females, aged from 34 to 68 years old with an average of 52 years. Postoperative pain and functional results were analyzed by the visual analogue scale(VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index(ODI). Radiological examination was obtained for each patient to assess the height of intervertebral space, postoperative intervertebral fusion conditions and general complications. All patients were followed up from 5 to 8 years with an average of 6.7 years. VAS scores of low back pain and leg pain decreased from preoperative 7.82±0.71, 8.42±1.24 to postoperative 1.87±0.81, 2.23±1.62, respectively( P degenerative diseases according to over 5 year follow up, however, its indications should be well considered. But the problems such as intervertebral space height of operated side loss and adjacent segment degeneration after unilateral pedicle screw fixation need further clinical study.

  10. [The shor-term clinical outcomes and safety of extreme lateral interbody fusion combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xu-Dong; Ma, Wei-Hu; Jiang, Wei-Yu; Ruan, Chao-Yue; Chen, Yun-Lin

    2017-02-25

    To evaluate the early efficacy and safety of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for lumbar degenerative disease. From January 2013 to June 2014, 13 patients with degenerative lumbar disease were treated with XLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, including 8 cases of lumbar instability, 5 cases of mild to moderate lumbar spondylolisthesis;there were 5 males and 8 females, aged from 56 to 73 years with an average of 62.1 years. All patients were single segment fusion. Operation time, perioperative bleeding and perioperative complications were recorded. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used to evaluate the clinical efficacy. Interbody fusion rate was observed and the intervertebral foramen area changes were compared preoperation and postoperation by X-rays and CT scanning. The mean operation time and perioperative bleeding in the patients respectively was(62.8±5.2) min and(82.5±22.6) ml. One case occurred in the numbness of femoribus internus and 1 case occurred in the muscle weakness of hip flexion after operation, both of them recovered within 2 weeks. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 19 months with an average of 15.6 months. VAS was decreased from preoperative 7.31±0.75 to 2.31±0.75 at final follow-up( P degenerative disease.

  11. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kyle [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Leslie, Michael [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, New Haven, CT (United States); Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  12. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Kyle; Leslie, Michael; Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  13. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  14. Comparison of Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Nonrigid Fixation System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Single-Level Lumbar Disc Herniation: A New Method of MRI Analysis of Lumbar Nucleus Pulposus Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaofeng; Liu, Yanan; Bao, Zhaohua; Zou, Jun; Yang, Huilin

    2017-05-19

    To evaluate the influence of a nonrigid fixation system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion on adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration by using MRI analysis of lumbar nucleus pulposus volume for single-level lumbar disc herniation. We selected 112 patients who underwent nonrigid fixation (17 men and 44 women) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (13 men and 38 women) for this retrospective study. Based on the T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans taken preoperatively, and 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery, the nucleus pulposus in the upper segments of the operated level was considered an ellipsoid, and their volumes were measured respectively and then compared between the two groups. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion group had significantly lower lumbar nucleus pulposus volume than the nonrigid fixation group at 12 (4.04 ± 1.42 vs. 5.25 ± 1.47 mm 3 ) and 24 months (4.16 ± 0.89 vs. 5.06 ± 1.23 mm 3 ), and had the highest nucleus pulposus. Meanwhile, the h value in the posterior lumbar interbody fusion group was notably smaller than the preoperative level at 12 (0.46 ± 0.03 vs. 0.55 ± 0.05 mm) and 24 months (0.44 ± 0.03 vs. 0.55 ± 0.05 mm). MRI analysis of lumbar nucleus pulposus volume is a new and quantitative method of analysis, which is a considerable method and contributes to the detection of severe intervertebral disc degeneration. Based on this new method, nonrigid fixation demonstrates excellent outcomes on the adjacent segment in comparison with posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

  15. Radiographic Analysis of Cervical and Spinal Alignment in Multilevel ACDF with Lordotic Interbody Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Lemons, Alex; Lorenz, Eileen; Swafford, Rachel; Osborn, James; Cason, Garrick

    2017-01-01

    Restoration and maintenance of cervical lordosis is an important clinical parameter in spine surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF: greater than 3 levels) procedure restores cervical lordosis and the affect of increasing lordosis on sagittal vertical axis. We performed a retrospective radiographic analysis of 69 patients who underwent multilevel ACDF by 2 surgeons between 2013 and 2014. We measured the global and segmental sagittal alignment of the cervical spine using the cobb method at 4 time intervals (preop, post op 4wks, 10wks and 6 months) as well as the sagittal vertical axis (SVA) using both a C1-S1 and C7-S1 plumb line methods at 2 time intervals (preop and post op 4wks). Radiographs were measured by three reviewers. Interrater reliability was good to excellent for all measurements. Cervical lordosis significantly increased from preop 10.26° to 4 weeks postop 19.44° and was maintained up to 6 months 19.34 (p<0.0005). Segmental cervical lordosis was also significantly increased from preop 8.22° to post op at 4 weeks (20.26°) and was maintained at post op 10weeks 20.30° and post op 6 months 19.56° (p<0.0005). C7-S1 SVA and C1-S1 SVA also significantly increased from 12.04mm preop to 27.49mm post op 4 wks (p<0.0005) and -1.93mm preop to 8.67mm post op (p<0.0005) respectively. A change in C2-C7 lordosis positively correlated with a change in C7-SVA and C1-SVA (r=0.37, P<0.005, and r=0.312, p<0.05 respectively). Multilevel ACDF significantly increases and maintains both segmental and global cervical lordosis up to 6 months after surgery. Increasing C2-C7 global lordosis is correlated with increasing positive sagittal vertical axis. Level of evidence: IV.

  16. MRI of anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Mohammad; Smitaman, Edward; Lawrence, David; Moukaddam, Hicham

    2014-07-01

    Anterior knee pain is the most common knee complaint. It may be due to a variety of soft tissue or osseous abnormalities. Knowledge of the radiologic appearance of the abnormalities allows more accurate diagnosis of the cause of the pain including chondral abnormalities, patellar instability and dislocation, femoral trochlear dysplasia, abnormal patellar location, bipartite patella, various tendinopathies, bursal inflammation, traction apophysitis in pediatric and adolescent patients, and miscellaneous diseases including mediopatellar plica syndrome and Hoffa's disease. Radiographs are often obtained to exclude acute osseous abnormalities, such as fractures. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior soft tissue contrast resolution and allows for more accurate evaluation of the underlying etiology and therefore may improve treatment and possible surgical planning.

  17. Fenestrated A1 segment of right anterior cerebral artery associated to duplicated anterior communicating artery

    OpenAIRE

    Sonda, Ildo; Basso, Luciano Silveira

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of fenestrated anterior cerebral artery associated to duplicated anterior communicating artery found duringa routine dissection of the brain in a male human body. Fenestrations of the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery are rare,especially if associated to a duplicated anterior communicating artery. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case in theliterature. We also present a brief review of the surgical importance of this anomaly

  18. Mild toxic anterior segment syndrome mimicking delayed onset toxic anterior segment syndrome after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Na Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS is an acute sterile postoperative anterior segment inflammation that may occur after anterior segment surgery. I report herein a case that developed mild TASS in one eye after bilateral uneventful cataract surgery, which was masked during early postoperative period under steroid eye drop and mimicking delayed onset TASS after switching to weaker steroid eye drop.

  19. Totally thrombosed giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Roopesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant anterior communicating artery aneurysmsarerare. Apatient presented with visual dysfunction, gait ataxia and urinary incontinence. MRI showed a giant suprasellar mass.At surgery, the lesion was identified as being an aneurysm arising from the anterior communicating artery.The difficulty in preoperative diagnosis and relevant literature are reviewed.

  20. Atraumatic Anterior Dislocation of the Hip Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiko Ohtsuru

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of the hip joint in adults is usually caused by high-energy trauma such as road traffic accidents or falls from heights. Posterior dislocation is observed in most cases. However, atraumatic anterior dislocation of the hip joint is extremely rare. We present a case of atraumatic anterior dislocation of the hip joint that was induced by an activity of daily living. The possible causes of this dislocation were anterior capsule insufficiency due to developmental dysplasia of the hip, posterior pelvic tilt following thoracolumbar kyphosis due to vertebral fracture, and acetabular anterior coverage changes by postural factor. Acetabular anterior coverage changes in the sagittal plane were measured using a tomosynthesis imaging system. This system was useful for elucidation of the dislocation mechanism in the present case.

  1. Hollow modular anchorage (HMA) screws for anterior transvertebral fixation in high-grade spondylolisthesis cases requiring 360 degrees in-situ fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Matthias A; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2018-03-22

    360 degrees in-situ fusion for high-grade spondylolisthesis showed satisfying clinical long-term results. Combining anterior with posterior surgery increases fusion rates. Anteriorly inserted transvertebral HMA screws could be an alternative to strut graft constructs or cages, avoiding donor site complications. In addition, complete posterior muscle detachment is avoided and the injury risk of neural structures is minimized. This study investigates the use of HMA screws in this context. Five consecutive patients requiring L4-S1 in-situ fusion for isthmic spondylolisthesis (four Grade 3 and one Grade 4) were included. The L5/S1 level was fused with an HMA screw filled with local bone and bone morphogenic protein (BMP2), inserted via the L4/5 disc space level. An L4/5 stand-alone interbody fusion with additional minimal invasive posterior screw fixation was added. Transvertebral insertion of the HMA device was accomplished via a retroperitoneal approach to L4/L5 in all cases without exposure of L5/S1. Blood loss ranged from 150 ml-350 ml. No intraoperative complication occurred. One patient developed posterior wound infection requiring debridement. Solid fusion was confirmed with a CT scan after 6 months in all patients. All patients improved to unrestricted activities of daily living with two being limited by occasional back pain. HMA screws allow for effective lumbosacral fusion via a limited anterior exposure. This is technically easier than posterior exposure of the lumbosacral junction in high-grade spondylolisthesis requiring 360 degrees fusion.

