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Sample records for anterior inferior cerebellar

  1. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

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    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  2. Anatomy and radiology of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the variations of the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA) and identifies its types of appearance in normal angiograms as well as in angiograms of patients suffering from posterior fossa tumours or from ischemic lesions in the vertebro-basilar territory. For this purpose a study of 20 normal specimens was undertaken. Four main types of the AICA are distinguished. One hundred normal vertebral angiograms, made between 1976 and 1982 in the Valeriuskliniek and the Academisch Ziekenhuis der Vrije Univesiteit are reviewed. The AICA's are classified in the same way as in the anatomical study. The same classification was used in the analysis of 41 vertebral angiograms of patients with posterior fossa tumours and nine angiograms of patients with ischemic disturbances in the posterior cranial fossa. (Auth.)

  3. Surgical treatment for ruptured anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms

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    TONG Xiao-guang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA aneurysm is an extremely raretumor, which can cause severe results after ruptured. This article retrospectively analyzed the clinical symptoms, imaging manifestations, surgical approaches, endovascular therapy and postoperative outcomes of 12 cases with AICA aneurysms, so as to provide reference for clinical practice. Methods Clinical data of patients with AICA aneurysms, who were treated in our hospital between June 2004 and June 2012, were carefully collected and studied. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS scores were used to evaluate the patients' living status. Results There were 12 patients (the average age was 54 years old with 13 ruptured aneurysms, accounting for 0.19% of all aneurysms (6467 cases treated in the same period. CT showed simple subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in 6 patients, simple ventricular hemorrhage in 1 patient and SAH complicated with ventricular hemorrhage in 5 patients. According to Hunt-Hess Grade, 2 patients were classified as Grade Ⅰ; 7 were Grade Ⅱ; 3 were Grade Ⅲ. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA showed there were 10 saccular aneurysms and 3 fusiform aneurysms. Three aneurysms were located in the proximal segment of AICA (the junction of AICA and basilar artery, 3 premeatal segment (first bifurcation of AICA, 3 meatal and 4 postmeatal. The mean diameter was 3.90 mm. Three patients with 4 aneurysms were treated with microsurgery, of which clipping was carried out in 2 patients with 3 aneurysms and trapping in 1 case. Other 9 patients were treated with endovascular therapy, of which 2 cases underwent coil embolization, 3 stent-assisted coil, and 4 parent artery occlusion (PAO. Postoperative complications included facial paralysis (1 case, dysphagia and coughing when drinking (1 case and contralateral hemianopia in both eyes (1 case. Follow-up was available in all of these cases for a mean of 36.41 months, with GOS scores 3 in 1 case, 4 in 2 cases and 5 in 9

  4. Moyamoya disease associated with an anterior inferior cerebellar artery arising from a persistent trigeminal artery

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    Uchino, A.; Sawada, A.; Takase, Y.; Kudo, S. [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga, 849-8501 (Japan); Koizumi, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga, 849-8501 (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The authors present a case of moyamoya disease associated with a persistent trigeminal artery from which the anterior inferior cerebellar artery arose. We reviewed previously reported cases of moyamoya disease associated with persistent carotid-basilar arterial anastomosis and investigated the embryology of this rare arterial variation. (orig.)

  5. A case of angiographically occult, distal small anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm

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    Hisashi Kubota; Yasuhiro Sanada; Kazuhiro Nagatsuka; Amami Kato

    2015-01-01

    Background: A small aneurysm at an unusual location, such as a distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm, may conceal as a computed tomography angiography (CTA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-occult aneurysm. Case Description: We herein present the case of a patient suffering from a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with two aneurysms in which the AICA aneurysm was negative by CTA and DSA. CTA demonstrated a right anterior choroidal artery aneurysm, which was revea...

  6. Far-lateral transcondylar approach for microsurgical trapping of an anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm.

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    Caplan, Justin M; Jusue-Torres, Ignacio; Kim, Jennifer E; Luksik, Andrew; Liauw, Jason; Gottschalk, Allan; Tamargo, Rafael J

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysms of the posterior circulation remain challenging lesions given their proximity to the brainstem and cranial nerves. Many of these aneurysms may best be approached through a retrosigmoid-suboccipital craniectomy with a far-lateral transcondylar extension. In this narrated video illustration, we present the case of a 37-year-old man with an incidentally discovered right-sided anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm. Diagnostic studies included CT angiography and cerebral angiography. A suboccipital craniectomy and far-lateral transcondylar extension were performed for microsurgical trapping and excision of the AICA aneurysm. The techniques of the retrosigmoid craniectomy, C-1 laminectomy, condylectomy and microsurgical trapping of the aneurysm are reviewed. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/JiM3CXVwXnk. PMID:26132623

  7. Gravity-dependent nystagmus and inner-ear dysfunction suggest anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct.

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    Shaikh, Aasef G; Miller, Benjamin R; Sundararajan, Sophia; Katirji, Bashar

    2014-04-01

    Cerebellar lesions may present with gravity-dependent nystagmus, where the direction and velocity of the drifts change with alterations in head position. Two patients had acute onset of hearing loss, vertigo, oscillopsia, nausea, and vomiting. Examination revealed gravity-dependent nystagmus, unilateral hypoactive vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and hearing loss ipsilateral to the VOR hypofunction. Traditionally, the hypoactive VOR and hearing loss suggest inner-ear dysfunction. Vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and nystagmus may suggest peripheral or central vestibulopathy. The gravity-dependent modulation of nystagmus, however, localizes to the posterior cerebellar vermis. Magnetic resonance imaging in our patients revealed acute cerebellar infarct affecting posterior cerebellar vermis, in the vascular distribution of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). This lesion explains the gravity-dependent nystagmus, nausea, and vomiting. Acute onset of unilateral hearing loss and VOR hypofunction could be the manifestation of inner-ear ischemic injury secondary to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) compromise. In cases of combined AICA and PICA infarction, the symptoms of peripheral vestibulopathy might masquerade the central vestibular syndrome and harbor a cerebellar stroke. However, the gravity-dependent nystagmus allows prompt identification of acute cerebellar infarct.

  8. Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) associated with high-flow lesion: report of two cases and review of literature.

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    Menovsky, T.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Although aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are rare lesions, their occurrence in combination with high-flow lesions in the same arterial territory is even more striking. Two cases of an AICA aneurysm in combination with a high -flow lesion are desc

  9. Aneurisma da artéria cerebelar ântero-inferior: relato de caso Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report

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    Juan Oscar Alarcón Adorno

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Os aneurismas intracranianos do sistema vértebro-basilar representam cerca de 5 a 10% de todos os aneurismas cerebrais. Os aneurismas da artéria cerebelar ântero-inferior (AICA são considerados raros, podendo causar síndrome do ângulo ponto cerebelar, com ou sem hemorragia subaracnóidea. Desde 1948, foram descritos poucos casos na literatura. Apresentamos o caso de uma paciente, de 33 anos, na qual, após investigação de quadro de hemorragia subaracnóidea, diagnosticou-se aneurisma sacular da AICA esquerda. Foi submetida a clipagem do aneurisma, com ótimo resultado pós operatório.The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  10. Distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm in a child

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    J. FRANCISCO SALOMÃO; René D. Leibinger; Yara M. S. Lima Ciro de A. Cunha; Ilton G. Shinzato; Paulo de T. L. Dantas

    1992-01-01

    The case of a 7-year-old boy presenting with recurrent episodes of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm (PICA), successfully operated, is reported.' The low incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the first decade of life and the rare occurrence of distal PICA aneurysms are unusual features of this case. The theories regarding the origin of intracranial berry aneurysms are discussed.

  11. Inferior Flap Tympanoplasty: A Novel Technique for Anterior Perforation Closure

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    Haim Gavriel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report a novel tympanoplasty modification for anterior tympanic membrane perforation closure. Materials and Methods. A prospective study on 13 patients who underwent inferior tympanoplasty between December 2008 and May 2011 was carried out. In our technique, an inferior rather than a posterior flap is raised and the graft is laid from the inferior direction to obtain better access to the anterior part of the tympanic membrane perforation and provide better support. Results. A total of 13 patients underwent the novel inferior tympanoplasty technique with a mean age of 33 years. Six patients had undergone tympanoplasties and/or mastoidectomies in the past, 3 in the contralateral ear. A marginal perforation was observed in 3 cases, total perforation in 2 and subtotal in 1 case. The mean preoperative pure-tone average was 40.4 dB (10 to 90 dB, compared to 26.5 dB (10 to 55 dB postoperatively. All perforations were found to be closed but one (92.3% success rate. Conclusions. The inferior tympanoplasty technique provides a favorable outcome in terms of tympanic membrane closure and hearing improvement for anterior perforations, even in difficult and complex cases. It is based on a well-known technique and is easy to implement.

  12. Right Ventricular Involvement in either Anterior or Inferior Myocardial Infarction

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    Firoozeh Abtahi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unlike left ventricular function, less attention has been paid to Right Ventricular (RV function after Myocardial Infarction (MI. Objectives: The current study aimed to compare RV function in patients with inferior and anterior MI. Patients and Methods: During the study period, 60 patients consecutively presented to the Emergency Department with chest pain were divided into two groups based on their electrocardiographic findings. Accordingly, 25 patients had inferior MI (IMI group and 35 ones had anterior MI (AMI group. Echocardiography was performed 48 hours after starting the standard therapy. Conventional echocardiographic parameters and Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI measurements were acquired from the standard views. Student t-test and the chi-square test were respectively used for comparisons of the normally distributed continuous and categorical variables in the two groups. Besides, P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant.

  13. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm during Pregnancy

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    Kim, Ki Dae; Chang, Chul Hoon; Choi, Byung Yon; Jung, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) during pregnancy is quite rare, however it has a high maternal mortality rate. A pregnant woman in the 16th gestational week was admitted to our hospital with a drowsy level of consciousness. A brain magnetic resonance (MR) image showed hemorrhage on the prepontine cistern, and both sylvian fissures, and MR angiography and cerebral digital subtraction angiography demonstrated an aneurysm at the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We perfo...

  14. Giant partially thrombosed 4 th ventricular posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm; microsurgical management

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    Forhad Hossain Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of progressive occipital headache, vomiting, walking difficulty, and repeated fall. She had no history of sudden and severe headache. She had positive cerebellar signs, predominantly on the right side. Computerized tomography (CT scan, CT angiogram, and magnetic resonance image (MRI of the brain showed suspected partially thrombosed giant 4 th ventricular posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Patient developed severe hypersensitivity reaction during both CT scan and MRI after contrast injection. Though needed, digital subtraction angiogram (DSA of cerebral vessels was not done. The aneurysm was managed by microsurgical clipping of the aneurysm neck and partial excision of thrombosed aneurysm. Here, we report the details of management of these difficult giant aneurysm without DSA.

  15. Persistent trigeminal artery feeding a hemispheric branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery: a rare anatomic variant.

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    Perot, G; Clarençon, F; Di Maria, F; Sourour, N; Biondi, A; Cornu, P; Chiras, J

    2011-10-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery is a rare persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis that usually connect the infracavernous segment of the ICA with the basilar artery. Rarely, PTA may feed cerebellar artery. We describe an exceptional case of PTA terminating in postero-inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) hemispheric branch. Angiographic and CTA features are presented and hypotheses regarding developmental origin of this variation are discussed. PMID:21492937

  16. Spontaneous healing and complete disappearance of a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissecting aneurysm.

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    Su, Tsung-Ming; Cheng, Ching-Hsiao; Chen, Wu-Fu; Hsu, Shih-Wei

    2014-05-01

    A 7-month-old baby presented with a 4-day history of drowsiness and vomiting after a falling accident. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and variable stages of subdural hematoma in bilateral occipital and left temporal subdural spaces. A partially thrombosed aneurysm was noted in the right craniocervical junction. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral retinal petechial hemorrhages. Conventional cerebral angiography revealed a dissecting aneurysm in the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Endovascular embolization was suggested, but the family refused. After conservative treatment, follow-up MRI revealed that the PICA aneurysm had remodeled and ultimately disappeared completely at the 10th month. This case illustrates the relatively plastic nature of intracranial aneurysms in pediatric patients. More studies are necessary to clarify the natural history of spontaneously thrombosed aneurysms to assist in their overall management.

  17. Heterotopic ossification following surgical treatment of avulsion fracture of the anterior inferior iliac spine

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    Gojković Zoran; Harhaji Vladimir; Milankov Miroslav Ž.; Drapšin Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the anterior inferior iliac spine are rare injuries of the pelvic ring and occur during sports activities. Hereby is presented a case of a 22-year-old professional football player who was diagnosed to have an avulsion fracture of the anterior inferior iliac spine on the right side four months after the initial injury and he was treated surgically with the excision of the avulsed fragment. The football player recovered completely and returned to his usual sports act...

  18. Cerebellar inhibitory output shapes the temporal dynamics of its somatosensory inferior olivary input.

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    Hogri, Roni; Segalis, Eyal; Mintz, Matti

    2014-08-01

    The cerebellum is necessary and sufficient for the acquisition and execution of adaptively timed conditioned motor responses following repeated paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus and an unconditioned stimulus. The underlying plasticity depends on the convergence of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli signals relayed to the cerebellum by the pontine nucleus and the inferior olive (IO), respectively. Adaptive timing of conditioned responses relies on the correctly predicted onset of the unconditioned stimulus, usually a noxious somatosensory stimulus. We addressed two questions: First, does the IO relay information regarding the duration of somatosensory stimuli to the cerebellum? Multiple-unit recordings from the IO of anesthetized rats that received periorbital airpuffs of various durations revealed that sustained somatosensory stimuli are invariably transformed into phasic IO outputs. The phasic response was followed by a post-peak depression in IO activity as compared to baseline, providing the cerebellum with a highly synchronous signal, time-locked to the stimulus' onset. Second, we sought to examine the involvement of olivocerebellar interactions in this signal transformation. Cerebello-olivary inhibition was interrupted using temporary pharmacological inactivation of cerebellar output nuclei, resulting in more sustained (i.e., less synchronous) IO responses to sustained somatosensory stimuli, in which the post-peak depression was substituted with elevated activity as compared to baseline. We discuss the possible roles of olivocerebellar negative-feedback loops and baseline cerebello-olivary inhibition levels in shaping the temporal dynamics of the IO's response to somatosensory stimuli and the consequences of this shaping for cerebellar plasticity and its ability to adapt to varying contexts.

  19. Internal carotid-cerebellar artery anastomosis. So-called persistent trigeminal artery variant

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    Tanohata, Kazunori; Maehara, Tadayuki; Noda, Masanobu; Katoh, Hiromi

    1987-09-01

    Five cases of internal carotid-cerebellar artery anastomosis are presented. These anomalous vessels are identical to the so-called persistent trigeminal artery variant (PTAV). In our cases, two superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs), two anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICAs) and one posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) arose from the precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. We discuss the embryolgical and neuroradiological aspects of this anomaly.

  20. Ruptured, dissecting posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: endovascular treatment without parent vessel occlusion

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    Cellerini, Martino [Careggi Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology, Florence (Italy); Centro Traumatologico-Ortopedico, Unita di Neuroradiologia, Florence (Italy); Mangiafico, Salvatore [Careggi Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology, Florence (Italy); Ammannati, Franco; Mennonna, Pasquale [Careggi Hospital, Neurosurgery, Florence (Italy); Ambrosanio, Gennaro; Muto, Mario [Cardarelli Hospital, Neuroradiology, Naples (Italy); Galasso, Luigi [S. Luca Hospital, Neuroradiology, Salerno (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Treatment of a dissecting aneurysm of the medullary segments of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) usually entails trapping of the diseased arterial segment with possible sacrifice of brainstem perforators. The goal of the work was to review our experience with selective coiling of ruptured, dissecting aneurysms of the anterolateral segments of the PICA without parent vessel occlusion. Eleven consecutive patients (9 women, 2 men, mean age 47.2 years) were retrospectively reviewed from a prospectively acquired neuroradiological database. On admission three patients had Hunt and Hess (HH) grade I, three HH grade II, two HH grade III, and one HH grade IV. Outcome was evaluated according to the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score. Follow-up (mean:19.4 months) consisted of magnetic resonance angiography and/or digital subtraction angiography in ten patients. Ten patients had mRS score 0 and one mRS score 2. No treatment failure occurred. The aneurysm was completely occluded in seven patients, a neck residue was present in two, and a loose coil mesh was present in two. Recurrence occurred in three patients, and all were successfully retreated for a total of 13 procedures. Procedure-related complications were all without clinical consequences and included a coil perforation in one procedure and stagnant filling of the parent vessel in six procedures. PICA occlusion did not occur in any patient. Coiling of ruptured, isolated dissecting aneurysms of the PICA without parent vessel occlusion is feasible, relatively safe and effective in preventing early/medium-term rebleeding. A strict angiographic follow-up program is, however, necessary to detect recurrence. (orig.)

  1. Inferior Frontal Gyrus Activity Triggers Anterior Insula Response to Emotional Facial Expressions

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    Jabbi, Mbemba; Keysers, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The observation of movies of facial expressions of others has been shown to recruit similar areas involved in experiencing one's own emotions: the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). the anterior insula and adjacent frontal operculum (IFO). The Causal link bet between activity in these 2 regions, associat

  2. Heterotopic ossification following surgical treatment of avulsion fracture of the anterior inferior iliac spine

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    Gojković Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion fractures of the anterior inferior iliac spine are rare injuries of the pelvic ring and occur during sports activities. Hereby is presented a case of a 22-year-old professional football player who was diagnosed to have an avulsion fracture of the anterior inferior iliac spine on the right side four months after the initial injury and he was treated surgically with the excision of the avulsed fragment. The football player recovered completely and returned to his usual sports activities. Two years later, due to the pain in the hip an x-ray and MR image were made, which established the existence of crescent formation, a heterotopic bone, in the area of the anterior inferior iliac spine, which was surgically removed. Physical and medical therapy was conducted and after four months, the professional athlete was back playing football. Two years after the surgical excision of heterotopic ossification, the patient was completely asymptomatic with the same ROM without any thigh muscle hypotrophy, although isokinetic muscle testing did show some weakness of the thigh extensor muscles. An x-ray did not show any signs of heterotopic ossification.

  3. Treatment of Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms Distal to the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery: Stenting or Trapping?

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    Fang, Yi-Bin, E-mail: fangyibin@163.com; Zhao, Kai-Jun, E-mail: zkjwcfzwh@163.com; Wu, Yi-Na, E-mail: wuyina0923@163.com; Zhou, Yu, E-mail: yzhou-2011@126.com; Li, Qiang, E-mail: lqeimm@126.com; Yang, Peng-Fei, E-mail: 15921196312@163.com; Huang, Qing-Hai, E-mail: ocinhqh@163.com; Zhao, Wen-Yuan, E-mail: doczhaowy@163.com; Xu, Yi, E-mail: xuyichyy@163.com; Liu, Jian-Min, E-mail: chstroke@163.com [Second Military Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Changhai Hospital (China)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe treatment of ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs) continues to be controversial. Our goal was to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and long-term outcomes of internal trapping and stent-assisted coiling (SAC) for ruptured VADAs distal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (supra-PICA VADAs), which is the most common subset.MethodsA retrospective review was conducted of 39 consecutive ruptured supra-PICA VADAs treated with internal trapping (n = 20) or with SAC (n = 19) at our institution. The clinical and angiographic data were retrospectively compared.ResultsThe immediate total occlusion rate of the VADAs was 80 % in the trapping group, which improved to 88.9 % at the follow-ups (45 months on average). Unwanted occlusions of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were detected in three trapped cases. Incomplete obliteration of the VADA or unwanted occlusions of the PICA were detected primarily in the VADAs closest to the PICA. In the stenting group, the immediate total occlusion rate was 47.4 %, which improved to 100 % at the follow-ups (39 months on average). The immediate total occlusion rate of the VADAs was higher in the trapping group (p < 0.05), but the later total occlusion was slightly higher in the stenting group (p > 0.05).ConclusionsOur preliminary results showed that internal trapping and stent-assisted coiling are both technically feasible for treating ruptured supra-PICA VADAs. Although not statistically significant, procedural related complications occurred more frequently in the trapping group. When the VADAs are close to the PICA, we suggest that the lesions should be treated using SAC.

  4. Avulsion fractures of the anterior inferior iliac spine: spectrum of imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avulsive injuries of the pelvic aphophyses are relatively common among 13-18 year old athletes, particularly among soccer players in Brazil. Diagnosis is made upon clinical and imaging findings. These lesions show three distinct phases: acute, repair and consolidation phases. Although acute and consolidation phases usually represent no diagnostic challenge, the repair phase may appear as an aggressive process on diagnostic images simulating neoplasic lesions. In this paper, the authors present the imaging findings of patients with avulsion of the anterior inferior iliac spine on plain radiographs, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the typical features of the three evolutive phases of these lesions. (author)

  5. Comparing angiography features of inferior versus anterior myocardial infarction regarding severity and extension in a cohort of Iranian patients

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    Elham Hakki Kazazi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The location of acute myocardial infarction (MI is an important prognostic factor for risk stratification of patients with first ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI. The main goal of this study was to compare the severity and extension of coronary involvement in inferior and anterior MI. Methods: This study reviewed angiographic reports of 579 patients with a first anterior wall STEMI and 690 with a first inferior STEMI that were referred to Tehran Heart Center between March 2004 and September 2007. The number of coronary vessels involvement and the presence of left main lesion were determined based on angiography reports. The Gensini score was also calculated for each patient from the coronary arteriogram. Results: Incidence of left main lesion was similar between the two groups. Although coronary arteries involvement according to Gensini score was more severe in anterior wall MI group compared with inferior wall MI group, the number of involved coronary arteries was significantly higher in the inferior MI patients. Recommendation of coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI or medical treatment were the same for both groups; however, patients with anterior MI were treated more with primary PCI. Conclusions: According to our angiography database, despite anterior wall MI is associated with more severity of coronary artery disease; inferior wall MI is more extent with regard to the number of involved coronary vessels. Location of MI can predict the severity and extension of infarction.

  6. Avulsion fracture of the anterior inferior iliac spine with abundant reactive ossification in the soft tissue.

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    Resnick, J M; Carrasco, C H; Edeiken, J; Yasko, A W; Ro, J Y; Ayala, A G

    1996-08-01

    Patients who have sustained an avulsion fracture and present clinically during the healing phase of the injury may manifest a mass that clinically and radiographically mimics a malignant neoplasm. A 15-year-old male soccer goalkeeper presented with a large ossified mass in the soft tissues overlying the right hip 6 months after experiencing a popping sensation in his hip joint during a game. Although an osteosarcoma was suspected clinically and radiographically, a Tru-Cut needle biopsy of the lesion revealed reactive bone formation. Correlation of the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings indicated an avulsion fracture of the anterior inferior iliac spine with abundant reactive ossification in the soft tissues. The healing phase of an avulsion fracture may clinically and radiographically be mistaken for neoplasia. In such cases, a Tru-Cut needle biopsy may reveal the reactive nature of the process. PMID:8865496

  7. The isolated inferior glenohumeral labrum injury, anterior to posterior (the ILAP: A case series

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    Val Irion

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We describe the presentation, exam findings, surgical repair techniques, and short-term outcomes in a series of patients with isolated inferior labral tears. Materials and Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed at a large academic medical center. Isolated inferior labral tears were defined as between the 4 o′clock and 8 o′clock position of the glenoid as determined by direct arthroscopic visualization. Tears that were smaller were also included but were required to cross the 6 o′clock point, having anterior and posterior components. Patients were excluded if they had any other pathology or treatment of the shoulder. 1-year follow-up was required. Results: Of the 17 patients who met inclusion criteria for review, 12 were available for a minimum 1-year follow-up. Average total follow-up for patients to complete the phone interview/Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS was an average of 37.7 months (range: 16-79 months. Postoperatively, all reported symptom improvement or resolution since surgery. The mean preoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 6.3 (range: 0-10. Mean postoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 2.25 (range: 0-5. Eleven of 12 patients (91.7% had returned to the level of activity desired. The mean OSIS was 41.4 (median: 43; range: 27-47. Eleven of 12 patients (91.7% had good or excellent scores. Ten of 12 patients (83.3% had a feeling of stability in the shoulder. All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation. Conclusions: We have presented our series of patients with isolated inferior labral injury, and have shown that when surgically treated, outcomes of this uncommon injury are good to excellent and a full return to sports can be expected.

  8. Functional and structural correlates of motor speed in the cerebellar anterior lobe.

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    Uwe Wenzel

    Full Text Available In athletics, motor performance is determined by different abilities such as technique, endurance, strength and speed. Based on animal studies, motor speed is thought to be encoded in the basal ganglia, sensorimotor cortex and the cerebellum. The question arises whether there is a unique structural feature in the human brain, which allows "power athletes" to perform a simple foot movement significantly faster than "endurance athletes". We acquired structural and functional brain imaging data from 32 track-and-field athletes. The study comprised of 16 "power athletes" requiring high speed foot movements (sprinters, jumpers, throwers and 16 endurance athletes (distance runners which in contrast do not require as high speed foot movements. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to identify speed specific regions of interest in the brain during fast and slow foot movements. Anatomical MRI scans were performed to assess structural grey matter volume differences between athletes groups (voxel based morphometry. We tested maximum movement velocity of plantarflexion (PF-Vmax and acquired electromyographical activity of the lateral and medial gastrocnemius muscle. Behaviourally, a significant difference between the two groups of athletes was noted in PF-Vmax and fMRI indicates that fast plantarflexions are accompanied by increased activity in the cerebellar anterior lobe. The same region indicates increased grey matter volume for the power athletes compared to the endurance counterparts. Our results suggest that speed-specific neuro-functional and -structural differences exist between power and endurance athletes in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  9. Conservative treatment of anterior inferior and superior avulsion fractures of spina iliaca in adolescent amateur footballer

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    Umut Hatay Gölge

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS and the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS avulsion fracture is a rare injury of pelvis. It usually occurs during the sport activities especially in football while hitting the ball. It is commonly misdiagnosed so that a detailed history and physical examination have a great importance. We present two cases of AIIS and ASIS avulsion fracture. Both of the patients applied to outpatient clinics with hip pain and difficulty in walking. History revealed the complaints started after hitting the ball during the football match and hip movements were limited. The patients were fifteen and sixteen years and after physical examination and radiological evaluation, avulsion fracture of the AIIS and the ASIS were diagnosed. Patients were treated conservatively with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and limited weight bearing with crutches for a month. The patients were free of pain and had full range of hip movements after one month period. At the end of the second month patients returned to active sports. AIIS and ASIS avulsion fractures are more common in adolescent football players but clinicians sometimes fail to diagnose this rare injury. We emphasize the importance of the detailed history and clinical examination and direct radiography could be enough for the diagnosis.

  10. The anterior loop of the inferior alveolar nerve. A radiographic study of panoramic radiographs and review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos VLASTOS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The inferior alveolar nerve sometimes extends anteriorly beyond the mental foramen and runs outward, upward and backward before it reaches the mental foramen, creating what is known as the anterior loop. Placement of dental implants in this area, has a high risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. Aim: This study seeks to investigate the visualization of the anterior loop on panoramic radiographs. Material and methods: 100 panoramic radiographs were analysed in terms of loop visualization. Results: Anterior loop was observed in 34% of the radiographs. Its prevalence was higher in males (70.5% and in patients between 40-60 years old (47%. In most cases the loop was located bilaterally (64.7%, while the interforaminal area was mostly edentulous (64.7%. The loop length ranged between 0.5-8 mm, with an average length of 4.37mm. Conclusions: An analysis of the findings shows that implants should be placed at least 5-8mm anteriorly to the mental foramen. According to a review of the literature, computed tomography is more accurate than panoramic radiography in identifying the anterior loop.

  11. High origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: MR arthrography with anatomic and histologic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Ruiz, Francisco Alejandro [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California and VA healthcare system, San Diego, CA (United States); Hospital Pablo Tobon Uribe, Departamento de Radiologia, Medellin (Colombia); Baranski Kaniak, Beatriz Cristina; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald L. [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California San Diego, VA Healthcare System Dan Diego, Department of Pathology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament has been described to arise from the anteroinferior labrum, but we have observed that in some persons its origin is from the anterior or anterosuperior labrum, creating diagnostic difficulties. Ten fresh unembalmed cadaveric shoulders underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using a posterior approach with a 1.5 T GE magnet, with the following sequences: T1-weighted fast spin-echo in axial, coronal and sagittal planes, and T1 fat-suppressed spin-echo in the axial plane (TR/TE 600/20, section thickness 2.5 mm, 0.5 mm interslice space, number of signals acquired, two, field of view 12 x 12 cm, and matrix 512 x 256 pixels). Following imaging, the shoulders were frozen and later sectioned using a band saw into 3-mm sections corresponding to the axial imaging plane. Histological analysis was also performed to determine the origin of the anterior band. Four of the ten shoulders had an origin of the anterior band above or at the 3 o'clock position: one at the 1 o'clock position, two at the 2 o'clock position, and one at the 3 o'clock position. In another shoulder, the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament originated from the middle glenohumeral ligament, and in five other shoulders, the anterior band originated from the anteroinferior labrum as has been described in the literature. This finding is of clinical significance as a high origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament leads to MR arthrographic finding that can simulate those of labral tears or detachments. (orig.)

  12. Intracranial-to-intracranial bypass for posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: options, technical challenges, and results in 35 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abla, Adib A; McDougall, Cameron M; Breshears, Jonathan D; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Intracranial-to-intracranial (IC-IC) bypasses are alternatives to traditional extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) bypasses to reanastomose parent arteries, reimplant efferent branches, revascularize branches with in situ donor arteries, and reconstruct bifurcations with interposition grafts that are entirely intracranial. These bypasses represent an evolution in bypass surgery from using scalp arteries and remote donor sites toward a more local and reconstructive approach. IC-IC bypass can be utilized preferentially when revascularization is needed in the management of complex aneurysms. Experiences using IC-IC bypass, as applied to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms in 35 patients, were reviewed. METHODS Patients with PICA aneurysms and vertebral artery (VA) aneurysms involving the PICA's origin were identified from a prospectively maintained database of the Vascular Neurosurgery Service, and patients who underwent bypass procedures for PICA revascularization were included. RESULTS During a 17-year period in which 129 PICA aneurysms in 125 patients were treated microsurgically, 35 IC-IC bypasses were performed as part of PICA aneurysm management, including in situ p3-p3 PICA-PICA bypass in 11 patients (31%), PICA reimplantation in 9 patients (26%), reanastomosis in 14 patients (40%), and 1 V3 VA-to-PICA bypass with an interposition graft (3%). All aneurysms were completely or nearly completely obliterated, 94% of bypasses were patent, 77% of patients were improved or unchanged after treatment, and good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale ≤ 2) were observed in 76% of patients. Two patients died expectantly. Ischemic complications were limited to 2 patients in whom the bypasses occluded, and permanent lower cranial nerve morbidity was limited to 3 patients and did not compromise independent function in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS PICA aneurysms receive the application of IC-IC bypass better than any other aneurysm, with nearly one

  13. Malunited anterior inferior iliac spine fracture as a cause of hip impingement: A case report and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desai Pingal; Timothy Marqueen; Karanvir Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Apophyseal injuries of the pelvis have increased recently with increased participation of teenagers in contact sports.Apophyseal fractures of the pelvis should be ruled out from apophysitis,os acetabuli and bony tumors.We report a case of fracture of anterior-inferior iliac spine following indirect injury to the hip in a young football player.The patient failed to get better with nonoperative management and continued to have pain in the left hip and signs and symptoms of impingement.He improved following surgical excision of the heterotopic bone and did not have any evidence of recurrence at 2 years followup.

  14. Malunited anterior inferior iliac spine fracture as a cause of hip impingement: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingal, Desai; Marqueen, Timothy; Prakash, Karanvir

    2016-04-01

    Apophyseal injuries of the pelvis have increased recently with increased participation of teenagers in contact sports. Apophyseal fractures of the pelvis should be ruled out from apophysitis, os acetabuli and bony tumors. We report a case of fracture of anterior-inferior iliac spine following indirect injury to the hip in a young football player. The patient failed to get better with nonoperative management and continued to have pain in the left hip and signs and symptoms of impingement. He improved following surgical excision of the heterotopic bone and did not have any evidence of recurrence at 2 years follow- up. PMID:27140222

  15. Fast convergence of learning requires plasticity between inferior olive and deep cerebellar nuclei in a manipulation task: a closed-loop robotic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Niceto R; Garrido, Jesús A; Carrillo, Richard R; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is known to play a critical role in learning relevant patterns of activity for adaptive motor control, but the underlying network mechanisms are only partly understood. The classical long-term synaptic plasticity between parallel fibers (PFs) and Purkinje cells (PCs), which is driven by the inferior olive (IO), can only account for limited aspects of learning. Recently, the role of additional forms of plasticity in the granular layer, molecular layer and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) has been considered. In particular, learning at DCN synapses allows for generalization, but convergence to a stable state requires hundreds of repetitions. In this paper we have explored the putative role of the IO-DCN connection by endowing it with adaptable weights and exploring its implications in a closed-loop robotic manipulation task. Our results show that IO-DCN plasticity accelerates convergence of learning by up to two orders of magnitude without conflicting with the generalization properties conferred by DCN plasticity. Thus, this model suggests that multiple distributed learning mechanisms provide a key for explaining the complex properties of procedural learning and open up new experimental questions for synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar network.

  16. Fast convergence of learning requires plasticity between inferior olive and deep cerebellar nuclei in a manipulation task: a closed-loop robotic simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niceto Rafael Luque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is known to play a critical role in learning relevant patterns of activity for adaptive motor control, but the underlying network mechanisms are only partly understood. The classical long-term synaptic plasticity between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells, which is driven by the inferior olive (IO, can only account for limited aspects of learning. Recently, the role of additional forms of plasticity in the granular layer, molecular layer and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN has been considered. In particular, learning at DCN synapses allows for generalization, but convergence to a stable state requires hundreds of repetitions. In this paper we have explored the putative role of the IO-DCN connection by endowing it with adaptable weights and exploring its implications in a closed-loop robotic manipulation task. Our results show that IO-DCN plasticity accelerates convergence of learning by up to two orders of magnitude without conflicting with the generalization properties conferred by DCN plasticity. Thus, this model suggests that multiple distributed learning mechanisms provide a key for explaining the complex properties of procedural learning and open up new experimental questions for synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar network.

  17. A ruptured aneurysm arising at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation from the extracranial vertebral artery to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery associated with bilateral vertebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, Masashi; Nishimura, Shinjitu; Kimura, Naoto; Ezura, Masayuki; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-02-01

    We report an extremely rare case of a small ruptured aneurysm of the leptomeningeal collateral circulation from the vertebral artery (VA) to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA); this aneurysm was associated with bilateral VA occlusion. A 72-year-old woman with sudden headache, nausea, and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was admitted to our hospital. On admission, no evidence of cerebral signs or cranial nerve palsy was found. Computed tomography imaging showed SAH predominantly in the posterior fossa, and digital subtraction angiography revealed bilateral VA occlusion and the left VA aneurysm located proximal to the VA union. In addition, a small aneurysm was observed at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation located between the extracranial left VA and the left PICA. The patient underwent radical surgery on the day of the onset of the symptoms associated with SAH. However, the VA aneurysm was unruptured and surgically trapped. The small aneurysm arising at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation was ruptured during the surgery and was electrocoagulated; the collateral circulation was preserved, and no neurologic deficits were observed. The postoperative course was uneventful. SAH with the occlusion of major vessels should be diagnosed with utmost caution to allow preoperative neurologic and radiological assessments.

  18. Occipital artery-to-posterior inferior cerebellar artery anastomosis with multiple-layer dissection of suboccipital muscles under a reverse C-shaped skin incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, Makoto; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Uemori, Genki; Kawasaki, Kazutsune; Izumi, Naoto; Hashimoto, Masaaki

    2015-06-01

    Although occipital artery (OA)-to-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) anastomosis is the most familiar reconstruction for posterior cerebral circulation, the procedure is considered difficult because of the anatomical complex course of OA and the depth of the operative field at the anastomosis site. Therefore, we attempted a safe and reliable method for OA-to-PICA anastomosis under multiple-layer dissection of suboccipital muscles and a reverse C-shaped skin incision. We reviewed the clinical records of patients who underwent OA-to-PICA anastomosis in our institute, and report the outcome with special emphasis on graft patency and surgical complications. Nine patients are described. In one patient the bypass was accomplished at the cortical segment of the PICA and in all others at the caudal loop. The average time for de-clamping the PICA was 29 min and 29 s. Although the overall graft patency rate was 100%, one patient showed a new medulla infarction at the time of post-operatory three-dimensional computed tomography angiography. Besides a secure OA-to-PICA anastomosis, this technique allows safe harvest of the OA and the creation of a shallow and wide anastomosis field. PMID:25633907

  19. The changes of inflammatory cytokines and their clinical significance in patients of inferior ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction with anterior ST-segment depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶明

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the level of Hs-CRP,Fib,IL-6,TNF-α,MDA,SOD,and analyze the correlation between the level of plasma inflammatory cytokines and clinical significance in patients with anterior ST-segment depression.Methods We chose 360 patients with inferior ST Segment elavation acute myocardial infarction from May 2007 to Sep 2012 in emergency department of

  20. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Bernardino

    Full Text Available Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  1. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:25668516

  2. Cerebellar arteries originating from the internal carotid artery: angiographic evaluation and embryologic explanations

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    Lee, Jae Young; Han, Moon Hee; Yu, In Gyu; Chang, Ki Hyun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eui Jong [Kyunghee Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Ho [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Asan(Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To find and describe the cerebellar arteries arising from the internal carotid artery, explain them embryologically, and evaluate their clinical implication. To determine the point in the internal carotid artery from which the cereballar artery arose anomalously, consecutive angiographic studies performed in the last three years were reviewed. The distribution of such anomalous cerebellar arteries, the point in the internal carotid artery from which the anomalous vessels originated, and associated findings were analyzed. Five anomalous origins of cerebellar arteries arising arising directly from the internal carotid artery were found in five patients. Three anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICA) and one common trunk of an AICA and a posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were found to originate from the internal carotid artery at a point close to the origin of the primitive trigeminal artery. A PICA arose from an artery presenting a course similar to the proatlantal intersegmental artery. Intracranial aneurysms in two patients, Moyamoya disease in one, and facial arteriovenous malformation in one. In our series, AICAs supplied from the arteries considered to be persistent trigeminal artery variants were the most common type. A correlation between type of anomalous cerebellar artery and type of carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis may exist. Cerebellar arteries originating anomalously from the internal carotid artery seem to occur as a result of the persistence of carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses associated with incomplete fusion of the longitudinal neural arteries. An understanding of these anomalous cerebellar arteries may help prevent accidents during therapeutic embolization and surgical treatment, as well as misinterpretation.

  3. Measurement of Anterior-Posterior Diameter of Inferior Vena Cava by Ultrasonography: A Non-Invasive Method for Estimation of Central Venous Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    R Nafisi-Moghadam; Mansourian, H.R

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objective: The assessment of blood volume is now one of the most commonly needed interventions in the first line of care and severe ill patients. Measuring central venous pressure (CVP) is an invasive method, most frequently used in clinical practice for the assessment of volume status. The di-ameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is a parameter to estimate central venous pressure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether measurement of the anterior-posterior diamete...

  4. Distortion of time interval reproduction in an epileptic patient with a focal lesion in the right anterior insular/inferior frontal cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfort, Vincent; Pfeuty, Micha; Klein, Madelyne; Collé, Steffie; Brissart, Hélène; Jonas, Jacques; Maillard, Louis

    2014-11-01

    This case report on an epileptic patient suffering from a focal lesion at the junction of the right anterior insular cortex (AIC) and the adjacent inferior frontal cortex (IFC) provides the first evidence that damage to this brain region impairs temporal performance in a visual time reproduction task in which participants had to reproduce the presentation duration (3, 5 and 7s) of emotionally-neutral and -negative pictures. Strikingly, as compared to a group of healthy subjects, the AIC/IFC case considerably overestimated reproduction times despite normal variability. The effect was obtained in all duration and emotion conditions. Such a distortion in time reproduction was not observed in four other epileptic patients without insular or inferior frontal damage. Importantly, the absolute extent of temporal over-reproduction increased in proportion to the magnitude of the target durations, which concurs with the scalar property of interval timing, and points to an impairment of time-specific rather than of non temporal (such as motor) mechanisms. Our data suggest that the disability in temporal reproduction of the AIC/IFC case would result from a distorted memory representation of the encoded duration, occurring during the process of storage and/or of recovery from memory and leading to a deviation of the temporal judgment during the reproduction task. These findings support the recent proposal that the anterior insular/inferior frontal cortices would be involved in time interval representation. PMID:25223467

  5. INFERIOR-SEPTAL MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION MISDIAGNOSED AS ANTERIOR-SEPTAL MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC, SCINTIGRAPHIC, AND ANGIOGRAPHIC CORRELATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-lin Chen; Zuo-xiang He; Zai-jia Chen; Jin-qing Yuan; Yue-qin Tian; Shu-bin Qiao; Rong-fang Shi; Yi-da Tang; Zong-lang Lu

    2007-01-01

    To explore the infarct sites in patients with inferior wall acute myocardial infarction (AMI) concomitant with ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 and leads V3R-V5R.Methods Five patients diagnosed as inferior, right ventricular, and anteroseptal walls AMI at admission were enrolled. Electrocardiographic data and results of isotope 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) myocardial perfusion imaging and coronary angiography (CAG) were analyzed.Results Electrocardiogram showed that ST segment significantly elevated in standard leads Ⅱ, Ⅲ, aVF, and leads V1-V3 , V3R-V5R in all five patients. The magnitude of ST segment elevation was maximal in lead V1 and decreased gradually from lead V1 to V3 and from lead V1 to V3R-V5R. There was isotope 99mTc-MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging defect in inferior and basal inferior-septal walls. CAG showed that right coronary artery was infarct-related artery.Conclusions The diagnostic criteria for basal inferior-septal wall AMI can be formulated as follows: ( 1 ) ST segment elevates ≥2 mm in lead V1 in the clinical setting of inferior wall AMI; (2) the magnitude of ST segment elevation is the tallest in lead V1 and decreases gradually from lead V1 to V3 and from lead V1 to V3R-V5R. With two conditions above, the basal inferior-septal wall AMI should be diagnosed.