  2. Does Subcutaneous Infiltration of Liposomal Bupivacaine Following Single-Level Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery Improve Immediate Postoperative Pain Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Marko; Tou, Kevin; Winkel, Rose; Puffer, Ross; Bydon, Mohamad; Nassr, Ahmad; Huddleston, Paul; Yaszemski, Michael; Currier, Bradford; Freedman, Brett

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective case-control study using prospectively collected data. Evaluate the impact of liposomal bupivacaine (LB) on postoperative pain management and narcotic use following standardized single-level low lumbar transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Poor pain control after surgery has been linked with decreased pain satisfaction and increased economic burden. Unfortunately, opioids have many limitations and side effects despite being the primary treatment of postoperative pain. LB may be a form of pre-emptive analgesia used to reduce the use of postoperative narcotics as evidence in other studies evaluating its use in single-level microdiskectomies. The infiltration of LB subcutaneously during wound closure was performed by a single surgeon beginning in July 2014 for all single-level lumbar TLIF spinal surgeries at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. This cohort was compared against a control cohort of patients who underwent the same surgery by the same surgeon in the preceding 6 months. Statistical analysis was performed on relevant variables including: morphine equivalents of narcotic medication used (primary outcome), length of hospitalization, Visual Analog Scale pain scores, and total time spent on a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump. A total of 30 patients were included in this study; 16 were in the intervention cohort and 14 were in the control cohort. The morphine equivalents of intravenous narcotic use postoperatively were significantly less in the LB cohort from day of surgery to postoperative day 3. Although the differences lost their statistical significance, the trend remained for total (oral and intravenous) narcotic consumption to be lower in the LB group. The patients who received the study intervention required an acute pain service consult less frequently (62.5% in LB cohort vs. 78.6% in control cohort). The amount of time spent on a PCA pump in the LB group was 31 hours versus 47 hours in the control group ( p =0.1506). Local

  3. Medium-term effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiting; Pang, Qingjiang; Jiang, Guoqiang

    2017-10-01

    Objective To compare the medium-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Fifty-seven patients with multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease underwent Dynesys stabilization (n = 26) or PLIF (n = 31) from December 2008 to February 2010. The mean follow-up period was 50.3 (range, 46-65) months. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Radiographic evaluations included disc height and range of motion (ROM) of the operative segments and proximal adjacent segment on lumbar flexion-extension X-rays. The intervertebral disc signal change was defined by magnetic resonance imaging, and disc degeneration was classified by the Pfirrmann grade. Results The clinical outcomes including the VAS score and ODI were significantly improved in both groups at 3 months and the final follow-up, but the difference between the two was not significant. At the final follow-up, the disc height of stabilized segments in both groups was significantly increased; the increase was more notable in the Dynesys than PLIF group. The ROM of stabilized segments at the final follow-up decreased from 6.20° to 2.76° and 6.56° to 0.00° in the Dynesys and PLIF groups, respectively. There was no distinct change in the height of the proximal adjacent segment in the two groups. The ROM of the proximal adjacent segment in both groups increased significantly at the final follow-up; the change was significantly greater in the PLIF than Dynesys group. Only one case of adjacent segment degeneration occurred in the PLIF group, and this patient underwent a second operation. Conclusions Both Dynesys stabilization and PLIF can improve the clinical and radiographic outcomes of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Compared with PLIF, Dynesys stabilization can maintain the mobility of the

  4. Long-term outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with spinal stenosis and degenerative scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurra, Swamy; Lavelle, William F; Silverstein, Michael P; Savage, Jason W; Orr, R Douglas

    2017-11-22

    Patients with spinal deformity may present with complaints related to either the deformity itself or the manifestations of the coexisting spinal stenosis. There are reports of successful management of lumbar pathology in the absence of global sagittal or coronal imbalance, with limited decompression and fusion, addressing only the symptomatic segment. Our study examined the long-term outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), a less extensive procedure, based on the experience of the senior author over the past 10 years. This was a retrospective study of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and spinal deformity managed by one surgeon at The Cleveland Clinic since 2003. Forty-one patients were included in the study. The present study measures the long-term clinical functional outcomes of these patients through EQ-5D (EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire), PHQ-9 (Patient Health Questionnaire), and PDQ (Pain Disability Questionnaire) forms, along with documented radiographic parameters and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). There were no funding or potential conflicts of interest associated biases in the present study. Patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis with neutral global alignment in the sagittal and coronal planes and symptomatic stenosis at the deformity level were treated by limited fusion and TLIF, and had a follow-up period of at least 5 years. Excluded were patients under 18 years of age, had more than three levels of fusion, and had an active spinal malignancy or recent spinal trauma. The grouping variables were curve magnitude, revision surgeries, and TLIF levels. Clinical outcomes were compared in all the grouping variables. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests were utilized; pfusion, in the setting of modest spinal deformity, is a reasonable and safe option. Further study on the concept of short segment fusions in the growing patient population is required as more comprehensive fusions do have noted complication

  5. Restoration of the spinopelvic sagittal balance in isthmic spondylolisthesis: posterior lumbar interbody fusion may be better than posterolateral fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yong; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Yang, Hui-Lin; Tang, Tian-Si

    2015-07-01

    More and more orthopedic surgeons recognize the importance of the sagittal balance of the spine. To analyze the pre- and postoperative sagittal and deformity parameters of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis and evaluate the effect of posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) on spinopelvic sagittal balance. Nonrandomized controlled prospective study with a historical control. A total of 99 patients with low-grade L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis were treated surgically; 36 patients (mean age, 60.2±5.2 years) received the PLF operation, and 63 patients (mean age, 57.1±6.9 years) chose the PLIF operation. The healthy control group was composed of 60 volunteers (mean age, 44.5±8.4 years). The pre- and postoperative spinopelvic and deformity parameters. All patients had radiographs that allowed measurement of spinopelvic parameters before and after the operation. All the spinopelvic and deformity parameters were measured. Two radiologists measured the parameters with the Cobb method. All of the preoperative spinopelvic parameters showed no difference between the PLIF and PLF groups in this study (p>.05). In both of the operation groups, the preoperative pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, lumbar lordosis (LL), and L5 incidence (L5I) were significantly higher than in the control group (p.05). LL increased in the PLIF group and decreased in the PLF group. The slip degree (SD) and L5I were restored significantly in both groups. The HOD of the PLIF group increased 5.04 mm, the postoperative HOD of the PLF group had no significant change. In both PLIF and PLF groups, the correction of SD was correlated with the change of LL (r=-0.398, p=.007; r=0.365, p=.022). The restoration of HOD in the PLIF group correlated with the change of LL (r=0.334, p=.011). No significant differences could be found between the short-term clinical outcomes of the PLF and PLIF. Either PLF or PLIF would lead a great change in spinopelvic parameters and

  6. The European multicenter trial on the safety and efficacy of guided oblique lumbar interbody fusion (GO-LIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkenmaier Christof

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the implant-related problems with pedicle screw-based spinal instrumentations, other types of fixation have been tried in spinal arthrodesis. One such technique is the direct trans-pedicular, trans-discal screw fixation, pioneered by Grob for spondylolisthesis. The newly developed GO-LIF procedure expands the scope of the Grob technique in several important ways and adds security by means of robotic-assisted navigation. This is the first clinical trial on the GO-LIF procedure and it will assess safety and efficacy. Methods/Design Multicentric prospective study with n = 40 patients to undergo single level instrumented spinal arthrodesis of the lumbar or the lumbosacral spine, based on a diagnosis of: painful disc degeneration, painful erosive osteochondrosis, segmental instability, recurrent disc herniation, spinal canal stenosis or foraminal stenosis. The primary target criteria with regards to safety are: The number, severity and cause of intra- and perioperative complications. The number of significant penetrations of the cortical layer of the vertebral body by the implant as recognized on postoperative CT. The primary target parameters with regards to feasibility are: Performance of the procedure according to the preoperative plan. The planned follow-up is 12 months and the following scores will be evaluated as secondary target parameters with regards to clinical improvement: VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, short form - 12 health questionnaire and the Swiss spinal stenosis questionnaire for patients with spinal claudication. The secondary parameters with regards to construct stability are visible fusion or lack thereof and signs of implant loosening, implant migration or pseudarthrosis on plain and functional radiographs. Discussion This trial will for the first time assess the safety and efficacy of guided oblique lumbar interbody fusion. There is no control group, but the results, the

  7. [Clinical outcomes of single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis by minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with bilateral tubular channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Z L; Jia, L; Yu, Y; Xu, W; Hu, X; Zhan, X H; Jia, Y W; Wang, J J; Cheng, L M

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment with bilateral Spotlight tubular channels. Methods: A total of 21 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis whom underwent MIS-TLIF via bilateral Spotlight tubular channels were retrospectively analyzed from October 2014 to November 2015. The 21 patients included 11 males and 10 females ranged from 35 to 82 years (average aged 60.7 years). In term of spondylolisthesis category, there were 18 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis and 3 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis. With respect to spondylolisthesis degree, 17 cases were grade Ⅰ° and 4 cases were grade Ⅱ°. Besides, 17 cases at L(4-5) and 4 cases at L(5)-S(1)were categorized by spondylolisthesis levels. Operation duration, blood loss, postoperative drainage and intraoperative exposure time were recorded, functional improvement was defined as an improvement in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was also employed at pre and post-operation (3 months and the last follow-up), to evaluate low back and leg pain. Furthermore, to evaluate the recovery of the intervertebral foramen and of lumbar sagittal curvature, average height of intervertebral space, Cobb angles of lumbar vertebrae and operative segments, spondylolisthesis index were measured. At the last follow-up, intervertebral fusion was assessed using Siepe evaluation criteria and the clinical outcome was assessed using the MacNab scale. Radiographic and functional outcomes were compared pre- and post-operation using the paired T test to determine the effectiveness of MIS-TLIF. Statistical significance was defined as P spondylolisthesis incidence ( t =17.1, P spondylolisthesis incidence ( t =18.6, P spondylolisthesis vertebrae were restored completely. Lastly, at the last follow-up, 12 cases of grade 1 and 7 cases of grade 2 fusion were present as determined

  8. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of adjacent segment disease: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jerry Y; Kiely, Paul D; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Aichmair, Alexander; Huang, Russel C

    2017-09-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes of 20 patients who underwent single level unilateral pedicle screw fixation following lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for treatment of lumbar adjacent segment disease (ASD). Demographic, comorbidity, clinical assessment, peri-operative, and complication data were assessed. Visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and short form-12 (SF-12) were used to assess clinical outcomes. Post-operative radiographs were assessed for subsidence, cage migration, and fusion. Average age of patients was 63.2±13.7 years (range, 41-86 years), with 8 males and 12 females. Recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was utilized in 18 LLIF cages (90%) and 12 posterolateral fusions (60%). Mean operation time was 214.1±47.2 minutes (range, 146-342 minutes), mean estimated blood loss of 187.5±90.1 cc (range, 50-400 cc). No patients received a blood transfusion. There were no intra-operative complications. Mean hospital length of stay was 4.4±1.7 days (range, 2-9 days). At final follow-up (mean: 13.0±12.7 months after surgery), there was significant improvement in post-op VAS (P=0.006) score compared to pre-op, but not ODI (P=0.181), SF-12 PC (P=0.480), and SF-12 MC (P=0.937). Patients with >6 months of post-operative imaging (14/20, 70%) demonstrated successful fusion in 13 out of 14 cases (93%). There was grade 0 subsidence of adjacent cranial vertebra in all cases (100%). There was grade 0 subsidence of the adjacent caudal vertebra in 13 cases (93%) and grade 1 subsidence in 1 case (7%). There was evidence of cage migration in 3 cases (21%). There were 4 patients (20%) who experienced transient neurological deficits that eventually resolved. Two patients required surgery for further ASD. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that patients who undergo LLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for treatment of ASD may have significantly reduced pain and favorable radiographic results. Further investigation in

  9. Superior Facet Joint Violations during Single Level Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Preliminary Retrospective Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Facet joint violation (FV was reported as variable iatrogenic damage that can be a crucial risk factor leading to the adjacent segment degeneration (ASD. “Blind” screw placement technique in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF contributes to the increasing incidence of FV that can be influenced by several potential factors. Many controversies about these factors and clinical outcomes of different types of FV patients exist, yet they have not been analyzed. Methods. 99 cases undergoing single-segment MIS-TLIF from July 2013 to December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Computed tomography (CT was applied to determine the incidence of FV, and then the correlation between FV and relevant factors, including gender, age, body mass index (BMI, top-screw level, and decompression, was analyzed. A total of 53 cases were followed up after one year, 31 cases in noninjury (A group and 22 patients in FV injury (B group. Results. The incidence of FV was 39. 39% (39/99 in the patients and 23.23% (46/198 in the screws. Logistic regression analysis showed that screw at L5 in patients with BMI > 30 kg/m2 was vulnerable to FV (P<0.05. Moreover, postoperative average intervertebral disc height (AIDH of fusion segment, visual analog scale (VAS, and Oswestry disability index (ODI scores improved significantly in group A and B when compared with preoperative data (P<0.05. Adjacent superior average intervertebral disc height (ASAIDH presented decrease, but adjacent superior intervertebral disc Cobb angle (ASIDCA appeared to increase in the two groups at the final follow-up compared with postoperative 3 days (P<0.05. Low back VAS and ODI scores in group A (31 cases were lower than those in group B (22 cases in the final follow-up (P<0.05. Conclusion. MIS-TLIF is an effective treatment for lumbar degenerative disease, but FV occurred at a higher incidence. Facet joints should be protected in MIS-TLIF to avoid FV.

  10. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of adjacent segment disease: a preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Paul D.; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Aichmair, Alexander; Huang, Russel C.

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the clinical outcomes of 20 patients who underwent single level unilateral pedicle screw fixation following lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for treatment of lumbar adjacent segment disease (ASD). Methods Demographic, comorbidity, clinical assessment, peri-operative, and complication data were assessed. Visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and short form-12 (SF-12) were used to assess clinical outcomes. Post-operative radiographs were assessed for subsidence, cage migration, and fusion. Results Average age of patients was 63.2±13.7 years (range, 41–86 years), with 8 males and 12 females. Recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was utilized in 18 LLIF cages (90%) and 12 posterolateral fusions (60%). Mean operation time was 214.1±47.2 minutes (range, 146–342 minutes), mean estimated blood loss of 187.5±90.1 cc (range, 50–400 cc). No patients received a blood transfusion. There were no intra-operative complications. Mean hospital length of stay was 4.4±1.7 days (range, 2–9 days). At final follow-up (mean: 13.0±12.7 months after surgery), there was significant improvement in post-op VAS (P=0.006) score compared to pre-op, but not ODI (P=0.181), SF-12 PC (P=0.480), and SF-12 MC (P=0.937). Patients with >6 months of post-operative imaging (14/20, 70%) demonstrated successful fusion in 13 out of 14 cases (93%). There was grade 0 subsidence of adjacent cranial vertebra in all cases (100%). There was grade 0 subsidence of the adjacent caudal vertebra in 13 cases (93%) and grade 1 subsidence in 1 case (7%). There was evidence of cage migration in 3 cases (21%). There were 4 patients (20%) who experienced transient neurological deficits that eventually resolved. Two patients required surgery for further ASD. Conclusions In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that patients who undergo LLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for treatment of ASD may have significantly reduced pain and favorable

  11. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rick W.; Haas, Amanda K.; Anderson, Joy; Calabrese, Gary; Cavanaugh, John; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lorring, Dawn; McKenzie, Christopher; Preston, Emily; Williams, Glenn; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation has evolved over the past 20 years. This evolution has been driven by a variety of level 1 and level 2 studies. Evidence Acquisition: The MOON Group is a collection of orthopaedic surgeons who have developed a prospective longitudinal cohort of the ACL reconstruction patients. To standardize the management of these patients, we developed, in conjunction with our physical therapy committee, an evidence-based rehabilitation guideline. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Results: This review was based on 2 systematic reviews of level 1 and level 2 studies. Recently, the guideline was updated by a new review. Continuous passive motion did not improve ultimate motion. Early weightbearing decreases patellofemoral pain. Postoperative rehabilitative bracing did not improve swelling, pain range of motion, or safety. Open chain quadriceps activity can begin at 6 weeks. Conclusion: High-level evidence exists to determine appropriate ACL rehabilitation guidelines. Utilizing this protocol follows the best available evidence. PMID:26131301

  12. Conservative treatment of excessive anterior pelvic tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    , DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark ABSTRACT (1795 anslag) Background: Excessive anterior pelvic tilt has been linked to pain and dysfunction of the hip and pelvic region. Conservative treatment (e.g. manual therapy and physical training) is suggested in correcting the tilt and eventually related symptoms....... However, the effectiveness in reducing excessive anterior pelvic tilt in adults is unknown. Purpose: To systematically review studies investigating the effectiveness of conservative treatment in reducing anterior pelvic tilt in adults and evaluate the quality of evidence. Materials and methods: MEDLINE...

  13. CT findings in malignant anterior mediastinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narimatsu, Akiko; Higuchi, Mutsuo; Shigeta, Akiko

    1992-01-01

    Materials were 26 malignant anterior mediastinal tumors: 7 thymic carcinomas, 6 invasive thymomas, 7 malignant lymphomas (ML) and 6 malignant germ cell tumors (GCT). Egg shell calcification in the tumor was indicative of the invasive thymoma. Presence of conglomerated mass in the anterior mediastinum strongly suggested the diagnosis of ML. Although differentiation between thymic carcinoma and ML was difficult, punctate calcification and pleural implants were frequently found in the former. GCT showed no significant findings on CT. However, another clinical information was helpful to make correct diagnosis. CT guided biopsy is necessary to diagnose the malignant anterior mediastinal tumors. (author)

  14. CT findings in malignant anterior mediastinal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narimatsu, Akiko; Higuchi, Mutsuo; Shigeta, Akiko (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-07-01

    Materials were 26 malignant anterior mediastinal tumors: 7 thymic carcinomas, 6 invasive thymomas, 7 malignant lymphomas (ML) and 6 malignant germ cell tumors (GCT). Egg shell calcification in the tumor was indicative of the invasive thymoma. Presence of conglomerated mass in the anterior mediastinum strongly suggested the diagnosis of ML. Although differentiation between thymic carcinoma and ML was difficult, punctate calcification and pleural implants were frequently found in the former. GCT showed no significant findings on CT. However, another clinical information was helpful to make correct diagnosis. CT guided biopsy is necessary to diagnose the malignant anterior mediastinal tumors. (author).

  15. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Comparison Study Based on End Plate Subsidence and Cystic Change in Individuals Older and Younger than 65 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guang-Xun; Quillo-Olvera, Javier; Jo, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Hyeong-Jin; Covarrubias-Rosas, Claudia Angelica; Jin, Chengzhen; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2017-10-01

    To compare the outcomes between patients older and younger than 65 years who underwent single-level minimally invasive transforaminal interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) surgery. This study is a retrospective analysis of 76 patients who underwent MI-TLIF between April 2012 and June 2016. Group A consisted of 35 patients (subsidence, end plate cyst formation, and fusion rate were assessed. The mean age of the study subjects was 65.3 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 18.98 months. Group B had a higher rate of comorbidities compared with group A (90.24% vs. 57.14%, respectively; P subsidence or positive cyst sign between the groups. MI-TLIF presented similar safeness and acceptable outcomes and complication rate in both groups. Cyst formation may be aggravated by cage subsidence, because cage subsidence was a useful potential predictor of cyst formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Changes of anterior and posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth after SMILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the changes of anterior and posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth after small incision lenticule extraction(SMILEfor low and high myopic astigmatism. METHODS: Sixty-three cases(88 eyesundergone SMILE in our hospital were included. The patients were divided into two groups based on astigmatism degree: the Group A: -2.00D to -4.00D astigmatism, the Group B: -0.25D to -1.00D astigmatism. Patients were examined at 1wk, 1 and 3mo after operations. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, refraction, corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth were recorded. The change of anterior and posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth was compared. Spearman correlation analysis and independent t test were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Surgery was done well in all patients without complications. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth preoperatively, postoperatively 7d,1 and 3mo(P>0.05. One week postoperatively, the anterior corneal curvature was statistically significant from that of preoperative in both groups(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION: No significant change of anterior and posterior corneal curvature and anterior chamber depth was found after SMILE for correcting low and high myopic astigmatism. One week after SMILE the anterior corneal curvature become stable.

  17. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  18. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: reducing anterior tibial subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bart; Duerr, Eric R H; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2016-09-01

    To measure and compare the amount of anterior tibial subluxation (ATS) after anatomic ACL reconstruction for both acute and chronic ACL-deficient patients. Fifty-two patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated after primary, unilateral, anatomic ACL reconstruction. Post-operative true lateral radiographs were obtained of both knees with the patient in supine position and knees in full passive extension with heels on a standardized bolster. ATS was measured on the radiographs by two independent and blinded observers. ATS was calculated as the side-to-side difference in tibial position relative to the femur. An independent t test was used to compare ATS between those undergoing anatomic reconstruction for an acute versus chronic ACL injury. Chronic ACL deficiency was defined as more than 12 weeks from injury to surgery. Patients averaged 26.4 ± 11.5 years (mean ± SD) of age, 43.6 % were female, and 48.1 % suffered an injury of the left knee. There were 30 and 22 patients in the acute and chronic groups, respectively. The median duration from injury to reconstruction for the acute group was 5 versus 31 weeks for the chronic group. After anatomic ACL reconstruction, the mean ATS was 1.0 ± 2.1 mm. There was no statistical difference in ATS between the acute and chronic groups (1.2 ± 2.0 vs. 0.6 ± 2.3 mm, n.s.). Assessment of inter-tester reliability for radiographic evaluation of ATS revealed an excellent intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.894. Anatomic ACL reconstruction reduces ATS with a mean difference of 1.0 mm from the healthy contralateral limb. This study did not find a statistical difference in ATS between patients after anatomic ACL reconstruction in the acute or chronic phase. These observations suggest that anatomic ACL reconstruction, performed in either the acute or the chronic phase, approaches the normal AP relationship of the tibiofemoral joint. IV.

  19. Effect of soft tissue thickness over the posterior border of the vertebral body and disc space on cage placement during posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae Hyuk; Kasat, Niraj Sharad; Whang, Jin Ho; Kim, Min Keun; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Hong, Jae Young; Modi, Hitesh N; Suh, Seung Woo

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether there is a difference between visual depth (VD) and radiological image depth (RD) of cages (i.e., structural interbody support devices) placed in disc spaces during posterior lumbar interbody fusion and whether soft tissues covering the posterior border of the vertebral body and associated disc space are the cause of any observed differences. Using digital calipers, cages were inserted at a depth of 5 mm from the soft tissues covering the posterior border of the vertebral body and disc space under direct vision; this depth was defined as VD. After insertion, RD was measured in triplicate. The reliability of RD measurements was evaluated using an intraclass coefficient test. To identify the cause of differences between VD and RD, the thicknesses of soft tissues were measured microscopically. A total of 40 lumbar intervertebral disc spaces with cages were evaluated. The mean RD of cages was 3.12 mm, while the mean difference between the VD and RD of cages (DVRD) was 1.91 mm. On histological examination, the mean thickness of the soft tissue was 2.02 mm. Comparative analysis between histological values and DVRD showed no statistical difference (P = 1.14, 1.55, 0.06). There was a significant difference between VD and RD during cage placement, and soft tissue structure appeared to be responsible for the DVRD of inserted cages. Therefore, cages should be inserted deeper to account for differences between visual and radiological image depths. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Factors affecting anterior knee pain following anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Yasuo; Hakozaki, Akihiro; Iwamoto, Wataru; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Suda, Yasunori

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anterior knee pain in anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to identify critical factors affecting postoperative anterior knee pain development. Subjects comprised 171 patients (171 knees) who underwent anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction with a follow-up period of ≥2 years. The procedure used bone-patellar tendon-bone plus gracilis tendon (BTB-G) in 56 knees, semitendinosus tendon (ST) in 71 knees, and ST-G in 44 knees. Clinical results and prevalence and severity of anterior knee pain were assessed at 3 months and 2 years postoperatively. Clinical variables influencing anterior knee pain development at each postoperative period were subjected to univariate analysis, followed by logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors for anterior knee pain. Overall prevalences of anterior knee pain at 3 months and 2 years postoperatively were 42.0 and 11.1%, respectively. Use of BTB-G graft represented the highest prevalence of anterior knee pain between the 3 different grafts (P = 0.001); however, this statistical significance disappeared at 2 years postoperatively. Prevalence of postoperative extension deficit was significantly higher in anterior knee pain-positive cohort than in anterior knee pain-negative cohort at 3 months postoperatively. Level of quadriceps strength was significantly lower, and Lysholm score was significantly worse in anterior knee pain-positive cohort than in anterior knee pain-negative cohort at 2 years postoperatively. According to logistic regression analysis, knee extension deficit was a predisposing factor for the development of anterior knee pain at 3 months postoperatively (odds ratio, 2.76; P = 0.004); however, there was no significant predisposing factor for anterior knee pain at 2 years postoperatively. Knee extension deficit was an important predisposing factor for postoperative anterior knee pain in the early

  1. MRI of tibialis anterior tendon rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Robert A.; DeMeo, Patrick J.; Kolman, Brett H.; Daffner, Richard H.; Sciulli, Robert L.; Roberts, Catherine C.