  6. Consideration of QRS complex in addition to ST-segment abnormalities in the estimation of the "risk region" during acute anterior or inferior myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaat, F E; Bouwmeester, S; van Hellemond, I E G; Wagner, G S; Gorgels, A P M

    2014-01-01

    The myocardial area at risk (MaR) is an important aspect in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). It represents the myocardium at the onset of the STEMI that is ischemic and could become infarcted if no reperfusion occurs. The MaR, therefore, has clinical value because it gives an indication of the amount of myocardium that could potentially be salvaged by rapid reperfusion therapy. The most validated method for measuring the MaR is (99m)Tc-sestamibi SPECT, but this technique is not easily applied in the clinical setting. Another method that can be used for measuring the MaR is the standard ECG-based scoring system, Aldrich ST score, which is more easily applied. This ECG-based scoring system can be used to estimate the extent of acute ischemia for anterior or inferior left ventricular locations, by considering quantitative changes in the ST-segment. Deviations in the ST-segment baseline that occur following an acute coronary occlusion represent the ischemic changes in the transmurally ischemic myocardium. In most instances however, the ECG is not available at the very first moments of STEMI and as times passes the ischemic myocardium becomes necrotic with regression of the ST-segment deviation along with progressive changes of the QRS complex. Thus over the time course of the acute event, the Aldrich ST score would be expected to progressively underestimate the MaR, as was seen in studies with SPECT as gold standard; anterior STEMI (r=0.21, p=0.32) and inferior STEMI (r=0.17, p=0.36). Another standard ECG-based scoring system is the Selvester QRS score, which can be used to estimate the final infarct size by considering the quantitative changes in the QRS complex. Therefore, additional consideration of the Selvester QRS score in the acute phase could potentially provide the "component" of infarcted myocardium that is missing when the Aldrich ST score alone is used to determine the MaR in the acute phase, as was seen in studies with SPECT as gold

  7. A bypass case due to an acute inferior myocardial infarction caused by vascular occlusion of the left subclavian artery and left anterior descending artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altas Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yakup Altas, Ali Veysel Ulugg Department of Cardiology, Diyarbakir Gazi Yasargil Education and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, Turkey Abstract: ST segment elevation is the most common electrocardiographic finding in acute myocardial infarction. ST elevation in chest leads generally represents left anterior descending artery occlusion, while elevation in DII and III, and aVF represents right coronary and circumflex artery occlusion. A female patient aged 66 years was admitted to our emergency service with ST elevation in leads DIII and aVF. A diagnosis of acute inferior myocardial infarction was made. The patient’s history included coronary artery bypass graft involving the left internal mammary artery to the left anterior descending coronary artery and aorta to the right coronary artery. The patient was taken to the cardiac catheterization laboratory for primary percutaneous coronary intervention and a lesion in the left anterior descending artery was identified. Additionally, the left subclavian artery was totally occluded. Following intervention to the lesion, the patient was discharged on day 4 of admission. Keywords: electrocardiography, myocardial infarction, coronary circulation

  8. Measurement of Anterior-Posterior Diameter of Inferior Vena Cava by Ultrasonography: A Non-Invasive Method for Estimation of Central Venous Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nafisi-Moghadam

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The assessment of blood volume is now one of the most commonly needed interventions in the first line of care and severe ill patients. Measuring central venous pressure (CVP is an invasive method, most frequently used in clinical practice for the assessment of volume status. The di-ameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC is a parameter to estimate central venous pressure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether measurement of the anterior-posterior diameter of the IVC by ultra-sonography, correlates with CVP. Materials and Methods: It was a descriptive and pro-spective study on 50 patients; CVP was measured in supine position by CVP manometer. Anterior – pos-terior IVC diameter was assessed by ultrasonography during inspiration and expiration. Results: The mean of CVP during inspiration and ex-piration was 11.31+5.59, 12.20 + 5.65cmH2o, respec-tively. The mean of inspiratory and expiratory IVC diameter was 7.71+3.56, 11.97+3.28 mm, respectively. There was significant relation between CVP and IVC diameter in the inspiration (r=0.664, p<0.0001 and expiration (r=0.495, p=0.001. The relation between these two variables was linear. Conclusion: Result of this study showed that IVC di-ameter measurement by ultrasonography can be used to estimate the mean of CVP.

  9. Failure of Fixation Suppression of Spontaneous Nystagmus in Cerebellar Infarction: Frequency, Pattern, and a Possible Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the frequency and pattern of failure of the fixation suppression (FFS) of spontaneous nystagmus (SN) in unilateral cerebellar infarction, and to identify the structure responsible for FFS, 29 patients with acute, mainly unilateral, isolated cerebellar infarction who had SN with a predominantly horizontal component were enrolled in this study. The ocular fixation index (OFI) was defined as the mean slow phase velocity (SPV) of the horizontal component of SN with fixation divided by the mean SPV of the horizontal component of SN without fixation. The OFI from age- and sex-matched patients with vestibular neuritis was calculated and used as the control data. The FFS of SN was only found in less than half (41 %, 12/29) of the patients. Approximately 65 % (n = 7) of the patients with isolated anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory cerebellar infarction showed FFS, whereas only a quarter (n = 3) of the patients with isolated posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory cerebellar infarction showed FFS. The proportion of gaze-evoked nystagmus (6/12 [50 %] vs. 2/17 [12 %], p = 0.04) and deficient gain of ipsilesional pursuit (10/12 [83 %] vs. 6/17 [35 %], p = 0.05) was more frequent in the FFS group than in the group without FFS. Lesion subtraction analysis in isolated PICA territory cerebellar infarction revealed that the nodulus was commonly damaged in patients with FFS, compared to that of patients without FFS. Our study shows that FFS of SN due to acute cerebellar infarction is less common than previously thought and the nodulus may be an important structure for the suppression of SN in humans. PMID:26082303

  10. Elevation deficiency after anterior transposition of inferior oblique muscle%下斜肌后徙转位术后的安全性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海华; 甘晓玲; 李巧娴; 田桂芬

    2010-01-01

    目的 通过比较下斜肌(Inferioroblique IO)后徙术与IO后徙转位术,术后至少3年的疗效,评价IO后徙转位术的安全性.方法 比较IO后徙术组(22例33只眼)和IO后徙转位术组(27例33只眼)病例手术后IO运动程度和眼球上转程度,分析可能的相关因素.结果 (1)IO后徙转位术组左右眼手术后远期IO运动程度、眼球上转程度均明显低于IO后徙术组,差别有统计学意义,P<0.001.(2)术后IO运动程度不足与手术年龄、有无弱视、屈光状态、是否同时行水平斜视手术、术前IO功能亢进程度和斜视度均无关.(3)IO后徙转位术组术后远期IO运动程度、眼球上转程度均低于近期(1周至1个月),有明显统计学差异,P<0.001.术后中期(3~6个月)与远期IO运动程度、眼球上转程度之间差异无统计学意义,P>0.05.结论 IO后徙转位术式存在术后眼球上转功能不足,IO功能不足的缺点,并且在术后持续存在.%Objective Through compared the effect of anterior transposition and recession of inferior oblique (IO), to study the security of anterior transposition of the inferior oblique. Methods A retrospective case control study. Compare the ocular elevation and the IO function after anterior transposition versus reces sion of the IO. Results The comparison of elevation and the IO function of anterior transposition versus recession of IO group yielded significant difference at long-term follow-up, P <0.001. The deficiency of IO function after surgery had no relationship with the age of surgery, amblyopia, refraction error, accompany horizontal strabismus surgery, the degree of IOOA and oblique angle. In anterior transposition of IO group, the ocular elevation and the IO function had significant difference at long term follow-up versus early follow-up, P <0.001, but had no difference at long term follow-up versus intermediate follow-up. Conclusions Anterior transposition of the IO may cause a limitation of

  11. Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and olivopontocerebellar degeneration, progressive degenerative disorders in which cerebellar degeneration is a key feature Friedreich’s ataxia, and other spinocerebellar ataxias, which are caused by ...

  12. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders that begin in early childhood, such as ataxia telangiectasia. In an infant or young child, symptoms of a disorder that features cerebellar hypoplasia might include floppy muscle tone, developmental or ...

  13. Effect of vertebral artery hypoplasia on the territory-related perfusion of posterior inferior cerebellar artery%椎动脉发育不全对小脑后下动脉供血区脑灌注的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马乾坤; 张道培; 张杰文; 张淑玲; 鹿桂凤; 尹所

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨椎动脉发育不全(vertebral artery hypoplasia,VAH )对小脑后下动脉供血区脑灌注的影响。方法选择2014-12—2015-07年龄≥30岁并行头颅磁共振灌注成像和头颈部三维对比增强磁共振血管造影检查的头晕或眩晕患者244例。获脑血流量(CBF)、脑血容量(CBV)、平均通过时间(MTT)和达峰时间(TTP)灌注图,测量一侧小脑后下动脉供血区及对侧镜像区的灌注参数值(CBF、CBV、MTT、TTP),计算椎动脉直径较小侧/对侧镜像区的灌注参数相对比值(rCBF、rCBV、rMTT、rTTP)。定义 VAH 为椎动脉直径≤2 mm,或双侧椎动脉不对称比≥1.7:1,分为 VAH 组和 non-VAH(Non-hypoplasitic vertebral artey)组,对临床资料和小脑、延髓灌参数相对比值进行比较。结果共纳入114例患者,男女各57例;VAH 组31例(27.2%),左侧5例(16%),右侧26例(84%);Non-VAH 组83例。2组间 VA 直径较小侧与对侧的 rTTP和 rCBF≤0.85的例数存在显著统计学差异(P 值分别为0.005,0.031);rCBF 倾向于有统计学差异(P =0.098);rCBV、rMTT 及 rCBV≤0.85例数无显著统计学差异。结论VAH 可以造成小脑后下动脉供血区域低灌注改变,且以 TTP 延长或 CBF 降低为主。%Objective To investigate the effect of vertebral artery hypoplasia on the territory perfusion of posterior inferi-or cerebellar artery (PICA).Methods 244 patients with vertigo or dizziness (age≥30 years old)from December 2014 to July 201 5 were selected as subjects who underwent brain perfusion-weighted imaging (pWI)and three-dimensional dynamic con-trast-enhanced MRA (3D DCE-MRA).The perfusion figures of cerebral blood flow(CBF),cerebral blood volume(CBV),mean transit time(MTT)and time to peak(TTP)were obtained.The perfusion parameters including CBF,CBV,MTT and TTP val-ues were measured at PICA areas and at the opposite mirror-imaging areas.Relative perfusion parameter values (rCBF,rCBV, rMTT and rTTP)defined as the ratio of the

  14. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  15. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (pAsperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  16. [Cerebellar stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowski, Michał; Zimny, Anna; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke belongs to a group of rare diseases of vascular origin. Cerebellum, supplied by three pairs of arteries (AICA, PICA, SCA) with many anastomoses between them is less susceptible for a stroke, especially ischemic one. Diagnosis of the stroke in this region is harder due to lower sensibility of commonly used CT of the head in case of stroke suspicion. The authors highlight clinical symptoms distinguishing between vascular territories or topographical locations of the stroke, diagnostic procedures, classical and surgical treatment, the most common misdiagnoses are also mentioned. The authors suggest a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm development, including rtPA treatment criteria for ischemic cerebellar stroke. PMID:26181157

  17. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  18. Correlação entre o índice morfológico das coroas dos incisivos inferiores e a estabilidade da correção do apinhamento ântero-inferior Correlation between the morphologic index of crowns of mandibular incisors and stability of correction of mandibular anterior crowding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cristina Faria Ribeiro de Castro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar até que ponto as dimensões mesiodistais e vestibulolinguais das coroas dos incisivos inferiores contribuem para a estabilidade da correção do apinhamento ântero-inferior. METODOLOGIA: foram avaliados 56 pacientes leucodermas, de ambos os gêneros (27 feminino e 29 masculino, que inicialmente apresentavam má oclusão de Classe I ou de Classe II, divisão 1 (28 cada, tratados com extrações dos quatro primeiros pré-molares e com mecânica Edgewise. Nenhum caso foi submetido a desgastes interproximais durante ou após o tratamento. As medidas foram realizadas nos modelos de estudo obtidos de cada caso nas fases pré, pós-tratamento e pós-contenção, totalizando na avaliação de 168 modelos inferiores. A idade média pré-tratamento foi de 13,23 anos, o tempo de tratamento de 2,11 anos e pós-tratamento foi de 5,12 anos. O índice de irregularidade de Little foi utilizado para quantificar o apinhamento ântero-inferior e o índice de Peck e Peck para mensuração das dimensões mesiodistais e vestibulolinguais dos mesmos. O teste de correlação de Pearson foi utilizado para determinar a significância de correlação entre a morfologia das coroas dos incisivos inferiores e a estabilidade. Secundariamente, investigou-se a presença de dimorfismo entre os gêneros e a existência de diferença entre os dois tipos de má oclusão inicial, em relação à estabilidade da correção do apinhamento ântero-inferior, utilizando o teste t independente. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: concluiu-se que a morfologia da coroa dos incisivos inferiores apresentou uma fraca correlação com a estabilidade pós-contenção. Nem o gênero dos pacientes, nem o tipo de má oclusão inicial influenciaram na estabilidade da correção do apinhamento ântero-inferior, cinco anos pós-tratamento.AIM: This study investigated the extent to which the mesiodistal and buccolingual dimensions of the crowns of mandibular incisors contribute with the

  19. Changes in a cerebellar peduncle lesion in a patient with Dandy-Walker malformation A diffusion tensor imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ah Young Lee; Sung Ho Jang; Sang Seok Yeo; Ensil Lee; Yun Woo Cho; Su Min Son

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with severe ataxia due to Dandy-Walker malformation, who showed functional recovery over 10 months corresponding to a change in a cerebellar peduncle lesion. A 20-month-old female patient who was diagnosed with Dandy-Walker syndrome and six age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled. The superior cerebellar peduncle, the middle cerebellar peduncle, and the inferior cerebellar peduncle were evaluated using fractional anisotropy and the apparent diffusion coefficient. The patients' functional ambulation category was 0 at the initial visit, but improved to 2 at the follow-up evaluation, and Berg's balance scale score also improved from 0 to 7. Initial diffusion tensor tractography revealed that the inferior cerebellar peduncle was not detected, that the fractional anisotropy of the superior cerebellar peduncle and middle cerebellar peduncle decreased by two standard deviations below, and that the apparent diffusion coefficient increased by two standard deviations over normal control values. However, on follow-up diffusion tensor tractography, both inferior cerebellar peduncles could be detected, and the fractional anisotropy of superior cerebellar peduncle increased to within two standard deviations of normal controls. The functional improvement in this patient appeared to correspond to changes in these cerebellar peduncles. We believe that evaluating cerebellar peduncles using diffusion tensor imaging is useful in cases when a cerebellar peduncle lesion is suspected.

  20. Neural correlates of impaired emotional face recognition in cerebellar lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamaszek, Michael; Kirkby, Kenneth C; D'Agata, Fedrico; Olbrich, Sebastian; Langner, Sönke; Steele, Christopher; Sehm, Bernhard; Busse, Stefan; Kessler, Christof; Hamm, Alfons

    2015-07-10

    Clinical and neuroimaging data indicate a cerebellar contribution to emotional processing, which may account for affective-behavioral disturbances in patients with cerebellar lesions. We studied the neurophysiology of cerebellar involvement in recognition of emotional facial expression. Participants comprised eight patients with discrete ischemic cerebellar lesions and eight control patients without any cerebrovascular stroke. Event-related potentials (ERP) were used to measure responses to faces from the Karolinska Directed Emotional Faces Database (KDEF), interspersed in a stream of images with salient contents. Images of faces augmented N170 in both groups, but increased late positive potential (LPP) only in control patients without brain lesions. Dipole analysis revealed altered activation patterns for negative emotions in patients with cerebellar lesions, including activation of the left inferior prefrontal area to images of faces showing fear, contralateral to controls. Correlation analysis indicated that lesions of cerebellar area Crus I contribute to ERP deviations. Overall, our results implicate the cerebellum in integrating emotional information at different higher order stages, suggesting distinct cerebellar contributions to the proposed large-scale cerebral network of emotional face recognition. PMID:25912431

  1. Bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahemey, R.; Warfield, A.T.; Ahmed, S.

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas are the most common benign osteoclastic tumours of the paranasal sinuses. However, nasal cavity and turbinate osteomas are extremely rare. Only nine middle turbinate, three inferior turbinate and one inferior turbinate osteoma cases have been reported to date. The present case report describes the management and follow-up of symptomatic bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. A 60-year-old female presented with symptoms of bilateral nasal obstruction and right-sided epiphora. Radiological investigation found hypertrophic bony changes involving both inferior turbinates. The patient was managed successfully by endoscopic inferior turbinectomies in order to achieve a patent airway, with no further recurrence of tumour after 3 months postoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. We describe a safe and minimally invasive method of tumour resection, which has a better cosmetic outcome compared with other approaches. PMID:27534890

  2. Cerebellar development in the absence of Gbx function in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen-Ying; Kemp, Hilary A; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is a well-known organizing center during vertebrate brain development. The MHB forms at the expression boundary of Otx2 and Gbx2, mutually repressive homeodomain transcription factors expressed in the midbrain/forebrain and anterior hindbrain, respectively. The genetic hierarchy of gene expression at the MHB is complex, involving multiple positive and negative feedback loops that result in the establishment of non-overlapping domains of Wnt1 and Fgf8 on either side of the boundary and the consequent specification of the cerebellum. The cerebellum derives from the dorsal part of the anterior-most hindbrain segment, rhombomere 1 (r1), which undergoes a distinctive morphogenesis to give rise to the cerebellar primordium within which the various cerebellar neuron types are specified. Previous studies in the mouse have shown that Gbx2 is essential for cerebellar development. Using zebrafish mutants we show here that in the zebrafish gbx1 and gbx2 are required redundantly for morphogenesis of the cerebellar primordium and subsequent cerebellar differentiation, but that this requirement is alleviated by knocking down Otx. Expression of fgf8, wnt1 and the entire MHB genetic program is progressively lost in gbx1-;gbx2- double mutants but is rescued by Otx knock-down. This rescue of the MHB genetic program depends on rescued Fgf signaling, however the rescue of cerebellar primordium morphogenesis is independent of both Gbx and Fgf. Based on our findings we propose a revised model for the role of Gbx in cerebellar development.

  3. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  4. Modality Specific Cerebro-Cerebellar Activations in Verbal Working Memory: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Kirschen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Verbal working memory (VWM engages frontal and temporal/parietal circuits subserving the phonological loop, as well as, superior and inferior cerebellar regions which have projections from these neocortical areas. Different cerebro-cerebellar circuits may be engaged for integrating aurally- and visually-presented information for VWM. The present fMRI study investigated load (2, 4, or 6 letters and modality (auditory and visual dependent cerebro-cerebellar VWM activation using a Sternberg task. FMRI revealed modality-independent activations in left frontal (BA 6/9/44, insular, cingulate (BA 32, and bilateral inferior parietal/supramarginal (BA 40 regions, as well as in bilateral superior (HVI and right inferior (HVIII cerebellar regions. Visual presentation evoked prominent activations in right superior (HVI/CrusI cerebellum, bilateral occipital (BA19 and left parietal (BA7/40 cortex while auditory presentation showed robust activations predominately in bilateral temporal regions (BA21/22. In the cerebellum, we noted a visual to auditory emphasis of function progressing from superior to inferior and from lateral to medial regions. These results extend our previous findings of fMRI activation in cerebro-cerebellar networks during VWM, and demonstrate both modality dependent commonalities and differences in activations with increasing memory load.

  5. Cerebellar anatomy as applied to cerebellar microsurgical resections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define the anatomy of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles, demonstrating the surgical application of anatomic landmarks in cerebellar resections. METHODS: Twenty cerebellar hemispheres were studied. RESULTS: The majority of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles had demonstrated constant relationship to other cerebellar structures, which provided landmarks for surgical approaching. The lateral border is separated from the midline by 19.5 mm in both hemispheres. The posterior border of the cortex is separated 23.3 mm from the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus; the lateral one is separated 26 mm from the lateral border of the nucleus; and the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus is separated 25.4 mm from the posterolateral angle formed by the junction of lateral and posterior borders of cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical anatomy has provided important landmarks that could be applied to cerebellar surgical resections.

  6. Cerebellar control of postural scaling and central set in stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, F B; Diener, H C

    1994-08-01

    1. The effects of cerebellar deficits in humans on scaling the magnitude of automatic postural responses based on sensory feedback and on predictive central set was investigated. Electromyographic (EMG) and surface reactive torques were compared in patients with anterior lobe cerebellar disorders and in normal healthy adults exposed to blocks of four velocities and five amplitudes of surface translations during stance. Correlations between the earliest postural responses (integrated EMG and initial rate of change of torque) and translation velocity provided a measure of postural magnitude scaling using sensory information from the current displacement. Correlations of responses with translation amplitude provided a measure of scaling dependent on predictive central set based on sequential experience with previous like displacements because the earliest postural responses occurred before completion of the displacements and because scaling to displacement amplitude disappeared when amplitudes were randomized in normal subjects. 2. Responses of cerebellar patients to forward body sway induced by backward surface displacements were hypermetric, that is, surface-reactive torque responses were two to three times larger than normal with longer muscle bursts resulting in overshooting of initial posture. Despite this postural hypermetria, the absolute and relative latencies of agonist muscle bursts at the ankle, knee, and hip were normal in cerebellar patients. 3. Although they were hypermetric, the earliest postural responses of cerebellar patients were scaled normally to platform displacement velocities using somatosensory feedback. Cerebellar patients, however, were unable to scale initial postural response magnitude to expected displacement amplitudes based on prior experience using central set. Randomization of displacement amplitudes eliminated the set effect of amplitude on initial responses in normal subjects, but responses to randomized and blocked trials were not

  7. A rare variant of persistent trigeminal artery: cavernous carotid-cerebellar artery anastomosis--a case report and a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphaeli, Guy; Bandeira, Alexandra; Mine, Benjamin; Brisbois, Denis; Lubicz, Boris

    2009-12-01

    We report a very rare anomalous anatomic variant of the cavernous internal carotid artery supplying directly the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, with no basilar artery opacification. A systematic review as well as a description of other variants of trigeminal-cerebellar anastomosis is given. PMID:19517204

  8. Memory consolidation in the cerebellar cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Kellett

    Full Text Available Several forms of learning, including classical conditioning of the eyeblink, depend upon the cerebellum. In examining mechanisms of eyeblink conditioning in rabbits, reversible inactivations of the control circuitry have begun to dissociate aspects of cerebellar cortical and nuclear function in memory consolidation. It was previously shown that post-training cerebellar cortical, but not nuclear, inactivations with the GABAA agonist muscimol prevented consolidation but these findings left open the question as to how final memory storage was partitioned across cortical and nuclear levels. Memory consolidation might be essentially cortical and directly disturbed by actions of the muscimol, or it might be nuclear, and sensitive to the raised excitability of the nuclear neurons following the loss of cortical inhibition. To resolve this question, we simultaneously inactivated cerebellar cortical lobule HVI and the anterior interpositus nucleus of rabbits during the post-training period, so protecting the nuclei from disinhibitory effects of cortical inactivation. Consolidation was impaired by these simultaneous inactivations. Because direct application of muscimol to the nuclei alone has no impact upon consolidation, we can conclude that post-training, consolidation processes and memory storage for eyeblink conditioning have critical cerebellar cortical components. The findings are consistent with a recent model that suggests the distribution of learning-related plasticity across cortical and nuclear levels is task-dependent. There can be transfer to nuclear or brainstem levels for control of high-frequency responses but learning with lower frequency response components, such as in eyeblink conditioning, remains mainly dependent upon cortical memory storage.

  9. Inferior Articular Cavity Injection of Sodium Hyaluronate in the Treatment of Anterior Temporomandibular Joint Disc Displacement%透明质酸钠关节下腔注射治疗颞下颌关节盘前移位的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁健; 龚忠诚; 凌彬; 林兆全

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨透明质酸钠治疗颞下颌关节盘前移位的临床疗效.方法:50例患者临床表现与核磁共振成像检查确诊为颞下颌关节盘前移位(可复性或不可复性),进行关节下腔灌洗及透明质酸钠注射治疗.观察分析治疗前、治疗1、2、3次和治疗后3个月临床疗效和Helkimo指数分析.结果:治疗1、2、3次、治疗后3个月与治疗前相比较,临床疗效及Helkimo指数差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),治疗3次与治疗后3个月差异无统计学意义.结论:应用透明质酸钠关节腔注射治疗颞下颌关节盘前移位具有良好的效果,治疗效果稳定.%Objective: To investigate the clinical efficacy of the sodium hyanuronate injection in the treatment of anterior temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement. Methods: Fifty cases with anterior TMJ disc displacement (with reduction or without reduction) were diagnosed by the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before management. All cases were treated with inferior articular cavity lavage of 2% lidocaine and injection of sodium hyaluronate. The treatment was performed for three times in every two weeks. Clinical features were evaluated before the treatment, after every injection and in the followed— up three months. Helkimo analysis was also applied to evaluate the function of TMJ before and after the treatment. Results; The clinical symptoms and Helkimo index of all the cases had been improved significantly after treatment (F<0. 05). The Helkimo index improved significantly with the prolongation of treatment. But there was no statistical difference of Helkimo index among the cases between the third injection and the post —treatment 3m. Conclusion: It suggested that the inferior articular cavity injection of sodium hyaluronate might be an effective therapy for anterior TMJ disc displacement with or without reduction.

  10. Cervicoplastia anterior Anterior cervicoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Gomes Patrocínio

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Muitos pacientes buscam correção estética da frouxidão da pele do pescoço, depósito de gordura na região submentoneana ou bandas de platisma. Em grande parte dos casos a ação medial, via cervicoplastia anterior é necessária. OBJETIVO: Demonstrar a casuística e avaliar os resultados e complicações com a técnica de cervicoplastia anterior no Serviço de Otorrinolaringologia da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Relato de série. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Quarenta e dois pacientes, entre 39 e 65 anos de idade, sendo 40 (95,2% do sexo feminino e 2 (4,8% do masculino, foram submetidos a cervicoplastia anterior. Retrospectivamente foram avaliados resultados e complicações. RESULTADOS: Destes, 34 apresentaram resultados satisfatórios, 4 apresentaram déficit estético notado somente pelo cirurgião, 3 apresentaram déficit estético notado somente pelo paciente e 1 apresentou déficit estético necessitando cirurgia revisional. Ao estudo fotográfico, todos os pacientes apresentaram melhora do perfil cervical, redução das bandas de platisma e da frouxidão da pele, estabilização da musculatura cervical e acentuação do ângulo cervicomental, em graus variados. Houve complicação em 2 casos (discreto serohematoma e cicatriz um pouco alargada. CONCLUSÃO: A cervicoplastia, associada ou não à tração lateral pela ritidoplastia, é uma técnica que produz resultados satisfatórios na grande maioria dos casos.Many patients look for aesthetic correction of the laxity of neck skin, submandibular fat deposit or platisma bands. In a large part of the cases, medial action, through anterior cervicoplasty is necessary. AIM: To demonstrate the casuistic and to evaluate the results and complications with anterior cervicoplasty technique in the Otorhinolaryngology Service of the Federal University of Uberlândia. STUDY DESIGN: Serie report. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-two patients, between 39 and 65 years of age, being 40 (95

  11. Cerebellar fMRI Activation Increases with Increasing Working Memory Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küper, M; Kaschani, P; Thürling, M; Stefanescu, M R; Burciu, R G; Göricke, S; Maderwald, S; Ladd, M E; Hautzel, H; Timmann, D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore cerebellar contributions to the central executive in n-back working memory tasks using 7-T functional magnetic imaging (fMRI). We hypothesized that cerebellar activation increased with increasing working memory demands. Activations of the cerebellar cortex and dentate nuclei were compared between 0-back (serving as a motor control task), 1-back, and 2-back working memory tasks for both verbal and abstract modalities. A block design was used. Data of 27 participants (mean age 26.6 ± 3.8 years, female/male 12:15) were included in group statistical analysis. We observed that cerebellar cortical activations increased with higher central executive demands in n-back tasks independent of task modality. As confirmed by subtraction analyses, additional bilateral activations following higher executive demands were found primarily in four distinct cerebellar areas: (i) the border region of lobule VI and crus I, (ii) inferior parts of the lateral cerebellum (lobules crus II, VIIb, VIII, IX), (iii) posterior parts of the paravermal cerebellar cortex (lobules VI, crus I, crus II), and (iv) the inferior vermis (lobules VI, VIIb, VIII, IX). Dentate activations were observed for both verbal and abstract modalities. Task-related increases were less robust and detected for the verbal n-back tasks only. These results provide further evidence that the cerebellum participates in an amodal bilateral neuronal network representing the central executive during working memory n-back tasks. PMID:26202670

  12. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S.; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Mi...

  13. 关节镜外侧半月板下入路技术用于外侧半月板前角层裂下层的切除%Arthroscopic Resection of the Inferior Leaf of the Anterior Horn through Sub-meniscal Route for Horizontal Tear of the Lateral Meniscus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫辉; 崔国庆; 敖英芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of arthroscopic partial meniseectomy via sub-meniscal route for unstable inferior leaf of the anterior horn in horizontal tear of the lateral meniscus. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2010, 10 patients with horizontal tear in the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy through submeniscal route. Three routes, anteromedial, anterolateral, and sub-meniscal route, were employed in our patients. An arthroscope was placed via an anteromedial route, and then the superior leaf of the anterior horn was averted by a probe through the anterolateral route for a better visualization of the lesion. Finally the inferior leaf of the anterior horn was excised with a punch through the sub-meniscal route. Results No postoperative complications occurred in our patients. They were followed up for 12 -45 months with a mean of 18.9 months, during which, 9 patients had the pain in the knee joints disappeared completely, and the other occasionally had the knee joint pain after doing sports. The flexion range of the knee joints recovered to a normal range in all the 10 patients, and the Lysholm score increased from 68.7 ± 12. 9 preoperation to 94. 4 ±5.7 ( paired t test, t=7.79, P = 0.00). Conclusion Sub-meniscal route provides a safe and effective alternative for resection of the interior leaf of the anterior horn for horizontal tear of the lateral meniscus.%目的 探讨关节镜外侧半月板下入路切除外侧半月板前角下层的效果. 方法 2008年1月~2010年12月,对10例外侧半月板前角层裂采用关节镜外侧半月板下入路切除外侧半月板前角层裂中不稳定的下层.采用3个入路:膝前外侧入路,前内侧入路及外侧半月板下入路.自前内侧入路置入关节镜观察;经前外侧入路使用探沟翻转层裂上层,并尽可能显露下层;经外侧半月板下入路使用直头Punch(篮钳)切除半月板前角层裂的下层. 结果

  14. Cerebellar substrates for error correction in motor conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, M A; Allen, M T; Myers, C E; Thompson, R F

    2001-11-01

    The authors evaluate a mapping of Rescorla and Wagner's (1972) behavioral model of classical conditioning onto the cerebellar substrates for motor reflex learning and illustrate how the limitations of the Rescorla-Wagner model are just as useful as its successes for guiding the development of new psychobiological theories of learning. They postulate that the inhibitory pathway that returns conditioned response information from the cerebellar interpositus nucleus back to the inferior olive is the neural basis for the error correction learning proposed by Rescorla and Wagner (Gluck, Myers, & Thompson, 1994; Thompson, 1986). The authors' cerebellar model expects that behavioral processes described by the Rescorla-Wagner model will be localized within the cerebellum and related brain stem structures, whereas behavioral processes beyond the scope of the Rescorla-Wagner model will depend on extracerebellar structures such as the hippocampus and related cortical regions. Simulations presented here support both implications. Several novel implications of the authors' cerebellar error-correcting model are described including a recent empirical study by Kim, Krupa, and Thompson (1998), who verified that suppressing the putative error correction pathway should interfere with the Kamin (1969) blocking effect, a behavioral manifestation of error correction learning. The authors also discuss the model's implications for understanding the limits of cerebellar contributions to associative learning and how this informs our understanding of hippocampal function in conditioning. This leads to a more integrative view of the neural substrates of conditioning in which the authors' real-time circuit-level model of the cerebellum can be viewed as a generalization of the long-term memory module of Gluck and Myers' (1993) trial-level theory of cerebellar-hippocampal interaction in motor conditioning.

  15. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  16. Tract Profiles of the Cerebellar White Matter Pathways in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Yael; Travis, Katherine E; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Yeom, Kristen W; Feldman, Heidi M

    2015-12-01

    Intact development of cerebellar connectivity is essential for healthy neuromotor and neurocognitive development. To date, limited knowledge about the microstructural properties of the cerebellar peduncles, the major white matter tracts of the cerebellum, is available for children and adolescents. Such information would be useful as a comparison for studies of normal development, clinical conditions, or associations of cerebellar structures with cognitive and motor functions. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the variability in diffusion measures of the cerebellar peduncles within individuals and within a normative sample of healthy children. Participants were 19 healthy children and adolescents, aged 9-17 years, mean age 13.0 ± 2.3. We analyzed diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data with deterministic tractography. We generated tract profiles for each of the cerebellar peduncles by extracting four diffusion properties (fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean, radial, and axial diffusivity) at 30 equidistant points along each tract. We were able to identify the middle cerebellar peduncle and the bilateral inferior and superior cerebellar peduncles in all participants. The results showed that within each of the peduncles, the diffusion properties varied along the trajectory of the tracts. However, the tracts showed consistent patterns of variation across individuals; the coefficient of variation for FA across individual profiles was low (≤20%) for each tract. We observed no systematic variation of the diffusion properties with age. These cerebellar tract profiles of the cerebellar peduncles can serve as a reference for future studies of children across the age range and for children and adolescents with clinical conditions that affect the cerebellum.

  17. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease.

  18. Metastatic cerebellar tumor of papillary thyroid carcinoma mimicking cerebellar hemangioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ideguchi, Makoto; Nishizaki, Takafumi; Ikeda, Norio; Nakano, Shigeki; Okamura, Tomomi; Fujii, Natsumi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Ikeda, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma generally (PTC) have a favorable prognosis. This metastasis is rare in the central nervous system. Brain metastasis has a relatively poor prognosis. We present a rare case of cerebellar metastasis, one that mimics a solid type cerebellar hemangioblastoma and because of which it was very hard to reach accurate preoperative diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis was challenging because of the similar imaging and histopathological findings for ...

  19. Automated cerebellar lobule segmentation with application to cerebellar structural analysis in cerebellar disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Ye, Chuyang; Bogovic, John A; Carass, Aaron; Jedynak, Bruno M; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L

    2016-02-15

    The cerebellum plays an important role in both motor control and cognitive function. Cerebellar function is topographically organized and diseases that affect specific parts of the cerebellum are associated with specific patterns of symptoms. Accordingly, delineation and quantification of cerebellar sub-regions from magnetic resonance images are important in the study of cerebellar atrophy and associated functional losses. This paper describes an automated cerebellar lobule segmentation method based on a graph cut segmentation framework. Results from multi-atlas labeling and tissue classification contribute to the region terms in the graph cut energy function and boundary classification contributes to the boundary term in the energy function. A cerebellar parcellation is achieved by minimizing the energy function using the α-expansion technique. The proposed method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation on 15 subjects including both healthy controls and patients with cerebellar diseases. Based on reported Dice coefficients, the proposed method outperforms two state-of-the-art methods. The proposed method was then applied to 77 subjects to study the region-specific cerebellar structural differences in three spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) genetic subtypes. Quantitative analysis of the lobule volumes shows distinct patterns of volume changes associated with different SCA subtypes consistent with known patterns of atrophy in these genetic subtypes. PMID:26408861

  20. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palau Francesc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000, ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000 and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000. Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder, ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1, and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning, electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia.

  1. Cerebellar Malformations and Cognitive Disdorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral developmental profile of 27 children and adults (17 males and 10 females with congenital cerebellar malformations was determined in a clinical, neuroradiological and neuropsychological study at the Scientific Institute 'E Medea', University of Milano, Italy.

  2. Incarcerated inferior lumbar (Petit's) hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astarcioğlu, H; Sökmen, S; Atila, K; Karademir, S

    2003-09-01

    Petit's hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall defect in the inferior lumbar triangle. Colonic incarceration through the inferior lumbar triangle, which causes mechanical obstructive symptoms, necessitates particular diagnostic and management strategy. We present a rare case of inferior lumbar hernia, leading to mechanical bowel obstruction, successfully treated with prosthetic mesh reinforcement repair.

  3. Spontaneous cluster activity in the inferior olivary nucleus in brainstem slices from postnatal mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C; Reveles Jensen, Kristian; Jahnsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    largely unknown. Here we show that the IO in in vitro slices from postnatal mice spontaneously generates clusters of neurons with synchronous Ca2+ transients. Neurons in the principal olive (PO), and the vestibular-related dorsomedial cell column (dmcc), showed an age-dependent increase in spontaneous......A distinctive property of the cerebellar system is olivocerebellar modules, where synchronized electrical activity in neurons in the inferior olivary nucleus (IO) evokes organized activity in the cerebellar cortex. However, the exact function of these modules, and how they are developed, is still...

  4. Cerebellar Lingula Size and Experiential Risk Factors Associated with High Levels of Alcohol and Drug Use in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Carl M.; Rabi, Keren; Lukas, Scott E.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have reported cerebellar abnormalities or static ataxia associated with risk for chronic use of alcohol and drugs. Adverse childhood experience (ACE) is another strong risk factor for later substance abuse. We therefore, sought to ascertain the relationship between morphological phenotypes of the lingula (Lobule I) of the anterior cerebellar vermis (ACV), and exposure to emotional (EM) versus physical (PM) maltreatment,on the degree of ongoing alcohol or drug use. The study d...

  5. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  6. Labeling of the cerebellar peduncles using a supervised Gaussian classifier with volumetric tract segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chuyang; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Bogovic, John A.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2012-02-01

    The cerebellar peduncles are white matter tracts that play an important role in the communication of the cerebellum with other regions of the brain. They can be grouped into three fiber bundles: inferior cerebellar peduncle middle cerebellar peduncle, and superior cerebellar peduncle. Their automatic segmentation on diffusion tensor images would enable a better understanding of the cerebellum and would be less time-consuming and more reproducible than manual delineation. This paper presents a method that automatically labels the three fiber bundles based on the segmentatin results from the diffusion oriented tract segmentation (DOTS) algorithm, which achieves volume segmentation of white matter tracts using a Markov random field (MRF) framework. We use the DOTS labeling result as a guide to determine the classification of fibers produced by wild bootstrap probabilistic tractography. Mean distances from each fiber to each DOTS volume label are defined and then used as features that contribute to classification. A supervised Gaussian classifier is employed to label the fibers. Manually delineated cerebellar peduncles serve as training data to determine the parameters of class probabilities for each label. Fibers are labeled ad the class that has the highest posterior probability. An outlier detection ste[ re,pves fober tracts that belong to noise of that are not modeled by DOTS. Experiments show a successful classification of the cerebellar peduncles. We have also compared results between successive scans to demonstrate the reproducibility of the proposed method.

  7. Isolated inferior mesenteric portal hypertension with giant inferior mesenteric vein and anomalous inferior mesenteric vein insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Raghavendra Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extrahepatic portal hypertension is not an uncommon disease in childhood, but isolated inferior mesenteric portal varices and lower gastrointestinal (GI bleed have not been reported till date. A 4-year-old girl presented with lower GI bleed. Surgical exploration revealed extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with giant inferior mesenteric vein and colonic varices. Inferior mesenteric vein was joining the superior mesenteric vein. The child was treated successfully with inferior mesenteric - inferior vena caval anastomosis. The child was relieved of GI bleed during the follow-up.

  8. Cognition and Emotion in Cerebellar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Cognition and Emotion in Cerebellar Disorders Are problems in the areas of cognition and ... active investigation. Why is this important for the ataxia patient? Cerebellar patients and families generally find it helpful to ...

  9. Familial cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, I C; O'Malley, B P; Young, I D

    1988-01-01

    Two sisters are reported who both developed partial cranial diabetes insipidus in their 4th decade, followed by progressive cerebellar ataxia. This appears to be the first report of cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus occurring together as a genetic entity.