    2004-01-01

    Ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are rare. We present the clinical histories and MRI findings of three recent male patients with tibialis anterior tendon rupture aged 58-67 years, all of whom presented with pain over the dorsum of the ankle. Two of the three patients presented with complete rupture showing discontinuity of the tendon, thickening of the retracted portion of the tendon, and excess fluid in the tendon sheath. One patient demonstrated a partial tear showing an attenuated tendon with increased surrounding fluid. Although rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon is a rarely reported entity, MRI is a useful modality in the definitive detection and characterization of tibialis anterior tendon ruptures. (orig.)

  2. Upper anterior zone restoration with composites

    OpenAIRE

    Lamas Lara, César; CD, Docente del Área de Operatoria Dental y Endodoncia de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Angulo de la Vega, Giselle; CD, Alumna de la Especialidad de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    The anterior sector problems are very common in our professional practice and became vital importance to make a suitable rehabilitation in these cases; we can not do a good rehabilitation if we do not know the basic characteristics, both aesthetic and functional. Today the composites are a valid alternative for the restoration of the anterior sector, since they offer to us a conservative and aesthetic possibility, but independently of the material to use we have to based on certain rules or p...

  3. Conservative treatment of excessive anterior pelvic tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    quality by two reviewers using Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias in RCT’s and the ROBINS-I tool (Risk Of Bias In Non-randomized Studies - of interventions). Data was synthesized qualitatively. The GRADE approach was used to determine the overall quality of the evidence. PROSPERO...... treatment may reduce anterior pelvis tilt and reduce symptoms in relation to faulty posture. Keywords: pelvis, anterior tilt, anteversion, posture...

  4. Endoscopic laser anterior commissurotomy for anterior glottic web: one-stage procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chih-Ying; Alswiahb, Jamil N; Hwang, Chung-Feng; Hsu, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Pei-Yin; Huang, Hsun-Hsien

    2010-05-01

    The conventional method for preventing web formation after anterior glottic web surgery is keel insertion. However, this presents risks of airway compromise and granulation tissue formation, which could necessitate tracheotomy in addition to a secondary procedure for keel removal. We introduce a novel, 1-stage endoscopic laser anterior commissurotomy for preventing anterior glottic web re-formation. Twenty patients with glottic webs involving the anterior commissure were studied. The lesions were removed by transoral carbon dioxide laser microsurgery. In all patients, the anterior glottic web was vaporized along with the inner perichondrium of the thyroid cartilage over the anterior commissure area, creating a raw vertical break "alley" between the anterior vocal folds that measured between 0.3 and 0.5 cm in width and between 0.8 and 2 cm in length. The preoperative and postoperative vocal folds and voice quality were evaluated by videostrobolaryngoscopy and voice recordings. All 20 patients had anterior glottic webs ranging from 11% to 64% of the length from the anterior commissure to the vocal process. None of the patients developed restenosis at the anterior commissure of a severity similar to that of the initial lesion during follow-up (mean, 13 months; range, 3 to 44 months).All patients except 1 reported satisfaction with their voice improvement. Outcome analysis revealed that partial re-formation of the web was noted in 4 patients. One-stage, endoscopic laser anterior commissurotomy was effective and relatively safe for removing glottic webs, for preventing anterior glottic web re-formation, and for improving vocal fold performance among our patients.

  5. Ultrasound biomicroscopy of the anterior segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, J M; Ritch, R

    1996-08-01

    New imaging technologies are revolutionizing the understanding and treatment of a wide variety of ocular disorders. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, ultrasound biomicroscopy, confocal scanning laser polarimetry, color doppler imaging of blood flow, and optical coherence tomography are providing important information regarding disease pathophysiology, diagnosis, progression, and treatment. High frequency (50 MHz), high resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy of the anterior segment was obtained in a wide variety of disorders of the anterior segment. Tissue resolution is approximately 50 microns and the penetration depth is 5 mm. Ultrasound biomicroscopy is capable of imaging the comea, iris, anterior chamber, anterior chamber angle, posterior chamber, and ciliary body with great detail. The structures surrounding the posterior chamber, previously hidden from clinical observation, can be imaged and their normal anatomic relationships assessed. The various forms of angle closure glaucoma, such as pupillary block and plateau iris configuration, can be differentiated. The concave iris found in pigment dispersion and its response to treatment can be assessed. Visualization of anterior segment anatomy in eyes with opaque media is possible. Ultrasound biomicroscopy assists in the management of eyes with disorders of the anterior segment. Future applications of this technology will yield important information regarding accommodation, normal ocular physiology and disease pathophysiology.

  6. Role of Weekly Teriparatide Administration in Osseous Union Enhancement within Six Months After Posterior or Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Osteoporosis-Associated Lumbar Degenerative Disorders: A Multicenter, Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebata, Shigeto; Takahashi, Jun; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Isogai, Yukihiro; Ohba, Tetsuro; Shibata, Yosuke; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Yamagata, Zentaro; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Haro, Hirotaka

    2017-03-01

    For elderly patients, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is usually performed to treat lumbar degenerative diseases. However, some patients exhibit pseudarthrosis following such procedures. The anabolic agent teriparatide is an approved treatment for promoting bone formation in osteoporotic patients. Our multicenter, prospective randomized study assessed the role of once-weekly teriparatide administration on patient outcomes following interbody fusion. Patients were females who were ≥50 years of age, had a bone mineral density (BMD) of teriparatide, administered subcutaneously starting at week 1, for 6 months postoperatively (the teriparatide arm), or no teriparatide (the control arm). Blinded radiographic evaluations were performed using dynamic radiography and computed tomography (CT) and assessed by modified intention-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analysis. Clinical and neurological symptoms were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOA-BPEQ) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Seventy-five patients were randomized to treatment, and 66 patients completed treatment. At 4 months postoperatively, bone fusion in the 2 center CT slices was significantly higher in the teriparatide arm compared with the control arm in the age-adjusted modified intention-to-treat analysis and was significantly higher at 6 months in the per-protocol analysis. Radiographic examinations showed no disc-space narrowing and no intervertebral disc instability. JOA-BPEQ and ODI results were improved postoperatively in both treatment arms. Weekly administration of teriparatide promoted bone formation at the surgical fusion site and decreased bone resorption, as indicated by bone metabolic marker results, within the early postoperative period. Our findings suggest that combining lumbar interbody fusion and teriparatide treatment may be an effective option for managing lumbar

  7. Posterolateral fusion (PLF) versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for spondylolisthesis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jay M; Tanenbaum, Joseph E; Steinmetz, Michael P; Mroz, Thomas E; Overley, Samuel C

    2018-02-13

    Lumbar fusion is an effective and durable treatment for symptomatic lumbar spondylolisthesis; however, the current literature provides insufficient evidence to recommend an optimal surgical fusion strategy. The present study aims to compare the clinical outcomes, fusion rates, blood loss, and operative times between open posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) alone and open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) + posterolateral fusion for spondylolisthesis. This is a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of English language studies for the treatment of spondylolisthesis with PLF versus PLF + TLIF. Data were obtained from published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and retrospective cohort studies. Clinical outcomes included Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), back pain, leg pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scores. Fusion rate, operative time, blood loss, and infection rate were also assessed. A literature search of three electronic databases was performed to identify investigations performed comparing PLF alone with PLF + TLIF for treatment of low-grade lumbar spondylolisthesis. The summary effect size was assessed from pooling observational studies for each of the outcome variables, with odds ratios (ORs) used for fusion and infection rate, mean difference used for improvement in ODI and leg pain as well as operative time and blood loss, and standardized mean difference used for improvement in back pain and HRQOL outcomes. Studies were weighed based on the inverse of the variance and heterogeneity. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I 2 -an estimate of the error caused by between-study variation. Effect sizes from the meta-analysis were then compared with data from the RCTs to assess congruence in outcomes. The initial literature search yielded 282 unique, English language studies. Seven were determined to meet our inclusion criteria and were included in our qualitative analysis. Five observational studies were included in

  8. Identification and quantification of turkey meat adulteration in fresh, frozen-thawed and cooked minced beef by FT-NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamprese, Cristina; Amigo, José Manuel; Casiraghi, Ernestina; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2016-11-01

    This work aims at the development of a method based on FT-NIR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the identification and quantification of minced beef meat adulteration with turkey meat. Samples were analyzed as raw, frozen-thawed and cooked. Different multivariate regression and class-modeling strategies were evaluated. PLS regression models with R(2) in prediction higher than 0.884 and RMSEP lower than 10.8% were developed. PLS-DA applied to discriminate each type of sample in two classes (adulteration threshold=20%) showed values of sensitivity and specificity in prediction higher than 0.84 and 0.76, respectively. Thus, the study demonstrates that FT-NIR spectroscopy coupled with suitable chemometric strategies is a reliable tool for the identification and quantification of minced beef adulteration with turkey meat not only in fresh products, but also in frozen-thawed and cooked samples. This achievement is of crucial importance in the meat industry due to the increasing number of processed meat products, in which technological treatments can mask a possible inter-species adulteration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Aphasia following anterior cerebral artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimosaka, Shinichi; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi; Shimizu, Takeo; Morikawa, Atsunori

    1982-01-01

    We have report two cases of aphasia that had infarcts in the distribution of the left or right anterior cerebral artery, as confirmed by computed tomography. Case 1 is a right-handed, 65-year-old man in whom computerized tomographic scanning revealed an infarction of the territory of the left anterior cerebral artery after the clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The standard language test of aphasia (SLTA) revealed non-fluent aphasia with dysarthria, good comprehension, almost normal repetition with good articulation, and a defectiveness in writing. This syndrome was considered an instance of transcortical motor aphasia. Although three years had passed from the onset, his aphasia did not show any improvement. Case 2 is a 37-year-old man who is right-handed but who can use his left hand as well. He was admitted because of subarachnoid hemorrhage from an anterior communicating aneurysm. Because of postoperative spasm, an infarction in the distribution of the right anterior cerebral artery developed. He was totally unable to express himself vocally, but he could use written language quite well to express his ideas and had a good comprehension of spoken language. This clinical picture was considered that of an aphemia. After several weeks, his vocalization returned, but the initial output was still hypophonic. (J.P.N.)