  10. Altered Functional Connectivity of Cognitive-Related Cerebellar Subregions in Well-Recovered Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum contains several cognitive-related subregions that are involved in different functional networks. The cerebellar crus II is correlated with the frontoparietal network (FPN, whereas the cerebellar IX is associated with the default-mode network (DMN. These two networks are anticorrelated and cooperatively implicated in cognitive control, which may facilitate the motor recovery in stroke patients. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC changes in 25 subcortical ischemic stroke patients with well-recovered global motor function. Consistent with previous studies, the crus II was correlated with the FPN, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and posterior parietal cortex, and the cerebellar IX was correlated with the DMN, including the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/Pcu, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, DLPFC, lateral parietal cortices, and anterior temporal cortices. No significantly increased rsFCs of these cerebellar subregions were found in stroke patients, suggesting that the rsFCs of the cognitive-related cerebellar subregions are not the critical factors contributing to the recovery of motor function in stroke patients. The finding of the disconnection in the cerebellar-related cognitive control networks may possibly explain the deficits in cognitive control function even in stroke patients with well-recovered global motor function.

  11. Direct transcranial puncture for Onyx embolization of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Evans, Avery J; Liu, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Intracranial hemangioblastomas are benign but hypervascular tumors, most commonly located in the cerebellum, which are difficult to resect without significant operative blood loss. While preoperative embolization may decrease the amount of operative bleeding, the vascular supply of cerebellar hemangioblastomas frequently precludes safe embolization by an endovascular route due to the risk of thromboembolic vertebrobasilar infarction. Direct puncture embolization overcomes many of the limitations of endovascular embolization but its safety and feasibility for intracranial tumors is unknown. We report a 48-year-old man who was diagnosed with a large cerebellar mass after presenting with headaches and gait ataxia. Based on diagnostic angiography, which demonstrated a highly vascular tumor supplied by the posterior inferior cerebellar and posterior meningeal arteries, we decided to embolize the tumor by a direct transcranial puncture approach. After trephinating the skull in a standard fashion, a catheter-needle construct, composed of an Echelon 10 microcatheter (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN, USA) placed into a 21-gauge spinal needle, was inserted into the tumor under biplanar angiographic guidance. Using continuous angiographic monitoring, 9cc of Onyx 34 (ev3 Endovascular) was injected through the catheter, resulting in 75% tumor devascularization without evidence of complications. The patient was taken directly to surgery where a gross total resection of the hemangioblastoma was achieved with an acceptable operative blood loss. At his 2 year follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact without neuroimaging evidence of residual tumor. We describe, to our knowledge, the first case of direct transcranial puncture for preoperative embolization of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma. PMID:24370504

  12. A rare case of cerebellar agenesis: a probabilistic Constrained Spherical Deconvolution tractographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormina, Enricomaria; Briguglio, Marilena; Morabito, Rosa; Arrigo, Alessandro; Marino, Silvia; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Micalizzi, Alessia; Valente, Enza Maria; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Vinci, Sergio Lucio; Longo, Marcello; Granata, Francesca

    2016-03-01

    Aim of this study is to show the potential of probabilistic tractographic techniques, based on the Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD) algorithms, in recognizing white matter fiber bundle anomalies in patients with complex cerebral malformations, such as cerebellar agenesis. The morphological and tractographic study of a 17-year-old male patient affected by cerebellar agenesis was performed by using a 3Tesla MRI scanner. Genetic and neuropsychological tests were carried out. An MRI morphological study showed the absence of both cerebellar hemispheres and the flattening of the anterior side of the pons. Moreover, it showed a severe vermian hypoplasia with a minimal vermian residual. The study recognized two thin cerebellar remnants, medially in contact with the small vermian residual, at the pontine level. The third ventricle, morphologically normal, communicated with a permagna cerebello-medullary cistern. Probabilistic CSD tractography identified some abnormal and aberrant infratentorial tracts, symmetrical on both sides. In particular, the transverse pontine fibers were absent and the following tracts with aberrant trajectories have been identified: "cerebello-thalamic" tracts; "fronto-cerebellar" tracts; and ipsilateral and contralateral "spino-cerebellar" tracts. Abnormal tracts connecting the two thin cerebellar remnants have also been detected. There were no visible alterations in the main supratentorial tracts in either side. Neuropsychiatric evaluation showed moderate cognitive-motor impairment with discrete adaptive compensation. Probabilistic CSD tractography is a promising technique that overcome reconstruction biases of other diffusion tensor-based approaches and allowed us to recognize, in a patient with cerebellar agenesis, abnormal tracts and aberrant trajectories of normally existing tracts. PMID:25832852

  13. Patterns of spontaneous and head-shaking nystagmus in cerebellar infarction: imaging correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Young Eun; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Horizontal head-shaking may induce nystagmus in peripheral as well as central vestibular lesions. While the patterns and mechanism of head-shaking nystagmus are well established in peripheral vestibulopathy, they require further exploration in central vestibular disorders. To define the characteristics and mechanism of head-shaking nystagmus in central vestibulopathies, we investigated spontaneous nystagmus and head-shaking nystagmus in 72 patients with isolated cerebellar infarction. Spontaneous nystagmus was observed in 28 (39%) patients, and was mostly ipsilesional when observed in unilateral infarction (15/18, 83%). Head-shaking nystagmus developed in 37 (51%) patients, and the horizontal component of head-shaking nystagmus was uniformly ipsilesional when induced in patients with unilateral infarction. Perverted head-shaking nystagmus occurred in 23 (23/37, 62%) patients and was mostly downbeat (22/23, 96%). Lesion subtraction analyses revealed that damage to the uvula, nodulus and inferior tonsil was mostly responsible for generation of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with unilateral posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction. Ipsilesional head-shaking nystagmus in patients with unilateral cerebellar infarction may be explained by unilateral disruption of uvulonodular inhibition over the velocity storage. Perverted (downbeat) head-shaking nystagmus may be ascribed to impaired control over the spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex due to uvulonodular lesions or a build-up of vertical vestibular asymmetry favouring upward bias due to lesions involving the inferior tonsil.

  14. Luxatio erecta: Inferior glenohumeral dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Baba Asif; Bhat Javid; Paljor S; Mir Naseer; Majid Suhail

    2007-01-01

    Inferior dislocation of the shoulder, also called luxatio erecta, is a rare form of the otherwise common shoulder dislocation. It accounts for less than 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. A case involving the inferior dislocation of the shoulder is reported. A brief review of the presentation and management of the condition is described.

  15. Luxatio erecta: Inferior glenohumeral dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Asif

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inferior dislocation of the shoulder, also called luxatio erecta, is a rare form of the otherwise common shoulder dislocation. It accounts for less than 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. A case involving the inferior dislocation of the shoulder is reported. A brief review of the presentation and management of the condition is described.

  16. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  17. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  18. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  19. Impaired cerebellar functional connectivity in schizophrenia patients and their healthy siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guusje eCollin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The long-standing notion of schizophrenia as a disorder of connectivity is supported by emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies, suggesting impairments of both structural and functional connectivity in schizophrenia. However, investigations are generally restricted to supratentorial brain regions, thereby excluding the cerebellum. As increasing evidence suggests that the cerebellum contributes to cognitive and affective processing, aberrant connectivity in schizophrenia may include cerebellar dysconnectivity. Moreover, as schizophrenia is highly heritable, unaffected family members of schizophrenia patients may exhibit similar connectivity profiles. The present study applies resting-state fMRI to determine cerebellar functional connectivity profiles, and the familial component of cerebellar connectivity profiles, in 62 schizophrenia patients and 67 siblings of schizophrenia patients. Compared to healthy control subjects, schizophrenia patients showed impaired functional connectivity between the cerebellum and several left-sided cerebral regions, including the hippocampus, thalamus, middle cingulate gyrus, triangular part of the inferior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area and lingual gyrus (all p<0.0025, whole brain significant. Importantly, siblings of schizophrenia patients showed several similarities to patients in cerebellar functional connectivity, suggesting that cerebellar dysconnectivity in schizophrenia might be related to familial factors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that dysconnectivity in schizophrenia involves the cerebellum and that this defect may be related to the risk to develop the illness.

  20. Inferior Turbinate Flap for Nasal-side Closure of Palatal Fistula in Cleft Patients: Technical Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Rahpeyma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Residual palatal fistula after repair of palatal cleft is common. Repair of residual oronasal fistula is not always successful. Two-layer closure techniques that close these fistulas with soft tissue are a common practice. Turnover flaps are the most used flaps and often the sole method for nasal-side closure of fistula. Anteriorly based inferior turbinate flap can be used to provide soft tissue for nasal-side closure when turnover flaps will not provide sufficient tissue for this purpose. Under general anesthesia with nasotracheal intubation, inferior turbinate was released from posterior attachment. After removing the inferior conchal bone, mucoperiosteal flap was used for nasal-side closure of anterior palatal fistula in patients with cleft. Anteriorly based inferior turbinate flap was used for nasal-side closure of residual palatal fistula in 3 patients with cleft. Age of the patients was 14, 16, and 18, and recurrence of palatal fistula has not occurred. Anteriorly based inferior turbinate flap is an axial pattern flap with appropriate surface of the paddle and vicinity to the oral cavity roof. It can be used in large anterior, palatal fistula for reconstruction of nasal floor. Considering appropriate another flap for oral side coverage of such fistula is mandatory.

  1. Altered corticomotor-cerebellar integrity in young ataxia telangiectasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahama, Ishani; Sinclair, Kate; Fiori, Simona; Pannek, Kerstin; Lavin, Martin; Rose, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research in identifying altered brain structure and function in ataxia-telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, is limited. Diffusion-weighted MRI were obtained from 11 ataxia telangiectasia patients (age range, 7-22 years; mean, 12 years) and 11 typically developing age-matched participants (age range, 8-23 years; mean, 13 years). Gray matter volume alterations in patients were compared with those of healthy controls using voxel-based morphometry, whereas tract-based spatial statistics was employed to elucidate white matter microstructure differences between groups. White matter microstructure was probed using quantitative fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity measures. Reduced gray matter volume in both cerebellar hemispheres and in the precentral-postcentral gyrus in the left cerebral hemisphere was observed in ataxia telangiectasia patients compared with controls (P < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). A significant reduction in fractional anisotropy in the cerebellar hemispheres, anterior/posterior horns of the medulla, cerebral peduncles, and internal capsule white matter, particularly in the left posterior limb of the internal capsule and corona radiata in the left cerebral hemisphere, was observed in patients compared with controls (P < 0.05). Mean diffusivity differences were observed within the left cerebellar hemisphere and the white matter of the superior lobule of the right cerebellar hemisphere (P < 0.05). Cerebellum-localized gray matter changes are seen in young ataxia telangiectasia patients along with white matter tract degeneration projecting from the cerebellum into corticomotor regions. The lack of cortical involvement may reflect early-stage white matter motor pathway degeneration within young patients. PMID:25042086

  2. Feasibility evaluation on preservation of left colonic artery in dealing with inferior mesenteric artery in laparoscopic anterior resection of rectal carcinoma%腹腔镜直肠癌前切除术中处理肠系膜下动脉时保留左结肠动脉的可行性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁志林; 王博; 杨雁灵; 李强

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨腹腔镜直肠癌前切除术中处理肠系膜下动脉(IMA)时保留左结肠动脉(LCA)的可行性与应用价值.方法 回顾性分析2010年4月至2013年10月72例腹腔镜直肠癌前切除术患者的临床资料,患者按随机数字表法分为两组,其中保留LCA 32例(观察组),不保留LCA40例(对照组),比较两组术中出血量、手术时间、术后排气时间、末端回肠造口情况、IMA根部淋巴结清扫数目、IMA根部淋巴结转移及预后情况.结果 观察组和对照组术中出血量、手术时间、术后排气时间、IMA根部淋巴结清扫数目、IMA根部淋巴结转移率比较差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).观察组均无需游离结肠脾区及做末端回肠造口;而对照组3例因近端肠管血运障碍需游离结肠脾曲(P=0.046),4例吻合后加做末端回肠造口(P=0.042).观察组术后无吻合口漏,而对照组术后有2例吻合口漏(P=0.090).两组术后随访6~48个月,局部复发率及肝转移率比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 腹腔镜直肠癌前切除术中处理IMA时保留LCA可以有效保障近端肠管血运.%Objective To explore the feasibility and value of preservation of left colonic artery (LCA) in dealing with inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) in laparoscopic anterior resection of rectal carcinoma.Methods The clinical data of 72 cases of laparoscopic anterior resection of rectal carcinoma from April 2010 to October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed including 32 cases with preservation of LCA (observation group) and 40 cases without preservation of LCA (control group).The blood loss,operative time,postoperative exhaust time,terminal ileum stoma,the number of lymph nodes removed around the root of IMA,the rate of lymph node metastasis around the root of IMA and prognosis were compared between two groups.Results There was no significant difference in the blood loss,operative time,postoperative exhaust time,terminal ileum stoma,the number

  3. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as Fried

  4. Cerebellar medulloblastoma presenting with skeletal metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Barai Sukanta; Bandopadhayaya G; Julka P; Dhanapathi H; Haloi A; Seith A

    2004-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are highly malignant brain tumours, but only rarely produce skeletal metastases. No case of medulloblastoma has been documented to have produced skeletal metastases prior to craniotomy or shunt surgery. A 21-year-old male presented with pain in the hip and lower back with difficulty in walking of 3 months′ duration. Signs of cerebellar dysfunction were present hence a diagnosis of cerebellar neoplasm or skeletal tuberculosis with cerebellar abscess formation was consid...

  5. Crossed cerebral - cerebellar diaschisis : MRI evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available MRI, done later in life, in two patients with infantile hemiplegia syndrome showed significant volume loss in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the side of the affected cerebrum. The cerebellar volume loss seemed to correlate with the degree of volume loss in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. These observations provide morphological evidence of the phenomenon of crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis (CCD. Functional neuroimaging studies in support of the concept of CCD has been critically reviewed.

  6. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias : the current state of affairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; van de Warrenburg, B. P. C.; Willemsen, M. A. A. P.; Cluitmans, M.; Scheffer, H.; Kremer, B. P.; Knoers, N. V. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the hereditary ataxias, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCAs) encompass a diverse group of rare neurodegenerative disorders in which a cerebellar syndrome is the key clinical feature. The clinical overlap between the different cerebellar ataxias, the occasional atypical phenotypes, an

  7. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion in brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnouchi, Seishi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishii, Ryuuichi; Futami, Shigemi; Tamura, Shozo [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi

    2000-10-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a well-known brain SPECT finding in stroke patients. Few reports, however, have described supratentorial and contralateral cerebellar hyperperfusion (crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion, CCH). We assessed the incidence of CCH in 33 patients with cerebral hyperperfusion. Brain SPECT showed CCH in five patients out of 20 epilepsy and three of 13 patients with acute encephalitis. These eight patients with CCH had recent epileptic attack. CCH was found in ECD SPECT as well as HM-PAO. The contralateral cerebellar activity correlated with the cerebral activity in patients with CCH. CCH would have a relation with supratentrial hyperfunction in epilepsy and acute encephalitis. (author)

  8. [Peripheral neuropathies associated with hereditary cerebellar ataxias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, M; Tranchant, C

    2011-01-01

    Inherited cerebellar ataxias constitute a complicated and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting the cerebellum and/or spinocerebellar tract, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. A peripheral neuropathy is frequently seen in inherited cerebellar ataxias although it rarely reveals the disease. Moreover, the peripheral neuropathy is helpful for the diagnostic procedure and contributes to the functional prognosis of the disease. Thus, electroneuromyography is essential in the algorithm for the diagnosis of inherited cerebellar ataxias, as well as brain MRI (looking especially for cerebellar atrophy) and the assessment of several biomarkers (alpha-foetoprotein, vitamin E, albumin, LDL cholesterol, lactic acid, phytanic acid).

  9. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P.; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Dylan J.; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M.; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R. Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A.; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S. Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar–motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar–thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  10. Fetal MRI and antenatal diagnosis of unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Houda El Mhabrech; Ahmed Zrig; Chiraz Hafsa

    2015-01-01

    Focal cerebellar hypoplasia is restricted to one cerebellar hemisphere or to the vermis. Prenatal diagnosis of unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia is possible by the use of ultrasound and MRI. Familiarity with the prenatal MRI findings is essential to recognize cerebellar pathologies accurately and prospectively. We present US and MRI findings in a fetus with cerebellar malformation at 20 weeks gestation. The goal of our case report is to present the fetal MRI findings of unilateral cerebellar h...

  11. Cerebellar activation in verb generation. Activation study with positron emission tomography in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Eriko [Inst. for Rehabilitation and Mental Health, Kyowa, Akita (Japan); Kanno, Iwao; Sadato, Norihiro; Senda, Michio; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagata, Ken

    1999-06-01

    To investigate the role of cerebellum in language function, we used the silent verb generation task in PET activation study. Subjects were 11 right-handed, healthy men with the mean age of 24.3. We used two experimental conditions, resting state and verb generation, and measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) alternately and repeatedly, three times for each condition. In the verb generation task, the subject was asked to silently think of as many verbs associated with auditorily given noun as he could. The subtraction image between verb generation and resting state showed activation foci at the left inferior to middle frontal lobe as well as temporal lobe in the supratentorium, consistent with previous studies. In the infratentorium, there were significant foci at bilateral cerebellar hemisphere and brain stem, which was predominantly seen over the right cerebellum. Activations were seen in the superior-lateral part of the right cerebellar hemisphere including the right dentate nucleus, and in the inferior-lateral part of the left cerebellar hemisphere. The amount of CBF increase by the task as compared with the resting condition in the upper cerebellum showed an increasing trend from the first to the third measurement. The present results suggest specific roles of the cerebellum in word retrieval as well as the practice-related changes during verbal learning. (author)

  12. Right anterior superior temporal activation predicts auditory sentence comprehension following aphasic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinion, Jenny; Price, Cathy J

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have suggested that recovery of speech comprehension after left hemisphere infarction may depend on a mechanism in the right hemisphere. However, the role that distinct right hemisphere regions play in speech comprehension following left hemisphere stroke has not been established. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate narrative speech activation in 18 neurologically normal subjects and 17 patients with left hemisphere stroke and a history of aphasia. Activation for listening to meaningful stories relative to meaningless reversed speech was identified in the normal subjects and in each patient. Second level analyses were then used to investigate how story activation changed with the patients' auditory sentence comprehension skills and surprise story recognition memory tests post-scanning. Irrespective of lesion site, performance on tests of auditory sentence comprehension was positively correlated with activation in the right lateral superior temporal region, anterior to primary auditory cortex. In addition, when the stroke spared the left temporal cortex, good performance on tests of auditory sentence comprehension was also correlated with the left posterior superior temporal cortex (Wernicke's area). In distinct contrast to this, good story recognition memory predicted left inferior frontal and right cerebellar activation. The implication of this double dissociation in the effects of auditory sentence comprehension and story recognition memory is that left frontal and left temporal activations are dissociable. Our findings strongly support the role of the right temporal lobe in processing narrative speech and, in particular, auditory sentence comprehension following left hemisphere aphasic stroke. In addition, they highlight the importance of the right anterior superior temporal cortex where the response was dissociated from that in the left posterior temporal lobe.

  13. The clinical presentation of preterm cerebellar haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Ecury-Goossen (Ginette); J. Dudink (Jeroen); M. Leguin (Maarten); M. Feijen-Roon (Monique); S. Horsch (Sandra); P. Govaert (Paul)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to evaluate clinical symptoms and findings on cranial ultrasound (CUS) in preterm infants with cerebellar haemorrhage through retrospective analysis of all preterm infants with a postnatal CUS or MRI diagnosis of cerebellar haemorrhage admitted in a tertia

  14. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling using vasopressin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kotwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Anatomical localization of pituitary adenoma can be challenging in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, and bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS is considered gold standard in this regard. Stimulation using corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH improves the sensitivity of BIPSS, however, same is not easily available in India. Therefore, we undertook this study of BIPPS using vasopressin as agent for stimulation owing to its ability to stimulate V3 receptors present on corticotrophs. Aims: To study the tumor localization and lateralization in difficult to localize cases of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome by bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling using vasopressin for corticotroph stimulation. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: Six patients (5 females meeting inclusion criteria underwent BIPSS using vasopressin for stimulation. Results: All six patients had nonsuppressible overnight and low dose dexamethasone suppression test with elevated plasma ACTH levels suggestive of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. High dose dexamethasone suppression test showed suppressible cortisol in two cases, and microadenoma was seen in two patients on magnetic resonance imaging pituitary. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen showed left adrenal hyperplasia in one case and anterior mediastinal mass with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia another. Using BIPSS four patients were classified as having Cushing's disease that was confirmed histopathologically following surgery. Of the remaining two, one had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, and another had thymic carcinoid with ectopic ACTH production as the cause of Cushing's syndrome. No serious adverse events were noted. Conclusions: Vasopressin may be used instead of CRH and desmopressin for stimulation in BIPSS.

  15. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  16. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  17. Cerebellar stroke-manifesting as mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Jagadesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed.

  18. Comparison of inferior myocardial defect between planar and SPECT image of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine cardiac scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Momose, Mitsuru; Kashikura, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Nobusuke; Saito, Katsumi; Asano, Ryuta; Hosoda, Saichi; Kusakabe, Kiyoko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    Discordant findings of inferior MIBG defect between SPECT and planar images were sometimes observed in the clinical studies. In this study, we compared inferior myocardial findings between planar and SPECT image of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzyl-guanidine (MIBG) cardiac scintigraphy in 29 patients. All patients were estimated as normal in anterior accumulation of MIBG. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the visual finding of inferior defect in the planar and SPECT image; normal group (normal inferior accumulation of MIBG both in the planar and SPECT image, N=10), discordance group (inferior MIBG defect was only observed in the SPECT image, but was not observed in the planar image, N=7), inferior defect group (inferior MIBG defect was observed both in the planar and SPECT image, N=12). Inferior/anterior count ratio of SPECT and planar image were 0.96{+-}0.11 vs. 0.97{+-}0.05 in normal group, 0.59{+-}0.21 vs. 0.99{+-}0.13 in discordance group, 0.46{+-}0.13 vs. 0.82{+-}0.04 in inferior defect group. Liver/heart count ratio was significantly higher in the discordance group (2.07{+-}0.49) than that in the normal (1.14{+-}0.15) and inferior defect group (1.45{+-}0.39). In phantom study, it has been reported that increased liver accumulation of MIBG causes artifactual inferior defect adjacent to the liver. These data indicate that increased liver/heart count ratio may cause artifactual inferior defect on MIBG SPECT image in the clinical studies. Planar image evaluation may be helpful to distinct the artifactual inferior defect on SPECT image. (author).

  19. Sexual dimorphism of the cerebellar vermis in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womer, Fay Y; Tang, Yanqing; Harms, Michael P; Bai, Chuan; Chang, Miao; Jiang, Xiaowei; Wei, Shengnan; Wang, Fei; Barch, Deanna M

    2016-10-01

    Converging lines of evidence implicate structural and functional abnormalities in the cerebellum in schizophrenia (SCZ). The cerebellar vermis is of particular interest given its association with clinical symptoms and cognitive deficits in SCZ and its known connections with cortical regions such as the prefrontal cortex. Prior neuroimaging studies have shown structural and functional abnormalities in the vermis in SCZ. In this study, we examined the cerebellar vermis in 50 individuals with SCZ and 54 healthy controls (HC) using a quantitative volumetric approach. All participants underwent high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The vermis was manually traced for each participant, and vermis volumes were computed using semiautomated methods. Volumes for total vermis and vermis subregions (anterior and posterior vermis) were analyzed in the SCZ and HC groups. Significant diagnosis-by-sex interaction effects were found in total vermis and vermis subregion analyses. These effects appeared to be driven by significantly decreased posterior vermis volumes in males with SCZ. Exploratory analyses did not reveal significant effects of clinical variables (FEP status, illness duration, and BPRS total score and subscores) on vermis volumes. The findings herein highlight the presence of neural sex differences in SCZ and the need for considering sex-related factors in studying the disorder. PMID:27401530

  20. Tratamento cirúrgico do câncer da porção distal do têrço inferior do reto pela ressecção anterior ultrabaixa e interesfinctérica com anastomose coloanal por videolaparoscopia Surgical treatment of ultra-low rectal cancer by laparoscopic coloanal anastomosis and intersphincteric resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Reinan Ramos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar as complicações pós-operatórias, a duração da internação hospitalar, os resultados funcionais clínicos, e os resultados oncológicos num seguimento médio de 2,5 anos nos pacientes com câncer do reto distal submetidosà ressecção anterior ultrabaixa e interesfinctérica com anastomose coloanal por videolaparoscopia. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: De um total de 491 pacientes operados pelo acesso videolaparoscópico, foram selecionados para esse estudo prospectivo 13 doentes , nove do sexo feminino,com câncer da porção distal do reto inferior entre os 172 pacientes com câncer do reto.Nenhum tumor T4 ou com resposta completa à quimiorradioterapia foi selecionado. A quimiorradioterapia neo-adjuvante foi aplicada em 8 doentes. RESULTADOS: A taxa de complicaçãos pós-operatória foi de 23,1%., sendo de 7,7% o índice de fístula anastomótica. A mortalide foi nula. A alta hospitalar ocorreu até o 7° dia de pós-operatório para 8 pacientes (61,5%, 4 dos quais no quinto dia.. O número médio de linfonodos por peça foi 13. A margem distal média foi de 1,5 cm. A margem circunferencial foi positiva em um caso (7,7%. Evacuação fracionada foi relatada por 11 pacientes (91% e incontinência fecal por 5 pacientes (41%. Onze pacientes (84% estão satisfeitos com a operação. Um paciente continua ileostomizado (7,7%. Em um seguimento médio de 30 meses ocorreu uma recidiva local (7,7% e dois casos de metástase pulmonar (15,4 %. As três pacientes faleceram da doença. Dez pacientes (77% estão sem doença. CONCLUSÕES: Apesar da pequena casuística, a analise permitiu as seguintes conclusões: a A técnica empregada mostrou ser viável e segura, pois apresentou baixo índice de complicação pós-operatória e mortalidade nula; b O emprego dessa técnica permitiu período de internação hospitalar pós-operatório curto; c Apesar dos resultados funcionais com avaliação clínica regular, evitou-se a colostomia

  1. Inferior ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Associated with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Koeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM is usually characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning. Due to the clinical symptoms which include chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, and elevated myocardial markers, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is frequently mimicking ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the absence of a significant coronary artery disease. Otherwise an acute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery can produce a typical Takotsubo contraction pattern. ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI is frequently associated with emotional stress, but to date no cases of STEMI triggering TCM have been reported. We describe a case of a female patient with inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by TCM.

  2. Cortical Amyloid beta in cognitively normal elderly adults is associated with decreased network efficiency within the cerebro-cerebellar system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eSteininger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of cortical amyloid beta (Aβ is a correlate of aging and a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD. While several higher order cognitive processes involve functional interactions between cortex and cerebellum, this study aims to investigate effects of cortical Aβ deposition on coupling within the cerebro-cerebellar system. We included 15 healthy elderly subjects with normal cognitive performance as assessed by neuropsychological testing. Cortical Aβ was quantified using Pittsburgh Compound-B positron-emission-tomography (PiB-PET late frame signals. Volumes of brain structures were assessed by applying an automated parcellation algorithm to three dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo T1-weighted images. Basal functional network activity within the cerebro-cerebellar system was assessed using blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI at the high field strength of 7 Tesla for measuring coupling between cerebellar seeds and cerebral gray matter. A bivariate regression approach was applied for identification of brain regions with significant effects of individual cortical Aβ load on coupling.Consistent with earlier reports, a significant degree of positive and negative coupling could be observed between cerebellar seeds and cerebral voxels. Significant positive effects of cortical Aβ load on cerebro-cerebellar coupling resulted for cerebral brain regions located in inferior temporal lobe, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and thalamus. Our findings indicate that brain amyloidosis in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with decreased network efficiency within the cerebro-cerebellar system. While the identified cerebral regions are consistent with established patterns of increased sensitivity for Aβ associated neurodegeneration, additional studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between dysfunction of the cerebro-cerebellar

  3. Clinical characteristics and pathogenesis of cerebellar glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshinobu; Makino, Keishi; Nakamura, Hideo; Hide, Takuichiro; Yano, Shigetoshi; Kamada, Hajime; Kuratsu, Jun-Ichi

    2014-11-01

    Cerebellar glioblastomas (GBMs) are rare, with neither their pathogenesis nor prognosis being completely understood. The present study aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of cerebellar GBMs by comparison with supratentorial GBMs, focusing particularly on the pathogenesis. The clinical factors between cerebellar (n=10) and supratentorial (n=216) GBMs were compared. Additionally, p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) levels were investigated in six patients by immunostaining as well as the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) status of five patients by direct sequencing. Eight males and two females participated in the present study, the mean age at diagnosis was 56.6 years and the range 37-75 years. Four patients presented with hydrocephalus and one with brainstem involvement, and two patients were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1. Two patients had previously received radiotherapy, eight patients received postoperative radiotherapy and seven chemotherapy. The mean Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score was lower in patients with cerebellar GBMs compared to those with supratentorial GBM; however, the survival times did not differ between the two groups. All of the cases of six cerebellar GBMs were p53‑positive and EGFR‑negative, as detected by immunostaining, consistent with secondary GBM. However, no IDH1 mutations were detected in any of the five cases of cerebellar GBMs analyzed, indicating that these tumors were not of the secondary type. The KPS score with cerebellar GBMs may be lower due to hydrocephalus, which was ameliorated by surgery but may have impacted the survival rate. It was confirmed that cerebellar GBMs were identical to supratentorial GBMs with respect to its clinical features, with the possible exception of the KPS score. The present study's genetic analyses indicated that cerebellar GBMs may develop via a pathway different from that of either primary or secondary GBM. PMID:25199771

  4. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26499980

  5. Pediatric Neurocutaneous Syndromes with Cerebellar Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes encompasses a broad group of genetic disorders with different clinical, genetic, and pathologic features that share developmental lesions of the skin as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Cerebellar involvement has been shown in numerous types of neurocutaneous syndrome. It may help or be needed for the diagnosis and to explain the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of affected children. This article describes various types of neurocutaneous syndrome with cerebellar involvement. For each neurocutaneous disease or syndrome, clinical features, genetic, neuroimaging findings, and the potential role of the cerebellar involvement is discussed. PMID:27423801

  6. CT findings in cerebellar hemangioblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, E.; Albert, F.

    1982-02-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 16 personal cases of cerebellar hemangioblastomas are presented. Accordings to other reports in the literature, three-quarters of the tumours were cystic, containing a small mural nodule, whereas the others were predominantly solid. By CT scan the cystic tumours were always identified as roundish or oval space-occupying lesions, sharply demarcated from the surrounding tissue. The solid portion of these tumours, projecting into the cystic part, was delineated more precisely by contrast enhancement, but sometimes escaped identification. On the contrary, even after contrast enhancement the predominantly solid tumours could not be clearly identified as hemangioblastomas. Calcification could not be demonstrated. Additional angiographic investigations were imperative in order to establish the diagnosis, besides visualizing further hypervascular nodules of hemangioblastoma, which CT scanning failed to reveal.

  7. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  8. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology a

  9. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention.......Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  10. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Person

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the input-output function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor

  11. Training-induced improvements in postural control are accompanied by alterations in cerebellar white matter in brain injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Drijkoningen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether balance control in young TBI patients can be promoted by an 8-week balance training program and whether this is associated with neuroplastic alterations in brain structure. The cerebellum and cerebellar peduncles were selected as regions of interest because of their importance in postural control as well as their vulnerability to brain injury. Young patients with moderate to severe TBI and typically developing (TD subjects participated in balance training using PC-based portable balancers with storage of training data and real-time visual feedback. An additional control group of TD subjects did not attend balance training. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were determined with diffusion MRI scans and were acquired before, during (4 weeks and at completion of training (8 weeks together with balance assessments on the EquiTest® System (NeuroCom which included the Sensory Organization Test, Rhythmic Weight Shift and Limits of Stability protocols. Following training, TBI patients showed significant improvements on all EquiTest protocols, as well as a significant increase in mean diffusivity in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Moreover, in both training groups, diffusion metrics in the cerebellum and/or cerebellar peduncles at baseline were predictive of the amount of performance increase after training. Finally, amount of training-induced improvement on the Rhythmic Weight Shift test in TBI patients was positively correlated with amount of change in fractional anisotropy in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. This suggests that training-induced plastic changes in balance control are associated with alterations in the cerebellar white matter microstructure in TBI patients.

  12. Inferior mirages: an improved model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrew T

    2015-02-01

    A quantitative model of the inferior mirage is presented, based on a realistic temperature profile in the convective boundary layer, using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The top of the inverted image is determined by the logarithmic part of the profile; the bottom is the apparent horizon, which depends on optical obstruction by roughness elements. These effects of surface roughness are included in the model, which is illustrated with a simulation. The vertical magnification varies throughout the mirage, becoming infinite at Minnaert's ill-named "vanishing line"-which makes green flashes apparent to the naked eye. PMID:25967823

  13. Fetal MRI and antenatal diagnosis of unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houda El Mhabrech

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Focal cerebellar hypoplasia is restricted to one cerebellar hemisphere or to the vermis. Prenatal diagnosis of unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia is possible by the use of ultrasound and MRI. Familiarity with the prenatal MRI findings is essential to recognize cerebellar pathologies accurately and prospectively. We present US and MRI findings in a fetus with cerebellar malformation at 20 weeks gestation. The goal of our case report is to present the fetal MRI findings of unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia, to discuss the value of fetal MRI in the early diagnoses of this malformation and to summarize the current main stream literature concerning the etiology.

  14. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  15. POSITION OF CEREBELLAR TONSILS IN REFERENCE TO FORAMEN MAGNUM: AN MRI STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal position of the cerebellar tonsils is described to be at or above the foramen magnum. Western studies have shown the cerebellar tonsils to be below the foramen magnum. Position of tonsils is of great importance in assessing the hind brain deformity–Chiari malformation. There are no Indian studies to corroborate the findings. Hence, we proposed a basic study to find out the existence of tonsillar ectopia (Position of tonsils below the foramen magnum in normal population. Our study was conducted for a period of 8 months at the Radiology Department of SCTIMST, Trivandrum, Kerala; 515 patients with normal brain, spinal cord and normal craniovertebral junction (CVJ were selected from a group of patients who underwent MRI investigation of brain and cervical spine for various vague complaints. They ranged from 2 months to 80 years and of both sexes. Patients with raised intracranial tension and established CVJ anomalies were excluded. The study was done on the MR images obtained on the MR monitor directly during the scan. Foramen magnum and the inferior extent of cerebellar tonsils were marked. The position of the tonsils was noted in reference to foramen magnum and the data analysed. Tonsillar ectopia was noticed in 21% of the population. A downward descent in the position was observed in the fifth decade of life. In infancy and old age, higher positions were noted. The study indicates that the position of the tonsils below the foramen magnum is a normal occurrence.

  16. Prognostic significance of right bundle branch block in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwasaki,Jun

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    There is little information available concerning the influence of right bundle branch block (RBBB on the prognosis of patients with inferior myocardial infarction (MI. In this study we evaluated the influence of RBBB on the short-term prognosis of patients with inferior MI. Our study subjects were 1,265 hospitalized patients with Q wave MI. Patients were divided into 4 groups based on the presence or absence of RBBB and on the location of the infarction. RBBB was classified into 4 categories according to the timing of its appearance and its duration as new permanent, transient, old and age indeterminate. In-hospital death and pulmonary congestion were observed more frequently in patients with RBBB than in those without RBBB. Moreover, in inferior MI as in anterior MI, in-hospital death and pulmonary congestion occurred more frequently in new permanent RBBB patients than in patients with other types of RBBB. Multivariate regression analysis reveals that new permanent RBBB was a strong independent predictor for an adverse short-term prognosis in patients with inferior MI, as well as in patients with anterior MI. New permanent RBBB during inferior MI is a strong independent predictor for increased in-hospital mortality, regardless of the infarction location.

  17. Chronic instability of the anterior syndesmosis of the ankle: Biomechanical, kinematical, radiological and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Beumer, Annechien

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is concerned with chronic anterior instability of the tibiofibular syndesmosis of the ankle. The ankle plays a fundamental role in locomotion. It consists of the talocrural and distal tibiofibular joint. The latter is a syndesmosis, a fibrous joint with ample intervening fibrous connective tissue. The syndesmosis consists of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL, also known as the anterior syndesmosis), the interosseous ligament (IL), and the posterior inf...

  18. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD]) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis

  19. Oculomotor studies of cerebellar function in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Caralynn V; Minshew, Nancy J; Luna, Beatriz; Takarae, Yukari; Sweeney, John A

    2005-11-15

    Histopathological, neuroimaging and genetic findings indicate cerebellar abnormalities in autism, but the extent of neurophysiological dysfunction associated with those findings has not been systematically examined. Suppression of intrusive saccades (square wave jerks) and the ability to sustain eccentric gaze, two phenomena requiring intact cerebellar function, were examined in 52 high-functioning individuals with autism and 52 age- and IQ-matched healthy subjects during visual fixation of static central and peripheral targets. Rates of intrusive saccades were not increased in autism during visual fixation, and foveopetal ocular drift was also not increased when subjects held an eccentric gaze. The absence of gross disturbances of visual fixation associated with cerebellar disease in individuals with autism, such as increased square wave jerk rates and foveopetal drift when holding eccentric gaze, indicates that the functional integrity of cerebellar--brainstem networks devoted to oculomotor control is preserved in autism despite reported anatomic variations. However, increased amplitude of intrusive saccades and reduced latency of target refixation after intrusive saccades were observed in individuals with autism, especially when subjects maintained fixation of remembered target locations without sensory guidance. The atypical metrics of intrusive saccades that were observed may be attributable to faulty functional connectivity in cortico-cerebellar networks. PMID:16214219

  20. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  1. Bristow-Latarjet Technique: Still a Very Successful Surgery for Anterior Glenohumeral Instability - A Forty Year One Clinic Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilson Ruci

    2015-05-01

    CONCLUSION: The Bristow-Latarjet procedure is a very good surgical treatment for recurrent anterior-inferior instability of the glenohumeral joint. It must not be used for multidirectional instability or psychogenic habitual dislocations.

  2. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  3. The position of the mandibular canal and histologic feature of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, C; Kamburoğlu, K; Ozen, T; Balcioglu, H A; Kurt, B; Kutoglu, T; Ozan, H

    2010-01-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve is the one of the large branches of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. It is vulnerable during surgical procedures of the mandible. Despite its importance, no anatomical and histological examination has been conducted to provide a detailed cross-sectional morphology of the mandibular canal according to dental status. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify the position of the mandibular canal through direct measurement and to determine the branches of the inferior alveolar nerve through histologic examination. The area between the anterior margin of the third molar and the anterior margin of the second premolar of dentulous, partially dentulous, and edentulous hemimandible specimens (n = 49) from 26 human cadavers was serially sectioned into seven segments, and specific distances were measured using digital calipers. Following this, 5-microm cross-sections were prepared along the mandibular canal and mental foramen, and examined by fluorescence microscopy. The mandibular canal was located at a mean distance of 10.52 mm above the inferior margin of the mandible. The mean maximum diameters of the mandibular canal, inferior alveolar nerve, inferior alveolar artery, and inferior alveolar vein were 2.52, 1.84, 0.42, and 0.58 mm, respectively. This study found that the inferior alveolar nerve often gives rise to several branches at each level (range 0-3). To minimize the risk of injury, knowledge of the small branches of the nerve and of the detailed findings regarding the position of the mandibular canal reported here should be considered when planning mandibular surgery, especially during implant placement. PMID:19918867

  4. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children ...

  5. Traumatismos de veia cava inferior Inferior vena cava injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleinaldo de Almeida Costa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência, o perfil clínico e as estratégias operatórias dos ferimentos de Veia Cava Inferior (VCI. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados retrospectivamente os prontuários de 76 doentes com ferimento de VCI atendidos nos dois prontossocorros de Manaus, no período de janeiro de 1997 a julho de 2002. Mecanismo de lesão, mortalidade, estado hemodinâmico, índice de trauma abdominal penetrante (PATI, achados intra-operatórios e conduta cirúrgica foram estudados. RESULTADOS: Quarenta e nove (65% doentes sofreram lesão por arma branca, 26 (34% por arma de fogo e um por traumatismo abdominal fechado. Quarenta e um (54% doentes sobreviveram. Quase todos chegaram acordados, entretanto 40% estavam hipotensos (pressão arterial sistólica BACKGROUND: Injuries of inferior vena cava (IVC require immediate and definitive action. Our objective is to evaluate the incidence, the clinical findings and the operative approach to IVC injuries. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 76 patients with IVC injuries treated in two Emergency Hospitals of Manaus, AM, Brazil, from January 1997 to July 2002. Mechanisms of injuries, mortality, hemodynamic status, penetrating abdominal trauma index (PATI, intraoperative findings and surgical approach were among assessed data. RESULTS: Fourty-nine patients (65% had stab wounds, 26 (34% gunshot wounds, and one had blunt abdominal trauma. Fourty-one (54% patients survived. Almost all patients entered the emergency room awake, although 40% were hypotensive (systolic blood pressure < 70 mmHg, and the penetrating abdominal trauma index average was above 40. At laparotomy, active retroperitoneal bleeding or an expanding retroperitoneal hematoma were detected in all cases. Caval injury was retro-hepatic in 21 patients, and infrahepatic in the other 55. The prevailing surgical approach was lateral repair in 65 patients. Atrial-caval shunting was tried in six patients, with only three survivals. CONCLUSIONS: We

  6. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B;

    1984-01-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by 133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow....... It is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes...