  10. Anterior Shoulder Instability in the Military Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Brian; Owens, Brett D.; Tokish, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Given its young, predominately male demographics and intense physical demands, the US military remains an ideal cohort for the study of anterior shoulder instability. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database was performed to identify all peer-reviewed publications from 1950 to 2016 from US military orthopaedic surgeons focusing on the management of anterior shoulder instability. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The incidence of anterior shoulder instability events in the military occurs at an order of magnitude greater than in civilian populations, with rates as high as 3% per year among high-risk groups. With more than 90% risk of a Bankart lesion and high risk for instability recurrence, the military has advocated for early intervention of first-time shoulder instability while documenting up to 76% relative risk reduction versus nonoperative treatment. Preoperative evaluation with advanced radiographic imaging should be used to evaluate for attritional bone loss or “off-track” engaging defects to guide comprehensive surgical management. With complex recurrent shoulder instability and/or cases of clinically significant osseous lesions, potential options such as remplissage, anterior open capsular procedures, or bone augmentation procedures may be preferentially considered. Conclusion: Careful risk stratification, clinical evaluation, and selective surgical management for at-risk military patients with anterior shoulder instability can optimize the recurrence risk and functional outcome in this population. PMID:27694151

  11. Ultrasonography of anterior abdominal wall lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.N.; Lee, S. K.; Park, H. Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, B. H. [Maryrnoll Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    The anterior abdominal wall has received little attention in the ultrasonic evaluation. However recently the improved resolution of ultrasound scanning devices has made possible routine examination of the anterior abdominal wall. The authors evaluated ultrasonographic findings of anterior abdominal wall lesions in 27 cases for 1 year(from July '82 to Aug. '83), which were finally diagnosed pathologically and clinically. The results were as follows: 1. Well defined peritoneal line and layers of the anterior abdominal wall made it possible to localize the lesions accurately from adjacent structures. 2. Abscess and hematoma were lower in echogenecity than adjacent tissues, such as muscle layer or subcutaneous fat space and were well delineated from normal structures. 3. In hernia, easy differentiation was made due to oval shape, poor or decreased echo pattern and protrustion from skin layer. Conclusively, in the doubtful cases of palpable mass in the abdominal wall, postoperative complications of sequele, such as accurately but also the guide of treatment. Ultrasonography of anterior abdominal wall is useful to demonstrate the exact location, extent of the lesions and to decrease the frequency of useless laparatomy

  12. Aphasia following anterior cerebral artery occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimosaka, Shinichi; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi; Shimizu, Takeo; Morikawa, Atsunori (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    We have report two cases of aphasia that had infarcts in the distribution of the left or right anterior cerebral artery, as confirmed by computed tomography. Case 1 is a right-handed, 65-year-old man in whom computerized tomographic scanning revealed an infarction of the territory of the left anterior cerebral artery after the clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The standard language test of aphasia (SLTA) revealed non-fluent aphasia with dysarthria, good comprehension, almost normal repetition with good articulation, and a defectiveness in writing. This syndrome was considered an instance of transcortical motor aphasia. Although three years had passed from the onset, his aphasia did not show any improvement. Case 2 is a 37-year-old man who is right-handed but who can use his left hand as well. He was admitted because of subarachnoid hemorrhage from an anterior communicating aneurysm. Because of postoperative spasm, an infarction in the distribution of the right anterior cerebral artery developed. He was totally unable to express himself vocally, but he could use written language quite well to express his ideas and had a good comprehension of spoken language. This clinical picture was considered that of an aphemia. After several weeks, his vocalization returned, but the initial output was still hypophonic.

  13. Rehabilitation of anterior teeth with customised incisal guide table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Priyanka; Singh, Kamleshwar; Rao, Jitendra; Kumar, Lakshya

    2013-05-24

    Restoration of anterior guidance is a major challenge to the clinician in planning of all restorative treatments. An accurate anterior guidance is important for proper function, aesthetics, comfort and phonetics. This article describes anterior rehabilitation of a patient who met with a road traffic accident and lost his anterior teeth. Anterior guidance developed in the provisional restorations was accurately recorded in the customised incisal guide table and permanent restorations were fabricated accordingly.

  14. Rehabilitation of anterior teeth with customised incisal guide table

    OpenAIRE

    Mall, Priyanka; Singh, Kamleshwar; Rao, Jitendra; Kumar, Lakshya

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of anterior guidance is a major challenge to the clinician in planning of all restorative treatments. An accurate anterior guidance is important for proper function, aesthetics, comfort and phonetics. This article describes anterior rehabilitation of a patient who met with a road traffic accident and lost his anterior teeth. Anterior guidance developed in the provisional restorations was accurately recorded in the customised incisal guide table and permanent restorations were fabr...

  15. Rehabilitation of anterior teeth with customised incisal guide table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Priyanka; Singh, Kamleshwar; Rao, Jitendra; Kumar, Lakshya

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of anterior guidance is a major challenge to the clinician in planning of all restorative treatments. An accurate anterior guidance is important for proper function, aesthetics, comfort and phonetics. This article describes anterior rehabilitation of a patient who met with a road traffic accident and lost his anterior teeth. Anterior guidance developed in the provisional restorations was accurately recorded in the customised incisal guide table and permanent restorations were fabricated accordingly. PMID:23709546

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: MRI versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Felix, R.; Schauwecker, W.; Dreithaler, B.

    1992-01-01

    Because of suspected rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament sixteen acute traumatised patients were investigated by MR and arthroscopy. The MR diagnosis of a lesion of the anterior cruciate ligament proved to be correct by arthroscopy in fifteen of sixteen cases. Diagnostic criteria for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were: increased signal intensity in T 1 - and T 2 weighted images, increased volume and discontinuity of ligamentous structures. Additional MR findings of meniscal tears were correct in three of four cases laterally and in four of four cases medially. Femoral cartilage lesions were correctly identified by MR in three cases. MR normal findings proved to be correct by arthroscopy in another five cases. (orig.) [de

  17. Anterior chamber collapse syndrome in a koala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Vl; Naranjo, C; Bernays, Me

    2014-05-01

    Anterior chamber collapse syndrome has been recognised in various species and is associated with early-life ocular disease or trauma. It is important to differentiate this acquired condition from a congenital malformation. An adult female koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) was referred for assessment of buphthalmos and severe keratitis of the right eye. The degree of keratitis obstructed examination of intraocular structures. Enucleation of the affected eye was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was anterior chamber collapse syndrome and secondary glaucoma. This case contributes to the limited information available in the literature on anterior chamber collapse syndrome, a disease unique in having secondary glaucoma with minimal or no inflammation. The case also expands the literature available on ocular disease in koalas. More specifically, this is the only reported case of glaucoma, of any aetiology, in the koala. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  18. [Post traumatic anterior abdominal wall hernia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mzoughi, Zeineb; Bayar, Rached; Khmiri, Hamdi; Gharbi, Lassad; Khalfallah, Mohamed Taher

    2016-01-01

    Post traumatic anterior abdominal wall hernia can be ignored in emergency settings. We here report the case of a 32-year-old patient with a BMI of 30 kg/m 2 , suffering from anterior abdominal wall hernia as a result of a road accident. This lesion wasn't detected during clinical examination. Abdominal tomodensitometry showed a defect of 8 cm in the anterior abdominal wall. The patient underwent surgery during which a musculoaponeurotic defect of 12 cm was detected. The repair was carried out using interrupted suture. The postoperative course was marked by a secondarily infected skin necrosis. The evolution was satisfactory after directed cicatrization. At 3 months postoperatively the patient was doing well with a healed wound and a strong abdominal wall.

  19. Nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis mimicking orbital inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch MC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Chen Lynch,1 Andrew B Mick21Optometry Clinic, Ocala West Veterans Affairs Specialty Clinic, Ocala, FL, USA; 2Eye Clinic, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: Anterior scleritis is an uncommon form of ocular inflammation, often associated with coexisting autoimmune disease. With early recognition and aggressive systemic therapy, prognosis for resolution is good. The diagnosis of underlying autoimmune disease involves a multidisciplinary approach.Case report: A 42-year-old African American female presented to the Eye Clinic at the San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center, with a tremendously painful left eye, worse on eye movement, with marked injection of conjunctiva. There was mild swelling of the upper eyelid. Visual acuity was unaffected, but there was a mild red cap desaturation. The posterior segment was unremarkable. The initial differential diagnoses included anterior scleritis and orbital inflammatory disease. Oral steroid treatment was initiated with rapid resolution over a few days. Orbital imaging was unremarkable, and extensive laboratory work-up was positive only for antinuclear antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with idiopathic diffuse, nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis and has been followed for over 5 years without recurrence. The rheumatology clinic monitors the patient closely, as suspicion remains for potential arthralgias including human leukocyte antigen-B27-associated arthritis, lupus-associated arthritis, seronegative rheumatoid arthritis, recurrent juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and scleroderma, based on her constitutional symptoms and clinical presentation, along with a positive anti-nuclear antibody lab result.Conclusion: Untreated anterior scleritis can progress to formation of cataracts, glaucoma, uveitis, corneal melting, and posterior segment disease with significant risk of vision loss. Patients with anterior scleritis must be aggressively treated with systemic anti

  20. Anterior cervical discectomy with or without fusion with ray titanium cage: a prospective randomized clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, J.; Kosteljanetz, M.; Bøge-Rasmussen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    adjacent disc degeneration or spondylosis were the same in both groups. CONCLUSION: This study showed no statistically significant difference between simple discectomy and discectomy followed by interbody fusion with a titanium cage in the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy caused by disc...

  1. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever.

  2. Roentgenographic findings following anterior cervical fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, D.R.; Gardner, G.M.; Sepic, S.B.; Murray, M.P.

    1986-10-01

    We reviewed the pre- and postoperative lateral cervical roentgenograms in 90 patients who had anterior fusions and compared their findings with age and sex-matched people without neck problems. The average interval from surgery to review was 5 years. Preoperatively, all patients had a higher incidence of degenerative spondylosis at the levels to be fused than their asymptomatic counterparts. Postoperatively, there was no difference in the incidence of degenerative change between the operated and the control group at the levels above and below the fusion with the exception of anterior osteophyte formation which was more frequent in those with fusions.

  3. Posterolateral instrumented fusion with and without transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis: A randomized clinical trial with 2-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Etemadifar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spondylolisthesis is a common cause of surgery in patients with lower back pain. Although posterolateral fusion and pedicle screw fixation are a relatively common treatment method for the treatment of spondylolisthesis, controversy exists about the necessity of adding interbody fusion to posterolateral fusion. The aim of our study was to assess the functional disability, pain, and complications in patients with spondylolisthesis treated by posterolateral instrumented fusion (PLF with and without transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in a randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: From February 2007 to February 2011, 50 adult patients with spondylolisthesis were randomly assigned to be treated with PLF or PLF+TLIF techniques (25 patients in each group by a single surgeon. Back pain, leg pain, and disability were assessed before treatment and until 2 years after surgical treatment using visual analog scale (VAS and oswestry disability index (ODI. Patients were also evaluated for postoperative complications such as infection, neurological complications, and instrument failure. Results: All patients completed the 24 months of follow-up. Twenty patients were females and 30 were males. Average age of the patients was 53 ± 11 years for the PLF group and 51 ± 13 for the PLF + TLIF group. Back pain, leg pain, and disability score were significantly improved postoperatively compared to preoperative scores (P < 0.001. At 3 months of follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS score for back pain and leg pain in both groups; however, after 6 months and 1 year and 2 years follow-up, the reported scores for back pain and leg pain were significantly lower in the PLF+TLIF group (P < 0.05. The ODI score was also significantly lower in the PLF+TLIF group at 1 year and 2 years of follow-up (P < 0.05. One screw breakage and one superficial infection occurred in the PLF+TLIF group, which had no statistical

  4. Surgical data and early postoperative outcomes after minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion: results of a prospective, multicenter, observational data-monitored study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Pereira