  7. Paraneoplastic cerebellar dysfunction in Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Sazzad Manir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL manifests as acute/sub-acute nature. We report a case of 21 yr old male presented with acute cerebellar signs along with underlying HL.MRI brain was normal. CSF study was unremarkable. Patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Neurological manifestations remarkably improved along with complete resolution of underlying HL. Anti-cancer therapy of underlying HL is the main strategy of treating associated PCD.

  8. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  9. On the Effect of Sex on Prefrontal and Cerebellar Neurometabolites in Healthy Adults: An MRS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Dominique; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Feige, Bernd; Backenecker, Stephan; Nickel, Kathrin; Bubl, Anna; Lange, Thomas; Mader, Irina; Maier, Simon; Perlov, Evgeniy

    2016-01-01

    In neuropsychiatric research, the aspects of sex have received increasing attention over the past decade. With regard to the neurometabolic differences in the prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum of both men and women, we performed a magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) study of a large group of healthy subjects. For neurometabolic measurements, we used single-voxel proton MRS. The voxels of interest (VOI) were placed in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC) and the left cerebellar hemisphere. Absolute quantification of creatine (Cre), total choline (t-Cho), glutamate and glutamine (Glx), N-acetylaspartate, and myo-inositol (mI) was performed. Thirty-three automatically matched ACCs and 31 cerebellar male–female pairs were statistically analyzed. We found no significant neurometabolic differences in the pACC region (Wilks' lambda: p = 0.657). In the left cerebellar region, we detected significant variations between the male and female groups (p = 0.001). Specifically, we detected significantly higher Cre (p = 0.005) and t-Cho (p = 0.000) levels in men. Additionally, males tended to have higher Glx and mI concentrations. This is the first study to report neurometabolic sex differences in the cerebellum. The effects of sexual hormones might have influenced our findings. Our data indicates the importance of adjusting for the confounding effects of sex in MRS studies. PMID:27531975

  10. Agenesia of the vena cava inferior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullnig, P.; Lammer, J.; Ranner, G.; Pilger, E.

    1986-12-01

    A case of agenesia of 3 of the 4 segments of the vena cava inferior is presented. The embryogenesis of the v. cava inferior is discussed in so far as is relevant for the malformation in this case. Exact diagnosis and classification can be made via intravenous and intraarterial DSA and computed tomography.

  11. Cerebellar motor dysfunction in schizophrenia and psychosis risk: the importance of regional cerebellar analysis approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Bernard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Motor abnormalities in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis are well documented. An accumulating body of work has also highlighted motor abnormalities related to cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia including eye-blink conditioning, timing, postural control, and motor learning. We have also recently found evidence for motor dysfunction in individuals at ultra high-risk for psychosis (1–3. This is particularly relevant as the cerebellum is thought to be central to the cognitive dysmetria model of schizophrenia, and these overt motor signs may point to more general cerebellar dysfunction in the etiology of psychotic disorders. While studies have provided evidence indicative of motor cerebellar dysfunction in at-risk populations and in schizophrenia, findings with respect to the cerebellum have been mixed. One factor potentially contributing to these mixed results is the whole-structure approach taken when investigating the cerebellum. In non-human primates there are distinct closed-loop circuits between the cerebellum, thalamus, and brain with motor and non-motor cortical regions. Recent human neuroimaging has supported this finding and indicates that there is a cerebellar functional topography (4, and this information is being missed with whole-structure approaches. Here, we review cerebellar motor dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis. We also discuss cerebellar abnormalities in psychosis, and the cerebellar functional topography. Because of the segregated functional regions of the cerebellum, we propose that it is important to look at the structure regionally in order to better understand its role in motor dysfunction in these populations. This is analogous to approaches taken with the basal ganglia, where each region is considered separately. Such an approach is necessary to better understand cerebellar pathophysiology on a macro-structural level with respect to the

  12. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  13. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  14. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Zampetti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70% makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres.

  15. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  16. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  17. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Sreedhar Babu

    Full Text Available Cerebellar liponeurocytoma is a rare cerebellar neoplasm of adults with advanced neuronal / neurocytic and focal lipomatous differentiation, a low proliferative potential and a favorable clinical prognosis corresponding to World Health Organization grade I or II. Only a few cases have been described in the literature (approximately 20 cases by different names. A 48-years old female, presented with history of headache and dizziness associated with neck pain; restricted neck movements, drop attacks and occasional regurgitation of food since one year. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a right cerebellar mass lesion. Gross total resec- tion of the tumour was accomplished through a suboccipital craniotomy. The excised tissue was diagnosed as cerebellar liponeurocytoma, a rare entity, based on histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry. The morphological appearance of this neoplasm can be confused with that of oligodendroglioma, neurocytoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, solid hemangioblastoma and metastatic carcinomas etc., with unpredictable prognosis, which require postoperative radiotherapy, hence the importance of accurately diagnosing this rare neoplasm. This tumour should be added to the differential diagnosis of mass lesions of the posterior fossa.

  18. Cerebellar cortical inhibition and classical eyeblink conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shaowen; Chen, Lu; Kim, Jeansok J; Thompson, Richard F

    2002-02-01

    The cerebellum is considered a brain structure in which memories for learned motor responses (e.g., conditioned eyeblink responses) are stored. Within the cerebellum, however, the relative importance of the cortex and the deep nuclei in motor learning/memory is not entirely clear. In this study, we show that the cerebellar cortex exerts both basal and stimulus-activated inhibition to the deep nuclei. Sequential application of a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) agonist and a noncompetitive GABA(A)R antagonist allows selective blockade of stimulus-activated inhibition. By using the same sequential agonist and antagonist methods in behaving animals, we demonstrate that the conditioned response (CR) expression and timing are completely dissociable and involve different inhibitory inputs; although the basal inhibition modulates CR expression, the conditioned stimulus-activated inhibition is required for the proper timing of the CR. In addition, complete blockade of cerebellar deep nuclear GABA(A)Rs prevents CR acquisition. Together, these results suggest that different aspects of the memories for eyeblink CRs are encoded in the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar deep nuclei.

  19. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchin, Anatoly; Rieubland, Sarah; Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S; Roth, Arnd

    2016-08-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  20. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  1. Unusual inferior dislocation of shoulder: reduction by two-step maneuver: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Patro Dilip K; Agarwal Dinesh K; Saseendar S; Menon Jagdish

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Dislocation of the shoulder is the commonest of all large joint dislocations. Inferior dislocation constitutes 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. It characteristically presents with overhead abduction of the arm, the humerus being parallel to the spine of scapula. We present an unusual case of recurrent luxatio erecta in which the arm transformed later into an adducted position resembling the more common anterior shoulder dislocation. Such a case has not been described before in Engl...

  2. Inferior Turbinate Flap for Nasal-side Closure of Palatal Fistula in Cleft Patients: Technical Note

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Rahpeyma; Saeedeh Khajehahmadi

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Residual palatal fistula after repair of palatal cleft is common. Repair of residual oronasal fistula is not always successful. Two-layer closure techniques that close these fistulas with soft tissue are a common practice. Turnover flaps are the most used flaps and often the sole method for nasal-side closure of fistula. Anteriorly based inferior turbinate flap can be used to provide soft tissue for nasal-side closure when turnover flaps will not provide sufficient tissue for this pu...

  3. Tuberculosis pulmonar de campos inferiores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra González

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis (TB que compromete sólo los campos pulmonares inferiores (TBCI es poco frecuente en el adulto y en general está asociada a alguna causa de inmunodepresión. El objetivo de nuestro trabajo fue determinar la incidencia de TBCI en nuestra población y comparar sus características respecto de la TB pulmonar de localización habitual. Se estudiaron en forma retrospectiva en el período de 2004 a 2008, 42 pacientes con TBCI que fueron comparados con 84 pacientes con TB pulmonar de localización habitual (grupo control. Se excluyeron pacientes con HIV. La TBCI representó el 6% del total de TB pulmonar. No se encontraron diferencias significativas en cuanto a edad, sexo, presencia de cavidades en la radiografía, días de evolución y nivel de albúmina. La TBCI tuvo significativamente mayor proporción de comorbilidades (p < 0.001, presencia de condensación (p < 0.001 y compromiso unilateral (p < 0.001 en la radiografía de tórax, junto con mayor número de internaciones (p = 0.02. Cabe destacar que sólo16 de los 42 pacientes con TBCI (38% tenían alguna comorbilidad demostrada. La TBCI puede presentarse aun sin comorbilidades asociadas y debe sospecharse en neumonías de evolución tórpida independientemente de su localización.

  4. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  5. Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Meena, Sanjay; Saini, Pramod; Singh, Vivek; Kumar, Ramakant; Trikha, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder dislocations are the most common major joint dislocations encountered in the emergency departments. Bilateral shoulder dislocations are rare and of these, bilateral posterior shoulder dislocations are more prevalent than bilateral anterior shoulder dislocations. Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is very rare. We present a case of 24-year-old male who sustained bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following minor trauma, with associated greater tuberosity fracture on one side...

  6. Inferior Oblique Muscle Weakening: Is It Possible to Quantify Its Effects on Horizontal Deviations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Taylan Sekeroglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate and quantify the effect of inferior oblique muscle weakening on horizontal deviations. Methods. The medical files of patients who had undergone an inferior oblique weakening as a single procedure were all reviewed. The main measures were the type of inferior oblique overaction (IOOA, pre- and postoperative amount of IOOA, and horizontal deviations in primary position. Results. The study was conducted with 66 patients (30 males, 36 females. The median age was 11 years (1–49. Of the 66 patients, 30 (45.5% had primary and 36 (54.5% had secondary IOOA. The most common procedure was inferior oblique anteriorization in 32 patients (48.5%. The mean postoperative horizontal and vertical deviations and the amount of IOOA were decreased postoperatively ( for all. The median amount of correction of horizontal near and distance deviations was (0–20. The preoperative amount of IOOA, the presence of fourth nerve palsy, and the type of the weakening procedure had no significant effect on the amount of correction of horizontal deviations. Conclusion. The inferior oblique weakening procedures have secondary effects and warrant reduction of horizontal deviations in varying degrees. This should be borne in mind in planning a simultaneous horizontal muscle surgery and setting the surgical amount.

  7. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  8. An incidental finding of the accessory inferior thyroid artery

    OpenAIRE

    Sedy J

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of an incidental finding of the right accessory inferior thyroid artery, emerging from the thyrocervical trunk together with a typical inferior thyroid artery, present in a normal position. On the left side, only single inferior thyroid artery was present. Only one inferior thyroid vein was found on each side. The accessory inferior thyroid artery entered the thyroid gland approximately 1 cm above the normal inferior thyroid, above the superior parathyroid gland. Although acc...

  9. Lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in a goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rômulo Soares dos Santos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A case of lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia was observed in a 30-day-old goat. The goat presented with sternal recumbence, absence of a menace response, intention tremors, ataxia, and nystagmus. The goat was euthanized and necropsied after having been hospitalised for eleven days. At necropsy, the surface of the brain was found to be smooth, the cerebral sulci and gyri were absent, and the cerebellum was reduced in size. Histologically, the grey matter and white matter were thicker and thinner than normal in cortices, respectively. The neurons were randomly arranged in the grey matter. In the cerebellum, the layers were disorganised, and cells were heterotopics. The histologic and gross lesions observed in this animal are characteristic of lissencephaly associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. The presence of a single goat affected suggests that the malformation was not of infectious origin and because lissencephaly is a malformation not previously described in goats, it is unlikely this case was inherited.

  10. Isolated rhomboencephalosynapsis – a rare cerebellar anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhomboencephalosynapsis (RES, RS) is a unique entity usually recognized in infancy based on neuroimaging. Cerebellar fusion and absence of cerebellar vermis is often associated with supratentorial findings. Since now there are about 50 cases described worldwide, with approximately 36 patients diagnosed by MRI. The authors present the first in Poland case of this uncommon malformation and review the literature. The authors describe a 28-month-old-girl with microcephaly and proper psychomotor development. The family history was unrelevant. Based on MRI the congenital malformation of posterior fossa-rhombencephalosynapsis was confirmed Presented patient is a typical example of MRI usefulness especially in patients with RES. RES symptoms are mild and that is why the diagnosis is usually made only in adulthood

  11. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  12. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  13. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria, unip...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  14. Computed tomography in hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, T.; Maki, Y.; Ono, Y.; Yoshizawa, T.; Tsuboi, K. (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Fourteen cases of cerebellar hemorrhage were analysed from the point of CT-scan, and the following results were obtained. 1. The number of cases of cerebellar hemorrhage forms 4.4% of that of total intracranial hemorrhage. 2. Most of the cerebellar hematomas extend upward. Downward extension is rare. 3. In acute dead cases hematomas are 5 cm or more in diameter and lie over bilateral hemispheres with the extension to third or fourth ventricles in CT-scans. 4. Slowly progressive cases are detriorated by the secondary hydrocephalus. 5. In mild cases hematomas are 3cm or less in diameter on CT-scans and the hematoma evacuation is not indicated for these cases. 6. The shunt operation alone is sufficient for the life saving of the slowly progressive cases, but the hematoma evacuation is indicated in these cases if the functional prognosis is taken into consideration. 7. Immediate hematoma evacuation together with the ventricular drainage is considered to be effective for the life saving of the acute fulminant cases.

  15. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, improves cerebellar tremor.

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, G P; Lesaux, J; Vandervoort, P.; Macewan, L; Ebers, G C

    1997-01-01

    It has been previously shown that ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, can ameliorate vertigo in patients with acute brainstem disorders. A coincidental benefit was the improvement of cerebellar tremor in some patients with both vertigo and tremor. To further evaluate this effect, a placebo controlled, double blind, crossover study was conducted of a single dose of intravenous ondansetron in 20 patients with cerebellar tremor caused by multiple sclerosis, cerebellar degeneration, or drug toxicity...

  16. GlyT2+ Neurons in the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Uusisaari, Marylka; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) are a major hub in the cerebellar circuitry but the functional classification of their neurons is incomplete. We have previously characterized three cell groups in the lateral cerebellar nucleus: large non-GABAergic neurons and two groups of smaller neurons, one of which express green fluorescence protein (GFP) in a GAD67/GFP mouse line and is therefore GABAergic. However, as a substantial number of glycinergic and glycine/GABA co-expressing neurons have been ...

  17. Sensory mechanisms of balance control in cerebellar disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bunn, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    A wealth of evidence exists to suggest that the cerebellum has an important role in the integration of vestibular, proprioceptive and visual sensory signals. Human bipedal balance depends on sensory integration and balance impairment is a common feature of cerebellar disease. I test the hypothesis that disrupted sensori-motor processing is responsible for balance impairment in cerebellar disease. Balance control in subjects with pure cerebellar disease (SCA6) was compared with matched healthy...

  18. Lacunar thalamic stroke with pure cerebellar and proprioceptive deficits.

    OpenAIRE

    Gutrecht, J A; Zamani, A A; D N Pandya

    1992-01-01

    Case reports of two patients with cerebellar ataxia and proprioceptive sensory loss are presented. MRI of the brain revealed lesions of the ventroposterior part of the thalamus. These patients illustrate clinically the anatomical independence of cerebellar and sensory pathways in the thalamus. We suggest that the ataxic deficit is caused by interruption of cerebellar outflow pathways in the thalamus and not secondary to sensory deafferentation.

  19. 颈椎前路手术前后康复护理工作要点%Nursing notes of rehabilitation before and after anterior cervical operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙彩霞; 何冰

    2003-01-01

    @@ BACKGROUND:The operation of anterior vertebrae often cause the injury of superior laryngeal nerve and inferior laryngeal nerve and it is important of enough preoperative preparations and postoperative care for pationts.

  20. Cerebellar ataxia as the presenting manifestation of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arav-Boger, Ravit; Crawford, Thomas; Steere, Allen C; Halsey, Neal A

    2002-04-01

    A 7-year-old boy from suburban Baltimore who presented with cerebellar ataxia and headaches was found by magnetic resonance imaging to have multiple cerebellar enhancing lesions. He had no history of tick exposure. He was initially treated with steroids for presumptive postinfectious encephalitis. Lyme disease was diagnosed 10 weeks later after arthritis developed. Testing of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained at the time cerebellar ataxia was diagnosed revealed intrathecal antibody production to Borrelia burgdorferi. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics led to rapid resolution of persistent cerebellar findings.

  1. Mice lacking the transcription factor SHOX2 display impaired cerebellar development and deficits in motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Jessica M; McAllister, Brendan B; Dyck, Richard H; Percival, Christopher J; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Cobb, John

    2015-03-01

    Purkinje cells of the developing cerebellum secrete the morphogen sonic hedgehog (SHH), which is required to maintain the proliferative state of granule cell precursors (GCPs) prior to their differentiation and migration to form the internal granule layer (IGL). Despite a wealth of knowledge regarding the function of SHH during cerebellar development, the upstream regulators of Shh expression during this process remain largely unknown. Here we report that the murine short stature homeobox 2 (Shox2) gene is required for normal Shh expression in dorsal-residing Purkinje cells. Using two different Cre drivers, we show that elimination of Shox2 in the brain results in developmental defects in the inferior colliculus and cerebellum. Specifically, loss of Shox2 in the cerebellum results in precocious differentiation and migration of GCPs from the external granule layer (EGL) to the IGL. This correlates with premature bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) expression in granule cells of the dorsal cerebellum. The size of the neonatal cerebellum is reduced in Shox2-mutant animals, which is consistent with a reduction in the number of GCPs present in the EGL, and could account for the smaller vermis and thinner IGL present in adult Shox2mutants. Shox2-mutant mice also display reduced exploratory activity, altered gait and impaired motor coordination. Our findings are the first to show a role for Shox2 in brain development. We provide evidence that Shox2 plays an important role during cerebellar development, perhaps to maintain the proper balance of Shh and Bmp expression levels in the dorsal vermis, and demonstrate that in the absence of Shox2, mice display both cerebellar impairments and deficits in motor coordination, ultimately highlighting the importance of Shox2 in the cerebellum.

  2. [Buspirone in the treatment of cerebellar ataxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetel, M; Vojvodić, N; Filipović, S R; Dragasević, N; Sternić, N; Kostić, V S

    1999-01-01

    Ataxia is defined as a disturbance which, quite independent of any motor weakness, alters direction and extent of voluntary movement and impairs the sustained voluntary of reflex muscle contraction necessary for maintaining postiue and equilibrium [1]. Since pathophysiological basis of cerebeller ataxia is still not completely clear, the current therapeutic attempts are mainly symptom-oriented [3]. One possible approach could be a modification of potentially involved neurotransmitter systems of the cerebellum, where particularly interesting is the serotonergic system. However, attempts with levorotatory form of tryptophan (5-HT precursors) proved to be ineffective [4, 5]. Since receptors in the cerebellum are mainly of 5-HTIA subtype, the use of specific agonists might be a more reasonable therapy [6]. The study initially involved 11 patients, but only 9 completed the protocol due to unfavorable side effects. Our open label prospective study lasted for 15 weeks. The patients were tested before the beginning of the treatment (initial visit), at 7th (first visit) and 11th week (second visit) of continuous therapy, and eventually at 15th week (final visit). The daily dose was 40 mg at the first and 60 mg at the second visit. We used the evaluation scale gurposed for cerebellar functions testing (speech, gait, coordination and ocular movements). Significant improvement of cerebellar ataxia in patients under buspiron therapy has been noted. We analyzed the results obtained from our 9 patients (4 females and 5 males), of which 6 patients suffered from cerebellar degeneration, one from multiple sclerosis, one from Ramsey-Hunt syndrome, and one from pontine myelinolysis. At the initial visit the patient score was 18.9 (SD = 7.3), subsequently, at the iirst visit the score was 15.4 (SD = 8), while the second visit yielded the score of 12.9 (SD = 8.2), and finally, after a two-weeks lasting wash-out period, it was 17.7 (SD = 7.1) (Table 1). It was found that patients

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL injury; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... knee. It prevents the knee from bending out. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is in the middle of the knee. ...

  4. Clinical studies on inferior right hepatic veins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xing; Hong Li; Wei-Guo Liu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Many small veins are called accessory, short hepatic veins in addition to the right, middle and left hepatic veins. The size of these veins varied from a pinhole to 1 cm; the size of inferior right hepatic veins (IRHVs) is thicker than that of short hepatic veins or more than 1 cm occasionally. Adults have a higher incidence rate of the IRHV. DATA SOURCES:A literature search of the PubMed database was conducted and research articles were reviewed. RESULTS:The size of IRHVs is related to the size of the right hepatic vein, i.e. the larger the diameter of the right hepatic vein, the smaller the diameter of the IRHVs, and vice versa. The IRHVs are divided into superior, medial and inferior groups, separately named the superior, medial and inferior right hepatic veins according to the position of the IRHV entering the inferior vena cava. The superior right hepatic vein mainly drains the superior part of segmentⅦ, and the medial right hepatic vein drains the middle part of segmentⅦ. A thicker IRHV mainly drains segmentⅥ and the inferior part of segmentⅦ and a thinner IRHV drains the inferior part of segmentⅤ. CONCLUSIONS:The clinical signiifcance of these studies on IRHVs is varied: (1) Hepatic caudate lobe resection could be introduced after study on the veins of that lobe. (2) It is very important to identify the draining region of the IRHV for guiding hepatic segmentectomy. The postero-inferior area of the right lobe can be preserved along with the hypertrophic IRHV even if the entire main right hepatic vein is resected during segmentectomy ofⅦ andⅧwith right hepatic vein resection for patients with primary liver cancer. (3) The ligation of the major hepatic vein for the treatment of juxtahepatic vein injury is recommended because of severe hemorrhagic shock and dififculty in

  5. Superior cerebellar artery infarction in endovascular treatment for tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jingbo; Lv Xianli; Jiang Chuhan; Li Youxiang [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan, Xili, Chongwen, 100050, Beijing (China); Wu Zhongxue, E-mail: ttyyzjb@sina.co [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan, Xili, Chongwen, 100050, Beijing (China)

    2010-06-15

    Background: Superior cerebellar artery (SCA) syndrome shows ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia and Horner's syndrome, contralateral superficial sensory disturbance, as well as nystagmus toward the impaired side, vertigo, and nausea. Occasionally, unilateral lesions may produce bilateral hypogeusia and contralateral hypoacusia. Objective: To report 2 patients with unilateral lower midbrain ischemic lesions of the inferior colliculus level caused by transarterial embolization for tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas (TDAVFs). Methods: Hospital records for 21 patients with TDAVFs mainly treated by endovascular techniques between 2005 and 2008 were reviewed. Two patients with MRI evidence of unilateral SCA territory infarction were investigated. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 treated transarterially with Onyx-18 (a nonahesive liquid embolic agent) developed infarctions in the territory of SCA. One patient had lateral SCA infarction characterized by ipsilateral gait ataxia, contralateral hemihypoesthesia, with additional ipsilateral ocular motor palsy and bilateral gustatory loss. And the other patient had medial SCA infarction characterized by ipsilateral ataxia contralateral hemihypoesthesia with additional contralateral hypoacusia. Conclusion: SCA infarction can be caused by transarterial injection of Onyx-18 via SCA or the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) for TDAVFs and additionally presented with gustatory loss and deafness, which is generally not a feature of the SCA syndrome.

  6. Catarata polar anterior piramidal deslocada para a câmara anterior causando edema de córnea: relato de caso Corneal edema caused by a pyramidal anterior polar cataract dislocated to the anterior chamber: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Coral Ghanem

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Cataratas polares anteriores piramidais são opacidades cônicas que se projetam para a câmara anterior a partir da cápsula anterior do cristalino. Na grande maioria dos pacientes a opacidade permanece aderida e estável durante toda a vida. O objetivo deste trabalho é documentar uma manifestação incomum desse tipo de catarata: a deiscência espontânea das pirâmides para a câmara anterior causando descompensação endotelial e edema corneal bilateral. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente feminina, de 66 anos, branca, que apresentava edema corneal localizado inferiormente no olho direito associado à lesão nodular branco-esclerótica compatível com a pirâmide anterior da catarata polar. O olho esquerdo apresentava edema corneal difuso intenso e presença de uma catarata polar anterior com a região piramidal deslocada para a câmara anterior. Sabe-se que a pirâmide anterior pode permanecer inabsorvida na câmara anterior por longo período, pois é composta de tecido colágeno denso. Isto causa perda endotelial progressiva e edema corneal e deve ser considerada indicação de remoção cirúrgica da catarata polar anterior e de seu fragmento. Ressalta-se, também, a importância do bom senso no julgamento das cataratas polares anteriores, considerando-se tamanho da opacidade, simetria das opacidades e componente cortical associado, na tentativa de se evitar ambliopia.Pyramidal anterior polar cataracts are conical opacities that project into the anterior chamber from the anterior capsule of the lens. In the vast majority of patients the opacity remains bound and stable throughout life. We report an unusual complication of this type of cataract: spontaneous dehiscence of the pyramids to the anterior chamber causing bilateral endothelial damage and corneal edema. 66-year-old white woman presented with inferior corneal edema in the right eye and diffuse corneal edema in the left eye. A white nodular lesion was observed in the inferior angle

  7. Functional organization of the left inferior precentral sulcus: dissociating the inferior frontal eye field and the inferior frontal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrfuss, J; Vogt, V L; Fiebach, C J; von Cramon, D Y; Tittgemeyer, M

    2012-02-15

    Two eye fields have been described in the human lateral frontal cortex: the frontal eye field (FEF) and the inferior frontal eye field (iFEF). The FEF has been extensively studied and has been found to lie at the ventral part of the superior precentral sulcus. Much less research, however, has focused on the iFEF. Recently, it was suggested that the iFEF is located at the dorsal part of the inferior precentral sulcus. A similar location was proposed for the inferior frontal junction area (IFJ), an area thought to be involved in cognitive control processes. The present study used fMRI to clarify the topographical and functional relationship of the iFEF and the IFJ in the left hemispheres of individual participants. The results show that both the iFEF and the IFJ are indeed located at the dorsal part of the inferior precentral sulcus. Nevertheless, the activations were spatially dissociable in every individual examined. The IFJ was located more towards the depth of the inferior precentral sulcus, close to the junction with the inferior frontal sulcus, whereas the iFEF assumed a more lateral, posterior and superior position. Furthermore, the results provided evidence for a functional double dissociation: the iFEF was activated only in a comparison of saccades vs. button presses, but not in a comparison of incongruent vs. congruent Stroop conditions, while the opposite pattern was found at the IFJ. These results provide evidence for a spatial and functional dissociation of two directly adjacent areas in the left posterior frontal lobe.

  8. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Castro Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics.

  9. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  10. [Cerebellar Control of Ocular Movements: Application to the Topographical Diagnosis of Cerebellar Lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, substantial information on cerebellar oculomotor control has been provided by the use of sophisticated neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and imaging techniques. We now know that an intact cerebellum is a prerequisite for normal oculomotor performance. This review clarifies the current knowledge on structure-function correlations of the cerebellum in relation to ocular movements and allows them to be applied to topographical diagnosis of cerebellar lesions. The cerebellar regions most closely related to oculomotor function are: (1) the flocculus/paraflocculus for VOR suppression, cancellation, smooth pursuit eye movement and gaze-holding, (2) the nodulus/ventral uvula for velocity storage and low frequency prolonged vestibular response, and (3) the dorsal oculomotor vermis (declive VI, folium VII) and the posterior portion of the fastigial nucleus (fastigial oculomotor region) for saccades and smooth pursuit initiation. Symptomatically, defects in the flocculus/parflocculus cause saccadic pursuit, downbeat nystagmus, and impairments to visual suppression of the VOR. Lesions of the nodulus/uvula reveal as periodic alternating nystagmus. Lesions of the oculomotor vermis and the fastigial nucleus can induce saccadic dysmetria, while fastigial nucleus lesions may also cause ocular flutter/opsoclonus. A detailed knowledge of cerebellar anatomy and the physiology of eye movements enables localization of lesions to specific areas of the cerebellum. PMID:27001776

  11. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzhat, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses) and group II (third-trimester fetuses), followed by dissection. Result. (1) Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%). In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2) Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3) Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4) Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position. PMID:27313956

  12. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Nuzhat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses and group II (third-trimester fetuses, followed by dissection. Result. (1 Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%. In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2 Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3 Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4 Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position.

  13. Portal Decompression Using the Inferior Mesenteric Vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gorini

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We report five patients with variceal hemorrhage, in three cases secondary to diffuse thrombosis of the portal, superior mesenteric and splenic veins. Mesenteric angiography demonstrated patency of the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV in each, and successful portal decompression by anastomosis of the IMV to the left renal vein (n=4 or the inferior vena cava (n=1 was accomplished. Bleeding was permanently controlled: four patients have survived from one to eight years post-operatively. Because shunt procedures utilizing the IMV are technically straightforward, subtotally decompress the portal system and avoid the right upper quadrant, they may be advantageous in certain clinical settings.

  14. Cerebellar disorders: clinical/radiologic findings and modern imaging tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar disorders, also called cerebellar ataxias, comprise a large group of sporadic and genetic diseases. Their core clinical features include impaired control of coordination and gait, as well as cognitive/behavioral deficits usually not detectable by a standard neurologic examination and therefore often overlooked. Two forms of cognitive/behavioral syndromes are now well identified: (1) the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, which combines an impairment of executive functions, including planning and working memory, deficits in visuospatial skills, linguistic deficiencies such as agrammatism, and inappropriate behavior; and (2) the posterior fossa syndrome, a very acute form of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome occurring essentially in children. Sporadic ataxias include stroke, toxic causes, immune ataxias, infectious/parainfectious ataxias, traumatic causes, neoplasias and paraneoplastic syndromes, endocrine disorders affecting the cerebellum, and the so-called "degenerative ataxias" (multiple system atrophy, and sporadic adult-onset ataxias). Genetic ataxias include mainly four groups of disorders: autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias, autosomal-dominant ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias and episodic ataxias), mitochondrial disorders, and X-linked ataxias. In addition to biochemical studies and genetic tests, brain imaging techniques are a cornerstone for the diagnosis, clinicoanatomic correlations, and follow-up of cerebellar ataxias. Modern radiologic tools to assess cerebellar ataxias include: functional imaging studies, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, volumetric studies, and tractography. These complementary methods provide a multimodal appreciation of the whole long-range cerebellar network functioning, and allow the extraction of potential biomarkers for prognosis and rating level of recovery after treatment. PMID:27432679

  15. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Y; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.



  16. Cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidich, M.J.; Walker, M.T.; Han, G. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Gottardi-Littell, N.R. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chandler, J.P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2004-10-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) occurring in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The histomorphology of this uncommon glial (astrocytic) neoplasm is discussed. The occurrence of this tumor within the posterior fossa is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a cerebellar PXA in a patient with NF1. (orig.)

  17. Foxc1 dependent mesenchymal signalling drives embryonic cerebellar growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Gillies, Gwendolyn S; Janson, Olivia K; Chizhikov, Victor V; Mithal, Divakar S; Miller, Richard J; Millen, Kathleen J

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Foxc1 is associated with Dandy-Walker malformation, the most common human cerebellar malformation characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and an enlarged posterior fossa and fourth ventricle. Although expressed in the mouse posterior fossa mesenchyme, loss of Foxc1 non-autonomously induces a rapid and devastating decrease in embryonic cerebellar ventricular zone radial glial proliferation and concurrent increase in cerebellar neuronal differentiation. Subsequent migration of cerebellar neurons is disrupted, associated with disordered radial glial morphology. In vitro, SDF1α, a direct Foxc1 target also expressed in the head mesenchyme, acts as a cerebellar radial glial mitogen and a chemoattractant for nascent Purkinje cells. Its receptor, Cxcr4, is expressed in cerebellar radial glial cells and conditional Cxcr4 ablation with Nes-Cre mimics the Foxc1−/− cerebellar phenotype. SDF1α also rescues the Foxc1−/− phenotype. Our data emphasizes that the head mesenchyme exerts a considerable influence on early embryonic brain development and its disruption contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03962.001 PMID:25513817

  18. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme presenting as a cerebellopontine angle mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Jindal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly malignant brain tumour, which is exceedingly rare and such tumour presenting as cerebellopontine angle (CPA mass is even rarer. We here discuss the case of a 15-year-old girl who had cerebellar GBM presenting as CPA mass that resembled meningioma on CT scan and was managed successfully with minimal problems.

  19. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and EMB

  20. Molecular markers of neuronal progenitors in the embryonic cerebellar anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Daniver; Hatten, Mary E

    2006-11-22

    The cerebellum, like the cerebrum, includes a nuclear structure and an overlying cortical structure. Experiments in the past decade have expanded knowledge beyond the traditional function of the cerebellum to include critical roles in motor learning and memory and sensory discrimination. The initial steps in cerebellar development depend on inductive signaling involving FGF and Wnt proteins produced at the mesencephalic/metencephalic boundary. To address the issue of how individual cerebellar cell fates within the cerebellar territory are specified, we examined the expression of transcription factors, including mammalian homologues of LIM homeodomain-containing proteins, basic helix-loop-helix proteins, and three amino acid loop-containing proteins. The results of these studies show that combinatorial codes of transcription factors define precursors of the cerebellar nuclei, and both Purkinje cells and granule neurons of the cerebellar cortex. Examination of gene expression patterns in several hundred lines of Egfp-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mice in the GENSAT Project revealed numerous genes with restricted expression in cerebellar progenitor populations, including genes specific for cerebellar nuclear precursors and Purkinje cell precursors. In addition, we identified patterns of gene expression that link granule and Purkinje cells to their precerebellar nuclei. These results identify molecular pathways that offer new insights on the development of the nuclear and cortical structures of the cerebellum, as well as components of the cerebellar circuitry.

  1. Time estimation in Parkinson's disease and degenerative cerebellar disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beudel, Martijin; Galama, Sjoukje; Leenders, Klaus L.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2008-01-01

    With functional MRI, we recently identified fronto-cerebellar activations in predicting time to reach a target and basal ganglia activation in velocity estimation, that is, small interval assessment. We now tested these functions in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and degenerative cerebellar

  2. Functional organization of the left inferior precentral sulcus: dissociating the inferior frontal eye field and the inferior frontal junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derrfuss, J.; Vogt, V.L.; Fiebach, C.J.; Cramon, D.Y. von; Tittgemeyer, M.

    2012-01-01

    Two eye fields have been described in the human lateral frontal cortex: the frontal eye field (FEF) and the inferior frontal eye field (iFEF). The FEF has been extensively studied and has been found to lie at the ventral part of the superior precentral sulcus. Much less research, however, has focuse

  3. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm associated with an infraoptic course of anterior cerebral artery and rare variant of the persistent trigeminal artery: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Arat, Anıl; Patel, Nirav; Kertmen, Hayri; Başkaya, Mustafa K

    2011-05-01

    Infraoptic course of the precommunicating segment of the anterior cerebral artery (A1) is a rare anomaly. Furthermore, the presence of this anomaly associated with persistent trigeminal artery variant has been reported in the literature only once. We present a patient who had infraoptic course of A1 associated with an ipsilateral persistent trigeminal artery variant arising from the right internal carotid artery with no apparent connection to the basilar artery. The persistent trigeminal artery variant supplied to the right posteroinferior cerebellar artery territory. The patient also had hypoplastic left vertebral artery, superior cerebellar arteries originating from posterior cerebellar arteries bilaterally, and a bilobed aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. The aneurysm was clipped and the infraoptic course was verified during the surgery. The post-operative course was uneventful and a follow-up arteriogram on the 7th postoperative day revealed successful obliteration of the aneurysm. We reviewed the literature with respect to presentation, associated vascular anomalies, imaging, associated cerebral aneurysms and other cerebral abnormalities, and treatment of the associated aneurysms. A discussion of the embryogenesis of this rare anomaly is also provided. PMID:21269759

  4. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    OpenAIRE

    Mattos João Paulo; Marenco Horacio Armando; Campos José Maria; Faria Andréa Vasconcellos; Queiroz Luciano de Souza; Borges Guilherme; Oliveira Evandro de

    2006-01-01

    Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor. This is the third case published in Brazilian literature and, the last one has been described more than 15 years ago. The aggressive behavior of GBM prompts for fast treatment, which can be hampered by the fact that the diagnosis of GBM requires a high degree of suspicion. We describe a case of GBM in a 46 years old man. In conjunction, we present a literature review including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studi...

  5. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattos João Paulo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor. This is the third case published in Brazilian literature and, the last one has been described more than 15 years ago. The aggressive behavior of GBM prompts for fast treatment, which can be hampered by the fact that the diagnosis of GBM requires a high degree of suspicion. We describe a case of GBM in a 46 years old man. In conjunction, we present a literature review including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options and the behavior of such malignant tumor.

  6. Iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, non-randomised, descriptive study is to characterise the neurosensory deficit and associated neurogenic discomfort in 52 patients with iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). All patients were examined and followed up according to a protocol...

  7. A case of inferior lumbar hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhyasagar M. Sharma

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report a case of inferior lumbar hernia. The patient underwent preperitoneal meshplasty. The patient is well on follow up with no recurrence. The relevant literature has been reviewed and management discussed in brief. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(1.000: 33-35

  8. Computed tomographic features of cerebellar hemangioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Lan; Ko, Young Tae; Kim, Ho Kyun [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-06-15

    Computed tomographic and angiographic findings of 6 proven cerebellar Hemangiotoma seen in this hospital during last 2 years were analyzed. The results were as follows: 1. Except one 14 years old female, all of them wee 37 to 48 years old males. 2. The operative findings of the tumors were 3 cystic tumors with mural nodules and 3 solid tumors. Computed tomographic findings were: 3. Of three cases of cystic cerebellar hemangiotomas, 2 cases revealed characteristic CT findings such as; a. In precontrast study, a well defined round lower density containing one isodense nodule in its periphery was seen in each case. The absorption coefficiency of each lower density was around 5 EMI unit. b. In post contrast study, the nodules were enhanced densely and homogeneously white the lower densities remain unchanged. 4. Of three cases of solid cerebella hemangiotoma, 2 cases revealed isodense mass suggested by mass effect such as displaced 4th ventricle and peripheral edema in precontrast study, while the remaining case revealed ill defined slightly high density with peripheral edema. In postcontrast study, the 2 isodense masses showed well circumscribed homogenous enhancement with central slight lower density in one of them, while high density mass revealed no enhancement at all. 5. The vertebral angiography performed in 5 cases revealed high vascular tumors with feeding arteries, draining veins and increased circulation time. 6. The tumor blushing seen in vertebral angiography was correlated to the postcontrast enhancement of solid tumors and mural nodules in cystic hemangioblastoma.

  9. Cerebellar ependymal cyst in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss-Fluehmann, G; Konar, M; Jaggy, A; Vandevelde, M; Oevermann, A

    2008-11-01

    An 11-week-old, male, Staffordshire Bull Terrier had a history of generalized ataxia and falling since birth. The neurologic findings suggested a localization in the cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed. In all sequences the area of the cerebellum was almost replaced by fluid isointense to cerebrospinal fluid. A complete necropsy was performed after euthanasia. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by extensive loss of cerebellar tissue in both hemispheres and vermis. Toward the surface of the cerebellar defect, the cavity was confined by ruptured and folded membranes consisting of a layer of glial fibrillary acidic (GFAP)-positive glial cells covered multifocally by epithelial cells. Some of these cells bore apical cilia and were cytokeratin and GFAP negative, supporting their ependymal origin. The histopathologic features of our case are consistent with the diagnosis of an ependymal cyst. Its glial and ependymal nature as demonstrated by histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination differs from arachnoid cysts, which have also been reported in dogs. The origin of these cysts remains controversial, but it has been suggested that they develop during embryogenesis subsequent to sequestration of developing neuroectoderm. We speculate that the cyst could have been the result of a pre- or perinatal, possibly traumatic, insult because hemorrhage, and tissue destruction had occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ependymal cyst in the veterinary literature.

  10. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  11. Patellotibial contusions in anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissman, Robert D; England, Eric; Mehta, Kaushal; Nepute, Joshua; Von Fischer, Nathaniel; Apgar, Josh; Javadi, Ariyan

    2014-02-01

    Bone contusions are an important ancillary finding of many knee injuries. Not only are they a source of pain, they may suggest a mechanism of injury or a specific derangement of the knee joint. We have encountered a small number of patients being evaluated for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears with unexplained patellar and tibial edema at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We present three individuals with contusions of the inferior patella with a corresponding contusion of the anteromedial tibial plateau. Internal derangements in these patients were similar to other individuals with acute ACL tears, however osseous contusions were more widespread. In conclusion, patellotibial contusions are rare and may indicate an injury with forces greater than usually encountered in most ACL tears. A careful search for uncommon associated injuries is prudent in these high-energy knee injuries. PMID:24037484

  12. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  13. Contribution of cerebellar sensorimotor adaptation to hippocampal spatial memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Passot

    Full Text Available Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation.

  14. Apathy is associated with lower inferior temporal cortical thickness in mild cognitive impairment and normal elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercio, Brendan; Donovan, Nancy J.; Ward, Andrew; Schultz, Aaron; Lorius, Natacha; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marshall, Gad A.

    2014-01-01

    Apathy is a common neuropsychiatric symptom in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and is associated with cortical atrophy in AD dementia. This study investigated possible correlations between apathy and cortical atrophy in 47 individuals with MCI and 19 clinically normal elderly (CN). Backward elimination multivariate linear regression was used to evaluate the cross-sectional relationship between scores on the Apathy Evaluation Scale and thickness of several cortical regions and covariates. Lower inferior temporal cortical thickness was predictive of greater apathy. Greater anterior cingulate cortical thickness was also predictive of greater apathy, suggesting an underlying reactive process. PMID:25716491

  15. Dyslexic children lack word selectivity gradients in occipito-temporal and inferior frontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Olulade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available fMRI studies using a region-of-interest approach have revealed that the ventral portion of the left occipito-temporal cortex, which is specialized for orthographic processing of visually presented words (and includes the so-called “visual word form area”, VWFA, is characterized by a posterior-to-anterior gradient of increasing selectivity for words in typically reading adults, adolescents, and children (e.g. Brem et al., 2006, 2009. Similarly, the left inferior frontal cortex (IFC has been shown to exhibit a medial-to-lateral gradient of print selectivity in typically reading adults (Vinckier et al., 2007. Functional brain imaging studies of dyslexia have reported relative underactivity in left hemisphere occipito-temporal and inferior frontal regions using whole-brain analyses during word processing tasks. Hence, the question arises whether gradient sensitivities in these regions are altered in dyslexia. Indeed, a region-of-interest analysis revealed the gradient-specific functional specialization in the occipito-temporal cortex to be disrupted in dyslexic children (van der Mark et al., 2009. Building on these studies, we here (1 investigate if a word-selective gradient exists in the inferior frontal cortex in addition to the occipito-temporal cortex in normally reading children, (2 compare typically reading with dyslexic children, and (3 examine functional connections between these regions in both groups. We replicated the previously reported anterior-to-posterior gradient of increasing selectivity for words in the left occipito-temporal cortex in typically reading children, and its absence in the dyslexic children. Our novel finding is the detection of a pattern of increasing selectivity for words along the medial-to-lateral axis of the left inferior frontal cortex in typically reading children and evidence of functional connectivity between the most lateral aspect of this area and the anterior aspects of the occipito-temporal cortex. We

  16. The inferior cochlear vein: surgical aspects in cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, HongLei; Chen, Wei; Zhu, XiaoQuan; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-02-01

    The patency of the inferior cochlear vein (ICV) may be challenged in cochlear implantation (CI) due to its location near the round window (RW). This may be essential to consider during selection of different trajectories for electrode insertion aiming at preserving residual hearing. Venous blood from the human cochlea is drained through the ICV. The vein also drains blood from the modiolus containing the spiral ganglion neurons. Surgical interference with this vein could cause neural damage influencing CI outcome. We analyzed the topographical relationship between the RW and ICV bony channel and cochlear aqueduct (CA) from a surgical standpoint. Archival human temporal bones were further microdissected to visualize the CA and its accessory canals (AC1 and AC2). This was combined with examinations of plastic and silicone molds of the human labyrinth. Metric analyses were made using photo stereomicroscopy documenting the proximal portion of the AC1, the internal aperture of the CA and the RW. The mean distance between the AC1 and the anterior rim of the RW was 0.81 mm in bone specimens and 0.67 mm assessed in corrosion casts. The AC1 runs from the floor of the scala tympani through the otic capsule passing parallel to the CA to the posterior cranial fossa. The mean distance between the CA and AC1 canal was 0.31 and 0.25 mm, respectively. PMID:25700831

  17. Ultrastructure of projections to the oculomotor nucleus and inferior olive from vestibular and cerebellar neurons involved in compensatory eye movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R. Wentzel (Pierre)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractEarly in the evolution of vertebrates eye movements were strictly primitive reflexes that were predominantly controlled by vestibular and visual sensory stimuli. Later during phylogeny, along with the development of the fovea of the retina, vertebrates acquired the ability to make volunt

  18. [A case of cerebral gigantism with cerebellar atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, K; Ikeda, M; Tsukagoshi, H

    1990-05-01

    A 37-year-old housewife, who had physical characteristics of cerebral gigantism, such as the tall stature, acromegaly, macrocephalia, high arched palate and antimongoloid slant, developed cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria. Her mother, uncle and grandmother were also reported to have slowly progressive gait disturbance. Her mother was also tall. Endocrinological studies failed to show any definite abnormality. CT and MRI revealed remarkable cerebellar atrophy. Though cerebral gigantism is often associated with clumsiness and incoordination, the etiology of the ataxia is poorly understood. This case indicates that the ataxia in cerebral gigantism may be, at least partly, caused by cerebellar atrophy. PMID:2401112

  19. Variant PTA Terminating in Cerebellar Artery, Associated with Multiple Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Uk Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA is one of the remnant fetal anastomoses between the carotid artery and basilar artery. PTAs are classified according to angiographic appearance and various connection. Among them, those directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries are rare subtype. In addition, aneurysms of the PTA are unusual in the literature and have not previously accompanied this subtype of PTA connecting cerebellar artery. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA which is directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries and combined with multiple aneurysms.

  20. Variant PTA Terminating in Cerebellar Artery, Associated with Multiple Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yeong Uk; Kim, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is one of the remnant fetal anastomoses between the carotid artery and basilar artery. PTAs are classified according to angiographic appearance and various connection. Among them, those directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries are rare subtype. In addition, aneurysms of the PTA are unusual in the literature and have not previously accompanied this subtype of PTA connecting cerebellar artery. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA which is directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries and combined with multiple aneurysms. PMID:27446623

  1. Does Wal-Mart Sell Inferior Goods?

    OpenAIRE

    Emek Basker

    2008-01-01

    I estimate the aggregate income elasticity of Wal-Mart's and Target's revenues using quarterly data for 1997-2006. I find that Wal-Mart's revenues increase during bad times, whereas Target's revenues decrease, consistent with Wal-Mart selling "inferior goods" in the technical sense of the term. An upper bound on the aggregate income elasticity of demand for Wal-Mart's wares is -0.5.

  2. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Cift; Salih Soylemez; Murat Demiroglu; Korhan Ozkan; Vahit Emre Ozden; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitat...

  3. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  4. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  5. Anomalous cerebellar anatomy in Chinese children with dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hui eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia (DD claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia.

  6. Cerebellar Hemangioblastoma and Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Six pediatric patients with cerebellar hemangioblastoma were screened for germline or somatic mutations of the von Hippel-Landau gene, in a study at Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA.

  7. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Broersma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII.

  8. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  9. Unilateral absence of cerebellar hemisphere: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdogan, N.; Ozturk, O. [Department of Radiology, Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine, Kayseri (Turkey); Kocakoc, E. [Department of Radiology, Women' s Hospital, Sivas (Turkey); Bekar, D. [Department of Neurology, City Hospital, Sivas (Turkey)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a 38-year-old woman with absence of right cerebellar hemisphere incidentally discovered by MR imaging. No cerebellar abnormality was detected on neurological examination. Tissue probably representing dysgenetic cerebellar tissue with no corticomedullary differentiation was present, connected to the right superior cerebellar peduncle. Ipsilateral enlargement of the pons and cerebral peduncle were additional findings. Although the terms ''aplasia'' or ''agenesis'' have been used to describe this entity, intrauterine destruction is the presumed pathogenetic mechanism in our case, and therefore these terms have been avoided. Asymmetry of pons and mesencephalon may be related to compensatory reorganisation or to the impairment of sequential development of nuclei and neural tracts. (orig.)

  10. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens J.L. De Cocker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  11. Adult-onset cerebellar Ataxia: a clinical and genetic Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Brusse (Esther)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar ataxias represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Two main categories are distinguished: hereditary and sporadic ataxias. Sporadic ataxias may be symptomatic or idiopathic. The clinical classification of hereditary ataxias is nowadays being replaced by an

  12. Maxillary antral lavage using inferior meatal cannula anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochloulis, G; Hern, J D; Hollis, L J; Tolley, N S

    1996-08-01

    Antral puncture and lavage through the inferior meatus is a minor but common otolaryngological procedure, usually performed under local anaesthesia. We describe a new method of introducing local anaesthetic into the inferior meatus, via the use of a soft intravenous cannula connected to a syringe containing 10 per cent cocaine paste. We have called this new technique inferior meatal cannula anaesthesia (IMCA).

  13. The Clinical Differentiation of Cerebellar Infarction from Common Vertigo Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, James A.; Viirre, Erik

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the emergency department approach to diagnosing cerebellar infarction in the patient presenting with vertigo. Vertigo is defined and identification of a vertigo syndrome is discussed. The differentiation of common vertigo syndromes such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere’s disease, migrainous vertigo, and vestibular neuritis is summarized. Confirmation of a peripheral vertigo syndrome substantially lowers the likelihood of cerebellar infarction, as do ind...

  14. Cerebellar Neuroblastoma in 2.5 Years Old Child

    OpenAIRE

    Pedram, Mohammad; Vafaie, Majid; Fekri, Kiavash; Haghi, Sabahat; Rashidi, Iran; Pirooti, Chia

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most common malignancy of childhood, after leukemia and brain tumors. Only 2% of all neuroblastoma occur in the brain. Primary cerebellar neuroblastoma is an specific subset of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors (PNET). Meduloblastoma is a relatively common and well-established entity, consisting of primitive and multipotential cells that may exhibit some evidence of neuroblastic or gliad differentiation. But cerebellar neuroblastoma with ultrastractural evidence of s...

  15. Cerebellar medulloblastoma in a 65 year old Indian male.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal A

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A case of cerebellar medulloblastoma in a 65 year old male is reported. Cerebellar medulloblastoma is classically seen during childhood, and less than 25% of these tumours are found in adults below 40 years of age. Rarely, cases are reported above the age of 40 years. So far only three cases have been reported in patients aged above 64 years and none of these case reports are from India.

  16. Cerebellar contributions to neurological soft signs in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Kubera, Katharina M; Stieltjes, Bram; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are frequently found in psychiatric disorders of significant neurodevelopmental origin, e.g., in patients with schizophrenia and autism. Yet NSS are also present in healthy individuals suggesting a neurodevelopmental signature of motor function, probably as a continuum between health and disease. So far, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying these motor phenomena in healthy persons, and it is even less known whether the cerebellum contributes to NSS expression. Thirty-seven healthy young adults (mean age = 23 years) were studied using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and "resting-state" functional MRI at three Tesla. NSS levels were measured using the "Heidelberg Scale." Cerebellar gray matter volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Cerebellar function was assessed using regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of local network strength. The relationship between cerebellar structure and function and NSS was analyzed using regression models. There was no significant relationship between cerebellar volume and NSS (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). Positive associations with cerebellar lobule VI activity were found for the "motor coordination" and "hard signs" NSS domains. A negative relationship was found between lobule VI activity and "complex motor task" domain (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). The data indicate that in healthy young adults, distinct NSS domains are related to cerebellar activity, specifically with activity of cerebellar subregions with known cortical somatomotor projections. In contrast, cerebellar volume is not predictive of NSS in healthy persons. PMID:25708455

  17. Oxidative Stress in Autism: Elevated Cerebellar 3-nitrotyrosine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Sajdel-Sulkowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that oxidative stress and/or mercury compounds play an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. This study compared for the first time the cerebellar levels of the oxidative stress marker 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, mercury (Hg and the antioxidant selenium (Se levels between control and autistic subjects. Tissue homogenates were prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors from the frozen cerebellar tissue of control (n=10; mean age, 15.5 years; mean PMI, 15.5 hours and autistic (n=9; mean age 12.1 years; mean PMI, 19.3 hours subjects. The concentration of cerebellar 3-NT, determined by ELISA, in controls ranged from 13.69 to 49.04 pmol g-1 of tissue; the concentration of 3-NT in autistic cases ranged from 3.91 to 333.03 pmol g-1 of tissue. Mean cerebellar 3-NT was elevated in autism by 68.9% and the increase was statistically significant (p=0.045. Cerebellar Hg, measured by atomic absorption spectrometry ranged from 0.9 to 35 pmol g-1 tissue in controls (n=10 and from 3.2 to 80.7 pmol g-1 tissue in autistic cases (n=9; the 68.2% increase in cerebellar Hg was not statistically significant. However, there was a positive correlation between cerebellar 3-NT and Hg levels (r=0.7961, p=0.0001. A small decrease in cerebellar Se levels in autism, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was not statistically significant but was accompanied by a 42.9% reduction in the molar ratio of Se to Hg in the autistic cerebellum. While preliminary, the results of the present study add elevated oxidative stress markers in brain to the growing body of data reflecting greater oxidative stress in autism.

  18. Deep Learning for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Functional Score Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhen; Zhong, Shenghua; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that has multiple genetic versions, each with a characteristic pattern of anatomical degeneration that yields distinctive motor and cognitive problems. Studying this pattern of degeneration can help with the diagnosis of disease subtypes, evaluation of disease stage, and treatment planning. In this work, we propose a learning framework using MR image data for discriminating a set of cerebellar ataxia types and predicting a disease ...

  19. Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder with large Hillsach's lesion & deficient glenoid: Treated by autogenous bone graft & modified Latarjet procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshin, Chetan; Jangira, Vivek; Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Jindal, Rohit

    2015-12-01

    Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder is rare in spite of the fact that the anterior dislocation of the shoulder is seen in around 90% of the acute cases. Most of the series of neglected dislocation describe posterior dislocation to be far more common.(1) (,2) We hereby report a case of the neglected anterior shoulder dislocation in a 15 year old boy who had a history of epilepsy. There was a large Hill Sachs lesion in humeral head which was impacted in glenoid inferiorly and glenoid was eburnated at that margin. The humeral head was reconstructed with a tricortical iliac graft. Glenoid was reconstructed by transfer of coracoids process of scapula to antero-inferior glenoid (modified Latarjet procedure). This case is unique because management of humeral head defect with bone graft is not mentioned in anterior dislocation.

  20. Abnormal cerebellar volume in acute and remitted major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depping, Malte S; Wolf, Nadine D; Vasic, Nenad; Sambataro, Fabio; Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal cortical volume is well-documented in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but cerebellar findings have been heterogeneous. It is unclear whether abnormal cerebellar structure relates to disease state or medication. In this study, using structural MRI, we investigated cerebellar volume in clinically acute (with and without psychotropic treatment) and remitted MDD patients. High-resolution structural MRI data at 3T were obtained from acute medicated (n=29), acute unmedicated (n=14) and remitted patients (n=16). Data from 29 healthy controls were used for comparison purposes. Cerebellar volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Patients with an acute MDD episode showed increased volume of left cerebellar area IX, and this was true for both medicated and unmedicated individuals (pbrain functional network with known relevance to core depressive symptom expression, exhibits abnormal volume in patients independent of clinical severity or medication. Thus, the data imply a possible trait marker of the disorder. However, given bilaterality and an association with clinical scores at least in remitted patients, the current findings raise the possibility that cerebellar volume may be reflective of successful treatment as well. PMID:27321187

  1. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration. PMID:26155762

  2. Oxidative injury in multiple sclerosis cerebellar grey matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Kevin; Redondo, Juliana; Hares, Kelly; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction is a significant contributor to disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Both white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) injury occurs within MS cerebellum and, within GM, demyelination, inflammatory cell infiltration and neuronal injury contribute to on-going pathology. The precise nature of cerebellar GM injury is, however, unknown. Oxidative stress pathways with ultimate lipid peroxidation and cell membrane injury occur extensively in MS and the purpose of this study was to investigate these processes in MS cerebellar GM. Post-mortem human cerebellar GM from MS and control subjects was analysed immunohistochemically, followed by semi-quantitative analysis of markers of cellular injury, lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant enzyme expression. We have shown evidence for reduction in myelin and neuronal markers in MS GM, coupled to an increase in expression of a microglial marker. We also show that the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal co-localises with myelin and its levels negatively correlate to myelin basic protein levels. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase (SOD1 and 2) enzymes, localised within cerebellar neurons, are up-regulated, yet the activation of subsequent enzymes responsible for the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, catalase and glutathione peroxidase are relatively deficient. These studies provide evidence for oxidative injury in MS cerebellar GM and further help define disease mechanisms within the MS brain. PMID:27086975

  3. Verbal Memory Impairments in Children after Cerebellar Tumor Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Kirschen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate cerebellar lobular contributions to specific cognitive deficits observed after cerebellar tumor resection. Verbal working memory (VWM tasks were administered to children following surgical resection of cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and age-matched controls. Anatomical MRI scans were used to quantify the extent of cerebellar lobular damage from each patient's resection. Patients exhibited significantly reduced digit span for auditory but not visual stimuli, relative to controls, and damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII was significantly correlated with this deficit. Patients also showed reduced effects of articulatory suppression and this was correlated with damage to the vermis and hemispheral lobule IV/V bilaterally. Phonological similarity and recency effects did not differ overall between patients and controls, but outlier patients with abnormal phonological similarity effects to either auditory or visual stimuli were found to have damage to hemispheral lobule VIII/VIIB on the left and right, respectively. We postulate that damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII may interfere with encoding of auditory stimuli into the phonological store. These data corroborate neuroimaging studies showing focal cerebellar activation during VWM paradigms, and thereby allow us to predict with greater accuracy which specific neurocognitive processes will be affected by a cerebellar tumor resection.

  4. Cerebellar Ataxia and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño, Helena; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Blanco, Yolanda; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Sabater, Lidia; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Rouco, Idoia; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep O.; Saiz, Albert; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current clinical and immunologic knowledge on cerebellar ataxia (CA) with glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies (GAD65-Abs) is based on case reports and small series with short-term follow-up data. OBJECTIVE To report the symptoms, additional antibodies, prognostic factors, and long-term outcomes in a cohort of patients with CA and GAD65-Abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations at a center for autoimmune neurologic disorders among 34 patients with CA and GAD65-Abs, including 25 with long-term follow-up data (median, 5.4 years; interquartile range, 3.1-10.3 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of clinicoimmunologic features and predictors of response to immunotherapy. Immunochemistry on rat brain, cultured neurons, and human embryonic kidney cells expressing GAD65, GAD67, α1-subunit of the glycine receptor, and a repertoire of known cell surface autoantigens were used to identify additional antibodies. Twenty-eight patients with stiff person syndrome and GAD65-Abs served as controls. RESULTS The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 33-80 years); 28 of 34 patients (82%) were women. Nine patients (26%) reported episodes of brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction or persistent vertigo several months before developing CA. The clinical presentation was subacute during a period of weeks in 13 patients (38%). Nine patients (26%) had coexisting stiff person syndrome symptoms. Systemic organ-specific autoimmunities (type 1 diabetes mellitus and others) were present in 29 patients (85%). Twenty of 25 patients with long-term follow-up data received immunotherapy (intravenous immunoglobulin in 10 and corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin or other immunosuppressors in 10), and 7 of them (35%) improved. Predictors of clinical response included subacute onset of CA (odds ratio [OR], 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99; P = .047) and prompt immunotherapy (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99; P = .01). Similar

  5. Inferior Gluteal Perforator Flaps for Breast Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Robert J.; LoTempio, Maria M.; Granzow, Jay W.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps represent the latest in the evolution of soft tissue flaps. They allow the transfer of the patient's own skin and fat in a reliable manner with minimal donor-site morbidity. The powerful perforator flap concept allows transfer of tissue from numerous, well-described donor sites to almost any distant site with suitable recipient vessels. The inferior gluteal artery perforator (I-GAP) flap is one option that allows a large volume of tissue to be used for breast reconstruction w...

  6. Lack of Kinase Regulation of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential 3 (TRPC3) Channel-dependent Currents in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Charmaine; Glitsch, Maike D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: TRPC3 channels are inhibited by PKC and PKG, which also induce cerebellar LTD. We investigate if PKC- and PKG-mediated modulation of cerebellar TRPC3 channels contributes to cerebellar LTD.

  7. Superior labrum anterior to posterior tears in throwing athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintner, David M

    2013-01-01

    Superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears and partial undersurface tears of the rotator cuff are common in experienced throwers, may be adaptive, and are only occasionally symptomatic. Pain in the shoulder of a throwing athlete with an MRI-documented SLAP tear or partial undersurface tear of the rotator cuff can be managed nonsurgically, with attention to posterior capsular contracture, scapular dyskinesia, and rotator cuff strength. The results of the surgical repair of SLAP lesions in the throwing athlete, with or without rotator cuff repair, are inferior to those of nonsurgical treatment. The cause of pain in the throwing athlete must be accurately diagnosed without reliance on MRI findings. PMID:23395053

  8. Abnormal cerebellar volume in acute and remitted major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depping, Malte S; Wolf, Nadine D; Vasic, Nenad; Sambataro, Fabio; Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal cortical volume is well-documented in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but cerebellar findings have been heterogeneous. It is unclear whether abnormal cerebellar structure relates to disease state or medication. In this study, using structural MRI, we investigated cerebellar volume in clinically acute (with and without psychotropic treatment) and remitted MDD patients. High-resolution structural MRI data at 3T were obtained from acute medicated (n=29), acute unmedicated (n=14) and remitted patients (n=16). Data from 29 healthy controls were used for comparison purposes. Cerebellar volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Patients with an acute MDD episode showed increased volume of left cerebellar area IX, and this was true for both medicated and unmedicated individuals (pvolume. In remitted, but not in acutely ill patients, area IX volume was significantly associated with measures of depression severity, as assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD). In addition, area IX volume in remitted patients was significantly related to the duration of antidepressant treatment. In acutely ill patients, no significant relationships were established using clinical variables, such as HAMD, illness or treatment duration and number of depressive episodes. The data suggest that cerebellar area IX, a non-motor region that belongs to a large-scale brain functional network with known relevance to core depressive symptom expression, exhibits abnormal volume in patients independent of clinical severity or medication. Thus, the data imply a possible trait marker of the disorder. However, given bilaterality and an association with clinical scores at least in remitted patients, the current findings raise the possibility that cerebellar volume may be reflective of successful treatment as well.

  9. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications.

  10. A cerebellar neuroprosthetic system: computational architecture and in vivo experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan eHerreros Alonso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuro-prosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuro-prosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step towards replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuro-prosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuro-prosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step towards the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term

  11. Homozygosity mapping and targeted genomic sequencing reveal the gene responsible for cerebellar hypoplasia and quadrupedal locomotion in a consanguineous kindred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Tekinay, Ayse Begum; Doerschner, Katja; Boyaci, Huseyin; Bilguvar, Kaya; Unal, Hilal; Ors, Aslihan; Onat, O. Emre; Atalar, Ergin; Basak, A. Nazli; Topaloglu, Haluk; Kansu, Tulay; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner; Gunel, Murat; Ozcelik, Tayfun

    2011-01-01

    The biological basis for the development of the cerebro-cerebellar structures required for posture and gait in humans is poorly understood. We investigated a large consanguineous family from Turkey exhibiting an extremely rare phenotype associated with quadrupedal locomotion, mental retardation, and cerebro-cerebellar hypoplasia, linked to a 7.1-Mb region of homozygosity on chromosome 17p13.1–13.3. Diffusion weighted imaging and fiber tractography of the patients' brains revealed morphological abnormalities in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular atrophy of superior, middle, and inferior peduncles of the cerebellum. Structural magnetic resonance imaging showed additional morphometric abnormalities in several cortical areas, including the corpus callosum, precentral gyrus, and Brodmann areas BA6, BA44, and BA45. Targeted sequencing of the entire homozygous region in three affected individuals and two obligate carriers uncovered a private missense mutation, WDR81 p.P856L, which cosegregated with the condition in the extended family. The mutation lies in a highly conserved region of WDR81, flanked by an N-terminal BEACH domain and C-terminal WD40 beta-propeller domains. WDR81 is predicted to be a transmembrane protein. It is highly expressed in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. WDR81 represents the third gene, after VLDLR and CA8, implicated in quadrupedal locomotion in humans. PMID:21885617

  12. Sudden stopping in patients with cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Mariano; Conte, Carmela; Casali, Carlo; Ranavolo, Alberto; Mari, Silvia; Di Fabio, Roberto; Perrotta, Armando; Coppola, Gianluca; Padua, Luca; Monamì, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Stopping during walking, a dynamic motor task frequent in everyday life, is very challenging for ataxic patients, as it reduces their gait stability and increases the incidence of falls. This study was conducted to analyse the biomechanical characteristics of upper and lower body segments during abrupt stopping in ataxic patients in order to identify possible strategies used to counteract the instability in the sagittal and frontal plane. Twelve patients with primary degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were studied. Time-distance parameters, dynamic stability of the centre of mass, upper body measures and lower joint kinematic and kinetic parameters were analysed. The results indicate that ataxic patients have a great difficulty in stopping abruptly during walking and adopt a multi-step stopping strategy, occasionally with feet parallel, to compensate for their inability to coordinate the upper body and to generate a well-coordinated lower limb joint flexor-extensor pattern and appropriate braking forces for progressively decelerating the progression of the body in the sagittal plane. A specific rehabilitation treatment designed to improve the ability of ataxic patients to transform unplanned stopping into planned stopping, to coordinate upper body and to execute an effective flexion-extension pattern of the hip and knee joints may be useful in these patients in order to improve their stopping performance and prevent falls.

  13. The anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC has a role in attention, analysis of sensory information, error recognition, problem solving, detection of novelty, behavior, emotions, social relations, cognitive control, and regulation of visceral functions. This area is active whenever the individual feels some emotions, solves a problem, or analyzes the pros and cons of an action (if it is a right decision. Analogous areas are also found in higher mammals, especially whales, and they contain spindle neurons that enable complex social interactions. Disturbance of ACC activity is found in dementias, schizophrenia, depression, the obsessive-compulsive syndrome, and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  14. Digital subtraction angiography of a persistent trigeminal artery variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temizöz, Osman; Genchellac, Hakan; Unlü, Ercüment; Cağli, Bekir; Ozdemir, Hüseyin; Demir, M Kemal

    2010-09-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery variants are described as cerebellar arteries that directly originate from the precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. This has been observed in 0.18% of cerebral catheter angiograms. On the other hand, a persistent trigeminal artery variant feeding both the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory is very rare. We present this uncommon anomalous artery along with digital subtraction angiography findings and discuss its clinical significance in light of the literature. PMID:19821254

  15. "Cool" inferior frontostriatal dysfunction in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder versus "hot" ventromedial orbitofrontal-limbic dysfunction in conduct disorder: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia, Katya

    2011-06-15

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder overlap behaviorally, clinically, and cognitively. An important question of potential future clinical relevance is whether these two overlapping disorders are mediated by similar or distinct underlying brain substrates. This article reviews the modern neuroimaging literature on brain structure, function, and connectivity in both disorders, shaping out commonalities and differences. Findings show that ADHD is characterized predominantly by abnormalities in inferior frontal, striatal, parietotemporal, and cerebellar regions and networks that mediate "cool"-cognitive, i.e., inhibitory, attention and timing functions associated with the disorder. Conduct disorder, by contrast, has consistently been associated with abnormalities of the "hot" paralimbic system that regulates motivation and affect, comprising lateral orbital and ventromedial prefrontal cortices, superior temporal lobes, and underlying limbic structures, most prominently the amygdala. Direct comparisons in functional imaging show that these associations of cool inferior fronto-striato-cerebellar dysfunction in ADHD and of hot orbitofrontal-paralimbic dysfunction in conduct disorder are disorder-specific. There is, hence, evidence for dissociated underlying pathophysiologies for these two disorders that may have implications for future anatomy-based differential diagnosis and prevention and intervention.

  16. Emotions and their cognitive control in children with cerebellar tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopyan, Talar; Laughlin, Suzanne; Dennis, Maureen

    2010-11-01

    A constellation of deficits, termed the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS), has been reported following acquired cerebellar lesions. We studied emotion identification and the cognitive control of emotion in children treated for acquired tumors of the cerebellum. Participants were 37 children (7-16 years) treated for cerebellar tumors (19 benign astrocytomas (AST), 18 malignant medulloblastomas (MB), and 37 matched controls (CON). The Emotion Identification Task investigated recognition of happy and sad emotions in music. In two cognitive control tasks, we investigated whether children could identify emotion in situations in which the emotion in the music and the emotion in the lyrics was either congruent or incongruent. Children with cerebellar tumors identified emotion as accurately and quickly as controls (p > .05), although there was a significant interaction of emotions and group (p sad emotions, and both cerebellar tumor groups were impaired in the cognitive control of emotions (p emotion rather than emotion identification provides some support for a model of the CCAS as a disorder, not so much of emotion as of the regulation of emotion by cognition. PMID:20887648

  17. MR imaging of solid cerebellar tumors in adult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Yu, In Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Sung Wook; Byun, Hong Sik [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Ho; Kim, Ki Jun [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-15

    The solid variety of cerebellar tumors in adult is relatively uncommon. This study is to describe the characteristic MR findings of various solid cerebellar tumors in adult. Twenty three cerebellar solid tumors from 22 consecutive patients over age of 15 with surgical confirmations were retrospectively evaluated with MR findings. Histologic diagnosis included hemangioblastoma (n = 6), metastasis (n = 6), high-grade astrocytoma (n = 3), and medulloblastoma (n = 8). The MR findings were reviewed with attention of the size, the signal intensity of the tumors, pattern of enhancement, tumoral margin, degree of peritumoral edema, signal void vascular structures within and/or around the tumor, and location in relation to attachment to the pial surface of the tumor. Solid hemangioblastomas consistently showed slightly low or iso signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images, dense homogeneous enhancement, and signal void vessels within and/or around the mass. Metastatic tumors showed various findings with predominantly low or iso signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Medulloblastomas was midline and/or paramidline in location, and had larger mass formation. High-grade astrocytomas revealed nonspecific MR findings with no signal void vessels. Hemangioblastoma, metastasis, malignant astrocytoma, and medulloblastoma should be included in differential diagnosis of solid cerebellar tumors in adult. Dense homogeneous enhancement and signal void vessels are characteristic of hemangioblastoma. The signal intensity of the tumor, and presence of signal void vessels, location and enhancement pattern can be some value in differential diagnosis of solid cerebellar tumors in adult.

  18. Development of the cerebellar cortex in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangshu Cheng; Jin Du; Dongming Yu; Qiying Jiang; Yanqiu Hu; Lei Wang; Mingshan Li; Jinbo Deng

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the central nervous system of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behavior. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis events. The formation of the layered structure in the developing cerebellum remains unclear. The present study investigated the development of the cerebellar cortex. The results demonstrate that the primordium of the cerebellum comprises the ependymal, mantle, and marginal layers at embryonic day 12 (E12). Subsequently, the laminated cerebellar cortex undergoes cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, and at about postnatal day 0 (P0), the cerebellar cortex presents an external granular layer, a molecular layer, a Purkinje layer, and an internal granular layer. The external granular layer is thickest at P6/7 and disappears at P20. From P0 to P30, the internal granular cells and the Purkinje cells gradually differentiate and develop until maturity. Apoptotic neurons are evident in the layered structure in the developing cerebellar cortex. The external granular layer disappears gradually because of cell migration and apoptosis. The cells of the other layers primarily undergo differentiation, development, and apoptosis.

  19. Does cerebellar neuronal integrity relate to cognitive ability?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows the non-invasive measurement of metabolite levels in the brain. One of these is N-acetylaspartate (NA), a molecule found solely in neurones, synthesised there by mitochondria. This compound can be considered as a marker of 1) neuronal density and 2) neuronal mitochondria function. We recently completed a joint MRS and neuropsychological investigation of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare (1/20,000) autosomal dominant disorder caused by a deletion which includes the elastin locus and LIM-kinase. The syndrome has an associated behavioural and cognitive profile which includes hyperactivity, hyperacusis and excessive sociability. Spatial skills are severely affected, while verbal skills are left relatively intact Our investigation showed loss of NA from the cerebellum in WBS compared with normal controls, with the subject population as a whole displaying a continuum of cerebellar NA concentration. Ability at cognitive tests, including the Weschler IQ scale and various verbal and spatial tests, was shown to correlate significantly and positively with the concentration of NA in the cerebellum. This finding can be interpreted in one of two ways: 1. Our sampling of cerebellar metabolite levels represents a 'global' sampling of total brain neuronal density and, as such, is independent of cerebellar integrity. 2. Cerebellar neuronal integrity is associated with performance at cognitive tests. If the latter interpretation is shown to be the case, it will have important implications for our current understanding of cerebellar function. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  20. Role of Optical Coherence Tomography in Assessing Anterior Chamber Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochupurakal, Reema Thomas; Jha, Kirti Nath; Rajalakshmi, A.R.; Nagarajan, Swathi; Ezhumalai, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gonioscopy is the gold standard in assessing anterior chamber angles. However, interobserver variations are common and there is a need for reliable objective method of assessment. Aim To compare the anterior chamber angle by gonioscopy and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) in individuals with shallow anterior chamber. Materials and Methods This comparative observational study was conducted in a rural tertiary multi-speciality teaching hospital. A total of 101 eyes of 54 patients with shallow anterior chamber on slit lamp evaluation were included. Anterior chamber angle was graded by gonioscopy using the shaffer grading system. Angles were also assessed by SD-OCT with Trabecular Iris Angle (TIA) and Angle Opening Distance (AOD). Chi-square test, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value to find correlation between OCT parameters and gonioscopy grading. Results Females represented 72.7%. The mean age was 53.93 ±8.24 years and mean anterior chamber depth was 2.47 ± 0.152 mm. Shaffer grade ≤ 2 were identified in 95(94%) superior, 42(41.5%) inferior, 65(64.3%) nasal and 57(56.4%) temporal quadrants. Cut-off values of TIA ≤ 22° and AOD ≤ 290 μm were taken as narrow angles on SD-OCT. TIA of ≤ 22° were found in 88(92.6%) nasal and 87(87%) temporal angles. AOD of ≤ 290 μm was found in 73(76.8%) nasal and 83(83%) temporal quadrants. Sensitivity in detecting narrow angles was 90.7% and 82.2% for TIA and AOD, while specificity was 11.7% and 23.4%, respectively. Conclusion Individuals were found to have narrow angles more with SD-OCT. Sensitivity was high and specificity was low in detecting narrow angles compared to gonioscopy, making it an unreliable tool for screening. PMID:27190851

  1. Decreased cortical inhibition and yet cerebellar pathology in 'familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Bour, Lo J.; Edwards, Mark J.; Brown, Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Rozemuller-Kwakkel, Johanna M.; Koehler, Peter J.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Rothwell, John C.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Cortical hyperexcitability is a feature of "familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy" (FCMTE). However, neuropathological investigations in a single FCMTE patient showed isolated cerebellar pathology. Pathological investigations in a second FCMTE patient, reported here, confirmed cerebellar

  2. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  3. Total laparoscopic retrieval of inferior vena cava filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Benrashid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available While there is some local variability in the use of inferior vena cava filters and there has been some evolution in the indications for filter placement over time, inferior vena cava filters remain a standard option for pulmonary embolism prophylaxis. Indications are clear in certain subpopulations of patients, particularly those with deep venous thrombosis and absolute contraindications to anticoagulation. There are, however, a variety of reported inferior vena cava filter complications in the short and long term, making retrieval of the filter desirable in most cases. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese patient complaining of chronic abdominal pain after inferior vena cava filter placement and malposition of the filter with extensive protrusion outside the inferior vena cava. She underwent successful laparoscopic retrieval of her malpositioned inferior vena cava filters after failure of a conventional endovascular approach.

  4. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Cift

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons.

  5. Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaki, M., E-mail: mbmv@doctors.org.uk [Department of Clinical Radiology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Willis, A.P.; Jones, R.G. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and its tributaries are increasingly recognized in asymptomatic patients due to the more frequent use of cross-sectional imaging and computed tomography (CT) in particular. IVC development is a complex process involving formation of anastomoses between three pairs of embryonic veins in the 4th to 8th week of gestation. Various permutations occur in the basic venous plan of the abdomen and pelvis resulting in variants such as isolated left IVC, double IVC, and retroaortic left renal vein. The majority of these anomalies are asymptomatic but occasionally present clinically with thromboembolic complications. However, awareness of their existence is important to avoid important diagnostic pitfalls and in preoperative surgical and interventional radiological planning.

  6. Miniplacas permitem tratamento eficiente e eficaz da mordida aberta anterior Miniplates allow efficient and effective treatment of anterior open bites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Faber

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: o tratamento das deformidades e más oclusões que incluem mordidas abertas anteriores foi uma das primeiras aplicações de miniplacas como forma de ancoragem ortodôntica. A implementação desse sistema de tratamento reduz o número de pacientes indicados para a cirurgia ortognática e simplifica muitos problemas. Nessa abordagem, os dentes posteriores são intruídos e a mandíbula sofre um giro no sentido anti-horário, diminuindo a altura facial inferior e projetando os pogônios de tecidos duro e mole. OBJETIVO: o presente artigo apresenta os fundamentos da mecânica ortodôntica para correção da mordida aberta anterior e os ilustra com uma série de casos clínicos.INTRODUCTION: The treatment of facial deformities and malocclusions, such as anterior open bite, was one of the first applications of miniplates for orthodontic anchorage. The use of this treatment system reduces the number of patients referred to orthognathic surgery and simplifies many problems. This approach applies intrusive forces to posterior teeth, and the mandible undergoes counterclockwise rotation, which decreases lower facial height and advances the projection of hard and soft tissue pogonions. OBJECTIVE: This study describes the principles of orthodontic mechanics in the correction of anterior open bite and illustrates these principles with a series of cases.

  7. Estudio de la afectación del ventrículo derecho en el infarto anterior reperfundido

    OpenAIRE

    Rumiz González, Eva

    2015-01-01

    La afectación del ventrículo derecho (VD) en el seno de un infarto agudo de miocardio de localización inferior, es de sobra conocida. Sin embargo, la vascularización de la cara anterior del VD depende de ramas de la arteria descendente anterior (ADA), siendo escasos los trabajos que estudian la afectación del VD que se produce durante un infarto agudo de miocardio de localización anterior. Evaluamos la afectación del VD que se produce tras la oclusión del ADA en un grupo experimental de 9 cer...

  8. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louiza B Thomsen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A TTX-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none tetrodotoxin (TTX -sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than one second affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette.

  9. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  10. Cerebellar networks with the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Andreea C; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2013-05-01

    The dominant view of cerebellar function has been that it is exclusively concerned with motor control and coordination. Recent findings from neuroanatomical, behavioral, and imaging studies have profoundly changed this view. Neuroanatomical studies using virus transneuronal tracers have demonstrated that cerebellar output reaches vast areas of the neocortex, including regions of prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex. Furthermore, it has recently become clear that the cerebellum is reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia, which suggests that the two subcortical structures are part of a densely interconnected network. Taken together, these findings elucidate the neuroanatomical substrate for cerebellar involvement in non-motor functions mediated by the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in processes traditionally associated with the basal ganglia. PMID:23579055

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  19. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  2. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Etiological aspects of anterior open bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Ljiljana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Open bite is a multifactorial phenomenon and no single factor can account for open-bite. Etiology plays an important role in diagnosis. Heredity, unfavorable growth patterns, incorrect jaw postoure, are the characteristics of skeletal open bite. Digit sucking. Depending on where the thumb is placed, a number of different types of dental problems can develop. Malocclusions of the late mixed or permanent dentitions, caused by thumb sucking are not self corrected and orthodontic treatment is necessary for their correction. Lymphatic tissue. In order to produce oral respiration, the mandible is postured inferiorly with the tongue protruded and resting against the oral floor. This postural alteration induces dental and skeletal modifications similar to those caused by thumb sucking. This may cause excessive eruption of the posterior teeth, leading to an increase in the vertical dimension of the face and result in development of anterior open bite. Tongue thrust. Tongue habits cause an anterior open bite or they develop secondarily to thumb sucking. In skeletal open bite the tongue habit acts as a secondary factor which helps to maintain or exacerbate the condition. Many orthodontists have had a discouraging experience of completing dental treatment, with what appeared to be good results, only to discover that the case had relapsed because the patient had a tongue thrust swallowing pattern. Conclusion. Dentoalveolar or habitual open bite is caused by habits, which influence the growth and development of dentoalveolar processes and contribute to occlusal disharmonies. Prior to eruption of adult dentition, open bite related to oral habits is usually not a concern as when the habits stop, because the erupting dentition tends to improve spontaneously. Treatment is usually not necessary until permanent teeth erupt (~6 years old. .