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF offers potential for reduced operative morbidity and earlier recovery compared with open procedures for patients with degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD. Firm conclusions about advantages of MILIF over open procedures cannot be made because of limited number of large studies of MILIF in a real-world setting. Clinical effectiveness of MILIF in a large, unselected real-world patient population was assessed in this Prospective, monitored, international, multicenter, observational study.To observe and document short-term recovery after minimally invasive interbody fusion for DLD.In a predefined 4-week analysis from this study, experienced surgeons (≥ 30 MILIF surgeries pre-study treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF. The primary study objective was to document patients' short-term post-interventional recovery (primary objective including back/leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS], disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], health status (EQ-5D and Patient satisfaction.At 4 weeks, 249 of 252 patients were remaining in the study; the majority received one-level MILIF (83% and TLIF was the preferred approach (94.8%. For one-level (and two-level procedures, surgery duration was 128 (182 min, fluoroscopy time 115 (154 sec, and blood-loss 164 (233 mL. Time to first ambulation was 1.3 days and time to study-defined surgery recovery was 3.2 days. Patients reported significantly (P < 0.0001 reduced back pain (VAS: 2.9 vs 6.2, leg pain (VAS: 2.5 vs 5.9, and disability (ODI: 34.5% vs 45.5%, and a significantly (P < 0.0001 improved health status (EQ-5D index: 0.61 vs 0.34; EQ VAS: 65.4 vs 52.9 4 weeks postoperatively. One adverse event was classified as related to the minimally invasive surgical approach. No deep site infections or deaths were reported.For experienced surgeons, MILIF for DLD demonstrated early benefits (short time to first ambulation, early recovery, high patient satisfaction

  5. Anterior bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anterior dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) though an infrequent presentation at the emergency department; often demands an immediate reduction to relieve discomfort and prevent adverse long-term sequelae. A simple and effective technique to reduce the dislocation is successfully demonstrated by putting ...

  6. ANTERIOR URETHRAL DIVERTICULUM: A CASE REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    congenital in approximately 10-20%3'6. The diagnosis may be evident clinically. Micturating cysto-urethrogram and ultrasound are the im- aging modalitles to guide the urologist to the correct management options. The case reported herein is interesting, be- cause the presence or possibility of an anterior diverticulum was ...

  7. Rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Acker, Gijs; Pingen, Francien; Luitse, Jan; Goslings, Carel

    2006-01-01

    Rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare. There is usually a delay in diagnosis, probably because it is an uncommon entity. Diagnosis is easy however, and recovery with surgical treatment is satisfactory if repair is performed within the first three months following the initial trauma. After

  8. Novel Insights into Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Meuffels (Duncan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAnterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common sports injuries of the knee. ACL reconstruction has become, standard orthopaedic practice worldwide with an estimated 175,000 reconstructions per year in the United States.6 The ACL remains the most frequently studied

  9. Psychosocial Aspect of Anterior Tooth Discoloration among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty two (65.9%), 47 (50.0%) and 38 (40.4%) respectively reported that it prevented them from freely answering questions, smiling and interacting. After oral examination, 120 (31.2%) subjects had one form of anterior tooth discoloration. The cause of tooth discoloration in the majority 64 (16.7%) of the participants was due ...

  10. Post caesarean section anterior abdominal wall endometriosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is a likely sequelae of caesarean section as viable endometrial tissue are deposited in the peritoneal cavity or anterior abdominal wall. One such case to sensitize clinicians of this rare presentation of the disease is presented. The patient was a 48 year old woman who presented with a lesion ...

  11. [Capsular retensioning in anterior unidirectional glenohumeral instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Pozos, Leonel; Martínez Molina, Oscar; Castañeda Landa, Ezequiel

    2007-01-01

    To present the experience of the Orthopedics Service PEMEX South Central Hospital in the management of anterior unidirectional shoulder instability with an arthroscopic technique consisting of capsular retensioning either combined with other anatomical repair procedures or alone. Thirty-one patients with anterior unidirectional shoulder instability operated-on between January 1999 and December 2005 were included. Fourteen patients underwent capsular retensioning and radiofrequency, and in 17 patients, capsular retensioning was combined with suture anchors. Patients with a history of relapsing glenohumeral dislocations and subluxations, with anterior instability with or without associated Bankart lesions were selected; all of them were young. The results were assessed considering basically the occurrence of instability during the postoperative follow-up. No cases of recurring instability occurred. Two cases had neuroma and one experienced irritation of the suture site. Six patients had residual limitation of combined lateral rotation and abduction movements, of a mean of 10 degrees compared with the healthy contralateral side. The most frequent incident was the leak of solutions to the soft tissues. Capsular retensioning, whether combined or not with other anatomical repair techniques, has proven to result in a highly satisfactory rate of glenohumeral stabilization in cases of anterior unidirectional instabilities. The arthroscopic approach offers the well-known advantages of causing less damage to the soft tissues, and a shorter time to starting rehabilitation therapy and exercises.

  12. psychosocial aspect of anterior tooth discoloration among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    discoloration on the psychosocial well being of adolescents with a view to providing information that will aid the ... Keywords: Psychosocial, Anterior tooth discolouration, Adolescents. Ann Ibd. Pg. Med 2011. Vol.9, No.2 94-99 ... often results in loss of self-esteem and damage to physical and mental health.9,10 Tooth ...

  13. ANTERIOR COLUMN FRACTURES OF THE ACETABULUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEEG, M; OTTER, N; KLASEN, HJ

    We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients at three to 19 years after displaced anterior fracture-dislocations of the hip. Eighteen of them were treated by traction, after ensuring that the femoral head was adequately reduced beneath the undisrupted part of the weight-bearing dome. Two required

  14. Anterior process fractures of the calcaneus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfrew, D.L.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Fractures of the anterior process of the calcaneus are often missed. This error follows from the tendency to focus exclusively on the mortise and malleoli when a history of ankle trauma is supplied. Seven patients with this fracture are presented. The anatomy, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, and the radiographic features of this injury are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Anterior process fractures of the calcaneus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfrew, D.L.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    1985-07-01

    Fractures of the anterior process of the calcaneus are often missed. This error follows from the tendency to focus exclusively on the mortise and malleoli when a history of ankle trauma is supplied. Seven patients with this fracture are presented. The anatomy, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, and the radiographic features of this injury are discussed.

  16. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    To compare, in young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, the mid-term (five year) patient reported and radiographic outcomes between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  17. Perawatan Ortodontik Gigi Anterior Berjejal dengan Tulang Alveolar yang Tipis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miesje K. Purwanegara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior teeth movement in orthodontic treatment is limited to labiolingual direction by very thin alveolar bone. An uncontrolled anterior tooth movement to labiolingual direction can cause alveolar bone perforation at its root segment. This case report is to remind us that alveolar bone thickness limits orthodontc tooth movement. A case of crowded anterior teeth with thin alveolar bone in malocclusion I is reported. This case is treated using adgewise orthodontic appliance. Protraction of anterior teeth is anticipated due to thin alveolar bone on the anterior surface. The conclusion is although the alveolar bone surrounding the crowded anterior teeth is thin, by controlling the movement the teeth reposition is allowed.

  18. Anterior Segment Ischemia after Strabismus Surger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Seyhan Göçmen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old male patient was referred to our clinic with complaints of diplopia and esotropia in his right eye that developed after a car accident. The patient had right esotropia in primary position and abduction of the right eye was totally limited. Primary deviation was over 40 prism diopters at near and distance. The patient was diagnosed with sixth nerve palsy and 18 months after trauma, he underwent right medial rectus muscle recession. Ten months after the first operation, full-thickness tendon transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscles (with Foster suture was performed. On the first postoperative day, slit-lamp examination revealed corneal edema, 3+ cells in the anterior chamber and an irregular pupil. According to these findings, the diagnosis was anterior segment ischemia. Treatment with 0.1/5 mL topical dexamethasone drops (16 times/day, cyclopentolate hydrochloride drops (3 times/day and 20 mg oral fluocortolone (3 times/day was initiated. After 1 week of treatment, corneal edema regressed and the anterior chamber was clean. Topical and systemic steroid treatment was gradually discontinued. At postoperative 1 month, the patient was orthophoric and there were no pathologic symptoms besides the irregular pupil. Anterior segment ischemia is one of the most serious complications of strabismus surgery. Despite the fact that in most cases the only remaining sequel is an irregular pupil, serious circulation deficits could lead to phthisis bulbi. Clinical properties of anterior segment ischemia should be well recognized and in especially risky cases, preventative measures should be taken.

  19. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support: a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year magnetic resonance imaging follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Egund, Niels; Christensen, Finn B; Grethe Jurik, Anne; Bünger, Cody E

    2010-10-15

    Randomized controlled trial. To analyze long-term adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion on magnetic resonance imaging and compare randomization groups with and without anterior column support. ASD can be a long-term complication after fusion. The prevalence and the cause of ASD are not well documented, but ASD are one of the main arguments for introducing the use of motion-preserving techniques as an alternative to fusion. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral lumbar fusion (ALIF+PLF) has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for ALIF+PLF or for PLF alone. Ninety-five patients participated. ASD was examined on magnetic resonance imaging with regard to disc degeneration, disc herniation, stenosis, and endplate changes. Disc heights on radiographs taken at index surgery and at long-term follow-up were compared. Outcome was assessed by validated questionnaires. The follow-up rate was 76%. ASD was similar between randomization groups. In the total cohort, endplate changes were seen in 26% of the participants and correlated significantly with the presence of disc degeneration and disc herniation. Disc degeneration and dorsal disc herniation were the parameters registered most frequently and were significantly more pronounced at the first adjacent level than at the second and the third adjacent levels. Patients without disc height reduction over time were significantly younger than patients with disc height reduction. Disc degeneration and stenosis correlated significantly with outcome at the first adjacent level. The cause of the superior outcome in the group with anterior support is still unclear. Compared with the findings reported in the literature, the prevalence of ASD is likely to be in concordance with the expected changes in a nonoperated symptomatic population and therefore

  20. Anterior insular cortex is necessary for empathetic pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaosi; Gao, Zhixian; Wang, Xingchao; Liu, Xun; Knight, Robert T; Hof, Patrick R; Fan, Jin

    2012-09-01

    Empathy refers to the ability to perceive and share another person's affective state. Much neuroimaging evidence suggests that observing others' suffering and pain elicits activations of the anterior insular and the anterior cingulate cortices associated with subjective empathetic responses in the observer. However, these observations do not provide causal evidence for the respective roles of anterior insular and anterior cingulate cortices in empathetic pain. Therefore, whether these regions are 'necessary' for empathetic pain remains unknown. Herein, we examined the perception of others' pain in patients with anterior insular cortex or anterior cingulate cortex lesions whose locations matched with the anterior insular cortex or anterior cingulate cortex clusters identified by a meta-analysis on neuroimaging studies of empathetic pain perception. Patients with focal anterior insular cortex lesions displayed decreased discrimination accuracy and prolonged reaction time when processing others' pain explicitly and lacked a typical interference effect of empathetic pain on the performance of a pain-irrelevant task. In contrast, these deficits were not observed in patients with anterior cingulate cortex lesions. These findings reveal that only discrete anterior insular cortex lesions, but not anterior cingulate cortex lesions, result in deficits in explicit and implicit pain perception, supporting a critical role of anterior insular cortex in empathetic pain processing. Our findings have implications for a wide range of neuropsychiatric illnesses characterized by prominent deficits in higher-level social functioning.