  17. Anterior hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, J W

    1999-10-15

    Anterior hip pain is a common complaint with many possible causes. Apophyseal avulsion and slipped capital femoral epiphysis should not be overlooked in adolescents. Muscle and tendon strains are common in adults. Subsequent to accurate diagnosis, strains should improve with rest and directed conservative treatment. Osteoarthritis, which is diagnosed radiographically, generally occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Arthritis in younger adults should prompt consideration of an inflammatory cause. A possible femoral neck stress fracture should be evaluated urgently to prevent the potentially significant complications associated with displacement. Patients with osteitis pubis should be educated about the natural history of the condition and should undergo physical therapy to correct abnormal pelvic mechanics. "Sports hernias," nerve entrapments and labral pathologic conditions should be considered in athletic adults with characteristic presentations and chronic symptoms. Surgical intervention may allow resumption of pain-free athletic activity. PMID:10537384

  18. Heat Shock Protein Beta-1 Modifies Anterior to Posterior Purkinje Cell Vulnerability in a Mouse Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chan; Elrick, Matthew J; Dell'Orco, James M; Qin, Zhaohui S; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Shakkottai, Vikram G; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Selective neuronal vulnerability is characteristic of most degenerative disorders of the CNS, yet mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly characterized. Many forms of cerebellar degeneration exhibit an anterior-to-posterior gradient of Purkinje cell loss including Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC) disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurological deficits that often begin in childhood. Here, we sought to identify candidate genes underlying vulnerability of Purkinje cells in anterior cerebellar lobules using data freely available in the Allen Brain Atlas. This approach led to the identification of 16 candidate neuroprotective or susceptibility genes. We demonstrate that one candidate gene, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1), promoted neuronal survival in cellular models of NPC disease through a mechanism that involved inhibition of apoptosis. Additionally, we show that over-expression of wild type HSPB1 or a phosphomimetic mutant in NPC mice slowed the progression of motor impairment and diminished cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. We confirmed the modulatory effect of Hspb1 on Purkinje cell degeneration in vivo, as knockdown by Hspb1 shRNA significantly enhanced neuron loss. These results suggest that strategies to promote HSPB1 activity may slow the rate of cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease and highlight the use of bioinformatics tools to uncover pathways leading to neuronal protection in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27152617

  19. Heat Shock Protein Beta-1 Modifies Anterior to Posterior Purkinje Cell Vulnerability in a Mouse Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Chung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Selective neuronal vulnerability is characteristic of most degenerative disorders of the CNS, yet mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly characterized. Many forms of cerebellar degeneration exhibit an anterior-to-posterior gradient of Purkinje cell loss including Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurological deficits that often begin in childhood. Here, we sought to identify candidate genes underlying vulnerability of Purkinje cells in anterior cerebellar lobules using data freely available in the Allen Brain Atlas. This approach led to the identification of 16 candidate neuroprotective or susceptibility genes. We demonstrate that one candidate gene, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1, promoted neuronal survival in cellular models of NPC disease through a mechanism that involved inhibition of apoptosis. Additionally, we show that over-expression of wild type HSPB1 or a phosphomimetic mutant in NPC mice slowed the progression of motor impairment and diminished cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. We confirmed the modulatory effect of Hspb1 on Purkinje cell degeneration in vivo, as knockdown by Hspb1 shRNA significantly enhanced neuron loss. These results suggest that strategies to promote HSPB1 activity may slow the rate of cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease and highlight the use of bioinformatics tools to uncover pathways leading to neuronal protection in neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration as a marker of endometrial cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Geoffrey; Morley, Thomas; Chowdhury, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman developed a cerebellar syndrome having undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for endometrial cancer 1 year previously. She was found to be anti-Yo antibody positive and was diagnosed with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). A subsequent positron emission tomography scan and lymph node biopsy identified recurrence of her endometrial cancer. This case illustrates how PCD can be an indicator of cancer recurrence, underlines the significance of PCD as a prompt to search for underlying malignancy, and highlights the difficulties PCD poses to the clinician in terms of diagnosis and management.

  1. Heterogeneous Expression of T-type Ca2+ Channels Defines Different Neuronal Populations in the Inferior Olive of the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; de Jeu, Marcel T. G.

    2016-01-01

    The neurons in the inferior olive express subthreshold oscillations in their membrane potential. This oscillatory activity is known to drive synchronous activity in the cerebellar cortex and plays a role in motor learning and motor timing. In the past years, it was commonly thought that olivary neurons belonged to a unique population of oscillating units and that oscillation properties were exclusively dependent on network settings and/or synaptic inputs. The origin of olivary oscillations is now known to be a local phenomenon and is generated by a combination of conductances. In the present work, we show the existence of at least two neuronal populations that can be distinguished on the basis of the presence or absence of low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels. The expression of this channel determines the oscillatory behavior of olivary neurons. Furthermore, the number of cells that express this channel is different between sub nuclei of the inferior olive. These findings clearly indicate the functional variability within and between olivary sub nuclei.

  2. Heterogeneous Expression of T-type Ca2+ Channels Defines Different Neuronal Populations in the Inferior Olive of the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; de Jeu, Marcel T. G.

    2016-01-01

    The neurons in the inferior olive express subthreshold oscillations in their membrane potential. This oscillatory activity is known to drive synchronous activity in the cerebellar cortex and plays a role in motor learning and motor timing. In the past years, it was commonly thought that olivary neurons belonged to a unique population of oscillating units and that oscillation properties were exclusively dependent on network settings and/or synaptic inputs. The origin of olivary oscillations is now known to be a local phenomenon and is generated by a combination of conductances. In the present work, we show the existence of at least two neuronal populations that can be distinguished on the basis of the presence or absence of low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels. The expression of this channel determines the oscillatory behavior of olivary neurons. Furthermore, the number of cells that express this channel is different between sub nuclei of the inferior olive. These findings clearly indicate the functional variability within and between olivary sub nuclei. PMID:27540355

  3. Preserved Glucose Metabolism of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in a Case of Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia: F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Dae Kwon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar glucose metabolism of multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C is known to be decreased but is not defined among areas of cerebellum. We encountered a 54-year-old man who developed dizziness and progressive ataxia followed by urinary incontinence and orthostatic hypotension, all of those symptoms progressed relentlessly and the symptoms responded poorly to levodopa therapy. Visual analysis and statistical parametric mapping analysis of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed hypometabolism of both cerebellar hemisphere, severe at cortical area, and pons. There was clear sparing of deep cerebellar nuclei. Our report, as we know, shows the first case of preserved glucose metabolism of deep cerebellar nuclei relative to cerebellar cortex in an MSA-C patient.

  4. Anterior cerebral artery aneurysm associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms and abdominal aorta aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yunghwan; Min, Hyung Ki; Yoon, Sang Pil

    2013-01-01

    We found multiple aneurysms in the intracranial arteries and abdominal aorta of an 87-year-old Korean female cadaver, whose cause of death was reported as "cholangiocarcinoma." An abdominal aortic aneurysm was observed in the infrarenal aorta, where the inferior mesenteric artery arose. The intracranial aneurysms were found in the A3 segment of the anterior cerebral artery and at the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. This case provides an example of the very rare association of perip...

  5. Simple self-reduction method for anterior shoulder dislocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reiner Wirbel; Martin Ruppert; Elmar Schwarz; Bernhard Zapp

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To demonstrate and evaluate a modified simple method about self-reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation for significance in the emergency room. Methods:TheBoss-Holzach-Matter method for self-reduction of anterior shoulder disloaction is described.Patients with an anterior shoulder dislocation were retrospectively analysed concerning age, gender, type of anterior shoulder dislocation, occurrence of associated fractures, time between injury and reduction, reduction time, and method of reduction with its respective success rate. Results:Eighty-six patients(52 men,34 women, mean age49 years) were treated fromJanuary 2010 toJune2014.The reduction time ranged between20 seconds and6 min(mean1.5 min). Subcoracoid type of shoulder dislocation was seen in72 cases(84%), subglenoid type in14 cases(16%).Associated factures were seen in20 cases, proportionally more often in subgleboid dislocations,12 at the greater tuberosity,6 at the inferior rim of the glenoid fossa and2 at both localizations.TheBoss-Holzach-Matter method was used in35 cases with a success rate of 71.5%; dieKocher method and traction/countertraction method with premedication were used in 14 cases and17 cases with success rates of64% and70%, respectively.All other cases and the failed primary attempts required hyponotic medication.All patients older than70(n=16) were not able to perform the self reducing procedure. Conclusion:The presentedBoss-Holzach-Matter method for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation is a simple method without the need of anaesthesia, but cooperation from patients is crucial.The successful rate is comparable with other established methods.

  6. Haemangioblastoma, Histological and immunohistological study of an enigmatic cerebellar tumour

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz-Sánchez, F. F.; Rossi, M L; Rodríguez-Prados, S.; Nakamura, N; Hughes, J T; Coakham, H. B.

    1990-01-01

    Paraffin-embedded blocks of 36 cerebellar haemangioblastomas were reacted with a panel of antibodies including glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin, Factor VIII, a neuroendocrine marker and with Ulex europaeus. agglutinin The main histological features, apart from the characteristic large abnormal vessels, were a prominent reticulin network, a cystic architecture and cellular and nuclear polymorphism. Two cell type...

  7. Very Preterm Birth, Cerebellar Development and Neuropsychological Outcome in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar volumes were measured on structural MRI at adolescence and adulthood in 65 preterm individuals (born before 33 weeks’ gestation, and a term-born comparison group, in a study at King’s College, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and University College, London; and Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea.

  8. Cerebellar output controls generalized spike-and-wave discharge occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke); S.J. Eelkman Rooda; J.K. Spanke (Jochen); P. Alva (Parimala); M. van Dongen (Marijn); A. Karapatis (Athanasios); E.A. Tolner (Else A.); C. Strydis (Christos); N. Davey (Neil); B.H.J. Winkelman (Beerend); M. Negrello (Mario); W. Serdijn (Wouter); V. Steuber (Volker); A.M.J.M. Maagdenberg (Arn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective Disrupting thalamocortical activity patterns has proven to be a promising approach to stop generalized spike-and-wave discharges (GSWDs) characteristic of absence seizures. Here, we investigated to what extent modulation of neuronal firing in cerebellar nuclei (CN), which are a

  9. Cerebellar Output Controls Generalized Spike-and-Wave Discharge Occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, L.; Eelkman Rooda, O.H.J.; Spanke, J.K.; Alva, P.; Van Dongen, M.N.; Karapatis, A.; Tolner, E.A.; Strydis, C.; Davey, N.; Winkelman, B.H.J.; Negrello, M.; Serdijn, W.A.; Steuber, V.; Van den Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M.; De Zeeuw, C.I.; Hoebeek, F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Disrupting thalamocortical activity patterns has proven to be a promising approach to stop generalized spike-and-wave discharges (GSWDs) characteristic of absence seizures. Here, we investigated to what extent modulation of neuronal firing in cerebellar nuclei (CN), which are anatomically

  10. Cerebellar output controls generalized spike-and-wave discharge occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, Lieke; Eelkman Rooda, Oscar H J; Spanke, Jochen K; Alva, Parimala; van Dongen, Marijn N; Karapatis, Athanasios; Tolner, Else A; Strydis, Christos; Davey, Neil; Winkelman, Beerend H J; Negrello, Mario; Serdijn, Wouter A; Steuber, Volker; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Disrupting thalamocortical activity patterns has proven to be a promising approach to stop generalized spike-and-wave discharges (GSWDs) characteristic of absence seizures. Here, we investigated to what extent modulation of neuronal firing in cerebellar nuclei (CN), which are anatomically

  11. Is a Cerebellar Deficit the Underlying Cause of Reading Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irannejad, Shahrzad; Savage, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether children with dyslexia differed in their performance on reading, phonological, rapid naming, motor, and cerebellar-related tasks and automaticity measures compared to reading age (RA)-matched and chronological age (CA)-matched control groups. Participants were 51 children attending mainstream English elementary…

  12. Cerebellar Control of Locomotion in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Vinueza Veloz (Maria)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Modern neuroscience is paving the way for new insight into cerebellar functions including the control of cognitive, autonomic and emotional processes. Yet, how the cerebellum contributes to complex motor behaviors, such as locomotion, is still only partially understood.

  13. Grip-load force coordination in cerebellar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrien, D J; Wiesendanger, M

    1999-09-01

    The study examined the anticipatory grip force modulations to load force changes during a drawer-opening task. An impact force was induced by a mechanical stop which abruptly arrested movement of the pulling hand. In performing this task, normal subjects generated a typical grip force profile characterized by an initial force impulse related to drawer movement onset, followed by a ramp-like grip force increase prior to the impending load perturbation. Finally, a reactive response was triggered by the impact. In patients with bilateral cerebellar dysfunction, the drawer-opening task was performed with an alternative control strategy. During pulling, grip force was increased to a high (overestimated) default level. The latter suggests that cerebellar patients were unable to adjust and to scale precisely the grip force according to the load force. In addition, the latency between impact and reactive activity was prolonged in the patients, suggesting an impaired cerebellar transmission of the long-latency responses. In conclusion, these data demonstrate the involvement of cerebellar circuits in both proactive and reactive mechanisms in view of predictable load perturbations during manipulative behavior. PMID:10473743

  14. Cerebellar damage impairs executive control and monitoring of movement generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Brunamonti

    Full Text Available Executive control of motor responses is a psychological construct of the executive system. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and thalamus in the inhibition of actions and monitoring of performance. The involvement of the cerebellum in cognitive function and its functional interaction with basal ganglia have recently been reported. Based on these findings, we examined the hypothesis of cerebellar involvement in executive control by administering a countermanding task in patients with focal cerebellar damage. The countermanding task requires one to make a movement in response to a 'go' signal and to halt it when a 'stop' signal is presented. The duration of the go process (reaction time; RT, the duration of the stop process (stop signal reaction time; SSRT, and their relationship, expressed by a psychometric function, are recorded as measures of executive control. All patients had longer go process duration in general and in particular, as a proactive control, as demonstrated by the increase in RT after erroneously performed stop trials. Further, they were defective in the slope of the psychometric function indicating a difficulty on triggering the stop process, although the SSRT did not differ from controls. Notably, their performance was worse when lesions affected deep cerebellar nuclei. Our results support the hypothesis that the cerebellum regulates the executive control of voluntary actions. We speculate that its activity is attributed to specific cerebellar influence over the cortico-striatal loop.

  15. Reevaluating the Role of LTD in Cerebellar Motor Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schonewille (Martijn); Z. Gao (Zhenyu); H.J. Boele (Henk-Jan); M.F. Vinueza Veloz (Maria); W.E. Amerika; A. Šimek (Antonia); M.T.G. Jeu (Marcel); J. Steinberg (Jordan); K. Takamiya (Kogo); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); D. Linden (David); R. Huganir (Richard); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractLong-term depression at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses (PF-PC LTD) has been proposed to be required for cerebellar motor learning. To date, tests of this hypothesis have sought to interfere with receptors (mGluR1) and enzymes (PKC, PKG, or αCamKII) necessary for induction of PF-PC

  16. Hippocampo-cerebellar theta band phase synchrony in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S; Penttonen, M

    2010-02-17

    Hippocampal functioning, in the form of theta band oscillation, has been shown to modulate and predict cerebellar learning of which rabbit eyeblink conditioning is perhaps the most well-known example. The contribution of hippocampal neural activity to cerebellar learning is only possible if there is a functional connection between the two structures. Here, in the context of trace eyeblink conditioning, we show (1) that, in addition to the hippocampus, prominent theta oscillation also occurs in the cerebellum, and (2) that cerebellar theta oscillation is synchronized with that in the hippocampus. Further, the degree of phase synchrony (PS) increased both as a response to the conditioning stimuli and as a function of the relative power of hippocampal theta oscillation. However, the degree of PS did not change as a function of either training or learning nor did it predict learning rate as the hippocampal theta ratio did. Nevertheless, theta band synchronization might reflect the formation of transient neural assemblies between the hippocampus and the cerebellum. These findings help us understand how hippocampal function can affect eyeblink conditioning, during which the critical plasticity occurs in the cerebellum. Future studies should examine cerebellar unit activity in relation to hippocampal theta oscillations in order to discover the detailed mechanisms of theta-paced neural activity. PMID:19945512

  17. Speech and Language Findings Associated with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R.; Vernino, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that…

  18. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with bull's-eye macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Eerola, K.U.; Vrijland, H.R.; Aandekerk, A.L.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Deutman, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 1980, we published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology two siblings with hereditary ataxia and atrophic maculopathy. The report is cited in the literature as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with retinal degeneration. The purpose of the present study is to document the progressi

  19. Neurophysiological evidence for cerebellar dysfunction in primary focal dystonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teo, J.T.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Schneider, S.A.; Rothwell, J.C.; Bhatia, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there may be functional and structural changes in the cerebellum of patients with adult onset primary focal dystonia. The aim of this study was to establish whether there is any neurophysiological indicator of abnormal cerebellar function, using the classic eyeblin

  20. Long-Term Sequelae after Cerebellar Astrocytoma Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The long-term effects on neurologic, neuropsychological, and behavioral functioning in a consecutive series of 23 children treated surgically for cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma without additional radio- and chemotherapy are determined in a study at Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and other medical centers.

  1. Resting state cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity networks: A comparison of anatomical and self-organizing map approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Bernard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum plays a role in a wide variety of complex behaviors. In order to better understand the role of the cerebellum in human behavior, it is important to know how this structure interacts with cortical and other subcortical regions of the brain. To date, several studies have investigated the cerebellum using resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI; Buckner et al., 2011; Krienen & Buckner, 2009; O’Reilly et al., 2009. However, none of this work has taken an anatomically-driven approach. Furthermore, though detailed maps of cerebral cortex and cerebellum networks have been proposed using different network solutions based on the cerebral cortex (Buckner et al., 2011, it remains unknown whether or not an anatomical lobular breakdown best encompasses the networks of the cerebellum. Here, we used fcMRI to create an anatomically-driven cerebellar connectivity atlas. Timecourses were extracted from the lobules of the right hemisphere and vermis. We found distinct networks for the individual lobules with a clear division into motor and non-motor regions. We also used a self-organizing map algorithm to parcellate the cerebellum. This allowed us to investigate redundancy and independence of the anatomically identified cerebellar networks. We found that while anatomical boundaries in the anterior cerebellum provide functional subdivisions of a larger motor grouping defined using our self-organizing map algorithm, in the posterior cerebellum, the lobules were made up of sub-regions associated with distinct functional networks. Together, our results indicate that the lobular boundaries of the human cerebellum are not indicative of functional boundaries, though anatomical divisions can be useful, as is the case of the anterior cerebellum. Additionally, driving the analyses from the cerebellum is key to determining the complete picture of functional connectivity within the structure.

  2. Global resting-state fMRI analysis identifies frontal cortex, striatal, and cerebellar dysconnectivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevic, Alan; Hu, Sien; Zhang, Sheng; Savic, Aleksandar; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Repovs, Grega; Cole, Michael W.; Bednarski, Sarah; Krystal, John H.; Bloch, Michael H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with regional hyperactivity in cortico-striatal circuits. However, the large-scale patterns of abnormal neural connectivity remain uncharacterized. Resting-state functional connectivity (rs-fcMRI) studies have shown altered connectivity within the implicated circuitry, but they have used seed-driven approaches wherein a circuit of interest is defined a priori. This limits their ability to identify network abnormalities beyond the prevailing framework. This limitation is particularly problematic within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is large and heterogeneous and where a priori specification of seeds is therefore difficult. A hypothesis-neutral data-driven approach to the analysis of connectivity is vital. Method We analyzed rs-fcMRI data collected at 3T in 27 OCD patients and 66 matched controls using a recently developed data-driven global brain connectivity (GBC) method, both within the PFC and across the whole brain. Results We found clusters of decreased connectivity in the left lateral PFC in both whole-brain and PFC-restricted analyses. Increased GBC was found in the right putamen and left cerebellar cortex. Within ROIs in the basal ganglia and thalamus, we identified increased GBC in dorsal striatum and anterior thalamus, which was reduced in patients on medication. The ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens exhibited decreased global connectivity, but increased connectivity specifically with the ventral anterior cingulate cortex in subjects with OCD. Conclusion These findings identify previously uncharacterized PFC and basal ganglia dysconnectivity in OCD and reveal differentially altered GBC in dorsal and ventral striatum. Results highlight complex disturbances in PFC networks, which could contribute to disrupted cortical-striatal-cerebellar circuits in OCD. PMID:24314349

  3. Inferior patellar pole fragmentation in children: just a normal variant?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragmentary ossification of the inferior patella is often dismissed as a normal variant in children younger than 10 years of age. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fragmentary inferior patellar pole ossification is a normal variant or is associated with symptoms or signs of pathology using MRI and clinical exam findings as reference. A retrospective review was performed on 150 patients ages 5-10 years who underwent 164 knee radiography and MRI exams (45.1% male, mean age: 7.8 years). The presence or absence of inferior patellar pole fragmentation on radiography was correlated with the presence or absence of edema-like signal on MR images. Clinical notes were reviewed for the presence of symptoms or signs referable to the inferior patellar pole. These data were compared with a 1:1 age- and sex-matched control group without inferior pole fragmentation. Statistical analysis was performed using two-tailed t-tests. Forty of 164 (24.4%) knee radiographs showed fragmentary ossification of the inferior patella. Of these 40 knees, 62.5% (25/40) had edema-like signal of the inferior patellar bone marrow compared with 7.5% (3/40) of controls (P = 0.035). Patients with fragmentary ossification at the inferior patella had a significantly higher incidence of documented focal inferior patellar pain compared with controls (20% vs. 2.5%, P = 0.015). Inferior patellar pole fragmentation in children 5 to 10 years of age may be associated with localized symptoms and bone marrow edema-like signal and should not be routinely dismissed as a normal variant of ossification. (orig.)

  4. Inferior patellar pole fragmentation in children: just a normal variant?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Vogelius, Esben S.; Orth, Robert C.; Guillerman, R.P.; Jadhav, Siddharth P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, E.B. Singleton Pediatric Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Fragmentary ossification of the inferior patella is often dismissed as a normal variant in children younger than 10 years of age. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fragmentary inferior patellar pole ossification is a normal variant or is associated with symptoms or signs of pathology using MRI and clinical exam findings as reference. A retrospective review was performed on 150 patients ages 5-10 years who underwent 164 knee radiography and MRI exams (45.1% male, mean age: 7.8 years). The presence or absence of inferior patellar pole fragmentation on radiography was correlated with the presence or absence of edema-like signal on MR images. Clinical notes were reviewed for the presence of symptoms or signs referable to the inferior patellar pole. These data were compared with a 1:1 age- and sex-matched control group without inferior pole fragmentation. Statistical analysis was performed using two-tailed t-tests. Forty of 164 (24.4%) knee radiographs showed fragmentary ossification of the inferior patella. Of these 40 knees, 62.5% (25/40) had edema-like signal of the inferior patellar bone marrow compared with 7.5% (3/40) of controls (P = 0.035). Patients with fragmentary ossification at the inferior patella had a significantly higher incidence of documented focal inferior patellar pain compared with controls (20% vs. 2.5%, P = 0.015). Inferior patellar pole fragmentation in children 5 to 10 years of age may be associated with localized symptoms and bone marrow edema-like signal and should not be routinely dismissed as a normal variant of ossification. (orig.)

  5. Post-Plasmodium vivax malaria cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis: A new form of delayed cerebellar ataxia or cerebellar variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav M Kasundra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is commonly seen after viral and bacterial infections, immunization, and Plasmodium falciparum (PF malaria. Plasmodium vivax (PV rarely causes ADEM. We report a 14-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset bilateral cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis, 2 weeks after recovery from PV. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral cerebellar hyperintensities suggestive of ADEM. No specific viral etiology was found on cerebrospinal fluid examination. Patient responded well to treatment without any sequelae. Thus, PV too is an important cause of ADEM along with PF. Two of the previously reported cases had co-infection with falciparum malaria. The only other two reported cases, as also this patient, are from Asia. A geographical or racial predisposition needs to be evaluated. Also, a possibility of post-PV delayed cerebellar ataxia, which is classically described post-PF infection, may be considered as it may be clinically, radiologically, and prognostically indistinguishable from a milder presentation of ADEM.

  6. Color-tuned neurons are spatially clustered according to color preference within alert macaque posterior inferior temporal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Bevil R.; Tsao, Doris Y

    2009-01-01

    Large islands of extrastriate cortex that are enriched for color-tuned neurons have recently been described in alert macaque using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and single-unit recording. These millimeter-sized islands, dubbed “globs,” are scattered throughout the posterior inferior temporal cortex (PIT), a swath of brain anterior to area V3, including areas V4, PITd, and posterior TEO. We investigated the micro-organization of neurons within the globs. We used...

  7. Unusual inferior dislocation of shoulder: reduction by two-step maneuver: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patro Dilip K

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dislocation of the shoulder is the commonest of all large joint dislocations. Inferior dislocation constitutes 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. It characteristically presents with overhead abduction of the arm, the humerus being parallel to the spine of scapula. We present an unusual case of recurrent luxatio erecta in which the arm transformed later into an adducted position resembling the more common anterior shoulder dislocation. Such a case has not been described before in English literature. Closed reduction by the two-step maneuver was successful with a single attempt. MRI revealed posterior labral tear and a Hill-Sachs variant lesion on the superolateral aspect of humeral head. Immobilisation in a chest-arm bandage followed by physiotherapy yielded excellent results. The case is first of its kind; the unusual mechanism, unique radiological findings and alternate method of treatment are discussed.

  8. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Human Cerebellar Pathways and their Interplay with Cerebral Macrostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer eKeser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar white matter connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the spinocerebellar, vestibulocerebellar, and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The Spinocerebellar (SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the vestibulocerebellar (VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI. Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 20-51 years were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2mm x 2mm x 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC, parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC, temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC. The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas were presented in standard Montréal Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM, cerebral white matter (WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~ 3.29 ± 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 ± 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~ 25.8 ± 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.52 ± 0.43 of the total intracranial volume.

  9. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans.

  10. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder.

  11. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed.

  12. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans. PMID:26116983

  13. Cerebellar motor learning: when is cortical plasticity not enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Porrill

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical Marr-Albus theories of cerebellar learning employ only cortical sites of plasticity. However, tests of these theories using adaptive calibration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR have indicated plasticity in both cerebellar cortex and the brainstem. To resolve this long-standing conflict, we attempted to identify the computational role of the brainstem site, by using an adaptive filter version of the cerebellar microcircuit to model VOR calibration for changes in the oculomotor plant. With only cortical plasticity, introducing a realistic delay in the retinal-slip error signal of 100 ms prevented learning at frequencies higher than 2.5 Hz, although the VOR itself is accurate up to at least 25 Hz. However, the introduction of an additional brainstem site of plasticity, driven by the correlation between cerebellar and vestibular inputs, overcame the 2.5 Hz limitation and allowed learning of accurate high-frequency gains. This "cortex-first" learning mechanism is consistent with a wide variety of evidence concerning the role of the flocculus in VOR calibration, and complements rather than replaces the previously proposed "brainstem-first" mechanism that operates when ocular tracking mechanisms are effective. These results (i describe a process whereby information originally learnt in one area of the brain (cerebellar cortex can be transferred and expressed in another (brainstem, and (ii indicate for the first time why a brainstem site of plasticity is actually required by Marr-Albus type models when high-frequency gains must be learned in the presence of error delay.

  14. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A; Carrillo, Richard R; Luque, Niceto R; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions. PMID:25390365

  15. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1, which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  16. Defects in the CAPN1 gene result in alterations in cerebellar development and in cerebellar ataxia in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hamad, Monia Ben; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous CAPN1 null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knock-out (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1 mediated cleavage of PH domain and Leucine rich repeat Protein Phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis, and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans. PMID:27320912

  17. Anatomic variations of anterior cerebral artery cortical branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, M A; Schneider, F L; Marrone, A C; Severino, A G; Jackowski, A P; Wallace, M C

    2000-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is a major vessel responsible for the blood supply to the interhemispheric region. The ACA segment after the anterior communicating artery (AComA) origin is called the distal ACA and has central and cortical branches. The cortical branches are distributed in the different regions of the orbital and medial part of the brain. The objects of this study are the anatomical variations found in the distal ACA. In 76 hemispheres the ACA distal branches were injected with latex and dissected under microscope magnification. Vessel diameters and distances between vessel origins and anterior communicating artery were recorded and analyzed. Microsurgical dissection was carried out to demonstrate anatomic variations of these vessels. Average diameter of ACA at origin was 2.61 +/- 0.34 mm and average diameter of cortical branches diameter ranged from 0.79 +/- 0.27 mm to 1.84 +/- 0.3 mm. Distances between vessel origin and AComA ranged from 7.68 +/- 3.91 mm (orbitofrontal) to 112.6 +/- 11.63 mm (inferior internal parietal). This study found anatomical variations: a single (azygos) ACA was present in one case and three in three cases. Crossing branches of the distal ACA to the contralateral hemisphere were present in 26% of the cases. In some cases a single ACA may supply the posterior hemispheric region through crossing branches. This calls attention to potential bilateral brain infarcts due to a single unilateral ACA occlusion. PMID:10873213

  18. Configuration of the inferior alveolar canal as detected by cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umadevi P Nair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the course of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC including its frequently seen variations in relation to root apices and the cortices of the mandible at fixed pre-determined anatomic reference points using cone beam volumetric computed tomography (CBVCT. Material and Methods: This retrospective study utilized CBVCT images from 44 patients to obtain quantifiable data to localize the IAC. Measurements to the IAC were made from the buccal and lingual cortical plates (BCP/LCP, inferior border of the mandible and the root apices of the mandibular posterior teeth and canine. Descriptive analysis was used to map out the course of the IAC. Results: IACs were noted to course superiorly toward the root apices from the second molar to the first premolar and closer to the buccal cortical plate anteriorly. The canal was closest to the LCP at the level of the second molar. In 32.95% of the cases, the canal was seen at the level of the canine. Conclusions: This study indicates that caution needs to be exercised during endodontic surgical procedures in the mandible even at the level of the canine. CBVCT seems to provide an optimal, low-dose, 3D imaging modality to help address the complexities in canal configuration.

  19. Differential contributions of the superior and inferior parietal cortex to feedback versus feedforward control of tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macuga, Kristen L; Frey, Scott H

    2014-05-15

    Damage to the superior and/or inferior parietal lobules (SPL, IPL) (Sirigu et al., 1996) or cerebellum (Grealy and Lee, 2011) can selectively disrupt motor imagery, motivating the hypothesis that these regions participate in predictive (i.e., feedforward) control. If so, then the SPL, IPL, and cerebellum should show greater activity as the demands on feedforward control increase from visually-guided execution (closed-loop) to execution without visual feedback (open-loop) to motor imagery. Using fMRI and a Fitts' reciprocal aiming task with tools directed at targets in far space, we found that the SPL and cerebellum exhibited greater activity during closed-loop control. Conversely, open-loop and imagery conditions were associated with increased activity within the IPL and prefrontal areas. These results are consistent with a superior-to-inferior gradient in the representation of feedback-to-feedforward control within the posterior parietal cortex. Additionally, the anterior SPL displayed greater activity when aiming movements were performed with a stick vs. laser pointer. This may suggest that it is involved in the remapping of far into near (reachable) space (Maravita and Iriki, 2004), or in distalization of the end-effector from hand to stick (Arbib et al., 2009). PMID:24473100

  20. Penatalaksanaan Sinus Preaurikuler Tipe Varian Dengan Pit pada Heliks Desenden Postero-Inferior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Munilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakSinus preaurikuler merupakan kelainan kongenital berupa adanya lubang kecil pada telinga luar yangbiasanya terdapat di anterior dari heliks asendens. Disamping lokasi tersebut, sinus preaurikuler juga dapatditemukan posterior dari liang telinga luar yang dikenal sebagai sinus preaurikuler tipe varian. Sinus preaurikulertipe varian merupakan kasus yang jarang dilaporkan. Kebanyakan kasus tidak menunjukkan gejala, sebagianlainnya mengalami masalah infeksi berupa keluarnya cairan, atau terbentuknya abses. Penatalaksanaan sinuspreaurikuler adalah dengan pengangkatan sinus secara lengkap. Kekambuhan merupakan masalah yang dapattimbul jika tidak diangkat secara lengkap.Dilaporkan satu kasus sinus preaurikuler tipe varian dengan pitberada pada heliksdesendens postero-inferior dekatlobulus pada seorang anak laki-laki umur 3 tahun 6 bulan dan ditatalaksana dengan sinektomi.Kata kunci: Sinus preaurikuler, sinus preaurikuler tipe varian, sinektomi.AbstractPreauricular sinusis a congenital malformation that manifests as pit in the extenal ear, usually located in theanterior limb of ascending helix. In additional to these location, preauricular sinus can also be found in the posterior ofthe external ear canal, known as the preauricular sinus with variant type. Preauricular sinus variant type is a rarelyreported. Almost cases are asymptomatic, but others are infectious with discharge or abscess formation. Themanagement of preauricular sinus is excision sinus completely. Recurrence is the problem that happen if the excisionwas not complete.One case of preauricular sinus variant type with pit on the postero-inferior decending helixnearlobulus in a boy 3 years and 6 months old and managed bysinectomy.Keywords: Preauricular sinus, Preauricular sinus variant type, sinectom

  1. Decision Making in the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART): Anterior Cingulate Cortex Signals Loss-Aversion but not the Infrequency of Risky Choices

    OpenAIRE

    Fukunaga, Rena; Brown, Joshua W.; Bogg, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula (IFG/AI) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are key regions involved in risk appraisal during decision making, but accounts of how these regions contribute to decision-making under risk remain contested. To help clarify the roles of these and other related regions, we used a modified version of the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (Lejuez et al., 2002) to distinguish between decision-making and feedback-related processes when participants decided to pursu...

  2. Timing tasks synchronize cerebellar and frontal ramping activity and theta oscillations: Implications for cerebellar stimulation in diseases of impaired cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Lynn Parker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing is a fundamental and highly conserved mammalian capability yet the underlying neural mechanisms are widely debated. Ramping activity of single neurons that gradually increase or decrease activity to encode the passage of time, has been speculated to predict a behaviorally relevant temporal event. Cue-evoked low-frequency activity has also been implicated in temporal processing. Ramping activity and low-frequency oscillations occur throughout the brain and could indicate a network-based approach to timing. Temporal processing requires cognitive mechanisms of working memory, attention, and reasoning which are dysfunctional in neuropsychiatric disease. Therefore, timing tasks could be used to probe cognition in animals with disease phenotypes. The medial frontal cortex and cerebellum are involved in cognition. Cerebellar stimulation has been shown to influence medial frontal activity and improve cognition in schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying the efficacy of cerebellar stimulation is unknown. Here we discuss how timing tasks can be used to probe cerebellar interactions with the frontal cortex and the therapeutic potential of cerebellar stimulation. The goal of this theory and hypothesis manuscript is threefold. First, we will summarize evidence indicating that in addition to motor learning, timing tasks involve cognitive processes that are present within both the cerebellum and medial frontal cortex. Second, we propose methodologies to investigate the connections between these areas in patients with Parkinson’s disease, autism, and schizophrenia. We hypothesis that cerebellar transcranial stimulation may rescue medial frontal ramping activity, theta oscillations, and timing abnormalities, thereby restoring executive function in diseases of impaired cognition. These hypotheses could inspire the use of timing tasks as biomarkers for neuronal and cognitive abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disease and promote the therapeutic

  3. The primary vestibular projection to the cerebellar cortex in the pigeon (Columba livia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, I.E.; Schwarz, D.W.

    1983-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex of the pigeon receiving direct vestibular afferents was delineated by anterograde transport of (/sup 3/H)-amino acids injected into the vestibular nerve. Labelled mossy fiber rosettes in the granular layer were concentrated in lobule X (nodulus) and to a lesser extent, in the ventral portion of lobule IXd (uvula and paraflocculus). A few solitary labelled rosettes were also found in more dorsal portions of lobule IX, as well as in the anterior lobe between lobule II and IV. The lingula remained unlabelled. Discrete injections of (/sup 3/H)-leucine into the cristae of each of the three semicircular canals or the utricular macula yielded a similar distribution of fewer labelled rosettes. A few primary mossy fiber terminals labelled after cochlear injections are attributed to afferents from the lagenar macula. Since effective diffusion of label from the injection site was excluded by controls, it is concluded that projection of individual canal and macula nerves to the vestibulocerebellar cortex is not topographically separated. It is proposed that this extensive convergence of various afferents is required by the cerebellum to compute precise and directionally specific control signals during head rotation in all conceivable planes.

  4. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  5. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin, Alan S R; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  6. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rahimi Balaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2 mouse (nax—naked-ataxia mutant mouse correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5. In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration.

  7. Multidisciplinary management of anterior diastemata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Herkrath, Fernando José; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino;

    2007-01-01

    the aesthetic results when orthodontic therapy itself is not feasible. This article presents integrated orthodonticrestorative solutions of anterior diastemata, associated with the conditioning of the gingival tissue with composite resin, and discusses the most relevant aspects related to their etiology...

  8. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  9. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Taperloc Microplasty stem and E-poly antioxidant-infused technology during a hip replacement through the anterior supine ... renewed interest at this time due to several advantages that it brings. The approach that is performed ...

  10. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it to have any real negative or deleterious effect by removing the anterior capsule. Now I would ... is what happens with one of the competitive designs. Like I told you, I just take a ...

  11. Update on anterior ankle impingement

    OpenAIRE

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Amendola, Annunziato

    2012-01-01

    Anterior ankle impingement results from an impingement of the ankle joint by a soft tissue or osteophyte formation at the anterior aspect of the distal tibia and talar neck. It often occurs secondary to direct trauma (impaction force) or repetitive ankle dorsiflexion (repetitive impaction and traction force). Chronic ankle pain, swelling, and limitation of ankle dorsiflexion are common complaints. Imaging is valuable for diagnosis of the bony impingement but not for the soft tissue impingemen...

  12. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  13. Attention and sentence processing deficits in Parkinson's disease: the role of anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, M; Crino, P; Reivich, M; Stern, M B; Hurtig, H I

    1992-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative condition involving a motor disorder that is related to reduced dopaminergic input to the striatum. Intellectual deficits are also seen in PD, but the pathophysiology of these difficulties is poorly understood. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in neurologically intact subjects during the performance of attention-demanding, sentence processing tasks using positron emission tomography (PET). The results demonstrated significantly increased rCBF in a distributed set of cerebral regions during the detection of an adjective or a particular agent in a sentence, including anterior cingulate cortex, left inferior and middle frontal cortex, left inferior temporo-occipital cortex, posterolateral temporal cortex, left caudate, and left thalamus. We identified defects in this cerebral network by studying PD patients with two PET techniques. Resting PET studies revealed a significant correlation between regional cerebral glucose metabolism in anterior cingulate cortex and deficits in attending to subtle grammatical aspects of sentences. Studies of PD patients with the PET activation technique revealed little change in anterior cingulate and left frontal CBF during performance of the adjective detection or agent detection tasks. These data suggest that a defect in anterior cingulate cortex contributes to the cognitive impairments observed in PD.

  14. Developmental changes in mental arithmetic: evidence for increased functional specialization in the left inferior parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, S M; Reiss, A L; Eckert, M A; Menon, V

    2005-11-01

    Arithmetic reasoning is arguably one of the most important cognitive skills a child must master. Here we examine neurodevelopmental changes in mental arithmetic. Subjects (ages 8-19 years) viewed arithmetic equations and were asked to judge whether the results were correct or incorrect. During two-operand addition or subtraction trials, for which accuracy was comparable across age, older subjects showed greater activation in the left parietal cortex, along the supramarginal gyrus and adjoining anterior intra-parietal sulcus as well as the left lateral occipital temporal cortex. These age-related changes were not associated with alterations in gray matter density, and provide novel evidence for increased functional maturation with age. By contrast, younger subjects showed greater activation in the prefrontal cortex, including the dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex, suggesting that they require comparatively more working memory and attentional resources to achieve similar levels of mental arithmetic performance. Younger subjects also showed greater activation of the hippocampus and dorsal basal ganglia, reflecting the greater demands placed on both declarative and procedural memory systems. Our findings provide evidence for a process of increased functional specialization of the left inferior parietal cortex in mental arithmetic, a process that is accompanied by decreased dependence on memory and attentional resources with development. PMID:15716474

  15. Neoplasms of the inferior vena cava - pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This pictorial essay reviews common and rare neoplasms affecting the inferior vena cava (IVC, Table 1), with a particular emphasis on the clinical implications and the role and efficacy of the various imaging techniques. (author)

  16. Troubleshooting OptEase inferior vena cava filter retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    For treatment of deep vein thrombosis and prevention of pulmonary thromboembolism, a retrievable inferior vena cava filter is commonly utilized as an effective bridge to anticoagulation. However, we have experienced difficulties in retrieving inferior vena cava filters. Endovascular retrieval assisted by disposable biopsy forceps is an appropriate approach because it provides a less-invasive low-cost way to remove a migrated filter. We suggest this troubleshooting technique to deal with filter hook migration into the caval wall. PMID:24828829

  17. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  18. [Atypical cerebellar neurocytoma resembling a hemangioblastoma. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista Martínez, Olalla; Rivas López, Luis Alfredo; Pombo Otero, Jorge Francisco; Amaro Cendón, Santiago; Bravo García, Christian; Villa Fernández, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Through August 2013, 105 cases of intracranial extraventricular neurocytoma (EVN) had been described; 6% were located in cerebellum and 22% were atypical EVN. A rare morphologic form of neurocytoma, atypical EVN has had only 24 cases reported to date. Its prognosis is poorer than the typical central neurocytoma. This case report describes an atypical cerebellar EVN, a form that has not been reported yet, hence the interest of this article. We emphasise its cystic nature and mural nodule, in an infrequent presentation. EVN are low-incidence tumours that we need to take into consideration when making the differential diagnosis of cystic cerebellar lesions with mural nodule. Given that the prognosis of atypical EVNs depends on the atypical nature and on the grade of resection, medical follow up has to be more constant, due to the greater degree of recurrence. PMID:24837842

  19. Abnormal ocular motility with brainstem and cerebellar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, T J; Bicknell, J M

    1978-01-01

    The disorders of ocular motility seen in association with brainstem or cerebellar disorders may point to rather specific anatomical or pathological correlations. Pontine gaze palsy reflects involvement of the pontine paramedian reticular formation. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia signifies a lesion in the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Skew deviation may result from a lesion anywhere in the posterior fossa. Ocular bobbing typically results from a pontine lesion. The Sylvian aqueduct syndrome is characteristic of involvement in the upper midbrain-pretectal region, usually a pinealoma. Cerebellar lesions may be manifested by gaze paresis, skew deviation, disturbances of saccadic or smooth pursuit movements, ocular myoclonus, or several characteristic forms of nystagmus. Familiarity with these disorders may be of great help to the physician dealing with a patient with a possible posterior fossa lesion.