  1. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Percutaneous Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation for Lumbosacral Spine Degenerative Diseases. A retrospective database of 40 consecutive treated cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millimaggi, Daniele Francesco; DI Norcia, Valerio; Luzzi, Sabino; Alfiero, Tommaso; Galzio, Renato Juan; Ricci, Alessandro

    2017-04-12

    To report our results about minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) with bilateral pedicle screw fixation, in patients with degenerative lumbosacral spine disease. To describe the indications, surgical technique and results of a consecutive series of 40 patients undergone MI-TLIF. Despite the limited number of clinical studies, published data suggest tremendous potential advantages of this technique. Forty patients with radiological findings of degenerative lumbosacral spine disease were undergone MI-TLIF between July 2012 and January 2015. Clinical outcomes were assessed by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Health Survey Scoring (SF36) before surgery and at first year follow-up. Furthermore, the following parameters were retrospectively reviewed: age, sex, working activity, body mass index (BMI), type of degenerative disease, number of levels of fusion, operative time, blood loss, length of hospital stay. Average operative time was of 230 minutes, mean estimated blood loss 170 mL, average length of hospital stay 5 days. The ODI improved from a score of 59, preoperatively, to post-operative score of 20 at first year follow-up. Average SF36 score increased from 36 to 54 (Physical Health) and from 29 to 50 (Mental Health) at first year outcome evaluation. MI-TLIF with bilateral pedicle screw fixation is an excellent choice for selected patients suffering from symptomatic degenerative lumbosacral spine disease, especially secondary to recurrent disk herniations.

  2. Effect of Mechanical Ventilation Mode Type on Intra- and Postoperative Blood Loss in Patients Undergoing Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woon-Seok; Oh, Chung-Sik; Kwon, Won-Kyoung; Rhee, Ka Young; Lee, Yun Gu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Suk Ha; Kim, Seong-Hyop

    2016-07-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical ventilation mode type, pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV), or volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on intra- and postoperative surgical bleeding in patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery. This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, and parallel study that included 56 patients undergoing PLIF and who were mechanically ventilated using PCV or VCV. A permuted block randomization was used with a computer-generated list. The hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were measured after anesthesia induction in supine position, 5 min after patients were changed from supine to prone position, at the time of skin closure, and 5 min after the patients were changed from prone to supine position. The amount of intraoperative surgical bleeding, fluid administration, urine output, and transfusion requirement were measured at the end of surgery. The amount of postoperative bleeding and transfusion requirement were recorded every 24 h for 72 h. The primary outcome was the amount of intraoperative surgical bleeding, and 56 patients were analyzed. The amount of intraoperative surgical bleeding was significantly less in the PCV group than that in the VCV group (median, 253.0 [interquartile range, 179.0 to 316.5] ml in PCV group vs. 382.5 [328.0 to 489.5] ml in VCV group; P patients undergoing PLIF, which may be related to lower intraoperative peak inspiratory pressure.

  3. Effects of Lordotic Angle of a Cage on Sagittal Alignment and Clinical Outcome in One Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Pedicle Screw Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ho Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the differences in the radiological and clinical results depending on the lordotic angles of the cage in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF. We reviewed 185 segments which underwent PLIF using two different lordotic angles of 4° and 8° of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK cage. The segmental lordosis and total lumbar lordosis of the 4° and 8° cage groups were compared preoperatively, as well as on the first postoperative day, 6th and 12th months postoperatively. Clinical assessment was performed using the ODI and the VAS of low back pain. The pre- and immediate postoperative segmental lordosis angles were 12.9° and 12.6° in the 4° group and 12° and 12.0° in the 8° group. Both groups exhibited no significant different segmental lordosis angle and total lumbar lordosis over period and time. However, the total lumbar lordosis significantly increased from six months postoperatively compared with the immediate postoperative day in the 8° group. The ODI and the VAS in both groups had no differences. Cages with different lordotic angles of 4° and 8° showed insignificant results clinically and radiologically in short-level PLIF surgery. Clinical improvements and sagittal alignment recovery were significantly observed in both groups.

  4. Hydrodynamics of triangular-grid arrays of floating point-absorber wave energy converters with inter-body and bottom slack-mooring connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, Pedro C.; Falcao, Antonio F. de O.; Gato, Luiz M.C. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Justino, Paulo A.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-07-01

    It may be convenient that dense arrays of floating point absorbers are spread-moored to the sea bottom through only some of their elements (possibly located in the periphery), while the other array elements are prevented from drifting and colliding with each other by connections to adjacent elements. An array of identical floating point absorbers located at the grid points of an equilateral triangular grid is considered in the paper. A spread set of slack-mooring lines connect the peripheric floaters to the bottom. A weight is located at the centre of each triangle whose function is o pull the three floaters towards each other and keep the inter-body moorings lines under tension. The whole system - buoys, moorings and power take-off systems - is assumed linear, so that a frequency domain analysis may be employed. Hydrodynamic interference between the oscillating bodies is neglected. Equations are presented for a set of three identical point absorbers. This is then extended to more complex equilateral iriangular grid arrays. Results from numerical simulations, with regular and irregular waves, are presented for the motions and power absorption of hemispherical converters in arrays of three and seven elements and different mooring and power take-off parameters, and wave incidence angles. Comparisons are given with the unmoored and independently-moored buoy situations.

  5. Relationship between the morphology of A-1 segment of anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between the morphology of A-1 segment of anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery aneurysms. Wenfeng Feng, Long Zhang, Weiguang Li, Guozhong Zhang, Xiaoyan He, Gang Wang, Mingzhou Li, Songtao Qi ...

  6. Anterior colporrhaphy does not induce bladder outlet obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, M. M. E.; Hakvoort, R. A.; van de Weijer, E. P.; Emanuel, M. H.; Roovers, J. P. W. R.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate if anterior colporrhaphy causes incomplete voiding due to bladder outlet obstruction. Women scheduled for anterior colporrhaphy were asked to undergo multichannel urodynamic investigation before surgery and the first postoperative day. Bladder outlet obstruction was assessed

  7. An OCT Study of Anterior Nodular Episcleritis and Scleritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakopoulos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Anterior scleritis and episcleritis are a well-known presentation in tuberculosis. The case of a female patient with presumed tuberculous anterior scleritis and episcleritis is discussed in this article. Anterior segment OCT was efficient in diagnosis and evaluation of the therapeutic outcome. Antituberculosis chemotherapy was sufficient to achieve clinical remission.

  8. An OCT Study of Anterior Nodular Episcleritis and Scleritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Christakopoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior scleritis and episcleritis are a well-known presentation in tuberculosis. The case of a female patient with presumed tuberculous anterior scleritis and episcleritis is discussed in this article. Anterior segment OCT was efficient in diagnosis and evaluation of the therapeutic outcome. Antituberculosis chemotherapy was sufficient to achieve clinical remission.

  9. An OCT Study of Anterior Nodular Episcleritis and Scleritis

    OpenAIRE

    Christakopoulos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Anterior scleritis and episcleritis are a well-known presentation in tuberculosis. The case of a female patient with presumed tuberculous anterior scleritis and episcleritis is discussed in this article. Anterior segment OCT was efficient in diagnosis and evaluation of the therapeutic outcome. Antituberculosis chemotherapy was sufficient to achieve clinical remission.

  10. Anterior Face Height Values in a Nigerian Population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-11

    Dec 11, 2012 ... the treatment options, in the treatment of malocclusion in. Nigerians hence the need for this study. In an earlier study on facial heights in Nigeria, Isiekwe[5] determined anterior and posterior facial height, but did not evaluate the ratio of lower anterior facial height to total anterior facial height. The.

  11. Chronic anterior knee pain in athletes: Common causes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anterior knee pain is a very common clinical presentation. In this article, the classification of anterior knee pain syndromes according to the anatomy of the knee extensor mechanism is described. The clinical diagnosis, special investigations, and principles of management of the more common causes of anterior knee pain ...

  12. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting with vision loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval P Shukla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior communicating artery aneurysm rarely presents with symptoms of compression of anterior visual pathways. We report a case of 65 years old man, who had complete loss of vision in right eye and temporal hemianopsia in left eye due to giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

  13. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting with vision loss

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Dhaval P.; Bhat, Dhananjaya I.; Devi, Bhagavatula I.

    2013-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm rarely presents with symptoms of compression of anterior visual pathways. We report a case of 65 years old man, who had complete loss of vision in right eye and temporal hemianopsia in left eye due to giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

  14. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting with vision loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dhaval P; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Devi, Bhagavatula I

    2013-07-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm rarely presents with symptoms of compression of anterior visual pathways. We report a case of 65 years old man, who had complete loss of vision in right eye and temporal hemianopsia in left eye due to giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

  15. Prevalence of retained primary teeth among children with anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anterior arch crowding affects the anterior teeth which comprises two central incisors, two lateral incisors and canines. Several factors are often implicated in anterior arch crowding and these include amongst others mesiodistal arch width discrepancy, tooth-arch-size discrepancy and retained primary teeth in ...

  16. [Esthetic restorations of primary anterior teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elqadir, A Jamil; Shapira, J; Ziskind, K; Ram, D

    2013-04-01

    Esthetic treatment of primary teeth is one of the greatest challenges to pediatric dentists. A variety of restorative options using full coverage are available for anterior primary teeth. In the last half century the emphasis on treatment of severely decayed primary teeth shifted from extraction to restoration. In the past, restorations consisted of placement of stainless steel crowns on severely decayed teeth. However, they are esthetically unacceptable today. Over the last decade parents expect a higher esthetic standard for their children's primary teeth. Thus, the restoration should provide esthetic appearance and durability in addition to restoring function. The purpose of this review is to describe the types of full coverage options for anterior primary teeth currently available.

  17. Displaced fracture through the anterior atlantal synchondrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakar, Chrishan; Allibone, James [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Spinal Deformity, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Harish, Srinivasan [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College, The Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    In the acute setting, accurate radiological interpretation of paediatric cervical spine trauma can be difficult due to a combination of normal variants and presence of multiple synchondroses. We present a rare case of a fracture through the anterior atlantal synchondrosis in a paediatric spine. A five-year-old boy, who fell backwards onto the top of his head while swinging across on a monkey bar frame, presented with neck pain, cervical muscle spasm and decreased right lateral rotation and extension of his neck. Computed tomography showed a displaced diastatic fracture through right anterior atlantal synchondrosis. There are only 12 cases of paediatric C1 fractures reported in the world literature. The importance of considering this diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting, and the normal variants in the paediatric atlas that can cause diagnostic dilemma to the interpreting radiologist, are discussed in this case report. (orig.)

  18. Displaced fracture through the anterior atlantal synchondrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakar, Chrishan; Allibone, James; Harish, Srinivasan; Saifuddin, Asif

    2005-01-01

    In the acute setting, accurate radiological interpretation of paediatric cervical spine trauma can be difficult due to a combination of normal variants and presence of multiple synchondroses. We present a rare case of a fracture through the anterior atlantal synchondrosis in a paediatric spine. A five-year-old boy, who fell backwards onto the top of his head while swinging across on a monkey bar frame, presented with neck pain, cervical muscle spasm and decreased right lateral rotation and extension of his neck. Computed tomography showed a displaced diastatic fracture through right anterior atlantal synchondrosis. There are only 12 cases of paediatric C1 fractures reported in the world literature. The importance of considering this diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting, and the normal variants in the paediatric atlas that can cause diagnostic dilemma to the interpreting radiologist, are discussed in this case report. (orig.)