  20. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis demonstrated by SPECT in hemiplegic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in twenty five children with hemiplegia were studied using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-I-123-iodoamphetamine. Seven of twenty-five patients had cerebral palsy, and the others were impaired by acquired brain injury between ten months and fourteen years of age. CCD was demonstrated in five patients (20%), who were impaired by acquired brain injury after seven years of age. CCD could never be detected in patients with cerebral palsy. Ipsilateral cerebellar diaschisis was also demonstrated in two patients with cerebral palsy and three with early acquired brain injury before three years of age. It is suggested that diaschisis presents itself as a different form in a contralateral and ipsilateral cerebellum before three years of age from a form which presents after seven years of age. (author)

  1. Cognitive planning deficit in patients with cerebellar atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafman, J; Litvan, I; Massaquoi, S; Stewart, M; Sirigu, A; Hallett, M

    1992-08-01

    We compared the performance of 12 patients with cerebellar atrophy (CA) and 12 normal controls matched for age and education on the Tower of Hanoi, a nine-problem task that requires cognitive planning. CA patients performed significantly worse than controls on this task despite no difference in planning and between-move pause times. A reanalysis of the data using just the subgroup of patients with pure cerebellar cortical atrophy (CCA) (N = 9) replicated the above results and also showed that CCA patients had significantly increased planning times compared with controls. Neither age, sex, education level, severity of dementia, word fluency, response time, memory, nor visuomotor procedural learning predicted CA or CCA performance. This deficit in cognitive planning suggests a functional link between the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and the frontal lobe concerning specific cognitive processes. However, the exact role of the cerebellum in cognitive planning remains undetermined. PMID:1641142

  2. Short latency cerebellar modulation of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher H; Fremont, Rachel; Arteaga-Bracho, Eduardo E; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The graceful, purposeful motion of our body is an engineering feat that remains unparalleled in robotic devices using advanced artificial intelligence. Much of the information required for complex movements is generated by the cerebellum and the basal ganglia in conjunction with the cortex. Cerebellum and basal ganglia have been thought to communicate with each other only through slow, multi-synaptic cortical loops, begging the question as to how they coordinate their outputs in real time. We found that the cerebellum rapidly modulates the activity of the striatum via a disynaptic pathway in mice. Under physiological conditions, this short latency pathway was capable of facilitating optimal motor control by allowing the basal ganglia to incorporate time-sensitive cerebellar information and by guiding the sign of cortico-striatal plasticity. Conversely, under pathological condition, this pathway relayed aberrant cerebellar activity to the basal ganglia to cause dystonia. PMID:25402853

  3. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis demonstrated by SPECT in hemiplegic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Nara, Takahiro; Nozaki, Hidetsugu; Fukushima, Kiyomi (Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan)); Imai, Masayuki; Kumagai, Koumei; Maekawa, Kihei

    1991-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in twenty five children with hemiplegia were studied using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-I-123-iodoamphetamine. Seven of twenty-five patients had cerebral palsy, and the others were impaired by acquired brain injury between ten months and fourteen years of age. CCD was demonstrated in five patients (20%), who were impaired by acquired brain injury after seven years of age. CCD could never be detected in patients with cerebral palsy. Ipsilateral cerebellar diaschisis was also demonstrated in two patients with cerebral palsy and three with early acquired brain injury before three years of age. It is suggested that diaschisis presents itself as a different form in a contralateral and ipsilateral cerebellum before three years of age from a form which presents after seven years of age. (author).

  4. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Solanki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis.

  5. Propofol effects on cerebellar long-term depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan Young; Kim, Young Im; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Hyung Seo; Park, Youn Joon; Ha, Myung Sook; Jin, Yunju; Kim, Dong Kwan

    2015-11-16

    Propofol is an intravenously administered anesthetic that induces γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition in the central nervous system. It has been implicated in prolonged movement disorders. Since the cerebellum is important for motor coordination and learning, we investigated the potential effects of propofol on cerebellar circuitry. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in Wister rat cerebellar slices, we demonstrated that propofol administration impaired long-term depression from the parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell (PC) synapses (PF-LTD). Also, propofol reduced metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1)-mediated and group I mGluR agonist-induced slow currents in PCs. These results suggest that the propofol-induced PF-LTD impairment may be related to an alteration in mGluR1 signaling, which is essential to motor learning. PMID:26455962

  6. Successful treatment of isolated cerebellar cysticercosis with albendazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱利平; 石尧忠; 潘孝彰; 莫凌; 翁心华

    2003-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic disease of the central nervous system (CNS) found world-wide.1 NCC is the most common cause of parasitic infection of CNS in China. Patients with NCC are treated successfully with chemotherapy. However, isolated cystic lesions sited in the cerebellum are usually treated by direct surgical excision as a primary therapeutic modality.2 We present here a case of isolated cerebellar vermis cysticercosis successfully treated with albendazole.

  7. Acute cerebellar ataxia: A neurological manifestation in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddametla Shravan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito presents with varied clinical manifestations. Neurological manifestations include headaches, confusion, convulsions, hemiplegia, ataxia, cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. We are presenting a case report of acute cerebellar ataxia in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with fever and positive for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria antibodies.

  8. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bocchetta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing.

  9. Cerebellar Herniation after Lumbar Puncture in Galactosemic Newborn

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    Salih Kalay

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral edema resulting in elevated intracranial pressure is a well-known complication of galactosemia. Lumbar puncture was performed for the diagnosis of clinically suspected bacterial meningitis. Herniation of cerebral tissue through the foramen magnum is not a common problem in neonatal intensive care units because of the open fontanelle in infants. We present the case of a 3-week-old infant with galactosemia who presented with signs of cerebellar herniation after lumbar puncture.

  10. Cerebellar Herniation after Lumbar Puncture in Galactosemic Newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Salih Kalay; Osman Öztekin; Gönül Tezel; Hakan Demirtaş; Mustafa Akçakuş; Nihal Oygür

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral edema resulting in elevated intracranial pressure is a well-known complication of galactosemia. Lumbar puncture was performed for the diagnosis of clinically suspected bacterial meningitis. Herniation of cerebral tissue through the foramen magnum is not a common problem in neonatal intensive care units because of the open fontanelle in infants. We present the case of a 3-week-old infant with galactosemia who presented with signs of cerebellar herniation after lumbar puncture.

  11. Hippocampal and cerebellar atrophy in patients with Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Till; Lüdecke, Daniel; Spies, Lothar; Wittmann, Linus; Westphal, Manfred; Flitsch, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    OBJECT Cushing's disease (CD) may cause atrophy of different regions of the human brain, mostly affecting the hippocampus and the cerebellum. This study evaluates the use of 3-T MRI of newly diagnosed patients with CD to detect atrophic degeneration with voxel-based volumetry. METHODS Subjects with newly diagnosed, untreated CD were included and underwent 3-T MRI. Images were analyzed using a voxelwise statistical test to detect reduction of brain parenchyma. In addition, an atlas-based volumetric study for regions likely to be affected by CD was performed. RESULTS Nineteen patients with a mean disease duration of 24 months were included. Tumor markers included adrenocorticotropic hormone (median 17.5 pmol/L), cortisol (949.4 nmol/L), and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (5.4 μmol/L). The following values are expressed as the mean ± SD. The voxelwise statistical test revealed clusters of significantly reduced gray matter in the hippocampus and cerebellum, with volumes of 2.90 ± 0.26 ml (right hippocampus), 2.89 ± 0.28 ml (left hippocampus), 41.95 ± 4.67 ml (right cerebellar hemisphere), and 42.11 ± 4.59 ml (left cerebellar hemisphere). Healthy control volunteers showed volumes of 3.22 ± 0.25 ml for the right hippocampus, 3.23 ± 0.25 ml for the left hippocampus, 50.87 ± 4.23 ml for the right cerebellar hemisphere, and 50.42 ± 3.97 ml for the left cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS Patients with untreated CD show significant reduction of gray matter in the cerebellum and hippocampus. These changes can be analyzed and objectified with the quantitative voxel-based method described in this study.

  12. Extra-Axial Medulloblastoma in the Cerebellar Hemisphere

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eui Jin; Jeun, Sin Soo

    2014-01-01

    Extra-axial medulloblastoma is a rare phenomenon. We report a case in a 5-year-old boy who presented with nausea, vomiting, and gait disturbance. He was treated with total removal of the tumor. This is the first case of an extra-axially located medulloblastoma occurring in the cerebellar hemisphere posteriolateral to the cerebellopontine angle in Korea. Although the extra-axial occurrence of medulloblastoma is rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extra-axial lesions ...

  13. [Cerebellar hemangioblastoma and thrombocytopenia: Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño G, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    The association between vascular tumors and thrombocytopenia is rare. Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome is seen in childhood and is characterized by hemangiomas and thrombocytopenia. A 42 years-old man with a cerebellar hemangioblastoma and thrombocytopenia, admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage is reported. The patient was operated and required a splenectomy to manage the thrombocytopenia. After the splenectomy the patient developed a subdural hematoma that was operated. Despite the surgical treatment, the patient died. PMID:27401386

  14. Cerebellar Hemangioblastoma: Four Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Sevgi Bakaris; Muruvet Yuksel

    2015-01-01

    Hemangioblastoma (HB) is a benign, slow-growing, highly vascular tumour of not well defined histological origin. These tumors make up about 1 to 2 percent of all intracranial neoplasms and occur primarily in the posterior fossa. Hemangioblastomas can occur sporadically but in about 20% to 30% cases, it is associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Four cases of cerebellar haemangioblastoma, not associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease (sporadic haemangioblastomas), were presented and r...

  15. Intratumoral Hemorrhage in a Patient With Cerebellar Hemangioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhen; Hu, Jun; Xu, Liang; Malaguit, Jay; Chen, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous hemorrhage is rarely associated with hemangioblastomas. Intratumoral hemorrhage occurring in cerebellar hemangioblastomas is more rare. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with headache. We found a round cystic lesion with solid part in the right cerebellum. The lesion was resected. The final pathological diagnosis was hemangioblastomas. The radiological features of this case were similar to normal hemangioblastomas, whereas our histological examination showed ...

  16. Lissencephaly-pachygyria and cerebellar hypoplasia in a calf

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Lemos dos Santos; Maria Cecília Florisbal Damé; Ana Carolina Barreto Coelho; Plínio Aguiar de Oliveira; Clairton Marcolongo-Pereira; Ana Lucia Schild

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: A case of lissencephaly-pachygyria and cerebellar hypoplasia diagnosed in a Charolais x Tabapuã calf is described. The calf presented since birth, clinical signs characterized by apathy, prolonged recumbency, tremors of the head and neck, ataxia, hypermetria, difficulty walking, blindness and swelling of the joints of the four limbs. Due to the unfavorable prognosis, the animal was euthanized and necropsied at 34 days of age. At necropsy, a rudimentary development of the brain folds...

  17. Imaging Spectrum of Cerebellar Pathologies: A Pictorial Essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerebellum is a crucial structure of hindbrain which helps in maintaining motor tone, posture, gait and also coordinates skilled voluntary movements including eye movements. Cerebellar abnormalities have different spectrum, presenting symptoms and prognosis as compared to supratentorial structures and brainstem. This article intends to review the various pathological processes involving the cerebellum along with their imaging features on MR, which are must to know for all radiologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons for their prompt diagnosis and management

  18. Patient adaptable cerebellar retractor system: Use in posterior fossa surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Borghei-Razavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new patient adaptable dual use soft tissue spreader and cerebellar retractor system designed for use during surgery of the posterior fossa is described. We found that this new retractor design allowed for excellent exposure, plus greater freedom and dexterity during the posterior fossa surgery. This novel instrument is an improvement over the existing instrument, because it provided more force/power transmission from pins/connectors to the brain spatula via the shorter flexible arm.

  19. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice.

  20. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options. PMID:27606347

  1. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Rijkers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ΔFosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX (immunohistochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN, interpositus nucleus (IN, and fastigial nucleus (FN of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ΔFosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P<0.05. COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P<0.05. These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy.

  2. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  3. Mutations in PTF1A cause pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellick, Gabrielle S; Barker, Karen T; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Fleischmann, Christina; Coleman, Richard J; Garrett, Christine; Gloyn, Anna L; Edghill, Emma L; Hattersley, Andrew T; Wellauer, Peter K; Goodwin, Graham; Houlston, Richard S

    2004-12-01

    Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus usually present within the first three months of life and require insulin treatment. We recently identified a locus on chromosome 10p13-p12.1 involved in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis in a genome-wide linkage search of a consanguineous Pakistani family. Here we report the further linkage analysis of this family and a second family of Northern European descent segregating an identical phenotype. Positional cloning identified the mutations 705insG and C886T in the gene PTF1A, encoding pancreas transcription factor 1alpha, as disease-causing sequence changes. Both mutations cause truncation of the expressed PTF1A protein C-terminal to the basic-helix-loop-helix domain. Reporter-gene studies using a minimal PTF1A deletion mutant indicate that the deleted region defines a new domain that is crucial for the function of this protein. PTF1A is known to have a role in mammalian pancreatic development, and the clinical phenotype of the affected individuals implicated the protein as a key regulator of cerebellar neurogenesis. The essential role of PTF1A in normal cerebellar development was confirmed by detailed neuropathological analysis of Ptf1a(-/-) mice. PMID:15543146

  4. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options.

  5. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striemer, Christopher L; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D; Danckert, James A; Schweizer, Tom A

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices-regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention. PMID:26300756

  6. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eStriemer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past fifteen years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n=11 without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n=11. Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50ms SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices – regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention.

  7. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, F. [Department of Radiology, University of Modena (Italy); Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, G.T. [Department of Endocrinology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Sullivan, K. [Department of Immunology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-05-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  8. Delineation of QRS offset by instantaneous changes in ECG vector angle can improve detection of acute inferior myocardial infarctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starc, Vito; Schlegel, Todd T

    2016-01-01

    We developed an automated new method for determining QRS offset, based on angular velocity (AV) changes around the QRS loop, and compared the method's performance to that of manual and more established automated methods for determining QRS offset in both healthy subjects and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Specifically, using Frank leads reconstructed from standard 12-lead ECGs, we determined AV in the direction of change raised to the 4th power, d(t). We found that the d(t)-determined AV transition (ΔAV) nearly coincided with manually determined QRS offset in healthy subjects, and in 27 patients with anterior AMI. However, in 31 patients with inferior AMI, ΔAV typically preceded that of QRS offset determined by the established automated methods, and by more than 10ms in 32% of cases. While this "ΔAV precedence" coincided with diagnostic ST elevation in only a minority of patients with recent inferior AMI, the use of ΔAV precedence as a complement to traditional determination of ST elevation increased the sensitivity for detecting inferior AMIs from 23 to 42%. PMID:26979381

  9. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka Shinsuke; Sundal Christina; Wszolek Zbigniew K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and...

  10. Successfull Management of a Life Threatening Cerebellar Haemorrhage Following Spine Surgery - A Case Report -

    OpenAIRE

    Pallud, Johan; Belaïd, Hayat; Aldea, Sorin

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhages are rare life-threatening complications following spine surgery that present challenges for their diagnostic and their therapeutic management. Their patho-physiology remains unclear. We report a case of a life-threatening cerebellar haemorrhage secondary to an occult dural tear following a planned L5-S1 laminectomy. The patient was treated with emergent external ventriculostomy following by a posterior fossa decompressive craniectomy. Cerebellar haemorrhages have to be...

  11. Adams Oliver syndrome: Description of a new phenotype with cerebellar abnormalities in a family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe cerebellar abnormalities in a family composed by a father and two affected sibs with Adams Oliver syndrome (AOS) (OMIM 100300). Brain MRI and MR angiography were performed at 1.5T. The siblings presented cerebellar cortex dysplasia characterized by the presence of cysts. Abnormalities of CNS are an unusual manifestation of AOS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cerebellar cortical dysplasia in a family with AOS

  12. Surgical resection of cerebellar hemangioblastoma with enhanced wall thickness: A report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Zhenxing; Yuan, Dan; SUN, YAXING; YAN, PENGXIANG; Zuo, Huancong

    2015-01-01

    Hemangioblastomas are tumors of the central nervous system, and the cerebellum is the most common site of occurrence. Cerebellar hemangioblastoma with enhanced wall thickness is rare and often misdiagnosed preoperatively. At present, no unified radiological classification system based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings exists for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, and this tumor type can be solid or cystic mass, according to the MRI findings. The most common presentation of cerebellar hem...

  13. Implications of functional anatomy on information processing in the deep cerebellar nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Gilad A.; Dana Cohen

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum has been implicated as a major player in producing temporal acuity. Theories of cerebellar timing typically emphasize the role of the cerebellar cortex while overlooking the role of the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) that provide the sole output of the cerebellum. Here we review anatomical and electrophysiological studies to shed light on the DCN’s ability to support temporal pattern generation in the cerebellum. Specifically, we examine data on the structure of the DCN, th...

  14. Implications of Functional Anatomy on Information Processing in the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Baumel, Yuval; Jacobson, Gilad A.; Cohen, Dana

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum has been implicated as a major player in producing temporal acuity. Theories of cerebellar timing typically emphasize the role of the cerebellar cortex while overlooking the role of the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) that provide the sole output of the cerebellum. Here we review anatomical and electrophysiological studies to shed light on the DCN's ability to support temporal pattern generation in the cerebellum. Specifically, we examine data on the structure of the DCN, the biop...

  15. Cerebellar hemorrhage after spine fixation misdiagnosed as a complication of narcotics use -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ki-Hwan; Han, Jeong Uk; Jung, Jong-Kwon; Lee, Doo Ik; Hwang, Sung-Il; Lim, Hyun Kyoung

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar hemorrhage occurs mainly due to hypertension. Postoperative cerebellar hemorrhage is known to be associated frequently with frontotemporal craniotomy, but quite rare with spine operation. A 56-year-old female received spinal fixation due to continuous leg tingling sensation for since two years ago. Twenty-one hours after operation, she was disoriented and unresponsive to voice. Performed computed tomography showed both cerebellar hemorrhage. An emergency decompressive craniotomy wa...

  16. Risk of impaired cerebellar growth in preterm infants: a prospective mastoid fontanelle ultrasound study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Correa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Recent studies realized with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed impaired cerebellar growth in follow-up of preterm infants. Cerebellar injury may contribute to impaired motor, cognitive, language and behavioral dysfunction seen among this group. This study was designed to evaluate cerebellar growth in premature babies by ultrasound, a bedside imaging method, and to detect variables that could influence impaired cerebellar growth. Material and methods: Postnatal cerebellar growth, measured by transverse cerebellar diameter (TCD, was prospectively assessed in 88 consecutive preterm infants born ≤ 32 weeks of gestational age (GA. TCD was obtained via mastoid fontanelle (MF ultrasound on a weekly basis, since the first week of life until 40 weeks postmenstrual age (p.m.a.. Variables that could influence cerebellar growth, such as GA, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, periventricular leukomalacia (PVL, peri-intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH, and posterior fossa hemorrhage (PFH were evaluated. Results: TCD could be measured by MF ultrasound in all patients. Cerebellar growth occurred linearly with postnatal age. At 40th p.m.a. week, TCD was smaller in IUGR group compared with no IUGR infants but their weekly cerebellar growth was similar. At term-equivalent age, cerebellar size was influenced by PFH, PVL and IVH severity. Conclusion: TCD measured by MF ultrasound has demonstrated to be a bedside method for measuring the cerebellum in preterm babies. Impaired cerebellar growth seemed to be influenced by other brain lesions in these patients. We suggest that cerebellum should be studied in preterm infants born ≤ 32 weeks gestation, at term equivalent age, using MF ultrasound.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques. PMID:27517015

  19. Clinical and genetic analysis of a four-generation family with a distinct autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H J; Ippel, P F; Hageman, G; Sinke, R J; van der Laan, E N; Beemer, F A

    2001-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive cerebellar dysfunction in combination with a variety of other associative features. Since 1993 ADCAs have been increasingly characterised in terms of their genetic

  20. Válvula de uretra anterior Anterior urethral valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Tucci Jr.

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: apresentar os aspectos clínicos, diagnósticos e terapêuticos de pacientes portadores de válvula da uretra anterior. Descrição: em dois neonatos, o diagnóstico presuntivo de patologia obstrutiva do trato urinário foi sugerido pela ultra-sonografia realizada no período pré-natal, confirmando-se o diagnóstico de válvula de uretra anterior pela avaliação pós-natal. Os pacientes foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico paliativo, com vesicostomia temporária e, posteriormente, definitivo, pela fulguração endoscópica das válvulas. Ambos evoluíram com função renal normal. Comentários: a válvula da uretra anterior é anomalia rara que deve ser considerada em meninos com quadro radiológico pré-natal sugestivo de obstrução infravesical, secundariamente à hipótese mais comum de válvula da uretra posterior. Ressaltamos a utilização da vesicostomia como derivação urinária temporária nestes casos, prevenindo potenciais complicações pela manipulação da uretra do recém-nascido.Objective: to discuss clinical signs, diagnostic tools and therapeutics of anterior urethral valves, an obstructive anomaly of the urinary system in males. Description: signs of urinary tract obstruction were identified on pre-natal ultrasound in two male fetuses and the diagnosis of anterior urethral valves was made through post-natal evaluation. As an initial treatment, vesicostomy was performed in both patients. Later, the valves were fulgurated using an endoscopic procedure. During the follow-up period both patients presented normal renal function. Comments: anterior urethral valves are a rare form of urethral anomaly that must be ruled out in boys with pre-natal ultrasound indicating infravesical obstruction. Vesicostomy used as an initial treatment rather than transurethral fulguration may prevent potential complications that can occur due to the small size of the neonatal urethra.

  1. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence.

  2. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure. PMID:27269666

  3. Specific inferior dislocation of the hip: one case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chao

    2007-01-01

    @@ Hip joint dislocations are generally classified as anterior, posterior, and central dislocations. In 1970s, the anterior dislocation was divided into pubic type and obturator type.1 It is generally recognized that for anterior dislocation of the hip joint, the femoral head is located at anteriorinferior part of the acetabulum, characterized clinically as abduction, extorsion, slight flexion deformity, and longer limb than the opposite side. When posterior dislocation is present, the femoral head is located at posteriorsuperior part of the acetabulum and manifested clinically as flexion, adduction, intorsion, and shortening deformity.

  4. Agenesia de veia cava inferior associada à trombose venosa profunda Agenesis of inferior vena cava associated with deep venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Luis Konopka

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A agenesia da veia cava inferior é uma anomalia congênita rara, que foi recentemente identificada como um importante fator de risco para o desenvolvimento e a recorrência de trombose venosa profunda de membros inferiores em jovens. O objetivo deste trabalho foi relatar o caso de uma paciente que apresentou trombose venosa profunda dois meses após a realização de cirurgia de varizes. A angiotomografia computadorizada demonstrou a presença de anomalia venosa complexa com ausência da veia cava inferior.The agenesis of the inferior vena cava is a rare congenital anomaly, which was recently identified as an important risk factor for the development and recurrence of deep venous thrombosis especially in young people. The goal of this work was to report the case of a patient who presented deep venous thrombosis approximately two months after varicose vein surgery. The computerized angiotomography demonstrated the presence of a complex venous anomaly with absence of the inferior vena cava.

  5. Osteointegration of soft tissue grafts within the bone tunnels in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be enhanced

    OpenAIRE

    Kuang, GM; Yau, WP; Lu, WW; Chiu, KY

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a soft tissue autograft (hamstring autograft) has grown in popularity in the last 10 years. However, the issues of a relatively long healing time and an inferior histological healing result in terms of Sharpey-like fibers connection in soft tissue grafts are still unsolved. To obtain a promising outcome in the long run, prompt osteointegration of the tendon graft within the bone tunnel is essential. In recent decades, numerous methods have been r...

  6. Cerebellar lingula size and experiential risk factors associated with high levels of alcohol and drug use in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl M; Rabi, Keren; Lukas, Scott E; Teicher, Martin H

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have reported cerebellar abnormalities or static ataxia associated with risk for chronic use of alcohol and drugs. Adverse childhood experience is another strong risk factor for later substance abuse. We therefore sought to ascertain the relationship between morphological phenotypes of the lingula (lobule I) of the anterior cerebellar vermis, and exposure to emotional (EM) versus physical (PM) maltreatment, on the degree of ongoing alcohol or drug use. The study design consisted of a cross-sectional in vivo neuroimaging study, utilizing retrospective assessment of maltreatment history and self-reports of alcohol and substance use. Study participants were 153 subjects (54 M/99F, 21.9 +/- 2.2 years) selected for imaging from a database of 1,402 community participants 18-25 years of age, who completed a detailed online screening instrument and met rigorous inclusion/exclusion criteria. Subjects were exposed to only physical abuse or harsh corporal punishment (HCP; PM group, n = 37) and parental verbal abuse and/or witnessing domestic violence (EM group, n = 58) or had no history of maltreatment or axis I disorders (n = 58). The main outcome measures consisted of the gray matter volume of lobule I as measured by manual tracing, number and type of alcoholic beverages consumed during a drinking session, number of sessions per month, and monthly drug use, along with family history of drug and alcohol abuse. Lingula thickness was not attenuated by alcohol use or maltreatment history. However, increased lingula thickness was associated with greater consumption of drugs and hard liquor, particularly in physically maltreated subjects who consumed 2.5- and 2.7-fold more alcohol and used drugs 6.1- and 7.8-fold more frequently than controls or EM subjects, respectively. In conclusion, physical maltreatment was observed to interact with cerebellar morphology resulting in a strong association with alcohol and substance use. Lingula thickness may represent a novel

  7. Pseudo-dissection of ascending aorta in inferior myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahame K. Goode

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute aortic dissection is a cardiac emergency which can present as inferior myocardial infarction. It has high morbidity and mortality requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Rapid advances in noninvasive imaging modalities have facilitated the early diagnosis of this condition and in ruling out this potentially catastrophic illness. We report an interesting case of a 57 year- old -man who presented with inferior myocardial infarction requiring thrombolysis and temporary pacing wire for complete heart block. An echocardiogram was highly suspicious of aortic dissection. CT scan confirmed that the malposition of the temporary pacing wire through the aorta mimicked aortic dissection.

  8. Maksilektomi Inferior pada Karsinoma Sel Skuamosa Palatum Durum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukri Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak          Karsinoma Palatum Durum adalah keganasan daerah kepala dan leher yang jarang terjadi dimana setengah diantaranya merupakan Karsinoma Sel Skuamosa. Pada fase awal keganasan ini dapat bersifat asimptomatis namun dapat juga menimbulkan gejala berupa ulkus yang terasa nyeri pada perkembangan penyakitnya. Operasi maksilektomi inferior merupakan salah satu pilihan tindakan yang dapat dilakukan dalam tatalaksana kasus ini, diikuti oleh pemberian radioterapi. Kasus ini dibuat untuk memahami penatalaksanaan karsinoma palatum durum. Dilaporkan kasus seorang laki-laki 45 tahun dengan diagnosis Karsinoma Sel Skuamosa Palatum Durum (Well to Moderately Differentiated Keratinized stadium IVa (T4aN0M0 dilakukan operasi maksilektomi inferior, namun tidak diikuti dengan radioterapi karena pasien menolak. Maksilektomi inferior merupakan pilihan pembedahan pada tumor yang terbatas pada palatum, lantai sinus maksila dan kavum nasi. Prognosis karsinoma sel skuamosa palatum durum cukup baik dan angka harapan hidup lima tahun akan bertambah bila dilakukan operasi diikuti dengan pemberian radioterapi. Kata kunci: Karsinoma sel skuamosa, maksilektomi inferior, radioterapi AbstractCarcinoma of the hard palate is a rare head and neck cancer in which half of it was Squamous Cell Carcinoma. In the initial phase of this malignancy may be asymptomatic, but can also cause symptoms such as painful ulcers in the development of the disease. Inferior maxillectomy is one of the choice of operation that can be performed, followed by radiotherapy to understand the management of carcinoma of the hard palate. Reported one case of a man 45 years old with diagnosis Squamous Cell Carcinoma of hard palate (Well to Moderately Differentiated Keratinized stage IVa (T4aN0M0 treated by inferior maxillectomy surgery, but not followed by radiotherapy because the patient refused. Inferior Maksilektomi is a surgical option in tumor that limited to the palate, floor of the

  9. Inferior glenohumeral joint dislocation with greater tuberosity avulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohd Faizan; Latif Zafar Jilani; Mazhar Abbas; Yasir Salam Siddiqui; Aamir Bin Sabir; M.K.A.Sherwani; Saifullah Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Inferior glenohumeral dislocation is the least common type of glenohumeral dislocations.It may be associated with fractures of the adjacent bones and neurovascular compromise.It should be treated immediately by close reduction.The associated neuropraxia usually recovers with time.Traction-counter traction method is commonly used for reduction followed by immobilization of the shoulder for three weeks.Here,we report a case of inferior glenohumeral joint dislocation with greater tuberosity fracture with transient neurovascular compromise and present a brief review of the literature.

  10. Suprarenal symplastic leiomyoma of the inferior vena cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepenekci, Ilknur; Demirkan, Arda; Sözener, Ulas; Cakmak, Atil; Demirer, Seher; Alaçayir, Iskender; Ekinci, Cemil

    2009-01-01

    We report on a case of a leiomyoma in the inferior vena cava that appeared in the image to be located in the adrenal gland. En bloc excision of the tumor with the right adrenal gland and the involved segment of the vena cava was carried out. Histopathological work-up of the tumor revealed smooth muscle fibers and marked nuclear pleomorphism consistent with symplastic leiomyoma. This case report presents a distinct histological variant of the rarely seen primary smooth muscle tumor of the inferior vena cava.

  11. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by mutations in the PEX2 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Sevin; S. Ferdinandusse; H.R. Waterham; R.J. Wanders; P. Aubourg

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To expand the spectrum of genetic causes of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA). Case report: Two brothers are described who developed progressive cerebellar ataxia at 3 1/2 and 18 years, respectively. After ruling out known common genetic causes of ARCA, analysis of bl

  12. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  13. Role of astrocytes in depolarization-coupled release of glutamate in cerebellar cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2004-01-01

    Release of preloaded D-[3H]aspartate in response to depolarization induced by high potassium, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) or the endogenous agonist glutamate was studied using cultured glutamatergic cerebellar granule neurons, cerebellar...

  14. Cerebellar motor learning deficits in medicated and medication-free men with recent-onset schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.H. Coesmans (Michiel); C. Röder (Constantin); A.E. Smit (Albertine Eline); S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); M.A. Frens (Maarten); J.N. van der Geest (Jos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The notion that cerebellar deficits may underlie clinical symptoms in people with schizophrenia is tested by evaluating 2 forms of cerebellar learning in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia. A potential medication effect is evaluated by including patients with or without

  15. Cerebellar motor learning deficits in medicated and medication-free men with recent-onset schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coesmans, Michael; Röder, Christian H; Smit, Albertine E; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Frens, Maarten A; van der Geest, Josef N

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The notion that cerebellar deficits may underlie clinical symptoms in people with schizophrenia is tested by evaluating 2 forms of cerebellar learning in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia. A potential medication effect is evaluated by including patients with or without antipsychot

  16. Surgical Treatment of A Dissecting Aneurysm of the Superior Cerebellar Artery: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanescu Florin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dissecting aneurysm located in the peripheral region of the superior cerebellar artery is very rare. There is little experience regarding their surgical or endovascular treatment. We present the case of a peripheral dissecting superior cerebellar artery aneurysm treated by surgical clipping.

  17. Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes : foot deformity in a first grade family member

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, HJ; Van der Hulst, M; Ippel, E; Prevo, RL; Hageman, G

    1999-01-01

    Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (EOCA) is a clinical syndrome characterised by progressive cerebellar ataxia with an onset before the age of 25 years and a wide spectrum of associated features. It is distinguished from Friedreich's ataxia (FA) mainly by the preservation o

  18. Optogenetics in the cerebellum: Purkinje cell-specific approaches for understanding local cerebellar functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita

    2013-10-15

    The cerebellum consists of the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar nuclei. Although the basic neuronal circuitry of the cerebellar cortex is uniform everywhere, anatomical data demonstrate that the input and output relationships of the cortex are spatially segregated between different cortical areas, which suggests that there are functional distinctions between these different areas. Perturbation of cerebellar cortical functions in a spatially restricted fashion is thus essential for investigating the distinctions among different cortical areas. In the cerebellar cortex, Purkinje cells are the sole output neurons that send information to downstream cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Therefore, selective manipulation of Purkinje cell activities, without disturbing other neuronal types and passing fibers within the cortex, is a direct approach to spatially restrict the effects of perturbations. Although this type of approach has for many years been technically difficult, recent advances in optogenetics now enable selective activation or inhibition of Purkinje cell activities, with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss the effectiveness of using Purkinje cell-specific optogenetic approaches to elucidate the functions of local cerebellar cortex regions. We also discuss what improvements to current methods are necessary for future investigations of cerebellar functions to provide further advances.

  19. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masud Sarmad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility for elective anterior cruciate ligament repair. He had no background history of any significant medical problems. He opted for general anesthesia over a regional technique. He was induced with fentanyl and propofol and a size 4 laryngeal mask airway was inserted without any problems. His head was in a neutral position during the surgery. After surgery in the recovery room, he complained of numbness in his lower lip. He also developed extensive scabbing of the lower lip on the second day after surgery. The numbness and scabbing started improving after a week, with complete recovery after two weeks. Conclusion We report the first case of vascular occlusion and injury to the inferior alveolar nerve, causing scabbing and numbness of the lower lip, resulting from laryngeal mask airway use. This is an original case report mostly of interest for anesthetists who use the laryngeal mask airway in day-to-day practice. Excessive inflation of the laryngeal mask airway cuff could have led to this complication. Despite the low incidence of cranial nerve injury associated with the use of the laryngeal mask airway, vigilant adherence to evidence-based medicine techniques and recommendations from the manufacturer's instructions can prevent such complications.

  20. Properties of bilateral spinocerebellar activation of cerebellar cortical neurons

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    Pontus eGeborek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to explore the cerebellar cortical inputs from two spinocerebellar pathways, the spinal border cell-component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (SBC-VSCT and the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT, respectively, in the sublobule C1 of the cerebellar posterior lobe. The two pathways were activated by electrical stimulation of the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF and the ipsilateral LF (iLF at lower thoracic levels. Most granule cells in sublobule C1 did not respond at all but part of the granule cell population displayed high-intensity responses to either coLF or iLF stimulation. As a rule, Golgi cells and Purkinje cell simple spikes responded to input from both LFs, although Golgi cells could be more selective. In addition, a small population of granule cells responded to input from both the coLF and the iLF. However, in these cases, similarities in the temporal topography and magnitude of the responses suggested that the same axons were stimulated from the two LFs, i.e. that the axons of individual spinocerebellar neurons could be present in both funiculi. This was also confirmed for a population of spinal neurons located within known locations of SBC-VSCT neurons and dorsal horn DSCT neurons. We conclude that bilateral spinocerebellar responses can occur in cerebellar granule cells, but the VSCT and DSCT systems that provide the input can also be organized bilaterally. The implications for the traditional functional separation of VSCT and DSCT systems and the issue whether granule cells primarily integrate functionally similar information or not are discussed.

  1. Cerebellar cortical degeneration in adult American Staffordshire Terriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olby, Natasha; Blot, Stephane; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Phillips, Jeff; O'Brien, Dennis P; Burr, Jeanne; Berg, Jason; Brown, Talmage; Breen, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Adult-onset cerebellar cortical degeneration recently has been reported in American Staffordshire Terriers. We describe the clinical and histopathologic features of this disease and examine its mode of inheritance in 63 affected dogs. The age at which neurologic deficits 1st were recognized varied from 18 months to 9 years, with the majority of dogs presented to veterinarians between 4 and 6 years of age. Time from onset of clinical signs to euthanasia varied from 6 months to 6.5 years, with the majority of affected dogs surviving from 2 to 4 years. Initial neurologic findings included stumbling, truncal sway, and ataxia exacerbated by lifting the head up and negotiating stairs. Signs progressed to obvious ataxia characterized by dysmetria, nystagmus, coarse intention tremor, variable loss of menace reaction, marked truncal sway, and falling with transient opisthotonus. With continued progression, dogs became unable to walk without falling repeatedly. Cerebellar atrophy was visible on magnetic resonance images and on gross pathology. Histopathologic findings included marked loss of Purkinje neurons with thinning of the molecular and granular layers and increased cellularity of the cerebellar nuclei. The closest common ancestor of the dogs was born in the 1950s and inheritance was most consistent with an autosomal recessive mode of transmission with a prevalence estimated at 1 in 400 dogs. This inherited disease is comparable to the group of diseases known as spinocerebellar ataxias in humans. Many spinocerebellar ataxias in humans are caused by nucleotide repeats, and this genetic aberration merits investigation as a potential cause of the disease in American Staffordshire Terriers. PMID:15058771

  2. Probabilistic identification of cerebellar cortical neurones across species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Van Dijck

    Full Text Available Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our

  3. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann K. Shinn

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the cognitive dysmetria and dysmetria of thought models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of

  4. Cerebellar Information Processing in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lesage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has characterized the anatomical connectivity of the cortico-cerebellar system – a large and important fibre system in the primate brain. Within this system, there are reciprocal projections between the prefrontal cortex and Crus II of the cerebellar cortex, which both play important roles in the acquisition and execution of cognitive skills. Here, we propose that this system also plays a particular role in sustaining skilled cognitive performance in patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS, in whom advancing neuropathology causes increasingly inefficient information processing. We scanned RRMS patients and closely matched healthy subjects while they performed the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT, a demanding test of information processing speed, and a control task. This enabled us to localize differences between conditions that change as a function of group (group-by-condition interactions. Hemodynamic activity in some patient populations with CNS pathology are not well understood and may be atypical, so we avoided analysis strategies that rely exclusively on models of hemodynamic activity derived from the healthy brain, using instead an approach that combined a ‘model-free’ analysis technique (Tensor Independent Component Analysis, TICA that was relatively free of such assumptions, with a post-hoc ‘model-based’ approach (General Linear Model, GLM. Our results showed group-by-condition interactions in cerebellar cortical Crus II. We suggest that this area may have in role maintaining performance in working memory tasks by compensating for inefficient data transfer associated with white matter lesions in MS.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. Cerebellar clear cell ependymoma in a 10 year old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thinzar Aye Nyein; Moon, Ah Rim; Hwang, Sun Chul; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, A Leum; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Hee Kyung; Chin, Su Sie [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Sang [Soonchunhyang University Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Clear cell ependymoma (CCE) is a histological rare variant (1–5%) of ependymoma, which is distinguished from other histological subtypes by the presence of fusiform cells arrayed radially around small blood vessels. These alleged perivascular pseudorosettes are significant characteristic features of ependymomas. About 95% of infratentorial ependymomas are found in the fourth ventricle and the remainder occurs as cerebellopontine angle lesions. In previous reports, the cerebellum is found to be a rare location for ependymoma. In this study we report one case of CCE originating from the cerebellar hemisphere, showing unusual morphology on 3T MRI.

  13. Understanding Cerebellar Liponeurocytomas: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Oudrhiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar liponeurocytomas were recognized in the 2000 WHO 3rd edition of CNS tumors as a distinct grade I pathological entity, a tumor with a more favorable prognosis than medulloblastoma. But reports of long-term recurrences and some possible aggressive behavior led to an upgrade on the latest WHO 4th edition of CNS tumors. The case of a 64-year-old female patient is reported in this paper. More than 30 cases of this lately recognized pathological entity have been reported to date. The diagnostic, radiological, and pathological features associated with this tumor are discussed through a literature review.

  14. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis on F-18 FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaschisis is the inhibition of function produced by focal disturbances in a portion of the brain at a distance from original site of injury. Many studies using brain SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) have demonstrated crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in patients with cerebral cortical infarct. We report a case of cerebrovascular accident involving the left middle cerebral artery territory. PET/CT performed one month after stroke showed hypometabolism in the left cerebral hemisphere with hypometabolism of the contralateral cerebellum. The finding of diminished glucose metabolism in the contralateral cerebellum represents CCD

  15. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in cases with cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossed cerebellar atrophy (CCA) was investigated by X-ray CT to establish the incidence, mechanism, and the relation to cerebral lesions in 130 cases of unilateral supratentorial cerebrovascular diseases. The 130 cases consisted of 83 males and 47 females with cerebral infarction (65 cases) and cerebral hemorrhage (65 cases). The patients' average age was 57.6 years. Crossed cerebellar atrophy was demonstrated in 8 cases (6.2%), 6 of whom had massive cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery area (9.2% of the 65 cases of cerebral infarction. The six cases of CCA caused by cerebral infarction had lesions in the frontal and temporal lobes. Two had a cerebral hemorrhage in the putamen and in the thalamus, respectively, accounting for 3.1% of the 65 cases of cerebral hemorrhage. Of the 2 cases, one had putaminal hemorrhage, and the other had thalamic hemorrhage. Cerebrovascular stroke had occured in these patients with CCA more than 2 months previously. In 5 of the 8 cases of CCA, atrophy was present in the basis pedunculi and the basis pontis on the side of the cerebral lesion. However, neither dilation nor deformity of the fourth ventricle was present in any of the patients, suggesting that none of the CCA patients had atrophy of the dentate nucleus. The CCA patients had massive cerebral lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes or atrophy of the basis pedunculi and basis pontis, suggesting the presence of the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. In the case of the thalamic hemorrhage, who had not hemorrhagic lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes, atrophy of the basis peduncli and basis pontis was not observed. Though dilation or deformity of the fourth ventricle is not observed in this case, presence of the degeneration of the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway cannot be denied. CCA seems to be caused by both the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway and the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway. (J.P.N.)

  16. Late effects of radiotherapy on patients with cerebellar medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine long-term survivors of cerebellar medulloblastoma treated with surgery and irradiation were retrospectively examined with a complete battery of neuropsychological tests and the results compared with their nonirradiated siblings. Significant decreased scores were found in the full-scale intelligence quotients (IQ), performance IQ, and verbal IQ with all nine irradiated patients scoring below their siblings. Also, educational quotients (EQ) of the irradiated patients were 12 to 17 points below the nonirradiated siblings with arithmetic EQ significantly decreased. Most severely affected were those children younger than 8 years at time of irradiation. No correlation was found with whole-brain dose, or objective physical or neurologic findings

  17. The Role of Intermittent Hypoxia on the Proliferative Inhibition of Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chun Chiu

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea syndrome, characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH, is linked with increased oxidative stress. This study investigates the mechanisms underlying IH and the effects of IH-induced oxidative stress on cerebellar astrocytes. Rat primary cerebellar astrocytes were kept in an incubator with an oscillating O2 concentration between 20% and 5% every 30 min for 1-4 days. Although the cell loss increased with the duration, the IH incubation didn't induce apoptosis or necrosis, but rather a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of cerebellar astrocytes was noted. ROS accumulation was associated with cell loss during IH. PARP activation, resulting in p21 activation and cyclin D1 degradation was associated with cell cycle G0/G1 arrest of IH-treated cerebellar astrocytes. Our results suggest that IH induces cell loss by enhancing oxidative stress, PARP activation and cell cycle G0/G1 arrest in rat primary cerebellar astrocytes.

  18. Sensory prediction or motor control? Application of marr-albus type models of cerebellar function to classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepora, Nathan F; Porrill, John; Yeo, Christopher H; Dean, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Marr-Albus adaptive filter models of the cerebellum have been applied successfully to a range of sensory and motor control problems. Here we analyze their properties when applied to classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in rabbits. We consider a system-level model of eyeblink conditioning based on the anatomy of the eyeblink circuitry, comprising an adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, a comparator model of the inferior olive and a linear dynamic model of the nictitating membrane plant. To our knowledge, this is the first model that explicitly includes all these principal components, in particular the motor plant that is vital for shaping and timing the behavioral response. Model assumptions and parameters were systematically investigated to disambiguate basic computational capacities of the model from features requiring tuning of properties and parameter values. Without such tuning, the model robustly reproduced a range of behaviors related to sensory prediction, by displaying appropriate trial-level associative learning effects for both single and multiple stimuli, including blocking and conditioned inhibition. In contrast, successful reproduction of the real-time motor behavior depended on appropriate specification of the plant, cerebellum and comparator models. Although some of these properties appear consistent with the system biology, fundamental questions remain about how the biological parameters are chosen if the cerebellar microcircuit applies a common computation to many distinct behavioral tasks. It is possible that the response profiles in classical conditioning of the eyeblink depend upon operant contingencies that have previously prevailed, for example in naturally occurring avoidance movements.

  19. 38 CFR 3.379 - Anterior poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anterior poliomyelitis. 3... Specific Diseases § 3.379 Anterior poliomyelitis. If the first manifestations of acute anterior poliomyelitis present themselves in a veteran within 35 days of termination of active military service, it...

  20. Epidermoid cyst in Anterior, Middle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankane Vivek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are benign slow growing more often extra-axial tumors that insinuate between brain structures, we present the clinical, imaging, and pathological findings in 35 years old female patients with atypical epidermoid cysts which was situated anterior, middle & posterior cranial fossa. NCCT head revealed hypodense lesion over right temporal and perisylvian region with extension in prepontine cistern with mass effect & midline shift and MRI findings revealed a non-enhancing heterogeneous signal intensity cystic lesion in right frontal & temporal region extending into prepontine cistern with restricted diffusion. Patient was detoriated in night of same day of admission, emergency Fronto-temporal craniotomy with anterior peterousectomy and subtotal resection was done. The histological examination confirms the epidermoid cyst. The timing of ectodermal tissue sequestration during fetal development may account for the occurrence of atypical epidermoid cysts.

  1. Anterior impingement syndrome in dancers

    OpenAIRE

    O’Kane, John William; Kadel, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Anterior impingement is a common problem in dancers occurring primarily secondary to the repetitive forced ankle dorsiflexion inherent in ballet. Symptoms generally occur progressively and may respond to conservative treatment including addressing biomechanical faults that contribute to the problem. As impingement progresses, movements essential to ballet may become impossible and arthroscopic ankle surgery is often effective for both diagnosis and treatment, allowing athletes to return to da...

  2. Transhepatic approach for extracardiac inferior cavopulmonary connection stent fenestration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny, Damien

    2012-02-01

    We report on a 3-year-old male who underwent transcatheter stent fenestration of the inferior portion of an extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection in the setting of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Transhepatic approach, following an unsuccessful attempt from the femoral vein facilitated delivery of a diabolo-shaped stent.

  3. INFERIOR VENA-CAVA OBSTRUCTION AFTER ORTHOTOPIC LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, MAM; DEJONG, KP; PEETERS, PMJG; BIJLEVELD, CMA; KLOMPMAKER, IJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1994-01-01

    Post-operative inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction is reported as an uncommon complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We report 6 cases after 245 OLT's in the period between March '79 and December '92. Compression or torsion of the IVC or a technical problem were underlying cause

  4. Spinal level of myelomeningocele lesion as a contributing factor in posterior fossa volume, intracranial cerebellar volume, and cerebellar ectopia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Kieron J

    2013-02-01

    McLone and Knepper\\'s unified theory of Chiari malformation Type II (CM-II) describes how the loss of CSF via the open posterior neuropore fails to create adequate distending pressure for the developing rhomboencephalic vesicle. The authors of the present article describe the relationship between the posterior fossa volume and intracranial cerebellar volume as being related to the distance from the obex of the fourth ventricle to the myelomeningocele lesion using a common mathematical model, the Hagen-Poiseuille law.

  5. Q-ball of inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and beyond.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Caverzasi

    Full Text Available The inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF is historically described as the longest associative bundle in the human brain and it connects various parts of the occipital cortex, temporo-basal area and the superior parietal lobule to the frontal lobe through the external/extreme capsule complex. The exact functional role and the detailed anatomical definition of the IFOF are still under debate within the scientific community. In this study we present a fiber tracking dissection of the right and left IFOF by using a q-ball residual-bootstrap reconstruction of High-Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI data sets in 20 healthy subjects. By defining a single seed region of interest on the coronal fractional anisotropy (FA color map of each subject, we investigated all the pathways connecting the parietal, occipital and posterior temporal cortices to the frontal lobe through the external/extreme capsule. In line with recent post-mortem dissection studies we found more extended anterior-posterior association connections than the "classical" fronto-occipital representation of the IFOF. In particular the pathways we evidenced showed: a diffuse projections in the frontal lobe, b fronto-parietal lobes connections trough the external capsule in almost all the subjects and c widespread connections in the posterior regions. Our study represents the first consistent in vivo demonstration across a large group of individuals of these novel anterior and posterior terminations of the IFOF detailed described only by post-mortem anatomical dissection. Furthermore our work establishes the feasibility of consistent in vivo mapping of this architecture with independent in vivo methodologies. In conclusion q-ball tractography dissection supports a more complex definition of IFOF, which includes several subcomponents likely underlying specific function.

  6. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the cerebellar vermis in an elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Skovrlj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA has recently been accepted as an aggressive variant of pilocytic astrocytoma with distinct histopathological features. PMAs have been frequently described in the pediatric population with a predilection for the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region. Case Description: A 72-year-old African American male presented with 6 months of memory loss, difficulty expressing himself, and a progressively worsening gait. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated a heterogeneously enhancing cystic mass centered within the cerebellar vermis with mass effect on the fourth ventricle and ventriculomegaly. The patient underwent placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt followed by a surgical resection of the lesion, which after immunohistopathologic evaluation, was diagnosed as a World Health Organization grade II PMA. The patient refused further treatment of the lesion and expired 11 months after initial symptom presentation and 4 months after surgery. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of PMA of the cerebellar vermis in a previously unreported age group. This case report describes the natural history of this type of tumor in a patient who refused adjuvant therapy following surgical resection.

  7. Cerebellar allocentric and action-intentional spatial neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Nicholas J; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Contralesional hemispatial neglect most often results from lesions in the right posterior temporoparietal cortex. Less commonly, contralesional and ipsilesional neglect are caused by lesions in the frontal lobe. Although unilateral left cerebellar lesions have been reported to cause body-centered (egocentric) ipsilesional neglect, they have not been reported to cause left-side object-centered (allocentric) neglect together with a leftward action-intentional bias. We describe a patient who had these signs of neglect 7 months after a left cerebellar hemorrhage. This 61-year-old right-handed woman reported emotional lability and difficulty walking, frequently bumping into things on her left side. Neurologic examination revealed ocular dysmetria and left-side limb ataxia. Neuropsychological tests showed evidence of neglect. On a clock-drawing test, the patient accurately drew a circle but her number placement deviated to the left side. She showed the same leftward deviation when she tried to draw a circle composed of small triangles. Although her line bisection was normal, on an allocentric task of open-triangle cancellation she was most likely to neglect triangles with a left-side opening. Her performance on this task indicated left allocentric neglect. Her leftward deviation on the clock and figure drawing tasks seems to be a form of an action-intentional grasp, which may have been induced by right frontal dysfunction superimposed on a deficit of global attention. PMID:25237748

  8. Congenital disorders of glycosylation with emphasis on cerebellar involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Rita; Fiumara, Agata; Jaeken, Jaak

    2014-07-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are genetic diseases due to defective glycosylation of proteins and lipids. The authors present an update on these disorders affecting the central nervous system with a focus on cerebellar involvement. The rate of identification of novel CDG shows an exponential increase. Some 76 CDG are actually known, not taking into account the defects in glycan-modifying proteins. Neurologic involvement is present in the large majority of CDG. Screening methods are limited to serum transferrin isoelectrofocusing (for N-glycosylation disorders with sialic acid deficiency), and serum apolipoprotein C-III isoelectrofocusing (for core 1 mucin-type O-glycosylation disorders). Whole exome/genome sequencing is increasingly used in the diagnostic workup of patients with CDG-X. Treatment is greatly lagging behind because only one CDG is efficiently treatable (MPI-CDG). Cerebellar involvement is an important feature of PMM2-CDG, the congenital muscular dystrophies due to dystroglycanopathy, and SRD5A3-CDG. It has also been reported in some patients with ALG1-CDG, ALG3-CDG, ALG9-CDG, ALG6-CDG, ALG8-CDG, PIGA-CDG, DPM1-CDG, DPM2-CDG, B4GALT1-CDG, SLC35A2-CDG, COG1-CDG, COG5-CDG, COG7-CDG, and COG8-CDG.

  9. Coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of 4 different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora, Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble.

  10. Cerebellar cystic hemangioblastoma and cystic astrocytoma : differentiation on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, In Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chi Sung; Lee, Sang Hyung [Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    To determine differential points, if any, on MR imaging between cerebellar cystic hemangioblastoma and cystic astrocytoma. MR images of patients with sugically proven cerebellar cystic hemangioblastomas (n=12) and cystic astrocytomas (n=14) were retrospectively reviewed with regard to the following point: size, location and signal intensity of the tumor ; tumor margin; presence, size and location of the enhancing mural nodule; vascule signal voids, internal septations, enhancing fearure of the cyst wall, secondary findings (degree of peritumoral edema and presence of hydrocephalus ) and the patient's age. The significant (p<.05) differential points were vascular signal voids, which were the most important clue, as well as the presence of an enhancing mural nodule, tumor margin, enhancing featrure of the cyst wall and the patient's age. If the patient was an adult and presented an enhancing mural nodule with adjacent vascular signal voids and smooth tumor margin, then cysitc hemangioblastoma was suggested, while the presence of an irregular-margined thick enhancing cyst wall, mural nodule without adjacent vascular signal voids and pediatric age were suggestive of cystic astrocytoma. On MR imaging, there are certain significant differential points between these similar-appearing tumors and these would be useful for a more accurate diagnosis.

  11. Procedural learning in Parkinson's disease and cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Leone, A; Grafman, J; Clark, K; Stewart, M; Massaquoi, S; Lou, J S; Hallett, M

    1993-10-01

    We compared procedural learning, translation of procedural knowledge into declarative knowledge, and use of declarative knowledge in age-matched normal volunteers (n = 30), patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 20), and patients with cerebellar degeneration (n = 15) by using a serial reaction time task. Patients with Parkinson's disease achieved procedural knowledge and used declarative knowledge of the task to improve performance, but they required a larger number of repetitions of the task to translate procedural knowledge into declarative knowledge. Patients with cerebellar degeneration did not show performance improvement due to procedural learning, failed to achieve declarative knowledge, and showed limited use of declarative knowledge of the task to improve their performance. Both basal ganglia and cerebellum are involved in procedural learning, but their roles are different. The normal influence of the basal ganglia on the prefrontal cortex may be required for timely access of information to and from the working memory buffer, while the cerebellum may index and order events in the time domain and be therefore essential for any cognitive functions involving sequences. PMID:8215247

  12. Deep Learning for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Functional Score Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Zhong, Shenghua; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that has multiple genetic versions, each with a characteristic pattern of anatomical degeneration that yields distinctive motor and cognitive problems. Studying this pattern of degeneration can help with the diagnosis of disease subtypes, evaluation of disease stage, and treatment planning. In this work, we propose a learning framework using MR image data for discriminating a set of cerebellar ataxia types and predicting a disease related functional score. We address the difficulty in analyzing high-dimensional image data with limited training subjects by: 1) training weak classifiers/regressors on a set of image subdomains separately, and combining the weak classifier/regressor outputs to make the decision; 2) perturbing the image subdomain to increase the training samples; 3) using a deep learning technique called the stacked auto-encoder to develop highly representative feature vectors of the input data. Experiments show that our approach can reliably classify between one of four categories (healthy control and three types of ataxia), and predict the functional staging score for ataxia. PMID:25553339

  13. HSF1-deficiency affects gait coordination and cerebellar calbindin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Estrada, Veronica; Stahr, Anna; Müller, Hans Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in cell homeostasis and protect against cell damage. They were previously identified as key players in different ataxia models. HSF1 is the main transcription factor for HSP activation. HSF1-deficient mice (HSF1-/-) are known to have deficiencies in motor control test. However, little is known about effects of HSF1-deficiency on locomotor, especially gait, coordination. Therefore, we compared HSF-deficient (HSF1-/-) mice and wildtype littermates using an automated gait analysis system for objective assessment of gait coordination. We found significant changes in gait parameters of HSF1-/- mice reminiscent of cerebellar ataxia. Immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebellum revealed co-localization of HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of a potential interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Calbindin levels were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. While quantitative PCR revealed no differences in calbindin mRNA levels between HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- mice, calbindin protein levels, however, were significantly decreased in a cerebellum of HSF1-/- mice. A pathway analysis supports the hypothesis of an interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin. In summary, the targeted deletion of HSF1 results in changes of locomotor function associated with changes in cerebellar calbindin protein levels. These findings suggest a role of HSF1 in regular Purkinje cell calcium homeostasis. PMID:27173427

  14. Speech prosody in Friedreich's and olivo-ponto cerebellar atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen

    2001-05-01

    A critical issue in the study of speech motor control is the identification of the mechanisms that generate the temporal flow of serially ordered articulatory events. Two staged models of serial ordered events (Lashley, 1951; Lindblom, 1963) claim that time controls events whereas dynamic models predict a relative relation between time and space. Each of these models predicts a different relation between the acoustic measures of formant frequency and segmental duration. The most recent method described herein provides a sensitive index of speech deterioration which is both acoustically robust and phonetically systematic. Both acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging measures were used to describe the speech disturbance in two neurologically distinct groups of cerebellar ataxia: Friedreich's ataxia and olivo-ponto cerebellar ataxia. The speaking task was designed to elicit six different prosodic conditions and four prosodic contrasts. All subjects read the same syllable embedded in a sentence, under six different prosodic conditions. Pair-wise comparisons derived from the six conditions were used to describe (1) final lengthening, (2) phrasal accent, (3) nuclear accent and (4) syllable reduction. An estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual and normal subects' acoustic values of syllable duration, formant and fundamental frequencies was used in correlation analyses with magnetic resonance imaging ratings.

  15. Cerebral and cerebellar gray matter reduction in first-episode patients with major depressive disorder: A voxel-based morphometry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate cerebral and cerebellar gray matter abnormalities in patients with first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD). Materials and methods: We examined the structural difference in regional gray matter density (GMD) between 22 first-episode MDD patients and 30 age-, gender- and education-matched healthy controls by optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed decreased GMD in the right medial and left lateral orbitofrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), bilateral temporal pole, right superior temporal gyrus, bilateral anterior insular cortex, left parahippocampal gyrus, and left cerebellum. In addition, in MDD patients, there was a negative correlation between GMD values of the right DLPFC and the score of the depression rating scale. Conclusions: Our findings provided additional support for the involvement of limbic-cortical circuits in the pathophysiology of MDD and preliminary evidence that a defect involving the cerebellum may also be implicated.

  16. Cerebral and cerebellar gray matter reduction in first-episode patients with major depressive disorder: A voxel-based morphometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Jing, E-mail: ppengjjing@sina.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Liu Jiangtao, E-mail: Liujiangtao813@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Nie Binbin, E-mail: niebb@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Li Yang, E-mail: Liyang2007428@hotmail.com [Department of Psychiatry, Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 5, An Kang Hutong, Deshengmen wai, Xicheng District, Beijing 100088 (China); Shan Baoci, E-mail: shanbc@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Gang, E-mail: gangwang@gmail.com [Department of Psychiatry, Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 5, An Kang Hutong, Deshengmen wai, Xicheng District, Beijing 100088 (China); Li Kuncheng, E-mail: likuncheng1955@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate cerebral and cerebellar gray matter abnormalities in patients with first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD). Materials and methods: We examined the structural difference in regional gray matter density (GMD) between 22 first-episode MDD patients and 30 age-, gender- and education-matched healthy controls by optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed decreased GMD in the right medial and left lateral orbitofrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), bilateral temporal pole, right superior temporal gyrus, bilateral anterior insular cortex, left parahippocampal gyrus, and left cerebellum. In addition, in MDD patients, there was a negative correlation between GMD values of the right DLPFC and the score of the depression rating scale. Conclusions: Our findings provided additional support for the involvement of limbic-cortical circuits in the pathophysiology of MDD and preliminary evidence that a defect involving the cerebellum may also be implicated.

  17. Reproducibility and Agreement Between 2 Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Devices for Anterior Chamber Angle Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Marion, Kenneth M.; Maram, Jyotsna; Pan, Xiaojing; Dastiridou, Anna; Zhang, ZhouYuan; Ho, Alex; Francis, Brian A; Sadda, Srinivas R.; Chopra, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare anterior chamber angle parameters based on the location of Schwalbe line (SL) from 2 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) instruments and to measure their reproducibility. Methods: Forty-two eyes from 21 normal, healthy participants underwent imaging of the inferior irido-corneal angle with the Spectralis and Cirrus SD-OCT under tightly controlled low-light conditions. SL-angle opening distance (SL-AOD) and SL-trabecular iris space area (SL-TISA) were meas...

  18. Variant Anterior Digastric Muscle Transfer for Marginal Mandibular Branch of Facial Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Zdilla, DC

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve (MMBFN palsy is a common consequence of head and neck surgeries. MMBFN palsy results in paralysis of muscles which depress the inferior lip. Current management of MMBFN palsy involves ruination of normal neuromuscular anatomy and physiology to restore symmetry to the mouth. The article outlines the possibility to transfer variant anterior digastric musculature to accomplish reanimation of the mouth without adversely affecting normal nonvariant anatomy. The procedure may have the additional cosmetic benefit of correcting asymmetrical muscular bulk in the submental region.

  19. Processing of Positive and Negative Feedback in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustemeier, Martina; Koch, Benno; Schwarz, Michael; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-08-01

    It is well accepted that the cerebellum plays a crucial role in the prediction of the sensory consequences of movements. Recent findings of altered error processing in patients with selective cerebellar lesions led to the hypothesis that feedback processing and feedback-based learning might be affected by cerebellar damage as well. Thus, the present study investigated learning from and processing of positive and negative feedback in 12 patients with selective cerebellar lesions and healthy control subjects. Participants performed a monetary feedback learning task. The processing of positive and negative feedback was assessed by means of event-related potentials (ERPs) during the learning task and during a separate task in which the frequencies of positive and negative feedback were balanced. Patients did not show a general learning deficit compared to controls. Relative to the control group, however, patients with cerebellar lesions showed significantly higher ERP difference wave amplitudes (rewards-losses) in a time window between 250 and 450 ms after feedback presentation, possibly indicating impaired outcome prediction. The analysis of the original waveforms suggested that patients and controls primarily differed in their pattern of feedback-related negativity and P300 amplitudes. Our results add to recent findings on altered performance monitoring associated with cerebellar damage and demonstrate, for the first time, alterations of feedback processing in patients with cerebellar damage. Unaffected learning performance appears to suggest that chronic cerebellar lesions can be compensated in behaviour. PMID:26208703

  20. Direct and indirect spino-cerebellar pathways: shared ideas but different functions in motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eJiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The impressive precision of mammalian limb movements relies on internal feedback pathways that convey information about ongoing motor output to cerebellar circuits. The spino-cerebellar tracts (SCT in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord have long been considered canonical neural substrates for the conveyance of internal feedback signals. Here we consider the distinct features of an indirect spino-cerebellar route, via the brainstem lateral reticular nucleus (LRN, and the implications of this pre-cerebellar ‘detour’ for the execution and evolution of limb motor control. Both direct and indirect spino-cerebellar pathways signal spinal interneuronal activity to the cerebellum during movements, but evidence suggests that direct SCT neurons are mainly modulated by rhythmic activity, whereas the LRN also receives information from systems active during postural adjustment, reaching and grasping. Thus, while direct and indirect spino-cerebellar circuits can both be regarded as internal copy pathways, it seems likely that the direct system is principally dedicated to rhythmic motor acts like locomotion, while the indirect system also provides a means of pre-cerebellar integration relevant to the execution and coordination of de

  1. Dissociation of locomotor and cerebellar deficits in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Caroline F; Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Aronica, Eleonora M A; Judson, Matthew C; Philpot, Benjamin D; Hoebeek, Freek E; van Woerden, Geeske M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurological disorder that is associated with prominent movement and balance impairments that are widely considered to be due to defects of cerebellar origin. Here, using the cerebellar-specific vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) paradigm, we determined that cerebellar function is only mildly impaired in the Ube3am-/p+ mouse model of AS. VOR phase-reversal learning was singularly impaired in these animals and correlated with reduced tonic inhibition between Golgi cells and granule cells. Purkinje cell physiology, in contrast, was normal in AS mice as shown by synaptic plasticity and spontaneous firing properties that resembled those of controls. Accordingly, neither VOR phase-reversal learning nor locomotion was impaired following selective deletion of Ube3a in Purkinje cells. However, genetic normalization of αCaMKII inhibitory phosphorylation fully rescued locomotor deficits despite failing to improve cerebellar learning in AS mice, suggesting extracerebellar circuit involvement in locomotor learning. We confirmed this hypothesis through cerebellum-specific reinstatement of Ube3a, which ameliorated cerebellar learning deficits but did not rescue locomotor deficits. This double dissociation of locomotion and cerebellar phenotypes strongly suggests that the locomotor deficits of AS mice do not arise from impaired cerebellar cortex function. Our results provide important insights into the etiology of the motor deficits associated with AS. PMID:26485287

  2. Innovative use of computer-assisted tomography in the management of an irreducible anterior shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajpal S Nandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior dislocation of the shoulder is a common injury which is often reduced in the emergency department, without specialist orthopedic input. We report a case of an irreducible locked anterior glenohumeral dislocation with impaction of the humeral head onto the antero-inferior glenoid rim and subsequent generation of a Hill-Sachs lesion. To our knowledge, we describe the first reported case of using computer-assisted tomography to generate a sequence of movements to safely disimpact the locked dislocation without causing further iatrogenic injury or a fracture through the humeral articular surface. This novel image-assisted closed reduction technique spared the patient from the morbidity associated with performing open reduction surgery. At 6-month follow-up, the patient reported no re-dislocations, returned to work and had excellent range of motion.

  3. Translational and rotational knee joint stability in anterior and posterior cruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, JiaHsuan; Müller, Otto; Dilger, Torsten; Wülker, Nikolaus; Wünschel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated passive translational and rotational stability properties of the intact knee joint, after bicruciate-retaining bi-compartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) and after posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fourteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used in this study, and a robotic manipulator with six-axis force/torque sensor was used to test the joint laxity in anterior-posterior translation, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation. The results show the knee joint stability after bicruciate-retaining BKA is similar to that of the native knee. On the other hand, the PCL-retaining TKA results in inferior joint stability in valgus, varus, external rotation, anterior and, surprisingly, posterior directions. Our findings suggest that, provided functional ligamentous structures, bicruciate-retaining BKA is a biomechanically attractive treatment for joint degenerative disease.

  4. PEMANFAATAN BIJI KAKAO INFERIOR CAMPURAN SEBAGAI SUMBER ANTIOKSIDAN DAN ANTIBAKTERI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulianto Tri Chandra Kusuma

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available [ENGLISH] There are about 30% of cocoa beans still classified as inferior or low quality beans due to diseases. Low-quality cocoa beans can be used as the source of polyphenolic substances. The purpose of this study was to determine the potency of inferior cocoa beans with various particle sizes as raw materials for polyphenol extraction, and the use of polyphenol-rich cocoa extracts as antioxidant and antibacterial substances. The research was conducted in two stages, namely preliminary research and primary research. This preliminary study aimed to obtain polyphenol-rich cocoa bean extract and to examine antioxidant activity using DPPH method. The next research was to conduct antibacterial test against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis using well diffusion method treated using polyphenols of each type of various particle size (16 mesh, 25 mesh, 35 mesh with concentrations of 0 ppm, 25.000 ppm, 50.000 ppm, 75.000 ppm, 100.000 ppm. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours and the inhibition power against bacteria was observed. The results showed that the greater the concentration of polyphenol extracts and the smaller size of the filter powder cocoa resulted in the increase of bacterial growth inhibition area. Keywords: Polyphenol; Cocoa beans; Escherichia coli; Bacillus subtilis [INDONESIAN] Biji kakao inferior merupakan biji buah kakao bermutu rendah karena terserang penyakit dan belum termanfaatkan secara maksimal. Biji kakao berkualitas rendah dapat dimanfaatkan dengan cara mengekstrak kandungan polifenolnya. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui potensi ekstrak polifenol biji kakao inferior dengan variasi ukuran partikel sebagai bahan yang memiliki aktivitas antioksidan dan penghambat pertumbuhan bakteri. Penelitian ini dilakukan dalam dua tahap, yaitu penelitian pendahuluan dan penelitian utama. Penelitian pendahuluan bertujuan untuk memperoleh esktrak polifenol dari biji kakao inferior campuran yang terserang penyakit

  5. Cerebellar Infarction in Childhood: Delayed-Onset Complication of Mild Head Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilker Oz, Ibrahim; Bozay Oz, Evrim; Şerifoğlu, Ismail; Kaya, Nurullah; Erdem, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebellar ischemic infarction is a rare complication of minor head trauma. Vertebral artery dissection, vasospasm or systemic hypo perfusion can cause infarct. However, underlying causes of the ischemic infarct cannot be explained in nearly half of cases. The accurate diagnosis is essential to ensure appropriate treatment. Here we report a five yr old boy patient of cerebellar infraction after minor head trauma, admitted to emergency serves of BulentEcevit University, Turkey in 2013. We aimed to remind minor head trauma that causes cerebellar infarction during childhood, and to review the important points of the diagnosis, which should be keep in mind. PMID:27375760

  6. Cerebellar Degeneration as a Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome in a Child With Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramova, Boryana E; Hristova, Tanya; Yordanova, Maya; Vlahova, Irena; Muchinova, Albena; Bojinova, Veneta; Konstantinov, Dobrin

    2016-08-01

    We report a rare case of cerebellar degeneration as a paraneoplastic syndrome in an 8-year-old boy with Hodgkin lymphoma that presented during first-line treatment. Antibodies against Purkinje cells (anti-Tr antibodies) were detected in the serum of the patient. After successful treatment of the lymphoma, the cerebellar symptoms resolved partially. Childhood presentation of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is extremely rare, with only a few reports in the literature. For this reason, the description of all such cases contributes to the enrichment of the medical knowledge and will improve the diagnosis and the treatment of this complication. PMID:26599987

  7. Cerebellar abnormalities typical of methylmercury poisoning in a fledged saltmarsh sparrow, Ammodramus caudacutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Sheila A; Lane, Oksana P

    2013-05-01

    A fledged, 12-15 day-old saltmarsh sparrow, Ammodramus caudacutus, was collected from an accidental kill on Cinder Island, Long Island, NY, USA. The sparrow was assessed for feather mercury levels and the brain analyzed for cerebellar abnormalities by microscopic examination. In humans, fetal Minamata disease is caused by maternal ingestion of mercury. It is characterized by disrupted and disordered cerebellar neuronal migration in the fetus or infant. Results from this sparrow show cerebellar abnormalities typical of Minamata disease. It is the first known avian or mammalian specimen taken from the wild to show the abnormalities typical of the human fetal syndrome.

  8. Isolated inferior rectus muscle rupture after blunt orbital trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Patrick; Metzler, Philipp; Jacobsen, Christine

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old man was referred to our department with diplopia, periorbital swelling and haematoma of the left eye after orbital trauma due to a punch. During the examination, mild enophthalmos, hypertropia and a total absence of infraduction were observed. An orbital computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a left orbital floor blow-out fracture, with caudal herniation of periorbital fat and rectus inferior muscle. Repair was performed under total anaesthesia with placement of a Titan mesh. The following days were marked by the persistence of diplopia without improvement of infraduction. A postoperative, 0.5 mm CT scan highlighted a complete rupture of the inferior rectus muscle, not seen before operation, by a 1.0 mm-sliced CT. In this case, orthoptic therapy was undertaken with good results after 6 months and without need of a second repair. PMID:24963904

  9. Inferior turbinate osteoma as a cause of unilateral nose obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabovac, Stjepan; Hadzibegović, Ana Danić; Markesić, Josip

    2012-11-01

    Osteomas are benign, slow growing bone tumors often seen in paranasal sinuses, mostly in the frontal sinus, whereas they are rare in the nasal cavity. Inferior turbinate osteoma is extremely rare and our case is the third reported in the literature to date. Symptoms vary depending on the location, size and spreading and nasal obstruction is the most common symptom. Treatment of osteomas is surgical and is reserved only for rapidly growing osteomas with symptoms of infection or compression. Although endoscopic surgery is preferred modality, external approach with lateral rhinotomy should be considered with larger osteomas especially those that involve the ethmoid labyrinth. In cases like ours, when large osteoma is localized on the inferior nasal turbinate, sublabial incision through the vestibulum is very suitable approach because it provides wide access and good visibility and leaves no visible scar.

  10. Cytology of nasal mucosa, olfactometry and rhinomanometry in patients after CO2 laser mucotomy in inferior turbinate hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Soroczyńska

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cytology of nasal mucosa and sense of smell and nasal patency in patients underwent carbon dioxide laser turbinoplasty (CO2 laser mucotomy due to chronic nasal hypertrophy. 46 patients with inferior turbinate hypertrophy underwent complete laryngological examination, anterior rhinomanometry, olfactory measurements and cytology of nasal mucous which were performed before and 3 months after CO2 laser mucotomy. Laser mucotomy was performed under local anesthesia. Cytograms revealed significant changes in cell proportion before and after the surgery. Goblet cells predominated in nasal smears before the laser mucotomy. An average percentage of eosinophils in evaluated cytograms before the surgery was 2.1%. Three months after laser mucotomy we observed decrease in goblet cells proportion (the mean range of goblet cells was 16.4% in nasal cytology. We have also observed improvement in olfactory function, however only in 7 patients (20.6%. The mean value of total nasal airway resistance (NAR before treatment was 0.98+/-0.24 Pa/cm3/s at 75 Pa. Rhinomanometry after 3 months showed a reduction in mean total resistance from the pretreatment level to 0.77 Pa/cm3/s. We believe that CO2 laser mucotomy is an efficacious, minimally invasive and easy to use treatment of inferior turbinate hypertrophy which is performed under local anesthesia with little discomfort for the patient and does not require hospitalization.

  11. Coronectomy - A viable alternative to prevent inferior alveolar nerve injury

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    Alok Sagtani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Coronectomy is a relatively new method to prevent the risk of Inferior Alveolar Nerve (IAN injury during removal of lower third molars with limited scientific literature among Nepalese patients. Thus, a study was designed to evaluate coronectomy regarding its use, outcomes and complications.Materials and Methods: A descriptive study was conducted from December 2012 to December 2013 among patients attending Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dental Sciences, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal for removal of mandibular third molars. After reviewing the radiograph for proximity of third molar to the IAN, coronectomy was advised. A written informed consent was obtained from the patients and coronectomy was performed. Patients were recalled after one week. The outcome measures in the follow-up visit were primary healing, pain, infection, dry socket, root exposure and IAN injury. The prevalence of IAN proximity of lower third molars and incidence of complications were calculated.Results: A total 300 mandibular third molars were extracted in 278 patients during the study period. Out of 300 impacted mandibular third molar, 41 (13.7% showed close proximity to inferior alveolar nerve . The incidence of complications and failed procedure was 7.4% among the patients who underwent coronectomy. During the follow up visit, persistent pain and root exposure was reported while other complications like inferior alveolar nerve injury, dry socket and infection was not experienced by the study patients.Conclusion: With a success rate of 92.6% among the 41 patients, coronectomy is a viable alternative to conventional total extraction for mandibular third molars who have a higher risk for damage to the inferior alveolar nerve.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:1-5.

  12. Myelinated axon counts of human inferior alveolar nerves.

    OpenAIRE

    Heasman, P A; Beynon, A D

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative, postmortem study of 36 human inferior alveolar nerves is described. The total myelinated fibre count (TMFC) of nerves was not related to sex or age of the subjects but significant positive correlations were found between TMFC and subject body weight in both dentate (r = 0.616) and edentulous (r = 0.676) groups. The TMFC was significantly lower in nerves from edentulous subjects than in nerves from dentate subjects.

  13. Two Classes of GABAergic Neurons in the Inferior Colliculus

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Tetsufumi; Bishop, Deborah C; Oliver, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is unique, having both glutamatergic and GABAergic projections ascending to the thalamus. Although subpopulations of GABAergic neurons in the IC have been proposed, criteria to distinguish them have been elusive and specific types have not been associated with specific neural circuits. Recently, the largest IC neurons were found to be recipients of somatic terminals containing vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). Here, we show with electron microscopy that ...

  14. Unusual variant of infrarenal duplication of inferior vena cava

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    Ranjan Kumar Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrarenal inferior vena cava (IVC duplication is a rare anomaly. Most of the cases are asymptomatic and are detected incidentally. Prior knowledge of the anomaly is essential for safe procedure by intervention radiologist, retroperitoneal operation, and multi-visceral recovery operation from deceased donor by surgeon. We report a case of infrarenal IVC duplication detected incidentally during contrast-enhanced computed tomography examination of abdomen of a patient presenting with viral hepatitis and mild obstructive jaundice.

  15. Evidence of Mirror Neurons in Human Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Kilner, J. M.; Neal, A.; Weiskopf, N; Friston, K.J.; Frith, C. D.

    2009-01-01

    There is much current debate about the existence of mirror neurons in humans. To identify mirror neurons in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of humans we employed a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects either executed or observed a series of actions. Here we show that in the IFG, responses were suppressed both when an executed action was followed by the same rather than a different observed action and when an obse...

  16. Optional inferior vena caval filters: where are we now?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, A N

    2008-08-01

    With the advent of newer optional\\/retrievable inferior vena caval filters, there has been a rise in the number of filters inserted globally. This review article examines the currently available approved optional filter models, outlines the clinical indications for filter insertion and examines the expanding indications. Additionally, the available evidence behind the use of optional filters is reviewed, the issue of anticoagulation is discussed and possible future filter developments are considered.

  17. Nerve growth factor enhances DNA synthesis in cultured cerebellar neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confort, C; Charrasse, S; Clos, J

    1991-10-01

    The cerebellar neuroblasts in primary cultures from five-day-old rats bore NGF receptor immunoreactivity, suggesting a potential responsive to NGF. At low plating density, NGF was found to enhance DNA synthesis in these cells in a dose-dependent manner. As these cells synthesize NGF, one possibility to account for the lack of response of neuroblasts plated at high density is that the amount of endogenous trophic agent produced in this culture condition is sufficient to ensure an optimal effect. The results demonstrate that premitotic neuroblasts in the CNS, as well postmitotic neurons, are responsive to NGF. At the early stage of its development, the cerebellum therefore appears to be a very good autocrine model of NGF action. PMID:1661619

  18. Consensus paper on post-operative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Morgan, Angela T; Lux, Andrew L;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Confusion has surrounded the description of post-operative mutism and associated morbidity in pediatric patients with cerebellar tumors for years. The heterogeneity of definitions and diagnostic features has hampered research progress within the field, and to date, no international......-operative pediatric CMS" was formed, preliminary recommendations for diagnostic and follow-up procedures were created, two working groups on a new scoring scale and risk prediction and prevention were established, and areas were identified where further information is needed. DISCUSSION: The consensus process...... was motivated by desire to further research and improve quality of life for pediatric brain tumor patients. The Delphi rounds identified relevant topics and established basic agreement, while face-to-face engagement helped resolve matters of conflict and refine terminology. The new definition is intended...

  19. Cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I.; Baskan, O.; Haliloglu, M.; Aydingoz, U. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Sihhiye 06100, Ankara (Turkey)

    1999-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown cause characterised by proliferation of histiocytic granulomas in tissues; the primary cerebral manifestation is diabetes insipidus caused by hypothalamic infiltration. We present a patient in whom, except for the absence of high signal on T 1 weighting in the posterior pituitary, consistent with central diabetes insipidus, MRI showed no evidence of hypothalamic involvement by histiocytosis, despite the long duration of the disease. However, there was bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the cerebellum and globus pallidus in addition to a calvarial lesion. High signal in the cerebellar white matter on T 2-weighted images may represent demyelination, gliosis and cell loss, as previously reported on pathologic examination. (orig.) With 5 figs., 22 refs.

  20. Adult cerebellar medulloblastoma: CT and MRI findings in eight cases

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    Carvalho Neto Arnolfo de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a brain tumor of neuroepithelial origin, which represents 15 to 30% of all pediatric brain tumors, and less than 1% of CNS adult neoplasms. We report the imaging findings of 8 adult patients with medulloblastoma. The mean age was 35 years, ranging from 20 to 65 years, and the male:female rate was 3:5. The tumors were predominantly lateral (63%, hyperdense on CT scans (83%, and on the MRI, hypointense on T1 (100% and hyperintense on T2 (80% weighted images. It was seen intratumoral necrosis and cysts in six cases and calcifications in three. Hydrocephalus was observed in 5 cases and brain stem invasion in four. The imaging findings of medulloblastomas in adults are different of those in child, and also nonspecific. Although these tumors are uncommon in adults, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses in the posterior fossa of this age group.