  19. A brief review on anterior urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of urethral strictures remains a challenging field in urology even though there are a variety of procedures to treat it at present, as no one approach is superior over another. This paper reviewed the surgical options for the management of different sites and types of anterior urethral stricture, providing a brief discussion of the controversies regarding this issue and suggesting possible future advancements. Among the existing procedures, simple dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy are more commonly used for short urethral strictures ( <1 cm, soft and no previous intervention. Currently, urethroplasty using buccal mucosa or penile skin is the most widely adopted clinical techniques and have proved successful. Nonetheless, complications such as donor site morbidity remain problem. Tissue engineering techniques are considered as a promising solution for urethral reconstruction, but require further investigation, as does stem cell therapy. Keywords: Anterior urethral strictures, Urethral reconstruction, Tissue engineering, Urethral strictures

  20. Cataract Surgery in Anterior Megalophthalmos: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALVIS, Virgilio; TELLO, Alejandro; M. RANGEL, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anterior megalophthalmos is characterized by megalocornea associated with a very broad anterior chamber and ciliary ring elongation. It is also called X-linked megalocornea. It is accompanied by early development of cataracts, zonular anomalies, and, rarely, vitreoretinal disorders. Subluxation of a cataract can occur in cataract surgery because of zonular weakness. In addition, in most patients, standard intraocular lens (IOL) decentration is a risk because of the enlarged sulcus and capsular bag. These unique circumstances make cataract surgery challenging. To date, several approaches have been developed. Implantation of a retropupillary iris-claw aphakic intraocular lens may be a good option because it is easier than suturing the IOL and can have better and more stable anatomic and visual outcomes, compared to other techniques. PMID:27350950

  1. [Anterior retroperitoneal L5-S1 arthrodesis and fixation with cage and plate. Prospective study in 40 cases with a follow-up of one to 2.2 year (mean 1.5 year)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liquois, F; Tournier, C; Xu, B S; Le Huec, J-C

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to assess outcome after anterior retroperitoneal interbody arthrodesis for L5-S1 discopathy. We used a cage filled with an autologous corticocancellous graft and plate fixation. Forty patients with low back pain unresponsive to medical treatment for more than six months were included in this series. We noted the clinical signs and radiculalgia. Patients were assessed preoperatively, postoperatively, at one year and at last follow-up using the Oswestry score and a visual analog scale (VAS). The plain X-rays disclosed 30 cases of discopathy (16 primary and 14 postdiscectomy) and 10 cases of spondylolisthesis by L5 isthmic lysis (three Meyerding grade 0 and seven grade 1). MRI revealed signs of disc degeneration in all cases with a black disc or modification of the endplate signals (Modic type 1 in 23 and type 2 in 13). The anterior retroperitoneal approach was used in all cases for complete discectomy, arthrodesis with cage insertion and an autologous corticocancellous graft harvested from the iliac bone and fixation using a triangular plate (Pyramid, Medtronic, Memphis TN). Clinical and radiographic follow-up data were available at six weeks and three, six and 12 months in addition to last follow-up. A follow-up using MRI was performed in the event of complications. The population was composed of 25 women and 15 men, mean age 44 years and eight months (range 29-693 years). Thirteen patients presented radiculalgia. There were no vascular or gastrointestinal complications with the anterior approach. Bone healing was achieved at one year in 38 patients (95%). The mean Oswestry score improved from 52 to 16% and the mean VAS from 7.8 to 1.83 at 18 months follow-up. All occupationally-active patients but one resumed their former activity at mean 4.7 months. There were no sexual complications in this series. Low back pain persisted in three patients and five developed transient facet joint symptoms. Two patients developed

  2. Bollen's jig and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, A B; Bollen, S R

    2000-10-01

    We report the design of a surgical instrument that facilitates the harvest of the autologous patellar tendon in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The advantage of this jig is that it is a simple, self-centring device resulting in a reproducible and consistent autograft. Its use also minimises the potential risks of donor site morbidity such as patellar fracture and tendon rupture. We briefly describe our technique and discuss its advantages.

  3. Imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wing Hung Alex; Griffith, James Francis; Hung, Esther Hiu Yee; Paunipagar, Bhawan; Law, Billy Kan Yip; Yung, Patrick Shu Hang

    2011-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an important structure in maintaining the normal biomechanics of the knee and is the most commonly injured knee ligament. However, the oblique course of the ACL within the intercondylar fossa limits the visualization and assessment of the pathology of the ligament. This pictorial essay provides a comprehensive and illustrative review of the anatomy and biomechanics as well as updated information on different modalities of radiological investigation of ACL, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:22474639

  4. Anterior Tibial Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Tor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aneurysmsatic changes of the infrapopliteal arteries are rarely seen. They are pseudoaneurysms rather than true aneursyms. The most important cause of them is trauma. There is not a standart treatment for infrapopliteal aneursyms. In this study, we have evaluated a case operated for anterior tibial artery pseudoaneurysm developed after penetrant trauma and diagnosed two weeks later. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(3.000: 172-175

  5. Anterior guidance--movement and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohaut, Jean-Charles

    2014-09-01

    Instability of our orthodontic treatment is not uncommon, in particular in the anterior teeth. Given that the mandible is constantly in movement and that the lower and upper teeth regularly meet head-on during normal functioning, one might ask: are the static and normative end of treatment objectives we generally target sufficient to ensure treatment stability? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of mo...

  7. Unilateral Anterior Epistaxis Electrocautery versus Chemical Cautery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, A. S.; Rahat, Z. M.; Hussain, S. S.; Khan, M. Z.; Fareed, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the two methods, electrocautery versus chemical cautery, for controlling unilateral anterior epistaxis and to identify the complications. Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration: This study was conducted in ENT Department PNS Shifa Hospital Karachi from August 2009 to June 2011. Patients and Methods: Ninety two cases with unilateral anterior epistaxis were divided using random number trials into two groups i.e. group A and group B containing 46 cases each. In group A electrocautery and in group B chemical cautery with 50% silver nitrate was done and the results were compared. Results: In this study 92 cases were divided randomly into two groups i.e. group A and group B containing 46 cases in each group. In group A 44 (95.6%) out of 46 cases were treated successfully with a single visit as an outpatient by electrocautery, the patients were called for follow up on the fifth day and then fortnightly for three months after the procedure, only 2 (4.3%) cases reported in first five days with mild recurrence of bleeding. In group B 42 (91.3%) cases out of 46 cases were treated successfully in a single visit and recurrence of bleeding occured in 4 (8.7%) cases who required a second visit during the first five days. There were no major complications found in either group except few complaints of post cauterization pain and mucosal inflammation observed slightly more in group B patients. Conclusion: Electrocautery and chemical cautery with 50% silver nitrate both are equally effective procedures to control anterior epistaxis if the bleeding point is visible and small. Both procedures are reliable and there are no major complications. Occasionally if the bleeding point in the anterior nasal septum is large then electrocautery may be a preferred option. (author)

  8. [COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS AND CHANGE OF SAGITTAL SPINO-PELVIC PARAMETERS BETWEEN MINIMALLY INVASIVE TRANSFORAMINAL AND CONVENTIONAL OPEN POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSIONS IN TREATMENT OF LOW-DEGREE ISTHMIC LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Zeng, Rong; Li, Guangsheng; Wei, Bo; Hu, Zibing; Lin, Hao; Chen, Guanghua; Chen, Siyuan; Sun, Jiecong

    2015-12-01

    To compare the effectiveness and changes of sagittal spino-pelvic parameters between minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and conventional open posterior lumbar interbody fusion in treatment of the low-degree isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis. Between May 2012 and May 2013, 86 patients with single segmental isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis (Meyerding degree I or II) were treated by minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (minimally invasive group) in 39 cases, and by open posterior lumbar interbody fusion in 47 cases (open group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, disease duration, degree of lumbar spondylolisthesis, preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and Oswestry disability index (ODI) between 2 groups (P>0.05). The following sagittal spino-pelvic parameters were compared between 2 groups before and after operation: the percentage of slipping (PS), intervertebral height, angle of slip (AS), thoracolumbar junction (TLJ), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), spino-sacral angle (SSA), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), and pelvic incidence (PI). Pearson correlation analysis of the changes between pre- and post-operation was done. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients of 2 groups. The postoperative hospital stay of minimally invasive group [(5.1 ± 1.6) days] was significantly shorter than that of open group [(7.2 ± 2.1) days] (t = 2.593, P = 0.017). The patients were followed up 11-20 months (mean, 15 months). The reduction rate was 68.53% ± 20.52% in minimally invasive group, and was 64.21% ± 30.21% in open group, showing no significant difference (t = 0.725, P = 0.093). The back and leg pain VAS scores, and ODI at 3 months after operation were significantly reduced when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). The postoperative other sagittal spino-pelvic parameters were significantly improved (P 0.05), but there was no significant

  9. Anterior open bite: aetiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Paul Jonathan; Madahar, Arun K; Murray, Alison

    2011-10-01

    Anterior open bite has a multi-factorial aetiology comprising: genetically inherited skeletal pattern, soft tissue effect and digit-sucking habits. To formulate an appropriate treatment plan, accurate diagnosis is essential. Simple open bites may sometimes resolve completely during the transition from mixed to permanent dentition, if the digit-sucking habit is broken. More significant open bites, however, sometimes extending right back to the terminal molars, rarely resolve spontaneously and will often require complex orthodontic treatment, involving active molar intrusion or even major orthognathic surgery. Unfortunately, surgery has associated risks attached, including pain, swelling, bruising, altered nerve sensation and, occasionally, permanent anaesthesia, as well as involving significant costs, as with any major surgical procedure under general anaesthesia. The introduction of Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) has expanded the possibilities of orthodontic treatment, beyond traditional limitations of tooth movement. Molar intrusion can be successfully carried out without the need for major surgical intervention, thus avoiding all the attendant risks and disadvantages. This paper provides an overview of anterior open bite and uses an illustrative case where open bite was successfully treated with a combination of fixed appliance therapy and TADs. Anterior open bite is commonly seen in general practice. A knowledge of the possible aetiological factors and their potential management should be understood by general dental practitioners. The increased popularity of TADS allows a new and less invasive approach to management of these cases.

  10. A pancreatic cyst of the anterior mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Ordonez, B; Wesson, D E; Smith, C R; Asa, S L

    1996-03-01

    Although heterotopia of pancreatic tissue is a developmental anomaly found in approximately 2% of all autopsies, pancreatic tissue within the thorax and mediastinum is uncommon. In most of these instances, the pancreatic acini and islets are components of gastroenteric duplication cysts, intralobar pulmonary sequestrations, or teratomas. We describe the clinicopathologic features and hormonal profile of a patient with an anterior mediastinal cyst formed entirely by pancreatic tissue. To our knowledge, the English literature reveals only two previous examples of this lesion. The patient, a previously healthy 16-year-old girl, was found to have a cystic lesion in the anterior mediastinum during investigation of an asymptomatic heart murmur. The lesion measured 12 cm in maximal diameter and contained dark, turbid fluid. The wall was fibrotic and contained a haphazard mixture of ducts, exocrine acini, and islets. In many areas, the ducts and islets formed ductuloinsular complexes resembling those seen in diffuse nesidioblastosis. Immunohistochemical examination showed that the islets contained an increased number of B and PP cells, recapitulating the hormonal profile of the ventral anlage of the fetal pancreas. The similarity between this lesion and a fetal pancreas was further supported by the presence of a significant number of islet cells containing gastrin. The histogenesis of this lesion is unclear; we think that this lesion represents a derivative of the ventral (anterior) primitive foregut, but unidirectional differentiation of a benign cystic teratoma cann